Santa Barbara Independent 11/10/22 publication

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Santa Barbara

NOV. 10-17, 2022 VOL. 36 NO. 878

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SCHOOLS of THOUGHT OUR ANNUAL EDUCATION GUIDE by LESLIE DINABERG

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S.Y. Residents Identified in January 6 Mob Election Night Results Glen Phillips’s Post-Pandemic POV Pico’s Chef Cameron Ingle School Bus Couple’s 11th Anniversary Mic Meets Microscope for Spencer Doc Voice: On Racism


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NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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Performed to Live Music

Nominated for three Grammy Awards and three Americana Music Association awards

Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company

Allison Russell

What Problem?

Bill T. Jones, Artistic Director

Wed, Nov 16 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Tue, Nov 15 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre

“Her abstract poetry mixed with a literal mind is just unbelievable…this is one of the best conceptual albums I’ve ever heard” – Brandi Carlile A member of Birds of Chicago and Our Native Daughters, Russell’s solo album Outside Child was released in 2021 to critical acclaim, topping The New York Times’ Best Of list.

“Visually and sonically stunning.” The New York Times This new work from Tony Award-winning MacArthur “Genius“ Bill T. Jones features a live original score and excerpts from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s I Have a Dream speech.

Santa Barbara Debut

Matthew Whitaker

Watkins Family Hour Tue, Nov 29 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Thu, Nov 17 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

“What this prodigy can do better than anything else, and arguably anyone else, is play piano, organ and keyboards.” DownBeat

Jazz Series Lead Sponsor: Manitou Fund Presented in association with UCSB Global Engagement, as part of International Education Week

Sean and Sara Watkins are akin to royalty in American folk circles.” The Guardian (U.K.) Get ready for a lively evening of authentic Americana as brother and sister Sean and Sara Watkins bring a special 20th anniversary edition of their bluegrass musical variety show to town.

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535

Special Thanks

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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Artwork: Sea Anemones by Ernst Haeckel (1904)

Heal the Ocean

Honorary Chair, Julia Louis-Dreyfus Heal the Ocean proudly salutes the generous Sponsors and Supporters who made our Journey into The Past Fantastic for our 2022 Imaginary Gala such a success! With your help, we raised over $227,000! We thank Julia Louis-Dreyfus again for being our Honorary Chair, hosting it all with such joy. We are deeply grateful to the following Sponsors and Supporters for our Journey to travel back to earlier, more pristine times. Thank you, one and all!

2022 IMAGINARY GALA FANTASTIC SPONSORS SEASTAR

GORGONIAN CORAL

CRINOID

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Jonathan Gans & Abigail Turin Susan Baerwald & Marcy Carsey / Martha Blackwell Gordon Auchincloss & Belita Ong Just Folk Julia Louis-Dreyfus & Brad Hall/ John & Gloria McManus Lee Parker Bacon Hall Charitable Trust Tom & Sheila Cullen Phil & Leslie Bernstein/ SAND DOLLAR Nora McNeely Hurley David, Theresa & Summer Dolotta/ Bernstein Family Fund & Michael Hurley The Dolotta Family Charitable Foundation Larry & Wendy Barels John & Caron Berryhill/ The Radis Family Agnes B. Kline Memorial Foundation/ Ken & Nancy Goldsholl/ MEDUSAE in memory of Agnes B. Kline & Ford G. Kline The M and M Foundation Garland & Brenda Reiter/ Sam Scranton Garland and Brenda Reiter Family Terri Carlson MD Frederick C. Herzog III & Marla J. Mercer/ in memory of Sherilyn Scranton Foundation Herzog & Mercer Family Living Trust Ani Casillas Jay & Talia Roston/ Gary Larson Thomas Dabney & Darcie Dierenfield GIANT SQUID Pajadoro Family Foundation Ron & Stacy Pulice/Pulice Trust Jed Hirsch Thomas & Nancy Crawford Steve Starkey & Olivia Erschen Blair & Steve Raber K. Leonard & Melanie Judson Roy E. Crummer Foundation Jonathan & Elise Wygant, Barrett & Charles & Eileen Read Kenny Loggins/Higher Vision, Inc. Tomchin Family Foundation Catherine Cordero, Ken & Sammi Sterling/ Roxanna & Randy Solakian Dwight & Kimberly Lowell Big Speak Inc. Ray Link & Jill Taylor Marcia & John Mike Cohen ECHINODERM Patsy Tisch Denise Nelson Tom & Sheila Cullen Alan & Lisa Parsons Melissa & Christian Riparetti-Stepien Clayton Clark Verbinski Alex & Gina Ziegler

2022 IMAGINARY GALA FANTASTIC SUPPORTERS URCHIN

Richard & Connie Kennelly Sharon Metsch Peter & Rebecca Adams Andy & Yvonne Neumann Anthony Allina & Kathy Snow & Bendy White Christiane Schlumberger Evan Turpin Stephen & Maria Black Charles Vinick & Susan Venable Hope Bryant Tracey Willfong/ Inga & Jack Canfield Willfong-Singh Family Fund Brian & Judi Cearnal Jim Winter Cinda & Donnelley Erdman Grant & Dana Justesen Trexler Karen Yoon & Bruce Raph/ Town & Country Water Gardens Inc. Janice & Mark Kaspersen

BARNACLE

SEA HORSE

Judith Bennett & Stephen Schweitzer Elizabeth & Dennis Boscacci Mike & Lynne Cage Cotty & Isabella Chubb Edgar Eltrich Lee Heller Chris & Connie Lambert Loraine McIntosh Peter & Shelly Overgaag Libe Washburn & Sharon Keigher

Manuela & Rob Cavaness Bob & Alea Cunningham Susanne Humbel-Heierling Linda Krop Dreena Lindsay Sheila Lodge John Lyon Ron & Jeanie Sickafoose Carolyn McCleskey Teresa McWilliams David Niles & Karin Van Hoek Niles

Eric & Kit Peterson Stephen Segal/Stephen Segal Construction Karla Shelton & Bruce Dobrin Cath Webb George & Judy Writer

SEA SHELL Rosemary Alden John Hankins Sandy Mezzio Tom & Deb Trauntvein

Unique American Folk and Outsider Art

Heal the Ocean, 1430 Chapala St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 965-7570; info@healtheocean.org; www.HealtheOcean.org 4

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NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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TABLE of CONTENTS

Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Callie Fausey, Melea Maglalang, Zoha Malik, Lola Watts Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

23

LEARNING THE CITY Name: Zoha Malik Title: News Intern

Schools of Thought 2022 Our Annual Education Guide by Leslie Dinaberg

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

COURTESY

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporter Ryan P. Cruz Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

volume 36 # 878, Nov. 10- 17, 2022

Why did you want to intern at the Independent? What do you hope to get out of this experience? I wanted to intern since it served as a great way to get more involved in local journalism. While the experience itself polishes writing, interviewing, and editing skills, it also has made me a lot more familiar with Santa Barbara as a city. It’s also been really rewarding getting to know reporters with a lot more experience than me. What stories have you enjoyed reporting so far, and what’s a topic you’d like to cover in the future? So far, I liked reporting on a city council meeting and the Exxon settlement with the fishermen the most, since those gave me an interesting look into local politics and organizations, but I also liked doing the Creek Week/Thousand Steps pieces, since I got to wander around pretty places in Santa Barbara and take photos. I’m definitely interested in covering more stories revolving around local politics, maybe related to social activism.

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

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ON THE COVER: Courtesy photos. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

PARALLEL STORIES Mecca: Susan Straight

THURSDAY | NOVEMBER 17 | 5:30 PM The New York Times award-winning author Susan Straight returns to read from her latest and much lauded novel, Mecca. Set in Southern California’s inland and high desert area, this is a story of freeways, wildfires, secrets, and struggles that is a love song for a place and its people. Told from different points of view in interwoven narratives, Mecca speaks of loneliness and grief, family, and home, and the ways in which language, with its power and peculiarities carries a culture’s hopes and fears. With courage and grace, Straight looks closely at the California few see, pushes deep into the difficult territories of the past few years, and shifts how we see the land and each other. Book signing to follow.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net

Location: Mary Craig Auditorium, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/$10 NON-MEMBERS | Purchase tickets online at tickets.sbma.net. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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THE SYMPHONY PRESENTS

Wisdom of the Water, Earth, Sky Saturday, November 19, 2022 | 7:30 PM Sunday, November 20, 2022 | 3 PM Honoring the past in an intersection of connection, community, and culture, this program offers a symphonic and visual homage to our region’s centuries old Chumash heritage from local composer and preservationist Cody Westheimer. Paired with Robert Schumann’s romantic musical gift to his future wife, the Piano Concerto in A minor, featuring world-renowned pianist and Santa Barbara favorite, Alessio Bax; Jean Sibelius’ Valse Triste; and Mozart’s inimitable masterpiece, Symphony No. 40, this repertoire delivers a deeply moving and moody tribute. REPERTOIRE Cody Westheimer | Wisdom of the Water, Earth, Sky Robert Schumann | Piano Concerto in A minor Jean Sibelius | Valse Triste W. A. Mozart | Symphony No. 40 in G minor THE ARTISTS Marianne Parra & Ernestine Ygnacio-DeSoto, Chumash Descendants

Nir Kabaretti, Conductor

Alessio Bax, Piano

CONCERT SPONSORS

2022/23 SEASON SPONSORS

Artist Sponsor Barbara Ann Clark

70th Anniversary Season Sponsor: Sarah & Roger Chrisman

Selection Sponsors Barbara Burger & Paul E. Munch Libby & Stephen Erickson Janet A. Garufis

70th Anniversary Season Corp. Sponsor:

70th Anniversary Grand Venue Sponsor:

YOUR SEATS ARE WAITING! Tickets start at $35 Order online at bit.ly/wisdomInd or scan the QR code OR call the Granada Box Office 805.899.2222

TheSymphony.org

2022/23 SEASON UP NEXT:

December 31, 2022 New Year’s Eve With The Symphony 6

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NOVEMBER 10, 2022

Jan. 21 & 22, 2023 Plains, Trains & Violins INDEPENDENT.COM

Feb. 18 & 19, 2023 Transformation

Mar. 18 & 19, 2023 John Williams: A Cinematic Celebration

Apr. 15 & 16, 2023 Beethoven Dreams


NOV. 3-10, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

ELECTION 2022

Blue Tide Washes over S.B.

CITY

I N G R I D B OSTROM

Democrats Win at State Level, in Goleta City Council, and in School Boards Across the County

Nov. 8, 2022, General Election

Semi-Official Election Night Results For the latest, most complete election results, see independent .com/2022-general-election.

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY RESULTS Total Votes: 75,799 Total Registered Voters: 237,759 Turnout: 31.88% County Board of Education – Trustee Area 1 Marybeth Carty: 8,419 (70.78%) Rosanne Crawford: 3,437 (28.89%) Santa Barbara Community College District – Trustee Area 1 Charlotte Gullap-Moore: 3,928 (61.41%) Debi Stoker: 2,454 (38.37%)

by Ryan P. Cruz and Nick Welsh

A

s results poured in on a rainy Election Night in Santa Barbara County, it became clear that the balance of power—at least locally—would remain with the Democratic Party, with nearly all of the candidates endorsed by the party winning their races. Timbers Restaurant, on the western outer reaches of Goleta, was packed with the Democratic faithful on Election Night, and the back room was flowing with celebratory drinks as the first round of projected numbers were released showing a near sweep for the party. On Wednesday morning, semi-official results showed much of the same. Two of the biggest winners were Salud Carbajal —who took the 24th Congressional District race with 60.3 percent of the vote against challenger Brad Allen with 39.7 percent—and County Supervisor Gregg Hart, who made a successful bid for State Assembly with 58.8 percent of the vote against perennial Republican candidate Mike Stoker’s 41.2 percent. Carbajal, who will now serve his fourth term in Congress, was even more jovial than usual as the countywide results came in. “The

results are extremely positive,” he stated. “I’m optimistic and grateful the Central Coast voters have shown up.” But while the Democratic Party was in a great position on the Central Coast, Carbajal and others at Timbers were watching the televisions closely as nationwide totals were being counted, showing a neck-and-neck run for the Senate and House majorities. Carbajal expressed relief that the national election results do not appear to be bearing out the Red Tide prognostications many had predicted. “Preliminaries show the Democrats seem to have defied the overwhelming change pundits predicted. We are not headed in the direction they all said it was going to go.” In the race for State Assembly, Hart took on a local Republican warhorse in Stoker, most famous recently for having led the “Lock ’er Up” chant about Hillary Clinton during the 2016 Republican convention at which Donald Trump was nominated his party’s standardbearer, then later for being dropped from his Trump-appointed position as West Coast administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency.

COMMUNITY Community historian and artist Michael Montenegro — curator of the Instagram account @ChicanoCultureSB —hosted the seventh annual Santa Barbara Mural Ride on 11/5, leading a group on a bicycle tour to visit some of the most important murals and public works of art in the downtown area. The tour began at Ortega Park, with stops at SBHS, the Museum of Art, Bohnett Park, SBCC, Syuxtun Story Circle, and La Casa de la Raza. The murals celebrated the city’s deep artistic and cultural heritage and included works by local artists and student groups like Manuel Unzueta, Santa Barbara High School’s Ethnic Studies Club, and UMOJA. Watch a video of the ride at independent.com/mural-ride-vid.

LABOR Thousands of academic workers at UCSB and the UC’s other nine campuses will go on strike 11/14 “unless the university stops its unlawful conduct so that meaningful progress can be made at the bargaining table,”according to a UAW union statement. On 11/2, more than 36,500 of the UC’s 48,000 unionized researchers, teaching assistants, tutors, and readers voted to authorize a strike, setting a strike date the following day. Denying the alleged unlawful behavior, the UC in a written statement said that “our locations will be prepared to ensure continuity of instruction and research in the event of a UAW strike” but that they “are committed to continuing to negotiate in good faith and reaching full agreements as soon as possible.” Full story at independent.com/ uc-uaw-strike.

Santa Barbara Community College District – Trustee Area 5 Marsha Croninger: 4,866 (80.07%) Sharon Salvador-Jegottka: 1,176 (19.35%) TIMBER! Santa Barbara City College board candidate Charlotte Gullap-Moore celebrates her early lead on Election Night at the Timbers Restaurant in Goleta.

During a special closed-door hearing on 11/8, the S.B. City Council voted unanimously to terminate long-time City Attorney Ariel Calonne, who’d been placed on paid administrative leave in July after what had been described as an exceptionally heated exchange with another attorney who worked in his office. Calonne, who was hired in 2014 and has earned about $280,000 a year, is contractually entitled to a year’s salary, plus a year’s worth of health insurance and the equivalent of his car allowance, valued at $605 a month. Sarah Knecht will continue to run the department as interim City Attorney. Full story at independent.com/city-attorney-fired.

Santa Barbara Unified School District – Trustee Area 1 Gabe Escobedo: 2,148 (56.00%) Efigenia Banales: 986 (25.70%) Dan La Berge: 682 (17.78%) Santa Barbara Unified School District – Trustee Area 4 Rose Muñoz: 2,114 (81.37%) Phebe Mansur: 472 (18.17%)

PUBLIC SAFETY

Goleta Union School District – Trustee Area 1 Richard Mayer: 2,209 (59.08%) Caroline Abate: 1,515 (40.52%) Goleta Union School District – Trustee Area 3 Emily Zacarias: 1,551 (61.45%) Christy Lozano: 641 (25.40%) Bert Haley: 322 (12.76%) City of Carpinteria City Council Member – District 5 Al Clark: 321 (56.32%) Gregg A. Carty: 185 (32.46%) Patrick O’Connor: 59 (10.35%) City of Goleta City Council Member – District 1 Luz Reyes-Martín: 1,321(56.07%) Roger S. Aceves: 1,024 (43.46%) CONT’D ON PAGE 8 

A 6-year-old boy was reported dead following a crash near the Gaviota State Beach Tunnel on 11/1 shortly after 7:30 p.m., in which a Nissan truck slid out of control and into the ravine between the north and southbound lanes of Highway 101, according to a CHP report. A 2-yearold boy and 31-year-old woman were also injured and transported to Santa Ynez Cottage Hospital, where the woman was treated for minor injuries and the boy was being treated for moderate internal injuries. The 31-yearold male driver was uninjured. The CHP report states alcohol and/or drugs were “not a factor in this crash,” which remains under investigation.

COURTS & CRIME A Santa Barbara man was arrested for arson in connection with last week’s Ward Fire in Goleta, the Sheriff’s Office reported. At about 11:40 p.m. on 11/2, deputies and County Fire arrived at a brush fire across CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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7


NOV. 3-10, 2022

SEMI-OFFICIAL ELECTION NIGHT RESULTS City of Goleta City Council Member – District 2 James Kyriaco: 514 (57.82%) Sam Ramirez: 373 (41.96%)

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Measure B (Goleta One Cent Sales Tax Hike) Yes: 4,055 (63.91%) No: 2,290GOLETA (36.09%)

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Measure C (Goleta Ban on Sale of Flavored Tobacco Products) Yes: 4,902 (77.25%) No: 1,444 (22.75%)

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Prop. 1: Constitutional Right to Reproductive Freedom Yes: 3,487,297 (65.0%) No: 1,879,056 (35.0%) Prop. 26: Sports Wagering on Tribal Lands Yes: 1,597,859 (29.9%) No: 3,750,587 (70.1%) Prop. 27: Online Sports Wagering Outside of Tribal Lands Yes: 898,952 (16.7%) No: 4,495,593 (83.3%) Prop. 28: Public School Arts and Music Education Funding Yes: 3,308,470 (61.5%) No: 2,069,248 (38.5%) Prop. 29: Regulates Kidney Dialysis Clinics Yes: 1,608,411 (30.1%) No: 3,738,429 (69.9%) Prop. 30: Tax to Fund ZEV/Wildfire Programs Yes: 2,206,695 (40.9%) No: 3,184,147 (59.1%) Prop. 31: Prohibition on Sale of Certain Tobacco Products Yes: 3,342,884 (62.3%) No: 2,025,642 (37.7%)

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I NG R I D B OSTROM

Hart, a longtime figure in local politics, said he was eager to make Springfield 15 oz. SOLE FILLET SPINACH the next step up from the county to the state level. lb. “I’m really proud of the opportunity to represent our commuea. lb. nity in the State Assembly,” Hart said. “I’ve been involved in local Boneless Springfield 8 oz. government a long time, so I JALAPENOS MARINATED CHICKEN think I understand the values, the issues, that people care about in lb. our community.” lb. lb. Democrats also had a strong showing in school board races, with incumbent Santa Barbara Minute Maid 59 oz. Unified School District president Rose Muñoz taking 81.4 percent THANK YOU FOR VOTING US of the vote over Phebe Mansur in ea. Area 4, and several newcomers overcoming conservative challengers across the county. antacruzmarkets.com www.santacruzmarkets.com Planning Commissioner Gabe Escobedo had a successful run in the district’s other contested race, S.B. Unified school board candidate Gabe Escobedo By the bag ANANAS BANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAIN RICE BEEF TRI TIP ¢ taking 56 percent of the vote in a ¢ 99 $ D TO STOCK HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL 49 ON 1 49DAYS $199 $ 59 Mayer took Area 1 with 59.1 percent 2 crowded race that included Efigenia BanaFROM OCTOBER Chicken NOVEMBER 2ND against Abate’s 40.5 percent, and Zacarias MESQUITE27TH CHARCOALTHROUGH MESQUITE CHARCOAL NEAPPLES PINEAPPLES les (25.7 percent) and Dan La Berge (17.8 $ 89 LEG QUARTERS $ 89 2 $ 99 finished with 61.5 percent against Lozano’s $ 99 ¢ 1 El Pato 7 oz. 2 percent). 1 69 El Pato 7 oz. HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE FOLLOW US AND LIKE USTOMATOES ON FACEBOOK Escobedo has become a force recently, 25.4 percent. ¢ ON INSTAGRAM MA TOMATOES PORK BUTT ¢ ROMA 59 “I didn’t see a pathway for her ideals,” 59 helping shape the city’s new police review $ 59 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 89 ¢ BEA BARB 1 Best ST Zacarias said of her challenger, Lozano. COFFEE ARA of SANT INSTANT board, and will look to build on that experibest $ 89 Santa Barbara Thin sliced BEST 5 UJI APPLES Santa barbara In the Goleta City Council races, DemoFUJI APPLES W I N N E R $589 CARNE RANCHERA ence on the school board. WINNER 89 ¢ PEAS & CARROTS W i n n e r$598 89 ¢ PEAS & CARROTS In the race for Goleta Union school crats James Kyriaco and rising star Luz Reyes¢ ¢ 89 89 Santa Cruz EDIUM YAMS MEDIUM YAMS board, political newbie Emily Zacarias and Martín are both ahead of challengers Sam PORK CHORIZO SANTA BARBARA ¢ GOLETA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA SANTA BARBARA 59 ¢ WHIP TOPPING 59 40-year incumbent Richard Mayer both took Ramirez and Roger Aceves. Kyriaco has 58 GOLETA $ 49 2 $ 49 1 324324 5757 Hollister Ave Montecito St St 1 W.W.Montecito 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister on conservative challengers in Christy Lozano percent of the vote in District 2, while ReyesEAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE ORANGE JUICE ORANGE JUICE ¢ Mahatma 2# and Caroline Abate, in what many considered Martín is ahead in District 1 with 56 percent. 79 $ 89 By the bag $198 Mahatma 2# 79 ¢ $ 89 3 Support local people working at 3 gonna be a clean sweep,” Kyriaco to be a battle LONG GRAIN RICEbetween the forces of cultural said,“It’s“with LONG fresh GRAIN bread daily from featuring bread RICE daily from sa Bakery ¢ La Bella Rosa Bakery locally businesses! ¢Nowowned conservatism $ 99 and liberal progressivism in passing.” me and Luz and both measures $ 99 $ 59 lb.NO SALES TO DEALERS CONT’D ON PAGE 10  lb. local schools. lb.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

COMMUNITY

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON

Alzheimer’s Walk Raises $134K

S

104th Concert Season

MASTERSERIES AT THE LOBERO THEATRE JAN ELLE B OESC H

anta Barbara’s Chase Palm Park and Cabrillo Boulevard were painted purple Saturday morning, with 428 participants donning their purple T-shirts and taking over the beachfront for this year’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s. The Alzheimer’s Association Central Coast Chapter hosted the event, which brought 77 SEEING PURPLE: More than 400 participants walked down Santa teams to walk the 5k route and Barbara’s beachfront for this year’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s. raised more than $134,000 toward care, support, and research efforts. orange for those who support Alzheimer’s Alzheimer’s is now the third leading cause awareness and research; yellow for those of death in California, and the number of who care for someone currently living people living with the disease is expected with Alzheimer’s; blue for those living with to double in the next 20 years, according to Alzheimer’s; and purple for anyone who has data released by the California Department lost a loved one to the disease. Several locals shared their own stories, of Public Health and the Alzheimer’s Assoincluding Gene Lucas, a former executive ciation in 2021. Event Chair Gabriella Garcia shared her vice chancellor at UC Santa Barbara who own experiences caring for her grandfather, recently lost both his wife and sister-in-law Jose Paramo, who passed away after a long after long battles with Alzheimer’s. Lucas said caring for his wife while watching the fight with the disease in 2012. “I was his voice when he no longer had disease slowly take hold was “probably the one, and it has been one of the greatest hon- hardest” thing he’s ever done. “You see them disappear a little bit every ors of my life,” Garcia said. “I truly believe that together we can end Alzheimer’s, and I day,” Lucas said. After the opening ceremony at the park, can tell by looking out into this sea of purple Mayor Randy Rowse counted down to the that I’m not alone.” She said that the costs of care are escalat- start of the walk and the group marched ing into the billions of dollars as more people down Cabrillo. are affected by the disease, but there are curWith $134,998 raised so far, the Alzheimrently more than 920 projects in 45 coun- er’s Association has reached more than 57 tries across the world that are researching percent of its goal for this year, but the nonways to slow the cognitive decline related to profit hopes to reach $237,000 by December 31. This year’s top fundraising teams were Alzheimer’s and dementia. The lawn at Chase Palm Park was flow- the Alzheimer’s Women’s Initiative, Team ing with hundreds of flowers spinning in Carpinteria, and Team Union Bank, with a the wind, each color representing some- combined $35,000 between the three teams. one’s personal connection with the disease: —Ryan P. Cruz

SEASON SPONSOR:

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022, 7:30PM

HÉLÈNE GRIMAUD

, piano

Internationally acclaimed French pianist Hélène Grimaud returns to the Lobero stage for a transformative recital performance featuring Schumann’s Kreisleriana, Op.16, along with a selection of evanescent miniatures by Chopin, Debussy, Satie, and Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov, which, in Grimaud’s own words, “conjure atmospheres of fragile reflection, a mirage of what was—or what could have been.” Sponsor: Alison & Jan Bowlus Co-Sponsors: CAMA Women’s Board • Nancy & Byron K. Wood Concert Partners: Stephen Cloud • Raye Haskell Melville • Maureen & Les Shapiro

Lobero Theatre Box Office ⫽ (805) 963-0761 ⫽ lobero.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA

DAILY RAFFLE • • • Win an E-Bike and MORE!

