Santa Barbara Independent 12/22/22

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Santa Barbara Century Man Baseball Star, Internment Camp Survivor, and Hardworking Hometown Hero turns 100 + + End in Sight for UC Strike? In Memoriam: Kemp Aaberg Keeping the Tomol Tradition Alive Eyes of the Endangered Species DEC. 22-29, 2022 VOL. 37 NO. 884
2 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM (805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu 2023 Grammy Nominee
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INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 3 Ballet Hispánico Doña Perón Mar 11 An Evening with Amor Towles Feb 2 Emanuel Ax Leonidas Kavakos Yo-Yo Ma Jan 27 BalletPreljocaj Swan Lake Feb 25 & Feb 26 Pink Martini featuringChinaForbes Feb 3 Nina Totenberg Dinners with Ruth: The Power of Friendships Feb 7 Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour All-star line-up Featuring Dee Dee Bridgewater and Kurt Elling Jan 29 Lang Lang Feb 27 Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain Apr 22 Give the gift that always fits! Gift certificates available online! Get your ticket to this season’s hottest events. (805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
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INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 5 INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Callie Fausey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan,
George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill IndyKids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com,letters@independent.com,advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us TABLE of CONTENTS volume 37 #884, Dec. 22-29, 2022 NEWS 7 OPINIONS 17 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 In Memoriam 19 OBITUARIES 17 THE WEEK 28 LIVING.......................... 31 FOOD & DRINK .............. 34 Restaurant Guy 35 ARTS LIFE 36 ASTROLOGY 38 CLASSIFIEDS 40 ON THE COVER: Roke Fukumura. Photo by Ingrid Bostrom. Design by Xavier Pereyra. Independent designers and company recently traded their keyboards and mice for brushes and acrylic at the Painted Cabernet. As you can imagine, they were naturals. The rest of us were just happy to have some wine. Happy holidays! LES ARTISTES DE INDY Century Man Baseball Star, Internment Camp Survivor, and Hardworking Hometown Hero Turns 100 by Tyler Hayden 23 COVER STORY SARAH SINCLAIR LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLE * “Spend $100+ on Potent Goods Products and receive a limited edition holiday gift bundle” ONLY THROUGH ONE PLANT DELIVERY DELIVERY MENU EXCLUSIVE HOLIDAY BUNDLES * GOLETA
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NEWS of the WEEK

ENVIRONMENT

Salvage Team to Sink Grounded Fishing Boat

After a fishing boat carrying 16,000 pounds of squid ran aground off Santa Cruz Island last Thursday, the operation to contain the toxic diesel fuel and hydraulic fluid had turned into a salvage operation by the following Tuesday.

The Speranza Marie held about 1,000 gallons of diesel fuel when it hit shore at Chinese Harbor around 2 a.m. on December 15, for reasons that remain under investigation, said Coast Guard Petty Officer Richard Brahm. The island is about 27 miles directly south of the City of Santa Barbara and part of the Channel Islands National Park and Marine Sanctuary.

The six people aboard were rescued by another fishing boat and taken to Ventura, while a toxic-response team and cleanup crew headed to the island. Diesel fuel is light and floats, rather than sinking, and had largely evaporated within a few days, leaving a bare rainbow shimmer. The containers holding the eight tons of calamari had smashed open as the 60-foot boat was ground into the rocks

by waves and tides, said Brahm, which was making the recovery and salvage difficult, though about 20 gallons of hydraulic oils were removed. One dead cormorant was retrieved by Fish & Wildlife responders.

The salvage team Global Diving and Salvage and Tow Boat U.S.A. was planning to drag the boat off the rocks and sink it to stabilize it for removal, the Coast Guard announced on Tuesday. Windy weather was expected, and possible rain next week, and the Speranza Marie would be anchored in place for the next salvage step.

The boat is owned by Ocean Angel VI LLC, a commercial fishing company based in Watsonville, which shares an address with Del Mar Seafood, which unloads in Ventura Harbor and is based out of Monterey. The Unified Command includes Coast Guard, state Fish & Wildlife’s Office of Spill Prevention and Response, Santa Barbara County, Channel Islands National Park, Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, and Ocean Angel representatives.

HOUSING

Nearly 700 Units of Housing Proposed for La Cumbre Mall

City’s 60-Foot Height Limit Emerges as Bone of Contention

Santa Barbara Mayor Randy Rowse knew going into last Thursday’s meeting of the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG) just how many friends he had in the room.

Absolutely none.

Rowse, it would turn out, had been overly optimistic.

“I didn’t really enjoy it too much,” the mayor would later say of the experience.

Rowse sits on the SBCAG board as do the mayors of the county’s eight incorporated cities as well as all five county supervisors. He was hoping to secure a $1.1 million state grant to underwrite a two-year master planning process for the future of La Cumbre Plaza, the open-air shopping mall where as many as 2,000 housing units are now officially envisioned for construction.

Rowse was opposed in his quest by Jim and Matt Taylor, the father-son team of developers who only the day before had submitted a preliminary application to build 685 units of housing on the site. Matt Taylor testified that the Specific Plan planning process advocated by Rowse and City Hall’s two highest ranking land-use gurus Eli Isaacson and Dan Gullett was not only unnecessary but would slow things down, thus delaying the provision of desperately needed workforce housing.

County Supervisor Das Williams, who

for years served on the Santa Barbara City Council and whose seat Rowse was appointed to replace when Williams took the role of state assemblymember described the city’s proposed master planning process as an exercise in futility.

“I have spent many, many months, years of my life, in the City of Santa Barbara’s planning process that went nowhere,” Williams complained.

Planning efforts that promised to bring the community together and generate unity, he charged, delivered neither; progress, he said, was impeded. City Hall leadership, Williams contended, tolerated a culture in which “design review commissions run amok,” adding, “It is a horrifying thing to watch.”

Williams’s remarks, Rowse conceded, got under his skin.

“I think he was a little hyperbolic,” Rowse said. “This idea that City Hall can’t be trusted and is going to just screw things up, I find a little disturbing.”

Rowse noted how City Hall managed to approve a new workforce housing project for downtown State Street in record time without a single syllable of discouraging words by any of the city’s “amok” design review boards.

“And not to toot our horn,” he added, “but we also helped pave the way for more new rental housing in the last five years than we

did in the previous 60.”

By contrast, Rowse had nothing but glowing words for the Taylors, their development team of architect Brian Cearnal and consultant Ben Romo, and their groundbreaking plans for La Cumbre Plaza. But, he cautioned, the Taylor partnership is just one of three ownership groups with a major stake and major development plans for the 31-acre mall.

“I’m sure that whatever they eventually build will be first rate,” Rowse said. But, he

added, “This is a project that’s going to be there for decades and decades. What the Taylors are talking about will be here at least 75 years. We have to make sure we get this right even if that were to mean pushing things back a few months.”

What Jim and Matt Taylor are now proposing is by itself the biggest single housing development dubbed The Neighborhood @ State and Hope Santa Barbara has ever seen: 685 units, six levels above ground, on 8.79 acres. The development as proposed

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 7
DEC. 15-22, 2022
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RYAN P. CRUZ, CALLIE FAUSEY, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF
CONT’D ON PAGE 12 
Jean Yamamura MALL MAKEOVER: Dubbed The Neighborhood @ State and Hope, the 685-unit housing project proposed for La Cumbre Plaza would be the biggest single housing development Santa Barbara has ever seen. Above is a rendering of the proposed development’s Central Square.
U.S.
GUARD
MCP SANTA BARBARA LLC
COAST
SHIPWRECKED:  The Speranza Marie ran aground at Santa Cruz Island’s Chinese Harbor last Thursday.

Tensions Brewing over Deal to End UC Strike

After a month of protests, rallies, and back-and-forth negotiations, all four union bargaining teams representing 48,000 striking UC student employees have reached agreements with the university. However, some student workers, including at UC Santa Barbara, where the cost of living is one of the highest among UC campuses, are not yet willing to ditch the picket line or the bargaining table.

Technically, all that’s left for the strike to officially end is for graduate student researchers and academic student employees including teaching assistants, tutors, and readers to ratify their new contracts, which were announced on December 16. But, of course, it’s not that simple.

Fifteen out of 37 voting bargaining team members voted no on the tentative agreement, including four alternates, at UCSB, UC Riverside, UC San Diego, UC Santa Cruz, and UC Merced. The vote at UCSB was 100 percent, with all four bargaining team members voting no.

“I voted no on this tentative agreement because the wages that it enshrines will still leave myself and all of my colleagues rentburdened and does not actually enshrine any material changes in living conditions or financial circumstances for myself and my coworkers,” said Janna Haider, recording secretary at UCSB for UAW 2865, the bargaining team representing academic student employees.

Haider, along with 20 other UC workers statewide who are against the contracts, signed an opposition letter on December 16 in response to the agreements in a campaign to kill the tentative agreement and return to the bargaining table.

The letter states that it is their “belief that the UC’s mediated proposals fail to deliver on the major demands of the strike,”

including meaningful raises that address the cost of living, non-residential supplemental tuition remission, less barriers for workers needing accessibility accommodations, and sufficient childcare subsidies and healthcare for dependents. In addition, according to a press release from those unit members, “hourly workers (graders, readers, tutors) would see only a $1.50 bump in hourly pay.”

Despite this, many union members, like Joe Costello, a graduate student researcher in UCSB’s Physics Department, expressed hope that the contract would be ratified.

“I think it’s a significant win, especially for student researchers,” Costello said. “People in my position will be making $50k a year in October 2024. This doesn’t eliminate the rent burden or solve every problem that we as graduate students at Santa Barbara have, but it does represent a significant step forward, with really unprecedented raises and protections against bullying.”

Haider said that student researchers currently do not have a union negotiated contract, so for those student workers, there are different stakes. “But I would also say that for the academic student employees, we won’t receive any wages increased immediately upon ratification,” she continued. “The next wages increase that we get, which will, in theory, apply on April 1, will be a raise from about $23,000 pre-tax to about $25,000 pre-tax, which will be a monthly increase of $200, which is negligible. Several of my colleagues have said to me, to each other, and on their social media accounts that they didn’t go on strike for five and a half weeks to get a $200 raise.”

The ratification vote began Monday and will conclude this Friday. If a simple majority of the 36,000 union members still on strike vote to ratify, the contracts will be effective through May 31, 2025, and both

8 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM DEC. 15-22, 2022
LABOR
to Strike Them Down
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UCSB’s Bargaining Team Members Vote No on Tentative Agreements, Rally Others
INGRID BOSTROM

Anti-Semitic Flyers Hit Mesa on Hanukkah

Drive-By Drops Part of ‘Orchestrated Campaign,’ Says Anti-Defamation League Leader

Many residents of Santa Barbara’s Mesa neighborhood woke on Sunday morning the first day of Hanukkah to find one of several virulently anti-Semitic flyers in their driveway. City Councilmember Michael Jordan who represents the Mesa on the council estimated that “hundreds” of homes had been visited by drive-by delivery squads.

Among the many things the flyers blamed Jews for was the COVID pandemic. They also brought up the lynching of Leo Frank a Jew in 1915, after his death sentence had been commuted for the crime of murdering a 13-year-old boy in the state of Georgia. Frank would be exonerated of those charges 70 years after his murder.

The flyers came wrapped in plastic bags, which contained rice or beans and according to some reports, rocks to make the flyers easier to toss and to prevent them from blowing away. The flyers were found on driveways and sidewalks in front of homes on the West Mesa, on a street behind Mesa Produce, on Flora Vista and West Valerio streets, on Shoreline Drive, on the Westside, and as far away as Hidden Valley.

Councilmember Jordan thanked everyone who’d expressed “outrage,” especially the early-morning walkers who scooped up the flyers “to make sure people did not have to start their day seeing this on the driveway.” Jordan said a police officer picked up 35 flyers a constituent had deposited with him, but said it does not appear a “hate crime” was committed because the flyers were not exclusively distributed at the homes of Jewish residents.

Dan Meisel, regional director of the Santa Barbara Regional Anti-Defamation League (ADL), said the drive-by drops were part of “an orchestrated campaign” waged by a small nationally based anti-Semitic fringe group that’s grown increasingly active in the past two years. Meisel estimated the group’s membership hovered in the “low three figures” and that the late-night drops are part of a broader effort to generate interest in the group’s social media outlets and television outlet, he said, “to monetize hate.” Meisel declined to mention the group’s name for publication.

“To do so would give them what they most want publicity,” he said. “It puts us in a tough spot. How do we acknowledge and condemn what they do without amplifying their message?”

The Independent has decided not to publish the group’s name or photos of the flyers, which include the group’s name, in this story.

The group, Meisel claimed, was responsible for 350 actions throughout 41 states thus far in 2022. Last year, he said, it was just 74. Meisel said law enforcement agencies are

broadly aware of the organization, but that most choose not to prosecute, citing freedom of speech concerns. A few, he said, have filed charges for littering.

Meisel said the ADL also takes the First Amendment issues seriously but stated there are ways other than governmental sanction to hold such organizations and individuals accountable. He said he hopes video footage from home security systems might reveal the identities of the parties involved, thus stripping them of the anonymity that protects them.

“If people know who they are, maybe they’d lose their jobs. Just because there is freedom of speech doesn’t mean there are no consequences,” he said.

Meisel said the action was clearly timed to coincide with the Jewish feast of Hanukkah an eight-day celebration that takes place roughly about the same time as Christmas. He said the group typically identifies neighborhoods with easy freeway access, and he speculated it’s quite possible that none of the individuals involved lived in Santa Barbara.

He noted that the same group hung a giant banner from the 405 freeway about a month ago proclaiming “Kanye was right,” referring to the hip-hop artist who now goes by “Ye” and has outraged and alienated many former supporters with his outspokenly anti-Semitic remarks.

On a more positive note, Chabad of Santa Barbara hosted its 43rd annual Chanukah celebration, but this time in the middle of State Street in front of Wylde Works, a new establishment specializing in honeyed beers. There was music, singing, and dancing with participants greeting passersby and onlookers with an enthusiastic “Happy Hanukkah” and “Would you like a latke?”

The Santa Barbara Police Department encourages anyone with information about the flyers or in possession of surveillance footage of distribution in their neighborhood to contact Lt. A. Baker at (805) 897-3754 or abaker@sbpd.com

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 9 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK COMMUNITY
ARNOLD Consistently
as one of the leading
the
returns to
Dan Meisel, regional director of the S.B. Regional Anti-Defamation League on Music Director Riccardo Muti’s
GAIL hailed
orchestras in the world,
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Santa Barbara
farewell tour, performing works by Beethoven, Lyadov, and Mussorgsky’s immortal Pictures at an Exhibition
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Riccardo Muti, Music Director WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2023, 7:30PM Primary Sponsor: Northern Trust Principal Sponsor: Kum Su Kim & John Perry Sponsors: Alison & Jan Bowlus • Edward S. DeLoreto Michele Saltoun • Shanbrom Family Foundation Co-Sponsors: Bob Boghosian & Beth Gates-Warren Dorothy & John Gardner • The Granada Theatre • Ellen & John Pillsbury Don’t Miss the Classical Concert of the Year! SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE NOW Granada Theatre Box Office ⫽ (805) 899-2222 ⫽ granadasb.org 50% SAVINGS! FOUR CONCERTS MINI-SUBSCRIPTION! (805) 966-4324 ⫽ camasb.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919 CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON 104th Concert Season INTERNATIONAL SERIES AT THE GRANADA THEATRE SEASON SPONSOR: SAGE PUBLISHING GIVE THE GIFT OF MUSIC!
Photo by Todd Rosenberg Photography

Al Clark Named Carp Mayor

Carty’s dedication to public service began when he was appointed to the Carpinteria Architectural Review Board, where he served from 1991 to 2002 and again from 2005 to 2006. He then went on to serve four terms on the City Council, from December 2006 to December 2022 including two terms when he was appointed mayor, from 2008 to 2010 and again from 2014 to 2016.

In this most recent election, Carpinteria moved from at-large elections for city councilmembers to district elections, forcing the city’s voters to choose between Carty and Clark who both live in District 5, but had avoided a head-to-head race up until now.

Carpinteria has a new mayor, longtime councilmember Al Clark who was just reelected to the council in a headto-head race against friend and colleague Gregg Carty in the city’s first-ever district election and who will now serve as the city’s mayor for the next two years.

Last week, the City Council nominated Clark, who served as Carpinteria’s vice mayor for the past two years, to replace Wade Nomura, who will continue to serve as a city councilmember. The council also unanimously approved Councilmember Natalia Alarcon as the city’s new vice mayor.

“I’d like to thank Mayor Wade Nomura,” Clark said. “I think Wade has truly been one of the greatest mayors we have ever had. I really admire everything that he does.”

Both Clark and Nomura were nominated for the position. Councilmember Roy Lee nominated Nomura for a second term but was outvoted 4-1, with Nomura himself voting against the motion.

Clark was approved in a 4-1 vote, with Lee opposing, and was welcomed with applause from a packed City Hall chambers. He took the time to thank the community of Carpinteria for electing him in the District 5 race, and said he has learned a lot from former mayor Nomura’s leadership style.

“I’m glad we don’t have to say goodbye,” Clark said. “We’re going to keep working with him and we’re going to keep tapping into what he does.”

The meeting also served as a chance for the city to bid a fond farewell to Carty who was celebrated by the council with an official resolution commending him for his years of service to the community.

The City Council read through a long list of Carty’s accomplishments in the city, from his efforts to work with the Land Trust of Santa Barbara County to acquire the Rincon Bluffs Preserve to his advocacy for momand-pop businesses. During the pandemic, Carty pushed for local businesses to receive relief funds from the city, which helped keep many small businesses afloat.

“I want to thank Gregg Carty for his lifetime of service to our community,” Clark said. “Gregg sincerely loves Carpinteria, and I know he will keep working to make Carpinteria the best place it can be.”

Carty, who has deep roots in the Carpinteria community, offered a few comments to the standing-room-only crowd.

“I’ve always strived to be a good steward for our wonderful community of Carpinteria,” Carty said. “I’m happy and proud of what we’ve accomplished together.” He received a standing ovation and a plaque from the city.

Replacing Carty will be Mónica Solórzano, who won District 1 unopposed. Councilmember Lee won District 3, also unopposed.

“Today marks the beginning not only of my time on the city council of Carpinteria, but also the shift to district elections for the city,” Solórzano said. “I’m proud that Carpinteria now has five representatives for five districts, and I’m very proud to be representing District 1.”

Her first official motion was to nominate Clark for the position of mayor. She explained that while Nomura has been a great leader through a tough few years, the city should welcome a diversity of voices at the position.

“It’s so important to have rotating and new leadership and to have new ideas coming into play every couple years,” she said.

Alarcon, who will now serve as vice mayor, also thanked Nomura for his leadership, and said she was looking forward to working with Mayor Clark. “I think I as well as everyone else have high expectations,” she said.

10 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM DEC. 15-22, 2022
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CARPINTERIA Gregg Carty Gets Fond Farewell from City Council RYAN P. CRUZ
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Carpinteria Mayor Al Clark

HEALTH

Agroup of Dos Pueblos High School employees, concerned about a potential cancer cluster, met with Principal Bill Woodard earlier this month to express their worries. In response, the school district has set several studies in motion: to determine the amount of cancer at the school, to survey those affected, and to assess the environment on campus that might be related, said Santa Barbara Unified Superintendent Hilda Maldonado on December 15.

Roughly 160 people work at DP, including teachers and classified staff, said Woodard. Built in 1966, the 182-acre high school sits below Cathedral Oaks Road in the El Encanto Heights neighborhood, with an old avocado orchard across the road to one side and the Glen Annie Golf Course above. A group of 15-20 employees had talked with Woodard about their concerns after an employee recently received a cancer diagnosis. The anxiety was compounded by the deaths by cancer since about 1990, as well as a recent death that may have been due to cancer.

Maldonado said district leaders first spoke with County Public Health to seek guidance on what to do. Among those steps is collecting more information on who is getting cancer and what types. On Monday, a contractor began an environmental health

assessment of things like the air, water, and soil on campus.

“We want to make sure we do a comprehensive assessment,” Maldonado said.

While the concerns being aired now are coming from adults on campus, Maldonado indicated that questions about students, families, or nearby residents may be revealed through the Cancer Registry information. All families are being notified, she said.

On Friday, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) reported that questions about Dos Pueblos had been sent to the regional cancer registry at the request of County Public Health. A CDPH spokesperson explained that a true cancer cluster “is a situation in which there are more cancer cases in a group of people, in a location, or in a time period than would be expected based upon usual patterns.” A “cluster” usually is for one type of cancer, the spokesperson explained.

Doctors, hospitals, and pathologists have reported all cancers to the state since 1985, and the information is used to identify trends, statistics, and factors like race or occupational risk. An epidemiologist with the regional registry will work with the community to gather information and perform an assessment in this instance.

