Santa Barbara Independent 11/17/22 publication

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Celebrate the Holidays in Santa Barbara!

Jake Shimabukuro Christmas in Hawai'i

Thu, Dec 1 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre “If everyone played the ukulele, the world would be a better place.” – Jake Shimabukuro Drawing on signature favorites, a vibrant catalog of holiday classics, and selections from his recent album, Jake Shimabukuro’s merry live show Christmas in Hawai’i is sure to make spirits bright.

Mariachi Sol de México

José Hernández’ Merry-Achi Christmas Wed, Dec 7 / 7 PM / Arlington Theatre

“Mariachi is the heart, the soul and the passion of Mexico.” – José Hernández One of the world’s foremost mariachi groups, Mariachi Sol de México incorporates elements of Las Posadas alongside traditional Christmas carols in this festive musical tribute to Mexico’s holiday traditions.

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535

Special Thanks

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Callie Fausey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley

volume 36 # 879, Nov. 17- 23, 2022

COVER STORY

23

The Psychedelic Surge Riding a Wave of Medical Promise, Magic Mushrooms and Other Hallucinogens Have Gone Mainstream

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell

by Ethan Stewart

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Melea Maglalang, Zoha Malik, Lola Watts Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 37

‘FATE FAVORS THE BOLD’ Cover story author Ethan Stewart answers a couple of questions about the newly intersecting realms of psychedelics and medicine.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

How do you think more conservative-minded folks will react to psychedelics entering the mainstream? How would you respond to their concerns? “New” things are always scary, change is always uncomfortable, and, of course, haters are always going to hate. But these are real tools increasingly supported by real medical professionals, and we have a large population of people in this world who need some real help with their mental health. To deny the potential benefits of psychedelics simply because you don’t understand them, fear them, or, worse yet, are stuck living with a closed-mind — that would be a major disservice to yourself and your community. Good things happen when we are open to the unknown. What would you say to someone considering using psychedelics for medicinal purposes? Do it the right way. Find a trained professional to work with. Identify your explicit intention for pursuing psychedelic-assisted therapy and commit to the process. As I wrote in the pages of the Independent a long time ago, “Fate favors the bold.”

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 ON THE COVER: Design by Xavier Pereyra.

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WINTER

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10 9 am – 3 pm | Ages 5 – 12 Children gain inspiration from works of art in the Museum’s collection to draw, paint, print, collage, and sculpt artful gifts to share with friends and family. $120 SBMA Members/$150 Non-Members Location: Ridley-Tree Education Center at McCormick House, 1600 Santa Barbara Street

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Making People Better

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NOV. 10-17, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, CALLIE FAUSEY, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

LABOR

I N G R I D B OSTROM

UCSB Academic Workers Join Statewide Strike Unionized Picketers Demand End to Unfair Labor Practices, Better Wages and Benefits

ON STRIKE: Thousands of unionized academic workers walked off the job Monday at UCSB and the UC’s other nine campuses and continued to picket into the week. by Callie Fausey he sound of beating drums, hundreds of shuffling feet, and various impassioned chants such as “U-C-S-B—keeping us in poverty!” rang out across the UC Santa Barbara campus as a mobile picket line marched through the university’s grounds on Monday, marking the first day of the largest walkout in the history of U.S. higher education. As the strike entered its third day Wednesday, picketers have not indicated any sign of lost momentum. Tuesday’s rallies across UC campuses asking the University to resume bargaining — after administrators said they would not return to the table until Wednesday—proved successful, according to a union press release. Starting at 2 p.m., parties discussed benefits related to green, alternative transportation, which seems to be progress toward the bargaining in good faith both sides of the picket line claim they want to engage in. Various acts in support of the strike have occurred over the past two days, including professors canceling classes and truck drivers refusing to cross picket lines to deliver packages, the union’s update stated. Striking employees at UCSB make up about 3,100 of the total 48,000 academic workers represented by the United Auto Workers union (UAW) — including teaching assistants, postdocs, academic student employees, graduate student researchers, academic researchers, readers, tutors, and more—from all 10 campuses of the University of California protesting against 28 alleged Unfair Labor Practices committed by the University. According to union representatives, these alleged unlawful practices have interfered with the union’s ability to bargain effectively for a better contract to meet the cost of living, among other proposals.

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Progress toward a contract that satisfies both parties has been slow-going; more than a year has gone by since they first took their seats at the bargaining table. The union claims that the UC further “thwarted” that progress by failing to meet its legal obligations in the bargaining process, by “making unilateral changes to…working conditions without negotiating, [refusing] to provide necessary information for negotiations, and obstructing the bargaining process.” The UC denies the allegations that they have engaged in illegal labor practices. “The strike is not about wages; the strike is about the University’s behavior, which is preventing us from being able to work with them in good faith,” said Evan Plunkett, a postdoc at UCSB and the postdoc unit chair for UAW-5810. “One of the main goals, across all units, is the elimination of rent burden. But right now, and for the indefinite future, the goal is to get the UC to work with us. Negotiations are ongoing, but some progress has been made in the past week that gives us some hope that they are starting to understand what is going on and what is at stake.” According to the union’s website, “92% of Graduate Workers and 61% of Postdoctoral Scholars are rent-burdened,” meaning they pay more than 30 percent of their income for housing. In addition, membership surveys by UAW found that “40% of Graduate Workers report spending more than half of their income on rent.” Considering Santa Barbara’s current housing crisis, that burden can weigh heavily on UCSB’s academic workers. “The rent burden is eating up about 55 percent of my paycheck right now,” said Misa Nguyen, a graduate student and TA for Greek mythology at UCSB, who said she had to skip meals and keep her heater off to make it through one particularly rough month. The UC’s student workers make an aver-

age of about $24,000 annually; the unions are calling for a base annual salary of $54,000 for all grad workers and a $70,000 salary for postdocs. In negotiation, the UC proposed adjusting salary scales and hourly wages for each bargaining unit, which includes initial increases in the range of 4-8 percent and additional, annual increases ranging from about 3-6 percent in each subsequent contract year. For reference, UC’s proposal would mean that in the first year of the contract, that average annual wage for student workers would only increase by an estimated amount of $960 to $1,920. A significant majority of the teaching and research at UC is performed by academic workers. Nguyen mentioned that, officially, TAs are only expected to work about 20 hours per week; during grading season and midterms, however, they have put in a far greater amount of time to meet their workload. “This quarter, I had to grade 80 student papers in two weeks, on top of teaching and everything else,” she said. Class cancelations for UCSB students have already begun, and while the exact impact and spread of this interruption on students is unclear, multiple undergrads have reported classes, and especially TA-taught sections, being mothballed. Faculty across the board have shown support for the strike, but instruction in the humanities appears to be more susceptible to cessation in solidarity; various political, environmental, writing, foreign language, and social science courses have reportedly been called off. In response to inquiries about continued instruction, UCSB issued a statement saying, “Most classes have recently completed their midterms. The University is continuing negotiations with the union and is planning for finals to take place as scheduled.” However, some undergraduate students, like CCS biology major Lauren Jennings, have already taken certain finals off their schedules. Jennings said that her Feminist Studies professor is supporting the strike by canceling class for the remainder of the quarter, and recently announced that Jennings and her classmates would not be taking their final exam. With finals season just a few weeks away, further interference with instruction and research seems inevitable as picketing workers prepare to keep the strike going until their requests are met. Many TAs will not be around to teach or grade, so it’s possible that more exam plans could be adjusted or canceled. “We are willing to bring the University’s functions of education and teaching to a halt. We are willing to stop classes, to stop lectures. We are willing to withhold grades; that is CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

NEWS BRIEFS HOUSING A public workshop will be held 11/17 in the County Planning Commission Hearing Room at 6 p.m. to discuss potential housing sites in the county’s unincorporated areas, which are being explored as options to meet the state’s Regional Housing Needs Allocation of 8,001 units by 2031. An interactive map recently released by the county Planning and Development Department shows sites that range from parcels deep in the Santa Ynez Mountains to areas as far south as Casitas Pass and include Santa Barbara Juvenile Hall and Glen Annie Golf Course, which could account for more than 1,500 new units of housing combined. Full story at independent.com/ housing-element-workshop. The Goleta Planning Commission voted 11/14 to send the Heritage Ridge housing project to the City Council for approval. Though Commissioner Elrawd MacLearn stated he’d rather see more space in the two-acre park for active sports like soccer, the park was approved overall with improved trails, a cultural tot lot, and some active areas. The park is surrounded by 332 apartments, 228 at market rates. The remainder, 104, are slated to be affordable to low- and very-low-income veterans, seniors, and families, as well as holding two manager units. Though Red Tail Development and the Towbes Group are the developers, the county Housing Authority will finish the affordable homes and purchase them by June 2025.

COMMUNITY The remains of a diver were recovered 11/11 in an underwater cave system near Painted Cave on Santa Cruz Island, the Sheriff’s Office announced 11/14. The remains were transported to the Sheriff’s Office Coroner’s Bureau, where, according to a Sheriff’s statement, “Coroner’s detectives plan on utilizing rapid DNA to confirm the identity of the decedent with anticipated completion next week,” at which point next of kin will be notified. The Sheriff’s Office noted that the remains were recovered near the same spot where missing Port Hueneme diver Ryder Sturt, 34, was last seen alive in November 2020. A male pedestrian was struck and killed by a car while crossing Highway 101 in Santa Barbara early 11/11. The man was hit on the northbound side of the freeway by an Uber passenger vehicle near the Patterson Avenue freeway entrance around 1:50 a.m., according to County Fire spokesperson Scott Safechuck. The man was pronounced dead at the scene. All northbound lanes of the 101 were closed for approximately five hours, reopening shortly before 7 a.m., according to Caltrans. The California Highway Patrol is investigating the death.

COURTS & CRIME AT&T settled with prosecutors statewide for $5.9 million regarding hazardous materials violations, including in Santa Barbara County, due to unreported batteries at cell-phone towers and other facilities, DA Joyce E. Dudley announced 11/15. The settlement is the largest amount ever awarded statewide for this kind of environmental violation. Most of the sum, $5,650,000, will go to civil penalties. From that

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news.

CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

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NOV. 10-17, 2022

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he mathematic equation to emerge from the updated results of last Tuesday’s Santa Barbara County election is that Democratic candidates were automatically guaranteed about 60 percent of the vote, no matter how experienced or inexperienced they were. Republican candidates, in turn, took home about 40 percent, regardless of any lack of campaign cash or experience. What makes this striking is that Democrats make up only 50 percent of registered voters, with declined-to-states and Republicans making up the rest. For example, Democratic Congressmember Salud Carbajal—a three-term incumbent—won 60.97 percent of county votes with his opponent Dr. Brad Allen winning 39.03. For the 37th Assembly seat, county supervisor and Democratic Party stalwart Gregg Hart won 59.29 percent while his Republican opponent, Mike Stoker, took 40.71 percent. Long-term City College trustee incumbent Marsha Croninger—a moderate GOLETA Democrat—won with 79.9 per5757 Hollister Ave cent, and Charlotte Gullap-Moore—a firstMahatma time 2# candidate backed by the party—won by 61.4 percent. LONG GRAIN RICE Escobedo — a Democrat Party $Gabe99 player and city planning commissioner—won a three-way race for the Santa 7#

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Barbara Unified school board with 60.2 percent, and Rose Muñoz — backed by the Democrats—won with 80 percent in a two-way race. In the Goleta school district, cultural conservatives Caroline Abate and Christy Lozano posted 39 percent and 25 percent, respectively, while their Democratic-backed opponents Richard Mayer and Emily Zacarias took 60.4 and 62.9 percent, respectively. Perhaps the biggest nail-biter of the night involved Carpinteria’s Measure T, which would have required another election to approve a plan to build a new downtown hotel on a public parking lot. The votes in all races are still being tallied, but as of the last posting, Measure T was trailing by 72. Carpinteria councilmembers Gregg Carty and Al Clark — both first-term incumbents — were forced to run against each other because of redistricting. Clark, an unapologetic slow-growther—and a registered Democrat was decisively ahead of Carty. Otherwise, all bond measures, parcel taxes, bed tax increases and sales tax increases on the ballot passed, including a one-cent sales tax increase for the City of Goleta. As of Tuesday, November 15, 12,330 —Nick Welsh votes were still uncounted.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOMELESSNESS

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Up to 160 Deaths over Two Years

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ased on still preliminary analysis, as many as 160 homeless people could have died in Santa Barbara County over 2019 and 2020. Broken down by year, 2019 could have witnessed 76 homeless deaths, and for 2020, the number could be 84. These numbers remain somewhat raw and uncooked, according to county epidemiologist Ralph Barbosa, who heads the annual homeless mortality count and cautioned the numbers could be considerably lower by the time the final report goes to the county supervisors in February. It turns out that determining whether someone was homeless at the time of their demise is far more challenging than it might appear at first blush. “It seems so simple, right?” Barbosa said. “But it’s not.” Many of the federal privacy protections regarding the dissemination of medical information also apply to dead people, making it challenging and time-consuming for the seven-bean salad of government agencies involved in homeless mortality reviews to share information. Also, Barbosa noted, federal agencies have multiple definitions for what constitutes “homelessness.” One has to do with housing and another pertaining to medical conditions. Some of the individuals suspected of having been homeless may simply have ended their lives estranged and alienated from their next of kin. Initial accounts of where bodies are found — on the railroad tracks, in an encampment, or in a shelter, for example—often prove anecdotal, sketchy, and inaccurate. “It’s not just a box the coroner can check,” Barbosa added. In fact, he said, sometimes the coroner will use the phrase “transient” to describe homelessness; other times, the same word will be used to describe a decedent going from one location to another destination. In Santa Barbara County, people like

Barbosa have been tracking the number and circumstances of homeless deaths since 1989. Joining him in this are representatives from the county’s major hospitals, homeless outreach agencies, the Public Guardian’s office, the Sheriff ’s Office, the Social Services Department, and the Department of Behavioral Wellness. Homeless deaths are tracked in part because of federal requirements imposed on government agencies that take government funds to provide homeless health care. It’s also used to determine whether enough doctors, nurses, and medical professionals are being deployed in the right numbers at the right locations. How and where someone dies might be of epidemiological significance, but again, Barbosa stated, the cause is not always obvious. “Does your next of kin know everything about your immediate medical history?” he asked. The numbers reported thus far, he said, are consistent with numbers released “at this stage of the process” and do not indicate a big jump. The real question, he said, is what happens to the numbers during the next 30 days of winnowing and vetting. In 2017, the county reported 44 homeless deaths. In 2016, it was 44; in 2015, 40; and in 2014, 32. Typically, about 80 percent of the decedents are males, the vast majority White, and the average age in the lower fifties. Over the years, the number of veterans represented in this population has fluctuated from 15.6 percent to 2.5 percent, but mostly has hovered about 9 to 10 percent. Likewise, slightly less than half died outdoors. Typically, the largest number of deaths has occurred during winter months. With Santa Barbara entering a cold snap, the county’s system of emergency shelters—operating out of various churches throughout the county — has now been activated and will remain on alert until next March 31. —Nick Welsh

La Arcada Plaza

Festive Fridays

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 9 amount, $613,479 goes to the Santa Barbara County DA’s Office and $110,625 to County Environmental Health Services. Another $250,000 will be used as a Supplemental Environmental Project to the CUPA Forum Environmental Protection Trust Fund. Jerry Boylan pleaded not guilty once again in the manslaughter case against him in the deaths of 34 people aboard the Conception charter boat. In an arraignment held 11/11, he pleaded not guilty to a new charge of gross negligence — occasioned by his public defenders’ successful motion to dismiss the first complaint. He had also pleaded not guilty to the original negligence allegation. Boylan faces 10 years in prison if convicted of the new criminal charge. The trial is scheduled for 12/20 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. S.B. man Elias Maldonado, 35, was arrested 11/10 for allegedly attempting to kidnap a young girl in Carpinteria on 11/7, according to Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Raquel Zick. According to the Sheriff’s Office, the incident occurred around 4 p.m. on the

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La Arcada Plaza

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5500 block of Carpinteria Avenue near the entrance to the bike path. Using the description of the suspect provided by the victim, authorities identified and tracked down Maldonado to a motel on the same block. He is currently being held on $150,000 bail at the Main Jail facing charges of attempted kidnapping of a child under the age of 14 and obstructing a peace officer, as well as his outstanding warrant for domestic violence and false imprisonment. Five youth inmates at the juvenile hall in Santa Maria attempted to escape the facility on 11/9, injuring a probation staff member and destroying property in the process, according to the County Probation Department. Following several failed attempts by Probation personnel to get the situation under control, the Sheriff’s Office Special Operations Response Team was called in and removed the five youth from the upper tier of the unit, where they had barricaded themselves in, placing them into secure cells under Probation custody. The staff member was taken to the hospital with minor injuries, and none of the youth were reportedly injured in the incident. n

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TRI-COUNTIES’ PREMIER EMPLOYMENT LAW FIRM ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS OBTAINED OVER TWO HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS ($200,000,000.00) FOR CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEES IN CASES INVOLVING: · UNPAID OVERTIME · SEXUAL HARASSMENT · WRONGFUL TERMINATION · WHISTLEBLOWERS · DISABILITY · UNPAID MINIMUM WAGE · MISCLASSIFICATION OF INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS · MEAL AND REST VIOLATIONS · LEAVES OF ABSENCE

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UCSB STRIKE

CONT’D FROM P. 9

I N G R I D B OSTROM PHOTOS

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PRO-LABOR PROFS: UCSB faculty dressed in regalia and holding signs in solidarity marched alongside their students Monday.

going to be our biggest weapon, because the grading deadline is December 14,” Nguyen said. “We have massive undergraduate support to understand why we have to withhold grades.” One UCSB undergraduate student, who requested to be referred to as JD, was on the picket’s sidelines with Food Not Bombs, a student organization that prepared food for protesters and is planning on doing so for the remainder of the strike. “A lot of the TAs are saying, ‘I really do want to teach, but I have to strike,’ because they need to make a living,” JD said. “... A lot of peoples’ financial aid … [relies] on their grades. … Despite the fact that financial aid students like me risk losing their financial aid, I haven’t heard any undergraduate students say anything negative about the strike.” UCSB faculty also seems to be generally supportive of the strike, across the various disciplines. A group of professors and other faculty members dressed in regalia and holding signs in solidarity were greeted by their students as they marched alongside them. Charmaine Chua, an assistant professor in the Global Studies department at UCSB, said she came back to campus from sabbatical to show her support and mobilize fellow faculty members “to help them understand 12

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NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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their ability to cancel classes,” and remind them that they have “the legal right to respect the picket line, which is guaranteed under HEERA,” the Higher Education Employer-Employee Relations Act. “I was a grad student not so long ago,” Chua said. “I experienced what our graduate students are experiencing, which is poverty wages making it really hard for them to do what they want to do: study to become faculty. … It wouldn’t be possible to teach large lectures without grad workers; it wouldn’t be possible to conduct research without student researchers. The UC underpays these workers, despite the fact that they are essential to the University.” In response to the strike, the UC issued the following statement: “Our campuses have been preparing to mitigate the impact of any strike activity on our students by ensuring, to the extent possible, continuity of instruction and research. This includes encouraging departmental and academic units to provide additional support and resources to students for learning. Additionally, campuses will be prepared for contingencies should a strike interfere with the conclusion of the academic term.” In the latest update by the UC, they stated that they have proposed to the UAW enlisting the assistance of a third-party, neutral mediator so they can “achieve a compromise.” Furthermore, they said, following negotiations through the weekend, the resulting, current University proposal “would set the standard for graduate employee support among public research. It is important to note that our graduate student employees work strictly on a parttime basis while earning their graduate or doctoral degree, and that compensation is just one of the many ways in which they are supported as students during their time with the University.” In response to UC’s new proposal to shift to mediation, UAW 2865 President Rafael Jaime said, “At this point, the priority should be round-the-clock bargaining in good faith, as opposed to switching to a mediation process. We remain willing and able to meet with the University on an ongoing basis to reach a resolution.” n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CITY

Ortega Park Plans Almost ‘Shovel Ready’ by Ryan P. Cruz

T

COU RTESY SANTA BAR BAR A PAR KS & R EC R EATION DEPARTMENT

Walls and Fencing Removed, Pool Expanded, Skate Park Now ‘All Wheels’ Park he final plans for Ortega Park’s estimated $14 million makeover are nearly “shovel ready,” according to Project Manager Justin Van Mullem, who revealed the latest updates during a community event hosted by the City of Santa Barbara at the Eastside park’s Welcome House over the weekend. An overall plan was approved through the city’s Planning Commission more FREE PLAY: The new plans for Ortega Park are more open and “flexible,” than a year ago, but in that Project Manager Justin Van Mullem explained during a community event time, city staff have held sev- over the weekend. eral community meetings to nail down specific plans for table wouldn’t allow the skate park to be the murals, swimming pool, and proposed built any deeper than four feet, the city skate park. On Saturday, the city’s Parks and decided to redesign the spot as a more Recreation Department held one final open accessible “all wheels” park to welcome house to gather public input on the final bikes, scooters, roller-bladers, and skattouches and provide an update on the pro- ers of all types. The 12,200-square-foot jected timeline for completion. park will have sections with smaller, kidThe city missed the previous round of friendly obstacles and several “zones” for federal grants, but Van Mullem said that each wheel type to prevent collisions. project planners “want to keep the project moving, so we can get in line for the fund- Aquatics Area: The new swimming pool ing that’s on its way.” will now be nearly seven times larger than “We want to be shovel ready,” he said. the current pool and was expanded from “There are a lot of other grants for parks out the originally proposed four lanes to six there currently.” 25-yard lanes with starting blocks, allowing In the latest draft, the city dropped the for competitive swim meets to be held at controversial concrete-and-steel fencing the park for the first time in its history. The proposed in the previous set of plans, opt- large pool will be 7.5 feet deep and open ing instead to keep the common areas of for lap swimming, water aerobics, and the park open at all hours; the new artificial swim lessons, along with availability for turf field, swimming pool, and skate park competitive swimming activities for local areas will be gated and closed after normal clubs. An “aquatics slide” will be the first park hours. of its kind in the city, and a “splash pad” Van Mullem added that there are still “a wading pool will serve as an approachable thousand little decisions” to make, includ- introduction to water play for children. ing where to place tables, benches, and barbecue pits to best serve the neighborhood Turf Field: A full-size, multi-sport, artificial residents, but the city is looking forward turf field with all-new lights will allow for to finding funding and ultimately starting pickup games and organized leagues to use construction sometime in 2024. the space with a permit as late as 10 p.m. According to the latest draft site plans, The 92,700-square-foot turf field will be here are a few of the park’s biggest pieces easier to maintain and more long-lasting that have been set in stone: than the current grass field and will remain

Murals: Twelve of the park’s most historic

murals will be relocated, re-created, or “reenvisioned” using updated and more accurate imagery in collaboration with local artists and student groups, in the same spirit as when they were first painted decades ago. As many as 12 all-new murals will also be commissioned throughout the park.

‘All Wheels’ Park: After a study of the land under Ortega Park found that the water

fenced off after hours to prevent unpermitted play and additional wear and tear on the surface.

Community Plaza/Open Space: In the latest

draft, the city removed many extra elements — bocce ball courts, bean bags, and Ping-Pong tables — to make room for more open and flexible space. Now, the park has more than 33,000 square feet of “community space,” including a plaza, play area, open grass, and a new basketball n court.

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PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

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Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

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As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

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NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until November 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Ask Not for Whom the Flea Bites

COLLECTIVE AMNESIA: Usually I go out of my way to avoid arguments with Sherlock Holmes. But on the question of coincidence,

I might have to make an exception. Where the likes of Sigmund Freud and C.J. Jung were all agog about the pivotal role of coincidence in human affairs — synchronicity, they preferred to call it — the fictional 19th-century super sleuth was famously contemptuous. “Rarely,” Holmes told his brother Mycroft when asked about the matter, “is the universe so lazy.” I raise the issue because last week, I found myself covering two totally disjointed news stories that just happened to be joined at the hip by the ghost of John Valentine Stahl, another one of the most important wheeler dealers in Santa Barbara’s modern political history that nobody’s ever heard of. The first involved the nasty showdown — far from resolved — between feuding factions of the South Coast’s enviro camp over a proposed stretch of bike lane — 4,000 feet long — somewhere alongside Modoc Road. The other involved ExxonMobil’s decision to sell off its entire Santa Ynez operation — three offshore platforms, a massive onshore processing plant, and a 123-mile stretch of pipeline that’s been shut down since 2015, when part of that pipe sprung a 4,000-barrel leak, thus shutting down America’s biggest oil company in one of the richest oil-producing counties on the planet for the last seven years. But for Stahl, it’s uncertain whether there

ever would have been an oil pipeline through which the oil companies could have pumped their black gold in the first place. Back in the day, Exxon and the rest of the industry insisted that God intended them to ship their oil via tankers. Pipelines, they argued, were strictly for sissies and atheists. And but for Stahl, there absolutely would never been a bike path built that connects UCSB to Modoc Road following along an invitingly flat and meandering creekside pathway. Proponents of the new trail — of which I am one — insist this proposed new pathway would connect a key missing link for what would otherwise be a 20-mile con-

tinuous system of intertwined bike lanes

linking UCSB to Montecito. To underscore the obvious, without Stahl, there wouldn’t have been a necklace in place to add these necessary pearls. Naturally, Stahl’s name was not invoked once in any of these deliberations. I would discover by accident — reading the obituaries section of the Independent, it turns out — that Stahl died just months before, in June of this year. Coincidence? I knew Stahl well enough only to say I did. He was one of those shrewd guys who could see around corners. As much sinner as saint — he would later work for the oil industry and private developers — Stahl had one of the great cynical chuckles that called to mind small glasses of amber liquids.