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 7 the creek from the end of Ward Drive in Goleta. A witness on the bike path near Patterson Road gave a description of the suspect who reportedly started the fire. Close to midnight, deputies located a man fitting the description, Jose Martin Alvarez-Castro, 30, who was arrested for felony arson and misdemeanor obstruction of a peace officer and possession. He is in county jail on $20,000 bail. The fire, which triggered evacuation warnings for residents off More Ranch Road, was 100 percent contained as of 11/6, according to County Fire. Tom Barrack, an erstwhile part-time Santa Barbara resident and confidante of former president Donald Trump, was found not guilty by a Brooklyn jury on federal charges of acting as an unregistered agent for a foreign government. The Justice Department had charged that Barrack, who at one time owned Michael Jackson’s former Neverland Ranch, had acted as an agent and lobbyist on behalf of the United Arab Emirates. The U.S. attorneys also charged him with obstruction of justice and lying to federal officials. Barrack, who led the fundraising effort on behalf of Trump’s inauguration, was acquitted on all charges.

The Sheriff’s Office is investigating a shooting on 11/7 in Carpinteria that has left a teenage girl with moderate injuries. Sheriff’s deputies responded to an area hospital around 6:40 p.m. to investigate “a report of a female juvenile with a gunshot wound to an extremity,” according to a Sheriff’s Office statement. During their investigation, deputies discovered the victim, who is expected to recover, had been shot near the 5500 block of Carpinteria Avenue. No arrests had been made as of press time, and anyone with information about the case can call the Sheriff’s Criminal Investigations Division at (805) 681-4150. To make an anonymous tip, call (805) 681-4171 or visit sbsheriff.org. The $4 billion payout that was part of the proposed merger between Kroger and Albertsons — the two largest supermarket operators in the country — was temporarily blocked by a judge in Washington state, after several state attorneys general filed similar motions urging the courts to delay the merger to allow the Federal Trade Commission to complete a full review. The proposed payment to investors was scheduled to take place 11/7, but now the dividend will be delayed until courts fully vet the merger. Full story at independent.com/merger-payout-blocked. n

Join us for an ONLINE AUCTION KICKOFF CONCERT! A FREE, community performance by award-winning electroacoustic duo

WED, NOV 16, 4-6 PM AT WEINMAN HALL Music Academy, 1070 Fairway Road

Every auction item or raffle ticket purchase supports the Music Academy Sing! Program, a free, after-school choral program for local elementary students, and Summer Festival fellow scholarships. INDEPENDENT.COM

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NOV. 3-10, 2022

I N G R I D B OSTROM PHOTOS

BLUE TIDE WASHES OVER S.B. CONT’D FROM P. 8

CELEBRATE

Thanksgiving Thanksgiving Buffet

Gather and give thanks this Thanksgiving at the Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort Seating: 11:00am - 4:00pm Adults $115 | Children $50 To make a reservation, please call (805) 884- 8526 or email SBAFP_SpecialEvents@Hilton.com Price subject to 8.75% sales tax and 20% service charge. 13.1% of service charge is gratuity for servers, 6.9% covers discretionary administrative costs for the resort. For more information, scan the QR code.

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Goleta Union school board candidate Emily Zacarias

The two measures to which he alludes are the sales-tax bump — Measure B — on the Goleta ballot and Measure C, which would impose an even stricter ban on the sale of flavored tobacco in Goleta than state voters appear to be approving statewide with Proposition 31. Both C and 31 are in a solid position to pass. In races for the city college board, longtime incumbent Marsha Croninger — who has not always seen eye-to-eye with the Democratic Party establishment — is way out ahead of her challenger, Sharon SalvadorJegottka, by 80.1 percent to 19.4 percent. Likewise, newcomer Charlotte Gullap-Moore is ahead over fellow first-timer Debi Stoker, wife of Mike Stoker, 61.4 percent to 38.4. Gullap-Moore thanked her predecessor Peter Haslund, who’s served for several generations, for endorsing her candidacy the day she announced. Marybeth Carty, who has served on the County Board of Education since 2013, is way out in front of challenger Rosanne Crawford with 70.8 percent of the vote compared to Crawford’s 28.9 percent. Carpinteria turned out to be home to the most contested races, with two incumbent councilmembers facing off in the city’s first-ever district election. As of Wednesday morning, Al Clark is almost certain to win with 56.3 percent against 32.5 for Gregg Carty. But the closest race in the local election is the fight for Measure T, the ballot initiative that would effectively snuff out the proposed Surfliner Inn in Carpinteria. With 2,903 votes counted, 50.14 percent have voted “no,” while 49.86 have voted “yes” — a margin of only eight votes. With a decision of “no,” the proposed hotel would continue through city review as with other projects. Statewide propositions were much clearer, according to Santa Barbara County voters. Prop. 1, which would codify abortion rights explicitly in the state’s constitution, was approved by 67.9 percent of county voters. Props 26 and 27, which both aimed to

Goleta City Council candidate Luz Reyes-Martín

legalize gambling in the state, failed dramatically. Prop. 26 received 71.05 percent “no” votes, while 27 received 84.31 percent “no” votes. When it came to more money for school arts and music programs, Santa Barbara voters were slightly more supportive, endorsing Prop. 28 by 65.9 percent. Props 29 and 30, regarding kidney dialysis and a tax on the wealthy toward electric vehicles, both failed. In total, 75,799 voters cast ballots by Tuesday evening, accounting for 32 percent of the county’s 237,759 registered voters. Of those ballots cast, just over 10,000 were at the polls while 65,735 were mailed in. According to county elections czar Joe Holland, about 55,000 more ballots still need to be counted, which brings total turnout to 55 percent. All 297 precincts have reported, and the semi-official results are expected to be finalized by Tuesday, November 15. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D TRANSPORTATION

path, acknowledged mistakes were made. He, too, would have signed the petition, he said, based on the early estimates of tree casualties. But, he stressed, even Yosemite National Park — “the crown jewel of the national park system” — has 23 paved or semi-paved trails. Animated by the specter of climate change, bike advocates and their allies rallied in response to the initial passion and vehemence of the proposal’s opponents. Enlisting residents who helped found the Modoc Preserve, they argued the community could have both trees and trails. If anything, they argued, the new “multiuse” bike path would open the preserve, allowing more people to savor the saved environment. “To enjoy the preserve, you must go into the preserve,” declared Jim Kemp, former chief executive for the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments. The bike path’s advocates cited the 13 serious accidents that befell bike riders on that stretch of road—where cars zoom past at 50 miles an hour—over the last 10 years. One involved a fatality. A new, segregated bike lane, they argued, would be infinitely safer, allowing Westside kids to ride their bikes to San Marcos High School without mingling with traffic. “I hear the screeches,” one 12-year-old supporter of the path testified. Some of the neighborhood critics remained unconvinced. The mitigated negative declaration was neither accurate nor truthful, they argued. Others argued that either alternative—A or B—was “completely and totally unreasonable.” Supervisor Hart radiated 1,000-watt optimism, saying, “This is our chance to rise to the moment.” After the meeting, he described the easement as “just words written on a piece of paper 30 years ago,” adding that their meaning “lay in the eye of the beholder.” For example, the prohibition against motorized vehicles it contained, he said, was written decades before electric bikes were ever contemplated. If people were of a mind to find a solution, he said, a solution could be found. “The road ahead in these situations is never clear or straight,” he said. “It’s always n one step at a time.”

PHOTOGRAPHY

A

THE ART AND SOUL OF DANCE

FRITZ OLENBERGER

by Nick Welsh dvocates for a new bike lane proposed along a 4,000-foot stretch of Modoc Road in Santa Barbara overwhelmed their preservationist-minded opponents with sheer numbers, passion, and positivity at last week’s county supervisors’ hearing, winning in the process a key victory without which the proposal would have been dead on arrival. The county supervisors voted unanimously to award the project a “mitigated negative declaration” for purposes of environmental review. That means the project can now proceed to the design phase and begin to draw upon the $5.3 million state grant for alternativetransportation projects for which the proposal was the top ranked in the state. But the dispute — pitting alt-transportation advocates against neighborhood activists out to save trees along Modoc Road—is hardly settled. Remaining at issue is whether the proposed 15-foot-wide paved path can be built through a 50-acre nature preserve next to Modoc Road without “substantially” or “significantly” violating the legal restrictions written into the easement to protect the land from development. Based on testimony from the Santa Barbara Land Trust — which has managed the Modoc Road Preserve since its inception in 1999 — it’s not clear that’s possible given that the easement specifically bans “the construction of any road or structure” and the use of any motorized vehicle. Joining the Land Trust in this concern was the La Cumbre Mutual Water Company. Supervisor Steve Lavagnino expressed incredulity that preservationists found themselves at such loggerheads. “You guys have the same goal!” he exclaimed. Triggering the controversy were initial plans that called for the removal of up to 64 trees along Modoc Road where a smaller existing bike lane—not separated from the flow of traffic — now exists. Of those, 29 were the iconic Canary palms. Outraged by the proposed slaughter of so many iconic specimens, a group of neighbors organized and collected more than 5,000 signatures opposing the project. Since then, the number of trees to be removed under that scenario—known as Alternative A—has been whittled down to 48. But if the bike path were allowed to encroach into the preserve —known as Alternative B—that number could be dropped further still, to 21. Of those, none would be Canary palms, three would be oaks, and 13 would be eucalyptus, with the remaining five trees being various species. It didn’t help matters any that county Public Works officials never contacted the Land Trust until this July. Supervisor Gregg Hart, who represents the district and is a staunch supporter of the new bike

BASSH 2022

COU RTESY

Modoc Bike Trail Rolls On Fate of Controversial Bike Path Could Hinge on Meaning of ‘Significant’

DERRICK CURTIS PRODUCTIONS

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23rd Annual 25th Annual

Santa Barbara Empty Bowls Support our neighbors in need at the beloved community soup fundraiser.

Sun, Nov 13 • 11am-3pm

Sun, Dec 5 • 11am-3pm Foodbank Warehouse • 4554 Hollister (next to Page Youth Center) Foodbank Warehouse • 4554 Hollister (next to Page Youth Center)

• Join friends in person • Choose your bowl • Gourmet soup to go

• Join friends in person • Choose your own bowl • Festive raffle • Gourmet soup to go • Exclusive restaurant discounts • Handmade ceramics marketplace • Warehouse tours • Festive raffle • Warehouse tours • Handmade holiday marketplace

Tickets: $30 Tickets: $30

FoodbankSBC.org/SBEB22 FoodbankSBC.org/SBEB21 Or scan code with smartphone

David and Julie Siegel • Thomchin Family Foundation

and Don Thompson • Carolyn and Philip Wyatt BenMary Page Youth Center • Katherine Bower • Katherine Bower • Susan and Jeff Bridges • Barbara Ford • NS Ceramic Brylen Technologies, Inc. • California Learning Center • Leon and Elizabeth Olson • Maryan Schall • Village Properties Clay Studios • Danyel Dean & Peter Castellanos • Eji Experiences • Food from the Heart • Ford Family • Sadie Hall • Susan Hersberger • Cyndee Howard • Donnalyn Karpeles • Elizabeth & Leon Olson • Susan Rose • Santa Barbara Airbus • David & Julie Siegel • Mary Thompson

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, SPONSORS!

SPONSORS!

PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

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The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

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As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until November 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


NEWS of the WEEK

NOV. 3-10, 2022

CONT’D

ENVIRONMENT

Is ExxonMobil Sailing Off into S.B.’s Sunset? G LEN N B ELTZ

Oil Giant Sells Offshore Oil Platforms, Onshore Processing Plant, and 123 Miles of Pipeline

process will not be a piece of cake no matter who the applicant is. Some of the state rules, it turns out, are considerably more stringent than federal safety requirements. But compared to the extensive public review process that would play throughout not just one but three counties under the pipeline replacement approach, the public process offered by California Fire Marshal’s office appears to be an impenetrable black box. In a presentation for prospective investors, Sable Offshore Corporation pledged to get the pipeline up and operating by January 1, 2024. Under the terms of the deal with Exxon, Sable has until January 1, 2026, to begin production. Failing that, the property reverts to Exxon, and the deal is over. Although the name Sable is new to Santa Barbara, many of the key players behind this deal are anything but — James Flores, Sable’s CEO and board chair, being a key case in point. From 2001 to 2013, Sable served as chief executive for the oil company PXP, then operating in federal waters off the coast of Pt. Arguello. Flores and his company proved politically nimble and creative, negotiating OFFSHORE OFFLOADING: ExxonMobil has sold off all assets associated with its Santa Ynez Unit, including its three offshore platforms, (from left) Harmony, a deal with most of the key players in Santa Hondo, and Heritage. Barbara’s sprawling environmental establishment that would have allowed PXP to by Nick Welsh of 3-2. Efforts by Plains All American Pipeline company to expand its drilling operations — via slant drilling — into iven the South Coast’s historic antipathy to the oil secure the necessary permits to build 123 miles of new and state waters in exchange for an agreement to stop drillindustry, one might have expected a few historic technologically superior pipeline that runs along the exist- ing at an earlier date than the company would have been gasps in response to the news that ExxonMobil — ing one have, by all accounts, “languished” in the environ- otherwise obligated. one of the biggest oil companies on the planet — has mental review process, with Plains showing little urgency. Ultimately, the deal would blow up in the faces of pretty decided to sell all its onshore and offshore assets along Yet another delay has been occasioned by the need for more much everyone involved — with both the State Lands the Gaviota Coast to a mysterious new entity called Sable biological information about bird migration patterns. This Commission and state legislature rejecting the proposal Offshore Corporation. To the extent the news, released information will be provided only after new field research — but it demonstrated that Flores and his crew were willing last week, qualified as a shot heard around the world, a scheduled to take place next spring. to try new approaches. Coming along with Flores — who silencer was clearly involved. Even now, Santa Barbara According to Supervisor Joan Hartmann — whose dis- later served three years as CEO for a mining and oil comCounty energy planners, elected officials and long-term trict includes Exxon’s facilities — it appears the plan is no pany until 2016 — is a supporting cast who cut their teeth environmental activists are scrambling to figure out what’s longer to install 123 miles of new and improved oil pipelines with PXP. really afoot and what influence, if any, they can hope to to replace the ones found to be corroded by federal pipeline Flores did, in fact, return calls for comment, but said he exert over future developments. safety inspectors. Instead, she said, it appears it is to replace couldn’t speak until early next week. One thing’s for certain: Exxon’s not taking its ball and and repair only those portions of the pipeline that have Attorney Barry Cappello, who represents many property owners enmeshed in heated easement negotiations going home. Its ball remains very much in play, no matter been deemed to be defective. An application to reactivate the pipeline was made with over the existing and proposed new pipeline, described the how shut down Exxon’s production has been in the wake of the Refugio Oil Spill caused by Plains All American the California Fire Marshal on April 1, 2021. The applica- conditions of the pipeline as “virtual Swiss cheese, a rust Pipeline in 2015. tion was submitted pursuant to terms of a consent decree bucket with over 80 serious deficiencies.” No matter how Last week, ExxonMobil quietly confirmed the sale of between Plains All American Pipeline Company and a politically adroit James Flores and the new Sable team is, all its assets associated with its Santa Ynez Unit — three multitude of federal regulatory and environmental agen- Cappello said, “Any project repair or replacement has to get offshore platforms, Heritage, Harmony, and Hondo, with cies signed in March 2020 in which Plains agreed to pay past our federal court case.” 112 wells — its 135-acre production facility along the coast $38 million in fines and penalties while admitting no guilt “This is not necessarily good news for those of us concerned about oil,” commented Supervisor Hartmann. “For at Las Flores Canyon, and 123 miles of pipeline that Exx- for their role leading up to the pipeline spill. onMobil purchased from Plains All American Pipeline just Hartmann said she was made aware of the applica- Exxon, this is just a drop in the bucket, but for these people, the week before. To make the deal happen, ExxonMobil tion only recently. It remains uncertain, she added, what it’s everything. I expect them to really buckle down and try loaned the new entity 97 percent of the $643 million Sable influence or oversight — if any — the county would have to make something happen.” paid Exxon, to be paid back over a five-year period at 10 over the State Fire Marshal’s decision. It remains likewise Hartmann noted that the political winds regarding oil percent interest. Even so, the deal will hit Exxon with a $2 uncertain what role — if any — the public might have in development have shifted significantly in recent months in billion loss. The Santa Ynez Unit is the last production node reviewing or commenting. response to the worldwide spike in oil prices precipitated for Exxon in California. As to the difference between the two approaches — a by Russia’s war against Ukraine. Governor Gavin Newsom, Precipitating the deal in the first place was the Plains new pipeline or repaired one — county energy planner she noted, relaxed emission standards at the gas pump pipeline rupture of 2015 that left 3,400 barrels of oil on the Errin Briggs likened the former to buying a new car and the this past summer, and President Biden, she added, has beaches by Refugio Canyon. That immediately and effec- latter to buying something used. Hartmann added, “If you been clearing the path for more domestic production. Her tively shut down the pipeline upon which Exxon depended have a house that’s really in bad shape, sometimes the best focus, she said, was transitioning away from fossil fuels and to get its oil to market. toward greener energy sources. approach is just to knock it down and start over.” “It has to happen eventually,” she said, “but I’m really The company’s application to truck the oil instead was Federal officials who’ve been bird-dogging the process n shot down by the county supervisors this March by a vote behind the scenes caution that the Fire Marshal’s review worried about today.”

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Gratitude Grows Here. We never stop reaching higher for our patients and for our community.

Your generosity ensures we have the best healthcare right here at home. Learn more at cottagehealth.org/reachinghigher

The new Cottage Family Suites provide accommodations for out-of-town families caring for a loved one who is hospitalized.

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NEWS of the WEEK

NOV. 3-10, 2022

CONT’D

COURTS & CRIME

Santa Ynez Official Identified Among January 6 Mob COU RTESY

Videos Show Karen Jones and Husband Inside Capitol Building During Attack

FOUND IN THE FOYER: Karen and Robert Jones milled with the crowd inside the East Foyer doors before entering the Rotunda.