Drug Bust at North County Jail

Several people suspected of attempting to bring illegal substances into Santa Barbara’s Northern Branch Jail have been arrested, and several more commissary workers were banned, following investigations into overdoses that occurred at the facility in recent months, according to Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Raquel Zick.

Zick could not confirm the number of individuals arrested, nor could she provide details on whether those arrested were inmates currently housed in the facility, employees of the jail, or outside workers contracted at the facility.

Jail staff did confirm that several contract commissary employees were “banned from Sheriff’s Office jail facility for security violations,” but staff could not elaborate on specifics regarding the violations.

“The nature of the security violations is not available for release as we do not want to jeopardize the safety of our facilities,” Zick told the Independent. “These investigations remain ongoing.”

Sheriff’s detectives and patrol deputies made the arrests following the investigation into a rash of overdoses in recent months, including an incident on November 19 in which two inmates overdosed at the Northern Branch Jail in one night, causing custody deputies and emergency staff to scramble to resuscitate both. One man successfully

regained consciousness after six doses of naloxone, but the other Edgar Estrada Amezcua, 37, from Santa Maria was pronounced dead early the next morning after multiple failed attempts at life-saving measures.

Both county jails contract their commissary service through the Keefe Group, and though some of the contracted employees were banned from the jail going forward, Zick said the commissary contract with the company will continue.

Earlier in the week, the Sheriff’s Office and Pacific Pride Foundation hosted a naloxone training at the Northern Branch Jail, where more than 90 inmates at the facility were trained on administering the life-saving drug in emergency situations and recognizing signs of an overdose, which include difficulty staying awake, slowed breathing, confusion, and pale, blueish lips and fingernails.

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 11 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK
Cancer Cluster at Dos Pueblos High?
Ryan P. Cruz COURTS & CRIME
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LIFESAVER: A sheriff’s custody deputy holds a dose of Narcan, the OD-reversing drug also known as naloxone.

third largest mall operator in the United States holds a lease on much of the mall’s commercial and retail storefronts, and that doesn’t expire until 2077.

Since 2009, La Cumbre Plaza has been written into Santa Barbara’s general plan the equivalent of the constitution for land-use development as the biggest and best undeveloped housing site within city limits. For developers, that’s made the long-underperforming mall a cross between the Holy Grail and Moby Dick infinitely alluring, dauntingly complicated, and financially fraught all at the same time.

Several developers have tried to tie up La Cumbre into one big manageable package;

none have succeeded. But on Thanksgiving 2021, a partnership led by Jim and Matt Taylor bought 15 acres of the site’s 31, backed by the Mandrake Capital Group.

The Taylors operate on a national having gotten in on the ground floor in the early days of Costco and are now in the processing of developing a major subdivision by Lake Tahoe. They also have deep local roots. Jim Taylor moved to Santa Barbara from Chicago with his family as a teenager in 1963; he attended San Marcos High School and lived next door then also a teenwho would later give Taylor his first job in the development world. Today, Taylor and his son run American Capital Management, have offices upstairs in El Paseo, and are involved in plans to build the Surfliner Inn, the proposed hotel in downtown Carpinteria that sparked the unsuccessful ballot measure to stop it in November’s election.

Over the years, Taylor smart, gregarious, shrewd, and given to occasional bursts of off-color humor made a point to remain strategically below the radar, never courting media attention and avoiding it where possible. Even now, he prefers to give his son the microphone at official gatherings, like last week’s SBCAG meeting. But given the scope and scale of The Neighborhood project, that may no longer be possible.

As envisioned, The Neighborhood will be more than just another development project; it will, in fact, be a new neighborhood. On the drawing boards are nine new buildings ranging in height from two to six stories. Already built are two below-ground levels of parking, one space per unit.

Architecturally, The Neighborhood will offer a blend of the traditional and the modern, some Moorish in style, others Mediterranean.

The preliminary application submitted

12 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM CONT’D ON PAGE 15 
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Mayor Randy Rowse

Five years after the cut-flower industry began converting to cannabis in the Carpinteria Valley, a solution to the persistent smell of pot that hangs around schools, homes, and farms appears tantalizingly within reach if growers decide to embrace it.

A study released this month shows that state-of-the-art carbon filters, or “scrubbers,” from the Netherlands can eliminate 84 percent of the smell of cannabis, on average, before it escapes through the open vents on greenhouse roofs.

But there are no signs that a valley-wide transition to scrubbers is imminent. County officials are not eager to issue a blanket rule requiring their use across-the-board. And, at $22,000 per scrubber and a recommended ratio of 10 per acre, it’s expensive to adopt the new technology, especially since the price of wholesale cannabis has plummeted in recent years.

At a December 13 hearing before the county Board of Supervisors, Alex Van Wingerden and Tristan Strauss, the CEO of Headwaters co-operators of Ceres Farms, a nine-acre grow at 6030 Casitas Pass Road and one of the largest cannabis greenhouse operations in the valley nevertheless proposed to install scrubbers if they could have two years to put them in. The board voted 5-0 to approve a zoning permit for Ceres with that timeline.

Supervisor Das Williams, who represents the valley, took credit for persuading Van Wingerden and Strauss to switch to scrubbers. But he said that a general mandate to use the technology would require an amendment to the county’s cannabis ordinance, a process that could take two years or more.

“The fastest and best remedy to this is growers voluntarily adopting carbon scrubbers,” Williams said. “There’s no way to do it faster than that.”

Weighing in at her first board meeting, Supervisor Laura Capps, who lost her bid for Williams’s seat in 2020 and was elected in November to represent the Goleta Valley, said she would favor “tightening up the ordinance.”

“It seems we owe it to our community to be employing the best technology to take

care of the grievance that is plaguing the lives of people,” Capps said.

Right now, most of the cannabis industry in the valley is using an earlier technology known as a “vapor-phase” system, in which perforated pipes around the outside of the greenhouses set up a curtain of mist to mask the smell of marijuana in the open air. Since early 2018, Carpinterians have filed more than 2,800 odor complaints with the county, objecting to both the “skunky” smell of pot from the greenhouses that ring the city and the “laundromat” smell from their vaporphase systems.

Under the current ordinance, a professional engineer or industrial hygienist can certify the “best available control technology” for a cannabis greenhouse on a case-bycase basis and that technology can include vapor-phase systems.

Lisa Plowman, the county planning director, told the supervisors that a consulting engineering firm would soon be on board to start inspecting greenhouse odor-control systems and responding to complaints from residents. If a grower’s system is not working, Plowman said, the county can “ramp it up to the next level” and require scrubbers without the need for an ordinance change.

Capps said: “We should not be waiting to ramp up to this best technology, but rather requiring it from the get-go.”

For some of Van Wingerden’s neighbors, including Bill and Danielle Dall’Armi Hahn, the owners of the Rose Story Farm, it couldn’t happen soon enough. They operate a “fragrant rose” operation with 30,000 rose bushes for the wholesale cut-flower market at 5950 Casitas Pass Road.

Bill Hahn told the board that the smell of pot and the vapor-phase deodorant from Ceres was hurting the family’s business, driving away tenants, and causing his wife to suffer headaches, nausea, and “respiratory distress.”

“We have not been able to continue selling roses, giving tours, or promoting the farm as a very special place where you can smell flowers,” Hahn said. “We can’t rent our homes. We’ve had a number of people leave the farm because they’ve said, ‘We can’t stand that smell’ … Whatever timeline is laid out, it will be slow and cumbersome.” n

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 13 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK CANNABIS
Carp’s Slow Road to Fresh Air Ceres Farms Gets Two Years to Install Odor-Scrubbing Filters in Cannabis Greenhouses MELINDA BURNS Ceres Farms, 6030 Casitas Pass Road Joy Love Action Wonder Courage Integrity Diversity Generosity Community U N I T A R I A N S O C I E T Y Christmas Eve at the 5 : 0 0 P M " A W o n d e r f u l S t o r y " O u r F a m i l y S e r v i c e 7 : 0 0 P M " J o y f u l W o n d e r i n g " L e s s o n s & C a r o l s 9 : 0 0 P M " A W o n d e r - f u l J a z z C h r i s t m a s " 1 5 3 5 S a n t a B a r b a r a S t . a t A r r e l l a g a ( 8 0 5 ) 9 6 5 - 4 5 8 3 w w w . u s s b . o r g
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UC STRIKE

parties will be able to leave the bargaining table behind, at least for the time being.

If the contract fails, and unit members do have the opportunity to return to bargaining, then both parties would have the chance to revert to previous bargaining positions.

“That means that we could reopen some of our earlier wage demands $40,000, possibly higher and rethink our bargaining strategy a little bit because the current majority of the team made some strategic decisions that I did not agree with and voted against,” Haider said. “We certainly don’t expect that the university will just agree to all of our initial demands. But what we do need to see is some sort of new meaningful change in the financial realities in which we live. I currently pay 49 percent of my income to my landlord. It’s not acceptable, and as inflation continues to rise, our wages have to keep up with the cost of living.”

New, five-year contracts for UC postdoctoral scholars and academic researchers were ratified on December 9, and that same day marked the shift to voluntary mediation for negotiations between the

UC and the bargaining teams representing graduate student workers.

The parties’ chosen mediator, mayor of Sacramento Darrell Steinberg, congratu lated both sides for reaching the agree ments, despite controversy among union membership. “Together, they reached a principled solution to end the difficult impasse,” he said.

If the contracts are not ratified, Haider said it’s uncertain whether Steinberg will continue as mediator. “At some point during mediation, he did tell us that if we demanded anything else, he would walk,” Haider said. “And if we vote down this contract and resumed bargaining, I assume that constitutes asking for something else.”

Should the strike officially end, then come January, academic student workers will return to their teaching and research. But the end may not be so soon. Those in opposition of the contracts said that, on their campuses, they’ve observed “firm commitments … toward a long-haul strike, we think that there is still more to be won, and that we still have the capacity to win it.” n

last week highlighted what Taylor describes as “elements of discovery,” paseos and corridors that lead to landscaped public gathering places, including a large outdoor square and a public garden space.

While about 250,000 of commercial retail space will be eliminated, the Taylors will retain about 27,000 square feet of retail.

Under existing zoning, 548 units of housing can be built on the site. But under new state law which offers density bonuses to developers willing to provide affordable units the Taylors’ partnership can build 685. Of those, 646 will be rented out at market rates. About half will be one-bedroom rentals with an average size of 716 square feet. Perhaps 142 will be set aside for seniors. Fifty-six of the units will be affordable. Of those, 39 will be affordable to those deemed “very low income,” with the balance targeting those whose incomes qualify as “moderate.”

The most obvious and immediate rub will be height. Right now, the existing zoning limits building height at La Cumbre

Plaza to no more than 45 feet. The maximum allowed anywhere within city limits under the city’s charter and approved by city voters in 1972 by a margin of 3-to-1 is 60 feet. Elements of the proposed new development are envisioned as high as 74 feet. Without such elevations, the Taylors say, as many as 50 of the proposed units cannot feasibly be built.

But if you listen to Mayor Rowse or the city’s Community Development Director Isaacson, the City Council could not legally approve anything beyond 60 feet even if they wanted to because to do so would violate the city charter, the municipal equivalent of its 10 Commandments. Because the 60-foot limit was passed by referendum, Rowse stated, it would require another bal lot election to undo it.

The Taylors insist otherwise, contending that a “Yes, in My Backyard” bill passed in 2019 the Housing Crisis Act preempts the city charter.

“The State has declared affordable hous ing a statewide emergency, and state density

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 15 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK DEC. 15-22, 2022
CONT’D ON PAGE 16 
CONT’D FROM P. 8
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bonus regulations apply to charter cities,” Matthew Taylor wrote. “Santa Barbara is not an exception.”

The city’s 60-foot height limit, he said, would effectively preclude the developers from achieving the number of units to which they are entitled under this law.

“Trying to build below the current height limitations would result in the kind of blunt architecture we see in other communities,” Taylor objected.

Buttressing Rowse’s remarks, City Attorney Sarah Knecht stressed that the state’s Housing Crisis Act “does not change any local zoning standards.” She noted the city’s

60-foot height limit was written into the charter when voters approved it in 1972.

“The charter is the city’s ‘constitution,’ and the height limit established by the charter cannot be changed without voter approval.”

Unless this matter has been clearly resolved in court, Rowse and Councilmember Eric Friedman who represents the district caution that the open question could give rise to a possible lawsuit or even a ballot initiative by residents upset at loss of local control.

“Remember how prickly people in San Roque became about Chick-fil-A?” Rowse asked, referring to the public outcry over

cars backing up into State Street.

The other big issue left to be resolved is whether City Hall will embark upon the long and cumbersome Specific Plan planning process on its own.

Interim City Planner Gullett said the Specific Plan is necessary to better integrate whatever the Sears owners want to do with what the Taylors hope to build. By addressing thorny issues like open space, creek setbacks, floor area ratios, height, traffic circulation, and impact on the neighboring Hope School District up front, he argued, developers will enjoy a degree of clarity, certainty, and flexibility to respond to shifting market conditions many years hence.

“We’re looking at a once-in-a-100-year situation to make this really good for the city as a whole,” Gullett said.

But with 17 percent of City Hall’s plan-

ning positions currently vacant, such an undertaking would prove challenging in the extreme for in-house planners. Conversely, $1 million is a lot of money particularly as city budget planners are girding for budget cuts to hire outside help. Either way, the Taylors argue that a Specific Plan would hold up their development and could add an element of undue risk beyond the $250 million they say the project will cost to build. It’s far from obvious if there’s council support to pursue that approach.

The one thing the Taylors and City Hall all agree on is the need for more housing.

“We all want the same thing,” Rowse said. “We just have different ways of getting there.”

The vote, by the way, at last week’s SBCAG meeting was 10-to-1 against funding the city’s Specific Plan. Rowse cast the sole vote on the city’s behalf.

n

16 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK DEC. 15-22, 2022
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obituaries

Steve Pearce

2/29/1944 - 11/21/2021

of the Universe.

His true delight in life was his wife, Judy.  They had a deep and soulful connection, and were a dynamic balance, harmonizing each other. They shared a love of music (they knew how to cut a rug!), and they had a favorite campground in the eastern Sierras where they would sit, side by side, for a couple of weeks reading through the crates of books they took with them.

Rental Insanity

In response to last week’s “Caught in the Rental Crunch,” here is another story regarding the Santa Barbara rental insanity.

About a year ago, my husband and I were ready to purchase a home, and we found one in Boise, Idaho. We’d been realistic that Santa Barbara wasn’t in the cards for us, but we intended to remain renters in the S.B. area.

However, we were given notice to move out of our rental, and after three months of looking, we finally gave up. Not only had the rental prices basically doubled in four years, there was virtually no inventory.

We changed course and moved to Boise this past summer. It was a great decision. Boise is a welcoming community with gorgeous scenery and lots of wonderful things to do. Both my husband and I were active in the Santa Barbara community, volunteers as well as small business owners. What a loss for us and the community.

Thank goodness for the great work the Santa Barbara Housing Authority, Tenants Union, and other agencies are doing, but it is not enough. Santa Barbara’s local government has allowed the town to become untenable for many of us to live, prioritizing property value over people.

Readers weighed in at Instagram:

@fiitt00 Santa Barbara probably has the highest population of full-time employed professionals living full-time in vans. The labor pool is beyond fractured in S.B.; it’s shattered. • @swirly.trash .vortex My old 1/1 apartment that was $490 is now $3,300. And it still has the same 1960s kitchen and bathroom. Even the same linoleum that I laid myself. • @burncycleproject High rents also have a way of pushing people into what can be unsafe living conditions, including a higher density of people in high-fire-risk areas.

@ catherine_macchapple We need a strictly enforced vacancy tax and we need higher property taxes on Airbnb properties and second homes. We should also get rid of the Prop. 13 tax advantage for landlords. • @jennajobst We could end this if we stopped the millions of

short-term rentals as a lot of tourist cities have done, such as Mallorca. Then the jobs come back because more people will be staying in the hundreds of vacant hotels in Santa Barbara. C’mon leaders, we know this is a push to build more houses by the developers. We don’t have to be lied to.

@jenrufer My one-bedroom in Ventura is the same as the average one-bedroom in S.B. We thought it would be cheaper here. • @marmealy This is exactly why we moved to Santa Maria. What I want to know is, where are these people working that can afford to live there?

@emilykathleenwrites Something not covered here is the incredibly slow and opaque process of permitting in S.B. We hope to remodel our house next year, and we needed to find a rental during construction. We secured a rental but are still waiting on permits. That means one family will take up two housing units for who knows how long before our permits are approved and we can start construction. I have a friend who is in the same situation. And we have just one house! I can’t imagine the red tape around larger projects. The hoops the city and county make you jump through are ridiculous!

Good Rental Deeds

Our story on Jason Yardi’s purchase of 821 State Street and deciding to turn it into below-market workforce housing also got Instagram responses:

@mindyrainey This is fantastic, but what about everybody else who doesn’t get into those 14 units? We need at least below-market-rate rent as well

• @_recyclops If you read the article, you’ll see the rents are expected to range from about $900 to $1,700. Small units and a small number, yes, that’s true. But let’s not allow perfect to be the enemy of good. This effort should be celebrated.

• @nevergiveuporg This is a great example of allowing good to prevail. Way to go, Yardi, for creating solutions to a problem so few dare to tackle!

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions

Steve Pearce was born on February 29, 1944, outside of Hespler, Ontario in Canada, to Mary and Donald Pearce.  In 1955, the Pearce family moved to a home on Cliff Drive in Santa Barbara, where Steve was able to ride his bike all around the open space of the Mesa, for at that time the area was sparsely developed, and where he played in the WWII bunkers located where the Mesa Shopping Center is today.  His first job was at a nearby pharmacy where he swept up at the end of the day.  By 1956, he was working at Santa Barbara Boat Rentals in the harbor.  His intrigue with being on the water started at age six during a transatlantic voyage to Ireland, at age 12 he gained access to boats, and for over 3 decades he worked on the water.

People close to Steve often found comfort in his ability to listen.  He could simplify the most complicated of situations in just a few words.  Steve’s ability to hear and understand challenges presented by life, allowed for him to support many in our community when he worked as a counselor at Project Recovery, and Cottage Hospital.

Steve was well known for his accomplished conga drum playing.  In his 20s and 30s, Steve could be found driving a Jaguar XKE with his congas lashed to the luggage rack.  In his 40s he took up running and would run 10 miles each day. Steve took up bike riding in his 50s.  He would ride from his Carpinteria home to UCSB and back when he took, as well as, taught classes there.  His favorite loop was going to Ojai via Hwy 150 and returning along Hwy 1. An easy day was a ride up Gobernador Canyon.

Steve was rarely seen without a book within arm’s reach. Witty and subtle describes his humor.  One could tell when he was up to something by the twinkle in his eye, a grin, or the slightest change in his tone of voice. He was kind. From his years living on the ocean, he was able to read the sky and predict what the weather would do in the next couple of hours, and days. He was pragmatic, and valued the power

Steve unexpectedly passed away at home in Carpinteria on November 21, 2021.  He is survived by his sister, Marny Pearce Smith; his daughter, Sara Killen; stepchildren: Kathy Gregory, Tom Polous, and Karen Latter; two grandchildren; six step-grandchildren, and one step-great-grandchild.

Arthur Conrad Lucero

10/26/1938 - 10/17/2022

Arthur Conrad Lucero, a Santa Barbara native who worked for 45 years for the Santa Barbara City School System, passed peacefully in the presence of his loving family on October 17, 2022. He was 83 years old.  His full obituary can be found at https://www.independent.com/obits/2022/10/26/ arthur-conrad-lucero/

A mass in honor Arthur Lucero will be held on December 27, 2022, at 10:00 am at the Saint Raphael Catholic Church, Santa Barbara. The mass will be immediately followed by a Celebration of Art’s Life in Saint Raphael Hall next to the church. Relatives and friends are encouraged to join the Lucero family in sharing their fond memories of this loving and well-loved husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather, godfather, uncle, brother, and friend.

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 17
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OPINIONS Letters
“TRUMP TRAITOR CARDS” BY JOHN DARKOW, COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN
Continued on p.18

obituaries

5/12/1949 - 11/27/2022

Jerome “Jerry” Phillips 3/25/1923 - 11/3/2022

Olga “Ollie” Nellis 9/18/1924 - 11/20/2022

ACT III

In her final decade, Ollie’s brain slowly fell victim to dementia. Unable to live on her own any longer, she moved to Seattle to be near grandson Doug and his wife, Susan.

Mark Charles Menzel passed away peacefully on Sunday, November 27th after a long illness. Mark was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as the oldest son to Howard and Maria Menzel. His parents moved with Mark and his two younger brothers to Santa Barbara in 1954.

The Menzel boys were active and curious as they enjoyed their early childhood exploring their Mesa neighborhood. The open fields that are now Shoreline Park, the ocean bluffs and beaches, and the harbor were their playground. It was this time in his life that Mark developed his initial love of fishing. The family moved to a new home in the Hope Ranch Annex area off Hollister Avenue where Mark and his brothers attended Vieja Valley elementary, La Colina Jr High, and San Marcos High School where Mark graduated in 1968.