It would be an exaggeration to say that Stahl singlehandedly yanked political power away from the Good Old Boys who had controlled the board of supervisors from time immemorial and handed it to the South Coast liberal-environmental majority that’s been so dominant — with a few significant hiccups — since the 1970s. But only slightly. When a politically outspoken young attorney then still new to town named Jim Slater allowed himself to be talked into running for Third District Supervisor back in 1971, it was John Stahl — a one-time frontcounter planner for the County of Santa Barbara — who ran his successful campaign. Fueled by the newly minted Isla Vista voting bloc — 18-year-olds had just been given the right to vote — Stahl and Slater won the Third District. At the same time, a UCSB antiquities professor named Frank Frost shattered the Good Old Boys ceiling in the First District. These were the good old days when Frost felt the need to wear a wire to meetings with developers — one famously would be sent away on bribery charges — and Slater brought his tape recorder to meetings with developers’ representatives. Stahl didn’t just get Slater elected. He ran Slater’s shop as his consigliere. When Slater became a judge, Stahl took over running the campaign of his successor, a brilliant young veterinarian and ardent slow-growther named Bill Wallace. Wallace, who served

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five terms, would become the center force of the most formidable political machine ever assembled in Santa Barbara. Stahl also served as Wallace’s chief of staff for a time. While working for both Slater and Wallace, Stahl waged war on Exxon and the whole oil industry. Later however, he joined that industry, working for the company that installed the very pipeline that many years later would spring so huge a leak in 2015. It was while working with Slater, Stahl got the idea for the UCSB bike path. It was the ’70s; cycling became the environmentally cool thing. There was an energy crisis. Stahl, a Lompoc boy and the son of a project manager who helped build Lake Cachuma, was comfortable with the dozer jockeys at public works departments. He knew where the money was hidden. He knew right-ofways and flood-control maps. So endowed, he got the first half of the UCSB bike lane built under Slater’s watch; and finished the job under Wallace’s. Today, it’s known as the Obern Trail. If the proposed new bike lane is ever built, it should be named after Stahl. If it doesn’t get built, it’s because stupid mistakes were made early on that inflamed the opposition. If Stahl had been involved, those mistakes would never have happened. But getting back to coincidences, I’ll take Albert Einstein over Sherlock Holmes. “Coincidence,” Einstein wrote, “is God’s way of staying anonymous.” —Nick Welsh

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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obituaries Charles Theodore Stevens 1/9/1927 - 11/1/2022

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Chuck passed away at the ripe old age of 95 after a life well spent doing what he loved. Chuck was born in Santa Barbara on January 9, 1927, the only child of Lawrence and Wealthia Stevens. He was raised in a house on Haley Street next door to his Grandmother Brancie Stevens. He played with his cousin Reg Lathim and told many stories of their antics growing up. Chuck spent many weekends with his father traveling to various remote areas of the West coast collecting bird eggs which would later become part of the egg collection at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. This experience gave Chuck a knowledge and appreciation of birds that he carried throughout his life. Upon graduating from Santa Barbara High School Chuck enlisted in the Navy where he was trained as an airplane mechanic. He appreciated the opportunity to travel to various parts of the United States and Europe as well as work on the aircraft carrier USS Randolph. After his discharge he used that training, and his father’s knowledge in the same field, to become an auto mechanic, ultimately spending the majority of his career at Tom Williams Oldsmobile/Cadillac. In fact, he continued to change the oil in his own cars into his 90’s. Chuck spent his bachelor years bowling, exploring photography, boating and waterskiing. Waterskiing led him to meeting Barbara Rogers at West Beach one day in 1957. They spent their early years together waterskiing, going to boat races, enjoying Fiesta and spending time with friends. They married in 1960 and welcomed daughter Sharon in 1961. Eventually they purchased a brand new house on the Mesa after Barbara’s house where they were living in Montecito burned in the Coyote Fire. They had a son, Mark, who died as an infant in 1965. In 1966 their son Bruce was born. Chuck enjoyed spending his two weeks of vacation each year driving the family station wagon, and eventually a small motorhome, to various locations throughout the west and we have fond memories of camping and seeing many beautiful parts of the country. Thanksgivings were often spent at Lake Havasu going to boat

races. Many summer weekends found the family and friends at Lake Nacimiento enjoying the camping, boating and waterskiing. After his retirement Chuck and Barbara found a joy for cruising and they explored the world on at least 35 cruises. Chuck’s greatest passion, however, was volleyball. He learned the sport playing at the YMCA with his father and he and Barbara played whenever they could. Wednesday nights were always volleyball nights at McKenzie Park followed by dinner at Char West, Peterson’s Drive-In or Taco Bell. Sunday mornings were volleyball days as well. They also played in the evenings at Santa Barbara Junior High and in co-ed City Leagues through the Santa Barbara City Recreation Department. Eventually, Sharon and Bruce were old enough to play with them and learned the game from their parents. Chuck enjoyed watching volleyball as much as he did playing. His summer weekends were filled attending beach volleyball tournaments and his evenings were often spent at UCSB or one of the local high schools watching the game he loved. He and Barbara especially enjoyed being able to watch their children, and then their grandchildren, play and grow to love the game as well. Chuck played regularly at East Beach until he was 87 and then continued to go to watch his many volleyball friends play until he suffered the stroke that led to his passing shortly after. Chuck was preceded in death by his son Mark and by his wife Barbara. He leaves behind his daughter Sharon Estabrooks, her husband Phil Estabrooks and grandsons Kyle and Sean as well as his son Bruce Stevens, his wife Tracy Stevens and granddaughter Taryn and grandson Tanner. Everyone loved Chuck. He had a great sense of humor, was kind and friendly to everyone, and only got angry when he was stuck in traffic or his volleyball team missed serves. His grandchildren loved spending time with him and listening to his stories. Sharon and Bruce appreciate all that he was able to provide for them through his hard work and his fun hobbies. We would like to thank Right At Home and all of their caregivers who helped Chuck stay in that Mesa home until the end. Per Chuck’s request there will be no services.

Santa Barbara, 1200 State Street, (805) 560-6883

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AN

OPINIONS CONT’D

EPIC JOURNEY

40 YEARS

RED WAVE BY RIVERS

Letters

IN THE MAKING

Just in time for Thanksgiving! A film full of life affirming beauty

GRATITUDE REVEALED FILM PREMIERE

Recycle Explained

A

story on NPR makes me ask if all the plastic I’ve collected and sorted into recycle bins over all these years end up in the landfill anyway?

—Luciana Mitzkun Weston, S.B.

Editor’s Note: Leslie Wells, who heads Resource

Recovery for Santa Barbara County, replied: Plastics with numbers #1 and #2 are highly recyclable (and valuable). Large rigid #5 is also recycled. In general, plastics #3 through #7 (excluding the large #5s) have always been problematic. Those are “plastic film,” and the reason why several communities, including the county, and the state passed singleuse plastic bag bans, as well as clam shells often used for food in grocery stores or to-go containers.

Parklet Realities

I

n response to recent articles decrying parklets and outdoor dining on State Street, and detailing one restaurateur’s opinion, we in the restaurant community who have had very different experiences, feel it is time to tell the other side of the story. Most of us would submit that the reality is much different than what this one operator has expressed. First and foremost, the city and restaurateurs with parklets have been working together for many months to define an interim plan for State Street outdoor dining operations while we transition to the new Master Plan the State Street Advisory Committee and our consultant firm MIG will come up with around the end of 2023.Countless meetings have addressed the issues raised in this recent article and active solutions are being implemented right now, for instance, cleanliness under parklets. Here is what two parklet owners found when moving or downsizing their parklets: Opal downsized 20 feet from their first parklet and found nothing but dirt and a few leaves underneath the removed areas. The Little Kitchen found the same when temporarily moving theirs. We cannot speak for parklets not well-maintained but would submit most would have a similar experience. Regarding homeless behavior issues: Clay Holdren, of Holdren’s restaurant, found these issues virtually completely eliminated after State Street was closed to automobiles and parklets were allowed to offer outdoor dining.

Are there fewer business-oriented lunch diners on State Street, post-pandemic? Yes, as many employees still haven’t returned to their offices. Regarding the complaint that everyone has gone to the Funk Zone: Actually, the vibrant atmosphere created by outdoor dining on State Street now has a similar attraction as the Funk Zone. This has in turn enhanced the vibrancy of Santa Barbara as a whole. Since concerns about parklets are being addressed and outdoor dining is wildly popular with locals and visitors alike, outdoor dining will certainly be part of the completed Master Plan. We urge that the sensible course is to maintain outdoor dining on parklets until the interim period is over, rather than removing them and the cultural and economic vitality they have restored to State Street. We recognize there are things to improve; businesses and the city have already been hard at work making things better and will continue to do so until we graduate to the Master Plan that will hold the key to our city’s future vitality. The full version of this letter is online at independent.com/opinions. —Richard Yates and Tina Takaya,

Saturday, November 19, 6:30 to 9pm, Tickets $10

Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 Cota St. Santa Barbara

Tickets available online at sbindytickets.com or at the door.

Q&A following with Louie Schwartzberg

Santa Barbara Permaculture Network www.sbpermaculture.org Event Cosponsors: Explore Ecology, Community Environmental Council, Teeccino, Sweetwater Collaborative, Quail Springs, Sustainable World Radio, Blue Sky Biochar, SB Aquaponics & the Santa Barbara Independent

Owners, Opal restaurant and bar

For the Record

¶ In our story on staffing shortages at the Sheriff ’s Office a few weeks back, we note that only 1-2 percent survive all the tests and evaluations, not 1-2 percent of those who take the initial mental and physical tests. Sheriff Brown stated there was a false national narrative that cops were racist, not that they were killers. Regarding inmates released over a 59-day period, the correct number was 91, not 98, and only concerned those found incompetent to stand trial, not among the general population. Brown said that the jail created its own competency restoration program because it takes so much longer to get inmates into Patton, a state psychiatric hospital for those facing serious criminal charges. The jail’s restoration program takes roughly half as much time as Patton’s. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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obituaries Fredda B Meisel

2/23/1935 - 11/3/2022

Fredda Meisel has passed away after a brief illness in which, over a few weeks, she charmed a bevy of health care providers and hospice angels. Her journey here complete, Fredda expressed “looking forward to the next journey”, to reunite with her lifetime soul mate, Dr. Harris “Bubs” Meisel, as previously agreed, “right up there” on the third star of Orion’s belt. Dr. Harris & Fredda came to Santa Barbara in 1965 when Harris became the Founding Medical Director for the Memorial Rehabilitation Hospital, now Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital. The couple were an inseparable pair of swans, gracefully navigating life with warmth and friendship throughout the Santa Barbara community. Their successes were many, with their greatest triumph being a 68 year relationship of enduring love that produced three children (Melody, Alex and Ben, and 4 grandchildren (Matthew, Joshua, Lea and Sophia). Fredda was the radiant engine, and power plant of the family, as well as to many in the community, all of us fortunate to be graced by her caring, her humor and her dedication to a positive outlook both tenacious and unwavering. During her almost 60 years in Santa Barbara, Fredda relished her volunteerism and board participation in many organizations: Santa Barbara Scholarship Foundation, Santa Barbara Youth Theater, Valle Verde (and the Meals on Wheels program), and the Junior League of Santa Barbara, where she helped to establish Public / Educational TV for the Central Coast as Founding President of Santa Barbara’s KCETTV Affiliates. She was ever involved as a supportive partner to Harris and the Rehabilitation Institute at Santa Barbara, with boots on the ground and a smile on her face befriending all. Fredda Meisel colored outside the lines, and endeavored to give and give and give in ways passionate, silly, thoughtful, mischievous, strategically heartfelt, impetuously loving, and ever self effacing. Her appetite to bring joy or comfort to others was insatiable. And as she neared her exit from this life, she seemed to grow more radiant and brazen in fulfilling her task of making others share in joy. During her last few weeks, her children were privileged to hear time and again, “your mother was so important to me,” and “she was like a second mother to me.” She was an artist at bringing people together in 18

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com community and Santa Barbara was the “village” she would build and nourish over her lifetime. Fredda Doris Blechman was born in Coatesville, Pennsylvania on February 23, 1935, and had a very challenging childhood. In this understatement lies the core and essence of Fredda’s great tenacity and power in giving to others through her dedication to kindness and positive action. At an early age she found the power of her own voice through writing. In 1949, at the age of 14 she wrote scripts and hosted a radio show, “Get Ready for Freddy-Tips for Teens,” using the media format to give diverse student voices a venue to share common values. Her goal was to further understanding and diversity in her community and to help foster integration of black and white students in local schools. In 1959 the couple moved to Harrisburg where Fredda joined WHP-TV to host the Romper Room genre, “Aunt Mary’s Birthday Party,” while Harris entered a medical internship nearby. Aunt Mary’s television career ended shortly after Fredda sipped a sponsor’s chocolate milk on live TV, and promptly threw up as a result of morning sickness. The pregnant Meisels left Pennsylvania in 1960, and went to the Navajo reservation, where Harris’s Public Health Service deployment brought them to the Shiprock Public Health Hospital in Farmington, New Mexico. Fredda gave birth to Melody and 11 ½ months later to Alex. The newborns received the honor of a Navajo Ceremonial “Sing” to celebrate their births, and the family developed deep, lifelong, friendships in the Diné community. In 1963 Harris became the Chief Resident in Rehab Medicine at Stanford University, and in 1965 the family moved to Santa Barbara where both Fredda and Harris worked to establish the Memorial Rehabilitation Hospital that would eventually become what today is the Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital Santa Barbara. While raising a family, and working with many organizations, Fredda also had a passion for cooking, creativity and contesting. She was a marketing wordsmith who would enter contests and sweepstakes with clever recipes and targeted strategies. She won trips to Montreal, Australia, Amsterdam, Hong Kong, Singapore and China, and was a successful business in the eyes of the IRS. She took great pride in laughing with family members who received surprise “consolation prizes” in their mailboxes, after Fredda would enter their names into competitions without their knowing. Unconventional, warm, loving and a strident force for good, Fredda will be missed. She was an OG “influencer” and made sure that before she left this life, she got one last voting ballot signed, sealed and delivered. She was preceded in death by her husband, Dr. Harris Meisel, and she is survived by her children,

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

and grand children, Melody Meisel Klein (Steven), Alex (Dr. Jacqui Drobis Meisel, and children Matthew and Joshua), and Ben (children Lea and Sophia Meisel). A celebration of her life will occur at a future date, and in lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Alpha Resource Center of Santa Barbara. https://alphasb.org/ donate

Elvira Gomez de Tafoya 9/2/1935 - 11/6/2022

Elvira Gomez de Tafoya passed away on Sunday, November 6, 2022 in her home surrounded by her daughters at the age of 87. She was born on September 2, 1935 in El Paso, Texas and was the youngest of five children. Elvira attended and graduated from El Paso High, then attended Texas Western University, majoring in Spanish Language & Literature. Elvira then attended graduate school at the University of the Americas in Mexico City completing a Master Degree in Spanish Literature. Prior to getting married, Elvira focused on community service; teaching, and volunteering in her community and went on several missionary trips through the Catholic Church. She spent a significant amount of time working with the Tarahumara of Copper Canyon and several indigenous communities in Chiapas, teaching and translating alongside her missionary work. In 1974, Elvira and her late husband, Edward, moved to Santa Barbara, where they made their home and raised their children, Gabriela and Xóchitl. She was a trained Montessori teacher and believed that children learn best in an environment that has been prepared to enable them to do things for themselves. With Montessori’s vision, Elvira was the founder and executive director of Marisol Montessori School where she created a TK/Kinder program that embodied a wonderful learning environment for children to explore materials of their choosing. Mirasol Montessori School included a dual language environment where Spanish was spoken alongside English. She included her love of the violin

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into Mirasol Montessori School, incorporating music instruction into her curriculum via the Suzuki Method. Elvira was an educational pioneer ahead of her time. Always child-centered, Elvira believed the learning environment should promote freedom for children to explore materials of their choice. Elvira was a life-long educator and taught at a number of local institutions, including the Adult Education Program for SBCC, Oxnard City College, Laguna Blanca, Santa Barbara High and completed her teaching career as a Spanish teacher at Dos Pueblos High School. While at DP, she was an excellent teacher whom all of her students passed the AP Spanish language exam the last years of her career. Elvira believed deeply in community service. She was an active member of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church and the Old Mission Santa Barbara Parish volunteering for decades as a lecturer. As a selftaught violinist, Elvira cherished her time as a member of the Santa Barbara City College Orchestra, with whom she played for over 30 years. Another joy for Elvira was as a volunteer for Old Spanish Days. She loved seeing all the horses in El Desfile Histórico and served as a volunteer announcer for that parade, beginning in the early 90’s. She was well known for her announcements and commentary in both English and Spanish. She was a true consummate lover of art and music and loved attending live classical concerts weekly. Since 1975, Elvira researched, organized, produced and directed Pablo Del La Guerra’s version of “La Pastorela” performed throughout Santa Barbara including the Presidio, various churches, family homes and Los Prietos Boys Camp. La Pastorela is one of the Santa Barbara’s oldest and most beautiful Mexican Christmas traditions dramatizing the epic battle between good and evil, in rhyming Spanish verse performed by community members. The play invokes elements of spectacle, comedy and fantasy and most important, Christ’s redemption of man through the lens of traveling Shepherd. Elvira, with her beloved pastores, performed this throughout Santa Barbara from 1975 every Christmas holiday until her retirement in 2018. La Pastorela was a joy merging many of her passions of Spanish language, her strong Catholic faith, the Arts and giving back to her community. She also loved her local library and believed that libraries are one of the best supports for democracy in America. She believed that knowledge should be free for all communities, all people, so she volunteered with the Friends of the Eastside Library for over three decades to support their fundraising efforts for programs unavailable through regular agency sources. Through her work as “the Eastside Library book lady” she helped raise funds for programming such as storytelling,

library materials and various free classes for children and parents for her cherished Eastside Library. One of Elvira’s greatest joys was being a grandmother. In her retirement she took care of her two grandchildren – Ysabella and Eddie; taking them on daily visits to the park and the Santa Barbara Zoo, to concerts, and cello lessons. She enjoyed cooking with them, often using lessons from her Montessori background to include her grandchildren in meal prep. There was always a lesson for young minds, whether helping measure ingredients or cutting vegetables for soup. Elvira was a strong, fierce, smart and exceptional woman who loved her family, culture and always wanted to go beyond expectations breaking barriers and glass ceilings. She was a true lover of education and master teacher, constantly learning herself and supporting her students, seeing their highest potential. Elvira is survived by her two daughters; Gabriela Dodson and Xóchitl Tafoya, and their spouses; Steve Dodson & Nicole Koger as well as her beloved grandchildren Ysabella and Eddie Dodson. A funeral mass will be held for Elvira on Thursday, November 17th at 1 PM at the Old Mission Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers please consider a donation to the Friends of the Eastside Library or Planned Parenthood.

Danica Pagal Lado 11/6/2022

Danica was granted her angel wings on November 6, 2022. Her final days were spent surrounded by family and friends that Danica had positively impacted throughout her short, yet very memorable happy life. She attended Hollister Elementary School, La Colina Junior High, and graduated San Marcos High School in 2021. She was a sophomore at SBCC majoring in Psychology for transfer. Danica is survived by her loving parents, Arnold and Judith, her sister Elle, grandmothers, uncles, aunts, and lots of cousins. Danica, your sweet memories will always be forever in our hearts.


obituaries Karen Crate Wimberly 10/26/2022

On Wednesday, October 26, 2022, Karen Crate Wimberly (née Karen Marie Crate), loving mother, grandmother, and friend passed away in Austin, Texas. She was 74. Karen is survived by her loving sons, Cory, Mac and Daniel and her grandchildren, Hudson, Cael, Wilder, and Mars. Karen will also be dearly missed by her brothers Thomas and Daniel, sisters Mary and Therese, and a wealth of close friends too numerous to count. Karen was born in Joliet, Illinois to John and Rosemary Crate. She attended St. Patrick’s grade school, Saint Francis Academy, and went on to earn a Bachelors and Master’s degree in education from Northern Illinois University. After a brief stint in administration, Karen moved into the classroom where she felt she could make a greater difference in students’ lives. She taught elementary school in Romeoville and represented her teacher’s union as a negotiator until moving to Santa Barbara, California in 1987. Karen worked for the California State Disability Insurance Office until 2011. Not one to settle down, Karen spent her retirement years on the go. She completed a regular circumnavigation of the United States moving from Nevada to New Mexico to Texas to Florida to Illinois to Indiana to Michigan to California. She visited her far-flung family and friends and enjoyed swimming, boating, skiing, and cards with them. She also enjoyed exploring new places–Hawaii and Italy were two of her favorites. In her time at home, she loved getting together with friends for a drink by the ocean, walking, quilting, gardening, and attending yoga. She was a long time member of her book club and often planned to be home just for the meetings. She was also committed to her work for the Assistance league of Santa Barbara, Las Aletas Auxiliary. She was especially committed to ‘Operation School Bell Goleta’ in which she would take needy children shopping for clothing, books, backpacks, school supplies, and toiletries. In early January 2022, Karen was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and spent these past months fighting the numerous physical and

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com emotional battles that came along with her diagnosis. Throughout her ordeal, Karen never lost her irreverent sense of humor and playful wit. Karen’s ability to bring laughs and smiles to the people around her was one of the reasons she was so loved and appreciated. Karen had an unbelievable ability to make friends and bring people together, even in the last phases of her life. The number of people who came to visit her this past year was a testament to the meaning and impact she had on so many lives. In honor of Karen, please visit a friend or make a new one. If you can do so on a patio or over a cocktail, it would be ideal. Karen’s celebration of life is Sunday December 11, 2022 at 11:00am-12:00 noon at the Carousel House at 223 East Cabrillo Boulevard in Santa Barbara. She wanted people to wear bright colors and share their favorite stories of her. She was adamant that it truly be a celebration of her. All her family, friends, and acquaintances are invited. Please RSVP at https://everloved.com/life-of/ karen-wimberly/funeral/.

Raphael Wayne Harper 4/17/1961 - 10/30/2022

Raphael Wayne Harper was born in Santa Barbara, CA, on April 17, 1961, to Raphael and Helen Dansby Harper, both now deceased. Raphael suddenly passed away from a heart attack at age 61 on October 30 while at his Santa Barbara home. He was born into a large family well known for their kindness, acts of community service, and support of Santa Barbara’s African American and Latino communities. Raphael stood regal in stature, and reigned as his family’s King of Hearts. Raphael, known to childhood friends and family as Big Wayne, attended McKinley Elementary School and graduated from Santa Barbara High School. As a Don, he was known for his abilities

on the basketball court. Friends recall his prowess on the basketball court and football field, talents later passed down to his sons and grandson. Raphael attended Westmont College in Montecito before heading north to San Francisco State University on a basketball scholarship. He transferred to Long Beach State University and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy. During his career, Raphael worked as a physical therapist, most recently as a fitness instructor at Gold’s Gym. At 19, Raphael celebrated the birth of his first child, Raquel Odile, named after her Father. His second child, Shante, came a little later. He subsequently met his wife, Joanie, and her daughter, Cryshauna McKee. They became partners, marrying in Las Vegas and celebrating the birth of three more children, Raphael Cortez, Ramon Marquez, and Raliccia. Unfortunately, Joanie preceded Raphael in passing away. Raphael’s descendants brought his greatest joy as he doted on four grandchildren from his daughter, Raquel, including Justice, Jayah, Joyous, and Jermelle. He enjoyed Raphael Cortez’s children, Ramelo, Raphael, Cortez Amir, and Ayiah; Ramon’s child Julian, and Raliccia’s children, Christopher and Legacy. Raphael loved, cheered, and praised their efforts. Raphael spent the last 11 years of his life as a partner with Josephine Pereyra. They lived in Santa Barbara, enjoying visits with family, friends, and church. As a man of faith, Raphael found tremendous comfort from life’s tribulations in his Roman Catholic faith. As a result, he became close to Father Dan Lackie and other faith workers serving Mission Santa Barbara, which honors all people in the spirit of St. Francis. In addition to his children, grandchildren, and partner, Raphael is missed by many aunts and uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews, and friends who cherish him. The viewing will be November 17 630pm at Mcdermott-Crockett & Associates mortuary, 2020 Chapala St, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 The funeral service will be November 18 11am Old Mission Santa Barbara, 2201 Laguna St, Santa Bar-

bara, CA 93105

Jane Endacott

many friends will take a moment over the holidays to join us in raising a glass to our sweet Jane.