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by Tyler Hayden

Santa Barbara–based “sedition hunter,” a member of an online group of amateur sleuths who help the FBI identify members of the pro-Trump mob that attacked the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021, has collected video evidence of a North County elected official and her husband trespassing into the Capitol building during the riot. The footage, which was forwarded in recent days to the FBI as well as the Santa Barbara Independent, first shows Karen Jones—a two-time candidate for county supervisor who currently serves as president of the Santa Ynez Valley Community Services District — and her husband, Robert, attending the rally at the Ellipse, where the former president encouraged his supporters to “fight like hell” and “take back our country.” The couple is then spotted at the front of the crowd near the base of the Capitol building’s East Steps shortly before it rushes forward, shoving and battering a line of police officers as it advances. The clips come from security camera and body cam footage, as well as cell phone video posted on social media by individual rioters, which has been downloaded, archived, and made public by the online detective community, who are also referred to as “open-source intelligence investigators.” They’ve used publicly available facial recognition software to track thousands of individuals over the course of that day, labeling them with visual-based monikers like #FlagFaceBandit and #GasMaskTwins so others can pick up where they left off. Their work thus far has aided in hundreds of arrests. Karen and Robert Jones have so far been identified as #Insider1492 and #Insider0594, respectively. The Santa Barbara investigator asked to remain anonymous, though their identity is known to the Independent. Neither Karen nor Robert Jones responded to multiple requests for comment. A spokesperson for the FBI said the agency could not confrim nor deny the existence of an open investigation In a video captured when rioters took control of the steps, Jones, wearing a cream-colored fleece pullover and a black-and-yellow Trump baseball cap, speaks into a microphone. “Hi, I’m Karen Jones,” she announces. “I’m from

Calabasas, California, home of the Reagan Ranch, and I’m very proud to be here.” (The Joneses, in reality, are longtime residents of Santa Ynez, and the Reagan Ranch is located in Santa Barbara.) “I was in the first wave up the stairs,” Jones bellows. “I lucked out. Thank you to all of the people that carried me in the crowd. Took a little pepper spray. Didn’t think I’d ever be sprayed by cops in my own country. I support the police. But I’d like everybody to join me in saying the Pledge of Allegiance.” Footage then shows both Joneses inside the Capitol building near the East Foyer doors as the crowd continues to surge. While neither are depicted engaging in any violence or property destruction themselves, officers are openly assaulted just feet from them in the foyer, and then again inside the Capitol Rotunda. During one confrontation, Robert Jones, wearing a blue-and-green jacket and a blue Trump beanie, is jostled as nearby members of the mob grapple with officers while shouting “U.S.A.! U.S.A.! U.S.A.!” Federal authorities have so far arrested 928 individuals involved in the attack, many of them on charges of “entering and remaining in a restricted building” or “disorderly conduct in a Capitol building.” Four members of the United States Capitol Police have died by suicide since the incident. The Joneses would be the first Santa Barbara County residents to be charged in connection with January 6, and only the second or third in the tri-counties. In 2021, 32-year-old Ventura resident Eduardo Nicolas Alvear Gonzalez—dubbed “The Capitol Rotunda Doobie Smoker” after he livestreamed himself lighting up in the name of “freedom” — was arrested and pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct. He spent 45 days in jail and was sentenced to two years of probation. Also last year, an Orcutt man who attended the Ellipse rally but allegedly did not breach the Capitol resigned from his position as CEO of the OASIS Senior Center. Doug Dougherty, who had led the North County organization for more than 10 years, was pressured to step down after a number of his Facebook posts went public, including one

on January 5, 2021, that stated “Tomorrow the walls shake,” and another that made an ageist swipe at a critic: “You show every one of your 65+ years of age in your dementia riddled logic,” Dougherty wrote. “Time to hit that life alert button so the staff can help you climb into bed at the retirement home.” A political firebrand and active member of her community, 63-year-old Jones is the founding president and a current volunteer at the Santa Ynez Valley Opportunity Shop, hosts an annual music festival at her home called JonesFest (where her friend, country music star Kinky Friedman, recently played) and previously served on the Board of Directors of the Santa Ynez Valley Airport Authority (SYVAA). “Her three-year term expired in October 2020 and she did not seek reelection at that time,” said current SYVAA President Jourdi de Werd. Jones appears to instead be focusing her energies on the Santa Ynez Valley Community Services District, which she has presided over since 2020 and which provides sewer collection and streetlight services to residents. She was originally elected to its Board of Directors in 2016. Requests for comment from vice president David Beard and general manager Loch Dreizler went unreturned. Earlier this fall, the district generated controversy by voting to significantly reduce the salaries of its small workforce, in some cases by more than $2,000 a month. The employees, represented by the Teamsters labor union, have stated they could not survive such a loss in income and would be forced to quit. During her bids for supervisor in 2016 and 2020 to represent Santa Barbara County’s 3rd District, Jones made no secret of her distaste for unions. She was also outspoken in her opposition to plans by the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians to build a tribal center and housing for its members, calling their casino operations a “racket” and arguing Native American land should not be designated as sovereign nations. She supported increasing oil and gas production in Santa Maria’s Cat Canyon, legalizing cannabis, and preserving the valley’s agriculture. She didn’t accept any campaign donations from corporations or special interest groups and touted a platform of “individual liberty” and “personal responsibility.” During both campaigns, the conservative Jones forged an unlikely alliance with Democrat Joan Hartmann, the ultimate winner in each contest. The two ganged up on Hartmann’s stronger Republican rival, Bruce Porter, whom Jones accused of kowtowing to donors and shirking his “moral obligations.” Though she may disagree with Hartmann on policy issues, Jones would frequently say, she admired Hartmann’s strong ethical code. When it became clear Jones was not within striking distance of either opponent, she threw her support behind Hartmann, likely helping her secure victory over Porter in relatively tight races. Jones grew up in Bakersfield, where her parents were heavily involved in the Republican Party. Her mother registered voters while Jones played at party headquarters; her father talked politics with a reporter over nightcaps, as she eavesdropped. Raising three children of her own, Jones frequently took them to political debates and protests, her daughter stated in a 2016 editorial. “This taught me about the power of ‘we the people’ and that it is up to the individuals of a populace to have their voices heard and make a difference,” she wrote.

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

When Dog Stars Bark at the Moon

MIXED BLESSINGS: In our house, when an

elbow is bent heavenward and spirits get hoist, our dance of lips and limbs is typically accompanied by a blessing that sounds very much like, “Slahnj-eh-vah.” It’s a Gaelic thing; you wouldn’t understand. I’m betting not even the Gaels do either. Naturally, the Gaels choose to spell this phrase different ways depending whether they originated in Ireland or in Scotland. Neither spelling makes a lick of sense even to those trained in the convoluted judo of phonics. Neither bears any remote resemblance to the sound of the word itself. This was no doubt a clever ruse devised to keep the British, their colonial subjugators, in the dark. The Irish, it turns out, spell the salutation, “Shlainte Mhòr.” Those who kiss the tartan, however, insist on the alternate spelling of “Slàinte Mhath.” Either way you do the math, the meaning is the same: “To your health.” Which is kind of hilarious — though only in a bitterly ironic way — when you think about the devastation alcohol is wreaking upon the species with increasing ferocity. Even before the onslaught of COVID, the CDC just reported that booze was wiping out 140,000 of us annually between 2015 and 2019. To put that in its proper Prohibitionist perspective, that’s even more than the 100,000 souls lost to opioids. Worse yet, twothirds of these casualties were in the alleged primes of their lives, people ages 20-49.

Not a good omen. But with the world population poised to hit the eight billion mark next Wednesday, maybe it makes sense in a dark, Malthusian way. When I was born, that number was three billion. Worse yet, we have subsequently learned that the speed with which liquor is killing off our best and brightest has markedly accelerated under COVID. Deaths by self-inebriation jumped by 26 percent in the first year of COVID. Before that, we’d been posting steady increases of 7 percent. Of course, all this is part of a broader death spiral in which the average American life expectancy just dropped by three years since 2019. We used to live to be 79 years old; now it’s just 76. No other so-called civilizedindustrialized-pseudo democratic nation has experienced anything like it. Leading the charge of the lemmings in our race to the bottom are our White males. Political scientists like Howard Rosenthal have made a lot of noise over the fact that the median income for White males — the voters most inclined to vote for the likes of Donald Trump — has not experienced any appreciable gain since the 1960s. On the flip side, the top one percent has experienced an increase of $50 billion in their collective assets. Rosenthal made a career tracking the increased polarization of our political process; in fact, he reduced it to a mathematical formula that allowed him to predict with uncanny precision the results of

national elections. Yes, it’s definitely about racism. But it’s not all about racism. It’s also about the money. I’d like to tell you that Howard Rosenthal predicted the results of this year’s election. But Rosenthal died this July at age 83 of a broken heart. His algorithm was too right. Despite the enormity of the collateral damage inflicted by liquor, peoples the world over drink for good reason. Several, in fact. Mostly it helps us get along in a sociable way without wanting to kill each other. But after one “Shlainte Mhòr” too many, we hit that tipping point. That’s when we feel the impulse to kill each other again. The trick has always been finding that sweet spot. I bring this up in this historical moment — some might call it an inflection point, though I prefer the term genuflection — because the recent election results indicate that our party of yin and their party of yang remain very much stuck with each another. Joined at the hip, moving in opposite directions, and armed to the teeth. Yes, we dodged the Big Red Tide — much predicted by those who think God is an algorithm with a mean streak — but still not a pretty picture. I don’t pretend to have a plan going forward. But look at the good news: Things could, in fact, be worse. How many millions of people — and I do mean millions — perished during religious conflicts between Shia and Sunni Muslims throughout much of the

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Middle East? These are people who fundamentally agreed on all the Fundamentals, yet spilled each other’s blood by the barrelful over such burning issues as whether angels have been endowed by their Creator with a capacity for disobedience. Or whether their religious leaders should be divinely appointed. Or on the proper role of self-flagellation as an expression of religious faith. Hey, we’ve all been there. And of course, it’s more complicated. Whenever we talk about religion or God, we’re talking about something else. Like control over water, oil, or land. Or in this country, women’s bodies and the bodies of those who insist on the right to choose their genders. There is cause for some hope. Just look at the Irish and Scots. At another time in history, they would have waged bloody war over the proper spelling of the phrase starting with “Shlainte.” Worse yet, they would have written great songs and powerful poems that would make us all weep and want to kill even more over the heroic tragedy of it all. There’s a reason when you go to Ireland that the bars have signs proclaiming, “No singing.” They learned the hard way that singing leads to fighting. But then, what doesn’t? The point is this: If the children of the barley can differ on the proper Gaelic spelling of “To your health,” without killing one another, then maybe we can get out of this alive. If not, you can always drink. Either way, Shlainte Mhòr to you. And Slàinte Mhath, too. —Nick Welsh


OPINIONS CONT’D

ELECTION RESULTS BY RIVERS

Letters

Capps Forum on Ethics and Public Policy Water Always Wins: Thriving in an Age of Drought and Deluge _________________________________________________________________________

Erica Gies Independent journalist

Not All Landlords

S

anta Barbara Tenants Union (SBTU) and CAUSE rallied together recently to propagate self-serving narratives about how all landlords are bad, gouge tenants, don’t maintain their properties, and don’t want tenants to know their rights. That couldn’t be further from the truth! It’s becoming more difficult to remain silent in the face of such lies. They proclaimed, “The rents are too damn high!” But so are insurance, utilities, labor costs, construction materials, and taxes that property owners pay. Most landlords respond to tenants’ maintenance requests; they follow the tenant-protection laws. In fact, a group of mom-and-pop landlords wanted to attend S.B. Housing Day to inform tenants of their rights, but we couldn’t because we are not a nonprofit. Fortunately, the S.B. Rental Housing Mediation Program did a tenants’ rights presentation. At the rally, a 20-year advocate for CAUSE retold a story of a mother living in a studio with her three daughters who was being evicted and did not get their full security deposit back. How could CAUSE not know four people living in a studio could potentially be illegal overcrowding? In a multiunit building, a landlord must pay tenant relocation expenses at three times the rent for no-cause tenancy termination within S.B City. Did they get that? California law states a tenant is entitled to 100 percent of their deposit if the tenant complied with the law. Did CAUSE help them file a claim to get twice the security deposit, should they be on the right side of the law? CAUSE is a well-funded, multimillion-dollar nonprofit. Are they using these funds to help tenants? They pay themselves more than a million dollars per year in salaries, compensation, and employee benefits, according to their 2020 tax filing. CAUSE shares incomplete, one-sided information while keeping these communities in the dark of their actual legal rights and remedies. The stories propagated by these supposed tenant-protection groups are the rare, extreme examples designed to elicit sympathy for their cause. We’d love to know why CAUSE and the SBTU focus on telling horror stories instead of holding free community workshops with well-sourced information to get the legal help tenants need and take steps against the very few bad actors. Why are they always demonizing all landlords? All of us are not terrible, worthy of a horror story! —John and Loy Beardsmore, S.B.

About the Waterford Program

R

egarding the Waterford program covered in the Angry Poodle Barbecue on October 26, as a program participant, I’d like to correct some errors on how the program ended. The administration did not close the program because it was too expensive. Grants paid for the whole thing. In fact, the Women’s Fund had just committed funds to cover the next several years. The program did not die slowly and ignominiously but immediately when the mobile-van teachers were fired. They did not take the children out of the van for finger play and singing, as instructed by the new preschool program director. All the preschool classroom computers were removed. While the issue of phonics-based teaching versus the Calkins method never came up at the time, it is true that phonics training is at the heart of the Waterford program. By delivering the program to individual children by computers, it eliminated some of the time-consuming one-on-time by teachers and allowed children to learn at their own pace. This is the reason proficiency test failures dropped by 45 percent over the last three years of the program. The van reached 96 children each year; the 43 computers reached almost 500. The Calkins approach was in use in elementary grades at the time van-based Waterford program was introduced. It continued to be used in elementary grades after the preschool Waterford program was discontinued. The only abrupt discontinuity in proficiency test scores occurred at the preschool level; proficiency tests failures dropped by 81 percent compared to when phonics training was delivered by computers. Whether this improvement continued in the elementary grades for those preschoolers is something no one has been able to investigate.

For the Record

Increasingly severe and frequent floods and droughts expose the deep dysfunction of our relationship with water. As we grapple Erica Gies is the author of Water Always with extreme weather, a hard truth is Wins: Thriving in an Age of Drought and Deluge (2022). A National Geographic emerging: our development, including Explorer and journalist, her stories concrete infrastructure designed covering water and climate change to control water, is actually exacerbating our appear in Scientific American, Nature, The Atlantic, and the New York Times. problems. Because sooner or later, water always wins. Science journalist Erica Gies November 16, 2022 introduces us to innovators in what she calls 5:00 p.m. the Slow Water movement who start by asking a revolutionary question: What does McCune Conference Room, HSSB 6020 water want? Figuring out what water wants—and accommodating its desires UC Santa Barbara within our human landscapes—is now a Free and open to the public crucial survival strategy.

For more information, contact the Capps Center at info@cappscenter.ucsb.edu or 805-893-2317

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¶ Last week’s story on Dos Pueblos High School’s live sports coverage misspelled a few names; correctly, they are Richard Rockenbach, Logan Surber, and Gabriel Casselman. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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obituaries Leonard A. Price M.D. 5/31/1935 - 10/6/2022

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Hospice in his name. His family is eternally grateful for the care he received from VNA and Dr. Michael Bordofsky. Memorial service will be held at the First Presbyterian Church Santa Barbara at 21E Constance Ave 2pm on Thursday, November 17, 2022.

Charles Owen

10/20/1927 - 10/31/2022

Christopher James Reimel 1/2/1980 - 10/25/2022 Leonard Atkinson Price, M.D. passed away October 6, 2022 at age 87 at his home in Santa Barbara after a long term illness. This beloved man was husband of Diane D. Price, father to Dawn Laura (Price) Schroeder and Geoffrey Leonard Price, previous father in law to Richard Schroeder and Jeanette Price, and proud grandfather of Grant Gregory Schroeder, Erica Diane Schroeder, Griffen Atkinson Price, and Victoria GiGi Price. Born in Ogdensburg, New York on May 31, 1935, to Dr. George LeRoy Price and Mrs. Laura Atkinson Price, Leonard (known to friends as “Cap”) attended college at St. Lawrence University and was a proud Phi Sigma Kappa. He worked and was on active duty in the Army’s Military Police as he saved money for medical school. He attended Queen’s University in Canada to earn his MD and during his residency at Hurley Hospital in Flint Michigan he met nurse and his future wife Diane DeWeese Watters. They married in 1964 and later moved to La Jolla, California for a fellowship at Scripps Clinic. He spent two years treating patients at the VA Hospital for lung disease. In 1969 the family moved to Santa Barbara to begin a practice in Allergy/Internal Medicine. He was involved in his local community as past president of the SB Medical Society, specialist at UCSB student health center, teaching staff at Cottage and Goleta Valley Hospitals, board member of SB Scholarship Foundation, an elder at the First Presbyterian Church, Sponsor of Momentum 4 Life triathlon teams, volunteer basketball coach at San Marcos High School and a volunteer tutor in the Goleta Union School District. He enjoyed many hobbies such as singing in the church choir, playing golf, fishing, gardening, growing roses, loving all sports, throwing 4th of July and Halloween parties, making photo montages, his poker group, the game of bridge, and most of all relishing in the pursuits of his children and grandchildren with family time. As a living legacy donations can be made to VNA Health18

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Christopher was born at Cottage Hospital on January 2, 1980, the first Carpinteria baby of the new decade. He died suddenly in Pismo Beach on October 25th. Chris grew up in Carpinteria attending local schools and graduated from Santa Barbara High. He later attended SBCC. Christopher was a son, brother, father, uncle and nephew. He is survived by his parents Don and Linda Reimel, son Charles James Reimel, brother Matthew Reimel, sister Courtney (Gregg) Simms, uncles Patrick (Jennifer) Housh, Rick Housh, John (Tish) Housh, Peter (Linda) Housh, Jim Reimel and numerous cousins. Chris was an avid reader and would always have a new book with him, especially Laurence Block or Chuck Palahniuk. He was funny, artistic, and clever with a wicked sense of humor. Chris was a master of sudoku and crossword puzzles. He was a progressive thinker and enjoyed discussing politics with family and friends. He loved family get togethers especially trip barbecues. He was soft spoken, 6 ft 4 in, with beautiful blue eyes who loved to make people laugh. Chris’ greatest love was for his young son Charles James Reimel. He loved taking Charles to the beach, to the Zoo, exploring museums, playing games and hiking in Torro Canyon Park. Chris will be greatly missed. A memorial event will take place at a later date.

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

Charles (Chuck) William Owen passed away peacefully on 10/31/2022 in Santa Rosa, California. Born in Los Angeles, California on 10/20/1927, he was preceded in death by his parents Charles Elmer Owen and Ella Mary (Dermody) Owen, his first wife, Carol Ann (McLean) Owen and second wife, Helen Irene (Goyeneche) Owen. Charles is survived by his 5 children and their spouses, Ronald, Mary, Kathleen (Alex), Kevin (Kim) and Christine (John), 7 grandchildren and many grand dogs. Chuck lived a full life, graduating from high school in 1945, attending Loyola University in Los Angeles and graduating from there in 1949. He proceeded to Chicago and attended medical school at Loyola University Chicago, graduating with his MD in 1954. From there he joined the US Air Force, went to Officer’s Training School in Alabama, then served 3 years in England as a GMO on several U.S. Air Force Bases. While home from medical school in 1951, he met Carol Ann McLean, who was traveling from New Zealand with her mother. Chuck and Carol corresponded for several years. When she visited him in England, he proposed, and they married in London in 1957. They returned to Southern California, where Chuck did his pediatric residency at Los Angeles Children’s Hospital. They began a family in 1960 with the birth of Ron in Los Angeles. Shortly afterwards, they moved to Isla Vista, California where he began the first pediatric practice in the Goleta area. His four remaining children were born in Santa Barbara from 1962-1969. His beloved wife Carol passed away on 1/5/1981. Chuck attended a retreat for widowed Catholics in 1982 where he met Helen Goyneche. Chuck and Helen were married in August 1983. They sold the Owen house in Goleta in 1999 and moved to Carriage Hill, near Hope Ranch. In 2009, they

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moved to Arizona for 4 years. Then in 2013, upon moving back in Goleta, they lived at Maravilla senior living community. His beloved wife, Helen, passed away on 11/1/2016. Shortly after, Chuck agreed to move up to Santa Rosa, California to live with Ron. Chuck spent his remaining years with his children and grandchildren and first ever dog, Barley, where he was loved and cherished. Chuck will be remembered for his keen memory (particularly remembering important dates and birthdays), his legendary sweet tooth, his sense of humor, and his love for travel. He was the consummate doctor and friend. A viewing will be held on Friday, 11/18/22 from 2pm-4pm at Welch Ryce and Haider on Sola Street. A funeral mass will be held at Holy Cross Catholic Church, 1740 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, California on Saturday, November 19th at 10 am. A burial at Calvary Cemetary in Santa Barbara and reception will follow. His favorite color was blue. We ask those attending to wear something blue in his honor. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Spark Rescue of Santa Barbara (a dog and cat rescue: sparkrescue.org).