Mark was a classic product of the curious 60’s when he enjoyed surfing, epic concerts at UCSB, and all the excitement that Isla Vista could provide to a teenager, including the protests at the Bank of America. After high school, Mark continued to pursue his love of adventure by moving to a small surfing town in Baja California, Mexico. He eventually returned to Santa Barbara where he took classes at SBCC and worked as hotshot firefighter, abalone diver, and City Fireman trainee. Mark moved to Fresno, CA where he attended Cal State Fresno and could pursue his love of fishing throughout the Sierras. At the age of 52, Mark graduated from CSU Fresno with a BS in Business Administration with an emphasis in Finance. He later bought a home in Oakhurst, CA outside of Yosemite where his passion for the outdoors and fishing were at his doorstep. Mark was a proud and active member of the Knights of Columbus in Oakhurst where he enjoyed much brotherly love in worshipping and volunteering to help those in need.

Mark was admired for his kind and generous heart, sense of adventure and independence, humor, fortitude, and amazing intellect like no other. He always had a kind and positive word to say to everyone he encountered, even in his most challenging times. He loved and was loved by the families of his brothers Paul (Karen), and Chuck (Candy), with two generations of nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents in 2017.

Jerome “Jerry” Phillips, of Solvang, passed away peacefully on November 3rd, 2022 at the age of 99.

Jerry was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin on March 25, 1923, to Joseph Phillips (Filipowicz) and Anna  Phillips (Virbitzke). After finishing trade school in Milwaukee, Jerry enlisted in the Army Air Corps in anticipation of the Second World War. He was assigned to the 42nd Bombardment Squadron and trained to fly as an airman gunner and radio operator in the B-24 Liberator bomber.  He participated in the Pacific Theater flying 46 missions over Iwo Jima, Okinawa, and Marcus Island to name a few.  In 1946, upon returning from the war, Jerry married his beloved wife Lorraine (Hermann).

After his time in the service, Jerry became a master machinist/tool & die maker at AC Spark Plug, a division of General Motors, in Milwaukee, WI.  In 1962 he relocated to General Motors Research Facility in Goleta, California with his wife and two children. As a master machinist he worked on several unique projects in the development of special military and government projects including instrumental parts for the lunar roving vehicle used in 1969 moon landing mission and the Apollo Space Craft program.

In 1980 Jerry retired from General Motors allowing more time to spend with family and friends and in the garden which brought him the distinguished Goleta Valley Beautiful Award.  He was an avid golfer, Elks member, and engulfed himself and Lorraine in activities of the Gem and Mineral Society, panning for gold in the Sierra’s, and traveling across the states in their RV.  In 1993 they moved from Goleta to Solvang, where they started specializing in finding the best donut shops in town.

Jerry was predeceased by his wife Lorraine, son Dennis, and twin sisters Lillian and Elizabeth. He is survived by his daughter, June Darby and her husband Bob, and grandchildren Nick Phillips and Carena Phillips.

A special thanks to Cliffview Terrace for their excellent and loving care in his last few years.

A celebration of life will be announced at a later date.

ACT I

Olga “Ollie” Nellis was born on September 18, 1924 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada to Wasyl (Bill) and Anastasia (Nastia or Nettie) Swystun, immigrants from Eastern Galicia (now Ukraine).

Bill ran a regional bus line where Ollie would help with operations when she wasn’t diligently practicing violin, with younger sister Stephanie nearby.

After graduating from Gordon Bell High School in Hazelridge, Manitoba and briefly attending the University of Manitoba, Ollie met a dashing RCAF navigator named Cliff Nellis, whom she married in 1945. Ten months later she gave birth to their beloved son, Bryan.

Within a year the family ventured west to Vancouver, BC, where (along with Bill) Ollie and Cliff owned and operated a coffee shop and a rooming house.

Dreams of sunny California beckoned. Ollie, Cliff, and Bryan moved to Ontario, CA in December 1953. Ollie taught music and played violin with the Claremont Symphony Orchestra for many years, while also catering to Bryan and the family dog Sable. Frequently poolside.

ACT II

Ollie and Cliff divorced in 1974. Ollie moved to Santa Barbara (and then Carpinteria) to be closer to Bryan, his wife Michel, and their children Ann and Doug (“Annie and Dougie” to grandma).

Newly single, Ollie focused on a career. As it turns out, assisting her dad at the bus company was a kind of internship, and Ollie began working as a travel agent, first at Ask Mr. Foster, and then at Your Travel Center, where she was an office manager for several years. She didn’t fully retire until May 2000—it’s hard to give up those travel perks!

Ollie LOVED to travel. Through Egypt, India, China, Kenya, Malaysia, Australia, Poland, Panama, Russia, and more. She visited every continent except Antarctica, drinking a few martinis (or the local equivalent) and making new friends on each.

Dementia is no picnic, but those final years were more comedy than tragedy. Visits to the symphony. Conversations with goldfish. And lots of laughter. As she moved through assisted living and memory care, caregivers would tell family, “We’re not supposed to have favorites, but Ollie is my favorite.”

Although her memory slipped away, her spirit and sense of humor never wavered. She was smiling and joking until her final days. Ollie Nellis passed away on November 20, 2022 of something that can only be described as “old age.”

Lower the curtain and cue the orchestra. It was a good run.

Born in Laguna Beach and raised in beautiful Santa Barbara. Chris enjoyed his many childhood friends, riding his bike, days on the beach, and the views of the mountains. In high school, he was a proud Santa Barbara Don who wore the number 66 while playing Defensive Guard.

9/25/2022

A warm hearted, caring and fun-loving woman, Bonnie, age 88, of Buellton, passed away September 25th at her home.

Bonnie was born in Sioux City, Iowa the second of five children to Helen Robinson and Miles Nelson. She earned her LPN degree in Minneapolis and while going to school, met the love of her life at a ski jump in 1950. She married Bill McLean five years later and they were happily married for 67 years.

She is survived by her husband Bill and three children: Robert, Brenda of Buellton and James (LiChuan) of Colorado Springs. Bonnie had three granddaughters, Mikaela, Lauren and Kaylyn and six great-grandchildren.

A Celebration of Life will be held at her home December 27th. Please call Bob at 805-298-2979 for details.

He was a loving husband, uncle, and friend to many. Chris and his wife, Lisa, fell madly in love with one another when they met as teenagers. They enjoyed many hobbies throughout their 43 years together golf, Volkswagens, raising parrots, RC racing, dogs, camping, fishing, just hanging out together, and loving life. In his later years, he developed a passion for collecting and restoring vintage trucks. He was a master autobody fabricator. Perfection was his middle name. Chris found the most happiness when he was floating on the water in his Ranger Bass Boat. He enjoyed bass and striper fishing with his wife. Throughout the years he loved to compete and bass fish with his buddies Meade, BJ, Chuck, Clark, Tony and countless others!

He enjoyed being an uncle to his nephews and nieces Adam, Drake, Beck, David, Daniel, Emerald and Lindsey. He is proceeded in death by his sister Robyn who had a special place in his heart, and brother Bobbie who meant a lot to him.

There will be no services. In honor of Chris Russell please make a donation in his name to Sansum Clinic Diabetes Research. PO box 1200 Santa Barbara CA 93102.

18 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM
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Bonita Belle McLean “Bonnie” 7/31/1934 - Chris Russell 1961 - 2022 Chris was 61 years old when he lost his battle with diabetes. He went to be with the Lord much too soon. He will be immensely missed by everyone who loved and knew him.
Continued on p.20

Kemp Aaberg

When we were kids growing up at our family home in Pacific Palisades, I thought my big brother Kemp Aaberg was invincible. A boy of boundless energy, he galloped his horse Venus bareback in the hills above town, pumped iron at the local gym, and played every sport at the park. In our backyard, Kemp built a high-jump pit, a high bar for gymnastics, a duck pond, a rabbit hutch, and a special cage for his homing pigeons. At Camp Fern in East Texas, Kemp won swimming, running, and canoe races, set a new chin-up record, and got first place in the horse show. After achieving every award Camp Fern had to offer, the counselors had to invent new ones, just for Kemp!

At University High School in West Los Angeles, Kemp excelled in track and field, especially pole vaulting. He trained vigorously after school. I remember watching him charge down the runway in his spiked track shoes, plant his pole, and swing his legs and body up and over the bar, 12 feet in the air. It was my job to catch his thick aluminum pole before it crashed to the ground. That year, Kemp set a new pole vault record at Uni High and competed in the all-city track meet. But then, surfing took over.

There were very few surfers in Pacific Palisades during the mid ’50s. The summer of 1956, a guy named Jack Lamaroux loaned Kemp a heavy balsa wood surfboard he’d made in his garage. At age 16, Kemp loaded it into the back of his Oldsmobile, drove up to Malibu, and rode his first wave toward shore, standing erect on the deck of the surfboard. “Ole!” He jazzed on surfing for life! His wave-riding ability progressed exponentially. Only two years after he started, he was chosen to be one of the stars in Bruce Brown’s first 16mm surfing movie, Slippery When Wet. Surf legend Lance Carson remembers the day Kemp returned from riding the “heavies” in Hawai‘i, late November 1958. He was a different surfer, beaming with confidence. Lance witnessed Kemp fearlessly paddle his 9'6" Velzy balsa board into huge waves at Rincon, climbing and dropping all the way to the seawall. Who is that guy? Surfers couldn’t believe it was Kemp.

The summer of 1959, Kemp was hired as a seasonal ocean lifeguard for Los Angeles County and stationed at Zuma Beach and Malibu. He also entered the Catalina to Manhattan Beach paddleboard race, winning it in a nail-biter finish with famous waterman Mike Doyle. That winter, John Severson captured an image of Kemp in the cove at Rincon, arching his back in a graceful turn, backlit by a translucent late-afternoon peeler. After the Rincon photo appeared in Severson’s inaugural 1960 issue of Surfer Magazine, and Bruce Brown’s Slippery When Wet screened at high schools and civic auditoriums in Southern California, Kemp was a surf hero overnight. The Kemp Aaberg classic arch became a widely imitated maneuver for legions of stoked Baby Boomer surfers. For years after, Severson used the iconic image of Kemp as his Surfer Magazine logo.

Enter the Spanish guitar. Kemp was enamored by the sassy bravado inherent in flamenco music. He listened hours on end to Sabicas records, bought a nylon-string Spanish guitar, and began practicing his picados and rasgueado strum. In the early ’60s, he befriended a brilliant young classical guitarist, Michael Lorimer, who later became a protégé of Andrés Segovia. Lorimer introduced Kemp to the majesty and charm of classical guitar playing. Kemp taught himself to read notes and assiduously

studied proper classical technique. He even made two trips to Spain to learn flamenco from the gypsy players and classical guitar at the Segovia Master Classes in Santiago de Compostela.

Enchanted with the Santa Barbara area, Kemp enrolled in the 1960 fall quarter at UCSB. He and a couple of college buddies rented an old Victorian-style house on Butterfly Lane in sleepy Montecito, only a halfmile from their favorite secret surf spot, Hammond’s Reef. The Butterfly Lane house soon became a crash pad for traveling surfers and the site of many fun college keg parties. Between classes at UCSB, Kemp chugged down to Rincon in his beat-up ’55 Volkswagen bug to catch uncrowded waves. It was before the freeway. Often, even on big days, only a half-dozen surf wagons would be parked along the old coast highway, overlooking the break. Kemp, Bob Cooper, Renny Yater, Rick Kreisler, and a few other friends would be the only ones out on the point, getting the ride of their lives.

In 1974, after a four-year-long around-the-world odyssey, teaching school in Australia, erecting scaffolding in Germany, and picking grapes in the south of France, Kemp returned to Santa Barbara. He met and fell in love with his sweetheart and future wife, Ella. Together they bought a house in Goleta. Kemp worked for UPS as a driver and a loader. Many surf shop owners would recognize him in his brown UPS uniform, amazed to have their surf hero delivering their packages.

Always a man on the go, Kemp became obsessed with running marathons. He was a regular at the Santa Barbara marathon race and every other marathon race in California he could get to. But it was the advent of the triathlon endurance race that really piqued his interest, especially the Big Daddy of them all, the Ironman in Kona, on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. The race entailed a 2.4-mile ocean swim, followed by a 112-mile bicycle

race, finishing with a 26.2-mile run. Perfect for Kemp! He trained like a man possessed. After his early morning shift pre-loading for UPS, he’d jump on his bike and ride from Goleta to Gaviota and back and follow up with a 12-mile run. Kemp did stacks of triathlons. In his forties, he entered the Ironman race twice and beat many of the younger competitors.

Kemp and Ella moved to the Mesa in Santa Barbara. They cherished living near the sea and the sweet smell of the ozone and the invigorating fresh ocean breezes. After retiring from UPS in 2000, and backing off endurance races, Kemp focused on his original passions, surfing and playing guitar. He played for weddings, did volunteer performances at assisted living homes, and taught kids guitar for free at the YMCA. His quick wit and great sense of humor came through in the many articles he wrote for surf magazines and newspapers. Kemp stayed in top shape, doing daily year-around ocean swims off Leadbetter Beach, icy water and all.

The past few years, Kemp struggled with Parkinson’s disease. It was sad for everybody to see the disease progress and prevent him from doing the things he wanted. But he was a fighter. On November 6, with his loving wife, Ella, at his side, Kemp passed away at home, peacefully in his sleep. He was just shy of 83.

I am eternally grateful to have had Kemp as my brother. I was fortunate, as were many others, to have such a positive influence in my life. Kemp was a kind, fun-loving, humble man, who eschewed fame. He loved animals and nature. He loved people. He loved his wife. Now, his courageous spirit has moved on to the next dimension. I know he’s totally involved in some grand adventure. Here on earth, Kemp Aaberg will be dearly missed. His classic arch will be etched in the heart of surfing forever. We love you, brother.

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 19
n In Memoriam
1940-2022 The Man with the Classic Arch
JOHN
SEVERSON
Kemp Aaberg at Rincon, winter 1959

obituaries

Daly, Terence (Terry)

Patrick 8/4/1924 - 12/7/2022

YMCA, Santa Barbara Chamber of Commerce and the Santa Ynez Valley Historical Society. Terry also served as president of numerous organizations, including Santa Barbara Rotary Club, Santa Barbara Trojan Alumni Club, La Cumbre County Club, Cottage Hospital (Health), and the Alisal Men’s Club. Terry also held the distinction of being the youngest El Presidente of the Old Spanish Days Fiesta in 1966 at the age of 42 years.

Ynez Valley will remember Terry for his service as an usher at the Mission Santa Ines and as an official for track events at Santa Ynez High School.

Cynthia Nelson Dodds 11/30/2022

fudge, and the pancakes she made for her grandsons during every visit.

Terry Daly passed away peacefully on Wednesday, December 7th at the age of 98 in his home at Atterdag Village in Solvang, CA surrounded by his family. He was born in Onaway, Michigan to James and Margaret Daly on August 4, 1924, in what became a household of eleven children. Terry spent his formative years in Onaway working on the family farm and graduated from Onaway High School in 1941. He then joined the US Navy, becoming part of the V-12 officer training program while attending Denison University in Ohio and then the University of Kansas in the NROTC program. Terry was honorably discharged from the Navy in November 1945.

After WWII ended, Terry traveled across the country to attend USC on the GI Bill. He enrolled in the School of Business while also becoming a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity and Skull & Dagger Honor Society. After graduating from ‘SC with his BA in Business in 1948, Terry attended the University of Michigan Law School for one year. Needing to earn a living, Terry was unable to complete his law degree, so he returned to CA and went to work for Burroughs Adding Machine company, staying there for three years. Then, when an opportunity opened in the management training program at the Mission Linen Supply Company (now Mission Industries) he grabbed it.

Terry was an essential member of Mission Linen team for 55 years, serving as Treasurer, CFO and Director of Labor Relations. Upon his retirement from his duties at Mission he became a Director of the company as well continuing his role as a Mission’s labor consultant.

Terry served actively on numerous Boards in the Santa Barbara, Solvang and San Diego areas, including Mission Federal Savings, HomeFed Bank, Jordano’s Inc., Investor’s Research, Braun Industries, and Flavia Associates. He was also an ardent believer in giving back to his community serving as Director for the Salvation Army, Montecito

Terry loved sports of all varieties. He was a season ticket holder for USC football for over 30 years, as well as an avid fan of the Los Angeles Lakers, Dodgers and Rams. Terry was also a very avid golfer spending nearly 65 years as a member at the Montecito, La Cumbre, and the Alisal Clubs. Terry’s passion for the sport took him to courses around the world, most notably St. Andrews, Scotland and numerous beautiful courses in his country of origin- Ireland. His second passion was fishing, both freshwater and ocean. He would spend many years fishing at Lake Cachuma and in the Sierras with his family and friends and was he quite successful. Terry also had a life-long dream to catch a “billfish”, and he pursued this quest in many fishing grounds- Mexico, the Caribbean and Hawaii. Terry was finally able to complete this quest off the coast of Cabo San Lucas in 2004, while fishing with his son Tim.

Terry was happily married to his wife Jo for nearly seventy years. He and Jo (Jordano) were married at the Old Mission Santa Barbara on June 13, 1953, and celebrated 69 wonderful years of love and companionship. They enjoyed traveling the world, covering 5 of the 7 continents, including several visits to Jo’s family in Italy and Terry’s family in Ireland and Scotland.

Together, Terry and Jo had four children- Erin Patricia, Kathryn Theresa, Timothy Patrick and Terence Michael. You can clearly see who was the guiding influence on the chosen Irish names of the Daly children! The Daly’s moved to the Santa Ynez Valley in 1989 with the plan to live a very quiet retirement, but that would not come to pass. Terry’s talents were discovered by many organizations in the Valley where he would become the Director Santa Ynez Historical Society, Director and Treasurer of Mission Oaks, Director and Treasurer of the Alisal Men’s Club, Director and President of Solvang Rotary, which included earning the honor of the Paul Harris Fellow and “Joke Master”. Many others in the Santa

Terry Daly was a devout Catholic who epitomized the American dream. He was a devoted husband, father, grandfather (Pap) and great-grandfather (Grand Pap). He leaves behind his beloved wife Jo, daughters Erin Marra of Everett WA, and Kathi Hames (Bill) of Buellton, sons Tim Daly (Randy) of San Diego, and Mike Daly (Cindy) of Ventura. Also surviving are his grandchildren Katie Wright (Aaron) of Buellton, Will Hames (Katie Rose) of Gaviota, Caitlin Marra of North Bend WA, Alyssa Daly and Brendan Daly (Michelle) of Ventura, his sister Kathleen (Dave) Filener of Carson CA, 5 great-grandchildren of Buellton and Gaviota, plus numerous nieces and nephews throughout the United States, Ireland, England, and Scotland.

“We’ve lost the irreplaceable center of our family,” a family member said, “but the inspiration of his faith, optimism and integrity will live on in our hearts forever.” Rest in peace Terry/Dad/ Grampy.

A service and reception for Terry will be held at the Mission Santa Ines on January 14, 2023 at 10am. In lieu of flowers, the family would like to ask for donations to be sent to the following organizations:

Atterdag Village of Solvang636 Atterdag Road, Solvang, CA 93463

VNA Health- foundation@vnahealth.com

Sports for Exceptional Athletes- https://www.s4ea.org/ support-us

Santa Ynez Valley Therapeutic Riding Program- info@syvtherapeuticriding.org

The families would like to sincerely thank the following professionals who took such great care of Terry during the final stages of his life:

Dr. Gustavo Dascanio and his very competent medical staff Chris Parker and the entire wonderful staff at Atterdag Village/Solvang Lutheran Home VNA Health

The Loper Funeral Home

Cynthia “Cindy” N Dodds, 71 years old, passed away on Nov. 30, 2022 at home.

She was the wife of Larry Dodds. They shared 49 years of marriage together. Their 50th wedding anniversary is this New Year’s Eve.

Born in Hibbing, Minnesota, Cindy was the daughter of Audrey and Clayton Nelson. She is survived by five siblings (Laurie, Jeff, Melissa, Tim and Terry).

The family moved to Arizona for part of her childhood. The family then resided in Santa Barbara for her teen years. She graduated from San Marcos High School in 1969. After high school she attended a local business college and worked at a law firm until she married Larry in 1972.

After the wedding she and Larry moved to forested outposts in northern California for Larry’s career with the U.S. Forest Service ending in Burney in Shasta County, where she and Larry raised their three children, Bernadette, Nelson and Abigail.

32 years ago Cindy saw a vacant Bank of America building in her community and, with visionary non-profit entrepreneurial spirit she decided to create and run a nonprofit center for children. This became a foundational experience for countless young people growing up in Burney.  She ran this Tri County Community Network from 1990 to 2019. She was instrumental in developing multiple projects that increased health and joy in the community.

She will be remembered for the impact she had with children and families in the community. She loved serving those who were most in need.