Jane passed away unexpectedly November 3, 2022, from complications following surgery. Even though pneumonia took her away from us, her generous, fun, and loving heart will continue to shine on. Jane moved to Santa Barbara as a UCSB student and never left. Her walks along the beach and in the many beautiful neighborhoods of SB were a constant in her life. After a brief teaching career, she went into the legal field and was a paralegal for almost 50 years. She will be missed not only by her colleagues at Mullen and Henzel, but many others in the legal community. She was instrumental in starting the Paralegal education program at UCSB. Always adventurous, Jane took two months off in 1980 to be a Colorado River guide, where she made lifelong friends. When invited to a dude ranch, she took riding lessons for six weeks, breaking her finger when her horse was spooked. That did not deter her! Later, Jane’s passion for travel took her to the pyramids in Egypt, Christmas markets in Germany, and many other countries over many years. A lifelong learner, Jane was an avid reader and started two book clubs, both still active (one ongoing for 37 years). She read cookbooks like they were novels, and we all benefitted from her studies: she absolutely loved entertaining her friends with elaborate dinners, from signature cocktails to a special dessert. She loved her law firm’s holiday cooking competition, winning after discovering the secret ingredient for guaranteed votes: bacon. Family gatherings will not be the same without Jane in the kitchen! She was a treasured sister to Linda McClain (Jeff), aunt to Greg (Kate) and Darren McClain, great aunt to Scott and Ian McClain, and beloved daughter to her adopted mother-inlaw, Esther McClain. Family, friends and colleagues could depend on her sunny company and charming conversation. She was a bright light in too many lives to count. Memorial arrangements are in progress and will occur in early 2023. To be updated with details when they are decided you may contact Linda at lindamcclain@ me.com. If so inclined, donations may be made in Jane’s honor to the Central Branch of the Santa Barbara Library, The Breast Cancer Resource Center, Santa Barbara, or Animal Shelter Assistance Program (ASAP Cats). We hope that her

Barry Allan Kitnick

1946 - 2022

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7/25/1943 - 9/28/2022

Barry Allan Kitnick passed away in Santa Barbara, CA on September 28th, 2022 after a long illness. Barry was born in Philadelphia, PA on July 25th, 1943. He is survived by his beloved wife Jill, with whom he shared his life for over 45 years; his sons Alexander and Zachary (Daisy); his brothers Steven (Marilyn), Dean (Victoria), and David (Romy). He is also survived by nephews Eric (Kate), Craig (Sophia), and Ben (Shannon), nieces Sara, Emma (Zach), and Abby (Dylan). Barry grew up in the San Fernando Valley, and graduated from Van Nuys High School; L.A. Valley College, where he earned his Associate of Arts; and San Fernando Valley State College (now C.S.U.N); where he received a Bachelor of Arts in Cultural Anthropology. He earned his Master of Arts in African Area Studies from U.C.L.A. Barry served in the Peace Corps in Liberia in the late 1960s. Upon his return, with his love of art and business acumen, Barry opened Gallery K in West Hollywood, CA, where he exhibited African Art. In his early thirties, Barry became one of the youngest Sr. Appraisers and worldrenowned experts of African Art, and was noted for his ability to recognize “the real thing.” He was also involved with the Fowler Museum of Cultural History at U.C.L.A. and contributed to the museum in many ways over the years. After seven trips to Vietnam, Barry amassed a unique collection of shamanistic art, leading to a catalogue entitled: “How to Make the Universe Right: The Art of the Shaman from Vietnam and Southern China.” Barry will be remembered for the love he shared with his family, his generosity, philanthropy, and sense of humor. He lived an amazing and honorable life. Barry was preceded in death by his parents Earl and Marjorie “Margie” and his brother Dennis Kitnick. A private memorial will be held at a later date. Donations can be made in Barry’s honor to the Hospice of Santa Barbara, CA., Inc. www.hospiceofsb.org May his memory be for a blessing.

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Continued on p.20

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obituaries Jonathan Bixby

Steve Pearce

8/26/1950 - 11/6/2022

2/29/1944 - 11/21/2022

Jonathan Richard Bixby, 72, a longtime resident of Santa Barbara, passed away peacefully at home on Sunday November 6, 2022. He was surrounded by family and friends at the time of passing. He suffered from a rare brain disease called Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. He was born on August 26, 1950 in Los Angeles, the son of John Richard Bixby and Alice Patricia Bixby. Jonathan was the oldest of four children. Jonathan lived all his life in California. After graduating high school in 1968, he attended UCSC and graduated with a BA in Psychology. He then taught grammar school for five years before moving back to Santa Barbara for good. Jonathan found his real passion – dancing- in high school. During this time he met his longtime dance partner, Sylvia Sykes. They would go on to be known as “Jonathan and Sylvia”, and together, they took the Southern California Lindy Hop and Balboa scenes by storm. They danced on Dick Clark’s American Bandstand, learned from the greats of the swing dance world, competed for decades all around the world, and became a part of Santa Barbara’s fabric by bringing the joy of swing dancing to thousands through their dance troupe and popular dance classes from 1979 into the new millennium. During this time, he also worked at the family business, The Fireside Mart, for a few years, but he loved nothing more than dancing and teaching, especially in his beloved Carrillo Ballroom until the beginning of the Covid Pandemic. Jonathan’s parents preceded him in death. Jonathan is survived by his siblings Mary Bixby of Beaverton, Oregon, Steve Bixby (Teresa) of Grangeville, Idaho, and Susan Bixby Congleton Moore, (Chris) of Perry, Utah and 9 nieces and nephews, and his beloved cats (“girls”), Louise and Lucy. There will be a private memorial for Jonathan, invite only, remon Saturday November 19, 2022. 20

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Steve Pearce was born on February 29, 1944, outside of Hespler, Ontario in Canada, to Mary and Donald Pearce. In 1955, the Pearce family moved to a home on Cliff Drive in Santa Barbara, where Steve was able to ride his bike all around the open space of the Mesa, for at that time the area was sparsely developed, and where he played in the WWII bunkers located where the Mesa Shopping Center is today. His first job was at a nearby pharmacy where he swept up at the end of the day. By 1956, he was working at Santa Barbara Boat Rentals in the harbor. His intrigue with being on the water started at age six during a transatlantic voyage to Ireland, at age 12 he gained access to boats, and for over 3 decades he worked on the water. People close to Steve often found comfort in his ability to listen. He could simplify the most complicated of situations in just a few words. Steve’s ability to hear and understand challenges presented by life, allowed for him to support many in our community when he worked as a counselor at Project Recovery, and Cottage Hospital. Steve was well known for his accomplished conga drum playing. In his 20s and 30s, Steve could be found driving a Jaguar XKE with his congas lashed to the luggage rack. In his 40s he took up running and would run 10 miles each day. Steve took up bike riding in his 50s. He would ride from his Carpinteria home to UCSB and back when he took, as well as, taught classes there. His favorite loop was going to Ojai via Hwy 150 and returning along Hwy 1. An easy day was a ride up Gobernador Canyon. Steve was rarely seen without a book within arm’s reach. Witty and subtle describes his humor. One could tell when he was up to something by the twinkle in his eye, a grin, or the slightest change in his tone of voice. He was kind. From his years living on the ocean, he was able to read the sky and predict what the weather would do in the next couple of hours, and days. He was pragmatic, and valued the power of the Universe. His true delight in life was his

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

wife, Judy. They had a deep and soulful connection, and were a dynamic balance, harmonizing each other. They shared a love of music (they knew how to cut a rug!), and they had a favorite campground in the eastern Sierras where they would sit, side by side, for a couple of weeks reading through the crates of books they took with them. Steve unexpectedly passed away at home in Carpinteria on November 21, 2021. He is survived by his sister, Marny Pearce Smith; his daughter, Sara Killen; stepchildren: Kathy Gregory, Tom Polous, and Karen Latter; two grandchildren; six step-grandchildren, and one step-great-grandchild.

Guadalupe Sandoval 12/12/1926 - 11/4/2022

Guadalupe Sandoval passed away at his home on Friday November 4, 2022 at the age of 95. Guadalupe, a native of Santa Barbara, was born on December 12, 1926. He served in the Navy and received an honorable discharge. He became a skilled carpenter, contractor and an avid fisherman who spent his weekly trips at Cachuma Lake. He is preceded in death by his great grandson Oscar Reyes Jr. and his great granddaughter Kayla Rodriguez. He is survived by his wife Alice, sisters Vera Qurioga, Rosa Garcia, daughters Elizabeth Rodriguez(Sandoval) and Helen Torres(Sandoval), sons Lupe Sandoval, Joe Sandoval, and daughter Isabel T. Larsen, grandchildren Larry Rodriguez, Renee Rodriguez, Lisa Torres, Richard Torres, Francisco Torres, great grandchildren, Gaberial Rodriguez, Angelina Reyes, and Anthony Reyes. A gravesite service will be held on Monday November 21, 2022 at 11:00am Calvary Cemetery with a reception at Harry’s Restaurant after the service.

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Wilda Rae Donaldson Irvine 1928 - 2022

Wilda Rae Donaldson Irvine (94) went home to be with her Lord on September 25, 2022. Born in Watertown, Massachusetts in 1928 to William and Marion Donaldson, and moving to Santa Barbara at age 8 with brothers Don and Jack. Wilda graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1946. Home of where she met the love of her life “Sasha” Irvine. They were married at Montecito Presbyterian Church in 1950. Their marriage lasted an adventurous 65 years. She was a wonderfully involved mother to her children Gail, Craig and Wendy. The Irvine family lived an exciting life under the “silver bridge” near Steven’s Park. Wilda’s fun family expanded beginning in 1979. Wendy married Butch Phillips and added Jaclyn and Brett. Gail married Jerry Gray adding Aaron and Carly, to make four grandchildren she could enjoy. In 2009 the era of great grandsons began for Wilda. Kainan, Krew and Kove Gray, sons of Aaron. Brixton and Owen Schmiess, sons of Carly and Andy. Walker, Grant and Hayes, sons of Brett and Kara. “Coco” loved the energy and entertainment these 8 provided. Sash and Wilda loved to travel both near and far. From 16 cruises, elder hostels, Palm Springs or camping they made friends and memories around the globe. Always generous, Wilda loved to take her entire family on vacations. Wilda’s interests were many and varied. To name a few, Nu Pi Delta Chi sorority, First Presbyterian Church, Antique Club, Peabody PTA, Santa Barbara Riding Club, Knitting Bags, Bible Study Fellowship and was an avid volunteer. After a long full life, Wilda will be missed by many! Preceding her in death, were her parents, brothers, niece Janie and husband Sash. Wilda is survived by her children, grandchildren, great grandchildren, nieces and nephews. If desired, donations could be made to Santa Barbara First Presbyterian Church or any charity that benefits animals. A celebration of Wilda will be held graveside, November 21, 2:00pm, Goleta Cemetery 44 S. San Antonio Road.

Terrence Hughes 11/2/2022

Terrence Hughes passed away unexpectedly on November 2, 2022, at the age of 49. He was born and raised on the Eastside of Santa Barbara, CA. He attended Franklin and Cleveland elementary schools, Santa Barbara Jr. High, Santa Barbara High School, and Santa Barbara City College where he played both basketball and football. He was a loving husband to his wife, Brooke, and a best friend to many. Known to everyone as “Tee” or “Uncle Tee”, he enjoyed BBQing and spending time with his friends and family, dancing, riding his bicycle and motorcycle around town and of course attending the football games of his beloved 49ers. Terrence was a lover of life, he always had a smile on his face, his love language was cracking jokes about you or with you; there was never a dull moment with him. His laugh was contagious, and he had the ability to make anyone feel welcome with his big hugs and big heart. Terrence will be greatly missed by all that knew and loved him, but his spirit will no doubt live on in this town that has been home for his entire life. He is preceded in death by his grandfather Douglas Richardson, grandmother Mary L. Hughes and his grandfather Willie D. Hughes. He is survived by his wife, Brooke Hughes, his mother Virginia Hughes, his father Dennis “Ray” Hughes, grandmother Patty Sue Richardson, brother Shawn Hughes (Samantha), sister Taishoree Hughes (Octavio), nephew Kameron Avila, nieces Nevaeh Hughes, Kendall Avila and Samaria Hughes as well as many aunts, uncles, cousins and extended family. Because Terrence was so well known, the family has opted to hold a private funeral service for close family and friends on Thursday, November 17th. The family appreciates the outpouring of love and support they have received, should you wish to donate, a Go Fund Me page has been set up in his name. Arrangements entrusted to Pueblo del Rey Funeral Services


In Memoriam

Christopher Story VI 1925-2022

COURTESY PHOTOS

H

Santa Barbara’s Showman

BY T H E S T O R Y FA M I LY ow do you put finite words to

an infinite man? Take Einstein, Beethoven, Ringo, Leibowitz, Roddenberry, Krupa, Jimmy Stewart, Johnny Carson, James Bond, Glen Miller (the list goes on and on), and throw in a huge dollop of Peter Pan and you got Chris Story. In his early forties, he attended a classical concert, looked up at the conductor, and said “Hey, I wanna do that!” and so he did. He was practically self-taught, and note that this was well before the internet or YouTube. He formed the West Coast Symphony and all its offshoots; 55 years of concerts ensued. Truly, the only time he cried was when he thought about how beautiful classical music was. There absolutely needs to be a plaque in his name on those courthouse steps for the more than five decades of free concerts he gave during Fiesta and the Fourth of July. Orchestras aren’t cheap! Perpetually happy, of course he served as board president of The Optimist Club. He’d tell his angsty daughters, “See every problem as an opportunity!” and then, in a high-pitched voice, say, “Wheeeeeeeeee!” Nobody sang a better rendition of “On the Sunny Side of the Street” than he. A kid at heart and a creature of habit, he’d have half a grapefruit every single morning and two Oreo cookies every single night. He considered Carrows and IHOP fine dining. Like Buddy from Elf, he loved food, especially if it involved sugar. He would be the first at the table, with his napkin fixed like a bib—gotta protect that tie—as if to say, “Let’s get this party started!” He was not a fan of anything spicy. Mild salsa was too much. He told the story of a wedding reception he attended that served all Japanese food. He took a huge spoonful of green tea ice cream. Nope—it was, in fact, wasabi. Can’t get any spicier than that! He almost had a coronary! He believed in moderation in everything except for sci-fi. We think his mind was so far beyond this time and place that science fiction made the most sense to him. He was the original Trekkie, and we will challenge anyone who doubts that. We had to bolt out of many a restaurant, practically bringing the plates with us, because “Star Trek is about to start!” He had a dream goal to build a Star Trek: Enterprise hotel/park in Las Vegas. Blueprints were drafted, and Gene Roddenberry was “on board.” Growing up, there were times when he was driving five screaming girls in the station wagon, with Mom yelling “Shut up!” and blindly batting at them, and we’re sure Scotty was “beaming him up” as he air-conducted symphonies in his head. At 78, he was the only person over 13 in line for Disney’s first virtual-reality ride, and, looking like a kid at Christmas, he was clearly the most excited. He called everyone “Kiddo” and “Tiger” or “There he is!” when he couldn’t remember your name. He could do anything that took brain power. He was a composer, pianist, drummer, actor, singer, financier. He could speak a lot to a little bit of every language and loved meeting foreigners to practice with. Of course, he could tell them a joke in their native tongue.

ON THE SUNNY SIDE: Christopher Story VI was a great optimist, who conducted free concerts at the courthouse over the decades (above) and fathered a busy family.

He was an avid tennis player and even played his fair share of cricket. He was brilliant at bridge, chess, and gin, letting his daughters win often, but not always, to keep them sharp. He was the Limerick King. We had to save many a person from being “limericked to death” by him—a classy gentleman who could tell a dirty joke that would have the queen cackling. Jokes he could tell, one after the other for hours, with pitch-perfect timing. What a massive vault his mind was. He wore three-piece suits to picnics, barbecues, and pool parties because he learned somewhere that “Ya gotta dress for success.” As he got older, we finally talked him into sweat suits for casual events. In his white Adidas, he looked more like a rapper and delighted in doing his best Snoop Dogg impersonation: leaned back, arms folded high, and a De Niro pout. Costumes, oh, how he loved costumes, and he loved his kids in costumes. He literally beamed with joy watching his kids perform and was always their number-one fan. His tips for improvement were always spot-on. He told Brian Setzer of the Stray Cats, with complete sincerity, that he should turn down his guitar because you couldn’t hear the horn section. Guess what—he was right. Whether he was gracing the stage with his first wife, Dorothy, at the Lobero (sharing the limelight with Charlton Heston); entertaining the masses with his wife of 43 years, Barbara; or taking the show on the road with wife Candi, life was a stage, and oh boy did he love it! He was always humble and didn’t have a mean bone in his body. When Mom told him he had to discipline his daughters, he’d put on his best gruff voice and bellow, “You girls better shape up or ship out!” He’d then turn to Mom, smiling from ear to ear, and ask, “Was that good!?” “Kill ’em with kindness!” was his mantra. “Worry is interest on trouble not yet due.” “Don’t waste time with the ribbon clerks; go to the top.” And a favorite: “The first hundred years are the worst.” He saw life as a game, and every morning, he leapt out of bed to play! Sitting there drinking his coffee, which was all milk and sugar, he’d tell his kids that you can create anything you want. Even going into a packed parking lot was grounds for manifestation, as he always “created” an empty spot. Possibly the original inspiration for FOMO, Chris wanted to do everything. “Why not?” he’d say. He was the sixth of eight Christopher Storys, and from the three we know and love, we can say they are savants, one and all. Chris Story VI walked, talked, and breathed the power of positive thinking and instilled that in his adoring kids. There will never be a person like him. Ever. He taught us every day to look at the world with wonderment and stars in our eyes. To find in every moment the utter joy of life and the glee to be had. How incredibly lucky were we that we got to walk with him for as long we did on his fantastic and incredible journey. Suffice it to say, we are a bit jealous of Heaven now.

A Celebration of Life will be held on November 20, 2-5 p.m., at Harry’s Plaza Café in the Ranchero Room. Come pop in and share a favorite “Story” of the late, great Chris Story. INDEPENDENT.COM

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The Psychedelic Surge Riding a Wave of Medical Promise, Magic Mushrooms and Other Hallucinogens Have Gone Mainstream COURTESY

L

BY ETHAN A. STEWART

who cut their teeth during the early years of the throughout California. Historically hot. movement. In the name of survival, many thouAnd so it went until 2000, when Johns Hopsands of Golden Staters flocked to the kins University, the famed East Coast hotbed of beach. I was no exception and found medical innovation and professionalism, quietly myself on the shoreline with an extended group of garnered regulatory approval from the federal friends and acquaintances, all of us firmly in our government to once again begin researching with psychedelics. In 2006, led by Dr. Roland Griffiths, middle age, coupled up, and raising young famithey published a now-famous paper about the lies. There, we had good food and good drinks, safety and lasting benefits of a single dose of psialong with umbrellas, surf boards, an air of sunlocybin. In the 15 years since, they have published block, and stoked kids galore. more than 60 peer-reviewed papers on the topic, It was a full-on beach blanket bingo vibe, save for one little wrinkle—there were no less than looking at everything from addiction and deprestwo different types of psychedelics involved. That’s sion to PTSD and the often-crippling existential right; the Montecito mainstream has officially dread associated with a terminal diagnosis. Again turned on and tuned in to the fast-growing psyand again they have found psychedelics, when administered in a professional setting with proper chedelics-as-medicine movement. patient screening, to be a safe, non-addictive, and “I use small amounts of mushrooms a couple effective course of treatment for a wide range times a week,” said one mom. “I find that I am a of afflictions and conditions. The university is happier, more energized person. And way more currently in the process of using clinical trials patient with my kids.” Another offered, after swallowing a small, to further investigate the use of psilocybin and brown capsule of psilocybin, “I’ve been off SSRIs other psychedelics for things like Lyme disease, Alzheimer’s, opioid addiction, anorexia, obsesfor almost a year now and have never felt more stable as an adult. Only once did I accidentally sive compulsive disorders, and anxiety. And they take too much and feel kinda messed up.” aren’t alone. There are now robust programs at Columbia A third chimed in, “My brother has dealt with University in New York, Imperial College Londepression ever since 9/11. It’s not uncommon for a career firefighter like him. Since using mushdon in the U.K., the Usona Institute in Wisconsin, rooms and working with a therapist, he is a new Stanford, Yale, Washington State, the University of MEDS: Microdose psilocybin capsules and a vial of microdose LSD. The LSD is mixed with niacin São Paulo, the University of Zurich, the University man. I mean, my whole family notices it.” to modulate the bioavailability of the drugs and prevent the user from consuming any more One of the dads walked over, helped himself of Copenhagen, etc. In fact, here in the States, than the prescribed 10 micrograms. to one of the psilocybin pills, and said, “I’ve used psychedelics are already slow-stepping toward medical legalization and wholesale decriminalizasmall amounts of LSD while at work. Micro-dose size, I guess, because I have never felt much more than a strong ceremonies, coming-of-age rituals, and medicinal modali- tion in places like Massachusetts, Michigan, and Washington, cup of coffee. It’s great for my creativity and helping me blast ties. So vast and varied is this practice of using psychedelics D.C., while Oregon, and, as of Election Day two weeks ago, as more than a mere intoxicant that even our own federal Colorado have already given the okay to medical usage. through my to-do list.” I sat back on my towel and marveled at the scene. These government famously pursued them as both a medicine and For our part, here in California, both Santa Cruz and Oakland have already decriminalized psilocybin in the name were all good, successful, educated, and generally sober, law- a weapon in the middle part of the 20th century. abiding people. Wholesome, if you will. The majority had Some of the brightest minds from around the world in the of medical benefit, and a decriminalization bill in the state avoided any real drug use in their youth save for drinking and field of psychology saw psychedelics as a potent and emerging senate, SB 519, was narrowly approved in 2021 before being occasional cannabis consumption, and yet, here they were, therapeutic tool until widespread illegality was established in shelved in the full assembly this past August so that additional using small amounts of illegal psychedelics while hanging out the early 1970s. In fact, the case for hallucinogens as medicine, research could happen. The author of the bill, State Senator with family and friends on a holiday weekend. More to the albeit one with certain risks, has long been louder and more Scott Wiener of San Francisco, has promised to bring it back in point, they weren’t dosing to alter reality and catch a buzz; they established than that of cannabis. Even the term “psychedelic” 2023. All of this is to say that there is no doubt that a worldwide were doing it in pursuit of a happier, healthier life. was coined by a clinical psychologist, Humphry Osmond, and movement is underway. presented with wholehearted support in front of the New York But the real inflection point for the mainstream, when Academy of Sciences in 1957. average people truly started to get interested and start their Despite all of this, most reading this article likely have many own psychonaut-styled health interventions, came in 2018 negative talking points at the ready about these types of drugs. when author, journalist, and influential thinker Michael PolThe use of psychedelics as medicine is, of course, nothing Such was the potency of the anti-psychedelic campaigns dur- lan published a book in which he personally explores the new. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) was discovered in a ing the last decades of the 20th century and the early years of benefits of several illegal, consciousness-expanding drugs. pharmaceutical company’s lab some 80-plus years ago by the the aughts. Who among us doesn’t have a story about that kid How to Change Your Mind was a New York Times number-one Swiss chemist Albert Hofmann. In short order, that company, from high school who took too much acid and still thinks they best-seller for months on end and has since become a wildly Sandoz (now known as Novartis), began shipping the sub- are a glass of orange juice? They cause personality disorders. popular series on Netflix. stance to doctors all over the world for free in hopes of best They make you go insane. They destroy your nervous system. It was also about this time that the concept of “microThey make you believe you can fly. These views, though largely dosing,” the practice of consuming a very small, sub-clinical figuring out how to use it in a clinical setting. Long before this, native cultures from around the world unsupported by science, came to dominate the mainstream amount of a substance like LSD or psilocybin, became trendy employed naturally occurring entheogens (another term for narrative. As a result, the concept of psychedelics as a tool for in the tech world and beyond as a tool for creative problemconsciousness-expanding drugs) such as magic mushrooms health was all but forgotten save for a few underground activist solving, increased productivity, and a means for enhancing (psilocybin), peyote, and ayahuasca as part of their religious doctors, certain religious practitioners, and lifelong devotees your neural plasticity. Stories soon followed in the Wall Street

abor Day weekend was hot this year

SET AND SETTING

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Journal, Fast Company, the New York Times, The Economist, and Wired magazine. To anyone paying attention, it quickly became clear that psychedelics were no longer exclusive to the counter-culture. A population that was already obsessed with bio-hacking and improving human performance had merged with a much larger group that was suffering badly from pandemic-esque levels of poor mental health, stress, and wide-ranging traumas. Illegality be damned, a wellness revolution was at hand.