Charles “Chick” Williams

3/10/1959 - 10/8/2022

Chick was born in Northridge California on March 10th 1959. He passed peacefully the morning of October 8th, 2022 at Serenity House. The family moved to Santa Barbara when he was just a baby and he never left. Chick went to Cold Spring School and Montecito Union then off to Santa Barbara Junior and Senior High. Chick recently retired from the city of Santa Barbara Parks and Rec dept. Of all the jobs he had this was his absolute favorite job. He made many great friends there. When people asked Chick where he worked he would say “I get paid to hang out at the beach all day” He loved his job and the people he worked with. One of Chicks’s loves was his dog Coco. She went with him everywhere. They could be spot-

ted chasing squirrels at Wilcox or walking the trails in Montecito or curled up on the couch watching a ball game. She was always by his side. Another passion was softball. He played on local leagues for many years, most recently with the “Old Guys Rule” team. Chick leaves behind his older siblings, Barb (Sam) Licata, Mark, Suzi (David) Schwartz, Barbara (Willy) Hughes, many nieces, nephews, cousins and aunts and uncles and all his softball friends and friends at the City of Santa Barbara Parks and Rec dept., especially his best friend Leveque. We miss you little brother. A celebration of Chicks wonderful life will be held November 18th at 3:00 at Shoreline park. `

Shirlie Carter

10/22/1926 - 10/22/2022

On Saturday, October 22, 2022, Shirlie Carter, loving grandmother, and four-time great grandmother, passed away on her birthday, having just turned 96 years old. Shirlie was born on October 22, 1926, in Santa Monica, CA to Robert Clark and Agnes Carhart. She was married to her high school sweetheart, Ed Carter, following the end of WWII, on October 13, 1946, at the age of 19—a marriage that lasted over 63 years until Ed’s passing in 2009. They had one son, Joe, who was raised in Santa Barbara. Shirlie was a long time employee with the Santa Barbara Country Public Works Department as an administrative assistant; she retired in 1988. Shirlie was known for her wit, sense of humor, and a personality as colorful as the award-winning orchids she grew. She was passionate about family, gardening, genealogy, history, traveling, square dancing, painting, and giving back to the community through volunteering. Shirlie was preceded in death by her husband, Ed, and her son, Joe. She is survived by her two grandchildren, Vanessa, and Ed, and her four great grandchildren, Aria, Ava Shirlie (her namesake), Cora, and Joey. In lieu of flowers, consider a donation in her honor to The Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens.


obituaries Gail Thornton

5/171952 - 10/25/2022

Gail Thornton peacefully passed away on October 25, 2022 due to metastatic lung cancer. Gail was born in Los Angeles on May 17, 1952. Gail was a free spirit with a sense of adventure and absolute devotion to the care of and connection with animals. Growing up, she excelled in showing horses and loved competitive cross-country, jumping and dressage. As an adult, she spent 7 years sailing and living onboard a sailboat, exploring the coasts of New York, Florida, and the Virgin Islands, before making her home in the Santa Ynez Valley where she lived for more than four decades. There, she returned to her love of horses: first, by breaking yearlings for the racetrack and then, by becoming a Veterinary Technician at Alamo Pintado Equine Medical Center, a world class facility providing cutting edge medical treatment for horses. She was a beloved part of the family at the clinic, building close relationships with her coworkers and clients, and taking meticulous care of her recovering equine patients. She was admired for her tireless work habits and intuitive connection with horses. Gail was tiny (at 5’3” and 100 pounds) but mighty, with surprising strength, grit, and determination. She was such a workhorse that it took 5 staff members to take over the work she did on her own. Gail was loved for her kind and joyful spirit; she had a childlike innocence and sometimes mischievous air about her, and she treasured shared moments of side-splitting laughter. Gail was moved by the awesome beauty of the world. She had a heart that loved deeply. She also recognized the pains and sorrows that life brings and did not shy from such topics. Those who knew her always described her as real and genuine. She will be sorely missed by all whose lives she touched. She is survived by her brothers and wives Bruce & Sharyn Charnas, Mark & Gretchen Charnas, her daughter and husband Rebecca & Jasan Sherman,

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com and her grandchildren Ben, Ruby & Mack Sherman. A celebration of Gail’s life will take place in Santa Ynez, date to be determined. Contact her daughter Rebecca at rebecca@ humanrightsesq.com, to be updated on details. Contributions in lieu of flowers can be made to the ASPCA (American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals).

Richard Allen Weichbrod

3/31/1948 - 10/14/2022

Richard was born in Washington D.C. and would be the second oldest of 4 siblings (Mike, Rob, and Anne) to Ethel (Modoi) and Joseph Weichbrod. Richard grew up in Langley Park, Maryland, and attended Montgomery Blair High School. He went onto college at the University of Maryland, receiving a degree in Mechanical Engineering. While a junior in high school Richard met his soon to be wife and life partner, Nancy, and the two married in 1969. Richard and Nancy lived in Greenbelt and then Bethesda, Maryland, while Richard finished his education at the University of Maryland. After graduating college, he worked for various engineering companies, which included his father’s company, National Instrument Laboratory. He always had a unique ability to fix things and being an engineer appeared to have always been his calling. Growing up he learned a lot from his father about tools, woodworking, and construction, even helping his father build an addition to the family home when he was a teenager. Before deciding to start a family, Richard and Nancy focused on their careers and exploring the world. The two did several international trips, including visiting the Greek Islands and Europe. In his free time, Richard enjoyed playing the guitar and drums, and he received his pilot’s license with the hopes of adventure. In 1977, the couple decided to move west when Richard accepted an engineering position in Santa Barbara. They left their family and friends behind in Maryland to embark on

a new life. A year later they had their first-born son, Brett. The start-up engineering company that had brought them to Santa Barbara ultimately dissolved, but the quality of life and favorable weather left a memorable impression. Richard and the family decided to embark on another adventure after he had accepted a position at John Fluke Manufacturing Company, which meant relocating to Seattle, Washington. After two years in Seattle, Nancy and Richard decided they missed Santa Barbara and made plans to return. Richard purchased a small company, Scarab Graphics, and become an entrepreneur. Scarab Graphics, located in the industrial area of Goleta, provided color separation and engraving design services for companies in the region. Although he had no background in graphics design, he saw the growing need for the service. Several years later he also purchased a small company, in downtown Santa Barbara, called Photo Engraving. Ultimately, he moved both businesses to Carpinteria to a larger facility and combined them into Scarab. During that time, Nancy and Richard welcomed their second child, Kevin. In 2001, Richard decided to semiretire and sold his business, but still managed properties and became an avid investor. Always an athletic person, with his new freedom Richard was able to focus on many outdoor activities, including running, skiing, and cycling, even trying his hand in bicycle racing in the master’s categories. When Nancy retired, the two were able to enjoy traveling together, which included yearly trips to Maui, Mexico, and unique cruises around the world. Richard loved spending time with his adult sons, his large network of friends, and with his lifelong desires to learn and explore, he lived every day like it was his last. Richard and Nancy celebrated their 53rd wedding anniversary shortly before his untimely passing. He is survived by his wife, Nancy, two sons Brett and Kevin, daughter in-law Jennifer, and his granddaughter Nyrie.

William Allen Wood 1941 - 2022

William Allen Wood passed away peacefully at home in Mission Canyon on Friday, October 28th, 2022 after a short, but fierce battle with lymphoma. Born in Santa Barbara in 1941 William spent his life loving Santa Barbara as a true ‘home boy’. In 1957 he was the fourth generation of his family to graduate from Santa Barbara High, after which he met a smart and beautiful UCSB freshman, Barbara Stinson and fell in love. After traveling in Europe together and losing their house in the Coyote Fire, Barbara and William built a new home, planting hundreds of trees to restore the Painted Cave landscape ravaged by the fire. Ascribing to beatnik values they raised their two daughters, Cricket and Zoë in their one room mountain home nestled against a rock accompanied by goats, chickens, donkeys, ponies, cats, dogs, fish and the natural world that surrounded them. William loved fresh orange juice from their citrus trees, working hard, being a member of the Painted Cave mountain community and engaging in silly antics to get a giggle out of the neighborhood children. He dug a swimming pond with his backhoe for his family to cool off in on hot summer days which brought joy to the neighborhood and is where his daughters learned to swim. Always an artist, William worked in wood and stone and restored buildings to express his wabi-sabi/ California arts and craft movement style. He looked to nature as his primary muse and believed everything could be recycled and saved and if put in the right place, be beautiful. His cactus gardens had hidden crystals and his wood shop had silly dolls crammed in with R. Crumb comics and Buddist figurines alongside every tool imaginable. There was almost no building task he wasn’t willing to tackle, including beautifully renovating an 1890’s house almost crumbling to the touch. He loved Santa Barbara history, memorabilia and imagery, and regaled his family with stories of his father and grandfather running the earliest car dealership on State Street and his great uncle working in

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the Potter Hotel and the early film industry of SB. He always had a story about the nooks and crannies of Santa Barbara and loved his hometown. William fondly recalled watching from his childhood home on A.P.S. the steam train chuffing into Santa Barbara and maintained a lifelong love of train sets, vehicles and engines in general. This love spanned working on his various hot rods in his mother, Elizabeth’s driveway during high school to tinkering with the family car (1936 Chevy) and a 1964 Triumph motorcycle he shared with Barbara before finding the joy of an e-bike as an older man. He cherished his friends and had an active social life, whether at the Coral Casino as a child, or as an enthusiastic member of E. Clampus Vitus 1.5 and the Santa Barbara Westerners historical society in his later years. He took up yoga at the age of 65, and was a devoted attendee of Iyengar Yoga. William (Bopa to his five grandchildren) is survived by his loving wife Barbara Wood, oldest daughter Cricket Wood, her husband Paul Muhl and their three children Kai, Tavi and Rylee Muhlwood and his youngest daughter Zoë Wood, her husband Demian Barnett and their two children Winslow and Quincy Barnwood. He is also survived by his loving brother Vince Wood and his wife Judy and their children and grandchildren. A celebration of life will be held 11/27, contact his family for details. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the charity of your choice or the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County. `

Douglas Peter Nelson 3/30/1956 - 9/11/2022

We are sad to announce the passing of Douglas Peter Nelson (aka Dirty Doug) of Santa Barbara. He died at age 66 on September 11, 2022 of natural causes. Doug was quite a character known both around Santa Barbara and Carpinteria. He also had spent many years in Palm Desert and Lake Tahoe. Doug had a rough exterior but once you got to know him you would see his big heart. Please join us to celebrate his life on Saturday, November 19, 2022 at 2:00pm at the Rincon Beach Shack (Bates Rd.) Continued on p.20

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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obituaries Madelyn F. Stapp

Hiram Thomas Jaqua

12/30/1934 - 9/13/2022

12/6/1931 - 10/1/2022

“Mom to her children, Grandma Maggie to her grandchildren and Maggie (with a smile) to everyone she ever met” After a brief illness, Madelyn F. Stapp passed away on Sept. 13, 2022. Maggie was born in Illinois, and attended Alleman H.S. where she met the love of her life, Edwin Stapp. After graduating with a degree in English from Marycrest College, she married Ed in 1957. They spent the next 15 years in New Berlin, Wisconsin, then moved to Santa Barbara in 1973. She was very involved with Saint Raphael’s Church, working with their educational and music programs and later worked as the assistant for Bishop Curry of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles out of San Roque Parish. She was also active at St. Marks Church for a number of years. After the loss of her husband in 1997 her focus became her family and her 10 grandchildren were a source of great joy and comfort. She loved them all so much; Bryan, Adam, Jess, Matt, Haylee, Delanee, Josh, Sawyer, Zach and Nick. She was absolutely thrilled to become a great grandmother to Avery, Kynzlee and Reagan. After retiring, she and her mother moved to Clovis, where she divided her time between caring for her mother, spending time with her grandchildren and working in her garden. Later, after she moved to Carmel Village, she discovered a love of coloring and created beautiful, vivid artwork. She is survived by her brother Ed Smith, her 5 children; David, Heather, Bruce, Shelly and Julie; her 10 grandchildren, and 3 great grandchildren

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Hiram Thomas Jaqua (Tom), a CA native passed peacefully on October 1, 2022 after a very brief illness. He was 90 years old. The cause of death was congestive heart failure. Tom was born in 1931 in Altadena, California and raised in Laguna Beach. He had fond memories of walking to school barefoot and visiting the beach every day and remembered seeing Betty Davis shopping at the local grocery store. As a teenager growing up in Laguna Beach, Tom apprenticed at a commercial photo studio which launched his career in photography. After graduating high school in 1950 Tom was immediately sent to the Korean War as a member of the Army National Guard, 40th infantry division. He was a motor pool dispatcher for a year in Japan, driving officers to various duties. One of his best memories was hiking to the top of Mt. Fuji. In Korea he drove an M-16 halftrack and received honorable discharge in 1952 after suffering an injury. At San Diego State where Tom graduated college, he was the photographer for his college newspaper, and then worked for KFMB-TV as a newsreel photographer, news script writer and editor. At college Tom met and married Anna Jean Chaney. Upon graduating, Tom worked at Convair in San Diego documenting their test activities at Edwards AFB and became a specialist in air-to-air motion picture photography. As a pilot himself, Tom greatly enjoyed the thrill of riding with the nation’s top test pilots (including Chuck Yeager) in the latest fighter jets. In 1957 Tom worked at General Dynamics Astronautics and documented the Atlas Rocket activities at Vandenberg Air Force Base in Lompoc. In 1959 he moved with his wife and infant daughter to Santa Barbara so that he could commute to Vandenberg and establish a photo/optics office for General Dynamics. Tom worked at Vandenberg Air Force Base for fifteen years and during this time became a top NASA photographic officer, documenting all NASA activities for

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

Vandenberg, Edwards and Williams Air Force Bases and various Navy facilities. He met and photographed all of the astronauts in the space program, including Neil Armstrong and his family. During his time in Santa Barbara Tom designed and helped construct his house on San Marcos Pass and later his house above San Antonio Creek, which was featured in a “house beautiful” section of the Santa Barbara News Press. Tom greatly loved the outdoors and took his family of three girls and his wife on many outdoor adventures, including annual backpacking trips in the Sierras, Nordic skiing in Mammoth and bicycling in Morro Bay. In 1976 Tom and his family moved to a suburb of Washington D.C. where he was promoted to Director of Audio Visual for NASA. In addition to documenting space shuttle missions, he also wrote and produced NASA radio programs that were sent to radio stations nationwide for airing. Tom traveled from coast to coast with video crews to interview professors and scientists that worked on NASA projects and became good friends with Willard Scott, a popular television personality on the Today Show, who narrated many of Tom’s programs. Tom retired in Santa Barbara and lived many years in a mountain cabin at Flores Flats, at the top of Gibraltar Road. He greatly enjoyed his time with the community there and became a true mountain man, living off the grid, keeping busy with numerous building projects and bushwhacking trails. In his later years Tom moved off the mountain and resided with one of his daughters near the beach. His favorite pastime was collecting driftwood, shells, and other treasures he found along his daily beach walks. He often made temporary art with these found objects, artistically arranged on the beach or his outdoor patio. Tom is preceded in death by his brother Richard Jaqua, sister Joanne Hedley and niece Candace Hedley. He is survived by his daughters Jennifer Jaqua, Allison Jaqua (Rob Robinson) and Sara Jaqua and grandchildren Nico Fairbanks, Dylan Fairbanks, Dakota Fairbanks, Van Henderson, niece Colleen Hedley, nephew Craig Hedley and cat Lula. Tom was a gentle spirt whose kind and humorous nature touched everyone he encountered. He will be greatly missed by his family. A celebration of Tom’s life will be held this Saturday, November 12th at 3:00 pm at a local beach. Contact: htjaqua@gmail.com for details.

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Otto Wood Laula

11/23/1942 - 10/12/2022

Otto grew up in Birmingham, Michigan where he played baseball, was an honor student and president of his senior class. Graduating from Duke University as an English major, he went on to receive a law degree from the University of Michigan. Soon afterward, Otto married his high school sweetheart Sue McNeal and the couple moved to Window Rock, Arizona, to work with the Navajo Nation as VISTA volunteers. It was here that Baby Jessani was born. Soon afterwards, the family moved West again, landing in Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara was the perfect backdrop for Otto’s interest in pursuing spiritual understanding and listening to inner truth. This became particularly important following the tragedy of Sue’s early death in 1976. With a sense of spirit guiding the way, Otto embraced being Jessani’s father as the central focus of his life. Their beautiful father-daughter relationship was an inspiration to all who knew them. From Jessani’s point of view, her Dad’s parenting style was both unconventional and fun. “He was always available & interested in everything I did, loved me unconditionally and life with him was one big adventure!” Through it all, her Dad showed up 100% – for her and everyone in their lives. People were drawn to Otto’s charismatic personality. And, he was a loyal and interested friend to many….keeping in touch with old high school buddies, past relationships, new acquaintances and various characters encountered along the way. For Otto, amassing wealth and glory weren’t as important as showing up with compassion and authenticity.

Whether as manager for the SB Recycling Center, a taxi driver or long-haul trucker, real estate agent or daytime bartender at Café del Sol for twenty-five years, Otto brought along his quirky sense of humor and deep love of for humanity. Following a diagnosis of advanced neuro-endocrine cancer, Otto embarked on his end-of -life journey surrounded by the warm embrace of his loving family, including: his beloved partner Patsy Evans; his precious daughter Jessani Johnson with her husband, Scott, and children Hannah (Adrian and great grandson Sammy), Will (Haley), Jack (Tori) and Katey (Collin); his brother Dick, sister-in-law June, and nephew Luke; and his sister Molly Laula. And, from afar, his sister-in-laws Pricilla (Sandy) and Sheryl (Paul). Over the past few weeks, a wide circle of friends joined in to hold the space for Otto’s passage. There were tender stories, odd synchronicities, and moments of spontaneous levity. Just as he would have wanted. We will miss Otto’s welcoming smile, birthday greetings, and standard Navajo welcome: “Ya’at’eeh” –pronounced yah-tahey, meaning everything on Earth is good. Any encounter with this dear man, including his passing, ended with a sense that, indeed, everything is good. If inclined, donations may be made in Otto’s memory to: VNA Health Foundation (Serenity House), Laguna Cottages for Seniors, Organic Soup Kitchen, and Self-Realization Fellowship.

Jose Manuel Jauregui 6/29/1953 - 10/21/2022

Born and raised as a Santa Barbara local. Born to the late Lupe Sanchez Jauregui. Manny was blessed with a large family and three children. He was a loving Father, Brother, Grandfather and Son. He worked for the USPS for 30+ years. He continued to show hard work and dedication for his family. Forever in our hearts… Services held at SB Seventh Day Adventist 425 Arroyo Rd. Santa Barbara Ca 93110 Sunday Nov. 13th, 2022 at 1pm


Opinions

The Sad Truth of Racism CONT’D

voices

BY CONNIE ALEXANDER AND

T

M A R C O S VA R G A S

he revelations of the horrific, racist, private

conversation by members of the Los Angeles City Council brings up genuine and raw emotions, as well as important realizations that are needed to achieve racial justice in our society. We have all become painfully aware of the racist comments made in secret by L.A. Council President Nury Martinez, and councilmembers Kevin de Leon and Gil Cedillo. The comments were caught on an audio recording, including hateful language toward African Americans, Indigenous communities, LGBTQIA+, and Jewish communities. Their 2021 conversation centered on their plans for how they and their allies would politically disenfranchise other people of color, in particular, African Americans in Los Angeles, through the city’s redistricting process. As difficult and painful as these revelations have been for Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) in Los Angeles, it raises an important reality — these elected officials are not just a few bad apples in L.A. City Hall. There exist Latinx and other BIPOC elected officials and community leaders in Los Angeles and in other localities who have deliberately worked to advance policies from a place of internalized racism — principally anti-Blackness, colorism, and antiIndigenous racism. A growing number of Latinx leaders are speaking out publicly about the realities that racism and antiBlackness are not only pervasive throughout our society but are very real within the Latinx community. Such sentiments have been swept under the rug for too long, and therefore must be exposed and addressed. Representing the efforts to address the realities of colorism and anti-Indigenous racism in the Latinx community, in 2012 the Mixteco Indigenous Organizing Project (MICOP) had to go as far as advocating successfully for a ban in the use of derogatory terms, such as “oaxaquita,” in three Latinx-dominated school districts in Ventura County. One of the problems is that the current political process fails to vet candidates of all races and identities on issues of racism. It fails to examine the stands of candidates on policies that either work to achieve equity, or those that seek to perpetuate inequity, specifically policies that are anti-Black, as well as those that hurt the working poor and immigrants, including recent Indigenous immigrants from Mexico. District elections have the potential to achieve equitable racial political representation. But the redistricting process has often become a zero-sum game, pitting one racial group against another. Some “progressive-

PAT BYRNES, POLITICALCARTOONS.COM

Exposed Among the L.A. City Council, It Must Not Be Allowed to Undermine Important Alliances

thinking” elected officials narrowly work for one historically underrepresented group, showing no interest in equal representation for the broader BIPOC community. White women in leadership roles, who we would hope would be natural allies, too often, however, avoid sharing power and are driven by what is politically expedient for themselves. Los Angeles is considered a liberal city. Yet these racist comments shed light on the fact that even in those localities that like to see themselves as liberal or more socially conscious, forms of bigotry are deeply rooted historically. And that bigotry is reinforced through policy decisions made by elected and appointed officials and supported by community leaders both white and BIPOC. Disturbingly, white supremacist efforts have had some success in undermining and even eliminating school programs that seek to build an appreciation for racial diversity by educating teachers and students about the historical and current realities of racism. It is urgent that we all strengthen our support for school programs, such as ethnic studies, that aid students in valuing their own cultural identity while understanding and appreciating the differences around them. The Fund for Santa Barbara is heartened by and will continue to put its full support behind anti-racist community efforts. One of these important efforts is the one being led by the NAACP of Santa Barbara and Gateway Educational Services to bring together BIPOC leaders throughout our region for conversations and relationship-building. These efforts are needed more than ever. Anti-blackness continues to thrive in our community in issues from housing and education to health care and criminal justice reform, and in every sector, from business, K-12 and higher education, government, philanthropy, and the nonprofit sector. If you are Black/African American, there is no escaping the toxicity and aggression of the hate. Racial hatred is saddest when coming from other people of color. However, the exposure of racism among Latinx members of the L.A. City Council must not be allowed to undermine important alliances being built today within BIPOC communities. The realization of these deeply rooted forms of internalized racism, even as they currently exist among other oppressed groups, must be understood in order to inform the hard work of eliminating all forms of racism and bigotry from our society — an endeavor that has room for all of us. Connie Alexander is the president of the NAACP Santa Barbara. Marcos Vargas is the executive director of the Fund for Santa Barbara and a member of the NAACP Santa Barbara.

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Photo: Nell Campbell

The SBCC Promise

The SBCC Promise provides all recent, local high school graduates with the opportunity to pursue their dreams at Santa Barbara City College, covering all fees, books, and supplies for two years. The SBCC Foundation partners with generous businesses, individuals, and organizations to invest in our community’s college, supporting the SBCC Promise, student success programs, scholarships, emergency grants, and more.