Cindy loved vacations with her husband, especially if it included time on the Central Coast near Cambria. She spent numerous hours working in her flowerbeds and beautifying the property where she and Larry lived. Her favorite place on earth was her back porch, in the sun, enjoying the fresh air, grass meadow and towering pine trees.

Her family will remember her immense love, laughter, encouragement, humor, homemade

Cindy is survived by her husband, three children and their spouses, three grandchildren and seven grand-dogs. She was predeceased by her parents, and favorite grand-dog, Rudy.

There will be a family celebration in Burney, Ca. in the spring when Cindy’s tulips are blooming in the yard. Memorial donations may be made to the Tri County Community Network. In lieu of flowers, she would want you do a random act of kindness in your community.

8/25/1939 - 12/1/2022

William (Bill) Fuher, 83, of Santa Barbara, CA, passed away on December 01, 2022.

Bill was born August 25, 1939, to Frank William Fuher and Bernice (Thomason) Fuher in Spokane, WA and grew up in Livingston, MT. After graduating from Park County High School in 1957, he served in the United States Air Force as an Aircraft Control and Warning Systems (AC&W) Operator from 1957 to 1961.

Bill and Judy (Peccia) wed in April of 1961 in Lewistown, MT. After the birth of their daughter Tammy in 1962, they made their way to Santa Barbara, CA. In 1964, the family expanded with the addition of son Craig William.

Bill opened his own insurance agency with Farmers Insurance in 1973 and built that business until retirement in 1999.

One of his greatest joys was spending time with his grandchildren and great grandchildren watching them grow and develop their passions.

He is survived by his wife Judy Fuher, daughter Tammy (Fuher) O’Brien (Greg), son Craig Fuher (Jenifer), grandchildren Tara (Logan) Anderson (Eric), William R. Fuher, Ashley O’Brien, Aubree Fuher, great-grandchildren Logan Anderson, Presley Anderson, and numerous nieces and nephews.

In lieu of flowers, please consider making a contribution to the Goleta Boys & Girls Club.

SERVICE INFORMATION: https://everloved.com/life-of/ william-bill-fuher/.

20 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM
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obituaries

Gela Percal

11/26/1924 - 8/15/2022

of David on their sleeves and display signs in their windows; by 1941 it was everyone over the age of 6. The government adopted hundreds of laws, decrees, directives, guidelines, and regulations that increasingly restricted the civil and human rights of the Jewish people as well as other minorities.

Baser Percal, our lovely Mom and Grandma, passed away peacefully at her home in Santa Barbara on the morning of August 15, 2022, at the age of 97. She went on her own schedule and slept comfortably as she transitioned to the other side. Gela was beloved by many and respected by all for her kindness, wit, generosity, humor and intelligence. She was a fantastic cook, bringing with her some of the traditional Eastern European flavors and techniques she grew up with, while adopting new flavors and styles popular in the culture of her adopted American home. A firm believer and advocate of living healthy, she was very disciplined about keeping a nutritious diet along with a rigorous exercise routine; she practiced yoga daily, followed by long walks on Mountain Drive into her mid-80’s.

Gela was born in in 1924 Rakow, Poland, a small town where she lived with her loving family of 4 siblings and devoted, hardworking parents, Asher and Malka (Betel) Baser. Her father was an artisan furniture maker; her mother raised and tended to the large family. Gela told many stories of her family and childhood: how the children would go to the forest to pick blueberries that her mom would bake into kuchen, a simple cake studded with the delicious fruit; how the girls would scrub and clean the copper cooking pots with the sand at the riverbank; how her younger sister would play with the goats kept by her best friend’s family. Her talented oldest brother was accepted to study architecture at the university in Warsaw on full scholarship but couldn’t attend because he was needed in the family business to make ends meet.

The idyllic childhood came to a halt with the rise of Hitler and the Nazi invasion of Poland in September of 1939. Gela witnessed mounting restrictions on the Jewish population under Nazi occupation: Jewish children were expelled from public schools, as were Jewish teachers. Access to higher education was denied. Use of public transportation, and even the use of bicycles was forbidden. By the end of 1939 all Jews in Poland aged ten and above were forced to wear badges with a Star

The family was forced to flee from their home when Gela was 17 years old, hiding in the forest under the harshest of conditions. Gela and her sister Rachel survived miraculously after the rest of the family were killed. The sisters then fled to Germany under false identities, posing as Catholic girls working as forced laborers in Nazi households where they managed to escape detection until the end of the war. Finally liberated, Gela and her sister were able to leave Germany with the help of the US Armed Forces and became displaced, stateless persons in Brussels Belgium. Gela emerged deeply affected, carrying the effects of her experience for the rest of her life, but was determined never be defined as a victim.

Gela met her future husband, Fred Percal, an American soldier from Santa Barbara, at a USO officer’s dance in Brussels. Neither could speak the other’s language, but the spark was there. She asked him, with her limited English, “Are you on Hollywood?” meaning to ask if he was on holiday. They married 3 months later, waiting until she became of legal age at 21 because her parents were not alive to give their permission. Several months later she followed Fred to the US on a War Bride ship, then took a train across the country to Fred’s hometown.

Gela spent the rest of her life in beautiful Santa Barbara with the family she lovingly created, raising two daughters, along with a couple of family pets over the years, and became very involved in her community. She and Fred created a business in real estate together, slowly transitioning out of Percal’s Poultry, the longtime family business on Montecito St, started by Fred’s father. The couple were active members in Congregation B’nai Brith, participating in the wonderful barbeques at Tucker’s Grove every summer, where the kids played while dads barbequed huge batches of Percal’s Poultry Market chickens and moms created all the side dishes. Gela also loved the garden and raised dozens of beautiful cymbidium orchid plants on the patio under the oak trees. She invited her close friends for lunch there when the orchids were in bloom, a delightful paradise-like setting.

Although deprived of her early education in Poland at the age of 14, she attended classes at SBCC credit and adult ed departments,

studying writing, music, psychology, and languages. Always wanting to give back, she volunteered as a reading tutor for children at Adams Elementary School. In her later years, she found the courage to speak about her Holocaust experiences in presentations for college students and local school children. A short film about her Holocaust experience can be seen at ‘Gela Percal Portraits of Survivors’ on YouTube, a video series made through a program of the Jewish Federation of Santa Barbara.

Gela was pre-deceased by Fred, her husband of 68 years. She is survived by daughters Susan and Malka Percal, grandchildren Primo Lasana and Galite Jimenez Percal, sister Rachel Freisleben, and niece and nephews Marilyn, Alan and Jerry.

She will be greatly missed by all of us but will be carried in our hearts forever. Contributions in her memory can be made to Congregation B’nai Brith (www. CBBSB.org)

Nancy Jean Ortega passed away on November 15 due to complications from a stroke. Nancy is survived by her mother, Mary, sisters, Terry and Kathy, nephew Gabriel, nieces Mia and Miranda, aunt and uncle Gloria and Jack Hulbert, and cousin, Shannon Cherry, second cousins, Aiden and Kayla Cherry, brothers-in-law, Brian Tanguay and Rod Britton, extended family from Mexico City to London, and many friends.

Eighth generation Santa Barbaran and first daughter to Mary and Jess Ortega, Nancy attended Lincoln Elementary, Goleta Valley Jr. High, and San Marcos High School. Outgoing by nature, Nancy had a career in customer service and sales, mostly in Santa Maria. She found her calling as a wedding planner and officiant, especially proud to marry couples of all orientations. She loved the sun and the moon, the science of the stars, mysteries of the unknown, and the history of our ancestors in Santa Barbara.

buy a ticket to a live concert, buy a vinyl record, download music, but mostly, find your joy.

May the good Lord be with ya down every road you roam

And may sunshine and happiness surround you when you’re far from home

And may you grow to be proud, dignified, and true And do unto others as you would have done to you Be courageous and be brave And in my heart you’ll always stay

Forever young, forever young Forever young ~Rod Stewart T&K

Peter J Davidson

Patrick Pfannenstiel 10/13/1952 - 11/14/2022

Nancy was a loving aunt. The pride she felt about her nieces and nephew was immeasurable. Nancy also found immense joy in being a fierce, loving, and loyal friend to so many people, from those she met in school to even those she met in the last year. We wish to extend heartfelt gratitude to all the friends that donated to her reading machine which brought her great joy and entertainment in the last year. She said that the love for her friends was everything to her.

Peter Davidson died in Santa Barbara on 17 November 2022 after an extended illness. He graduated from Bishop Diego Garcia High School and attended Santa Clara and Cal Poly SLO Universities. He moved to San Francisco where his lifelong love of good food was nurtured. He also fed his passions for travel, golf, hiking and fishing, including becoming a master at making hand-crafted fishing poles, all while working his way up to vice president of an SF company. But he often returned to his home town and on the occasion of their 30th high school reunion reconnected with Dorothy. They soon married and moved to a hillside home in Pacifica, retiring 10-years later and returning to Santa Barbara.

Thomas Patrick Pfannenstiel, age 70, of Goleta, CA, born October 13, 1952, in Bethesda, MD, passed away November 14, 2022. He was preceded in death by his mother, Betty Lu (Price) and his father Herbert Pfannenstiel. He is survived by his wife Kristine (Nicholas), son Timothy, brother, Terry (Cheryl) Pfannenstiel and his two beloved dogs, Josie and Jackson. Tom attended San Roque and Bishop Diego before graduating from San Marcos HS, class of 1970. He owned Tom Pfannenstiel Construction for 30 years. Tom loved animals and the ocean. His passion was fishing. A Spreading of Ashes will take place aboard the fishing boat Stardust out of Santa Barbara Harbor at a future date to be announced.

What fed Nancy’s soul most was music. We remember she started asking for albums, 45s, and 8-tracks from a very young age. We would play her 45s in the garage and have dance parties with the neighbors, creating choreography (“Sugar, Sugar”, “Draggin’ The Line…,”) and rehearsing for imaginary performances. She deejayed at Monty’s in Magnolia Center for a few years in the 80s. The Beatles and Rod Stewart were Nancy’s biggest musical loves. During her life, Nancy was able to see Paul McCartney and Rod (over 100 times!) in concert. Nancy curated the soundtrack of our lives, and we didn’t even know it until now.

Despite her challenging health problems, Nancy remained upbeat and optimistic until the end. We are planning a celebration of Nancy’s life in the New Year. If you would like to honor Nancy now or in the future, she would have loved it if you would

Like all who knew him, Dorothy was charmed by Peter’s outgoing and sociable nature, his generosity, his shy smile and his love of romantic gestures. He preferred logic over emotion but was a pushover especially with family who exploited his profound weakness for candy and cookies.

Peter had deep roots in Santa Barbara. Both of his parents trace back several generations in the city and his wife Dorothy is a descendent of the Ortega family of Rancho Arroyo Hondo. He also leaves behind two step daughters Erika Ronchietto and Ashley Butler, sons-in-law Martin Ronchietto and David Soberano, five beloved grandchildren, and his sister Mary Kay Hewitt, husband Roger and sons Paul and Peter. His sister Pat Davidson preceded him. A celebration of his life is planned to take place in early 2023; for more information please send a message to PeterDavidsonMemorial@gmail.com. For anyone caring to do so, Dorothy suggests a donation in his name to support the Arroyo Hondo Preserve (Land Trust for SB County).

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Gela Thomas Nancy Jean Ortega 1959 - 2022
12/12/1949 - 11/17/2022

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Santa Barbara’s Century Man

Roke Fukumura is an early bird. Always has been. Five days a week for the past 32 years, he’s arrived at TriCounty Produce before dawn, more recently in an Easy Lift van because of his waning night vision. “I come early or not at all” was his response after his boss suggested he start a little later.

Standing outside the lower Milpas Street grocery store, Roke can hear the train and smell the ocean. Across the street is Cabrillo Park, where, at just 14 years old, he played semiprofessional baseball. Up the road on the Mesa is where he was born on his family’s farm. Roke rarely strays far from Santa Barbara, and when he does, he doesn’t particularly enjoy it. “This is home,” he said.

store’s main buyer, he takes immense pride in his work. He beams when customers compliment the produce, which is among the crispest and tastiest anywhere on the South Coast. “I enjoy serving the public, and I meet very wonderful people,” he said. “I love it.”

Once he clocks out, Roke occupies himself with the other thing he loves: sports. “Anything competitive,” he explained. He’s a Dodgers fan but especially appreciates Clayton Kershaw’s intensity on the mound. That same fire to win still burns in Roke’s belly, more than eight decades after he helped Santa Barbara High School secure its first— and still only— CIF Southern California Baseball Championship.

Roke’s first task of the morning is to help unload the trucks. He lifts 50-pound sacks of onions like a much younger man, though he can no longer hoist them onto his shoulders. The aches and pains are too much. When his coworkers encourage him to try something lighter, like mushrooms, he shakes his head. His Japanese-American father, who raised five children almost all on his own through the Great Depression, World War II, and an internment camp, had a saying: “Bear it.”

Roke spends the rest of the day trimming and stacking the fruits and vegetables that fill Tri-County’s racks. He’s also quality control. As he has throughout his career, including as the

On November 26, Roke turned 100 years old. To him, it was just another trip around the sun. No big deal. But his longtime friend and employer, John Dixon, convinced the star shortstop to let others celebrate him and his rich life. On hand that day among the balloons and cupcakes were friends and family and a whole contingent of dignitaries, including a couple of mayors and a member of Congress. Jokes were told and proclamations read. They said Roke embodied the American dream, and they apologized on behalf of the U.S. government for violating his rights during the war.

Roke was appreciative but brief on the mic. Only later did he begin to tear up. “I thank John for bringing these people here,” he said. But the vulnerability didn’t last long. Soon he was back to his smiling, straighttalking self. People wanted to know his secret for long life. Less meat and more vegetables, he replied. Keep your body moving. Forget about politics. And above all, he said, “Stay single.”

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COVER STORY
Fukumura: Baseball Star, Internment Camp Survivor, Hardworking Hometown Hero
Roke
INGRID BOSTROM PHOTOS
Roke Fukumura (left), wearing his high school letterman jacket that still fits like a glove, with his longtime friend and employer, Tri-County Produce owner John Dixon

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Riyokui Fukumura, whom everyone has called Roke (row-kee) since grammar school, is the baby of the family. His parents migrated to Santa Barbara in 1904 from a village in Japan’s Kumamoto prefecture, living first in Mission Canyon before leasing a six-acre piece of farmland on the Mesa. Japanese residents weren’t allowed to own property at the time. The Fukumuras grew “a little of this and a little of that,” Roke explained, including carrots, spinach, and sweet peas. “The town was so small back then, you could only grow so much and sell so much.”

The family home was a semi-abandoned two-story house at 1919 Cliff Drive (the current site of the Mesa Verde restaurant), and it was there that Roke’s mother gave birth to him with the assistance of a midwife. They didn’t have a lot of toys, but the children had plenty of space in which to play, as the neighborhood back then was almost all agriculture. There was a strawberry farm around the corner, and “Porky Joe” next door had a team of horses that plowed the fields. You could see the Mesa lighthouse from the home’s upstairs windows, Roke recalled, though the 5,000-candle-power bulb would cast spooky shadows on the walls.

When Roke was 5 years old, his mother, Gima, died of pneumonia. He says so matter-of-factly, but his brow furrows at the memory. That left his father, Kameki, on his own to look after the children. “He worked hard and supported all of us,” Roke said. “I give him so much credit for that.” Every morning at 6 a.m., Kameki loaded his Model T with the harvest and sold what he could in town, making sure to be back by 7 a.m. so he could take the kids to school. He would farm all day until he picked them up at 3 p.m. then head back into the field until dark.

While Roke fed the chickens; his brother, Tom, tended to the horses; and their sisters washed the dishes, Kameki took care of everything else. He bought and disassembled two worn-out sewing machines and rebuilt one with the working parts to make their nightgowns and other clothing. Kameki’s most oft-repeated lesson was to never steal. Ever. Under any circumstances. “We were poor but we were taught not to get sticky fingers,” Roke said.

Even though the house had three big bedrooms upstairs, the protective patriarch and his children all slept in the downstairs master so he could keep an eye

on one daughter who had recurring whooping cough and another who would get very bad earaches. They used kerosene lamps and a wood-burning stove and listened to records on a hand-cranked phonograph. “My father was a tough guy, but he was also very gentle with us in a lot of ways,” Roke said.

All of the Fukumura children took turns helping their dad with the farming. All of them except Roke. For whatever reason maybe because he was the youngest, maybe because he showed budding talent from such a young age Kameki cut Roke loose to play sports after school and on the weekends. He attended McKinley Elementary School, La Cumbre Junior High, and Santa Barbara High, and played baseball and basketball and ran track. “I was short,” he said, standing a little over 5'2", “but I was fast.”

Roke set a high school record in the 50-yard dash and even qualified to run in the CIF Championships at the Los Angeles Coliseum. But the day of the track

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The Fukumuras lived on a six-acre farm on the Mesa.
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Roke (far left) with Santa Barbara High’s 1941 CIF championship team
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meet, he faced a dilemma travel to L.A. for a shot at personal glory or accompany the baseball team to their quarterfinal game scheduled for the same time in Oxnard. “I went with the team,” Roke said. “They needed me.”

That 1941 squad was stacked. It featured a handful of football stars who were just as talented on the diamond, including pitcher Dan Zuzalek, who led the team with a .384 batting average. Second baseman Johnny Latham hit .375 and batted second in the order behind their leadoff ace, Roke, who was the only Asian-American starter. Being a little shy, Roke said, he didn’t muster the courage to try out until his sophomore year, at which point his classmates practically begged him to lend his speed and arm to the Dons.

They were good, but they weren’t flashy, said Roke. “We stuck to the basics bunt, steal, hit, and run. You know, small ball,” not unlike the strategy of today’s Santa Barbara Foresters that makes them so hard to beat. Roke was especially deadly on the basepath. He stole 20 bases his senior season, owing to his previous experience with Santa Barbara’s semi-pro team at the time, the Hi Stars, who played Sundays at Cabrillo Park against regional rivals like the Carpinteria Merchants.

“I could read the pitchers,” Roke said. Once he was on base, he explained, he could often reach third on a bunt from Latham. “That was one of our plays.” Roke was also the team’s hype man, stoking spirits and encouraging effort when the chips were down. Sometimes he’d get a little too worked up, he admitted, and the coaches would tell him to take it easy.

The Dons won their quarterfinal game in Oxnard, then beat Pasadena in the semis, teeing them up for a showdown with Long Beach for the championship. Long Beach had their own weapons, including their starting pitcher, a 6'2" hurler who went on to play for the Cleveland Indians. He stood more than a head taller than Roke, which was pointed out to him when the teams ran into each other outside their locker rooms. “Look! They brought their water boy!” the opposing players snickered. “I stole four bases that game,” Roke remembered with a wry smile.

The contest was one for the ages, a pitching duel that went 17 innings and remains the longest CIF baseball final in section history. The Dons were the away team, so the crowd was against them, but they endured and took home the trophy, thanks in no small part to Roke’s near-perfect defense. “Roke’s fielding at shortstop was outstanding,” Coach Skip Winans told reporters at the time. “It was a grand time for us,” said Roke.

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But the good times didn’t last. Less than seven months later, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor and Roke and his family were unceremoniously packed and shipped to an internment camp in Poston, Arizona, along with nearly 18,000 others. The Japanese American Citizens League, to which the Fukumuras belonged, advised them not to resist. It would only make things worse.

For the next three years, the family lived in a single 20-by-25-foot room. Roke, who was 19, tried to enlist in the Army as it was one of the few ways to escape imprisonment, but he didn’t pass the physical exam. Ironically, the Santa Barbara speedster was rejected due to a congenital bone growth in his leg.

Roke was instead assigned as a cook, responsible for feeding 300 people in his barracks with whatever rations the government gave them. Sometimes they received beef hearts and liver, which, having grown up mainly on vegetables and the occasional chicken, he had no idea what to do with. “Luckily, we had a cook from a hotel who knew how to bread and prepare them,” he said.

Every day after work, Roke and his brother played baseball with the Block No. 308 team on a makeshift field they called Yankee Stadium. They were a particularly effective double-play duo with Roke at shortstop and Tom at second. “That gave us something to do,” Roke said. “It kept us going.” At night, their father would sing them traditional Japanese songs.

Not one to complain, Roke doesn’t say much about his time at the camp, other than that it happened and it’s done. He appreciated the apology during his birthday party, he said, but he’d already heard the same thing from Ronald Reagan. What good does it do to dwell on the past? A passage from the National Archives, however, paints a vivid picture of what life was really like in Poston:

The relentless summer sun scorched the earth, and the frequent winds whipped the sands into blinding dust storms. In the winter, chilling gales easily penetrated the walls of the flimsily built tarpaper barracks and through the wide cracks in the flooring. The infrequent but torrential rains quickly turned the parched walkways and roads into a slippery, treacherous, and muddy quagmire. The extreme environmental conditions added to the hardships of internment.