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Now, it needs to be said that I am no unknowing neophyte in the realm of psychedelics. Far from it. I explored with things like acid and mushrooms and MDMA during my college years. It seemed a good complement to the educational expansion for which my liberal arts school was charging top dollar. In my experience, there was nothing particularly uncommon about this phase of my life. But when some grave health problems landed in my lap in my mid-thirties, including an advancedstage, incurable cancer diagnosis, I returned to the realm of psychedelics with full awareness of the work that was underway at Johns Hopkins. I sat with peyote in the wake of my cancer news to help me see a path toward survival. And, when I was expecting my first child a few years later—a wild mind-fuck for a guy with a terminal disease who also happened to lose his own dad at a relatively young age—I used LSD to help confront my fears and rewire my thinking around the topic of parenthood. I have since used micro-dosing practices to explore my boundaries of professional creativity, and just this past year, when I decided to enroll in a potentially life-changing clinical trial for my cancer at Stanford University, I once again returned to intentional LSD use in the lead-up to help create new neural pathways in my mind so that I might be able to better receive the experimental medicine and not focus on its undeniably toxic nature. I have zero doubt that all of these decisions have served me well and have gone a long way toward helping me stay alive and vital to this day. Now, if you look around the greater Santa Barbara landscape these days, it soon becomes obvious that, once again, there is nothing particularly uncommon about my exploration of psychedelics, this time as a tool for better mental health and/or spiritual renewal. For years, there have been private ceremonies hosted throughout the South Coast for folks interested in working with a shaman or spirit guide or some such keeper of psychedelic wisdom. Substances like peyote, ayahuasca, 5-MeO-DMT (a compound derived from the Colorado River toad), and kambô (a psychedelic secretion from the Amazonian giant leaf frog) have all been pretty commonplace among certain social scenes and alternative medical communities. Phrases such as “plant medicine,” or simply, “the medicine” or “the toad” have crept into our collective vernacular. This, however, has recently evolved to include a wide variety of decidedly less clandestine events. There was a well-attended psychedelic speaker series featuring all sorts of experts from the field, including doctors and neuroscience researchers, held at the Unity Unitarian Church on Santa Barbara Street in the months before COVID. There have been regular, invite-only meetings among licensed therapists and

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psychologists and assorted other individuals who are interested in the topic. The group gathers at a private residence off the 154 on a bimonthly basis to discuss the latest research and share insights and experiences. The Santa Barbara Ketamine Therapy clinic opened on North La Cumbre Road in 2021 and is already planning an expansion to a bigger space this winter so it can better accommodate customer demand. And then there is the aforementioned proliferation of DIY patients, many of them exploring the potential of micro-dosing psilocybin or LSD without any formal and/or professional support. It is not uncommon for pills or dropper bottles of medicine to be available via places like Instagram or Reddit and for it to arrive at your house packaged like it was meant to be sold in a store. The majority, however, is still sourced from chemists and mushroom growers via real-life social networks, word of mouth, and friends of friends. This loose affiliation of drug providers, though still mostly illicit, is rapidly becoming less and less informal as more certified psychedelic guides, “Trip Sitters,” and professional therapists are being licensed by reputable institutions like UC Berkeley. “It is impossible not to be enthused by the research that has come out. And it’s just as hard not to be excited for what is coming next,” says Lisa Benson, a board-certified psychologist with 25 years of experience in private practice here in Santa Barbara. “Whether it’s anxiety, depression, or PTSD or addiction, healing is often a slow process. As clinical practitioners, we have the tools to help but, unfortunately, it takes a lot of time, a lot of resources, and a lot of effort. Psilocybin really seems to speed things up…. It is not unheard of for someone to have a major breakthrough after only one session.” In fact, so impressed is Benson by the potential of psychedelic medicine that she recently applied to the professional certification program at San Francisco’s California Institute of Integral Studies. The ninemonth course would give Benson the tools to better prepare her patients for using psychedelics and, most importantly, to support them during the experience and help them integrate it afterward. “This is really powerful stuff that we are seeing happen,” she explains. “It is exactly what I’ve always wanted for my patients, but it is able to happen with so much more efficiency.” Modern science breakthroughs have made it possible to image the brain and measure neural activity in remarkable ways. This has opened the door for doctors and researchers to better understand the mechanisms by which psychedelics are working. Benson and others in the field point specifically to the circuitry in the brain known as the “defaultmode network” as the hard evidence of psilocybin’s efficacy. “The default-mode network is over-active when someone is experiencing anxiety or depression or the ill effects of trauma,” Benson says. “[Psychedelics] quiet that overactivity and brings a person into the here and now…. It drops beneath the filters we use on a regular basis to survive, and connects you to a deeper sense of being, to compassion and gratitude, and love.” The latter sounds exactly like the way my friends at the beach were talking about their experiences. “Psychedelics are giving me hope,” sums up Benson. “Hope that we will be able to better deal with this really sick world we are living in.”

n


INGRID BOSTROM PHOTOS

Watkins Family Hour Tue, Nov 29 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $20! “Sean and Sara Watkins are akin to royalty in American folk circles.” The Guardian (U.K.)

Get ready for a lively evening of authentic Americana as brother and sister Sean and Sara Watkins (of Nickel Creek) bring a special 20th-anniversary edition of their bluegrass musical variety show from LA’s famed Largo club to Santa Barbara.

Special Thanks

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Jacob Tell

A PSYCHEDELIC SOCIAL CLUB Jacob Tell knows about the intersection of art and culture and business. The S.B.-based creative agency and business strategy company, Oniracom, which he cofounded in 2001, is a formidable force, working with clients like Jack Johnson, the Santa Barbara Bowl, and Proyo Ice Cream. “I learned long ago that life isn’t a straight line,” says Tell. “Things often come back around and can offer profound experiences and benefits if you keep your mind open.” It was this mindset that led Tell and his team to be early allies for the legal marijuana industry and, now, psychedelics. “My goal with District 216 is to help this new culture that is emerging,” he explains. “We can’t think about the future in creative and hopeful ways if we are stuck in a default mode of thinking.” To be clear, District 216 isn’t a new client of Oniracom’s. It’s Tell’s big, new idea for growing community and helping facilitate creative innovation, two things that have always been at the heart of what he does best. Specifically, District 216 is a membership-driven, private social club aiming to connect people around the four pillars of art, music, cannabis, and psychedelics. The goal is to create a multi-faceted “edu-tainment” net-

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Gratitude Grows Here. We never stop reaching higher for our patients and for our community. When your loved one is in our care, we’re here to support you and your family.

The new Cottage Family Suites provide accommodations for out-oftown families caring for a loved one who is hospitalized. Cottage Family Suites are made possible by donations from the community. Thank you for ensuring we have the highest quality and compassionate care...and hospitality...right here at home.

Learn more at cottagehealth.org/reachinghigher

Join us for

Join us for

Fill the Foodbank!

Fill the Foodbank! Food Drive Food DriveSaturday, November 19 10am - 2pm- 2pm Saturday, November 19, 10am

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need!

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need! Foodbank Sharehouse

work for creatives, business leaders, venture capitalists, and Web 3.0 developers. Think panel discussions, curated speakers, art and music shows, fun-focused social mixers, and genre-bending incubation for ideas. It is both a physical and virtual town square, a place for free thinkers to come together and exchange insights and information. “We aren’t handing out mushroom chocolates. Far from it,” says Tell. “We are creating a safe space where we use the psychedelic values of intention and integration to explore ideas.” It is like a counter-culture version of the internationally known Soho House Members’ Clubs but with the ability for members to co-create events and use Oniracom’s extensive production facilities as a sort of co-working space. “We are just getting started, but already it feels like we have something special on our hands,” Tell says. “I am excited to see where it goes.”

Join us for

Fill the Foodbank! Food Drive See District216.com.

Saturday, November 19 KETAMINE 10am - 2pm AS A CURE

Foodbank Sharehouse 80 Coromar Drive, Goleta 80 Coromar Drive, Goleta

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need!

TURKEY DRIVE 2021

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COURTESY

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exceedingly safe user profile, it has become a popular—and legal—psychedelic therapy for a broad range of afflictions, helping with everything from chronic pain and depression to anger disorders and PTSD. “It is so real, this mystical/medical space we are working in. There is no doubt that it is the future,” says Dr. Remi Drozd, the owner of the Santa Barbara Ketamine Clinic. A classically trained physician with more than 15 years of experience as an ER doctor, Drozd is a relatively new convert to the world of psychedelic medicine. Like so many in the space, he had a personal experience that changed his views on the topic. “Working in the ER, I often would see patients that I could never really help. They were dealing with underlying issues, things like poor mental health stuff or addiction, problems that I just didn’t have the tools to effectively address. I could never get to the root cause,” says Drozd, who opened his clinic in downtown Santa Barbara last year. “I’d be lying if I said it wasn’t frustrating.” However, after participating in a psilocybin trial at Johns Hopkins and later receiving ketamine-assisted therapy himself, Drozd saw a new way to think about helping his patients. And then, while on sabbatical and traveling in Yellowstone National Park with his family, he read The Ketamine Papers by Dr. Phil Wolfson, and the hook was set. “Honestly, I never thought about changing my career like this, but here I am. The evidence was too loud to ignore.” Though dosing and sequencing varies on a case-by-case basis, the general practice of ketamine-assisted therapy looks like this: A patient comes to the clinic, either self-referring or at the suggestion of their therapist or psychologist or primary care doctor. Dr. Drozd meets with the patient and tries to get a more complete picture of what is motivating them, establishing their intentions for the therapy. There is a modest amount of somatic work done followed by breath work and, if necessary, an additional screening with a psychotherapist on the clinic’s team.

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Learn more/Donate: All Saints-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime


INGRID BOSTROM

At the next appointment, the ketamine is administered via an intramuscular injection, and the experience lasts roughly 45 minutes with a doctor or nurse nearby the entire time. According to Drozd, the typical protocol calls for six sessions of ketamine and six corresponding “integration sessions” with one of the licensed therapists at the clinic, all of it spread out over an eight-week period. “Absolutely, we see long-lasting, cognitive changes in the majority of our patients,” explains the doctor. “It’s amazing what an almost-apocalyptic shutdown of your ego can accomplish when you set an intention and pair it with a well-trained talk therapist.”

To learn more about ketamine therapy and Dr. Drozd’s practice, head to santabarbaraketamine .com.

COURTESY

THE ACCIDENTAL QUEEN OF PSYCHEDELIC SUPPORT

can’t just go around talking about them.’ But the science behind it is superb and I had seen too many good things happen. It was time to speak up.” And, after watching her terminally ill husband, Michael, get transcendent benefit from a DMT trip as well as her own therapeutic experiences using psychedelics to help heal some deep traumas from her childhood in Paraguay, that is exactly what she did. Lopez founded the nonprofit organization EntheoMedicine, built out an impressively thorough and easy-to-use educational website on all things psychedelic, and started working to bring psychedelic luminaries, researchers, and practitioners to speak in Santa Barbara. The speaker series, which her company Spiritual Safari Media produced, ran in 2018 and 2019 at S.B.’s Unity Church and was the first of its kind on the South Coast, enjoying widespread popularity and offering many their first experience with serious conversation about the benefits of psychedelics. But COVID stopped the momentum of the in-person events and Lopez ultimately had to pivot. She doubled down on her website and almost immediately saw traffic grow exponentially. The Michael Pollan effect, from both his book and his Netflix series, coupled with the dynamic mental health implications of COVID and the related periods of isolation that people had to endure, ramped up interest in psychedelics in a way that few saw coming. People, not just from the Santa Barbara area but from all over the country, were hungry for info and guidance on how best to proceed. “It’s almost like people needed permission or something to explore. And they saw me, a normal woman who runs a successful company and the caregiver to a sick partner, and I was safe. I could provide that permission, even though that was never my intention,” opines Lopez. In June of this year, Lopez started the Psychedelic Hotline, a place where people can book free, 15-minute consultations with her to help begin their journey with psychedelic medicine. She counsels them on all the potential options and works to connect people with medical professionals and therapists working in the space. She says demand for her services has increased fourfold in recent months. “Look, I still have my day job. I don’t do the psychedelic stuff as a business or for money. It’s just something I believe in and want to support and see grow.” Says Lopez, “We are just scratching the surface on what consciousness is all about and the potential [of psychedelics]. It is an exciting thing to be a part of.”

Jacqueline Lopez

“I am an advocate for psychedelics. I can’t help it,” explains Santa Barbara’s Jacqueline Lopez, a 57-year-old professional event organizer and business marketing whiz. “I mean, it wasn’t that long ago that I thought to myself, ‘What are you thinking, Jackie? These are Schedule I drugs. You

THE FUTURE IS NOW The Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara is pleased to introduce the most advanced digital PET/CT scanner to the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, the first of its kind in our community. Our dedication to bring stateof-the-art technology to the Central Coast is just one example of our enduring commitment to excellence and to our community— now and for the future.

cfsb.org/nucmed

Learn more at entheomedicine.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

27


LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 NOV 20 SUNDAY!

Ovation Jazz Series - Spring 2023

Enjoy 4 shows @ 20% off select ticket prices. *Plus bonus early bird ticket opportunity for Charles Lloyd 85th Birthday Celebration. Series on sale now / Single tix on sale Dec. 1.

FRIDAY

MARCH

3

PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND

FRIDAY

APRIL

THE DEREK DOUGET BAND

SATURDAY

MAY

12 FRIDAY

The Immediate Family

Guitarists Danny Kortchmar and Waddy Wachtel, drummer Russ Kunkel, and bassist Leland Sklar, with guitarist Steve Postell, perform their own songs as supergroup The Immediate Family.

One of the world’s most acknowledged guardians of jazz trumpet and flugelhorn, as well as a renowned classical artist, pianist, and composer.

From the heart of the French Quarter to the world’s stage, Preservation Hall Jazz Band has spread the joyful spirit of true New Orleans jazz since 1961.

8

HELLO SANTA BARBARA PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

An Evening Honoring Spencer Barnitz, featuring “Spencer the Gardener” and Special Guests

NOV 18

Douget has performed with many notable musicians on the New Orleans scene, mixing his Louisiana upbringing with his strong individualism and idiosyncratic voice.

with guest artist Serge Merlaud

The 9-time GRAMMY® nominee has received a “Best Jazz Vocal Album” nod for every project she’s released in the last decade.

10 FRIDAY

OUTSIDE+ PRESENTS

Warren Miller’s Daymaker

NOV 22

SPECIAL PERFORMANCE

CHARLES LLOYD 85TH

Birthday Celebration with Jason Moran, Larry Grenadier, and Brian Blade

Subscribe today!

Scan the QR CODE, call the BOX OFFICE or GO ONLINE to reserve your seats or make a gift.

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

INDEPENDENT.COM

Doublewide Kings NOV 19

DEC 2

TIERNEY SUTTON BAND

MARCH

28

PRESENT

ARTURO SANDOVAL

FEBRUARY

10

EARL MINNIS PRESENTS &

STATE STREET BALLET ACADEMY PRESENTS

Rudolph DEC 3

JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION


Breaking the Stigma

of Homelessness!

PHS landlords have shifted their thinking and rented to over 1,000 homeless people, including families with children, veterans & veteran families and individuals.


our Mission Partners in Housing Solutions helps people who are experiencing homelessness to secure and retain permanent housing through our network of private landlords.

People who experience homelessness face hardships that often lead to discrimination and exclusion which create added housing barriers.

BREAKING THE STIGMA ABOUT HOMELESSNESS Misconception vs Reality

All of our clients would rather live in a home than on the streets.

Employment

Seeking

Unemployed

• Homeless people choose to be homeless • Homeless people don’t work • Homeless people are uneducated

16%

4%

6%

57%

14%

No Diploma

28%

Disabled

Some Higher Education

38%

High School Graduates

40%

PHS 2021 Housing Data

What We Do

We partner to build community support and empower people to address housing barriers

College Degree

Retired

44% Employed

Education

We match our clients to housing opportunities based on their needs

We work with and support landlords to bridge the gap to housing

We have built and continue to maintain a network of over 190 landlords with trust at the core of these relationships


We have housed over 1,000 people in six years including…

112

Veterans & Veteran Family Members

380 households placed:

460

Children

180

142 in Santa Barbara 149 77

in Santa Maria

12

Disabled Adults & Children

in Lompoc Out of County

What PHS offers, “levels the playing field” for those that have struggled to stay housed in a very competitive rental market. By offering additional rental support, incentives, hotline, and loss prevention, a landlord can consider PHS candidates with confidence. -Krystal- PHS Landlord “With the help of PHS I was able to do what I needed to do for me and my son, so he can have a brighter future.” - PHS Client City Net has had positive experiences working with Partner’s in Housing. We are impressed with their ability to advocate for our clients’ tenancy and promote client choice in the housing navigation process. They have created many long lasting relationships with landlords and partnering agencies through responsive communication and problem solving. Their niche in housing navigation has filled in the gaps that some traditional street outreach programs cannot always fill-- and for that, our outreach teams are grateful. -Emily-PHS Partner

Partners in Housing Solutions is only six years old but is doing perhaps one of the hardest, yet most impactful things for the homeless, helping house them.


How To Get Involved Join our Landlord Network: (805)714-0389 DONATE Help us further our work by visiting partnersinhousingsolutions.org

Landlords and Property Managers Please join Partners in Housing Solutions for a Landlords Engagement Event in Santa Barbra at Workzones at Paseo Nuevo On Friday December 2nd at noon Meet a participating landlord and learn more about our organization RSVP to info@partnersinhousingsolutions.org (805)714-0389

(805) 803-1584 | info@partnersinhousingsolutions.org www.partnersinhousingsolutions.org


NOV. 17-23

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE

TERRY ORTEGA

by

VICTORIA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COURTESY

17 THURSDAY 11/

THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

11/17:

UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Matthew Whitaker Out

with two acclaimed albums including 2021’s Connections, 20-yearold American jazz pianist Matthew Whittaker will make his S.B. debut. 8pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: $15; GA: $30-$45. Call (805) 893-3535 or email info@ artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

11/17: The Couture Pattern Museum Insider Series: Look Inside Couture Take a look at four

11/17: Trail Talks: The History of Rincon Point: From the Chumash through the Surfers Join area writer Vince

1957 couture dresses and learn about steel bones, corselettes, waist-stays, and petticoats and the materials used during the golden age of couture. Workzones, Paseo Nuevo 2nd Floor, 351 Paseo Nuevo. $25. Email contact@couturepattern museum.com.

Burns for a talk about his and Stephen Bates’s book Rincon Point (Images of America) about the Queen of the Coast and one of the premier surfing spots in the world with a rich history. 6:30-7:30pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free.

couturepatternmuseum.com/ events

11/17: Chumash Maritime History: Past, Present, & Future Storyteller and researcher Chumash Elder Puchuk Ya’ia’c (Alan Salazar) will share stories and his knowledge of the history of the ocean plank canoes known as tomols. 7-9pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free-$20. Call (805) 962-8404 or email info@sbmm.org.

tinyurl.com/RinconTrailTalk

11/17-11/18: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, or, The Night They Missed the Forest for the Trees The S.B. Junior High Performing Arts Club and State Street Ballet’s Library Dances present this unique adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Follow teenagers, fairies, workers, royalty, and a grand prankster as they collide in the forest on a summer night. 7pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. $5-$10. luketheatre.org/events

sbmm.org/santa-barbara-events

11/17: County of S.B. South Coast Housing Element Workshop Learn

11/17: Film Screening and Discussion: Altiplano Watch 2009’s Altiplano

about the County’s housing element process and discuss solutions to local housing challenges. Attend in person or view virtually. Spanish translation will be available. 6pm. S.B. County Planning Commission Hearing Rm., 123 E. Anapamu St. Free.

(Not Rated), which was shot in the high-altitude landscapes of the Andes Mountains of Peru and follows residents of an Andean village who find their community devastated by toxic mercury contamination from a nearby mine. A pre-recorded discussion between writer/ director team Jessica Woodworth and Peter Brosens, and moderator Stephen N. Borunda (Film and Media Studies, UCSB) will follow the screening. 7-9:45pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-4637.

carseywolf.ucsb.edu/events/

tinyurl.com/SBHousingWorkshop

11/17-11/19: SBCC Theatre Arts Department Presents The Importance of Being Earnest The talented SBCC students will perform Oscar Wilde’s funny and engaging comedy about three couples navigating love with a little deception, flattery, and witty dialogue. Directed by Katie Laris. Thu.-Fri.: 7:30pm; Sat.: 2pm. Jurkowitz Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 969 Cliff Dr. $10-$18. Call (805)

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

Matthew Whitaker

SUNDAY

WEDNESDAY

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

cfsb.info/sat 965-5935.

theatregroupsbcc.com/current-season 11/17-11/20: UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Presents The Government Inspector Enjoy Nikolai Gogol’s satire of small-town corruption in this hilariously relevant story of greed, corruption, and stupidity of the Imperial Russian government. Thu.-Fri.: 7:30pm; Sat.: 2 and 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Hatlen Theater, UCSB. $13-$19. Call (805) 893-2064.

Shows on Tap

11/17-11/20, 11/23: Lost Chord Guitars Thu: World Jazz Guitarist Ethan

“Emaginario” Margolis, 7:30-9:30pm. Free. Fri.: Alan Satchwell Jazz Trio, 8-11:30pm. Free. Sat.: The Pollen Collective, 8-10:30pm. $10. Sun.: Arwen Lewis, 8-10:30pm. Free; suggested donation: $5. Wed.: Brandon Johnas, 7:30-9:30pm. Free; suggested donation: $5. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Ages 21+. Call (805) 331-4363.

lostchordguitars.com

11/17-11/18, 11/20, 11/23: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: The Living Room Jam hosted by Jason Libs, 8pm. $10. Fri.: ENT Legends Present: Duckwrth with Elujay, 8pm. $22. Ages 18+. Sun.: The Elemento’s Project with Special Guests, noon-3pm. $10. Wed.: The Hansen Duckwrth Family Songfest, 7pm. Free. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

11/18, 11/20: Eos Lounge Fri.: Shiba San, 9pm. $18.54. Sun.: Baad Sunday, noon. Free. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410. eoslounge.com 11/18-11/19: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Do No Harm, 6-8pm. Sat.: The New Vibe, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

11/18-11/19: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: Moneluv, 8-10pm. Sat.: Goodlanders, 8-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco .com 11/18-11/20: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Dusty Jugz, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Deanna

D’Amico White, noon-4pm; Indigenous, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Sam Mitchell, noon4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

COURTESY

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

11/18: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

11/18: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800.

uptownlounge805.com/events 11/21: The Red Piano Teresa Russell

and Tom Buenger, 7:30pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 3581439. theredpiano.com/schedule

FRIDAY 11/18 COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

theaterdance.ucsb.edu

11/17-11/19: SBHS Theatre Presents The Crucible This modern retelling of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, about the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts during 1692-1693, will have a modern retelling with added choreography while still keeping true to the original plot and narrative. Thu.-Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 2 and 7pm. S.B. High School Theatre, 700 E Anapamu St. $10-$25. Call (805) 966-9101 x5209 or email sbhstheatreboxoffice@gmail .com. sbhstheatre.com/tickets

11/17: Opening Reception and Panel Discussion: Barry Berkus This exhibition will feature the collection of local architect Barry Berkus. Insights and discussion into Berkus’s life and collection will be discussed with Jeffrey Berkus, Dane Goodman, and Tony Askew. 4-6pm. Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art, 955 La Paz Rd. Free. Call (805) 565-6162 or email museum@westmont. edu. westmont.edu/berkus

Detail of “East Mesa Girls” by Edward S. Curtis

11/18:

Storytelling: Native People Through the Lens of Edward S. Curtis The photographs of Edward S. Curtis were meant to

create a photo and ethnographic record of Indigenous peoples living in Western regions from the Mexican border to Alaskan shores, motivated by a belief that U.S. government policy and the land grabs of American settlers might wipe away Native lifeways forever. Curtis’s vision endeavors to present his breathtaking photographs within the context of American colonialism. Storytelling runs through April 30, 2023. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$18. Thu.-Mon., Wed.: 10am-5pm. Call (805) 682-4711. sbnature.org/storytelling

11/18-11/20: Reggae on the Mountain 2022 Join for camping, world cuisine, craft beer and wine, a vendor village, live art, a kids’ and wellness village, yoga, and music on multiple stages from Ziggy Marley, Steel Pulse, Ky-Mani Marley, Don Carlos,

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

29


SBCC THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT presents Showcase Presents a Student

T HE COURTESY

7 OSCAR WILDE’S

IMPORTANCE 5

BEING T

EARNEST

11/18:

Art From Scrap Block Printing Workshop Carve original designs on rubber blocks to create single color prints in this hands-on workshop for adults taught by Rachel Palmer just in time to create holiday cards or wrapping paper. 6-8pm. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. $30. Call (805) 884-0459 or email jill@exploreecology.org. exploreecology.org/event COURTESY

Yellowman, and more. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Life Rolls On Foundation. Visit the website for pass information. Fri.: 7pm through Sun.: 11:30pm. Live Oak Camp, 4600 CA-154.

by Henry Lewis, Henry Shields Directed by Katie Laris and Jonathan Sayer

reggaeonthemountain.com

11/18: Daughtry at Chumash This Grammy-nominated

NOVEMBER 9-19, 2022 JURKOWITZ THEATRE | SBCC WEST CAMPUS www.theatregroupsbcc.com | 805.965.5935

Thank you toThank ourto our you season season sponsor: sponsor:

Sunday LIVE 11/13 CAPTIONING @ 2pm

INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

11/18: Presentation and Book-Signing: Mike Ritter and John Ogden Meet and talk with and get your books

sbmm.org/santa-barbara-events

Formerly the CALM Antique Show

NOV 18,19 & 20, 2022

Fri 11- 6 , SAT 11-6, Sun 11-4

at the Earl Warren Showgrounds with FREE PARKING 3400 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, California

From 17th Century to Mid-Century... Over 60 Quality Dealers from around the country offer a wide array of furniture, paintings, jewelry, silver, china, textiles, Asian, and much much more.