Your gift makes it possible. sbccfoundation.org 22

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2 2 0 2

SCHOOLS of THOUGHT S

The Santa Barbara Independent ’s Annual Education Guide

o much of education is about adaptation — teaching students how to think, rather than what to think — a need that became even more evident these past few years, with educational institutions and programs continually testing students’ abilities to adjust and pivot and modify the way they do things, again and again and again! That being said, our local educators all deserve an A+ for hanging in there with our students in what had to have been the worst of times. And yet, the stories they shared here are overwhelmingly positive. From preparing your child to rock kindergarten, to learning to love reading through the magic of great storytelling, to

keeping the beat alive in our public education system, to supporting local students through their college journeys, we’ve got a little bit of something for almost everyone in these pages. To develop relevant articles for our 2022 Schools of Thought special section, we started by asking the issue’s sponsors to suggest numerous story ideas based on people, projects, or trends that they’re excited about in their schools and organizations. From those suggestions, we developed stories that represent a wide variety of learning experiences in Santa Barbara and produced the editorial content independently. We hope you enjoy the read and learn something new about learning!

by LESLIE DINABERG

HOW TO PREPARE YOUR CHILD TO ROCK KINDERGARTEN

K

indergarten begins a new and exciting chapter for both parents and children. Longtime Laguna Blanca kindergarten teacher Mieke Delwiche offers some valuable tips to help families prepare to start school. The most important thing is to have fun with learning, says the Carpinteria native, who has been teaching for nearly 20 years.

Ready, Set, Go! Expert Tips to Make Starting School a Success Social/Emotional Readiness

• Teach your child how to express their feelings if they do not like something. • Learning to share and take turns: Play cooperative games with your child. • Interacting with other children in an age-appropriate way: “Give your child opportunities to interact with other children in preschool or social groups or playdates,” she says. “Role-play different situations they might experience on the playground or at school. Help them find solutions for typical problems they might encounter.” • Separating from parent or caregiver • Focusing for five minutes or more when an adult is leading: “Give your child two- and three-step directions. For example: ‘Put the toy away, pick a book to read, and sit on the couch.’ ”

Self-Care

• Using the bathroom independently (be able to wipe

oneself and pull clothing up and down independently) • Washing hands • Getting dressed independently (Bonus: tying shoes) • Knowing their first and last name and age

COURTESY

GROUNDWORK

Fine Motor Skills

• Using a pencil or crayons with some control • Using scissors: “Show them how to hold and use scissors safely. Give your child old magazines or newspapers to cut up. Have them make a collage using scissors to cut out pictures and then glue them onto a piece of paper.” • Making marks that look like letters: She suggests writing using all types of supplies, including fat crayons, window markers, outdoor chalk, colored pencils, and markers. • Writing some of the letters in their name: “Work with your child to learn to write their name. Write in shaving cream, use chalk outside, paint letters with water and a paintbrush on your driveway or sidewalk. Write in the steam on your shower door or bathroom mirror!” • Putting together a simple puzzle: Some additional ways to improve fine motor skills include building with blocks, stringing beads, playing with Play-Doh, and picking up small items — like cotton balls or uncooked pasta — with a clothespin, tweezers, or chopsticks.

Longtime Laguna Blanca kindergarten teacher Mieke Delwiche offers some excellent ideas for making sure your child is ready to shine when they start school.

CONTINUED > INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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COURTESY

Language Skills

• Speaking in complete sentences • Using words to express needs and wants: Delwiche recommends role-playing. For example, “use stuffed animals to have conversations that help your child practice advocating for themselves or communicating their feelings.” • Understanding and following two-step directions: Have your child help you prepare a meal or snack. Talk through the directions. “First, I am going to wash the apple. Next, I will cut the apple. Last, I will eat the apple.” • Making comparisons and describing relationships between objects • Some additional ways to improve language skills are to read with your child. Also, sing with your child: rhyming songs, silly songs, or even your favorite songs. Tell your child about your day and what you are doing. Then ask them questions about their day.

Academic Skills Games like Simon Says and hopscotch help prepare kids for following directions and playing on the playground.

Gross Motor Skills • • • • •

Standing on one foot for 10 seconds Mimicking movements accurately (Simon Says) Jumping sideways (hopscotch) Kicking a stationary ball “Draw a line on the ground for your child to walk on. Pretend it is a tightrope, a log over a creek, and a freeway, and have your child practice walking on the line in a way that mimics the scenario you give.”

Reading • Enjoying listening to stories: Play games with rhyming words to help your child hear similar sounds in words. For example, “As you are going up the stairs, name one word that rhymes with ‘bin’ for each step as you go up. Nonsense words work too!” • Reciting the alphabet and identifying some letters: “Make your child aware of the sound that each letter makes. Find items around the house that begin with the same sound and identify the letter that makes each sound. (‘Show me three items that start with the sound /s/.’) Use old magazines and newspapers to make letter collages. Have your child find pictures of things that start with each letter of the alphabet.”

• Recognizing and trying to write their own name • Drawing a picture to help express an idea • Identifying the cover of a book and which way the pages turn: “Run your finger under the words as you read to your child to help them learn that words go from left to right and top to bottom.” Math • Counting from one to 10: Count throughout the day. “How many crackers are you eating for a snack? How many socks are you taking out of the dryer? You can even count the number of apples you are bagging at the grocery store.” • Recognizing and naming basic shapes and colors: Delwiche suggests pointing out numbers and things you see in your environment and having your child name them on a regular basis; playing games in which your child finds objects of particular colors and shapes around the house; and playing I Spy. • Understanding “more than” and “less than”: Some additional ways to improve math skills are by making number collages. “Write the number five on a piece of paper and have your child cut out five items from a magazine and glue those items to the number-five poster. Repeat!” In addition, Delwiche says “Games like Chutes and Ladders, Hi Ho! Cherry-O, Candy Land, Avalanche, and Memory are perfect for reinforcing math skills and practicing graceful winning and losing.” • Make learning and the idea of attending school something fun. “Your child will benefit greatly from the special time you are spending with them,” says Delwiche. “Play games. Read books. Talk to each other. And LAUGH! Learning means so much more when it is enjoyable.” See lagunablanca.org.

SMALL STEPS TO BIG FUTURES RIVIERARIDGE.ORG

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COURTESY PHOTOS

Dr. Maria Montessori observed that children learn best when they are free to move, free to choose their own work and progress at their own pace.

AUTONOMY

MEETING THE NEEDS OF 21ST-CENTURY LEARNERS

“M

ontessori prepares its students well for what they will face as older students and adults,” says Melanie Jacobs, who’s been head of Montessori Center School (MCS) since 2016 and worked at MCS for almost 30 years.

Exploring the Montessori Approach Students have opportunities to do collaborative work from a young age, she explains. “Allowing them to build their social skills and work effectively with others. At the elementary level, the students do research together and often present their findings to their classmates and/or parents through oral presentations. Events such as science fairs, historical figure reports, poetry recitals, and dramatic productions allow them to hone their public speaking skills and become comfortable interacting with peers and adults.” Problem-solving is another skill emphasized in the program. “They are encouraged to think out of the box regularly and are urged to participate in their classroom and school community in many ways. If they have ideas, they are listened to by their teachers and peers,” says Jacobs. As an example, she points out the school’s Gaga Ball Pit (Gaga is a fast-paced, high-energy sport played in an octagonal pit and sometimes described as a kinder,

gentler version of dodgeball). “Our upper elementary students played the game at a science camp they attended. When they returned to school, they raised money to build their own Gaga Ball Pit, organizing parent volunteers to build and install it.” Students taking the lead in a project like bringing a new game to the school is also an example of the value placed on independence and self-sufficiency. “The independence that Montessori emphasizes helps students strengthen their executive functioning skills, such as time management, organization, problem-solving, task initiation, etc. Providing a variety of learning experiences is an important part of Montessori philosophy. They learn to use tools such as work charts and planners at the elementary level so that they can be advocates of their own learning,” will become life-long learners who will become positive Jacobs says. forces to care for and transform our world.” In another nod to the workforce of the future, she Among the most important ways that Montessori difadds, “We also incorporate computer science into our fers from the more traditional approaches to teaching is a curriculum at the upper elementary level, covering skills focus on the whole child. Which means, Jacobs says, “that such as keyboarding, slideshow presentations, basic cod- we place special emphasis on several areas of a child’s ing, research, and more.” development, including academic, social, emotional, Respecting all people and cultures of the world is at the physical, and moral development. We view these categoheart of the Montessori philosophy, which is especially ries as equally important, and the Montessori curriculum important in today’s world, Jacobs says. “ ‘Respect for addresses all of these areas.” all’ is one of our core values, and this includes respecting the environment, which is crucial for students who See mcssb.org. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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A H a! TM

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SCHOOL MODERNIZATION SERVES MULTIPLE PURPOSES

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he stage is finally set! After decades of not having a permanent stage for performances or a place to gather all of the students and their teachers under one roof, Vieja Valley School finally got its modernized multipurpose room this year. The remodeled room is also being used for teacher training sessions, such as the one shown here. “A big thank-you to our community for passing Measure J,” said Hope Elementary School District Superintendent Anne Hubbard, Ed.D. The

district is currently advocating for Measure S, which Hubbard explained is “a five-year extension of the $79 a year parcel tax, and we allow all possible exemptions (seniors, people on disability, and contiguous parcels) for our district. It funds additional classroom staff (instructional aides, advanced academics, and intervention teachers) so that we can keep our student-toadult ratio low and address our students’ needs.”

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The Vieja Valley multipurpose room before (above) and after (right), with teachers able to comfortably gather together for a training in the modernized room

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SERVING UP A LOVE OF LITERATURE

T

here are so many different philosophies about education, but one of the few things we can almost universally agree on is that a love of reading goes hand in hand with learning. With an eye (and an ear, and a belly full of quiche, fruit, and doughnuts) toward nurturing that love of literature, the Santa Barbara County Education

Santa Barbara County Education Office’s 70th Annual Breakfast with the Authors

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Office hosted its annual Breakfast with the Authors this fall for the 70th year! Students, parents, teachers, librarians, community members, and of course, children’s book authors and illustrators gathered — many in seasonal costumes as their favorite literary characters, including Greg Trine (gregtrine.com), whose latest book is Dino Mighty: The Heist Age) — to talk about writing in general and the topic of “voice” in particular. Children’s and Young Adult authors and illustrators recently gathered for SBCEO’s 70th annual Breakfast with the Authors. From left: Bonnie Lady Lee, Andrea J. Loney, Alexis O’Neill, Greg Trine, Nikki Barthelmess, James Burks, Mary Penney Hershey, Joan Bransfield Graham, and Anita Perez Ferguson.

Anita Perez Ferguson writes historical adventures for young adults.

Emphasizing the importance of having voices coming from many different cultures and many different times in history, Santa Barbara native Anita Perez Ferguson (anitaperezferguson.com) writes the young adult Mission Bells trilogy, which weaves together historic figures and events with exciting action. She explained that her first book, Twisted Cross, “starts in Spain in the late 1700s. Most of you in this room know that we have the Mission Santa Barbara here in our community. And there’s a whole string of missions up and down the state of California. Before those were even built, this story begins as a boy who started in Spain and ends up in jail. He made a big mistake. In those days, in certain jails and companies, when they needed more people to work on the ships that were crossing over the Atlantic, they’d go get the prisoners out of the jail. And they ended up being the workers on the ships at this time.” Joan Bransfield Graham (joangraham.com) is a fiction writer and poet. Her books for children, Splish Splash and Flicker Flash, are what she described as “concrete poems about water and light” that can be used to inspire students to write their own poetry. “I have the opportunity to use many different kinds of voices in my poems,” she explained. Her picture poem book, The Poem That Will Not End, is a charming vehicle to teach children about poetry forms, from sonnets to limericks, conversational poems, villanelles, and more!

“I have a love for wildlife conservation. That’s my voice. I can anthropomorphize pretty much any animal on this planet and give it a voice,” said author Bonnie Lady Lee (bonnieleebooks.com). She both charmed and baffled the audience as she shared the challenges of being asked to develop a storyline for the Hershey Company, despite the fact that she’s “somebody who absolutely despises chocolate!” Lee said, “This was a really challenging subject for me. One being I absolutely just hate chocolate. Being somebody who has such a passion for not liking it gave me a different voice and I came up with telling the story of how milk chocolate is made.” Ironically, Lee’s presentation was followed by Mary Penney Hershey (marypenneyhershey.com), who quipped, “I was very worried that she was gonna say something bad about the Hersheys.” Hershey caught the eye of her first editor at Random House with the title of her first book, My Big Sister Is So Bossy She Says You Can’t Read This Book. “That was for her the first hearing of my voice. And then she read the 10 pages and asked for more, and eventually she bought it.” Her most recent book is titled Green Eyes and Ham, which is about “two 8th-grade boys who find that they have a crush on one another. Finding my voice to become that character — I tend to write in first person — was really exciting for me. I really enjoyed it. And I hope to write more about some of the marginalized groups that need voices.” Author Nikki Barthelmess (nikkibarthelmess.com), who writes young adult fiction, expounded on the concept of voice. “I wanted to start by talking about how our voices are all different,” she said. “So what is voice? The perspective from which the story is coming from. So when I’m telling a story, or when I’m coming into a room, for example, it’s a lot different than anybody else in this room because I’m a different person. I’m Nikki; I’m an author. I grew up in Nevada, but I’m from California. I grew up in foster care. I’m bicultural. So all that I bring to the table, that makes me who I am.” Children’s book writer Andrea J. Loney (andreajloney .com) had an apt analogy for creating characters. “If you like Legos, and you buy the box, and you’ve got the box, and you see the house or whatever you want to make with the Legos, you don’t just empty it out and all the blocks fall in place. … You actually have to spread them out and play

with them. … You have to work at it. It’s the same thing with writing. And that’s part of how you find the voice.” “There’s never one voice that you write; you have to play with voice itself when you’re writing,” echoed author Alexis O’Neill (alexisoneill.com), whose books include The Efficient, Inventive (Often Annoying) Melvil Dewey, a picture book about the inventor of the Dewey Decimal System. Animator, author, and illustrator James Burks (jamesburks.com) shared that taking improv classes and learning magic helped him learn to become a character. “I used to work at Starbucks,” he said. “I would go take my kids to school, and I would go sit at Starbucks and sit over in the corner with my laptop and my sketchbook. And I would have these made-up conversations between a bird and a squirrel. If you saw me over there, you would probably think I was crazy. ‘Why is he making those goofy faces?’ I’m trying to find the voice of these characters that I’m creating, whether they’re birds, squirrels, or little girls.” In addition to the featured authors, the tireless team of education activist Cheri Rae (author of the book DyslexiaLand) and Monie DeWitt (photographer extraordinaire) were on hand to provide information for Dyslexia Awareness Month in October. For more information about their work, visit dyslexiaproject.com. See sbceo.org

This creative signage was part of the Dyslexia Project booth.

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VALUES

Making Values into Actions

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rane Country Day School is in its 95th year, but a lot of the core values of the school remain unchanged. Probably the thing that is the “most Crane-like,” says Head of School Joel Weiss, “is that it’s a school that believes in — the old way of talking about it used to be experiential learning — learning by doing, project-based learning, active learning.” The concept was first articulated by John Dewey, but Weiss sums it up as: “Kids learn best when they are actively engaged in the material. So it’s the diametric opposite of sitting passively in a class where somebody’s lecturing and you’re just taking notes.”

Crane School Embeds Active Learning into an Updated Credo While keeping the same core value concepts (experiential, academics, creativity, community, character, and confidence), the school recently reworded its values so that they are also actionable. As Director of Marketing & Communications Kristen Peralta writes, “Making the school values active allows students, Staffulty (staff + faculty), parents, and board members to live by the values and talk about them daily. They are memorable and relatable for all ages, and they give purpose and direction for communicating with peers on the playground, managing a classroom, running a meeting, and planning for the future of the school. The values are now visually and verbally depicted around campus in a student-friendly, inclusive way.” “A core value is intended to be both descriptive of where the school is today, but at the same time, hopefully rich

enough that it’s aspirational,” explains Weiss. Here are a few examples of how the core values are embedded into the daily doings of the school.

Doing Deepens Discovery The 7th-graders have a year-long QED (Quests, Explorations, Discoveries) project that provides them with the opportunity to choose something they’re really interested in, find a community mentor to work with on that topic, and set up an ongoing relationship, and at the end of the year they have a big celebration to present what they have learned. “This is a very different thing where the kids really get to select something that they’re really passionate about. And it’s so much fun to watch it unfold, because it’s so powerful,” says Weiss.

Cultivate Kindness “We equally value character development alongside academic development because we know who our students are is as important as what they know,” reads one of the value statements posted around the school.

Value Your Voice “Crane has always been known as a school that kind of aggressively teaches public speaking,” says Weiss. That was part of the founding of the school, and today, students, starting from kindergarten, go up on stage by themselves, memorize a poem, and recite it to a full audience. “It’s quite an impressive thing with a 5-year-old.” In their final year, “every 8th-grader


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Art class is an ideal place to “Find Joy in the Pursuit” of education at Crane.

is expected to lead an all-school assembly with everybody in the school — all the adults, all the visitors, it’s probably an audience of three to 50 people — and they do a 10-minute speech on something that they’re passionate about,” says Weiss. The speech is quite a rite of passage, he says. But what’s even more impressive is that after their speech, they field questions from the audience. “So it’s not only preparing, memorizing a speech, and delivering it well, but it’s being so wellversed on the topic that you can respond to questions on the fly.”

Put ‘We’ Before ‘Me’

With so much emphasis on rigor these days, “I think there are some schools that would be embarrassed to say, ‘Oh, we’re a joyful place.’ But we like that,” says Weiss. “I go around as the Head and I see kids having fun and laughing and being silly and doing kid-centered things. And that it has a sense of fun and lightness and playfulness. To me, that’s good teaching, not something to be embarrassed about.” At the same time, he says, “with the right teacher, a teacher can take something that is hard and bring a lightness to it.” He continues, “To make sure an elementary school is using words like ‘joy’ … I think our world could use more joy. And especially this generation of kids who, for the last two or three years of their life, had so much that has been taken away from them.”

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“Our individual experiences wouldn’t be possible without the collective, and an inclusive culture is a shared responsibility,” reads one of the value statements. “Together, we ensure that every voice is heard, and that students and adults not only feel included, but that they express a strong sense of belonging as part of their experience in this community.”

Find Joy in the Pursuit

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Graphic illustrations of Crane’s new value statements are strategically placed around the school. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Supporting programs that instill a love of music is a key part of the work of the Santa Barbara Education Foundation.

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anta Barbara Education Foundation (SBEF) provides and supports programs that enrich the academic, artistic, and personal development of all students in the Santa Barbara Unified School District (SBUSD).

Santa Barbara Education Foundation Still Keeps the Beat One of its best known, signature programs is Keep the Beat. Since 2003, SBEF has been Keeping the Beat — raising funds to pay for music education in local schools. Today, all 5,000-plus elementary students learn to play an instrument during their school day. “We raise funds through grants, individual donors, and our radio-thon with 99.9 KTYD during the month of February,” says Programs Manager Katie Szopa. “These funds are given to our music teachers at the beginning of each school year to purchase instruments and accessories and pay for instrument coaches. This past August, we awarded $33,000 to our music teachers. SBEF also runs a year-round instrument drive. We repair the instruments and place them into the hands of our students.” Nick Rail Summer Band Camp is another signature SBEF program. Originally founded by Nick Rail in 1989, this well-established program provides an enriching and affordable summer music experience for students in grades 4-9. Campers are grouped by ability and taught by professional musicians to play solo and as a group. SBEF took over the administration of this camp in 2016, says Szopa. Since its inception, more than 2,000 students have attended band camp. Asked about the importance of the camp, SBUSD music teacher Brett Larsen (who was honored as 2017 Performing Arts Teacher of the Year for Santa Barbara County), says, “Summer band camp provides a space for beginning students to get excited and ready to join their school ensembles. And it gives the more experienced junior high and high school students the challenges needed to continue practicing and honing their skills over the summer break.” Summer String Camp is another SBEF signature program. Szopa says the camp welcomes partici34

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pants, students of all levels in incoming grades 4-9, to play the violin, viola, cello, or bass. String students gain technical skills on their instrument, increased note-reading facility, and composition instruction in a fun, supportive environment. Players are divided by level into ensemble groups where they practice their instruments together, culminating in an endof-camp performance, including performing a piece of their own composition. Following the success of their band and string camps, SBEF (in collaboration with SBUSD teacher Charlie Ortega) designed Drumline Camp, focused on junior high students. The Drumline Camp allows participants to expand their understanding of the elements of music performance, learn rhythm reading, and develop proper playing techniques. Camp participants explore all the different types of percussion instruments used in large percussion ensembles, including snare, marching tenor, bass, hand percussion, and melodic percussion. In memory of avid performing arts supporter Léni Fé Bland, her dear friend Sara Miller McCune established the Léni Fé Bland Performing Arts Partnership honoring Léni and her incredible generosity to the performing arts. “The fund continues Léni’s work by supporting and encouraging student participation and exposure to the amazing performing arts programs in Santa Barbara,” says Szopa. “Our mission is to partner with performing arts organizations in Santa Barbara and SBUSD to provide students and teachers equitable access to performances and promote the performing arts in education. The Léni Fund provides Santa Barbara Unified School District students from Pre-K to 12th grade access to in-theater performing arts performances and in-class workshops. Students attend performances in four of Santa Barbara’s historic theaters: the Granada, the Lobero, the Arlington, and The New Vic.” SBEF is funded by grants, private donations, family foundation donations, and business donations, and it is an originating partner in the Pianos on State project, as well as a fiscal sponsor to community programs that benefit Santa Barbara Unified students, including Bravo!, a free, district-sponsored, after-school music program; and South Coast Youth Band, an after-school music program that provides fun band experiences and quality instruction for elementary school students in grades 4-6. See sbefoundation.org.

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Food for Thought

T

he team at Santa Barbara Middle School has long had a vision of creating a true Community Kitchen that would be an industrial teaching kitchen to prepare school meals and provide cooking classes to students, as well as a place for community collaborations. Under the leadership of Pierre-Alexandre Tremblay (Chef PA) that vision has finally come to life. We caught up with Chef PA recently to get an update on the Community Kitchen project.