When the war ended in 1945, the family moved back to the house they’d been renting on Ontare Road. Some of the neighbors objected, but their landlord told the complainers where to shove it. It was hardly the only time the Fukumuras experienced discrimination in the wake of the war. In one instance, when Tom and some friends were driving cross-country, they were chased from an Oklahoma gas station by an attendant with a gun.

Having been denied the opportunity to attend college, Roke followed in his father’s footsteps and tried his hand at farming, first at a property on El Sueno Road, where he rode a mule named Freddy and a horse named Pony, then in Fresno for a few years, where he grew watermelon. By 1950, he was back in town and had traded his mounts for a truck when he was hired by Harry Bowman at the banana house and wholesale produce market that eventually became Tri-County Produce.

Roke worked as Bowman’s buyer and was frequently on the road. He enjoyed his boss’s full confidence and, armed with a stack of blank checks, visited suppliers all over the region. He purchased carrots, cabbage, lettuce, celery, cucumber, tomatoes, and pumpkins from Lompoc; lettuce, squash, and beans from Santa Maria; cauliflower, broccoli, and strawberries from Guadalupe; and celery, romaine, and more cauliflower from Arroyo Grande. “I would take off at 5:30 in the morning and be back by 7:30 at night,” Roke said. “I put in a lot of hours.”

Roke was also starting a family. He was married in 1954 at the First Congregational Church and honeymooned for a week in Las Vegas. His son, Ron, was born two years later and his daughter, Sharon, the year after that. The marriage, however, was a painfully short one. With the children still very small, Roke’s wife realized family life was not for her and left them. Like his own father, Roke assumed the mantle of single dad and remained utterly devoted to his young ones. They went to Disneyland and always had a dog. He never remarried.

Roke climbed his way up to store manager, and in 1972, he was lured away by Santa Cruz Markets, who promised him less time on the road and more time with his kids. A few years later, he was picked up by Jordano’s Inc., where he remained until his “retirement” in 1991. It was then that Tri-County’s new owner, Jim Dixon, convinced Roke to come back and work for him.

The two were very close. Jim also came from modest means, and his father was also a farmer. “He treated me so nicely,” said Roke. “He was just super.” Three days a

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week, they would eat lunch at Carl’s Jr. up the block. They each got a burger, split a salad, and drank water, all for four dollars.

Jim’s son, John, met Roke when he was 8 years old at that point, Roke had already spent 50 years of his life in the Tri-County building and they quickly formed their own bond. The three became known as Los Tres Amigos, frequently spending holidays and other family gatherings together. Jim passed away six years ago, but John and Roke have soldiered on. John has recently made it a habit to hug his longtime pal every time he sees him.

As spry as he appears, Roke is thinking about hanging up his apron, this time for good. “When you get to be my age, you don’t have any fat anymore,” he said, rubbing his hip. “You’re all skin and bone.”

He also suffered a great personal tragedy not long ago that sapped some of his remaining strength. His son, Ron, with whom he shared his Berkeley Road home, died in June. He doesn’t like to talk about it.

Roke always doted on his children. He helped Ron finance an auto body shop, and when his daughter, Sharon, who lives in Camarillo, was starting her own family while trying to get a flower business off the ground, he drove south every week to babysit. He also helped care for his three older sisters during the last years of their lives. They each reached their mid-nineties. Now, Roke heaps his affection on his three grandkids, who love him right back.

If and when he actually retires, Roke will have more time to follow sports. And to offer his critiques. The Los Angeles Angels, for instance, need to rebuild their team in a bad way. While they have two powerhouses in Mike Trout and Shohei Ohtani, he said, the remaining roster are little more than journeymen. And don’t get him started on the Los Angeles Rams. “I used to be a fan, but something is wrong with them,” he said. “Their defense is terrible. Last year they were slaughtering quarterbacks, but this year they aren’t doing anything.”

But what really gets Roke’s goat is watching batters swing for the fences and hit nothing but air. “You don’t see .300 hitters anymore,” he said. “More like .240.” Like Cody Bellinger. “He swings so hard he misses. His head is all over the place. I think to myself, ‘Why don’t they watch the ball?’”

Maybe with more free time, he’ll travel a bit. See the world. Nah, he said. He once flew to Japan to visit his parents’ village but found the country too fast, too busy. On a trip to Hawai‘i, he grew bored. Santa Barbara is just right, he said. “I like it here.” n

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Shows on Tap Shows on Tap

12/22-12-23

Thu.: Corey Hugh Highberg, 7:309::30pm. Suggested donation: $10. Fri.: Shawn Jones Trio Christmas Party, 8-11:30pm. $20. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Ages 21+. Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com

12/22-12/23: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Thu.: Yules - Holiday Rock, 7-9pm: Fri.: The Last Decade, 8-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 324 4461. mspecialbrewco.com/state-sttaproom

12/23: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Blown Over, 5-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com/ goleta-calendar

12/23-12/24: Maverick Saloon

Fri.: The Robert Heft Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: The ’90s BaBiez Tribute Band, 9pmmidnight. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

12/22: 31st Annual Living Nativity Don’t miss your last chance to see the silent re-creation of the Holy Night with actors in costume along with live animals, such as camels, donkeys, sheep, and goats, that will surround the manger. 5:30-7:30pm. First United Methodist Church, 305 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 963-3579. tinyurl.com/31stLivingNativity

12/22-12/29: La La La Pop-Up Gallery View large-scale music and pop-related silkscreen works on canvas by artist Daniel Dens. The exhibition will show through December 31. Thu.-Sat.: 10am8pm; Sun.-Wed.: 11am-7pm. 931 State St. Free. Email info@danieldens.com. tinyurl.com/LaLaLaPopUp

12/22-12/23: A Cowboy Christmas The horse stable has been transformed into the North Pole with games, activities, music, the North Pole Café, Santa’s Speakeasy, Christmas-themed horse and pony encounters, and a visit from Santa! Visit the website to reserve your time slot. Goes through December 30. 2-8pm. River View Park, 151 Sycamore Dr.,

500 Niños Dr. Non-peak: free-$22; peak: free-$32. Call (805) 962-5339 or email zooinfo@sbzoo.org sbzoo.org/zoolights/

12/24: Cold Spring Tavern Jeffrey Pine, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

28 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CALENDAR COVID-19 VENUE POLICY As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. Volunteer Opportunity Fundraiser Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event. .
DEC. 22-28 12/22: Meal Ministry in the Park Join as the Meal Ministry partners with Trinity Lutheran Church to provide, prepare, and serve a meal to the unhoused neighbors in Alameda Park. Also participating will be the Neighborhood Navigation Center (NNC), a neighborhoodbased one-stop shop with services for those experiencing homelessness. Check the volunteer sign up for current opportunities. 3-7:30pm. Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St. Free trinitysb.org/upcomingevents THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm FRIDAY Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am SATURDAY Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm SUNDAY Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm TUESDAY Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm WEDNESDAY Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. (805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE
VICTORIA SNIDER by & TERRY ORTEGA
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116
Yanonali St.,
Free. Ages
Uptown Lounge The Trio,
12/23:
6-8pm.
E.
Ste. A-1.
21+. Call (805) 560-7254. urbanwinetrailsb.com/events 12/23:
5-7pm. 3126 State St. Free Call (805) 845-8800. uptownlounge805.com/events
Freedom Warming Centers S.B. County The mission of the Freedom Warming Centers is to relieve suffering and save lives of unsheltered homeless people on nights of severe weather conditions (forecast to be below 35 degrees or more than a 50 percent chance of rain). To donate clothing or other goods, contact Jill Drewisch at (805) 448-8020. Centers open through March 31, 2023. Hours: 6pm-6am. Carpinteria Community Church, 1111 Vallecito Rd., Carpinteria; Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State St.; Peace Lutheran Church, 1000 W. Ocean Blvd., Lompoc; S.B. Grogan Ctr., 1155 Rancho Verde, Santa Maria. Warming Ctr. Hotline (805) 324-2372. facebook.com/FreedomWarmingCenter
Buellton. GA: free$20; VIP: $49. Email bob@syvhorseback rides.com. syvcowboychristmas.com. 12/22-12/23,12/27-12/29: ZooLights The Zoo has transformed into an immersive magical world of lights, featuring handcrafted silk-covered lanterns lit with more than 50,000 LED bulbs that will showcase the African plains, the Outback, butterflies, and more through January 15, 2023! Reservations are required. 4:30-8:30pm. S.B. Zoo,
THURSDAY
12/22-12/24,
your reservation to experience over-the-top holiday decor, displays,
and more in collectable ceramic vessels (a portion of funds raised will go
Foundation’s Open for Good and Girls Rock S.B.). Open through December 31. Pearl Social, 131 Anacapa St., Ste. B. Free. Call (805) 284-0380 or email info@pearlsocialsb.com. pearlsocialsb.com
12/22
12/26-12/28: Miracle at the Funk Zone Make
and festive cocktails like Bad Santa, On Dasher,
to the James Beard
Lost Chord Guitar
Corey Hugh Highberg COURTESY COURTESY TERRY ORETGA

THE FRIDAY 12/23

SUNDAY 12/25

12/25: The Ritz-Carlton Bacara Christmas Buffet Gather with friends and family to enjoy all the traditional holiday favorites with live music playing in the background. 11:30am-9pm. The Bistro, The Ritz-Carlton Bacara S.B., 8301 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $95. Call (805) 571-4220. tinyurl.com/XmasBuffet

MONDAY 12/26

12/26: Liverpool vs Aston Villa Join the LFCSB Liverpool Supporter’s Club S.B. to watch Liverpool F.C. play Aston Villa F.C. 9:30am. S.B. Public Market, 38 W. Victoria St. Free tinyurl.com/LiverpoolSupporters

TUESDAY 12/27

12/23:

in release David Arkenstone will play chart-topping favorites, debut some of his neoclassical compositions that will feature strings, flutes, and percussion and play yuletide tunes. 7:30pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. GA: $28; VIP: $43. Call (805) 963-0408. centerstagetheater.org

12/23:

Wishfulfilling Jewel Prayers with Offerings

Engage in chanted meditations in a group setting as an offering as a “method for receiving attainments.” Make requests for yourself or for others who need help or protection in these prayers to purify negativity and fill your mind with positive, healing energy. Prayers are translated into English. 5-6:15pm. Mahakankala Buddhist Ctr., 1825 State St., Ste. 202. Free meditationinsantabarbara.org/calendar

SATURDAY 12/24

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 29
A Winter’s Eve Concert with David Arkenstone & Friends Five-time Grammy nominee with 60+ albums
of something yummy and have a bite while listening to the sounds of A Smooth Exchange.
Free
or
12/24-12/25: S.B. Zoo Open Christmas Eve and Christmas Day Spend some time at one of the most beautiful zoos around and check out all of you animal friends. 9:303:30pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free-$19.95. Call (805) 962-5339 or emai zooinfo@sbzoo.org. sbzoo.org 12/27: Yoga on the Rooftop Santa Barbara Beach Yoga invites you to this all-levels, fun, and light-hearted class that will offer invigorating Vinyasa flow to get your body and breath moving with a focus on alignment and building strength, confidence, and balance followed by restorative poses. 4-5pm. East Beach Cabrillo Pavilion Bathhouse Rooftop, 1118 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $20. santabarbarabeachyoga.com/calendar 12/23: Golden Arrow Pop-Up Stop by for a cup of java and to shop for last minute gifts such as candles, soaps, and bath products. 8am-noon. Handlebar Coffee Roasters, 2720 De la Vina St. Free. Email info@goldenarrowgoods.com goldenarrowgoods.com/events 12/23: Kerry Irish Productions Presents An Irish Christmas Take a journey through Christmas in Ireland with a spectacular high-energy display of Irish dancing at its very best. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $25-$75. Call (805) 963.0761. lobero.org/events COURTESY COURTESY COURTESY COURTESY Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Michael H Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286 Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict
H
Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286 Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict
H
Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286 Covid-19 Issues • Offering Video & Phone
WEDNESDAY 12/28 12/28: Live DJ Set Enjoy a glass
5:30-8:30pm. Satellite SB, 1117 State St.
. Call (805) 364-3043
email drew@satellitesb.com. satellitesb.com/collections/events
Michael
Kreitsek, MA
Michael
Kreitsek, MA
30 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC Season’s Greetings! Celebrate 150 Years of Live Performance Usher in 2023 with our amazing lineup of events! 10 10 2 19 3 8 4 12 F E B M A R M A R M A R M A R A P R M A R M A Y ARTURO SANDOVAL CHARLES LLOYD 85th Birthday Celebration TIERNEY SUTTON Paris Sessions Trio & Celebrating 30 years of The Tierney Sutton Band LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO LANCE BURTON & FRIENDS PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND THE DEREK DOUGET BAND CAMA & LOBERO THEATRE FDN PRESENT LOS ROMEROS GUITAR QUARTET MILT LARSEN TERRY HILL presents
in Town! Come Discover Come theCoolest Place Coolest Place Ice in Paradise is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization Tax ID #45-0508885

ICE SKATING IS FOR EVERYONE

I love gure skating because I can go fast and learn many new tricks.

Ice in Paradise has been a wonderful part of my life. The instructors and atmosphere are very supportive. It’s my happy place.

– Coleen Van Nostrand

HOCKEY BUILDS LIFELONG FRIENDSHIPS

I love hockey because it is fun and competitive, the other players are friendly, and the coaches are great!

“ ”

– Orin, 9 years old

“ ”

– Winter, 7 years old Ice in Paradise is a 501(c) 3 non-profit

Ice in Paradise welcomed me like family. They set me up on a team with some great people and I have had a blast every week since.

It’s great to play and then having a beer and a slice of pizza from the Cafe (which happens to be some of the best in town).

– Jordan DeVille

Tax ID #45-0508885
organization

COME SEE US SOON

“ ”

The friendly and knowledgeable staff at Ice in Paradise recommended the proper skates and lessons to match my granddaughter’s skill level. She has since developed a real passion for skating. It’s a pleasure to know that she is in a safe and friendly environment.

– Scott Rowland

Public Skating Schedule

DAILY PUBLIC SESSION

1:30pm - 4:30pm

COLLEGE NIGHT

Tuesdays 7 pm - 10 pm

TEEN NIGHT Fridays 7 pm - 10 pm

Host a Birthday Party or Plan a Private Event

“ ”

Our Ice in Paradise adventures began when our daughter found her ‘feet’ on the ice. She was instantly welcomed, mentored, challenged, and valued by the skating community the moment she stepped on the ice. She has made lifetime friends and gained such inspiration. It is a joy to watch!

– Sara Sanchez

INTERVIEW WITH OUR BOARD PRESIDENT

STEVE HEINZE

What does Ice in Paradise mean to you and your family?

Santa Barbara area has been our home since 2004, but for me, it didn’t become my hometown until 2015 when Ice in Paradise became a reality.

The rink has given me a purpose, a way to give back, a place to be challenged, a place of joy, a community. For our family it is our village that is helping raise our two youngest, who are still in high school. Our daughter is a figure skater and our son a hockey player.

What makes Ice in Paradise unique?

We are a non-profit. We are an indoor recreational facility that has something to offer all individuals, groups and families of any age. It is also one of the highest quality public ice skating facilities you may ever set foot in. It’s also definitely “cooler” than any place around!

Why should people come to Ice in Paradise?

You can get exercise, learn a new skill, compete, learn life lessons, make friends, be entertained or simply experience the joy of gliding across a shimmering sheet of frozen water. The best thing is that you become part of a positive, healthy, caring community.

Ice in Paradise is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization Tax ID #45-0508885

Board of Directors

Jack Norqual

Steve Heinze

Bryce Wendel

John Ewasiuk

Kathy Mintzer

Jonathan Steiner

Alison Juricek

Andy Katsev

Hod Dunbar

Board Chair President Co-Vice-President Co-Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Director Director Director

Left to Right - Caden, Gage, Steve, Eli, Sadie, & Lori Heinze Steve is a graduate of Boston College where he was an All American ice hockey player, Olympian in 1992, and played professionally for 12 NHL seasons.
Q Q Q
A A A
HOW YOU CAN HELP LEARN MORE: Visit us at
in
Support Ice in Paradise and help us create joy everyday!
Ice
Paradise 6985 Santa Felicia Drive Goleta, CA 93117 www.iceinparadise.org info@iceinparadise.org
Photos By:
⬔ Donate to our Annual Campaign ⬔ Sponsor a Dasher Board ⬔ Volunteer ⬔ Buy a Brick to be placed in our beautiful outdoor donor park
Ice in Paradise is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization Tax ID #45-0508885
Meg Sorel Photography
Ice in Paradise is a non-profit 501 (c) 3. We rely not only on rink user fees, but also importantly annual donations, grants, sponsorships, our Buy-A-Brick program, and continued community support. All donations are invested back into Ice in Paradise to ensure we have the highest quality programs, equipment and facilities available and accessible to all!

Culture living Keeping the Tomol Tradition Alive

from West Beach to Leadbetter, where even more friends and family were waiting for a potluck.

Cheers and yells echoed along the beach, and everybody lent a hand to lug the tomol up the sand and onto the grass. And although it was beautiful to see the tomol sitting there, the wood now dark and speckled with sand, there was an underlying feeling of sadness to the celebration as a group of people native to this land were now forced to reserve a spot along the beach that has been their home for centuries. As they circled for prayers and sang solemn songs, packs of beachside barbecuers partied loudly, gawked, and turned judgy eyes toward the group.

“I want to ask people of faith, how would your life be affected if you did not have the option to practice your culture and religion?” Jaimes said. “It takes meetings months in advance to get permits, and it’s regulated by the government just to sit and pray. But people are barbecuing and partying around you while you finally get to pray.”

It’s early Sunday morning in late November, and a closeknit group of Chumash friends, family, and elders have gathered together along the shores of West Beach on land that was originally the village of Syuxtun to prepare for a “village hop,” where the community paddles its traditional tomol, or canoe, between West Beach and Leadbetter.

Friends, Family, and Elders Take Part in ‘Village Hop’

Spenser Jaimes is a 20-year-old Šmuwič-Chumash documentarian and part of a new generation of Indigenous youth taking traditions and marrying them with the modern age. He made waves at the 2022 Santa Barbara International Film Festival with his first-ever short film, Connected by Water, which documented a traditional paddle-out into the Santa Barbara Channel by members of the Coastal Band of Chumash, Tongva, and Acjachemen tribal nations in their redwood-plank vessels.

Thousands of years ago, Jaimes says, the channel was packed with the tomols returning to shore packed with fish for the villages, back when golden poppies covered the island hillsides of Limuw (now known as Santa Cruz). On a clear day, you could see the flowers sparkling in the sun.

Now, Jaimes serves as the caretaker of the ‘Elye’wun, or “Swordfish,” and the Xax ‘Alolk’oy’, or “Great Dolphin,” the 25-foot-long tomols that he had spent the several past weeks sanding, repairing, and refinishing alongside fellow paddler Jack Castillo under the watchful eyes of his father, navigator David Jaimes, and tomol Captain Ray Ward, who built both tomols and is now passing on his knowledge to the next generation. “It’s their turn,” Ward says, as he

watches the crew ready the tomol for today’s trip.

It starts with filling sandbags. The paddlers for today’s journey Matt Murillo, Jack Castillo, Tommy Gomez, Krista Armenta-Belen, and Spenser and David Jaimes work with friends and family to pack 600 pounds of ballast. It’s a team effort, as is everything else that day. Each task is a community effort toward a community benefit, as it always has been in the Chumash culture. Now in the water, the Xax ‘Alolk’oy’ looks natural, and it sits in contrast to the sailboats, fishing boats, and catamarans in the harbor; its simple beauty stands out.

David Jaimes has been navigating the vessels for years, and his eyes glow as he watches his son take charge. It’s been a tough few years for the Chumash, with many family members and elders lost during the pandemic and community events like the tomol crossing put on hold for nearly three years. Today is the first time some of the paddlers and family members have seen each other in months. They jump in one at a time and each carry a paddle more than 10 feet long, all rowing in harmony as the tomol launches and makes its way onto the open water.

Back on the shore of West Beach, elders, friends, and aunties gather, waiting in excitement as the tomol makes its way around the breakwater. As the watercraft approaches, they chant songs to welcome the paddlers in. “This paddle was a day for us as Chumash people to gather and pray,” Spenser Jaimes says. “For me, this was a space to tell my community my intentions as a newly appointed caretaker of two of our tomols.” Jaimes’s intentions are to continue learning the art of tomol navigation and to revive their traditional purpose fishing in a way that can benefit the local community today.

After a few small trips out into the channel, in which a few newcomers (including this reporter) were invited to paddle inside the tomol an experience which is unlike any other, gliding smoothly along the water with nothing but the splashing of the paddles in sync and the islands on the horizon the crew prepared for the mile-long journey

“Everybody has a place to privately pray and practice their religion,” he continued. “Us native peoples are the only ones who do not have a place to practice, to continue our culture and religion privately. Our sacred sites and traditional villages are almost all on private property, where we are often forced to trespass to access places that we have been tending since time immemorial, or they are in public, where we are gawked at and questioned.”