11/18: LCCCA 3rd Anniversary Art Walk La Cumbre Center for Creative Arts invites you to enjoy live music and more at Elevate, Fine Line, and Illuminations Galleries. 5-8pm. La Cumbre Plaza, 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. lcccasb.com/events

SATURDAY 11/19 11/19-11/20: The S.B. Symphony Presents Wisdom of the Sky, Water, Earth This program will offer a symphonic and visual homage to our region’s centuries-old Chumash heritage from area composer and preservationist Cody Westheimer. Nir Kabaretti will conduct this repertoire that will deliver a deeply moving and moody tribute. Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 3pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $35-$175. Call (805) 899-2222 or email boxoffice@granadasb.org. Read more on pg. 41.

11/19-11/21,11/23:

Exhibition: 7th Annual Holiday All-Member Exhibit and Mata Ortiz Pottery Market All 28 juried members are on display with contemporary work of many genres from abstract to realism and figurative to urban landscape in a variety of media. Also on view will be artistic pottery created by Mata Ortiz, from Chihuahua, Mexico. Thu.-Sat., Mon., Wed.: 11am-5pm. Sun.: noon-5pm. 10 West Gallery, 10 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 770-7711 or email director@10westgallery.com. 10westgallery.com

11/19: Bart’s Books Author Talk: Leanne Hinton Originally published in 1994, Flutes of Fire: An Introduction to Native California Languages, Revised and Updated, Leanne Hinton’s informative classic on Native culture-keeping and an introduction to Native California languages, is now in a newly expanded edition spotlighting 25 years of intervening linguistic activism keeping Indigenous voice, viewpoint, and tradition alive. 5-6pm. Bart’s Books, 302 W. Matilija St., Ojai. Free. tinyurl.com/FlutesOfFire 11/19: Film Screening: Gratitude Revealed, An Epic Journey 40 Years in the Making The S.B. Permaculture Network presents Gratitude Revealed, a new film by Louie Schwartzberg, director of Fantastic Fungi, with images of the natural world and extraordinary stories of luminaries such as Norman Lear, Jack Kornfield, Dr. Christine Carter, and more. A Q&A with Louie Schwartzberg will follow the screening. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 6:30-9pm. 721 E. Cota St. $10. Call (805) 962-2571.

tinyurl.com/GratitudeRevealed

ticketing.granadasb.org/events

Something for everyone! Tickets available at the door. $6 w/this AD•$5 Senior (62+) Child (Under 12 Free)

For dealer inquiries contact Gae Ann Mchale 619-925-2346

SBAntiqueShow.com THE INDEPENDENT

of music and story, and enjoy the sounds of Spencer Barnitz that span a career that started in the 1980s with his heartthrob band of towheads, The Tan. Footage from this live event will be included in an upcoming documentary about Spencer Barnitz. 7pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $36. Call (805) 9630761 or email boxoffice@lobero.com. lobero.org/whats-on

signed by author Mike Ritter and publisher John Ogden, including Ritter’s recently released book with Jack McCoy, GRAJAGAN – Surfing in the Tiger’s Lair: 1972-84, about the early days of discovery at Grajagan (East Java, Indonesia) one of the crown jewels of surfing and the site of the world’s first surf camp. 6-8pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free. Call (805) 962-8404 or email info@sbmm.org.

Decorative Arts &Vintage Show & Sale

30

11/18: Hello S.B. Productions Presents An Evening Honoring Spencer the Gardener Celebrate a special night

TIM CADIENTE

DIRECTED BY SAUNDRA McCLAIN

American rock band formed by lead vocalist Chris Daughtry will bring their Dearly Beloved tour to the Samala Showroom. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $59-$89. Ages 21+. chumashcasino.com/entertainment

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

11/19: S.B. Music Club Concert Award-winning violinist Sofia Malvinni will perform a program titled Masterworks for Violin Solo and works from Johann Sebastian Bach, Eugéne Ysaÿe, and Niccolò Paganini. 3pm. First United Methodist Church, 305 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 964-3211.

sbmusicclub.org

11/19: Doublewide Kings This S.B.-based band will bring a brand-new musical and visual concert experience that will include original material, classic rock favorites, special guests, and other surprises. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $50; VIP: $71; Gold Circle: $100. Call (805) 963-0761.

lobero.org/events

INDEPENDENT.COM

11/19:

The Cult Legendary rock band The Cult will

be in S.B. in support of their new album, Under The Midnight Sun, the band’s 11th studio album of their 30-plus-year career that includes LPs such as Love, Sonic Temple, Ceremony, and more. 8pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $39.50-$129.50. Call (805) 963-9580. thearlingtontheatre.com


NOV. 17-23

“Painting a Hat – Nakoaktok,” 1914, Edward S. Curtis

Storytelling Native People through the Lens of Edward S. Curtis

11/19: The Good Good Show Enjoy craft beers while yukking it up at this month’s stand-up show that will feature Chey Bell, Kyle Ayers, Julie Weidmann, Cara Connors, and Omar Nava. 7:30-9pm. Night Lizard Brewing Co., 607 State St. $10. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/GoodGoodShowNov19

SUNDAY 11/20 11/20: Earl Minnis and Lobero Live Present The Immediate Family Powerhouse rockers Danny Kortchmar, Waddy Wachtel, Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel, and Steve Postell, aka The Immediate Family, out with 2021’s self-titled album, will bring unique sound to S.B. 7pm. Lobero Theater, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $36-$46; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org. Read more on pg. 43. lobero.org/events

11/20: Botanic Garden Nursery Chats: Fall Planting Tips Retail and Nursery Manager Matt Straka will share the best practices for planting with California native plants. 9:30-10:30am. S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Free-$18. Call (805) 682-4726 or email info@sbbotanicgarden.org. sbbotanicgarden.org/calendar

MONDAY 11/21 11/21: Parker Quartet—Chamber Music Concert For their fourth performance at SBMA, the Grammy Award–winning Parker Quartet will play Caroline Shaw’s Valencia, Ligeti’s Quartet No. 2, and Beethoven’s Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 127. 7:30-9pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $20-$25. tickets.sbma.net

TUESDAY 11/22 11/22: Yin Yoga + Restore Series Let Shannon Stone guide you through this class by candlelight that will be centered by the connection to the elements. Enjoy hot tea, get cozy, and release any mind-body tension. Headphones and yoga blocks (limited number) will be provided. 6:30-7:45pm. Carousel House, 223 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $20. Call (213) 925-3939 or email hello@santabarbarabeachyoga.com. tinyurl.com/YinYogaNov22

11/22: Outside+ Presents Warren Miller’s Film Daymaker Miller’s 73rd annual ski and snowboard film, Daymaker, will take you on a journey to British Columbia’s Monashee mountains to Greece’s Olympus mountains and to Alaska and beyond. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $21-$38. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org.

lobero.org/events

WEDNESDAY 11/23 11/23: Morning Music Meditation with Adam Phillips Join in-person or online to participate in a morning meditation featuring instrumental and vocal music by Music Director Adam Phillips. 10am. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church of Goleta, 380 N. Fairview Ave. Free. Call (805) 967-1416. tinyurl.com/MeditationNov23

NOW OPE N Influenced by the pictorialist movement of the early twentieth century, Edward S. Curtis set out to create a photo and ethnographic record of Indigenous peoples living in Western regions from the Mexican border to Alaskan shores. 100 years later, Indigenous people still contend with “Indian” stereotypes that are consequences of Edward Curtis’s vision. This exhibit endeavors to present his breathtaking photogravures within the context of American colonialism.

2559 Puesta del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105 sbnature.org/storytelling

Sponsored by Knight Real Estate Group of Village Properties, First Republic Bank, Kathleen Kalp and Jim Balsitis, Kelly and Tory Milazzo

Shopping Local 11/17-11/23: 55th Annual Yes Store This S.B. tradition since 1968 will offer shopping for arts, crafts, custom fine jewelry, clothing, and so much more from past and new area artists. Open through December 24. 10am-7pm. La Arcada Plaza, 1100 State St. Free. Call (805) 966-9777. theyesstore.com

COURTESY

11/18-11/20: Santa Barbara Antique, Decorative Arts, & Vintage Show & Sale Shop from more than 70 dealers with items such as furniture, jewelry, art, pottery, textiles, and clothes in different styles. Fri.-Sat.: 11am-6pm; Sun.: 11am-4pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free-$8. Call (805) 484-1291 or email stpantiqueshows@aol.com. sbantiqueshow.com

11/19:

Ready to Hang 2022: A Panoply of Local Art Ready to Hang

presents a unique opportunity to see new works that are 12"x12"in size by our entire community of artists in one show. 4-7pm. Community Arts Workshop (CAW), 631 Garden St. Free. Read more on pg. 41.

tinyurl.com/ReadyToHang

11/20: Goodland Market Shop local and support small business while enjoying coffee, brunch, and mimosas (for purchase) on the patio. 11am-4pm. Old Town Coffee, 5877 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Free. Email kayla@meetmeatthe.market.

tinyurl.com/GoodlandMarket

2 Lessons For $45 CALL 805.963.6658 TO SCHEDULE

Special for new students only * May only be used once * INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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31


ALWAYS

AMAZING.

NE VER

ROUTINE.

The Arlington Theatre

­

­

The Arlington Theatre S A N T A

B A R B A R A ,

FREE ADMISSION

C A

• USA vs. Wales: Monday, 11/21 - 11:00am • Netherlands vs. Ecuador: Friday, 11/25 - 8:00am • USA vs. England: Friday, 11/25 - 11:00am

See Full Game Schedule: ArlingtonTheatreSB.com Fri 11/18

BAD AXE

Wed 11/23

THE MENJ

DEVOTION

STRANGE WORLD

GLASS ONION

BONES & ALL

DAUGHTRY NOVEMBER 18 | FRIDAY | 8PM

BARDO

SHE SAID

ENTERTAINMENT

GIFT CARD

THE CHOSEN

LOS TIGRES DEL NORTE

SOLD OUT

DECEMBER 2 | FRIDAY | 8PM

SPIRITED

PINOCCHIO

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Nov 18-24, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

JOHNNY MATHIS DECEMBER 16 | FRIDAY | 8PM

SEE WEBSITE FOR FULL SCHEDULE: She Said* (R): Fri, Mon/Tue: 4:45, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Pinocchio (PG13): Fri, Mon/Tue: 4:35, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 4:35, 7:15. Ticket to Paradise (PG13): Fri, Mon: 4:55, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:20, 4:55, 7:30. Tue: 4:55. Strange World* (PG): Tue: 7:30.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140

SEE WEBSITE FOR FULL SCHEDULE: The Menu* (R): Fri: 1:50, 4:30, 7:05, 9:45. Sat/Sun: 11:15, 1:50, 4:30, 7:05, 9:45. Mon/Tue: 3:10, 5:45, 8:25. Spirited (PG13): Fri-Sun: 12:30, 3:40, 6:40, 9:35. Mon: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. Tue: 1:30, 4:30. Black Adam (PG13): Fri, Mon: 2:20, 5:20, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 11:20, 2:20, 5:20, 8:15. Tue: 2:20, 5:20. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever* (PG13): Fri: 12:45, 2:00, 3:00, 4:15, 5:30, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:00. Sat/Sun: 11:30, 12:45, 2:00, 3:00, 4:15, 5:30, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:00. Mon/Tue: 2:00, 3:00, 4:15, 5:30, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00. Devotion* (PG13): Tue: 7:30. Bones and All* (R): Tue: 8:15.

NYE DISCO BOOGIE BALL DECEMBER 31 | SATURDAY | 9PM

HITCHCOCK Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER.

Welcome to Freedom

371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

SEE WEBSITE FOR FULL SCHEDULE: Bad Axe (NR): Fri, Mon/Tue: 5:05, 7:45. Sat/Sun:2:30, 5:05, 7:45. The Banshees of Inisherin (R): Fri, Mon/Tue: 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:20, 5:00, 7:30.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

No films scheduled 32

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NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

SEE WEBSITE FOR FULL SCHEDULE: Spirited (PG13): Fri-Tue: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever* (PG13): Fri: 2:25, 3:45, 4:45, 5:55/3D, 7:15, 8:20, 9:30. Sat: 12:15, 1:15, 2:25, 3:45, 4:45, 5:55/3D, 7:15, 8:20, 9:30. Sun: 12:15, 1:15, 2:25, 3:45, 4:45, 5:55/3D, 7:15, 8:20. Mon/Tue: 2:25, 3:45, 4:45, 5:55, 7:15. 8:20.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

SEE WEBSITE FOR FULL SCHEDULE: Bardo (R): Fri, Mon: 4:15, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 12:45, 4:15, 7:45. The Chosen Season 3: Ep 1&2: (NR): Fri, Mon: 4:00, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 12:40, 4:00, 7:20. Tue: 4:00. The Menu* (R): Fri, Mon/Tue: 5:20, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:40, 5:20, 8:00. Pinocchio (PG13): Fri, Mon: 4:30, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 1:50, 4:30, 7:05. Tue: 4:30. Black Adam (PG13): Fri, Mon: 4:40, 7:35. Sat/Sun: 1:40, 4:40, 7:35. Tue: 4:40. Strange World* (PG): Tue: 6:00, 7:20. Bones and All* (R): Tue: 8:15.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

SEE WEBSITE FOR FULL SCHEDULE: She Said* (R): Fri: 5:00, 8:00. Sat-Tue: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Armageddon Time (R): Fri: 7:30. Sat-Mon: 2:05, 7:30. Tue: 1:45, 7:30. Tar (R): Fri-Sat: 4:15. Tue: 4:15. Ticket to Paradise (PG13): Fri: 4:50, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 1:40, 4:50, 7:45. Tue: 1:40, 7:45. Lyle Lyle Crocodile (PG): Fri: 4:25, 7:00. Sat-Mon: 1:50, 4:25, 7:00. Tue: 1:50, 4:25. Devotion* (PG13): Tue: 4:20, 7:20.


Nov 18 - 24

From Africa with Love

ANDREW ANTONE

Nature

living

“DELIGHTFUL LOVE LETTER TO A FASHION ICON” INDIEWIRE

Andrew Antone (left) with husband Patrick

A

ndrew Antone and his husband always knew they wanted to go on an African safari for their honeymoon. And when they finally got the chance last March, after COVID put the kibosh on earlier plans, Antone was sure he would take a lot of pictures. He bought some new equipment and rented an extra-long lens so he’d be ready for anything.

FRI: 3:30pm SAT: 2:00pm & 7:30pm SUN: 2:00pm MON - THURS: 5:00pm & 7:30pm

New Photography Book Contributes to Zoo’s Conservation Programs by Tyler Hayden What Antone, a musician, designer, and the creative director of a Santa Barbara software company, didn’t realize at the time was that the stunning images he’d capture of wildlife through the grasslands and waterways of Kenya, Botswana, and Tanzania would turn into a 456-page coffee table book and exhibition at the Santa Barbara Zoo. “I had absolutely no plans to do anything like this,” he said recently. “But when we started looking at the images, I really began seeing something that needed to be shared.” AFRICA’s arresting stills of lions, leopards, elephants, giraffes, zebras, and other creatures, many of them highly endangered, were born out of love, Antone explained. “Love for animals, love for travel, love for life.” But their real value, we went on, is the consciousness he hopes they generate around preservation as the continent’s fragile ecosystem faces the constant threats of climate change, poaching, and habitat destruction. “In a couple generations, this could all be gone,” he said. A member and donor of the Santa Barbara Zoo for more than 15 years, Antone is a big supporter of its world-class conservation and education programs. In fact, 50 percent of the proceeds from the book and limited-edition giclées from the show will go directly to those efforts. One of the more rewarding parts of the trip, Antone went on, was seeing his husband, Patrick—who started volunteering at the Zoo when he was 12 and is now an employee—basking in his element.

"VICIOUSLY ENTERTAINING" LOS ANGELES TIMES

Every day of their two-week trip was packed with adventure, Antone said. They’d wake up at 5:30 and be in the open-air jeeps by 6:30, planning their routes around the animals’ behavior. Elephants, he explained, were the easiest to photograph. “They’re just so majestic,” he said. “Everything they did felt like they were posing for the camera.” Cape buffalo and hippos were the trickiest. But never was there any barrier between him and his subjects. “To be less than six feet away from and look into the eyes of these animals in their natural, unadulterated habitat, was an experience that can’t be communicated in words,” Antone said. “My hope is the book offers a foray in that experience.” Antone was similarly struck by the attitude of the people he encountered in his travels. “They’re stewards of the land,” he explained. “There’s a lot we can learn from their mentality—they aren’t the ones who are destroying their backyard.” If AFRICA can help foster a similar awareness over the fragility of this unique place, Antone said, he’ll be happy. Because the question hasn’t yet been answered: “How are we going to protect this world?”

411

AFRICA can be purchased at the Santa Barbara Zoo Gift Shop or online at Amazon.com. The exhibition runs until January 31, 2023, at the Santa Barbara Zoo Discovery Pavilion.

SAT: 4:30pm SUN: 8:00pm MON - THURS: 2:00pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

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NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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Join us in reading November’s book of the month! NOVEMBER’S THEME: F A N T A S Y, S C I - F I

Discussion:

Wednesday, November 30, 6pm, on Zoom BOOK OF T HE MONT H :

The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin

Register at independent.com/ indybookclub

Get tickets at sbzoo.org/zoolights Santa Barbara Zoo • (805) 962-5339 • Just off Cabrillo Blvd. at East Beach • sbzoo.org

Volunteer With Us!

(805) 692-2226 zoe@sbhabitat.org sbhabitat.org/volunteer

JENNIE K. WELSH MEDIATION welshmediation.com (805) 259-8097

34

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NOVEMBER 17, 2022

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Welcome to the World Cup COURTESY

Sports If they hope to advance out of Group B this month, the Americans need the three points for a victory against Wales, Ybarra said. The exclusion of high-scoring Javier “Chicharito” Hernandez from Mexico’s roster does not sit well with Ybarra, who thinks another attacking player, Raúl Jiménez, lacks match fitness. France won the 2018 World Cup and has two dynamic players in Kyrian Mbappé and Karim Benzema. Germany and Spain will try to reign over the same group. The Netherlands, another European power, cannot be discounted. How about an African team—Senegal? Morocco? And, oh, Canada finished ahead of Mexico and the U.S. in qualifying. “Things are so crazy in the world,” said Raúl Gil, who will welcome fans to his Westside restaurant, El Zarape. “Why not in the World Cup?”

HERE IS THE ARLINGTON THEATRE’S SCHEDULE: • U.S.A. vs. Wales, Monday, Nov. 21, 11:00 a.m. • Netherlands vs. Ecuador, Friday, Nov. 25, 8:00 a.m. • U.S.A. vs. England, Friday, Nov. 25, 11:00 a.m. CHECKERED PRIDE: Croatia’s fans celebrated along Ortega Street when their team reached the final of the World Cup in 2018. France won the title match, 4-2.

W

hen the men’s World Cup comes around every four years, Santa Barbara is usually ready for a rollicking summer party. But this year’s month-long soccer tournament, featuring 32 countries from all corners of the globe, conflicts with school and work schedules and competes with the NFL and NBA. It’s because of the fierce summer heat in Qatar, a controversial choice as the host country in more ways than one.

Press Room and Arlington Are the Places to Watch the Games by John Zant Because of the time difference, it will be more of a show for coffee sippers than beer drinkers, although it’s been claimed that a pint of Guinness is a nutritious breakfast. The earliest matches in the first round will start at 2 a.m.; the latest, including all three U.S.A. matches, kick off at 11 a.m. Qatar will play the opening game against Ecuador on Sunday, November 20, at 8 a.m., followed by two weeks of competition within eight groupings of four, with the top two in each group advancing to the knockout rounds. It will be a week before Christmas when the champions raise the trophy on December 18. There will be an epicenter of intense fandom on West Ortega Street in downtown Santa Barbara, where the redoubtable Press Room, the self-described World Cup headquarters, sits across from Dargan’s Irish Pub. The Press Room will be open for every match, as it was in 2002 when it was the only bar on the West Coast to screen the matches from Japan and South Korea in the middle of the night. Dargan’s plans to open an hour before 8 a.m. and 7 a.m. games. The Press Room, inhabited throughout the year by English Premier League fans, will be teeming when England faces off against Iran at 5 a.m. Monday, and when England faces the United States the following Friday. “We’re going to be slammed,” proprietor James Rafferty said. There will be plenty of room up State Street at the Arlington Theatre, which announced it will put seven firstrounders and all the knockout matches on the big screen.

Admission will be free, with the concession stand and bar selling food and beverages. Between Santa Barbara’s own sophisticated soccer fans and international visitors—Rafferty once logged patrons from 35 different nations over the course of a World Cup—there should be plenty of interest. The eventual champion will likely be one of the seven countries that previously won the trophy—an eighth titlist, Italy, did not qualify this year—Argentina, Brazil, England, France, Germany, Spain, and Uruguay. Rafferty would like to see England, with steady Harry Kane and young Jude Bellingham, go all the way. Peter Moore, founder of the Santa Barbara Sky FC pro team slated to play in 2024, also is pulling for his native England but said, “I’m old enough to remember more than 50 years of heartache,” since England won its only crown in 1966. Moore expects Argentina to make a strong showing with Lionel Messi, “the best player of the generation,” taking his last shot at the title. Rudy Ybarra, Santa Barbara’s first homegrown professional player and longtime coach, agrees that Argentina is formidable because of Messi’s supporting cast, but he sees Brazil winning its sixth World Cup with a cast of “nine attacking players” led by Neymar. Gustavo Argredano and his wife, Maria Licon, both played soccer, and they are used to waking up at 4:30 a.m. to watch a game from Europe. “The World Cup unifies us,” Licon said. “For three weeks, we can forget about problems.” They would like to see a new champion—Portugal, with Cristiano Ronaldo; or South Korea, with Son Heung-min. “Once the ref blows the whistle, they never stop running,” Gustavo said. Bernard Hicks grew up in Brooklyn an avid basketball player and fan, but when he moved here and became the athletic director at the Westside Boys & Girls Club, the kids taught him to appreciate the skills of soccer. “It’s my second favorite sport,” he said. “It’s basketball with your feet.” Hicks looks for the stars like Messi and Ronaldo to come up big in Qatar. Team U.S.A.’s chances are “slim and none,” Rafferty said, but Ybarra likes the youth of the team, with a true star in Christian Pulisic, although they should be stronger in 2026 when the World Cup comes to the U.S., Canada, and Mexico.

• France vs. Denmark, Saturday, Nov. 26, 8:00 a.m. • Argentina vs. Mexico, Saturday, Nov. 26, 11:00 a.m. • Spain vs. Germany, Sunday, Nov. 27, 11:00 a.m. • U.S.A. vs. Iran, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 11:00 a.m. • All Round of 16 (Dec. 3-6), Quarterfinals (Dec. 9-10), and Semifinal matches (Dec. 13-14). • Third-Place Match (Dec. 17, 7 a.m.) and Final (Dec. 18, 7 a.m.). END OF THE ROAD: The college soccer season came to a disappointing end for UCSB. Two late-season losses at UC Riverside—including a 1-0 setback in Saturday’s Big West championship match—cost the Gauchos (10-4-6) a berth NCAA men’s tournament. They had a 2-1-1 record against the rest of the tournament field, including a 3-1 win over No. 8–seeded Oregon State. Noting that UCR is matched against Portland, with the winner going to Oregon State, Gaucho forward Finn Ballard McBride said, “I feel we could have gone far in the tournament.” Ballard McBride scored 13 goals, ranking him fourth in the nation, but UCR denied him Saturday. The senior from Sydney will be pulling for Australia’s Socceroos in the World Cup. He’s hoping France, the favorite in their group, will be the latest defending champion to underperform. IN THE HUNT: Several area teams are still experiencing postseason success. Westmont College women’s soccer (14-0-3) is bound for the NAIA championships after defeating Ottawa (Arizona) 2-1 in the Golden State Athletic Conference final. The Warrior volleyball team (22-6) also received an NAIA invite. Bishop Diego High’s football team (9-3) will play a CIF Division 3 semifinal game on Friday (Nov. 18) at Upland after upsetting previously unbeaten El Modena, 31-21. SBCC expects to receive a bid to a community college football bowl game (Nov. 26 or Dec. 3); the Vaqueros (9-1) reeled off nine consecutive victories and claimed an outright American Pacific League title by shellacking Santa Monica last Saturday, 65-27. UCSB women’s volleyball is still in season; the Gauchos (14-2 in the Big West) will host a showdown against Hawai‘i (15-1) on November 25. n

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DOCTORS WITHOUT WALLS BENEFIT CONCERT

Register at sbhra.org under the Events Calendar!