Santa Barbara Middle School Builds Community in the Kitchen When we last spoke about this, the SBMS Community Kitchen was still in the visioning phase, but now you have an industrial kitchen on campus, right? Yes. We launched our campaign to build this kitchen right before COVID. Then it hit, and obviously all our funding possibilities got swept right out underneath us. So we put the project on pause until the second year of COVID. And, just sort of out of a whim, we felt like it was the right time. So we reopened the campaign, and literally, in four months, finished raising the funds. … We opened it in November last year. I’m assuming you feed the school from the kitchen. That’s correct. We have our own lunch program, and to the benefit of being an independent school, we get to have a lot of fun on

what that looks like. … What’s even better is that we have our nice garden at school. So now all the produce we grow goes straight into that lunch program. It isn’t just a production kitchen. There’s an entire teaching section where students can take electives, and they can also get plugged in through their academic courses, or our life skills program. How does that work? An example would be, Human Geography might be studying South America, and they want to learn about that culture through the cuisine. So they’ll come into the kitchen and talk about native ingredients to that region. We will make tortillas by hand … maybe also make a classic Xocolatl hot chocolate beverage — something that the Aztecs and the Mayans would drink. So we give them something not just that they can hear about and see on a slideshow presentation, but taste and touch and do. What about the community kitchen part of the program? Our earliest connections were with groups like the White Buffalo Foundation, starting with regenerative agriculture, and trying to get the kids into some dirt to know where most food starts. Connecting them to the land, and understanding just how hard it is. But it’s expanded, because now we also do projects with Santa Barbara Bucket Brigade, and we’ve done projects with the Organic Soup Kitchen. … Each organization kind of has their specialty, but we’ve plugged in with those organizations and brought the kids out to connect one step further.

Providing healthy meals to students is just one part of the SBMS Community Kitchen.

You mentioned working with Save Summerland Farms. What do they do? They are working on growing food and making Summerland a more secure food environment. They actually come and use our kitchen once a week to process their non-GMO corn into tortillas and tortilla chips. That’s very cool. It’s ever growing the way the students use the kitchen. We have a little community action club here too. … They love to try to do some fundraising through the kitchen; they’ll come in and actually prepare baked goods and sell them for a specific cause that they believe in. … The kitchen has become a place for them to generate a little bit of income and get some foundation toward helping people in need. What have been some of the surprises? I’ve been surprised how much kids really do love to learn about things through food…. If you can use that passion as a lesson, they have fun, they learn something, they connect, they walk away. They’re not even thinking they learned something. They’re just like, “This was the coolest day ever.” See sbms.org.

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Facilitating Deep Connections at Santa Barbara’s Schools

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ouncil Circles provide students and educators with a skillfully facilitated space to speak about what is on their minds or in their hearts in the presence of others who listen deeply. For the 2022-23 school year, AHA! has been invited to conduct Council Circles in about 25 classes at Carpinteria High and Middle schools and at La Colina, Santa Barbara, and Goleta Valley Junior High schools. Melissa Lowenstein, Director of Training & Adult Programming for the nonprofit, which has provided social-emotional education to more than 20,000 teens and youth care providers since it began in 1999, shared some information about the program.

AHA! Council Circles How did the Council Circles originate? Was it a pilot program? AHA!, which has been around since 1999, has always been based in part on the practice of Council. Rendy Freedman, MFT, one of our cofounders, has had extensive training in Council from the Ojai Foundation. AHA!’s long-running in-school programs have always involved a combination of social-emotional education and small group sharing and discussion using the same guidelines used in Council, and AHA! facilitators are trained Council Circle leaders. As students returned to campuses over the past year, school administrators were seeking ways

to help improve a sense of connectedness, belonging, and community among students and educators. Councils turned out to be an excellent fit for what schools were seeking.

Can you explain a little bit about how they work? Council involves sitting in a circle with other members of one’s community to speak and listen from the heart, with one person sharing at a time. As the talking piece goes around the circle and everyone responds to the question at hand, each person has a chance to speak their truth and make their voice heard. Skilled, trained facilitators guide the process, and everyone has an opportunity to deeply listen and grow to know others. AHA! facilitators visit each classroom for four consecutive weeks, once a week, to lead an hour-long Council. We play a bonding, fun, large group game first, then settle into groups of no more than 10 students per facilitator. Each week, we bring a series of Council questions designed to help students get to know each other more deeply and to consider how they can contribute to their school communities. Council is an ancient practice with many uses, including teaching, peace-building, problem-solving, and storytelling. In this modern iteration, it is meant to build a sense of community and belonging among students served. Who are the participants and how are they selected? Teachers who want Council Circles in their classrooms sign up for the offering. Are you going into areas with identified problems or is this a schoolwide program? This is a school-wide program; any teacher

AHA! Council Circles give students and educators a space to talk frankly about what’s on their minds.

who wishes to bring Council into a classroom can sign up. This being said, there have been instances where we are asked to bring a Council in response to a particular problem. Those Councils are tailored to the issue and the student population being served. What have some of the responses and outcomes been? Teachers reported a demonstrable change in classroom climate after circles completed. Post-surveys demonstrated a big jump in students’ sense of being connected with and listened to by their peers and their willingness to ask their teacher for support. Student feedback about what stood out as memorable, enjoyable, or meaningful included: “The talks we had about what inspires us.” “Checking in with others … I think is very meaningful.” “That everyone opens up about their life.” “That we were able to talk about topics that we normally don’t.” “When we all listened, no one judged.” “Being able to speak what’s on your mind to others, and how they respect your thoughts.” “Finding out I have deeper things in common with my peers.” See ahasb.org.

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The Promise of Free Education Is Alive and Well

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t’s been six years since the Promise program began providing regional high school graduates the opportunity to attend Santa Barbara City College full-time, free of charge, for up to two years. With the pandemic throwing all kinds of curveballs into the higher education system, we asked SBCC Foundation CEO Geoff Green for an update on what’s going on with the program today. “The Promise still remains the best thing since sliced bread,” says Green, with his characteristic enthusiasm. He’s

Despite Pandemic Ups and Downs, the SBCC Promise Still Delivers got the data to back it up: “almost 6,500 students and families have taken advantage of it in these first six years, so the Promise is absolutely having the impact that we were hoping for when we launched in 2016.” At that time, after crunching the data from the region’s K-12 districts, 1,345 students per cohort was the estimate. “So we figured we’d have somewhere between 1,300 and 1,400 students at a time once it was fully up and running,” says Green. “By 2019, we actually were at 1,700 students, so it was even more attractive than we’d initially projected. … But once COVID hit and everything pivoted to online, and childcare and other things were shut down at schools, and jobs were lost, we dropped all the way down to 1,100 students. So there was a major impact there. We saw nearly a 35 percent drop in participation enrollment in the Promise.”

This was an even steeper drop than the overall enrollment drop at SBCC, says Green. “Peak enrollment at SBCC was all the way back in 2010. That goes along with a national trend on the heels of the Great Recession,” he continues. “Enrollment is counter-cyclical with employment, which makes sense, if you think about it. If more people are unemployed or at risk of unemployment, they’re going to be enrolled in upskilling, or new ventures, or going back to school, or what have you, so that was normal. But our drop in enrollment since then has other factors, including challenges with housing and difficulties with the international students program. The Trump Administration certainly made that difficult. Then on the heels of that, COVID.” In terms of the Promise, another factor in the drop was that some students remained in school but could not continue a full-time schedule due to family and childcare issues, employment issues, “or just online learning was not the best way for them, which is certainly true for a lot of students.” That situation was the impetus for what Green calls a “no-fault return policy.” A statement on their website reads: “The COVID-19 pandemic has caused many students to put college on hold. If you graduated from high school in Southern Santa Barbara County during the pandemic and postponed college, or if you were an SBCC Promise student during this time and put college on hold, we want you back! In keeping with our commitment to increase college access, this fall the SBCC Foundation will be welcoming back all Promise students whose academic journeys were temporarily halted due to COVID-19. No questions asked.”

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The Promise graduates celebrate at La Playa Stadium.

After some fluctuations in enrollment, Green is happy to report that, “1,368 students are fully in good standing of meeting all the requirements of the Promise — meaning they are full-time students.” In terms of financing the program going forward, Green says, “It pencils out at any level, because we think it’s the right thing to do. Right now, it’s almost exactly the size we expected it to be when we first started six years ago. … Every dollar that supports the Promise is privately given. And those fundraising and expenditure cycles are out of phase. So there’s periods where we’re raising a lot more than we need. And then there’s periods where we’re spending a lot more than we have. And because of the size of this foundation, we can do that.” He continues, “I think the proof of concept has long been established; this works. It remains a national leader. And we absolutely believe in it.” See sbccfoundation.org.

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Celebrate the Holidays in Santa Barbara!

Jake Shimabukuro Christmas in Hawai'i

Thu, Dec 1 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre “If everyone played the ukulele, the world would be a better place.” – Jake Shimabukuro Drawing on signature favorites, a vibrant catalog of holiday classics, and selections from his recent album, Jake Shimabukuro’s merry live show Christmas in Hawai’i is sure to make spirits bright.

Mariachi Sol de México

José Hernández’ Merry-Achi Christmas Wed, Dec 7 / 7 PM / Arlington Theatre

“Mariachi is the heart, the soul and the passion of Mexico.” – José Hernández One of the world’s foremost mariachi groups, Mariachi Sol de México incorporates elements of Las Posadas alongside traditional Christmas carols in this festive musical tribute to Mexico’s holiday traditions.

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 38

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Special Thanks


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

NOV. 10-16

T HE

by

TERRY & VICTORIA ORTEGA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

11/10-11/13:

Marcia Burtt Gallery Exhibition: Casting Light Dramatic lighting streams

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

acy—Why the Rational Believe the Irrational, an overarching theory of conspiracy theories: who believes them and why, which ones are real, and what we should do about them. 6-7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787. chaucersbooks

cfsb.info/sat 11/10,11/12-11/13: UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Presents Fall One-Acts Enjoy a festival of one-act plays

.com/event

11/10: La Kaiser Jewelry Grand Opening Enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres while looking at S.B.’s newest jewelry store. Make a personal charm pendant with half of the proceeds to go to the My Trees Trust with the goal of reducing natural woodlands loss in Zimbabwe. An email RSVP is required. 5:30-8pm. La Kaiser Jewelry, 1101 State St. Free. Email prinfo@lwoodspr.com.

tinyurl.com/LaKaiserJewelry

11/10-11/13, 11/16: Lost Chord Guitars Thu: Thea the Band & Katie Leigh, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Fri.: Helen Rose, 8-11:30pm. $10. Sat.: Lisa Marie Johnston, EllaHarp and Jeff Berkley, 8-11:30pm. $10. Sun.: Terry Lawless (of U2), 8-10:30pm. Free. Wed.: Jay Asher, 7:30-9:30pm. Free, Suggested Donation $5. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Ages 21+. Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com

11/10-11/16: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: The Dip with Cassowary, 8pm. $22. Ages 21+. Fri.: Joe Hertler & The Rainbow Seekers x Proxima Parada with The Charities, 8:30pm. $15$18. Ages 21+. Sat.: Poor Man’s Whiskey with The Goodland, 9pm. $20-$25. Ages 21+. Sun.: Santa Barbara Jazz Society featuring James Arnold, 1-4pm, $10-$25; S.B. Acoustic presents The Idiomatiques, 7:30pm, $25$67. Mon.-Tue: Young Singers Recital, 6-8pm. Free. Wed.: The Brook & the Bluff, 8pm. $17-$20. Ages 18+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

11/11: Eos Lounge Sage Armstrong, 9pm. $6.18. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410.

eoslounge.com

11/11-11/12: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Stacked Music, 6-8pm. Sat.: Thunder Rose Band, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

11/10: UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Ian Bremmer Leading global political

11/11-11/12: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: Agua Santa, 8-10pm. Sat.: The Academy, 7-10pm. 634 State St. Free.

risk expert Ian Bremmer will talk about his new book, The Power of Crisis: How Three Threats—and Our Response—Will Change the World, about the lessons from global challenges of the past 100 years. 7:30pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. Students: $16; GA: $31-$51. Call (805) 893-3535 or email info@ artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu/events

FRIDAY 11/11

Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

11/10-11/13,11/16:

Zoo will transform into an immersive magical world of lights, featuring handcrafted, silk-covered lanterns lit with more than 50,000 LED bulbs that will showcase the African plains, the Outback, butterflies, and more! Reservations are required. Zoo hours: 9:30am5pm; ZooLight: 4:30-8:30pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free-$19.95. Non-peak: free$22; peak: free-$32. ZooLights goes through January 15, 2023. Call (805) 962-5339 or email zooinfo@sbzoo.org. sbzoo.org/zoolights/

Adrian Galysh, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.mavericksaloon

.com/event-calendar/

11/11: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

11/11-11/12: Uptown Lounge Fri.: The Trio, 5-7pm; Heart & Soul, 8-11pm. Sat.: Last Great Decade, 8-11pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800.

uptownlounge805.com/events

11/12: Brewhouse Porch Critter, 4-7pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call (805) 884-4664. sbbrewhouse.com 11/12: Yoga Soup Shimshai with Joss Jaffe, 7:30-9pm. 28 Parker Wy. $25$30. Call (805) 965-8811.

tinyurl.com/ShimshaiNov12

11/14: The Red Piano The Cinder Blues Band, 7:30pm. 519 State Street.

Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439. theredpiano.com/schedule

11/11: Jerry Seinfeld Comedian, sitcom star, and host of Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee Jerry Seinfeld will bring his signature observational wit to S.B. for two shows. 7 and 9:30pm. Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $65-$185. Call (805) 963-9580. thearlingtontheatre.com 11/11: Creating 805: Sun & Swell, Kate Flynn Join Creating 805 and Kate Flynn, founder and CEO at Sun & Swell (quality, organic, whole food), for a conversation around creativity and entrepreneurship. 8:30-10am. The Sandbox, 69 Santa Felicia Dr., Goleta. Donations accepted. Email hello@creating805.com. tinyurl.com/Creating805

11/11-11/13: Out of the Box Theatre Company Presents Miss You Like Hell

ZooLights The S.B.

11/11-11/13: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Rebel Heart, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Pull the Trigger, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.:

The Brook & the Bluff

ranging from cutting-edge contemporary pieces to classics about searching and longing featuring students and directed by undergraduate students. Thu.: 7:30pm; Sat.: 2 and 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. UCSB Studio Theater. Free-$3 donation.

theaterdance.ucsb.edu

TERRY ORTEGA

selling author and publisher of Skeptic magazine Michael Shermer will speak about and sign copies of his book, Conspir-

WEDNESDAY

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

through the artworks in this group exhibition. Using chiaroscuro and romantic atmospheric effects, the artists accentuate light falling on both landscape views and urban facades. The exhibition shows through November 27. 1-5pm. Marcia Burtt Gallery, 517 Laguna St. Free. Call (805) 962-5588. artlacuna.com

11/10: Chaucer’s Book Talk and Signing: Michael Shermer Best-

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

“Montecito Pond” by Marcia Burtt

theatregroupsbcc.com

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

SBCC students will perform Oscar Wilde’s funny and engaging comedy about three couples navigating love with a little deception, flattery, and witty dialogue. Directed by Katie Laris. The plays show through November 19. Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Jurkowitz Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 969 Cliff Dr. $10-$18. Call (805) 965-5935. Read more on p. 53.

SUNDAY

COURTESY

THURSDAY

10 THURSDAY 11/

11/10-11/12: SBCC Theatre Arts Department presents The Importance of Being Earnest The talented

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

This new musical follows a whip-smart teen who takes a road trip with her free-spirited Latina mother when their relationship gets threatened by immigration policies. Suggestive material and language. Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. Free-$35. Call (805) 963-0408 or email cstheater@sbcoxmail.com.

centerstagetheater.org

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR INDEPENDENT.COM

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

11/11:

VFW Post 1649 and PCVF Veterans Day Ceremony

Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1649 and Pierre Claeyssens Veterans Foundation will host this ceremony that will include a flyover by the Condor Squadron and presentations and performances by the UCSB Color Guard, Gold Coast Pipe & Drum Band, David Gonzalez and the S.B. Choral Society, and The Prime Time Band. 11am-1pm. S.B. Cemetery, 901 Channel Dr. Free. pcvf.org/veterans-

day-ceremony

Volunteer Opportunity NOVEMBER 10, 2022

Fundraiser

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39


Super CuCaS Santa Barbara

®

Runner-Up

11/11-11/13: Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum 38th Annual Vaquero Gala, Show, and Sale Kick off the weekend by celebrating “Vaquero of the

VOTED SANTA

BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 27 YEARS

IN A ROW!

BREAKFAST

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Santa Barbara

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Micheltorena & Mesa Locations

e Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Fre Mesa Locations) (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena &

DAILY LUNCH

9

$

SPECIALS

49

Year” Paul McEnroe at the preview of the Fine Western Items & Collectible Sale, gala dinner, and live auction followed by a weekend of food, fine art, memorabilia, wagons, dancing by Baile de California, and a Barn Dance & Pig Roast with music by Monty Mills and the Lucky Horseshoe Band. Proceeds will go toward the museum. Visit the website for the full schedule. Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum and Carriage House, 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. $65-$200. Call (805) 688-7889 x104 or email info@santaynezmuseum.org.

santaynezmuseum.org/vaquero-show

11/11-11/13: Celebrate Fall At Buellton’s Annual Fall Fest 2022 This three-day festival will feature live music from more than 30 bands on two stages, carnival rides and games, a street faire and food vendors, beer, wine, seltzer, and kombucha. Fri.: 4-10pm; Sat.-Sun.: noon-10pm. 180 Avenue of the Flags, Buellton. Free; unlimited ride wristband: $35/daily. Call (805) 448-7070 or email info@discoverbuellton.com.

buelltonfallfest.com 11/11: Zaca Mesa Winery Rock ’n’ Roll BBQ & Concert

2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863

Come to the tasting room courtyard for delicious tri-tip, pulled pork, and chicken BBQ fare, music from local rock band Unfinished Business, dancing, and your favorite wines. 5-7:30pm. Zaca Mesa Winery, 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd. $60-$70. Call (805) 688-9339 or email events@zacamesa.com.

626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028

zacamesa.com/upcoming-events

6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806

11/11: Santa Ynez Valley Empty Bowls Pick out a handmade bowl by Community Clayworks, then enjoy a simple dinner of soup (provided by Coast Range, Campo del Sol, Pico, Ramen Katori, and Clean Slate) and bread with 100 percent of the proceeds to benefit the Food Distribution Program at Bethania Church in Solvang. 5-8pm. St. Mark’s-in-theValley, 2901 Nojoqui Ave., Los Olivos. $30.

communityclayworks.com/empty-bowls

Semaglu(de (generic Ozempic®) for Weight Loss Available Now ・Have you been struggling with weight loss? ・Afraid of taking s(mulant drugs for weight loss? ・Are typical weight loss drugs contraindicated for you? ・Do you have prediabetes? ・Are you considering bariatric surgery? Semaglu(de is the latest and best weight loss medica(on to be approved by the FDA. It acts to suppress your appe(te, but is not a s(mulant. In clinical trials, the AVERAGE weight loss was 15% over 68 weeks. We combine semaglu(de with our established weight loss program and are seeing even beSer results. Call 805.452.1252 for a free consult with Dr Edman to determine if this program is appropriate for you. Go to edmanclinic.net/semaglu(de for more details. Limited slots are available. Act Now!

107 West Gu+errez Street edmanclinic.net 805.452.1252

The #1 SB Weight Loss Center on Yelp!