Jaimes and the new generation of Chumash, including his cousins and family members who are part of bands not federally recognized or financially supported, are hoping to push for community spaces to gather and store materials.

“Our people need a community center to gather; we need a tomol house to safely store our tomols, perform maintenance, and process our fish,” he said.

In addition to pushing for space, the younger generation has also started a genuine effort to rename the Northern Channel Islands to their ancestral Chumash designations: Anyapax (Anacapa), Limuw (Santa Cruz), Wi’ma (Santa Rosa), and Tuquan (San Miguel). An online petition has garnered nearly 1,000 signatures so far.

Jaimes recently started a website where locals can support the tomols of Syuxtun and help the group purchase everything from life vests to radios to navigational tools that would allow them to undertake the traditional 26-mile crossing to the islands.

“We have no casinos or enterprises to financially support our canoes,” Jaimes explained. “So donations are crucial to non-federally recognized nations. All of us are full-time working-class people living paycheck to paycheck. Having an ancestral vessel and being modern people means we need modern tools and equipment to legally operate.”

But there is hope for the future, and nearly every elder gushed with pride to see Jaimes and the youth take on this new role. The day reinvigorated the sense of community, and by the end of it, everybody couldn’t wait to see each other for the next village hop, which Jaimes is hoping will be held in July.

Support the tomols of Syuxtun by visiting thingstogetme.com/syuxtun tomols. Sign the petition to rename the Northern Channel islands at tinyurl.com/channelislandspetition.

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 31 p. 31
From left to right: Matt Murillo, John Bear, Spenser Jaimes, David Jaimes, Jack Castillo, Ryan P. Cruz, Tommy Gomez, and Krista Armenta-Belen launch the Xax’ ‘Alolk’oy during the November “village hop.” PHOTOS
AVERY BARTHEL
32 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM in your inbox, every morning. INDEPENDENT.COM Get fresh news from Independent.com/newsletters Sign up for INDY TODAY! JENNIE K. WELSH MEDIATION welshmediation.com (805) 259-8097 Mission Street Ice Cream & Yogurt Featuring McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS! Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location An Ownedindependently & Operated Mission Street Ice Cream & Yogurt Featuring McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS! Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara 805.569.2323 An Ownedindependently & Operated Shopsince1986!

It was almost six years ago when Julie DeAngelis and Hugh Margerum gathered some friends to head down to East Beach across from the Chromatic Gate and jump into the chilly Pacific Ocean on New Year’s Day.

“We decided to make it an annual tradition,” explains Margerum of that 2017 origin story. “It’s a refreshing way to start the year off and brings people from all walks of life together.”

With the 2023 dip on the horizon, Margerum answered a few of our questions about “Polar Dip Santa Barbara,” to which all are invited.

How’s it work? Do you have to go overhead? The “official” rules: No wetsuits. Fully submerge. I’m making 50 commemorative buttons as a reward for dippers (while they last) and will have a few other prizes. Spectators are welcome to provide moral support, take photos, and partake in the festivities.

How many people come out? The first year, it was about five people, and it’s grown to about 30 or so. We now have a website (and a Facebook page) and have been promoting it on social media a lot more this year and expect it to attract a big crowd. We commit to dip rain or shine!

Are there any special treats or libations served before or after the affair? We provide some snacks and celebratory beverages, but encourage people to bring food and drink as well as a reusable cup and a beach chair.

What do you recommend dippers wear before, during, and after? As I said, no wetsuits, but bathing attire if one is going in the ocean, and warm festive attire for afterward. Prizes for most creative outfits!

How does this compare to other Polar Dips around the world? We sometimes are given grief for describing this as a Polar Dip when the ocean temperature is in the sixties and the photos show blue skies and palm trees in the background, but it is still a challenge that requires commitment and a bit of courage. I’ve been to a huge New Year’s Day dip at Venice Beach and hope our version keeps growing and brings the community together.

Any fun anecdotes from years past? Once, a participant did lose her bikini bottom in the rush to dive in, and she had to stay in the cold water until we were able to find it and get it back to her.

What else should we know? Julie DeAngelis and I want to use the event to contribute to a different local charity each year. We will be selling merchandise from Julie’s Parasols in Paradise line, and I will be selling my books on local plants with a portion of the sales going to support Adam’s Angels.

Santa Barbara’s Polar Dip is on January 1, 2023, at East Beach, across from the Chromatic Arch. Gather at 11 a.m. and the dip is at 11:30 a.m. sharp. See hmargerum.wixsite .com/my-site and facebook.com/sbpolardip.

Battery Embedded Electronics

Like toys, phones, smartwatches, and e-cigarettes

• Batteries that are placed permanently into an electronic device, typically rechargeable, but are sometimes single-use

• Batteries that are embedded in a device and can’t be removed should be disposed of as e-waste

EXCEPT

for e-cigarettes

E-cigarettes or other types of smoking devices are HAZARDOUS and can spark fires. NEVER place these in the trash or recycling bin. These must be disposed of at a hazardous waste facility. Visit www.LessIsMore.org/ hazardouswaste for recycling options near you.

• 20 David Love Place, Goleta, (805) 964-1498

• 132 Nopalitos Way, Santa Barbara, (805) 963-1852

Community Hazardous Waste Collection Center

• UCSB Campus at Mesa Rd., Bldg. 565, (805) 882-3602

Santa Ynez Valley Recycling and Transfer Station

• 4004 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos, (805) 686-5080

Waste Management Recycling Centers

• 1850 West Betteravia Rd., Santa Maria, (805) 922-9092

• 97 Commerce Dr., Buellton, (805) 688-7456

Help us STOP THE SPARK and recycle your batteries properly!

65% of fires at solid waste facilities are caused by batteries.

• Up to 92% of Li-ion batteries are thrown away where they risk being mishandled. Never place them in the trash.

• Mishandling of batteries causes them to spark. Fires can damage equipment, result in severe injuries, or can cause a wildfire

• 100% of materials in batteries can be reclaimed for making new batteries or base material for roads and bridges.

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 33 Outdoors
living
New Year’s Day Tradition Started in 2017
Join the
411 The Polar Dip participants from 2022 COURTESY ARE YOU HIRING? Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com Contact advertising@independent.com for more details and in-print rates Recharge Your Battery Knowledge! Batteries contain hazardous materials that pose a threat when improperly discarded. In California, we handle batteries as hazardous waste! Single Use — Includes Alkaline and Lithium Metal Make up about 90% of the battery market BUT take more energy to manufacture than the energy they produce. Rechargeable — Includes NickelCadmium (NiCd),Lithium-Ion (Li-ion), & Lead-Acid Much lower environmental impact and can be reused Curbside Battery Collection — Waste Management and MarBorg Customers ONLY Recycle your old batteries at home! TAPE the ends of the rechargeable batteries, BAG in a clear plastic bag, and PLACE ON TOP of your recycling bin on collection days. OR Drop them Off!
Polar Bear Dip
MarBorg ABOP Centers
RECOVERY in
Batteries can spark and cause a fire when thrown away. TYPES
BATTERIES EASY Battery Disposal Steps PLACE ON TOP of Recycling Bin! INDEPENDENT JR. PAGE 3 COL. 5.541” wide x 9.333” tall QUESTIONS? Call us at (805) 882-3602 or visit us online at www.LessIsMore.org Many other locations accept batteries for recycling. Visit www.LessIsMore.org/batteries for a complete list.
Battery
Santa Barbara County
OF

Black

Avatar Way of Water* (PG13): Fri-Sun: Fri, Sun-Thur: 12:45, 1:30/3D, 2:20, 4:00/3D, 5:00, 5:45/3D, 6:40, 8:20/3D, 9:15. Sat: 12:00/3D, 12:45, 1:30/3D, 2:20, 4:00/3D, 5:00, 5:45/3D, 6:40, 8:20/3D.

Upon opening as a delightful little lounge on Anacapa Street in 2014, Villa Wine Bar quickly amassed a loyal base of customers who come in regularly for their impressive wine list, Italian-inspired bites, and rotating selection of rare beers on tap. But owners Sean and Gabi Larkins were not immune from the “pandemic pivot” most restaurants had to take.

up and prime our palates for the delicious meal to come.

Another highlight was the delicious yellowtail carpaccio, bathed in a beautiful broth of scallions, red onion, and garlic vinaigrette. With one bite of this succulent and flavorful creation, I could tell why it was Gabi’s favorite dish.

“Because we only do this twice a month, our fish is extremely fresh,” Gabi said. “It melts in your mouth. Some of the fish we get are caught in the Santa Barbara ocean the day before our sushi night. You can definitely taste the freshness. And that’s why the carpaccio is so good.”

“During the pandemic, we had to innovate and create the best ideas to be able to survive,” explained Gabi, “something different than what we offered in the past.”

The couple turned to Florencio Bartolo, who’d honed his sushi skills at Arigato and Oku and offered to be a pop-up sushi chef for Villa. At first, they could only serve outdoors, which was perfect for summer, and the idea was a hit. The team continued to sling sushi every other Tuesday since, and it’s become so popular that seating is by reservation only and fills up quickly.

The menu is small but mighty, with a selection of changing items including appetizers, carpaccio, nigiri, and rolls. When I visited with a friend on a rainy fall night, Gabi greeted us with a warm smile that immediately melted any chill from the outdoors. As we tucked into our cozy corner table, I couldn’t help but feel that the buzzing excitement of diners throwing off their jackets and diving into a special meal gave the intimate lounge a decidedly N.Y.C. kind of vibe.

Other standouts included the umami-laden dancing eel roll a California roll topped with eel, avocado, and eel sauce and, of course, their signature Villa Roll, bursting with yellowtail, ahi, chives, cucumber, and avocado, and layered generously with fresh salmon on top. I could see why the owners had their names on this one. The artful presentation of green, red, and white sauces on either side of the roll provided a playful and tasty nod to the Italian roots of Villa.

As we finished our last roll, looking out at the rainy streets, I didn’t want to leave our super friendly, sushi-filled bunker, but I knew I could look forward to more pop-ups to come.

“My plan is to do pop-ups with different chefs around town on Sundays,” Gabi said. “I am still working on it but thought it would be a good way to get our community together.”

They recently hosted a Brazilian night for the first time, complete with Brazilian drinks, a Brazilian deejay, and Brazilian tapas. “Being from Brazil and knowing that S.B. has such a large Brazilian community, I want to do it once a month,” Gabi explained.

Bardo (R): Sat: 1:00, 4:30. Tue: 1:00, 4:30, 8:00.

All Quiet on the Western Front (R): Sun, Wed: 1:00, 4:30, 8:00.

Babylon* (R): Fri:, Sun-Thur 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30, 8:30. Sat: 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30.

Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (PG13): Fri, Sun-Thur: 12:45, 4:15, 7:45.

The drink menu is filled with options for every palate. The Beachwood Japanese Lager on tap provided a delightful sushi pairing, and my friend greatly enjoyed her sake from their special Tuesdaynight list.

Our meal started with possibly my favorite item of the whole night and one I’ve not seen on menus elsewhere: baked mussels, which were filled with crab meat, green onion, and spicy aioli. These overflowing shells were the ideal starter to warm us

With the influx of holiday parties that Villa hosts, their next sushi night will not be until January 17, and then they will continue on their every-otherTuesday schedule. In the meantime, Villa’s doors are open for Italian treats, a variety of beverages, and the couple’s ever-present warmth.

“Being a small family business, we like to be very personal and make our customers feel at home,” Gabi said. “We made lots of friends throughout the years at Villa Wine Bar.” 618 Anacapa St.; (805) 770-5283; villawinebar.com

34 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM
Night Sushi @ Villa Wine Bar FOOD & DRINK FOOD & DRINK Chef Florencio Bartolo Shares Skills at Downtown Lounge
Tuesday
pop-ups @BITEMESB 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800 FAIRVIEW METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection FIESTA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455 The Arlington Theatre PASEO NUEVO 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451 Whitney Houston: I Wanna Dance w Somebody* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:15, 4:30, 7:45. Puss in Boots* (PG): Fri/Sat: 1:05, 2:30, 3:45, 5:00, 6:15, 7:30. Sun-Thur: 12:00, 1:05, 2:30, 3:45, 5:00, 6:15, 7:30. HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512 The Whale* (R): Fri:, Sun-Thur 2:30, 5:15, 6:40, 8:00. Sat: 2:30, 5:15, 6:40. Empire of Light (R): Fri-Thur: 3:45. Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Dec 23 - 29, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes” www.metrotheatres.com
ANACAPA EATS: Chef Florencio Bartolo serves a variety of fresh sushi every other Tuesday night at Villa Wine Bar on Anacapa Street.
Fri,
in Boots* (PG): Fri,
Whitney Houston: I Wanna Dance w Somebody* (PG13):
Sun-Thur: 12:00, 2:00, 3:30, 5:15, 6:45, 8:30.Sat: 12:00, 2:00, 3:30, 5:15, 6:45. Puss
Sun-Thur: 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:00, 5:20, 6:30, 8:15. Sat: 2:15, 1:30, 2:45, 4:00, 5:20, 6:30. The Menu (R): Fri, Sun-Thur: 9:00. Pinocchio (PG13): Fri, Mon, Thur: 1:40, 4:20, 7:00.
Fabelmans
CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140 ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580
Way of Water*
THE WHALE AVATAR: WAY OF WATER WHITNEY HOUSTON I WANNA DANCE w SOMEBODY
Sat: 12:45, 4:15. The
(PG13): Fri, Sun-Thur: 12:40, 4:00, 7:20.Sat: 13:40, 4:00.
Avatar
(PG13): Fri: 3:15, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 11:00, 3:15. Mon-Thur: 11:00, 3:15, 7:30.
Babylon* (R): Fri, Sun-Thur: 1:30, 3:15, 5:30, 7:15, 9:15. Sat: 1:30, 3:15, 5:30, 7:15.
Avatar Way of Water* (PG13): Fri, Sun: 12:15, 1:15, 3:00/3D, 4:15, 5:15, 7:00/3D, 8:15, 9:30/3D. Sat: 11:00, 12:15, 1:15, 3:00/3D, 4:15, 5:15, 7:00/3D, 8:15. Mon-Thur: 11:00, 12:15, 1:15, 3:00/3D, 4:15, 5:15, 7:00/3D, 8:15, 9:30/3D.
NOW PLAYING
IN BOOTS
Panther: Wakanda Forever (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:00, 4:30, 8:00. THIS HOLIDAY
PUSS
BABYLON

Saint Remy to Open After Christmas

Saint Remy, a Mediterraneaninspired restaurant inside the new Courtyard Marriott at 1601 State Street and Arrellaga Street, is opening on Monday, December 26. It will be available for dining seven days a week for breakfast, and offers small bites the rest of the day. You can access the restaurant by entering through the main hotel entrance on State Street and walking through the lobby to the pool area. The restaurant is next to the pool. After your meal, feel free to journey up the stairs to their rooftop deck to enjoy the view.

The breakfast menu includes Churros Waffle (cinnamon and sugar pancake, dulce de leche, dark chocolate sauce, churro crumble), Caramelized Fig Waffle (buttermilk pancake, figs, toasted almonds, vanilla Anglaise, whipped honey butter), Nutella Crunch French Toast (Nutella-stuffed French toast, bananas, amaretti and hazelnut crumble, vanilla Anglaise), French Toast with Berries (French toast, berries, whipped cream, maple syrup), Choco Chip Pancake (chocolate chips, buttermilk pancake, whipped butter, maple syrup), Blueberry Pancake (blueberries, buttermilk pancake, whipped butter, maple syrup), Frittata (market vegetable, goat cheese, Calabrian chili hollandaise), Shakshuka Benny (sourdough, red pepper sauce, feta crumble, poached egg, cream cheese hollandaise), Farmhouse Sandwich (brioche, baked egg, cheddar, bacon, arugula, hollandaise), and Three Eggs Anyway (with potatoes, toast, jam).

“Saint Remy features the freshest locally sourced ingredients, delivered with a Mediterranean coastal twist,” says their website (saintremysb.com). “From breakfast through dinner, every meal is uniformly inventive and crafted with the rich history and culture of the coast. Our cocktail menu offers the familiarity of classics like the Old Fashioned while introducing signature sippers like our debut, Bad Entropy. Our wines are sourced from local vintners such as One Stone Cellars, as well as from Argentina, Spain, and Oregon. With an easygoing and retro-inspired design, Saint Remy makes private parties, date nights, a gathering of friends, and even business meetings comfortable and noteworthy with a relaxed sensibility and palate that is uniquely Santa Barbara.”

CHRISTMAS EVE AT FINCH & FORK: Finch & Fork will be hosting a holiday meal in their recently redesigned space within the Kimpton Canary Hotel. Christmas Eve dinners by reservation will take place December 24, with seatings between 3:30-7:30 p.m. at 31 West Carrillo Street.

The menu pulls inspiration from traditional Christmas dishes and seasonal winter ingredients with a California flair for $140 per person. Wine pairings can be enjoyed with each of their dishes for an additional $50.

Menu items range from Chicken Liver Pâté served with Pomegranate Gelee, Grilled Rustic Sourdough Crispy Shallots, and Prosecco Vinegar, as well as an Eggnog Milkshake with Salted Cara-

mel and Shortbread Streusel Torched Merengue. Also offered are holiday dishes like a Herb-Crusted Prime Rib with White Chocolate Mashed Potatoes, Crispy Brussels Sprouts, Sherry Molasses, Horseradish, and Natural Jus and the Chocolate S’more Budino with Graham Cracker and Chantilly.

FOOD & DRINK

SEAR STEAKHOUSE LAUNCHES WEEKEND

BRUNCH

+ HAPPY HOUR: Chef Nate Peitso, chef/owner of Solvang’s Sear Steakhouse at 478 4th Place in Solvang has expanded the restaurant’s service and hours with the introduction of a weekend brunch and a weekend happy hour, the latter offered only at the bar. The new weekend brunch runs 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday; $50 per person includes a three-course menu (choose one item from each menu section), coffee, and a glass of sparkling wine or rosé, plus the option of a $40 per person addon of bottomless Mimosas, Bloody Marys, and/or S.Y.V. Sangria Blanca. Chef Nate also introduced a new happy hour promo, served only at the steakhouse bar, Saturdays and Sundays from 2-5 p.m. Happy hour includes drink deals (such as $5 beers) plus bar bites like a signature double smash burger ($12).

TEXAS TACOS LEAVES LAKE PARDALL: Last January, Texas Tacos opened on the shores of Lake Pardall, at 910 Embarcadero del Norte, and unfortunately the eatery has set sail for calmer seas. Lake Pardall is on its way to becoming a recreational facility in the heart of Isla Vista, likely someday being known for swimming, boating, and fishing, during the rainy season. However, neighboring businesses like Campus Cuts, Dublins, and Precious Slut Tattoo & Body Piercing, would prefer that it remain in its natural state, a parking lot, year-round so their customers can use it. But their pleas to landlord University of California Santa Barbara for more than a decade, to fill in the ever-growing hole with asphalt, have fallen on deaf ears. UCSB should consider fixing it soon because if endangered species like the snowy plover start nesting there, its parking lot days could be gone forever.

FOOD & DRINK

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 35
John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.
COURTESY HEAVENLY BREAKFAST: The new Courtyard Marriott at the corner of Arrellaga and State Streets is launching Saint Remy restaurant this month.
SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

R.E.S.P.E.C.T. BRINGS THE LEGENDARY ARETHA FRANKLIN TO LIFE

THEATRICAL CONCERT IS PART OF THE BROADWAY SERIES AT THE GRANADA

The legend of Aretha Franklin continues to loom large, following last year’s Jennifer Hudson film Respect, Cynthia Erivo in the National Geographic mini-series Genius: Aretha, and the Sydney Pollack documentary Amazing Grace, we now have the musical tribute R.E.S.P.E.C.T., a brand-new theatrical production coming to the Granada January 3-4, 2023.

While this show based on the hit Australian musical, RESPECT The Aretha Franklin Story, director Christina Sajous (SpongeBob SquarePants, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, American Idiot, Baby It’s You) has made some key adjustments for the American tour.

“What we discovered by seeing the show have a few runs in the past six, seven weeks, was that it seemed like audiences were attracted to all the characters in the show, because it’s kind of built with three backup singers and one lead singer. But now we’ve given the artists an opportunity to actually sing more of her music and be more intricate in the way that we tell the story it’s not really about one person playing Aretha. It’s actually who is the Aretha in all of us even if you’re a man, okay, so the story has become a little bit more universal,” said Sajous.

“No one’s playing Aretha. It’s kind of playing the spirit and voice of Aretha and how the story informs that song or that

music or who is singing it in that moment.”

With fully choreographed beloved Aretha Franklin hits like, “Natural Woman,” “I Knew You Were Waiting for Me,” “Chain of Fools,” “Respect,” and many more, Sajous described the show as “a theatrical concert,” with “intricate storytelling and design.”