Fa-la-la-la-la, la-la-la-la! SAVE THE DATE!! Gnome for the Holidays!

Join us on Wednesday, December 7 at 11:30AM-1:30PM Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort (formerly Fess Parker Hotel)!! EARLY BIRD ONLINE (ends November 15) Bonus! Includes complimentary two raffle tickets Say What? SBHRA Gnome, I'm not kidding! $40 Member $55 Nonmember

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With Special Guest: Omar Velasco Marjorie Luke Theatre • Thursday, December 8

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TICKETS: General Admission: $55 • VIP Admission - includes Song Circle 6pm: $125

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Support your new community Sharehouse! To discover and donate:

issue publishing Wednesday, November 23

EARLY ADVERTISING DEADLINE: Friday, November 18 at noon Contact your advertising representative at advertising@independent.com Santa Barbara

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cannabis

FOOD &DRINK

p.37

corner

BLAKE BRONSTAD PHOTOS

Crafting Healthier Edibles

BETTER-FOR-YOU BITES: Katherine Knowlton combines her culinary school background, concern for transparent sourcing, and nano extraction technology to produce a lower-dose but faster-acting cannabis edible called Happy Chance that’s neither gummy nor chocolate.

reational purposes in 2016, Katherine Knowlton was a culinary school grad living in San Francisco, where she worked as a food stylist and recipe developer. “I was super pumped up about cannabis becoming legal, but I couldn’t really eat any of the edibles,” said Knowlton, whose “gut health challenges” made her avoid refined sugars. “Everything was gummy and everything else was chocolate. They were just candy.”

the shelves there,” said Knowlton of the popular Mission Street dispensary — and sold out in six days. Happy Chance is also available at the Sespe Creek Collective in Ojai, and, as of last month, for home delivery from Carpinteria to Isla Vista. “It’s been overwhelmingly positive,” she said of the initial response. “But it’s a long road ahead and there’s a lot to do to spread awareness.” She’s hosted demos at each dispensary, offering free, non-dosed samples of the strawberry-turmeric, blueberry-cinnamon, and mango-lime flavors to customers. Most have not seen edibles in Happy Chance’s fruit-bite form: The squishy squares taste and act like suspended jam, able to either be quickly chewed or slowly melt in your mouth. “People immediately assume that it’s a gummy,” she explained. “But when you have a non-medicated sample in front of you, you realize that it’s not a gummy, that it’s actually real food.” The lower dose — 2.5 milligrams of THC per tiny cube, compared to mind-bending gummies with 10mg or more — is a selling point for those seeking a mellow and managed experience. The same goes for the nano-encapsulation, which can elicit effects in just 15 to 30 minutes, depending on an individual’s metabolism and tolerance. (Traditional edibles can take an hour or more.) Combined with the organic ingredients and colorful packaging — which features a very content bear plopped on the ground — customers seem okay with paying the $30 per package, which is a bit higher than popular edibles in the $12 to $20 range. That lazy bear is directly tied to the brand name. “Happy Chance is a real place in the mountains of North Carolina,” said Knowlton, explaining that it was the name of her grandfather’s farm, where visitors were greeted by the sight of a wooden bear hugging a tree. Growing up in Charleston, South Carolina, she hung out a lot with her grandpa, whom everyone called “Big Dad,” enjoying the extensive Sunday dinners he made from scratch ingredients. “He was one of the biggest influences on me in the kitchen,” Knowlton said. “From a very early age, I always

Katherine Knowlton’s Happy Chance Provides a Low-Dose, Natural Alternative to Gummies by Matt Kettmann

She was well aware that many people just bought marijuana products to get high, but Knowlton knew many others using it as part of their wellbeing regime, tapping into cannabis to help with relaxation and sleeping (like her) or for the plant’s anti-inflammatory properties. “All of these gummies are putting sugar or corn syrup, which are inflammatory, together with cannabis,” she said. “It’s a counterintuitive thing.” Add to that concerns over nebulous sourcing and even scarier ingredients, like titanium dioxide, and Knowlton decided to start experimenting with her own edible recipes at home. Using a food processor and dehydrator, she tested more than 125 combinations of highquality fruits, spices, nuts, root vegetables, and Medjool date sugar to develop a final series of fruit bite recipes. She then tested infusions from about 10 different cannabis extract companies, finally settling on the fasteracting, nano-emulsion, solventless rosins developed by Green Rush Alliances in Santa Barbara, where Knowlton had moved in 2018. After pandemic delays, Knowlton released her brand Happy Chance this summer, offering three flavors of a “healthy, low-dose alternative to the modern-day gummy.” They were unveiled at The Farmacy on July 19 — “It was a massive win for us to be able to land on

loved cooking and entertaining.” During summers while at the University of South Carolina, and then for four years afterward, Knowlton lived in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. After managing two different restaurants, she felt her restaurant career had peaked. “There was no more going up,” she recalled. A 2014 road trip to California lured her 26-year-old self to San Francisco, where a human resources job for a private equity firm revealed that office life wasn’t right for her either. Her mom encouraged cooking school as a way to meet people, and Knowlton chose the San Francisco Cooking School, which paired six months of intensive classroom instruction with externships in real kitchens. “It was very, very hands-on,” said Knowlton, who learned to butcher lambs, build wood fires, gather huckleberries, and forage seaweed near Point Reyes in order to make kelp noodles. “That very much instilled in me that it does matter where our ingredients come from. I really learned the value of cooking for optimal health and well-being.” She found satisfaction in making her own food rather than buying it off of a grocery store shelf, a feeling further cemented by her externship at Lilo Lilo Yacht Club. During a trip back to Charleston, she ran into former high school classmate Nathan Garrison at a Christmas party. He had co-founded a shark deterrent magnetic technology company called SharkBanz and was living in Santa Barbara. They fell in love, and then she fell in love with the creative culture of Santa Barbara too. “Santa Barbara is a place that breeds entrepreneurs,” she said, referring, among others, to Nathan as well as his brother, Tucker Garrison, who runs the superfood company Imlakesh Organics. “There are so many amazing people in this community doing their own thing. I wanted to be part of that too.” She hopes Happy Chance makes people care about what’s in their cannabis, much like we do with other foods and drinks. “It’s starting a new conversation around edibles, and spreading awareness that cannabis can be a better-for-you product,” Knowlton explained. “People do want it. They just don’t know it’s available yet.”

FOOD & DRINK

W

hen California voters legalized cannabis for rec-

See eathappychance.com and eathappychancedelivery.com.

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Santa Barbara

athletes

Sasha Vujačić’s Aleksander Wines COURTESY

EATS & DRINKS All you can eat “Buffet” is back Mon to Sat 11.30am to 2.30pm FLAVOROFINDIASB.COM • 805 682 6561 • 3026 STATE STREET

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A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

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NOVEMBER 17, 2022

S

asha Vujačić stepped to the free-throw line

FOOD & DRINK

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm

FREE THROWS TO FREE RUN: Retired NBA basketball player Sasha Vujačić is connecting with his Slovenian roots by making wines with his family.

INDEPENDENT.COM

with 11.7 seconds remaining in Game 7 of the 2010 NBA finals and the Lakers clinging to an 81-79 lead over their arch-rival Boston Celtics. Under the most immense pressure that the game of basketball can offer, Vujačić calmly knocked down both shots, putting the game out of reach and forever etching his name in Lakers lore.

L.A. Lakers Star Now Making Paso Robles Bordeaux Blends by Victor Bryant

“I recognized the magnitude of that moment and the precious opportunity to bring the team one final step closer towards finishing our long season in the way we imagined we would: with a hard-fought victory against our historical rivals, the Boston Celtics,” Vujačić said. “That moment will live on forever in my mind and heart.” With his playing days behind him, Vujačić turned his attention toward a new passion: winemaking. Founded with the 2010 vintage, his Paso Robles–based wine brand, Aleskander, produces Bordelaise red blends, typically releasing just two bottlings each vintage. (Aleksander is Vujačić’s real first name, which is commonly shortened to the nickname Sasha.) Unlike most other wine labels created by public figures — from other NBA star brands by Dwyane Wade to hip-hop vintners like E-40 and Snoop Dogg to Hollywood-powered efforts by actors like Kurt Russell and Cameron Diaz — Aleksander is the fruit of a collective family effort. Vujačić became interested in wines during the early years of his professional basketball career. His father, Vaso, was exploring the wines of the northeastern Italian region of Friuli and learning about the diverse practices, approaches, and traditions that determine the quality and character of a wine. As Vaso shared his profound appreciation for wine with his son, they began to entertain the idea of producing a wine that would reflect their

palates and express their international roots. “Slovenia boasts a strong wine culture and is recognized as an important producer of wines specific to the area,” said Vujačić of his heritage. “Slovenia’s viniculture and its proximity to affluent bordering wine countries such as Austria and Italy enables people from that part of the world to develop a varied and sophisticated palate.” Vujačić and his family have found the Central Coast to be the ideal spot for a thriving winery. “Paso Robles offered the ideal growing conditions and soil for the Old World–style Bordeaux blend we had always imagined,” Vujačić said. “The neighboring area and the property that hosts our winery today also met the needs and preferences of the family. In short, it was love at first sight.” Vujačić will be introducing his Aleksander wines to Santa Barbara County on Friday, November 18, when Nella Kitchen & Bar in Los Olivos will host an intimate dinner featuring current and library releases. Attendees will have the opportunity to rub shoulders with the two-time NBA champion while enjoying several vintages expertly paired with a multi-course meal curated by Nella’s Executive Chef Luca Crestanelli. “We were introduced to Chef Luca of Nella by our great friend Roberto Facciolla from Toscana Ristorante in Brentwood,” Vujačić said. “With Chef Luca, we planned a special wine dinner event hosted by Nella for an evening of perfect pairings.” Tickets are $145 and can be booked at tinyurl.com/aleksanderwinedinner. “My basketball and winemaking careers bear many similarities,” said Vujačić, who also played with the Nets, Clippers, Knicks, and numerous international teams until his final season in 2018. “While everyone loves a good win and a good wine, these are only possible with an honest behind-the-scenes commitment to the pursuit of excellence. A strong work ethic, the prioritization of collective effort, and loyalty to one’s vision are crucial to success in both worlds. Both basketball and wine bring people together in meaningful ways.”

See aleksanderwine.com.


L’antica Pizzeria da Michele Opens Downtown Enjoy big discounts at Santa Barbara’s favorite Mexican restaurant! Available all day until we run out

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’antica Pizzeria da Michele has opened

BURITTO al pastor or al pastor blanco

only

Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. (counter service lunch), 4-6 p.m. (takeout only), and 6-9 p.m. (full-service dinner). Call (805) 770 8055 or visit damicheleusa.com.

$8.05

tuesday + thursday

all day until we run out

3 TACOS al pastor or al pastor blanco

friday

OAT BAKERY OPENS IN GOLETA: Oat Bakery,

which opened at 5 West Haley Street five years ago, has opened a new location at 231 South Magnolia Avenue in Goleta, the former home of Goodland Kitchen and Market. Old Town Goleta’s newest eatery boasts a front-of-house seating area and 1,700-square-foot kitchen. Oat will now be able to fulfill larger wholesale orders, including partnerships with several Southern California companies such as Moon Juice and Flamingo Estate. Along with their complete original bread menu, Oat’s new Goleta location offers “by-the-slice” toast options topped with whipped butter, Comté cheese, and more, as well as Scandinavian breakfast and lunch options. The new bakery also has a front-of-house fridge with graband-go items, a coffee bar, and space for customers to sit and enjoy their bakery goods. Hours are Wednesday-Saturday, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Starting in January, 2023 Oat’s Goleta location will also be open Sundays 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Visit oatbakery.com.

TORTA cubana or al pastor or al pastor blanco

FOOD & DRINK

at 1031 State Street, the former home of Embermill, Aldo’s, and the Copper Coffee Pot, the latter occupying the address from 1927 to 1982. Italian entrepreneur, restaurateur, and owner Francesco Zimone—who opened the first U.S. outpost of the 152-year-old Naples brand in Hollywood in 2019—is dedicated to sourcing and highlighting Santa Barbara–based vintners, locally grown produce, and fresh seafood. “We are thrilled to expand our Naples footprint with the opening of our second California location in Santa Barbara—a city we are proud to embrace as our new home,” says Zimone. “Our cozy new location is equally on par with the authentic flavors diners could expect whilst eating in Italy, without having to leave this beautiful beach town. I for one, have fallen in love with the Mediterranean-style architecture of the city, and hope that our Naples style dining will add to Santa Barbara’s already rich and diverse dining community. With a dream to continue to share the treasured 152-year-old Italian recipes and sense of genuine hospitality and place, we look forward to welcoming the Santa Barbara community with open arms this season.” Head Pizzaiolo Michele Rubini includes the original recipe for the Naples original Neapolitan pizza, along with a selection of house-made pastas, salads, barley-fed steaks, an on-site salumeria, and a more laid-back and casual lunch menu featuring paninis, pastas, salads, and more. Menu highlights include Gnocco Fritto (deep-fried pizza dough stuffed with burrata, prosciutto, and arugula; $19), Diavola Pizza (imported tomatoes, fior di latte, pecorino, spicy salame, and Calabrian chili; $28), Spaghetti Nerano (house-made spaghetti, fresh zucchini, parmigiana, pecorino, and basil; $25), and Maccheroncini Carbonara (maccheroncini, guanciale, egg, and pecorino; $28). The new downtown dining destination has a 60-seat tree-covered courtyard with views of State Street, indoor dining, and bar seating for an additional 40 guests, as well as sidewalk-adjacent seating accommodating 20 guests. Hours are

deals

monday + wednesday

COURTESY

PROMENADE PIZZA: L’antica Pizzeria da Michele has opened downtown in the former longtime home of the Copper Coffee Pot.

805

➢ dine in: 1213 State Street ➢ order out: taqueriasb.com

JERSEY MIKE’S SUBS OPENS IN NOLETA: Jersey

Mike’s Subs, with more than 2,300 locations nationwide, has opened at 199 South Turnpike Road next to Lighthouse Coffee and Vons. Franchise owner Stephen Youlios and Kyanna Isaacson are holding a grand opening and fundraiser until Sunday, November 20, to support San Marcos High School. “We’re very excited to open our third location in the Santa Barbara area,” said Isaacson. “We cherish our relationships with our local schools. This newest store gives us an even greater ability to provide our schools with the resources they need.” Guests can place orders in-store or for pickup through the website or through the Jersey Mike’s app. Additionally, delivery is available in most areas through the Jersey Mike’s app or through third-party delivery partners. Curbside pickup is available for orders placed in Jersey Mike’s app. Hours are 10 a.m.-9 p.m., seven days a week. Call (805) 259-3482 or visit jerseymikes.com.

Cherry Pie

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@ SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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to save the West Mesa of the San Marcos Foothills from develop-ment in 2021. The plight of the land was something that reso-nated strongly with me. My late father and I were deeply involved in the fight to save Ellwood in the 1990s. I lent my services as a short -form filmmaker and made a series of videos—one actually incorporating a string orchestra, in a way a precursor to this new piece. Nir and I have talked about doing a nature-themed original piece for a while and Nir mentioned the idea of honoring the Chumash. I called Marianne and Ernestine and asked them if they’d be interested in collaborating. They are presenting the piece, and are essentially “soloists” in the orchestra.

Which composers had a strong Composer Cody Westheimer, who grew up in Goleta, will have the world premiere of his commission for the Santa impact and influence on you, and Barbara Symphony — Wisdom of the Sky, Water, Earth — at the Granada November 19-20. this piece? I absolutely love the music of Toru Takemitsu. … he Santa Barbara Symphony segues ries, a specialty of his. I’m deeply influenced by Samuel Now back in town, we connected with Barber, Aaron Copland. And a shout out from the multi-sensory spectacular of last month’s Carmina Burana sea- Westheimer to get the bigger picture of his to Toshiro Yoshimatsu, Arvo Pärt, and, of son-opening splash to a calmer demeanor soon-to-born brainchild. course, my hero in high school—and still this weekend (November 19-20). Maestro now—John Williams. Nir Kabaretti leads us into the staple fare You spoke at the Symphony season preview at of Schumann’s Piano Concerto in A minor the Lobero and talked about it still being in a Has technology enabled the prospect of scoring (with Alessandro Bax at the piano), Mozart’s gestation stage. Will this be one of those ink-still- remotely—as in Santa Barbara, say—more Symphony No. 40, and Jean Sibelius’ Valse wet premieres, worked on up to the deadline? than ever before? Technology is a huge part of With any premiere, the ink always will feel the process these days. It’s why I created my Triste. This weekend’s most intriguing feature, wet, I think. Deadlines force us to commit, “studio backpack” and my little pet project however, is locavore by nature, on more but I’ll always be second-guessing things like “Free Range Composing.” The truth is that than one front: the world premiere com- “Should I have doubled that line with clari- we as composers have always been remote. mission of Wisdom of the Sky, Water, Earth, net?” Once I knew what I was doing and was My wife Julia Marie Newmann and I have by Cody Westheimer, who grew up in Goleta confident, it almost felt like the piece wrote his/hers studios here in Santa Barbara, but and played in the Symphony’s Youth Sym- itself at times. also when we were in L.A., there were clients phony and heard the orchestra play his first across town that we’d email clips to. orchestral work at age 17. He then headed Can you explain how the Chumash and nature I can’t imagine not living here now that to Los Angeles and established a career as elements entered the creative process? I met I’ve been back for a few years. I’m still honeycomposer for film, television, and such other [Chumash natives] Marianne [Parra] and mooning with the Santa Barbara life. multimedia projects as nature documenta- Ernestine [Ygnacio-DeSoto] while fighting —Josef Woodard

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’Tis the season to buy local art. The work of dozens of painters, photographers, and artists of all sorts will be on view at one of our region’s largest showcases on Saturday, November 19, from 4-7 p.m. at Community Arts Workshop (CAW), 631 Garden Street. Open to all kinds of art, Ready to Hang is a one-day pop-up show where all pieces have to fit into a 12"x12" space. “I don’t think there’s a better way to get a sense of the ‘now’ of our arts scene than this show,” says Casey Caldwell, managing director of CAW. This year’s third annual show also marks the homestretch of CAW’s capital campaign, which has just $100,000 left for its $2 million goal. All artists are all donating 30 percent of their proceeds to support the work of the nonprofit Santa Barbara Arts Collaborative, whose largest project is creating CAW as a vital

space for artists to create and share their work. “The range of work takes the breath away,”says Caldwell.“We have works from some of Santa Barbara’s best-known artists, sharing walls with artists for whom this is their very first show.” In its first year, Ready to Hang exhibited 418 pieces of art by more than 200 artists. Up to 450 pieces are anticipated this year. “It’s one of the biggest art shows of the year, but also one of the most intimate, a real celebration of our community’s creative diversity,” says Nathan Vonk, owner of Sullivan Goss Gallery and the exhibit sponsor. The show is free and open to the public. —Leslie Dinaberg

For more information, visit sbcaw.org/hang.

SASHA HUCKOBY

READY TO HANG SHOWCASES CREATIVE DIVERSITY OF HUNDREDS OF LOCAL ARTISTS

Ready to Hang pop-up art show is one of the best places to get an overview of the breadth and depth of Santa Barbara’s artists.

L I F E PAGE 41

BEYOND BINGING WITH MEDIA PATH PODCAST COURTESY

COURTESY

LOCAVORE SYMPHONIA, AT THE GRANADA THEATRE

Fritz Coleman, left, and Louise Palanker host the Media Path Podcast, taking a deep dive into a huge array of topics. No matter what the delivery format is (radio, TV, webcasts, streaming services, podcasts), there’s always a hunger for deep conversations about meaningful subjects. Media Path Podcast co-hosts Fritz Coleman and Louise Palanker use their weekly shows as an opportunity to flesh out the subjects that they find interesting and compelling—everything from pop culture to politics. They recently released their 112th episode—featuring award winning documentarian Joyce Chopra, author of Lady Director: Adventures in Hollywood, Television and Beyond, and Jan Perry, Executive Director of Shelter Partnership, which helps provide essential needs to the unhoused in Los Angeles. A veteran radio producer, comedian, and filmmaker who spends about half of each week in Santa Barbara, Palanker began podcasting in 2005. Media Path is her fifth podcast. She and Coleman are old friends —with a shared mastery of topical comedy —but he had to retire from his almost 40-year career as a weatherman for NBC for them to be able to partner on what she calls “the podcast of my dreams.” Since launching in the summer of 2020 with an episode focused on their shared obsession with Turner Classic Movies, Media Path has covered the gamut, from Donald Trump and Russia, to true crime, reality TV and music. The show has found a special niche with what Palanker describes as “baby boomer favorites” like the Happy Days trifecta (Marian Ross, Henry Winkler, Anson Williams), Peter Noone, Cindy Williams, Johnny Whitaker and Marty Croft, among others. One of the things Palanker loves is reading a book and “then getting to ask all the questions. That part is really, really fun for me. … We’re really enjoying learning more and going on these discovery journeys.” As for the delivery method, which includes an impressive visual component on the YouTube version, “podcasting has become the streaming media of audio—you can get what you want, when you want it. It’s there for you when you’re ready. You can press pause … and you can pick it up where you left off. … People can curate exactly what interests them. And that’s kind of exciting,” Palanker says. For more information, visit mediapathpodcast.com. —LD

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ANIMALS ON OUR BRINK, AT THE WILDLING

CONT’D

Things That Make You Go ‘Ooh’ at the Zoo!

INGRID BOSTROM PHOTOS

ARTS LIFE

Hilary Baker, “7-Eleven”, 2022, acrylic on linen, 24 x 24 inches

Wildlife on the Edge: Hilary Baker is on view at the Wildling Museum of Art and Nature in Solvang (1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang) through March 6, 2023. For more information, visit wildlingmuseum.org.

ZooLights is at the Santa Barbara Zoo through January 15, 2023.

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ions and tigers and bears and lights! Families will want to check out the thousands of handcrafted, silk-covered lanterns now aglow with more than 50,000 LED bulbs for the Santa Barbara Zoo’s new ZooLights installation. Featuring penguins, peacocks, lions, tigers, elephants, butterflies, birds, and more, these larger-than-life animal and wildlife scenes light up the nights from 4:30-8:30 p.m. through January 15, 2023. Illuminating not just the Zoo but the community spirit this holiday season, this Insta-friendly exhibit

I

has multiple interactive areas perfect for fun and photo ops. Select dates will also include photos with Santa. —Leslie Dinaberg

For more information and to purchase tickets, visit sbzoo.org/zoolights/.