Alamar Dental Implant Center

11/11: La LoCA Milonga Presents Tanghetto Latin Grammy–nominated Argentinian band Tanghetto will bring their electro-tango sound to S.B. There’s no need to know how to tango — let the music take you, partner or no partner. 6-9pm. Buena Onda Empanadas, 724 Haley St. $45. Call (805) 455-1906 or email milongalaloca@gmail.com. tinyurl.com/

LaLoCaTanghetto

11/11: Authentic Relating Games Be challenged to listen and reflect in real time using Authentic Relating Games, a collection of extensively tested, masterfully led experiences that give players a hands-on taste of both the joy and skills of interpersonal connection. 7-9pm. Yoga Soup, 28 Parker Wy. $20-$25. Call (805) 965-8811.

tinyurl.com/AuthenticGames

11/11-11/12: BASSH: The Art & Soul of Dance Derrick Curtis and his team of talented professionals will bring together S.B.’s best choreographers and dancers for two performances that will feature dances in ballroom, Broadway, belly and aerial dance, hip-hop, flamenco, and Chinese classical dance. 7:30pm. The New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $15-$35. Email derrick@sbassh .com. sbassh.com

SATURDAY 11/12 11/12: Forever Young — Neil Young Birthday Celebration In celebration of the legendary music, words, and jams of Neil Young, Bay Area band Shakey Zimmerman will perform in this tribute concert. L.A.-based and singer/ songwriter Phil Cody and his band will open the show. 7-11pm. Alcazar Theater, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. $20-$25. Call (805) 684-6380 or email info@thealcazar.org.

thealcazar.org/calendar

sbimplants.com 40

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

11/12: Star Party at the Museum The Palmer Observatory will open its doors and its roof to share a remarkable view of the wonders of the night sky through its state-of-the-art 20-inch telescope. 7-10pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 x164 or email kcook@sbnature2.org. sbnature.org/visit/calendar/7193/star-party COURTESY

2018

Best of

T HE

INDEPENDENT.COM

11/12:

SBHS Theatre Presents The Crucible

This modern retelling of Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, about the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts during 1692-1693, will have a modern retelling with added choreography while still keeping true to the original plot and narrative. The play will show through November 19. 7-9pm. S.B. High School Theatre, 700 E. Anapamu St. $10-$25. Call (805) 966-9101 x5209 or email sbhstheatreboxoffice@gmail.com. sbhstheatre.com/tickets

11/12: UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Nigella Lawson Culinary powerhouse and global food icon Nigella Lawson will be in conversation with Evan Kleiman (host of KCRW’s Good Food) as she recounts the people, food, and recipes that have shaped her unique life. Books will be available for signing. 7:30pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $16-$46. Call (805) 8933535 or email info@artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu/events 11/12: Lyle Lovett and John Hiatt at Chumash Grammy Award winner Lyle Lovett and Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter John Hiatt will be joining each other on stage to perform their most popular hits. 8pm. Chumash Casino and Resort, 3400 E. Highway 246, Santa Ynez. $59-$94. Ages 21+. Call (800) 248-6274. chumashcasino.com/entertainment

SUNDAY 11/13 11/13: The Mesa Bookstore Book-Signing Three S.B. authors will read from and sign their recent novels. Tracy Shawn will read from her 2022 novel, Floating Underwater; Max Talley will read from his latest short story collection, My Secret Place; and DJ Palladino will read from Werewolf, Texas. 1:30-3pm. The Mesa Bookstore, 1838 A Cliff Dr. Free. Call (805) 966-3725.

tinyurl.com/TheMesaBookstore

11/13: Explore Ecology Beach Cleanup Join this volunteer effort for ocean health. Bring your own supplies or use the provided buckets, bags, and reusable or disposable gloves. Sign in at the Watershed Resource Center. 10am-noon. Arroyo Burro Beach, 2981 Cliff Drive. Free. Call (805) 884-0459 or email jill@exploreecology.org. exploreecology.org/calendar 11/13: S.B. Empty Bowls 2022 Pick out your handcrafted bowl at the outdoor pottery marketplace then enjoy a simple meal with all funds going toward the S.B. Foodbank. There will be tours and a raffle. Visit the website to pick your ticket time. 11am-3pm. Foodbank’s S.B. Warehouse, 4554 Hollister Ave. $30. Call (805) 967-5741. foodbanksbc.org 11/13: SBCAN’s Tribute to Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson S.B. County Action Network (SBCAN) will celebrate and honor Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson’s commitment to serving the community and celebrate her prolific career and many achievements in the state legislature. Join her in conversation with author and journalist Starshine Roshell. Proceeds will go toward SBCAN. 11am-2pm. El Paseo Mexican Restaurant, 10 El Paseo. $100. sbcan.nationbuilder.com


SBCC THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT

MARC BAPTISE

NOV. 10-16 CALLUM THOMPSON

MONDAY 11/14

artsandlectures.ucsb .edu/events

IMPORTANCE 5

BEING T

EARNEST by Henry Lewis, Henry Shields Directed by Katie Laris and Jonathan Sayer

Holiday Shopping

TUESDAY 11/15 11/15: Screening and Discussion: Lady Chatterley’s Lover Watch the 2022 adaptation of DH Lawrence’s classic novel about Lady Constance Chatterley (Emma Corrin), whose happy marriage to Sir Clifford Chatterley turns sour when he returns wounded from World War I. Producer Elizabeth Gabler and development executive Marisa Paiva from 3000 Pictures will join Carsey-Wolf Center Associate Director Emily Zinn for a post-screening discussion. 7-10pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Rated R. Call (805) 893-4637.

carseywolf.ucsb.edu/events/all-events

Head-Start 11/10: Curated Collective Presents Fall Pop-Up Night Market Listen to live music as you shop for one-of-a-kind items

DIRECTED BY SAUNDRA McCLAIN

in the Funk Zone while you support area artisans, crafters, and creators who thrive to create community. 5-9pm. Stik N Stuck Creative Studios, 118-A Gray Ave. Free. Email hello@curatedcollectivesb.com. curatedcollectivesb.com

NOVEMBER 9-19, 2022 JURKOWITZ THEATRE | SBCC WEST CAMPUS www.theatregroupsbcc.com | 805.965.5935

11/10-11/16: 55th Annual Yes Store This S.B. tradition COURTESY

11/15:

7 OSCAR WILDE’S

UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Allison Russell Nashville-based Allison Russell, whose 2021 album, Outside Child, was nominated for three Grammy Awards, will bring her Americana/roots/R&B/ indie rock sound to S.B. 8-10pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: $15; GA: $30-$45. Call (805) 893-3535 or email info@ artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

Science Pub: Sundowner Winds

Join UCSB Postdoctoral Scholar Callum Thompson, PhD, as he will highlight what UCSB weather and climate researchers have discovered about these dry, gusty winds known as sundowner winds that descend from the Santa Ynez Mountains and have driven rapidly spreading wildfires in S.B. 6:30-8pm. Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. Free. (805) 682-4711 x 172. sbnature.org/visit/calendar

11/16:

Jazz at the Lobero Presents Django Festival Allstars Listen

since 1968 will offer shopping for arts, crafts, custom fine jewelry, clothing, and so much more from past and new area artists. Open through December 24. 10am-7pm. La Arcada Plaza, 1100 State St. Free. Call (805) 966-9777. theyesstore.com

Thank you toThank ourto our you season season sponsor: sponsor:

Sunday LIVE 11/13 CAPTIONING @ 2pm

INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

11/11-11/13: S.B. Printmakers 2nd Annual Pop-Up Print Sale Learn about all types of printmaking, meet artists, and shop for affordable works of art on paper, framed and unframed. Fri: 5-7:30pm; Sat: 10am-4pm; Sun: noon-4pm. S.B. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. Free. Email mail@sbprintmakers.com. sbcaw.org/upcoming LE PERE STUDIO

11/14:

presents Showcase Presents a Student

to a night of high-energy interpretations and arrangements that pay tribute to gypsy jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt from a group who honors the traditions of his “hot jazz.” 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $39-$49; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@lobero.com. Read more on p. 55.

lobero.org/whats-on

WEDNESDAY 11/16 11/16: UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Presents The Government Inspector Enjoy Nikolai Gogol’s satire of small-town corruption in this hilariously relevant satire of greed, corruption, and stupidity of the Imperial Russian government. The play shows through November 20. 7:30pm. Hatlen Theater, UCSB. $13-$19. Call (805) 893-2064. theaterdance.ucsb.edu

11/16: Backstage S.B. Country Night Everybody get in line…and two-step and swing or ride the mechanical bull. 8pm-midnight. Backstage, 409 State St. $5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 957-4111 or email info@backstagesb.com.

backstagesb.com/entertainment

11/16: Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox: Life in the Past Lane Take in an ensemble of multi-talented singers and musicians who turn New York City pianist Scott Bradlee’s generation-spanning arrangements of today’s pop hits into the classic sounds of legends of yesterday, such as The Platters, Frank Sinatra, The Andrews Sisters, and more. 8pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. GA: $65-$95. Call (805) 899-2222 or email info@granadasb.org.

ticketing.granadasb.org/events

Hacienda Moderna 11/12-11/13: Ojai Holiday Home Tour & Marketplace Take a tour of B Hill Farm, Hacienda Moderna, Casa de Indigo, and Downtown Casita followed by perusing goods and shopping from 40+ vendors and artisans at Libbey Park. Proceeds will go toward the Ojai Music Festival and its BRAVO education and community program. 10am-4pm. 201 S. Signal St, Ojai. $45. Call (805) 646-2053 or email info@ojaifestival .org. tinyurl.com/OjaiTourMarketplace

Volunteer With Us!

11/12: Mosaic Market at the Courtyard Support local and shop small this holiday season from more than 25 crafters, artisans, small businesses, and makers. 11am-4pm. Mosaic Locale, 1131 State St. Free. Email kayla@meetmeatthe.market.

meetmeatthe.market

11/12-11/16: Miracle at the Funk Zone It’s that time of year when Pearl Social turns into the ‘Miracle’ pop-up Christmas Bar with over-the-top holiday decor and cocktails in collectible ceramic vessels. Reservations are recommended. The $5 per person reservation fee will be donated to Girls Rock S.B. 4pm. Pearl Social, 131 Anacapa St., Ste. B. Email info@pearlsocialsb .com. pearlsocialsb.com

(805) 692-2226 • zoe@sbhabitat.org sbhabitat.org/volunteer

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Science

DR. TODD BRA JE / SAN DIEGO STATE

Can Chumash Archaeology Save Fisheries?

SHELL EVIDENCE: Former grad student Stefanie Duncan takes in the views while doing archaeological fieldwork on Santa Rosa Island.

Y

ou can imagine the scene: visitors and residents alike, watching the sun set over the Santa Barbara coastline, as silhouettes of the Channel Islands float on the horizon, fishing boats bob in the foreground, and dolphins leap in the surf. This could be straight from a modern American Riviera dream, yet people have been enjoying those exact views for much longer than that. Although the ocean and our climate

How the Santa Barbara Channel’s Past Might Inform a Global Fishing Future by Austin Clinkenbeard are rapidly changing, Santa Barbara was just as nice to live here a millennium ago as it is now. The consistent weather, incredible variety of flora and fauna, and access to both mountains and the coast made this region a practical paradise for indigenous Chumash people. With such rich terrestrial and marine resources, they were able to trade nomadic ways for a settled life in permanent villages on the islands and the mainland. A critical component of that thriving Chumash way of life was managing fisheries, many of which have all but vanished in modern times. Swordfish and marlin were once frequent visitors to the Santa Barbara Channel—they’re not so much anymore—and numerous now-dwindling species of abalone and clams could be harvested all year long. Fisheries are hurting even more drastically on the global stage, due directly to the soaring population of hungry humans since the late 1800s. (Climate change also plays a role in certain regions.) A recent report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations said that more than 35 percent of the world’s fisheries are being harvested at unsustainable levels. Fishermen in the Southeast Pacific

and Mediterranean are the worst offenders, with about twothirds of their catch being beyond replaceable levels. But the American fishing industry is not immune: In 2022, for the first time ever, they canceled the snow crab season in Alaska. With human appetite for seafood only on the rise, marine biologists everywhere are implementing all manner of strategies to protect and bolster fisheries. But as they use the latest technologies to save dwindling fish populations, there’s growing evidence that a wise way to plan for the future might be to look at the past. Though the concept is still emerging and fraught with unique challenges, many researchers are realizing that archeology could play a pivotal role in fishery management in the years to come. “What starts out as a discussion about people’s diets in the past really becomes a story about California’s marine ecosystems,” explains Torben Rick, a UCSB graduate who frequently studies the Channel Islands and serves as curator of North American archaeology at the Smithsonian. “The people who collected that material are, in some ways, the biologists of the past.” Researchers like Rick and Todd Braje, who is the chair of anthropology at San Diego State, often focus on middens, those large piles of broken shells and crumbling bones that are found all over the Chumash landscape. “Efforts might want to start there: places resistant to environmental change and heavy fishing, places that were points of hyperabundance for tens of thousands of years,” said Braje, who has researched the geographic range of abalone eaten by the region’s pre-colonial populations. His work is one of the first cases where archeology is informing modern management. “Dr. Braje’s work identifying places of abalone abundance in the past has proven to be invaluable to rehabilitation efforts on the Islands today,” said Rick. But generally speaking, the archaeology-to-management connection is currently rare. “It’s still in limbo between academia and practical application,” said Rick.

A primary impediment in merging archaeological evidence with current conservation data about specific species is that the two fields essentially speak different languages. “Modern and deep historical data is very different,” confirmed Braje. “There’s some translation that has to happen.” Rick agreed. “You’re looking at that static archaeological record compared to a dynamic modern record,” he said. “You have to be more abstract in your comparisons, more accepting of uncertainty.” Part of the difficulty is separate goals. Conservation may focus on a day-to-day management of a living species, whereas archaeology might want to reconstruct ancient diets across a period of time. The data each scientist gathers requires further interpretation to reveal its relevance. The use of archeology in conservation management can provide direct access for indigenous peoples to take part in both analyzing their past and planning for the future. But that connection is also still in the early stages. “Archaeology right now is in a unique position with roles that indigenous populations are playing in the management of their own heritage,” explained Brian Holguin, a graduate student in archaeology at UCSB who is also a member of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians. “Now is a great time. Indigenous populations are gaining control of their heritage. The next step is to engage in the conversations about climate science and conservation. The Channel Islands are a great place because of such a unique environment.” Rick believes that archeologists “have a duty to highlight the descendants of the materials we’re studying,” noting that such a relationship can link “environmental research and social justice.” He explained, “The Chumash should be playing a key role in all of these things. They should be key participants in any restoration. They should have a seat at the table in making decisions and thinking about management.” That includes the ongoing discussion about bringing sea otters back in larger numbers to the Santa Barbara Channel, which fishermen fear would decimate already struggling shellfish species. The archeological record shows that the otters lived side-by-side with abalone and the like prior to European contact, although the Chumash occasionally hunted otters as well. Combining archeology and indigenous knowledge also reminds conservationists that humans were a part of this landscape for a very long time. “People were in that ‘pristine’ environment for probably the last 20,000 years,” said Holguin, explaining that it is often forgotten how humans play a pivotal role in the development of ecosystems. Researchers, he elaborated, sometimes “remove themselves from the environment as a species.” It can be hard for anyone, from veteran scientists to young students, to appreciate how information that dates back thousands of years might help humans understand the present. In an ever-changing world where it’s hard to keep pace with current events, Rick has heard people suggest that “adding an archaeological perspective might be unrealistic.” Braje has heard that too—that we are “too globalized,” that there is “nothing to learn” from archeology—but calls it the easy argument. “If we don’t consult the past, there is no road-map,” said Braje, pointing out the fault of using just the past century of data, long since globalized fisheries altered the environment. “Archaeology and deep history have to have a seat at the table.” n

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living

Transportation

INGRID BOSTROM

Eleven Years of Jumping on the School Bus

The Arlington Theatre

*2 SHOWS*

The Arlington Theatre S A N T A

B A R B A R A ,

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FREE ADMISSION • USA vs. Wales: Monday, 11/21 - 11:00am

See Full Game Schedule: ArlingtonTheatreSB.com Advance Preview 11/17: 11/17: THE MENU SHE SAID

11/11: BLACK PANTHER WAKANDA FOREVER

BIG BUS BUSINESS: Sierra Falso and Darin Fiechter are celebrating the 11th anniversary of their transportation business, Jump on the School Bus, on November 11, 2022. ENTERTAINMENT

T

he idea came while Sierra Falso and Darin Fiechter were on the beach, out of work for six months following the closure of the couple’s Paseo Nuevo restaurant, Live Culture, amid the recession of the late aughts.

Darin Fiechter and Sierra Falso Celebrate Success by Matt Kettmann “What if we got a school bus?” asked Falso, further proposing to do her hair in a beehive and bring a retro vibe to the party bus business. “If it doesn’t work, at least we could live in it.” Up to that point, Fiechter was a veteran of both medical sales and the hospitality business, working in restaurants like Cava, Brophy’s, and Paradise Café as well as for hotels like the Bacara. He’d never been so down on his luck, even selling a 1984 Westfalia just to get by. “We were selling everything to survive,” he said. “I rode her coattails because I’d never been through anything that tough.” While he’d led a pretty charmed life—born at Cottage Hospital, raised in Solvang where his dad sold insurance, surfing Jalama regularly—she’d had it a little tougher: growing up with a firefighter mom in a boat in the harbor and a cabin on Paradise Road, having a kid at 19 years old, even living on welfare for a time. Without any other apparent options, Falso sold her Rolex for $4,000 in October 2011 and bought a bus for $3,000. They used the other $1,000 to paint it black and decorate it for Halloween in Isla Vista, where a cop told them they didn’t have a license to drive passengers. Less than two weeks later, they had everything in order. On November 11, 2011—aka 11-11-11—Falso and Fiechter hosted their own roving wedding party from the Mission Rose Garden to the County Courthouse to Stearns Wharf. “Whoever wanted to jump on could jump on,” said Fiechter. “Jump on the School

Bus” became their new company’s name. They started running $20 roundtrips from the Rose Garden to Cold Spring Tavern on Sundays, which is when Santa Barbarans began to notice the big black bus with customized lettering on the side. “It was not well-received at first,” recalled Fiechter, who was a new competitor for the many trolley, wine tour, and party transportation companies in town. Not everyone enjoyed the pirate-like vibe of the bus, the bold messages on the side, the loud horn blasting. “You either loved us back then or you hated us,” he said. Party-throwers strongly approved, and business boomed into weddings, bachelorette and bachelor parties, kid birthday bashes, and the like. They bought old buses from school districts—one up by Eugene, Oregon, was particularly reliable for clean, working machines—and even trademarked their black-andwhite school bus with white lettering motif. Before COVID, they had 30 buses, all stored near the intersection of State Street and Highway 154. Pandemic restrictions cut them down to 17 buses, but they’re actively seeking more again, as they provide transportation for about 200 weddings per year, among other events. “We need more buses ASAP,” he said. “We can’t keep up.” Jump on the School Bus employs five full-time drivers with another 15-plus contractors working most weeks as well, plus another 20 to choose from. “We get the highest rates, so we pay the best,” said Fiechter of how they keep their drivers. Added Falso, “No one has ever quit.” This weekend, on November 11, 2022, they’re throwing a private anniversary party, and a proper wedding for themselves, at Dos Pueblos Ranch. “We never did a grand opening, or a five- or 10-year anniversary,” said Falso. “This is our first big anniversary celebration.” They’ve recently been reflecting a lot on these past 11 years. “We’ve been running efficiently without any problems,” said Falso. “We’re profitable and we are able to run a tight ship.” Fiechter sees their story as a great example of localsdone-great. “We created something from nothing and we did it the way we wanted to,” he explained. “I’m proud to have created a brand in my hometown that everyone recognizes.”

See jumpontheschoolbus.com.

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Metro 4 • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Paseo Nuevo • Fairview

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Nov 11-17, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

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FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

The Banshees of Inisherin (R): Fri-Sun: 2:25, 5:05, 7:45. Mon-Wed: 5:05, 7:45. Thur: 5:05. Ticket to Paradise (PG13): Fri,-Sun: 2:15, 4:55, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 4:55, 7:30. Smile (R): Fri-Sun: 2:00, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 8:00. Lyle Lyle Crocodile (PG): Fri-Thur: 4:45. She Said* (R): Thur: 7:45.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140

Black Panther: Wakanda Forever* (PG13): Fri: 10:45, 11:45, 12:30, 1:30, 2:15-3D, 3:15, 4:00, 5:00, 5:46, 6:45, 7:30, 8:30, 9:15, 10:15. Sat/Sun: 10:00, 10:45, 11:45, 12:30, 1:30, 2:15-3D, 3:15, 4:00, 5:00, 5:45, 6:45, 7:30, 8:30, 9:15, 10:15. Mon-Thur: 1:30, 2:15-3D, 3:15, 4:00, 5:00, 5:45, 6:45, 7:30, 8:30, 9:15, 10:15. One Piece Film Red -Sub (PG13): Fri-Sun: 11:15, 2:00, 4:45, 7:45. Mon-Wed: 2:00, 4:45, 7:45. Thur: 2:00. Black Adam (PG13): Fri-Sun: 11:30, 2:25, 5:20, 8:15. Mon-Thur: 2:25, 5:20, 8:15. The Menu* (R): Thur: 5:00, 8:00.

METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Black Panther: Wakanda Forever* (PG13): Fri: 11:30, 12:15, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 3:45, 4:30, 5:30-3D, 6:30, 7:15, 8:00, 9:00,10:00. Sat: 10:30, 11:30, 12:15, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 3:45, 4:30, 5:30-3D, 6:30, 7:15, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00. Sun: 10:30, 11:30, 12:15, 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 3:45, 4:30, 5:30-3D, 6:30, 7:15, 8:00, 9:00. Mon-Thur 2:00, 3:00, 3:45, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 7:15, 8:00, 9:00.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Till (PG13): Fri-Wed: 5:15. One Piece Film Red -Sub (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:55, 4:40, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:30. Black Adam (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:45, 4:50, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 4:50, 7:45. Prey for the Devil (R): Fri-Sun: 3:00, 5:30, 7:55. Mon-Thur: 5:30, 7:55. Smile (R): Fri-Sun: 2:30, 8:05. Mon-Thur: 8:05. Halloween Ends (R): Fri-Wed: 8:15. Lyle Lyle Crocodile (PG): Fri-Sun: 2:20, 5:00. Mon-Thur: 5:00. The Menu* (R): Thur: 5:20, 8:15.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

The Banshees of Inisherin (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45. Tar (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:15, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 1:10, 4:15, 7:20.

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Armageddon Time (R): Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:45, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:30. Tar (R): Fri-Sun: 1:50, 4:15, 7:45. Mon-Wed: 4:15, 7:45. Thur: 7:45. Aftersun (R): Fri-Sun: 1:40, 4:40, 7:20. Mon-Wed: 4:40. 7:20. Thur: 4:40. Ticket to Paradise (PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:05, 5:20, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 5:20, 8:00. She Said* (R): Thur: 5:00, 8:05.

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805 717-1678 Santa Barbara Permaculture Network Presents

Water Always Wins: Thriving in an Age of Drought & Deluge Talk & Booksigning WITH AUTHOR ERICA GIES AWARD WINNING JOURNALIST & NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC EXPLORER

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Chef Cameron Ingle Emphasizes Pico’s Farm-to-Table Format

I

f you choose the $75, eight-course tasting menu at

the Pico restaurant in the Los Alamos General Store, prepare to dine through experiential waves of flavor, a young chef ’s impeccable techniques, and, perhaps for some, a psychological reckoning. Each dish is intentionally simple, as Chef Cameron Ingle limits each offering to just four ingredients, all found within a 60-mile radius. Unless you actually grew up on a farm, you may leave Pico questioning everything you understood about the farm-to-table movement that’s been sweeping the world for years now.