As for her favorite number by the Queen of Soul, “I say ‘Natural Woman.’” says Sajous. “Not only is it my favorite song, but I’ve also noticed it’s one of the most attractive parts of our show, because it’s stripped down. And it really is just about three women singing at a piano. I want it to capture

the raw sensibility of how women express themselves, and to celebrate the female voice navigating that through those lyrics. … I would say it’s become one of my favorite numbers not only in the creative process, but also witnessing it come alive in the theater is so thrilling, because it’s exactly what I wanted that moment to be I wanted it to feel personal.”

R.E.S.P.E.C.T. is presented as part of the Broadway in Santa Barbara Series at The Granada Theatre, January 3-4. For more information, visit granadasb.org.

They say the eyes are the window to the soul, and an exhibition at the Thomas Reynolds Gallery is offering viewers a glimpse into the spiritual recesses of nearly 50 endangered animals. Eye Am features 47 small, round paintings, each a close-up of an animal’s eye a bonobo, an Asian elephant, a green sea turtle, and more. Together, they were created by artists Nancy Taliaferro and Caroline Thompson. The concept is rooted in the “lover’s eye” paintings popular during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. “The tiny painted eye of a beloved, in many manifestations, was worn as a brooch, often surrounded in gold pearls and precious stones,” said Taliaferro. She and Thompson had the idea to do the same with animals’ eyes, to speak both to their beauty and to their suffering. “We embarked upon the Eye Am initiative to honor these individuals whose very existence is endangered,” she added.

The artists met when Thompson, a novelist, film director, and producer who is best-known for having written the screenplays for Edward Scissorhands and The Nightmare Before Christmas, enrolled in one of fine artist Taliaferro’s oil painting classes. “Lucky me, I met a kindred spirit on many levels,” Taliaferro said. “We quickly discovered our shared love and compassion for animals.”

The exhibition continues through the end of December, and proceeds benefit the Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network.

But the show is only one element of the larger project. Even after the exhibition closes, Eye Am will live on digitally with a website full of games, other learning activities, and material about each endangered species.

“Educating and inspiring children is a very big component of the Eye Am initiative,” said Thompson. “We would like to encourage entire families to learn and to be

enlightened.” To that end, they have created a free video matching game for little ones that can be downloaded by anyone from the app store of their choice and that they plan on distributing to every school system and children’s museum in the country. In the game, players match Thompson’s and Taliaferro’s painted eyes to illustrations of the animals.

“We also have a weekly ever-changing Wordle challenge for older kids,” Thompson said. “Our aim is to get that into homerooms in middle and high schools in order to spark discussion and to develop awareness.”

They also seek to engage sustainability clubs at high schools that have them, providing member students with presentation materials they can share with elementary schools in their areas. “The idea,” Thompson said, “is to have the older kids expose the younger kids to the situation that will be theirs to address before they know it, to develop the understanding that we are a wildly interconnected and interdependent world, and to help the little ones find compassion for the creatures we are so in danger of losing forever.”

As Taliaferro noted, the pair hopes their project will sound an alarm. “We want to raise awareness about these beautiful animals through art, beauty, and play,” she said. “We hope that looking into their eyes will encourage a joining together for good, in both adults and children.”

36 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM MORE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT >>>
L I F E PAGE 36 JULIA DRUMMOND
OF THE ENDANGERED SPECIES EYE AM EXHIBIT BRINGS ATTENTION TO ANIMALS’ PLIGHT 4·1·1 Eye Am: Paintings of the Eyes of Endangered Species is on view at Thomas Reynolds Gallery (1331 State St., thomasreynolds.com) through December 31. For more information about the artist and the Eye Am initiative, visit eyeam.art.
EYES
NANCY TALIAFERRO AND CATHERINE CAROLINE THOMPSON PHOTOS

SANTA BARBARA READS

Our 2022 Roundup of Books by Local Authors

December is a great time to buy books as gifts, as well as to restock your own shelves and bedside tables with some enticing reads. Here’s a peek at what some of our local scribes will have been up to in 2022, and what you can find in bookstores this season.

Historical Fiction

Meeting Mozart: A Novel Drawn from the Secret Diaries of Lorenzo Da Ponte by Howard J. Smith spans generations and involves Mozart, mysteries, masquerades, opera, and spies. Bedtrick by Jinny Webber takes place in the London stage world of Shakespeare. Front Row Rebel by Loretta Redd is a front-row view of how cinema and society shaped each other. The Whisper of a Distant God by David L. Gersh is the story of the little-known War of New Mexico. Clara’s Secret by Stephan R. Frenkel is the story of a young woman living in Berlin during Belle Époque.

Nonfiction

Cinephiles will enjoy Cinema in Flux, Santa Barbara International Film Festival Executive Director Roger Durling’s thoughtful collection of movie recommendations that also served as a pandemic diary of sorts, in addition to raising funds for the film festival.

Another beautiful coffee-table book, The Fig District by architect Jeff Shelton, shares the colorful backstory behind eight of his most playful and exuberant buildings, all of which are within walking distance of each other and his downtown Fig Avenue office. The book also includes a walking tour map to help readers explore El Jardin, Cota Street Studios, El Zapato, Vera Cruz, the Ablitt Tower, El Andaluz, and the Pistachio House, as well as requiem to the now-closed Casa Blanca Restaurant.

Additional beautiful coffee-table books with a Santa Barbara spin are: Montecito Style: Paradise on California’s Gold Coast, with photographer Firooz Zahedi and writer Lorie Dewhirst Porter capturing the unique loveliness of 20 distinct area homes and estates; artist Richard Schloss’s treatise on the way we perceive light and atmosphere, Painting the Light, which explores how he’s been painting that light for the last 50 years; Lotusland: Eccentric Garden Paradise, a stunning creation by photographer Lisa Romerein and the Lotusland team as a welcome addition to any garden lover’s home; Santa Barbara and Beyond: The Photography of Mike Eliason, which takes a look

at our town through the lens of the longtime local photographer; Rancho Sisquoc: Enduring Legacy of an Historic Land Grant Ranch by Chase Reynolds Ewald, which history buffs will appreciate; Africa by Andrew Antone and Patrick Antone, which provides a visual safari to the second-largest continent on Earth and gives half the proceeds to the Santa Barbara Zoo.

Other real-life tales include: Spies on the Sidelines: The HighStakes World of NFL Espionage by Kevin Bryant; ‘Richard Eager’: A Pilot’s Story from Tennessee Eagle Scout to General Montgomery’s Flying Fortress by Richard Ernest Evans and Barbara Evans Kinnear; Werewolf: The True Story of an Extraordinary Police Dog by David Alton Hedges; Sinkable: Obsession, the Deep Sea, and the Shipwreck of the Titanic by Daniel Evan Stone; The Premonition: A Pandemic Story by Michael Lewis; Mavericks, Mystics, and Misfits: Americans Against the Grain by Arthur Hoyle; and A Spy in Plain Sight: The Inside Story of the FBI and Robert Hanssen America’s Most Damaging Russian Spy by Lis Wiehl.

In the spiritual/self-help realm, check out: A Map to Your Soul: Using the Astrology of Fire, Earth, Air, and Water to Live Deeply and Fully by Jennifer Freed, PhD; Trusting the Dawn: How to Choose Freedom and Joy After Trauma by Mary Firestone; Yes She Can: Biblical and Practical Reflections on Women in Leadership in the Church by John Jenks; The Thread: Let God Into Your Heart And Achieve Intentional Transformation by Leonie H. Mattison; At Heaven’s Door: What Shared Journeys to the Afterlife Teach About Dying Well and Living Better by William J. Peters; Outposts of Change: How to Create a Morally Rich, Socially Just Society in Harmony with Nature and Why We Must by Benjamin R. Wiener; and The Surfer and the Sage: A Guide to Survive & Ride Life’s Waves by Shaun Tomson and Noah benShea.

Additional nonfiction titles include: Movies & Million-Dollar Mansions: Silent Movies Made in Montecito by Independent columnist Betsy J. Green; Medicinal Herbs of California: A Field Guide to Common Healing Plants by Lanny Kaufer; Hike the Channel Islands by John McKinney and Chuck Graham; Conspiracy: Why the Rational Believe the Irrational by Michael Shermer; The Accidental Ecosystem by Peter Alagona; Rincon Point by Vincent Burns and Stephen Bates; Caren Rideau: Kitchen Designer, Vintner, Entertaining at Home by Caren Rideau; Cramm This Book: So You Know WTF Is Going On in the World Today by Olivia Seltzer; The Shame Machine: Who Profits in the New Age of Humiliation by Cathy O’Neil; The Bankers’ Blacklist by Julia C. Morse; and Healing Grounds: Climate, Justice, and the Deep Roots of Regenerative Farming by Liz Carlisle.

Memoir & Autobiography

The Sedgwick family’s connections to Santa Barbara run deep, so Alice Sedgwick Wohl’s new book, As It Turns Out: Thinking About Edie and Andy is particularly fascinating. Wohl writes about her sister Edie Sedgwick and her muse-like relationship with Andy Warhol as if she were telling the story to their brother Bobby, who died in a motorcycle accident in 1965, just before their sister met Warhol.

A fascinating and funny read (even for non-baseball lovers like me), Ron Shelton’s The Church of Baseball: The Making of Bull Durham: Home Runs, Bad Calls, Crazy Fights, Big Swings, and a Hit tells the behind-the-scenes story of the writer-director’s classic Bull Durham

Lemons and Ladybugs is a one-of-a-kind personal story by Mike Critelli about piecing together someone’s life through one-on-one interviews with close friends, Facebook posts, and phone-call transcripts when they’re already gone.

Other memoirs include: Off-Script: a Mom’s Journey Through Adoption, a Husband’s Alcoholism, and Special Needs Parenting by Valerie Cantella; American as Apple Pie by Rodney H. Chow; Spiritual Growth Through Travels, Nature, and Living Life by Lance T. Crawford; From Where I Sit: Essays/Art by Judy Ann Gilder; Building Community: Answering Kennedy’s Call by Harlan Russell Green; Dancing on Waves: A True Story of Finding Love & Redemption in the Ocean by Hillary Hauser; Blood from a Stone by Adam McHugh; Rough Draft by UCSB grad Katy Tur; Through the Dark by Yolanda Nava; and From WHITE to BLACK: One Life Between Two Worlds by Iris Rideau.

Autobiographies include: Your Path of Best Existence: A Medical Guide’s Roadmap by Glenn Wollman with Tracey Davis; Once Upon a Kentucky Farm: Hope and Healing from Family Abuse, Alcoholism, and Dysfunction by Connard Hogan; and Tales of Al: The Water Rescue Dog by Lynne Cox.

Poetry

Among the notable poetry titles this year: An Imaginary Affair: Poems Whispered to Neruda by Diana Raab; Free at Last: A Juneteenth Poem by Sojourner Kincaid Rolle; and The End of Michelangelo by Dan Gerber.

While every attempt has been made to make this list as comprehensive as possible, if we left your book out, please email arts@independent.com and we’ll update the list.

INDEPENDENT.COM DECEMBER 22, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT 37 EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM
MORE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT >>>

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries author Eric G. Wilson has written a book that I might typically recommend to 40 percent of the Aries tribe. But in 2023, I will raise that to 80 percent of you. The title is How to Be Weird: An Off-Kilter Guide to Living a One-of-a-Kind Life. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it will make sense for you to stop making sense on a semi-regular basis. Cheerfully rebelling against the status quo should be one of your most rewarding hobbies. The best way to educate and entertain yourself will be to ask yourself, “What is the most original and imaginative thing I can do right now?”

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): One of your potential superpowers is cultivating links between the spiritual and physical worlds. If you develop this talent, you illuminate the ways that eternity permeates the everyday routine. You weave together the sacred and the mundane so they synergize each other. You understand how practical matters may be infused with archetypal energies and epic themes. I hope you will be doing a lot of this playful work in 2023, Taurus. Many of us non-Bulls would love you to teach us more about these mysteries.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Here are fun and useful projects for you to cultivate in 2023: (1) Initiate interesting trends. Don’t follow mediocre trends. (2) Exert buoyant leadership in the groups you are part of. (3) Practice the art of enhancing your concentration by relaxing. (4) Every Sunday at noon, renew your vow to not deceive or lie to yourself during the coming week. (5) Make it your goal to be a fabulous communicator, not just an average one. (6) Cultivate your ability to discern what people are hiding or pretending about.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): In 2023, I hope you will refine and deepen your relationship with your gut instinct. I will be ecstatic if you learn more about the differences between your lucid intuition and the worry-mongering that your pesky demons rustle up. If you attend to these matters and life will conspire to help you if you do your rhythm will become dramatically more secure and stable. Your guidance system will serve you better than it ever has. A caveat: Seeking perfection in honing these skills is not necessary. Just do the best you can.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Psychiatrist and author Irvin Yalom wrote, “The question of meaning in life is, as the Buddha thought, not edifying. One must immerse oneself into the river of life and let the question drift away.” But Holocaust survivor and philosopher Viktor Frankl had a radically different view. He said that a sense of meaning is the single most important thing. That’s what sustains and nourishes us through the years: the feeling that our life has a meaning and that any particular experience has a meaning. I share Frankl’s perspective, and I advise you to adopt his approach throughout 2023. You will have unprecedented opportunities to see and know the overarching plan of your destiny, which has been only partially visible to you in the past. You will be regularly blessed with insights about your purpose here on earth.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): As a young woman, Virgo-born Ingeborg Rapoport (1912-2017) studied medicine at the University of Hamburg in Germany. But in 1938, the Nazis refused to let her defend her PhD thesis and get her medical degree because of her Jewish ancestry. Seventy-seven years later, she was finally given a chance to finish what she had started. Success! The dean of the school said, “She was absolutely brilliant. Her specific knowledge about the latest developments in medicine was unbelievable.” I expect comparable developments for you in 2023, Virgo. You will receive defining opportunities or invitations that have not been possible before. Postponed breakthroughs and resolutions will become achievable.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Of the 2,200-plus humans quoted in a 21stcentury edition of Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations, 164 are women a mere 7 percent! At least that’s more than the four females represented in 1855’s first edition. Let’s take this atrocious injustice as our provocation for your horoscope. In accordance with astrological omens, one of your assignments in 2023 will be to make personal efforts to equalize power among the genders. Your well-being will thrive as you work to create a misogyny-free future. Here are possible actions: If you’re a woman or nonbinary person, be extra bold and brave as you say what you genuinely think and feel and mean. If you’re a man, foster your skills at listening to women and nonbinary people. Give them abundant space and welcome to speak their truths. It will be in your ultimate interest to do so!

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): To prepare you for 2023, I’m offering you wisdom from mythologist Michael Meade. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Scorpios will be most likely to extract riches from it. Meade writes: “Becoming a genuine individual requires learning the oppositions within oneself. Those who fail or refuse to face the oppositions within have no choice but to find enemies to project upon. ‘Enemy’ simply means ‘not-friend’; unless a person deals with the not-friend within, they require enemies around them.”

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I will always be as difficult as necessary to achieve the best,” declared Sagittarian opera singer Maria Callas (1923-1977). Many critics say she was indeed one of the 20th century’s best. The consensus is that she was also a temperamental prima donna. Impresario Rudolf Bing said she was a trial to work with “because she was so much more intelligent. Other artists, you could get around. But Callas you could not get around. She knew exactly what she wanted and why she wanted it.” In accordance with astrological omens, Sagittarius, I authorize you, in your quest for success in 2023, to be as “difficult” as Callas was, in the sense of knowing exactly what you want. But please so as to not undermine your success don’t lapse into diva-like behavior.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): To inspire your self-inquiry in 2023, I have chosen a passage from Hermann Hesse’s fairy tale “A Dream Sequence.” It will provide guidance as you dive further than ever before into the precious mysteries in your inner depths. Hesse addressed his “good ardent darkness, the warm cradle of the soul, and lost homeland.” He asked them to open up for him. He wanted them to be fully available to his conscious mind. Hesse said this to his soul: “Just feel your way, soul, just wander about, burrow into the full bath of innocent twilight drives!”

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Cardiovascular surgeon Michael DeBakey lived ’til age 99. He almost died at 97 but was able to capitalize on an invention that he himself had created years before: a polymer resin that could repair or replace aging blood vessels. Surgeons used his technology to return him to health. I am predicting that in 2023, you, too, will derive a number of benefits from your actions in the past. Things you made, projects you nurtured, and ideas you initiated will prove valuable to you as you encounter the challenges and opportunities of the future.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): I decided to divine the state of your financial karma. To begin, I swirled a $10 bill through the flame rising from a green candle. Then I sought cosmic auguries in the burn patterns on the bill. The oracle provided bad news and good news. The bad news is that you live on a planet where one-fifth of the population owns much more than four-fifths of the wealth. The good news is that in 2023, you will be in decent shape to move closer to the elite one-fifth. Amazingly, the oracle also suggests that your ability to get richer quicker will increase in direct proportion to your integrity and generosity. Homework:

life is most worthy of you unleashing a big “Hooray!”? Testify! Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

38 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM
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PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1‑877‑806‑0935 (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET). Computer with internet is required. (Cal‑SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

history background check. Position is 50% FTE (20 hrs/wk). $27.56/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 46415

applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/16/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 46628

applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job #41572

Application review begins 1/5/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 46743

DIGITAL SYSTEMS & DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP SPECIALISTHYBRID/REMOTE

ENGLISH DEPARTMENT

The Digital Systems & Digital Scholarship Specialist manages all services and systems supporting

research, instruction, and administrative functions for the English Department and the South Hall Administrative Support Center (SASC), while coordinating with UCSB’s College of Letters & Science IT unit in its role of supporting common operational and technical resources. The Digital Systems & Digital Scholarship Specialist divides their time between 1) maintaining high availability of the English Department’s many research and

ASSISTANT TO THE CHAIR ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT OF TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

DIRECTOR

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH

A wonderful opportunity for someone passionate about human rights, who enjoys engaging the local community, fundraising and outreach. The job entails excellent communication and time management skills, an eye for detail, and data‑driven strategic planning. For more information and to submit an application, please visit https://boards.greenhouse. io/humanrightswatch/ jobs/6416736002

FINANCE

OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

PROFESSIONAL

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR

GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT

Works closely with the Director of the Center to manage spatial@ucsb’s administrative functions. Serves as the primary contact for the Center and organizes events and meetings, technology demonstrations, and outreach activities to pull in researchers both on and off campus. Researches extramural funding opportunities and assists with the development of proposals in coordination with the C&G Manager in Geography. Arranges and processes travel advances, reimbursements and other payments as needed. Prepares graphics and layout for hard copy printed material and web pages. Coordinates all professionally prepared print jobs. Plans and coordinates with all department visitors to ensure all visa, space, and computing needs are met in a timely manner. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/ or experience. 1‑3 years experience with project management. 1‑3 years experience in financial and cost accounting and financial analysis.

Notes Satisfactory conviction

Provides administrative support, including composing memos, scheduling appointments, making travel arrangements, submitting reimbursements, preparing and formatting reports, gathering and formatting statistical data, and helping make arrangements for faculty‑sponsored events. Duties are varied and require a high level of interpersonal skills in representing the Chair’s office. Uses good judgment and maintains confidentiality in dealing with faculty, potential faculty, prestigious visitors and other campus and community representatives. Responsible for assisting faculty and visitors with travel arrangements. Processes all departmental travel and entertainment reimbursements. Position also provides support to professors including, calendaring, copying, inquiries, parking needs for their visitors, housing/hotel reservations for their post‑docs and visitors, maintenance of publication files, and submission of bio‑bibs for merits and promotions. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. Knowledge of administrative procedures and processes including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted pay range $26.09 ‑ $27.32/hr. Full salary range as identified in TCS is $26.09 ‑ $37.40/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified

CLINICAL SOCIAL

WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS ANALYST

COMPUTER SCIENCE

Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California at all times during employment. Master’s degree from an accredited school of social work; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Three years of post‑master’s experience; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season.

Must have a current CA Licensed Clinical Social Worker license at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified

NOW HIRING

Responsible for developing and submitting research proposals, awards and/or transactions related to contract and grant management and maintains contract and grant records in compliance with institutional and research sponsor policies. Works on proposals of moderate scope such as single investigator NSF proposals where analysis of financial information or reports require review of a variety of factors (e.g. budgets, salaries, expenses, etc.) Receives assignments and analyzes problems, gathers data and information, and recommends solutions. Completes transactions for signature by manager or authorized institutional official. Maintains effective working relationships and coordinates closely with Principal Investigator, department staff, Office of Research, other campus central and academic departments. Is independently responsible for gift processing and projecting salary, benefits, tuition, and fees in GUS. Prepares subaward invoices for payment. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience. Working knowledge of and experience with financial accounting, analysis and reporting techniques. Notes: This position is funded through June 30, 2024 pending further funding. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted salary range $27.68 ‑ $30.45/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

CALENDAR ASSISTANT

The Independent is hiring a part-time calendar assistant to provide support to the calendar editor in getting The Week section to print by curating events and images and writing descriptions. This position assists in maintaining the online calendar and with special issues and guides such as Wedding, Summer Camp, Fiesta, Halloween, and ‘Tis the Season. The calendar assistant helps maintain and contribute to the sbindependent_events Instagram account.