Family Music Business, Back at the Lobero

n the beginning, or near the beginhave a forthcoming album. Their ning, there was the ’70s-born story has also been recently told in music doc form by director Denny aggregate known as “The Section,” a group of versatile studio musicians Tedesco, the son of famed studio who, like the earlier generation of Los guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and who Angeles studio players, the ’60s-based aptly also made the fine doc The “Wrecking Crew,” lent their skill and Wrecking Crew. impeccable feel to countless acts and Dropping in early 2023, the first stars. All these years later, a new monfull album by the band is fittingly iker and enterprise have come into called Skin in the Game — as in, they still have said skin, after all being out of the ashes of “The Section,” The Immediate Family performs at the Lobero on November 20. now bearing the friendly band name these years. For a sampling, check The Immediate Family. The band will pay a return out the album’s first single, “The Toughest Girl in visit to the Lobero Theatre on Sunday, November Town,” a sharp reworking of the tune by the quirky 20, after making a splash in that venue earlier this Los Angeles band Sparks. Sparks — the clever Mael year. Its members — guitarists Danny Kortchmar and brothers — gives the song an electronic new-wave Waddy Wachtel, bassist Leland Sklar, drummer Russ spin and irony in its original version, from their 1988 Kunkel and new addition, singer-songwriter Steve album Interior Design. Circa 2022, The Immediate Postell — have graced a vast host of albums and stages Family cleans it up real good, with the foursquare with the likes of Linda Ronstadt, Jackson Brown, rock-pop values and the guts ’n’ sheen quality that is Warren Zevon, James Taylor, Carole King … and the their coveted stock-in-trade, continuing into a new chapter all their own. list goes on, and on. Reconnecting and branding with the trappings —JW of an active new project, The Immediate Family has gotten busy in the past two years. They released a For more information and to purchase tickets, visit new EP in May, Live from Telefunken Soundstage, and lobero.org. COURTESY

A

s implied in its name, the Wildling Museum of Art and Nature in Solvang takes conscientious aim at nature in its element, generally focusing on art about the natural and animal world. Something slightly different is afoot with artist Hilary Baker’s fascinating exhibition Wildlife on the Edge. A Los Angeles native, now based in Ojai, Baker sidesteps the natural world, per se, and deals — in her clever, cagey artistic language — with the uncomfortable intersection of wild animal life and urban/suburban spaces. The show gains relevance at a time when weather and drought conditions are driving wild animals into human-occupied areas, including Santa Barbara. A bear lurks in a 7-Eleven parking lot. A mountain lion evokes both languid sensuality and potential peril outside the suave, now-defunct Parisian Room in Los Angeles, and a bat perches above the Hollywood Bowl, unimpressed. An implied question in Baker’s show: Which is the intruder, resident animal life or human-imposed developments on once unspoiled land? Baker’s art often crosses boundaries between abstraction and representation, with wit and an actively imaginative palette in tow. In her recent Predators series, she uses her minimalist, hard-edged graphic style to put these creatures in our face while creating a visual filter and scrim. Hints of a Spartan, cartoonish ambience distance us from the prickly reality of wild animals in the backyards, side yards and border regions of our urban comfort zones. Baker’s taste for ironic juxtapositions adds layers of witty references to her imagery in the series, as seen in the comic relief of “Red-Tailed Hawk, Van Nuys Drive-In,” with the avian subject as accidental moviegoer during the ripe cinematic moment of Janet Leigh’s shower scream scene in Psycho. “High Voltage” banks on the high-contrast, visually striking image of a woodpecker and a high voltage warning on a utility pole, with its implied sense of danger. L.A.-based landmarks are seen in new perspectives, through these impervious creatures’ eye views. An albino mantis is seen in the historic (and frequent movie location) Bradbury Building downtown, while Simon Rodia’s folk art shrine Watts Tower plays backdrop to an Anna’s hummingbird, aloft and aflutter. In what qualifies as good nature-reclaiming news, “Burrowing Owl, LAX” showcases the abandoned town of Surfridge, adjacent to LAX and now “a haven for California creatures.” “Pocket Mouse, Camp Pendleton” depicts a captive breeding program for endangered species. Hope hangs on by its claws, in the wild and in the town. —Josef Woodard

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2023 Early Bird Registration Now Open Lowest Price of the Year! santabarbarahalf.com 44

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF NOVEMBER 17

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Virginia Woolf wrote a passage that I suspect will apply to you in the coming weeks. She said, “There is no denying the wild horse in us. To gallop intemperately; fall on the sand tired out; to feel the earth spin; to have—positively—a rush of friendship for stones and grasses—there is no getting over the fact that this desire seizes us.” Here’s my question for you, Aries: How will you harness your wild horse energy? I’m hoping that the self-possessed human in you will take command of the horse and direct it to serve you and yours with constructive actions. It’s fine to indulge in some intemperate galloping, too. But I’ll be rooting for a lot of temperate and disciplined galloping.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): “The failure of love might account for most of the suffering in the world,” writes poet Marie Howe. I agree with that statement. Many of us have had painful episodes revolving around people who no longer love us and people whose lack of love for us makes us feel hurt. That’s the bad news, Taurus. The good news is that you now have more power than usual to heal the failures of love you have endured in the past. You also have an expanded capacity to heal others who have suffered from the failures of love. I hope you will be generous in your ministrations!

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Many Geminis tell me they are often partly awake as they sleep. In their dreams, they might work overtime trying to solve waking-life problems. Or they may lie in bed in the dark contemplating intricate ideas that fascinate them, or perhaps ruminating on the plot developments unfolding in a book they’ve been reading or a TV show they’ve been bingeing. If you are prone to such behavior, I will ask you to minimize it for a while. In my view, you need to relax your mind extra deeply and allow it to play luxuriously with non-utilitarian fantasies and dreams. You have a sacred duty to yourself to explore mysterious and stirring feelings that bypass rational thought.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Here are my two key messages for you. (1) Remember where you hide important stuff. (2) Remember that you have indeed hidden some important stuff. Got that? Please note that I am not questioning your urge to lock away a secret or two. I am not criticizing you for wanting to store a treasure that you are not yet ready to use or reveal. It’s completely understandable if you want to keep a part of your inner world off-limits to certain people for the time being. But as you engage in any or all of these actions, make sure you don’t lose touch with your valuables. And don’t forget why you are stashing them.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): I know I don’t have to give you lessons in expressing your sensuality. Nor do you need prods and encouragement to do so. As a Leo, you most likely have abundant talent in the epicurean arts. But as you prepare to glide into the lush and lusty heart of the Sensuality Season, it can’t hurt to offer you a pep talk from your fellow Leo bon vivant, James Baldwin. He said: “To be sensual is to respect and rejoice in the force of life, of life itself, and to be present in all that one does, from the effort of loving to the breaking of bread.”

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Many Virgos are on a lifelong quest to cultivate a knack described by Sigmund Freud: “In the small matters, trust the mind. In the large ones, the heart.” And I suspect you are now at a pivotal point in your efforts to master that wisdom. Important decisions are looming in regards to both small and large matters. I believe you will do the right things as long as you empower your mind to do what it does best and your heart to do what it does best.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Social media like Facebook and Twitter feed on our outrage. Their algorithms are designed to

stir up our disgust and indignation. I confess that I get semi-caught in their trap. I am sometimes seduced by the temptation to feel lots of umbrage and wrath, even though those feelings comprise a small minority of my total emotional range. As an antidote, I proactively seek experiences that rouse my wonder and sublimity and holiness. In the next two weeks, Libra, I invite you to cultivate a focus like mine. It’s high time for a phase of minimal anger and loathing—and maximum reverence and awe.

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SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio author Sylvia Plath had a disturbing, melodramatic relationship with romance. In one of her short stories, for example, she has a woman character say, “His love is the twenty-story leap, the rope at the throat, the knife at the heart.” I urge you to avoid contact with people who think and feel like that—as glamorous as they might seem. In my view, your romantic destiny in the coming months can and should be uplifting, exciting in healthy ways, and conducive to your well-being. There’s no need to link yourself with shadowy renegades when there will be plenty of radiant helpers available.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I like Sagittarian healer and author Caroline Myss because she’s both spiritual and practical, compassionate and fierce. Here’s a passage from her work that I think will be helpful for you in the coming weeks: “Get bored with your past. It’s over! Forgive yourself for what you think you did or didn’t do, and focus on what you will do, starting now.” To ensure you make the most of her counsel, I’ll add a further insight from author Augusten Burroughs: “You cannot be a prisoner of your past against your will—because you can only live in the past inside your mind.”

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CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): How would you respond if you learned that the $55 T-shirt you’re wearing was made by a Haitian kid who earned 10 cents for her work? Would you stop wearing the shirt? Donate it to a thrift store? Send money to the United Nations agency UNICEF, which works to protect Haitian child laborers? I recommend the latter option. I also suggest you use this as a prompt to engage in leisurely meditations on what you might do to reduce the world’s suffering. It’s an excellent time to stretch your imagination to understand how your personal life is interwoven with the lives of countless others, many of whom you don’t even know. And I hope you will think about how to offer extra healings and blessings not just to your allies, but also to strangers. What’s in it for you? Would this bring any selfish benefits your way? You may be amazed at how it leads you to interesting connections that expand your world. .AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian philosopher Alfred North Whitehead wrote, “The silly question is the first intimation of some totally new development.” He also said, “Every really new idea looks crazy at first.” With these thoughts in mind, Aquarius, I will tell you that you are now in the Season of the Silly Question. I invite you to enjoy dreaming up such queries. And as you indulge in that fertile pleasure, include another: Celebrate the Season of Crazy Ideas.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): We all love to follow stories: the stories we live, the stories that unfold for people we know, and the stories told in movies, TV shows, and books. A disproportionately high percentage of the entertainment industry’s stories are sad or tormented or horrendously painful. They influence us to think such stories are the norm. They tend to darken our view of life. While I would never try to coax you to avoid all those stories, Pisces, I will encourage you to question whether maybe it’s wise to limit how many you absorb. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to explore this possibility. Be willing to say, “These sad, tormented, painful stories are not ones I want to invite into my imagination.” Try this experiment: For the next three weeks, seek out mostly uplifting tales.

Homework: Is there something sad that you could ultimately become grateful for? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

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PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMIC FINANCIAL ANALYST

GLOBAL AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES Responsible for assisting in the financial management of departmental funds, contracts and grants, endowments and gifts. Researches, analyzes, and reconciles financial data, including payroll and general ledgers, endowments, grants, and state funds. Monitors and analyzes expenditures and spending patterns, and advises faculty of proper university guidelines regarding financial matters. Prepares budgetary projections. Maintains accuracy of information recorded in the accounting system as well as the shadow system. Prepares regular and custom financial reports and performs statistical analyses as requested by the program manager. Coordinates purchasing and payroll for the department. Also manages the department’s faculty recruitment activities including search plans and online applications and helps process passports for visiting scholars using the OISS International Scholar Dossier. Reqs: Working knowledge of financial processes, policies and procedures. Strong knowledge of financial data management and reporting systems. Strong organizational skills with a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail. Ability to interpret University policies and procedures regarding Accounting and Business and Financial Services. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran

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status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/30/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #45475

ASSISTANT STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES ADVISOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Provides free non‑attorney‑client privileged legal education and information to currently registered undergraduate and graduate UC Santa Barbara students and student organizations. Coordinates and advises the internship program as well as other internal projects agreed upon with the Student Legal Services Advisor, the Legal Resource Center Committee and the Associated Students (A.S.) Executive Director. Secondary and tertiary advisor for the Legal Resources Center(AS LRC); and the AS Isla Vista Tenants Union (AS IVTU), respectively. Main functional areas for the Assistant Student Legal Services Advisor include Student Guidance and Education; Coordination of the Legal Resource Center Intern Program; Management and Supports the area’s Assessment. *As a purely educational and informational position, the Assistant Student Legal Services Advisor shall not practice law in this role and is strictly forbidden to legally represent, in any capacity: ‑ The Regents of the University ‑ Any student or student organization. Reqs: JD from a American Bar Association‑approved law school. Must demonstrate abroad knowledge of multiple legal disciplines including but not limited to landlord / tenant law, interpretation involving the rental or leasing of housing property, immigration law, personal injury, dissolution, consumer complaints, sexual harassment, student/police relations, and other civil matters, and on criminal and traffic matters. Must have 3‑7 years experience using professional concepts to provide a variety of legal counsel including but not limited to campus students. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. The Legal Services Advisor shall not practice law or provide legal advice of any kind. This is a 75% time position. $68,475‑$78,937/Yr. at 75%. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44253

BIKE SHOP LEAD MECHANIC

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Responsible for organizing the day to day technical and repair aspects with the student mechanics of the Associated Students (A.S.) Bike Shop. The Lead Mechanic implements the training for student employees, outlined in the AS Bike Shop training manual, to student employees for

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the repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types and other rolling stock. Responsible for ensuring staff’s adherence to safety standards in all repair procedures. Reqs: Must possess a broad knowledge and technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. Must be able to communicate about processes clearly and effectively to customers and staff in a fast paced work environment. Ability to complete mechanical tasks left uncompleted by Student Mechanics. Understanding or experience with community based bicycle spaces. 1‑3 years Technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. 1‑3 years Repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Campus Security Authority. $22.25‑$23.18/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44251

CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California at all times during employment. Master’s degree from an accredited school of social work; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Three years of post‑master’s experience; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Licensed Clinical Social Worker license at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin,

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job #41572

CONFERENCE DINING ASSOCIATE

CAMPUS DINING Under the supervision of the Conference Dining Manager, plans, organizes and manages dining and catering content for assigned, moderately complex summer conference programs on campus and at University‑owned apartments. The Conference Dining Associate interacts with a diverse clientele, including University professors and commercial program directors, to assess and determine how a program’s dining and catering needs can be met by our services and facilities, or other on and off‑campus resources. Serves as a planning consultant to event organizers to ensure that all dining and catering details have been considered, working with the client’s needs and budget parameters, developing a comprehensive services package that includes vendor contracts. Reqs: Two to three years of experience and strong knowledge in event planning and management in the hospitality sector. Exceptional customer service skills with ability to cultivate professional business partnerships. Proficiency with Microsoft applications and general database management. Ability to learn specialized software systems quickly. Working knowledge of Google Workspace. Notes: Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Overtime may be required from May‑August to meet the operational needs of the department. Work hours/days may vary during the summer season. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39/hr.‑$30.65/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job #45073 EF INTERNATIONAL Language Campus in Santa Barbara is seeking a customer service minded Housing Coordinator. The applicant will possess excellent communication skills, enjoy working in a fast paced international environment and after training be able to prioritize work load, and self‑motivate to meet targets. The role requires flexibility with tasks, attention to detail, confidence in talking to both customers, suppliers and our sales office colleagues. You will also spend time working with the team to screen and recruit new families. If you are energetic, fun, enjoy multi‑tasking and would love to work with people from all over the world, we would love to hear from you. Please send your resume to ninh. nguyen@ef.com

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FINANCIAL & FACULTY ASSISTANT

SOLID STATE LIGHTING & ELECTRONICS CENTER Responsible for the overall completion of the fiscal affairs of the Solid State Lighting & Energy Electronics Center in accordance with university policies and procedures. Areas of responsibility

include: purchasing, reviewing expenditures, income accounts, reconciliation of general ledgers, travel and expense reimbursements. Maintains substantial knowledge of University policies and procedures related to purchasing, accounting and travel/entertainment and updates skills to perform high level functions including multiple spreadsheets and databases. Uses independent judgment, initiative, analytical skills. Reqs: Detail oriented with the ability to multitask and work with frequent

interruptions. Proficient in Excel, Word, email and experience working with office equipment. Strong written and oral communication skills. Must have strong organizational and problem solving skills with a demonstrated ability to meet deadlines. Excellent customer service skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $27.32‑$28.60/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants

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NOW HIRING

Inside Sales Administrator The Independent is seeking an inside sales administrator to join its sales team. This role is responsible for prospecting advertising clients, collecting and processing legal notices, classified ads, open house listings, and maintaining and fulfilling our print subscription database. This position will work full time in our downtown Santa Barbara office, ready to greet and assist our readers and customers. Qualified candidates must have a positive attitude and need to be self-motivated and highly organized with outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Responsibilities include providing excellent customer service (through email, on the phone and inperson), attending weekly sales meetings, and data entry with strong attention to detail. Must also be able to work under pressure in a deadline-driven environment and have a basic understanding of marketing and sales. Compensation will be hourly + commission. Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance, Section 125 cafeteria plan, 401(k), and vacation program. Please introduce yourself, reasons for interest, and a brief summary of your qualifications, along with your résumé to hr@independent.com. No phone calls, please. EOE m/f/d/v.


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62. “Meh” gesture 63. ___ Reader (eclectic 1. Mr. Burns’s teddy bear on magazine) “The Simpsons” 64. “No injury” 5. Like some chocolate 65. Overflows 9. Bogus customer 66. Snippy comeback 14. Frondy growth 67. 2022 award for Shohei 15. Fisher of “The Great Gatsby” Ohtani 16. “Pass Out” rapper ___ Tempah 17. Stewed meat dish with a 1. Very close pal French name 2. “___ the ramparts we 19. Getting grayer watched ...” 20. Handheld flame starter 3. Illegal payment scheme 22. Braces (oneself) 4. As scheduled 24. Seething state 5. Fiasco 25. Suffix with Wisconsin 6. Part of NBA or NEA, e.g. 26. Broadcast 7. “Full Metal Jacket” actor ___ 27. Main Street locales Ermey 8. Kato of O.J. Simpson trial 30. Butler who voiced many fame Hanna-Barbera characters 9. Play place 31. Agrees, casually 10. Elevated 34. Serf of old Sparta 11. Sign with letters? 35. “Stayin’ Alive” singer 12. Limerick segment that 38. Antidote source usually starts with “Who” 41. Alkaloid in tomatoes 13. Part of some upscale theater 45. Suffix with mega- or multiseats 46. Expressive action in Fortnite 18. 2006 movie set in Georgia 48. Blacktop material 21. 1040 issuers 49. Reply to a ques. 22. Airline based near Stockholm 50. Late Beastie Boys member 23. Carrere of 2022’s “Easter 51. Necklace parts Sunday” 54. Northeastern U.S. locale 28. Trireme propeller known as an art colony 29. “As a matter of fact, you’re 58. Quebec school wrong” 59. Typical offerings from 30. Target of a 2022 government compilation channels like relief plan “Aww Animals” and “Pets 32. PNW-based coffee chain, on Awesome” the NYSE

Down

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33. Orangey tuber 34. “House of the Dragon” network 36. “Scram,” in westerns 37. Glacial features 38. Least lavish 39. “___ Sol” (Ron Carter song that’s a poor translation of “The Night Sun”) 40. Correct a game outcome, perhaps 42. “So, apparently ...” 43. Snooze for a bit 44. Some TV drama settings 46. Prefix with friendly or tourism 47. Political activist Garvey 50. Downloaded clips, often 52. Deck total for Caesar? 53. Bill’s “Groundhog Day” costar 55. Vergara’s “AGT” seatmate 56. “So long!” 57. Chain components, for short 60. “And I ___” (Jasmine Masters meme) 61. Planetarium view ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1109

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 17, 17, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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EMPLOYMENT

LEAD END USER SUPPORT TECHNICIAN

ADMINISTRATIVE & RESIDENTIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Lead End User Support Technician delivers end user services to all users in the Housing, Dining, & Auxiliary Enterprises organizations, as well as the department of Human Resources. Provides technical leadership in windows system administration and support, information system implementation and support, systems analysis, network management, programming, report creation and generation, and troubleshooting. Scope of support includes all areas of Housing, Dining, & Auxiliary Enterprises organizations, as well as the department of Human Resources. Related duties include request management, resolution, and escalation of customer requests through completion. This includes installation, configuration, and troubleshooting of local network connections, desktop computers, thin client devices, printers, desktop software and line of business systems. Provides strategic input to management in the areas of end user support technologies. Works collaboratively with department, division and campus colleagues and serves as backup for other members of the Housing, Dining, & Auxiliary Enterprises IT support team. Maintains an advanced technical understanding

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of current Windows operating system, office productivity software, and standardized workstation to provide tier two support to Admin Services IT technical staff. Maintains regular end user communication with strong ability to maintain effective client and colleague rapport. Reqs: BS/BA degree or equivalent combination of experience and training. 4‑6 years experience providing technical leadership in windows system administration and support, information system implementation and support, systems analysis, network management, patch management, and troubleshooting. Note: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $72,340.39‑ $100,827.78/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 11/29/2022. Job #45355

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Notes: Credentials verification completed and passed before employment and date of hire. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory background check completed and passed before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Office Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patience care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Days and hours are M‑F, 7:45am‑4:30pm (may be required to work TH evenings until 7:00pm). $23.97/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 43395

PROCUREMENT ANALYST

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the general direction of the Materiel and Logistics Manager, the Procurement Analyst uses professional purchasing skills and concepts to manage procurement operation responsibilities, including forecasting, inventory management, purchase order creation, management and monitoring. Utilizing applicable software and databases, analyzes and reviews multiple procurement options.

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Analyzes and evaluates systems relating to Purchasing and Inventory Control. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent or equivalent combination of education and experience. 1‑3 years of procurement experience or equivalent experience. 1‑3 years of accounts payable and general ledger experience or equivalent experience. Strong business communication and analytical skills. Excellent organizational skills and ability to prioritize work in order to meet continual deadlines while making allowances for interruptions. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Strong computer skills demonstrating the use of Microsoft Office programs, Google Calendar, and Google Docs/ sheets. Ability to apply a high level of sound, independent judgment, tact, ingenuity, and resourcefulness in overseeing assigned areas, including working with managers and customers, and solving problems during the course of daily business. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a member of a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39‑ $34.90/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44905

PROGRAM MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the direction of the Associate Director of Project Management for Housing, Dining, & Auxiliary Enterprises (HDAE), the Procurement Analyst will serve as the Program Manager for Residential Operations and will collaborate with the HDAE department leaders to manage their respective operational affairs through Residential Operations. Prepares annual and projected budgets for routine and recurring programs, track expenses, and schedules as they relate to programs. Initiates agreements for services and has authority to make purchases within a defined dollar limit. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of years of experience. 1‑3 years experience working with higher education or government or equivalent combination of experience. Strong level of proficiency with spreadsheets, systems, database management and word processing software. Excellent management, financial, and analytical skills. Knowledge of department operations in order to meet procurement needs. Ability to read and interpret terms and conditions of contracts. Must be detail oriented and be able to work under pressure to meet strict deadlines. Possess excellent verbal and written communication skills. Must be able to work independently or as part of a team. Ability to work with minimal direction and with frequent interruptions to coordinate and execute numerous tasks simultaneously. Must be able to maintain confidentiality and exercise good judgement, logic, tact, and diplomacy while performing the critical duties of the position. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $80,388/ yr. ‑ $89,900/yr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected

NOVEMBER 17, 2022

by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Application review begins 11/29/2022. Job #45448

SENIOR PRODUCER‑ DIRECTOR

INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT Directs 2‑4 camera event location shoots at various sites on campus and around the community. Configures and runs webcast and streaming for events. Edits programs for later broadcast locally and on UCTV in a timely manner. Sets up and operates all aspects of television studio as needed. Supports various Field Cart tapings, which include live recording, webcasting, lecture capture,and video conferencing. Trains students in all aspects of production workflow. Assists Production Manager in coordination and operation of two in‑house video conferencing facilities. Reqs: Directing experience within a multiple‑camera environment including the setup of cameras, audio mixers, video switchers, etc. Experience in one‑camera remote shoots including the setup of camera, lights, microphones, etc. Fluent with entire Adobe Production Suite software, including: Premier, After Effects, Encore, Audition,‑ Photoshop, Illustrator, and Media Encoder. Experience in editing video programs for broadcast with working knowledge of digital editing software. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a conviction history background check. Flexible work schedule including nights and weekends. $29.23 ‑ $31.02/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39190.

Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 11/23/2022. Job #45296

REAL ESTATE MONEY TO LOAN RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 1‑818‑248‑0000. Broker‑principal DRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑ SCAN)

RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT STUDIOS $1440, Studios with patio $1500, 1BDs $1560, 1BDs with patio $1620, in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 805‑967‑6614

SERVICE

DIRECTORY CAREGIVING SERVICES WANTED CAREGIVER ‑ Provides friendly companionship and assistance with daily personal care activities and household duties. Basic Salary: $30.05 per Hour 5 days a Week. Email,mewills07@ gmail.com.

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SR. BUSINESS SYSTEMS DEVELOPER

ADMINISTRATIVE & RESIDENTIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY The Sr. Business Systems Developer works under the direction of the Director of Application Development and Collaboration Systems, ARIT and performs the following functions. Serves as a lead developer for various development projects. Collaborates with other developers to establish the best software development practices and related tools for all ARIT developers. Provides expertise and guidance in collaboration with Business Systems Analysts in ARIT for application design and development. Manages complex information systems projects. Performs systems analysis and design. Leads selection and implementation processes for vendor‑supplied software. Provides training to end‑users. Provides support for existing systems and leads efforts for their enhancements and modernization. Identifies strategies and opportunities for innovation and automation. Participate in multiple cross‑functional and cross‑organizational projects within a broader Administrative Services Division IT context. Reqs: 4‑6 years of: Experience with C# programming language. Experience with JavaScript/TypeScript. SQL development experience (T‑SQL preferred). Object‑Oriented Design and Programming. Working knowledge of version control software for branching, merging. Agile SDLC methodologies. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $83,100.‑ $126,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/

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SMALL, KIND family seeking regular housekeeper 4 mornings: Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri. 9am‑12noon. Laundry, organizing, errands. English speaking and references please. $21.50 hourly ($258 weekly). Home located near N. Jameson Ln/Hixon Rd, Montecito. Contact Kelley (917) 691‑6692.

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RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Groundskeeper maintains grounds and landscape duties around eight residence halls, four dining commons and five residential apartment complexes. May be assigned other duties (including those in other areas) to accomplish the operational needs of the department. May be required to work schedules other than Monday through Friday, 7am to 3:30pm, to meet the operational needs of the department. Complies with department safety and illness programs as implemented by supervisor and/or co‑workers. Professional Expectation/Attitude Standard/Customer Service Promotes customer service programs in the Grounds unit to residents/clients. Completes job duties in a manner that demonstrates support for Housing and Residential Services. Reqs: Minimum of three years experience in grounds maintenance or equivalent experience. Must be able to follow oral/written instructions. Ability to perform minor repairs on small equipment. Some knowledge of irrigation and drip systems. Experience with the use of tractors, small lawn mowers, edgers, power sweepers, roto‑tillers and chainsaws. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Mon‑Fri 7:00am‑3:30pm. $18.93/ hr.‑$22.20/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44227

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will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/1/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 45242

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHAEL JEROME EDWARDS, AKA MICHAEL J. EDWARDS CASE NO.: 22PR00538 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MICHAEL JEROME EDWARDS, AKA MICHAEL J. EDWARDS. A PETITION FOR PROBATE HAS BEEN FILED BY Angelica Edwards in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: Angelica Edwards be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 12/15/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 10/17/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published November 3, 10, 17, 2022. Proof of Service by Mail by Christie A. Gabbert. Served: Angelica Edwards. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: WILLIAM CARPER POEHLER AKA WILLIAM C. POEHLER & WILLIAM POEHLER NO: 22PR00531 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both WILLIAM CARPER POEHLER AKA WILLIAM C. POEHLER & WILLIAM POEHLER. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PAMELA M. POEHLER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Pamela M. Poehler be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 1/05/2023 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Steven A. Jung, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, 1021 Anacapa Street, 2nd Floor, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 882‑1443. Published November 3, 10, 17, 2022. Proof of Service by Mail The Served: Pamela M. Poehler, Trustee of the William and Pamela Poehler Living Trust Lillian G. Poehler Christopher G. Poehler Heather K. Poehler Mary Lynn Mallen

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name : 805 DEFENSE IS BEING ABANDONED at 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 06/3/07/2021 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2021‑0001660. The persons or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Amber Paresa, 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Elizabeth Bryson, 323 West Montecito Street, Apt C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Leana Gutierrez, 121 West Pueblo Street, Apt 7, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. The business was conducted as a general partnership. SIGNED BY AMBER PARESA, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 10/07/22, FBN2022‑0002505, E47. hereby

certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 DEFENSE, 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Amber K Paresa (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY AMBER PARESA, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002506. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CHRP DIAGNOSTIC, 4551 Oak Glen Drive, Unit F, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Kevin C Haeberle (same address), Lindsey N Haeberle (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY KEVIN HAEBERLE, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002564. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACADEMIC EQUITY CONSULTING 1821 Gillespie Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mary Bucholtz (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MARY BUCHOLTZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002581. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BYB REAL ESTATE,1290 Coast Village RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Brisaly Y Balderas, 451 Cannon Green Dr., Apt G, Goleta Ca 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY BRISALY BALDERAS, INDIVIDUAL. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002460. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: JHZ INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 5662 Calle Real #349, Goleta, CA 93117; James H Zbinden, 5731 Stow Canyon Rd., Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JAMES ZBINDEN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002603. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PACIFIC BUILDERS at 1128 Chino Street, A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; RLS Pacific Builders, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY RUBEN LOPEZ SOLIS, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 12, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN

Number: 2022‑0002529. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HUNTER ENTERPRISES at 4700 Stockdale Hwy, Ste.120, Bakersfield, CA 93309; Hunter‑Dooley Family Investments LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liabilty company. SIGNED BY KENNETH H. HUNTER, III, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002643. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOSPICE OF SANTA BARBARA, 2050 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 100, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Hospice of Santa Barbara, Inc. (same address), Compassionate Care Center, Compassionate Care of Isla Vista, Compassionate Care of Santa Barbara County, Compassionate Care of Carpinteria, Compassionate Care of North Santa Barbara County, Compassionate Care of the Central Coast, Compassionate Care of Goleta, Compassionate Care of Santa Barbara, Compassionate Care of the Santa Ynez Valley. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DAVID SELBERG, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002617. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TRUST TRANSFER ACCOUNT at 2921 Holly Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael G Vilkin (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MICHAEL VILKIN, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002632. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY THERAPY at 85 West Highway 246, Suite 140, Buellton, CA 93427; Kathryn EM Fleckenstein (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY KATHRYN EM FLECKENSTEIN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002609. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALFREDO’S MOVING & DELIVERY at 283 Ellwood Beach Dr, Goleta, CA 93117; Fredy Lopez (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY FREDY LOPEZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002463. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RIVIERA WINE COMPANY at 59 Industrial Way, Buellton, CA 93427; Margerum Wine Company, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DOUGLAS MARGERUM, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland,

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE GOLETA VALLEY COMMUNITY CENTER SEISMIC RETROFIT PROJECT DR 4308 (CIP NO. 9067) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“City”) invites and will receive sealed Bids up to but not later than 2:00 P.M. on 13 December, 2022 via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site which can be accessed at the CITY website link below, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 non-refundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http:// www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities. Bids shall be valid for a period of 90 calendar days after the Bid opening date. The City of Goleta (“City”) will select a single qualified Contractor to perform a structural retrofit of Goleta Valley Community Center. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, and equipment necessary to construct and deliver a finished GOLETA VALLEY COMMUNITY CENTER SEISMIC RETROFIT PROJECT – DR 4308 (CIP NO. 9067). The scope of work includes all work described in the construction documents, but is not limited to the following: Anchorage and strengthening of existing wood diaphragms and truss connections to existing concrete walls; extent of all existing “sprung” floor locations to be verified in field; patch & paint interior drywall and new exterior plaster; provide seismic bracing for non-structural elements; remove existing roofing in its entirety down to the existing plank sheathing, remove all existing roof crickets and built-up areas prior to installing new structural sheathing; provide new roofing system; repair deteriorated and damaged rafter tails and exposed wood elements; extend roof drains to drain into existing planter including selective demolition entrance planter; remove existing skylight and replace on a new curb; interior painted mural at the east wall of the Dining Room shall not be disturbed; removal of floor finishes as required to install new boundary and floor nailing; reinstall carpet following repairs; fully cooperate with all City agencies and others who might be working within the premise of the proposed project site; contractor to obtain building permit(s) from the City’s Building and Safety Division. Contractor shall pay for the permit fee. Plans have been approved by the Building and Safety Division; install electrical power and water connections for all contractors use. Provide and install one toilet, fencing with green screening around the construction site and dumpster/laydown area (if needed, with prior approval of location from City Engineer). Contractor is not permitted to use the existing restrooms, kitchen, or break rooms in the Goleta Valley Community Center building during the course of the construction.; the contractor is responsible to familiarize themselves with the existing utilities and electronic systems inside and outside the building project to facilitate their work on this project; the contractor is responsible for providing all required insurance, bonds, schedule of values, construction schedules, monthly updated schedules, attending weekly Owner, Architect, Contractor meetings, submitting monthly invoices, certified payrolls, three sets of closeout binders; contractor shall maintain during construction and provide final asbuilt drawings at completion of project; no excavations (such as for landscaping planters) directly adjacent to perimeter walls are permitted. The contract period is Ninety (90) Calendar Days. A mandatory pre-bid meeting for this project is scheduled on November 29, 2022, at 2:00 P.M. at the Goleta Community Center, 5679 Hollister Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117. This Structural retrofit scope of work of this project is funded by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds. Contractor is required to comply with all necessary reporting procedures as outlined in the granting agency guidelines. Bids must be submitted on the City’s Bid Forms. Bidders may obtain a copy of the Contract Documents from PlanetBids. To the extent required by section 20103.7 of the Public Contract Code, upon request from a contractor plan room service, the City shall provide an electronic copy of the Contract Documents at no charge to the contractor plan room. No bid will be accepted, nor any contract entered into, without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractor’s current registration with the Department of Industrial Relations to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the Department of Industrial Relations for the duration of the Project. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the contractor registration requirements mandated by Labor Code Sections 1725.5 and 1771.1 shall not apply to work performed on a public works project that is exempt pursuant to the small project exemption specified in Labor Code Sections 1725.5 and 1771.1. This Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. In bidding on this Project, it shall be the Bidder’s sole responsibility to evaluate and include the cost of complying with all labor compliance requirements under this contract and applicable law in its Bid. Pursuant to sections 7000 et seq. of the Business and Professions Code, each Bidder must hold an active license issued by the California Contractors State License Board throughout the time it submits its Bid and for the duration of the contract in the following classification(s): Class A (general engineering contractor) or Class B (general building contractor). The Bidder or a listed Subcontractor must also hold an active Class C-22 (asbestos abatement) license. A Class C-7 (low voltage systems) license is required if scope of work affects existing or new low voltage systems. If the Bidder holds a Class B license, the Bidder (if it will self-perform the demolition work) or a listed Subcontractor must hold a Class C-21 (building moving/demolition) license. In addition, the Bidder or a listed Subcontractor must hold all applicable State certifications from the California Contractors State License Board and any necessary registrations from the Division of Occupational Safety and Health at the Bid Deadline. Substitution requests shall be made within 35 calendar days after the award of the contract. Pursuant to Public Contract Code Section 3400(b), the City may make findings designating that certain additional materials, methods or services by specific brand or trade name other than those listed in the Standard Specifications be used for the Project. Such findings, if any, as well as the materials, methods or services and their specific brand or trade names that must be used for the Project may be found in the Special Conditions. City shall award the contract for the Project to the lowest responsive, responsible Bidder as determined by the City from the BASE BID ALONE. City reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to waive any irregularities or informalities in any bids or in the bidding process. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For further information, contact Matthew Fore, General Services Director at mfore@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA ___________________________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: November 10, 2022, and November 17, 2022

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COOPER COLLINS SMITH REALTY,18 Canon Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93105;

Cooper & Smith Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY NATALIE COLLINS‑SMITH, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 4, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it

was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002717. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LA VISTA

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE JONNY D. WALLIS NEIGHBORHOOD PARK SPLASH PAD AND IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. 9111 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., Monday, December 5, 2022, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 nonrefundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bidopportunities. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plantings and equipment necessary to construct and deliver the specified JONNY D. WALLIS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PARK SPLASH PAD AND IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. 9111. Work includes the construction of a new splash pad, seat walls, fencing, basketball court surfacing, installation of prefabricated shade structures, installation of security cameras, fencing and all project associated clearing, grubbing, grading, asphalt, concrete, drainage, utility connection, fencing, signage, irrigation and landscape work. The contract period is one hundred (100) Working Days. Deadline to submit Requests For Information (RFI) electronically to jplummer@ cityofgoleta.org is 5:00 pm on Monday, November 21, 2022. A Pre-Bid Meeting is not scheduled for this project. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed or submitted to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received or postmarked within three (3) City business days after the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR JONNY D. WALLIS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PARK SPLASH PAD AND IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. 9111.”

CONSULTING, 1020 La Vista RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. Stephanie K Ochoa (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY STEPHANIE OCHOA, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 31, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002678. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022.

(s) is/are doing business as: HAWT HANKS 7083 Del Norte Drive, Goleta, CA 93117; Nathan Van Etten(same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY NATHAN VAN ETTEN Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002638. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 101 DELI, 130 N Calle Cesar Chavez, #22, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Angie M Park, 2053 Mandrill Ave, Ventura, CA 93003. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY ANGIE M PARK, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002592. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ROBERT CHESTER THOMAS at 38 San Mateo Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117; Robin L Thomas (same address); Elizabeth C. Alix, 5081 Amberly Place, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This business is conducted by copartners. SIGNED BY ROBIN L THOMAS, COPARTNER. Filed by the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 01, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002694. Published: November 17, 23, December 1, 8 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAMANTHA HARRIS, 2635 State St, Apt. T3, Santa Barbara 93105 This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SAMANTHA HARRIS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 31, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002677. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TOOTH & PEN, 654 Ivy LN, Solvang, CA 93463; Michael C Ray (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MICHAEL RAY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002752. Published: November 17, 23, December 1, 8, 2022.

column appears monthly in the Independent written by local historian Betsy J. Green Do you have an older home in Santa Barbara with an interesting history? Betsy would love to hear from you.

BETS Y J.

GREE N

PHO TOS

Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive.

ADDRESS:

The Oldest Hou se

T

on the Block

Built by a Pione

er Family

Published: Santa Barbara Independent: November 10, 2022, and November 17, 2022 NOVEMBER 17, 2022

ar and Far

It pays to network when you history of are you that her hom r house. Chris lear curious about the ned from past and that e’s property had bee a neighbo r n was corrob the family had seve much larger in the ral farm anim orated by a 1909 ad paper for als. This that a “mi Soledad hom lch” (milk) cow for I found in the loca l sale at the e. 324 North A few mo the home nths after the curren in 1990, a woman kno t owners moved into cked on the door and

For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact JoAnne Plummer in writing at jplummer@cityofgoleta.org.

THE INDEPENDENT

324 North Soledad Str eet

History from Ne

his c. 190 0 home at 324 North was the onl Soledad Stre Built on a y house on the blo et of eac ck small hill between Mo until 1917. was h other. The James Gutierrez streets, on A. Blood who referred to ntecito and skirts of the wha as James built this city Junior to , this ably overloo home Queen Ann t was then the out distinguish A. Blood - the him from Carpinteri and trees ked the city when there–style home proba farmer, in the area e were few the farmer . Soledad dad) mea er hom was his unc although es fath ns “solitar (pro le, not his y” in Spanish nounced so-LAYer.) . THE GREAT HOUS The Bloods The hom E DETECTIVE rais ed six e is pai nte in Santa tor ical ly Barbara — children appropriat d his- whom severa l of spent tone colo e ear thrs this home. their adult lives in Emanu el that owners Chris The most and Pau l was Alice prominent had carefull Lom me n Mabel Blo od, an accom colors acc y researched. The plished pain who was entuate the been Sain ter and had ori gin al t Barbara home’s det ails . and val Queen The stee slop e of in the Flo the Festip parade its s of the 189 wer Festival as an old roofline marks it er James A. Blo 0s. shallower home among the od was in slopes of estate bus the real the newer homes tha iness and was co-owne t with Franci by Betsy J. home’s cro sur round it. The r Green wning glo House-Furn s H. Knight of the che erf ul ry is the sun State Street ishing Emporium on accents the burst mo near Ortega tif that fron . The t gable. Thi popular dec sold fur nitu store s was a re vintage. I’ve oration for homes — Family pic: The eve ryt hin of this noticed it g here. Kee right: Addie, Blood family posed on baby carriag from p an eye out on other homes the Carolyn, Fred around. for it as you , Mabel. Fron front porch in the 1920 coffins. The es to walk t row: Grace, s. company Mary J., Ella. Back row, from left to once caused troversy, acc kins. In his ording to Walker A. a con- explained tha Tompnew The family spaper Along with t her grandfather he wrote that in the column in 197 1, had built built the of James Augustus she had a some information Blood and 1880s, the home. Blo Blood about the the home. 1920s pho Knight put firm of od and his Mary Jose home’s pas to the side a huge sign of the Blo phine Hal porch. A of a bui t, on the l Blood, had wife, eled from ily member porch post can be od family posed on that read: lding facing Stearns Illinois by seen next s “BLOOD Wharf covered wag trav1870 and to the fam original to — the same post that UNDERTA AND KN settled in on in the home IGHT, KERS. CO San Blood fam separating PRICES.” is the larg is there today. Als FFINS AT ily came her ta Barbara. The o “Sin e the pair LOW ce fron tive, also many of San of poc t parlor from winter visi Chris Em named Jam e because a relata Barbara’s tors in the the family ket doors anu settled on es A. Blo el rem 1880s wer room. house 30 terminal embers falli od, had a farm in Car e in yea illn (My research pinteria in Blood and esses, the adverti their the one. The rs ago. “When I saw ng in love with the 1867. was mad sing of Knight — it, I knew both men has been very house has a very ous a nam not too eup this was shared the e especially challen wel e ging becaus same nam chill the mar in itself — was eno honi- original cha nicely redone and coming feel to it. It e and died e civic still retains ugh ract row pro within a yea Betsy J. Gree a lot of the r remove tests, that the con . So vociferous wer to work through er. There is a lot of n is a Santa trov e out very d.” the ersial sign Barbara hist the house lovely woo pepper tree was finally orian and auth and a grea din the bac t old or of Discover k.” Mexican Please do ing the History Soledad Stre not disturb the resi of Your House dents of 324 et. and Your Neig hborhood, Sant North a

Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org).

50

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASEY KENDRICK ALBERT‑HALL CASE NUMBER: 22CV03848 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: CASEY KENDRICK ALBERT‑HALL TO: CASEY ALBERT HALL. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING DECEMBER 7, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ANDREI ALEKSANDROVICH PERVOV NUMBER: 22CV03903 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: ANDREI ALEKSANDROVICH PERVOV TO: ANDREI ALEXANDER. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING DECEMBER 5, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper

Great House Detective

A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class “A” Contractor’s license, or specialty licensing in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer.

CITY OF GOLETA ___________________________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk

NAME CHANGE

Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: OCTOBER 19, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 17 2022

The

The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract.

Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 22300, the successful bidder may substitute certain securities for funds withheld by CITY to ensure performance under the Contract or, in the alternative, request the CITY to make payment of retention to an escrow agent.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: STEVE’S AUTO REPAIR, 254 East Highway 246, Buellton, CA 93427; Buellton Garage, 320 Central Ave, Buellton, CA 93427. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY JENNIFER HURNBLAD, CFO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 1, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002690. Published: November 17, 23, December 1, 8, 2022.

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

Monica Pres

s, 2002. Her

website is bets

yjgreen.com .

Y

County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002612. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022.

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LEGALS

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Message her through the Contact page of her website:

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: OCTOBER 19, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: TRACY ROCHESTIE, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03587 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: TRACY ROCHESTIE TO: TRACY PEREGRINE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING NOVEMBER 28, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: October 14, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published October 27, November 3, 10, 17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG, 1338 Portsuello Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. CASE NUMBER: 22CV03635 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG TO: LEANDER DEAN LOVE ANDEREGG. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING NOVEMBER 30, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: AUGUST 16, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27TH, NOVEMBER 3, 10,17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SIMONE CAMILLE BYERS CASE NUMBER: 22CV04172 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SIMONE CAMILLE BYERS TO: SIMONE CAMILLE BELAMOUR. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear

before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING DECEMBER 28, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: November 08, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published November 17, 23, December 1, 8, 2022

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. November 30, 2022 at 3:30 PM ROBBIN PARRA queen bed, crib, boxes VICTORIANO PEREZ Cleaning materials, clothing, furniture etc. JASON JOHNSON Personal items, mainly books. Boxes. SAMANTHA CAREY 5x10 GUY BERFIELD Boxes, furniture etc ROBERTO CATALAN personal Kaci Prati Household CHRISTINE BARRIOS bags boxes tv couches SAMANTHA CAREY boxes The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures. com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6250 VIA REAL, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 NOVEMBER 29, 2022 AT 12 PM TIMOTHY ORTIZ‑ Bicycle, Boxes, Shoes, Totes, Power Tools, Tool Box, Entertainment Center, Cooler. PATRICK CASEY‑ Restaurant Equipment, Coke Machine, Sink. EVELYN BENTON‑ Bags, Shoes, Totes, Blankets, Lamp. ROGER HINKLEY‑BOXES, Totes, Train Set, Vacuum, End Table. MONIQUE CORDERO‑ TV, Bags, Boxes, Clothes, Totes, Wicker. CHERIEKA MORGAN ‑GOSSETT‑ Couch, Entertainment Center, Table, TV, Books, Boxes, Totes, Desk. HALEY HOME‑ Beds, Totes, Fan, Screen, Christmas Tree Stand Wheel. LAWRENCE BRENNEN, JR‑ Bicycle, Sink, Curio Cabinet, Chandelier, Musical, Instrument Cart. CHERRY POST‑ Table, Bags, Books, Boxes. AMANDA FROST‑ Bicycle, Boxes, Totes, Rain Stick. CHERRY POST‑ Boxes. JUAN CARLOS‑ TV, Bags, Bicycle. MARIA FRAGOSO‑ Dresser, Bicycle, Boxes, Totes, Bike Cart, Trophies, Kitchen Items, Stroller, Fan, CD’s. SUSAN SEMBER‑ Chair, Mattress, Boxes, Wall Décor. KARL CAMERON‑ Boxes, File Cabinet, Power Tools, Shelves, Totes,

Power Strips, Helmet, Toaster Oven. JAMES STEVENSON‑ Shells, Boxes, Net, Shelves, Household Goods. MARIA RAPTIS‑ Bed, TV, Bags, Books, Boxes, Bedframe, Yarn, Cooler, Duffle Bag. SUSAN JOSEPHSON‑ Bed, Chair, Mattress, Table, Bags, Boxes, Totes, Pictures, Files, Clothes. RUSSELL SHEPPEL‑ Chair, Table, Bags, Boxes, Totes, Sports Equipment, Pinball Machine. SALLY BARTON‑ Chair, Couch, Dresser, Table, VCR, Boxes, Bags, Pictures, Clothes, Painting. THE AUCTION WILL BE LISTED AND ADVERTISED ON WWW. STORAGETREASURES.COM. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: 22CVO3135 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, RICHARD R. ROMERO, DANA FACTO, TRUSTEE OF THE BARBARA ROMERO REVOCABLE TRUST, DELPHINA ABBOTT, GAIL GORTON, MARK A. WILSON, SAM HOLROYD, JOHNNY WILSON, BARBARA J. ROMERO, GERALDINE ROMERO, TIMOTHY WILSON, PAULINE ZUNIGA, LOUISE CONNOLLY, TONY, ROMERO SOTO, RUSSELL LOPEZ, JIMMIE LOPEZ, ROBERT ROMERO LOPEZ, FAMONA ORTEGA, ARNULFO (ARNOLD), P. LOPEZ, MARGARET LOPEZ WILSON, VICKY HULL, ANNETTE LOPEZ, DONNA LOPEZ, KAREN LOPEZ GREENLEE, JUANITA VILLA JAUREGUI, MERCED ALCASAS ROMERO, TRINIDAD VILLA, NATALIE ROSE GARCIA, KENNETH VILLA, LEONARD VILLA, CHRISTINA CURTIS, ROBERT ANDREW ‘BUCK’ COTA, MCCORMICK, PATRICIA FALCON (MCCORMICK), THOMAS G. COTA, MARCIA COTA, JEFFREY COTA, JILL COTA, AND DOE DEFENDANTS 1‑50 IDENTIFIED AS ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): SUSAN ESTELLE JANSEN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You

can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Superior Court for the State of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is LAW OFFICES OF PAUL R. BURNS, P.C., 2700 GIBRALTAR ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105, 805 708 7144 DATE: (FECHA) 8/15/2022 CLERK, BY (SECRETARIO) /S/ YULIANA RAZO, DEPUTY (ADJUNTO). ORDER GRANTING EX‑PARTE APPLICATION FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS, CASE NO. 22CVO3135 Paul R. Burns, Esq. (SBN 230509)Solange D. Sanjueza (SBN289365) LAW OFFICES OF PAUL R. BURNS, P.C. 2700 Gilbraltar Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 paulburnslaw@gmail.com Attorneys for Plaintiff: Susan Estelle Jansen SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ‑ ANACAPA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PLAINTIFF: SUSAN ESTELLE JANSEN V. CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, RICHARD R. ROMERO ... AS ALL PERSONS

UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO. DEFENDANTS. ORDER AFTER APPLICATION FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS On reading the filings and evidence consisting of Plaintiff Susan Estelle Jansen’s Application for Order for Publication of Summons and Declaration of Paul R. Burns, Esq.,

it satisfactorily appearing to me therefrom that Defendants: CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, ET AL Cannot with reasonable diligence be served in any other manner specified in Sections 415.10 through 415.4 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, and that the defendants are a necessary parties to this action. IT IS ORDERED that the Summons be served on the above named Defendants by publication in SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDANT, which is a local newspaper of general circulation in Santa Barbara County, California,

hereby designated as the publication most likely to give Defendants actual notice of the action, and that the publication be made once a week for four successive weeks. FOR GOOD CAUSE SHOWN: IT IS SO ORDERED: DATED: 10/14/22 HONORARY COLLEEN K. STERNE JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE COMMUNITY GARDEN, SAN JOSE CREEK MULTI-PURPOSE PATH, AND ARMITOS PARK IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NOS. 9007 AND 9084 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., Monday, December 5, 2022, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 nonrefundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bidopportunities. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plantings and equipment necessary to construct and deliver the specified COMMUNITY GARDEN, SAN JOSE CREEK MULTI-PURPOSE PATH, AND ARMITOS PARK IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NOS. 9007 AND 9084. Work includes construction of a new community garden with raised garden beds, outdoor classroom, outdoor picnic area with pizza oven, installation of new playground equipment and surfacing material, constructing ADA accessible walkways, ramps and curbs, construction of the multi-purpose path and all project associated clearing, grubbing, grading, asphalt, concrete, drainage, fencing, signage and landscape work. The contract period is one hundred (100) Working Days. Deadline to submit Requests For Information (RFI) electronically to jplummer@ cityofgoleta.org is Monday, November 21, 2022. A Pre-Bid Meeting is not scheduled for this project. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed or submitted to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received or postmarked within three (3) City business days after the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR COMMUNITY GARDEN, SAN JOSE CREEK MULTI-PURPOSE PATH, AND ARMITOS PARK IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NOS. 9007 AND 9084.” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class “A” Contractor’s license, or specialty licensing in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 22300, the successful bidder may substitute certain securities for funds withheld by CITY to ensure performance under the Contract or, in the alternative, request the CITY to make payment of retention to an escrow agent. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact JoAnne Plummer in writing at jplummer@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA _____________________________ Deborah Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: November 10, 2022 and November 17, 2022

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