Calendar Assistant skills and abilities include:

• Writing skills and the ability to follow style guidelines

• Ability to communicate with the community via email and phone regarding events

• Ability to create and maintain databases and other documents as needed

• Ability to work on multiple projects and meet deadlines

• Support in daily, weekly, project, and department goals

• Attention to detail, initiative and follow-through Please email resume and/or questions

NOW HIRING

Inside Sales Administrator

The Independent is seeking an inside sales administrator to join its sales team. This role is responsible for prospecting advertising clients, collecting and processing legal notices, classified ads, open house listings, and maintaining and fulfilling our print subscription database. This position will work full time in our downtown Santa Barbara office, ready to greet and assist our readers and customers.

Qualified candidates must have a positive attitude and need to be self-motivated and highly organized with outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Responsibilities include providing excellent customer service (through email, on the phone and inperson), attending weekly sales meetings, and data entry with strong attention to detail. Must also be able to work under pressure in a deadline-driven environment and have a basic understanding of marketing and sales.

Compensation will be hourly + commission. Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance, Section 125 cafeteria plan, 401(k), and vacation program.

Please introduce yourself, reasons for interest, and a brief summary of your qualifications, along with your résumé to hr@independent.com No phone calls, please. EOE m/f/d/v.

40 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM 40 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT
Continued on p. 42
to hr@independent.com
40 THE INDEPENDENT 22, INDEPENDENT.COM CLASSIFIEDS | PHON E 805-965-5205 | ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM

ANNOUNCEMENTS

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“Round and Round” this counts double. LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: Across 1. New England soccer squad, for short 5. Astound 9. Messes (up) 14. Cookie that puts filling inside wafers 15. New Haven collegians 16. “Take ___ at it” 17. Sale spot 18. Ductwork opening 19. Dietary no-no for some 20. Air conditioning that doesn’t move? 23. One of the “Breakfast Club” archetypes 24. Abbr. for the president 25. Simple solid figure 28. “Stay (I Missed You)” singer Lisa 30. Pants pocket locale 33. Rush drummer Neil 34. “Awesome,” online 35. Verdi’s classic 38-Down 36. New York baseball player publicly displays affection? 39. Charitable gps. 40. They’re specialized for Big Macs 41. Rhythmic beat 42. Super-secret intelligence gp. 43. “Antony and Cleopatra” creatures 44. Talenti product 45. Get up 47. Muppet oatmeal lover 48. Ruling family full of cows? 53. Diamond center 54. Candy in a cylinder 55. Serious troubles 57. Lennox of the Eurythmics 58. Singer Levine in a recent texting scandal 59. Scheme 60. Concluding passages 61. Ex-heavyweight champ Riddick 62. “All the Young Dudes” group ___ the Hoople Down 1. “Succession” surname 2. Periods of distinction 3. Skateboarding version in the X Games, but not the Olympics 4. Fountain workers in the 1950s 5. Smartphone, e.g. 6. Smart one? 7. Sunscreen element 8. “___ Perpetua” (Idaho motto) 9. Fill-in-the-blanks story 10. Bolt like lightning? 11. Furry South American rodent 12. Japanese synthesizer brand since the 1960s 13. Porcine pen 21. Austrian cake 22. Kitchen sponge brand 25. Observe with secret cameras, perhaps 26. Fruit cocktail ingredients 27. Linger 28. Has a tendency 29. Has the deed to 31. “That is,” classically 32. 1990s Toyota model 34. Keurig pod 35. Late-night Cartoon Network programming 37. “The Beverly Hillbillies” actor 38. “Antony and Cleopatra,” e.g. 43. Private lines 44. What 2022 Nobel Prize winner Svante Pääbo has worked on mapping for Neanderthal Man 46. Ancient region of Turkey for which a sea is named 47. Club regulation 48. Bi-, bifurcated 49. Capture the attention of 50. Pigeon’s extinct cousin 51. List header 52. Chuck with force 53. Cheese partner 56. It peaks at 1600, for short ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1114 Day High Low High Low High Thu 22 1:21 am 2.2 7:49 am 6.9 3:17 pm -1.5 9:53 pm 3.7 Fri 23 2:06 am 2.2 8:33 am 7.0 4:03 pm -1.7 10:44 pm 3.7 Sat 24 2:54 am 2.3 9:19 am 7.0 4:51 pm -1.7 11:36 pm 3.7 Sun 25 3:47 am 2.4 10:09 am 6.8 5:41 pm -1.5 Mon 26 12:30 am 3.8 4:47 am 2.5 11:01 am 6.3 6:32 pm -1.1 Tue 27
am 4.0 5:59 am 2.6
am 5.6
pm
am
7:28 am 2.6
pm
am 4.6 9:09 am 2.2
pm 4.0
Sunrise 7:03 Sunset 4:55 Tide Guide source: tides net 23 D 29 H 6 D 14 23 D 29 H 6 D 14
By Matt Jones
1:26
11:59
7:23
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4.2
1:07
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2:30
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LEGALS EMPLOYMENT (CONT.)

other web sites and 2) researching and deploying new/upgraded IT services to meet the functional goals of the English department and SASC. Systems include 16+ linux and Windows servers and 30+ WordPress sites, data resources, and digital services for research, instruction, and collaboration. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area or equivalent experience/ training.1‑3 years’ experience with virtual machine administration and 1‑3 years’ experience with LAMP web application support. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary offers are determined based on final candidate qualifications and experience; the budget for the position; and application of fair, equitable and consistent pay practices at the University. The full salary range for this position is $75,800‑$149,600. The budgeted salary is $82,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/6/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42004

consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #45933.

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

SUPERVISOR PROFESSIONAL AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT

Works to optimize philanthropic support for the College of Engineering (COE) and other collaborative fundraising initiatives in response to academic priorities established by the dean of COE (“dean”) and select affiliated program directors. As a member of the Development Office staff, fundraising efforts are devoted primarily to engineering with the remaining time to other University initiatives, as appropriate. Fundraising focus will be on computer science and bioengineering while still inclusive of the broader College of Engineering. Approximately ninety percent time on fundraising activities for gifts of $25,000 and up, with emphasis on gifts of $100,000 and more. Focuses ten percent on other activities related to fund raising and administrative duties such as coordinating and executing aspects of the engineering development program. Coordinates and executes planned strategies for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewardship of gifts primarily from individuals, but may include, as appropriate, corporations and foundations. Works personally with donor prospects and supports the dean, faculty and volunteers in prospect relationships when appropriate, in order to maximize philanthropic support for engineering and UC Santa Barbara, raising gifts to meet identified fundraising priorities. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. 1‑3 years Annual gift and major gift experience, raising four to six‑figure gifts. 1‑3 years Demonstrated skill at gift negotiation and gift solicitation to engage complex and sophisticated individual, corporate, and foundation donors toward significant philanthropic outcomes.

Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Must maintain valid CA DL and a clean DMV record. This is an annually renewable contract position with no limit on total duration. Flexibility and willingness to travel frequently. Ability to work comfortably with a flexible work schedule including some evening and weekend work. The budgeted salary that the University reasonably expects to pay for this position is $100,000‑$117,000. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive

Independently implements and manages a wide range of complex fee‑supported programs, certificates and workshops mainly in the international education markets. Will take the leadership of UCSB Extension International Programs area, establishing goals and metrics in conjunction with the Senior Program Manager, overseeing budgets, interfacing with UCSB officials, and working with partner institutions; supervises the Program Managers in charge of daily program maintenance. Actively participates in long‑range strategic planning for International Programs including working with the CE and Extension finance staff to develop and oversee program and course budgets, and, in collaboration with Marketing, drafting the strategy for promoting the programs in their portfolio. Reaches out to international agencies, and crafts agreements for future collaboration. Oversees International Program Managers’ work on course and curriculum, as well as their customer service and outreach activities. Serves as the UCSB extension Principal Designated School Official and, in collaboration with the Customer Services and Outreach Supervisor, using in‑depth knowledge of Homeland Security’s Student and Exchange Visitor Program certification requirements, is responsible for training staff who are assigned the roles of UCSB Extension Designated school officials. Oversees and trains staff on PaCE International Program immigration processes and requirements. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years working experience in producing and delivering international programs.

Notes: US Citizenship/Permanent Residency, a Homeland Security and Immigration Advising Requirement. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary offers are determined based on final candidate qualifications and experience; the budget for the position; and application of fair, equitable and consistent pay practices at the University. The full salary range for this position is $55,100.00 ‑ $93,500.00/yr. The budgeted salary range is $64,000.00 ‑ $68,568.00/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/5/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 46740

the historical records of changes and provides research and information on past policies and procedures. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. 1‑3 years Experience in political science, public policy, or law. 1‑3 years Experience in an institution of higher education working with college students in an academic advising or counseling capacity, or other field that is directly related to the functions of the position or equivalency as determined by the hiring authority. 1‑3 years Experience in working with diverse communities and across multiple identities and respect and consideration for all identities, perspectives, and differences. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Campus Security Authority. Some evenings and weekends are required. $58,940 ‑ $64,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #46211

Running or not. We are local to S.B. Foreign/Domestic. Porsche, Mercedes, Ford, Chevy etc. We come to you.

805-699-0684

AUTO

AUTO PARTS

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CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Taryn Bazzell, 2114 Red Rose Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93109. (661) 330‑1333. Published December 8, 15, 22, 2022.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF ERNEST M. GRAZIANO.

CASE NO.: 22PR00601

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: ERNEST M. GRAZIANO.

97759. (805) 350‑0981. Published December 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FBN ABANDONMENT

OF

LEGISLATIVE LIAISON

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS

Serves as an expert informational resource for students on the A. S. Legal Code. The Legal Code is comprised of the A.S. Constitution, the A.S. By‑laws, and Standing Policies. Updates Associated Student Legal Code based on legislation passed at weekly meetings maintains

MEDIA CENTER SPECIALIST ASSOCIATED STUDENTS

Responsible for developing and coordinating student services provided by the A.S. Media Center. The Media Center Specialist is responsible for collecting, compiling, and writing information for various workshops, social media, and other various forms of written communication. As well as providing oversight and facilities management of the Annex space and acting as the backup for the Pardall Center space. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Knowledge of media equipment and software. Excellent organizational skills and attention to detail. 1‑3 years Experience with microsoft office suite, Google Suite or equivalent. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Campus Security Authority. $26.31/hr ‑ $28.57/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #45751

SENIOR USER EXPERIENCE DESIGNER sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Lead UX for physical products & experiences in consumer category. May work from home. Req: BS+2 yrs. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: AD0123)

LEGALS

LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM

ADMINISTER OF ESTATE

FILED IN SUPERIOR COURT, CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA OCTOBER 24, 2022, NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JEREMY M. KERMIT, CASE NO# 22PR00527 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Jeremy Maxwell Kermit.

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Taryn Bazzell in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Taryn Bazzell be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 1/05/2023 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A

A PETITION FOR PROBATE HAS BEEN FILED BY NORMAN GENE GRAZIANO in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION for probate requests that: NORMAN GENE GRAZIANO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 2/2/2023 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 12/7/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Petitioner: Norman Gene Graziano, 504 S. Oak St., Sisters, OR

STATEMENT

ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

NAME The following Fictitious Business Name: ABSTRAX TITLE SERVICES is being abandoned at 12348, A, Cactus Drive, Desert Hot Springs, CA 92240. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed on 11/26/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2019‑002931. The persons or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Ralph Peter Folsom (same address). The business was conducted as an individual.

SIGNED BY RALPH PETER FOLSOM, INDIVIDUAL. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 11/21/22, FBN2022‑0002826, E40 and is hereby certified that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). Published: December 1, 8,15 22, 2022.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CREEKSIDE STORIES, 902 Mission Canyon Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 10/15/2021 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. FBN2021‑0002901. The persons or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Jan Dewitt, 902 Mission Canyon Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Charlene M Huston, 203 Hitchcock, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. The business is conducted as a general partnership. SIGNED BY CHARLENE HUSTON, PARTNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 11/18/22, FBN2022‑0002818, E47. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22 2022.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT

OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: GALILEO COACHING, 121 Via Alicia Santa Barbara, CA 93108. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 7/29/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. FBN2019‑0001822. The persons or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Executive to Executive Inc .(same address). The business is conducted as a corporation. SIGNED BY KATHRYN M. DOWNING, PRESIDENT. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/06/22, FBN2022‑0002930, E47. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: TASCA TRAVEL, 11 W. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Established 1992, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited partnership. SIGNED BY ANGELA TASCA‑ZUNGRI, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002790. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: Abstrax Title Services, 315A Meigs Road, #178 , Santa Barbara, CA 93109;

Patricia OConnell (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY PATRICIA I OCONNELL, INDIVIDUAL. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0002827. Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRAMMAR GRIZZLY, 535 E Arrellaga St, #22, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Elke Ichau (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY ELKE ICHAU. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002845. Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: RARE SOCIETY, 214 State St., Santa Barbara, 93101; Brad L Wise, 1125 W Morena Blvd, San Diego, CA 92110. This business is conducted by a limited partnership. SIGNED BY BRAD WISE, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002831. Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INTEGRATED HOME DESIGNS, 601 Micheltorena, 38, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Vanessa B Rabatin, (same address); Kristina Wong, 1207 San Andres, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a general partnership. SIGNED BY VANESSA RABATIN, PARTNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002779. Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MEDBRIDGE BILLING ASSOCIATES, 121 Gray Avenue, Ste 200, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Medbridge Anesthesia Management, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY DAVID ODELL, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002839. Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHARMADILLO PRODUCTIONS, 72 Santa Felicia Drive, Goleta, CA 93117; Charlene Huston, 203 Hitchcock Way #119, Santa Barbara CA 93105. This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY CHARLENE HUSTON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002819. Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: BIG MIKE’S MARKETING , 7216 Fordham PL, Goleta, CA 93117; Michael R Sexsmith (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY MICHAEL R SEXSMITH. Filed with the County

42 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM 42 THE INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 22, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
CLASSIC CARS WANTED

LEGALS (CONT.)

Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 16, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002801. Published: December 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: BETTER CALL MICHAEL!, 2785 Alta Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael S Miller (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY MICHAEL MILLER, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002898. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TEAGUE, 929 Laguna Street, Unit E, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Walter Dorwin Teague Associates Incorporated,110 Union Street, Suite 400, Seattle, Washington 98101 This business is conducted by a corporation.

SIGNED BY JOHN BARRATT, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002899. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: THE SANTA BARBARA THEATRE COMPANY, 1024 Olive St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Santa Barbara Theatre Company (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY ELLEN PASTERNAK, MANAGING DIRECTOR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 2, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0002916. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COASTAL REALTY GROUP, 330 James Way, Suite 270, Pismo Beach, CA 93448; Coastal Community Builders, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY GARY H. GROSSMAN, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002848. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: CRTN MEDIA, 28 Vereda Cordillera, Goleta, CA 93117; Garrett D Norvell (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY GARRETT NORVELL. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002881. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOBOBA STUDIOS, 317 Milpas Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; James T Long, 805 Canon Perdido, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JAMES THOMAS LONG, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by

E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0002870. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: TSR ENTERPRISE , 1113 Camino Viejo, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. Timothy S Romano (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY TIMOTHY S ROMANO, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 23, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002867. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOUBUD WINES, 331‑C Northgate Dr., Goleta, CA 93117; Loubud Wines L.L.C. (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability partnership. SIGNED BY LAURA ROACH, MEMBER‑MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002874. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA PSYCHOTHERAPY, 21 E. Canon Perdido Street, Suite 213, Santa Barbara CA 93101; Kristine J Schwarz, 2767 Miradero Drive, Apt E, Santa Barbara CA 93105. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY KRISTINE J. SCHWARZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002852. Published: December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: ONYX MONDE BEAUTE, 4928 8th Street, Apt C, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Zaida Catarino Gallardo (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual . SIGNED BY ZAIDA CATARINO GALLARDO, OWNER. Filed in the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/9/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002960. E29. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: STEVE’S TIRE AND AUTO REPAIR, 254 East Highway 246, Buellton, CA 93427; Buellton Garage Inc, 320 Central Ave, Buellton, CA 93427. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY JENNIFER HURNBLAD, CFO/SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003025 E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: TRYON GRAPHICS , 1 San Marcos Trout Club, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Taylor W Cocciolone (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY TAYLOR COCCIOLONE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003005 E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: WHERE THE BROWS STAY, 130 S Hope Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Magali Resendiz, 3 Calaveras Ave, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MAGALI RESENDIZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/19/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003050. E35. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REFUGIO PATIENT ADVOCACY, 1190 North Refugio Road, Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Ken W. Partch (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY KEN PARTCH, ADVOCATE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003035 E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: SAGE GARDEN CARE, 555 Meadow View Dr, Buellton, CA 93247. Samuel Perez Cardenas (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SAMUEL PEREZ CARDENAS, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/19/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003062. E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: KEN SYMER AUTOMOTIVE, 421 N Nopal St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Christian Lozano, 612 Andamar Way, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY CHRISTIAN LOZANO, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/16/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003046. E54. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: ISLA VISTA FOOD CO‑OP, 6575 Seville Road, Isla Vista CA 93117; Isla Vista Food Cooperative (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY LISA OGLESBY, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/13/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003001. E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COMPLEMENTARY ORTHOPEDIC ACUPUNCTURE & SPORTS THERAPY, 5142 Hollister Ave, #237, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Kenneth E Luke, 4748 Camino Del Rey, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY KENNETH LUKE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/06/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002936. E30.

Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: PACIFIC

RIVIERA INTERIOR DESIGN, 1015 Diamond Crest Court, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Judith L Flattery (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JUDITH FLATTERY, OWNER/DESIGNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 11/29/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002891. E30. Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person (s) is/are doing business as: SANA PSYCHOLOGICAL CENTER, 315 Meigs Road, Suite A, #104, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Denise R Jaimes‑Villanueva (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY DENISE JAIMES‑VILLANUEVA. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/09/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002967, E30. Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BACKPOCKET LIFECOACH COUNSELING SERVICES INC., 5266 Hollister Ave, Ste 210, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Backpocket Lifecoach Counseling Services Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY BRANDI DAVIS, OWNER, filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 11/29/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002893. E30.Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: EPIC BUILDERS, 916 Linden Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Carrillo Painting and Decorating (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY LUIS IBARRA, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002793. Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GALILEO COACHING, 121 Via Alicia, Santa Barbara, CA 93108.

Kathryn M. Downing (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED KATHRYN M. DOWNING, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/6/22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002931.

Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: 7TH MIND, INC. 5266 Hollister Ave., Suite 320, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; 7th Mind, Inc. (same address).7th Mind Publishing; Brain Aware Training. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY BRITT ANDREATTA, CEO. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) on 11/22/22. FBN Number: 2022‑0002847, E30. Published: December 15, 22, 29, January 5, 2023.

NAME CHANGE

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE

FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SARAH JANE JENKINS, CASE NUMBER: 22CV04514

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SARAH JANE JENKINS TO: VICTORIA JANE JENKINS.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JANUARY 27, 2023 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition.

Dated: November 29, 2022. Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published December 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022.

Attorney for Sarah Jane Jenkins: Bruce A. Pence MULLEN & HENZELL L.L.P. 112 E. Victoria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 966‑1501

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ZACHARY NILES ZILLES; SHERRY DIANA ZILLES; CASE NUMBER: 22CV04422.

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s)

FROM: ZACHARY NILES ZILLES, GABRIEL ALLEN ZILLES, JOAQUIN HENRY ZILLES, SHERRY DIANA ZILLES

TO: ZACHARY NILES HEYWARD, GABRIEL ALLEN HEYWARD, JOAQUIN HENRY HEYWARD, SHERRY DIANA HEYWARD.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: JANUARY 25, 2023, 10:00 AM, DEPT: 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division.

A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition.

FILED 12/5/22 in Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Baksh, Narzalli, Deputy Clerk. 12/4/22 BY THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG, 1338 Portsuello Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93105.

CASE NUMBER: 22CV03635

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG TO: LEANDER DEAN LOVE ANDEREGG. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING JANUARY 25, 2023, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED DECEMBER 07, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published December 15, 22, 29, 2022 and January 5, 2023.

THE PETITION OF ARGELIA REYNOSO, 58 MAGNOLIA AVENUE, APT. D, GOLETA, CA 93117. ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME. CASE

NUMBER 22CV04575.

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s): FROM: ARGELIA REYNOSO TO: ARGELIA CONTRERAS OSORIA.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING 1/23/2023, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5 , SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Divison.

A COPY OF THIS ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Signed and Dated December 1, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published: December 15, 22, 29 and January 5, 2023.

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