Veteran of Top American Kitchens Brings Vision to Los Alamos General Store By now, most food-interested Americans think of ruby-red heirloom tomatoes, multi-hued hen eggs, and ranch-designated cuts of meat when the term “farm-totable” is uttered. But for Ingle, such expected items aren’t even the tip of the iceberg. Yes, we’re also talking about lettuce, as Ingle recently highlighted reine de glaces, the “queen of ice” crisphead lettuce from a French strain dating back to the 1800s. By diving deeper into such varieties of produce and proteins, Ingle hopes to fill in what’s missing from the common “farm-to-table” formula. While you’ll find traditional cuts of meat and veggies on Pico’s à la carte menu, the tasting experience aims to showcase bites that you’ve never before seen plated. A recent visit, for instance, featured cuts from a whole pig that Ingle acquired from Winfield Farms in Buellton and potatoes from Santa Maria’s LOV Farms, which uses seeds from Cornell University plant breeder Michael Mazourek’s company Row 7. Ingle gets particularly geeky about seeds. Many of them are crossings specifically bred for certain qualities, some were originally used by Indigenous peoples across North America, and most are aimed to give humans more effective vitamin absorption. One example is the bi-color purple sweet corn rather unaffectionately named “Seed 108” that Ingle worked into a vegan “creamed” corn. Those Row 7 potatoes, meanwhile — known as “NY-150” or, slightly more romantically, “Upstate Abundance” — were developed especially for their texture, and Ingle made the evening’s pancetta from Mangalitsa wooly pigs, Winfield’s specialty breed. Having worked at Thomas Keller’s Bouchon Bistro in Napa, and both Bavel and Bestia in Los Angeles, Ingle’s résumé reveals his methods and motivations. But his cooking style is most influenced by Dan Barber. The chef and author has already won most of the world’s culinary awards, largely for his work at Blue Hill at Stone Barns just north of New York City, where Ingle served as part of a resident chef program. Barber has written books about seed origins, warning against companies like

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NOVEMBER 10, 2022

FOOD & DRINK

by Vanessa Vin

Monsanto who threaten genetic diversity and overall nutrition of vegetables, and was heavily involved in President Barack Obama’s council on health and nutrition. Despite that top chef pedigree, Ingle’s start in the culinary world came from far more humble beginnings. In 2001, at just 12 years old, he was doing inventory for an Italian steakhouse in his hometown of Plymouth, Michigan, a town of about 10,000 people located between Detroit and Ann Arbor. “They put me in the basement, counting straws,” he recalled. “That’s how I started.” He was thrown on the salad station at 13, dicing up tomatoes for the New Year’s Eve menu. “It became my first night actually on the line cooking,” he said. “And looking back FARM FOCUS: Chef Cameron Ingle is elevating the concept of farm-to-table at Pico in Los on it, I’ve literally never had a job other Alamos, and one day hopes to buy his own property to raise chickens and grow veggies from heirloom seeds. than cooking since then.” Though he left his home state long ago, he’s still a fan, explaining, “I’m still in love with Michigan, and think I always will be.” New York was equally formative for Ingle, who was on the Blue Hill at Stone Barns staff in 2019 when the restaurant was awarded two Michelin stars. “Unless you have been at a restaurant that has received that, or gotten it yourself, you will never understand the feeling — it’s insane,” said a grinning Ingle, whose face lights up when remembering those days. “It’s the clearest validation of your skillset, of all your hard work, and what you have dedicated your time and energy to. It’s the greatest feeling ever.” He considers the Michelin Guide as the benchmark, and is very aware that Bell’s brought a Michelin star to Los Alamos, just down the block from Pico. But while the Guide now knows about this tiny town, its stars are not the be-all, endall for Ingle, who admits that it can also overall more important than chasing stars.” deter young chefs. He’s invested in building something long-term. “I want “Putting our feet to the fire is the reason why we got two stars at Blue Hill,” he said. “It became fun to push to invest in the community here, turn that land into a ourselves to the limit. Most people say they want to, but farm,” the 33-year-old said of that dream, before excitonce they start performing at the Michelin level, they edly describing how he’d do a quarter of the property realize, ‘Wow, this is terrible.’ It’s way too much pressure, in chickens, half in veggies, and then set aside space for it’s intense, it’s hot, and if you are working there just kids to come learn about farming, much like how the Los because you need a job, then you’re not going to last.” Alamos Library runs a day camp. “If I build it, they will come,” Ingle said confidently. There’s Michelin potential at Pico, but there’s a much more cohesive vision for Ingle, who is looking to buy “This area has so much opportunity. I can’t sit back and property nearby. “I’ll farm in the mornings and then order things from a produce company. This area was built come here and cook at night,” he said. “The team will on farming and ranching, and I am going to honor that. ” learn the land, and they’ll be happy, too. I want stability for them. My biggest thing is for the team to be happy. 458 Bell St., Los Alamos; (805) 344-1122; losalamosgeneralstore We’re making good food for the people. I think that is .com

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FOOD & DRINK

INGRID BOSTROM

@ Loquita

BACK TO ACME: Chef Sergei Simonov is back with Acme Hospitality, in charge of the kitchen at Loquita.

I

t’s only been about six months since

Sergei Simonov started leading the Loquita kitchen as executive chef, but it’s felt like 10 years already. “This summer, we’ve done the biggest business since the restaurant opened,” said Simonov, who tells us more about his circular culinary journey below. Simonov moved from the Bay Area to attend culinary school at Santa Barbara City College in 2011, then landed a sous chef job at The Lark under Chef Jason Paluska. “I still call him about things like how to cost out a dish,” said Simonov of his mentor. “He taught me A to Z, not just the flavor profile and palate.” He still borrows from Paluska’s plating style and love of pickled elements. Mentored by Jason Paluska:

Big City to Small Screen: A decade at The Lark made Simonov eager for new challenges, so he headed to San Diego to work as executive sous chef at Herb & Wood, the flagship of Brian Malarkey’s 15 restaurants. As a finalist on Top Chef All Stars, Malarkey awakened the showman in Simonov, who got to the dessert round on Chopped Next Gen. He can only talk vaguely about an in-the-can cooking competition show he’s in that should air later this year. “The shows emulate the fast pace that the kitchen already is and teach you creativity really quickly,” said Simonov, who wants to do more TV. “Top Chef would be a dream.”

Keeping Local: His San Diego sojourn

taught him the importance of staying local, particularly in seafood. “We want to offer a unique California product that still has the Spanish influences,” he said of the Loquita formula, pointing out the great flavors imparted by the restaurant’s red-oak grill. He’s particularly proud of a current menu star, a crudo featuring yellowtail from the Channel Islands. Young for Exec Chef: Simonov is Loquita’s

fourth chef in six years, and he plan to stick around. “I want to make this a shining star in Santa Barbara more than it already is,” said Simonov, who admits that the transition to being the boss can be challenging. “Cooking’s easy,” he said. “It’s all the management and the dealing with people and numbers that I’m learning.” Elevating Everywhere: Simonov hopes to do it all, from brunch to off-site events to Dining at Sea, and sees a lot of opportunity in the two sides of Spanish cuisine: the Michelin-starred palaces of gastronomy and the modest home food starting with pan con tomate. “The future of Spanish cuisine is to elevate these humble ingredients and dishes into something greater,” he said. “That’s what we do well at Loquita.” —George Yatchisin

202 State St., 805-880-3380, loquitasb.com


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Best Coast’s Fizzy Fun

Leading Global Risk Expert

Ian Bremmer How Three Threats – and Our Response – Will Change the World

KELLE RAMSEY PHOTOS

Thu, Nov 10 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

BUBBLING UP: Caroline Juen’s entrepreneurial enthusiasm is being canned into fizzy wines under the Best Coast label, with winemaking help from Sonja Magdevski.

L.A. Blogger Caroline Juen Now Making Canned Wines by Shannon Brooks “Sonja is truly one of the best winemakers I know,” said Juen. “The level of respect I have for [her] and the joy she and her wines bring to people, who wouldn’t want that kind of energy on their side?” Magdevski was among the many female winemakers from Santa Barbara County who inspired Juen to pour her entrepreneurial energy into the wine world. After countless visits to this region over the years, the current Angeleno and Bay Area native considers the Central Coast her “home” wine region. “Even though I have family in Napa, living in L.A. and being so close to Santa Barbara wine country, [this] has always felt more my speed,” Juen said. “My place. My people. My wine.” Helping clients bring their custom wine projects to fruition is a rewarding endeavor for Magdevski, who also makes her own Casa Dumetz, Clementine Carter, and Feminist Party labels. “Caroline has been extremely focused on what

she wants to achieve, and our combined goal was to make the most delicious wine that happens to be in a can,” Magdevski explained. That they did. I’ve had the pleasure of sampling more than a few cans of the Fizzy White (albariño) and Fizzy Red (50-50 blend of grenache-mourvèdre), which not only go down very easily but the good-looking, slender silver cans are almost too cute to recycle. “Delicious, unexpected, and defiant” is how Magdevski summed up the tasting notes. Next year’s releases — a grenache rosé and skin-contact viognier — are currently fermenting in Magdevksi’s Lompoc production space, and every year will bring new flavors. “Exploring different wines from different grapes is the name of the game,” Magdevski enthused. The wines reflect Juen’s colorful personal style and effervescent energy, from the sunny California branding to the accessible yet refined bubbles. Juen is firmly committed to the sparkling niche. “Cracking open a can of anything flat is a bit anticlimactic to me,” Juen explained. “When you crack open a can of something chilled, you’re expecting those gentle bubbles to tingle your nose and mouth and satisfy a quench, so a fizz was mandatory.” For her, bubbles signify celebration. “I want every can of Best Coast that people enjoy to be a party,” she said. “I want it to add to every single happy moment you’re having. Whether that’s at a concert, on the beach, by a pool, at a social gathering, doing a face mask on the couch — whatever it is, it’s a moment worth celebrating. See bestcoastbeverages.com.

FOOD & DRINK

A

new canned sparkling wine project, Best Coast Beverages, recently debuted at Babi’s Beer Emporium in Los Alamos. The brainchild of Caroline Juen, creator of the popular Love & Loathing L.A. blog, Best Coast’s first Fizzy White and Fizzy Red 2021 vintages were crafted by winemaker Sonja Magdevski using grapes sourced from the Santa Ynez Valley’s Mora and Kaerskov vineyards.

“Bremmer illuminates the possible paths forward on public health, politics, climate, and technology.” - Adam Grant

Lead Sponsors: Jillian & Pete Muller

Culinary Powerhouse and Global Food Icon

Nigella Lawson in Conversation with KCRW’s Evan Kleiman Sat, Nov 12 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

A beloved TV personality and author of 12 bestselling books, Nigella Lawson recounts her life trajectory by way of the people, food and recipes that have shaped her. Special Thanks

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org INDEPENDENT.COM

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ach November my inbox is swamped

with the same question: Which restaurants serve a traditional turkey dinner on Thanksgiving Day? For the 16th year in a row, I made a hundred phone calls to find the answers, which I serve below. Make your reservations early because many places will sell out; some are booked out three months in advance. · Ca’ Dario, Goleta: 3-9 p.m.; (805)

884-9419

· Ca’ Dario, Montecito: 3-9 p.m.; (805)

884-9419

· Ca’ Dario, Santa Barbara: 3-9 p.m.;

(805) 884-9419

· Ballard Inn Restaurant: sold out; reser-

· Convivo Restaurant, Santa Barbara Inn: $100 three-course, $125 four-

course adults, $30 ages 12 and below; noon-9 p.m.; (805) 845-6789 · Costa Kitchen & Bar, Mar Monte Hotel: $89 adults, $39 ages 12 and below; 1-7 p.m.; (805) 882-1234 · Crocodile Restaurant & Bar, Lemon Tree Inn: $34; noon-8:30 p.m.; (805)

687-6444

· Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant: $32.95;

11:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; (805) 568-0702

· Finch & Fork, Kimpton Canary Hotel:

$110 adults (wine pairing add $55), $45 ages 3-10; 3-8 p.m.; (805) 884-0300 · First & Oak, Mirabelle Inn, Solvang: sold out; reservations start in early October; (805) 688-1703 · Harbor Restaurant: $34.99; noon-9 p.m.; (805) 963-3311 · Harry’s Plaza Café: $28.95; 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; (805) 687-2800 · Helena Avenue Bakery: everything but turkey; takeout with at least four days’ notice; priced à la carte; (805) 880-3383 · Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort: Reagan Room buffet; $115

adults, $50 ages 4-12; noon-7 p.m.; (805) 884-8535

· Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront

p.m.; (805) 884-8535

· Holdren’s Steaks & Seafood: $39 turkey,

$49 prime rib; noon-9:30 p.m.; (805) 965-3363 · Jack’s Bistro & Famous Bagels: takeout only, at least six days’ notice; $265 feeds 10 people, $22 by the plate; (805) 319-0155 · Joe’s Café: $32.95 ham, $34.95 turkey, $39.95 prime rib, $19.95 turkey or ham for ages 12 and below; noon-9 p.m.; (805) 966-4638 · Little Dom’s Seafood: takeout only, deep fried turkey $100, sides/desserts extra; (805) 749-7400 · Louie’s California Bistro, The Upham: $75; 12:30-7 p.m.; (805) 963-7003

· Rosewood Miramar Beach: Chandelier Ballroom: brunch buffet; $165 adults,

$65 ages 4-12; noon-7 p.m.; (805) 303-6169

· Rosewood Miramar Beach: Revere Room: Brunch: priced à la carte; 7

a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Dinner: $125 adults, $55 ages 4-12, free ages 3 and below; 5-9 p.m.; (805) 303-6169 · Roy: turkey, prime rib, or salmon stuffed with crab and lobster; $75; 3-9 p.m.; (805) 966-5636 · Santa Barbara Sunshine Café: $24.95; 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; (805) 898-9121 · San Ysidro Ranch: Plow & Angel: sold out; reservations start in early October; (805) 565-1720 · San Ysidro Ranch: Stonehouse: sold out; reservations start in early October; (805) 565-1720 · Shoals Restaurant, Cliff House Inn: $75-$90 adults, discount ages 11 and below; 1:30-6:15 p.m.; (805) 652-1381 · Stella Mare’s: $69 adults, $29 ages 12 and below; noon-6 p.m.; (805) 969-6705

Fil

Fo

10am - 2pm- 2pm Saturday, November 19, 10am

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need!

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need! Foodbank Sharehouse

Saturday, No 10am - 2pm

Foodbank Sharehouse 80 Coromar Drive, Goleta 80 Coromar Drive, Goleta Most needed items: Most needed items: • Nut butters Nut butters • Canned protein (tuna,Canned chicken, etc.) protein (tuna, • Whole grain cereal chicken, etc.) • Dried or canned beansWhole grain cereal Dried or canned beans • Frozen turkeys/chickens

Donate healthy fo

TURKEY DRIVE 2021

Frozen turkeys/chickens Foodbank Sha Everyone deserves a healthy holiday meal! 80 Coromar Dr

TURKEY DRIVE 2021

For more info, contact PAguirre@FoodbankSBC.org or visit www.FoodbankSBC.org Turkey Drive Oct 24 - Nov 23 Drop off 4554 Hollister Ave 7am-3pm

Everyone deserves a TURKEYS/CHICKENS! healthy holiday meal! Everyone deserves DROP OFF

Most needed items

a healthy holiday meal! Mon-Fri • 7am-3pm

DROP OFF

· Mulligan’s Café & Bar, Santa Barbara Golf Club: sold out; reservations start

in early November; (805) 682-3228 · Pea Soup Andersen’s, Buellton: $39 turkey, $39 ham, $22 ages 4-10; 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; (805) 688-5581 · Poe & Coe: Thanksgiving to-go with at least five days’ notice; priced à la carte; (805) 669-7187 · Ritz-Carlton Bacara: Angel Oak: priced à la carte; 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; (805) 571-4220 · Ritz-Carlton Bacara: The Bistro: $95; 11:30 a.m.-9pm; (805) 571-4220 · Rosewood Miramar Beach: Caruso’s: sold out; reservations start in early October; (805) 303-6169

Join

Fill the Foodbank!

Fill the Foodbank! Food Drive Food DriveSaturday, November 19

Nut butters Canned protein chicken, etc.) Whole grain cer Dried or canned Frozen turkeys/

thru Nov 24 for Thanksgiving delivery

DROP OFF TURKEYS/CHICKENS! TURKEYS/CHICKENS Foodbank Warehouse 4554 Hollister Ave

(Next to Page Youth Center)

Oct 24 -DRIVE Nov 23 2021 TURKEY

Sun, Nov 21 • 8am-1pm Mon-Fri • 7am-3pm thru Nov 24 for Thanksgiving delivery

All Saints-by-the-Sea

Everyone deserves 4554 Hollister83Ave Eucalyptus Ln 4554 Hollister Ave a healthy holiday meal! Our Lady of Mt. Carmel 7am-3pm Episcopal Church Foodbank Warehouse (Next to Page Youth Center)

FOOD & DRINK

vations start in late September; (800) 638-2466 · Belmond El Encanto: sold out; reservations start in late September; (805) 845-5800 · bouchon: sold out; reservations start in late September; (805) 730-1160 · The Caya, The Leta Hotel: $90 adults, $30 ages 10 and below; 3-7:30 p.m.; (805) 964-1288 · Coast & Olive: sold out; reservations start in late September; (805) 690-3920 · Cold Spring Tavern: $85 adults, $35 ages 10 and below; noon-7 p.m.; (805) 967-0066

Resort: The Set: priced à la carte; 3-10

JOHN DICKSON PHOTOS

Who’s Serving Thanksgiving in 2022? E

Join us for

Join us for

Catholic Church 1300 E Valley Rd

Sun, Nov 21 • 8am-1pm

DROP OFF TURKEYS/CHICKENS!

Learn more/Donate: All Saints-by-the-Sea Mon-Fri • 7am-3pm Episcopal Church FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime

For more inf or Turkey Drive Oct 24

83 Eucalyptus Ln

thru Nov 24 for Thanksgiving delivery

Foodbank Warehouse Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Register at 4554 Hollister Ave Catholic Church sbhra.org under (Next to Page Youth Center)

Events!1300 E Valley Rd

Fa-la-la-la-la, la-la-la-la! Learn more/Donate:

Sun, Nov 21 • 8am-1pm

All Saints-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime 83 Eucalyptus Ln

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church

SAVE THE DATE!! Gnome for the Holidays!

Join us on Wednesday, December 7 at 11:30AM-1:30PM

1300 E Valley Rd

Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort (formerly Fess Parker Hotel)!!

Learn more/Donate: FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime EARLY BIRD ONLINE (ends November 15)

Bonus! Includes complimentary two raffle tickets Say What? SBHRA Gnome, I'm not kidding! $40 Member $55 Nonmember AFTER EARLY BIRD (registration closes December 3) $50 Member $65 Nonmember WALK-IN $60 Member $75 Nonmember

· Chumash Casino Resort: Grains & Grounds: $175 takeout, feeds 4-6; $20

pies; (805) 686-0855

· Chumash Casino Resort: Willows: $60;

3-9 p.m.; (805) 686-0855

SPONSORS BELOW

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 10, 2022

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51


LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 NOV 15

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LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

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La Scala di Seta (The Ladder Made of Silk)

NOV 13

JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION

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An Evening Honoring Spencer Barnitz, featuring “Spencer the Gardener” and Special Guests

NOV 18


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

CENTURY-OLD PHOTOGRAPHS DOCUMENT INDIGENOUS CULTURE AT THE SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

L I F E PAGE 53

ROSSINI COMIC OPERA GOES LOBERO COURTESY

CURTIS PLATE PHOTOS

EXHIBIT FOCUSED ON PHOTOGRAPHY COLLECTION BY EDWARD S. CURTIS

Jana McIntyre stars in Opera Santa Barbara’s La Scala di Seta.

“Plate 482: A Pomo Girl” (left) and “Plate 427: East Mesa Girls” are two of the Edward S. Curtis photographs on view at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.

awareness regarding the consequences that American colonialism and the U.S. government’s land-grabbing policies would have for the culture and lives of Indigenous people. Yet, amid the patriarchal backdrop and the way in which he staged his photos, Curtis’s photography unwittingly helped progress “Indian” stereotypes that are still being surmounted by Indigenous communities today. Within the exhibit, the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History aims to display photographs that may not have been seen before, in what Museum Librarian Terri Sheridan says is “a broader exhibit

for people, in terms of what’s on the walls as well as what their takeaways might be.” Visitors can expect photographs that highlight the previously unseen women in these Indigenous communities, as well as a repositioning of how Curtis’s work has been perceived in the past. The exhibit is included in the cost of admission and is sure to bring a new perspective to profound historical images, as well as evoke a sense of honor and celebration of the unique culture of the photographed communities. For more information, visit sbnature.org. —Lola Watts

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST

BEN CROP

I

n an attempt to reposition the lens through which his works were originally perceived in the late 19th and early 20th century, the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History is hosting an exhibit of photographs by the influential American photographer Edward S. Curtis. Running from November 11 through April 30 of next year, Storytelling: Native People through the Lens of Edward S. Curtis depicts century-old images of Indigenous people living across the United States, from Alaska to the Mexican border. Curtis’s original intent in publishing his collection of photographs was to invite

CLEVER WRITING AND PLOT TWISTS MAKE CLASSIC PLAY TIMELY Director Katie Laris was inspired to revisit the works of Oscar Wilde after reading a New York Timesarticle about the seeming sexual fluidity of Harry Styles wearing large flower corsages on his lapels in homage to the 19th-century writer. This rediscovery of Wilde’s work led Laris to direct The Importance of Being Earnest for the SBCC Theatre Arts Department’s student showcase, running in the Jurkowitz Theatre November 9–19. This classic comedy (set, in this version, in the swinging‘60s) is about deception, mistaken identity, and the benefits and pains of living a double life. Jack Worthing (played by Ben Watkins) lives in the country with his young ward, Cecily (played by Grace Wilson). He periodically visits his brother, Ernest, in the city — only, Ernest doesn’t really exist. He is, in fact, an invented persona Jack uses as an excuse to live the wild life in London. When Jack’s two lives intersect, shenanigans abound. “The biggest challenge of this role,” says Watkins, “is really trying to take into account Oscar Wilde’s personal life and how that influences the text. … In the

play, Ernest has two names and a double life, and I think that’s very parallel to Oscar Wilde’s life trying to hide his sexuality.” Though this play was Ben Watkins and Augustus Muller in SBCC written in the late 1800s, Laris Theatre Arts Department’s production of The Importance of Being Earnest calls The Importance of Being Earnest “cutting edge,”with verbal twists and turns that exemplify the clever writing the play is known for. Laris’s goal in bringing this timeless text to SBCC’s dramatic arts students was to make the process “fun and energetic and playful, and to have a robust imagination about every bit of innuendo and subtext.” Wilson calls SBCC’s production playful, charismatic, and colorful: “It has a very special kind of witty, somewhat satirical humor that is a unique kind of comedy.” —Maggie Yates

As Opera Santa Barbara (OSB) turns, the tragic gravitas of Tosca, the resourcefully inventive production of which opened its 2022-23 season at the grand Granada Theatre gives way to tuneful and glorious silly piffle on Sunday, November 13, at the Lobero Theatre. Welcome to the comic opera world of Gioachino Rossini’s La Scala di Seta (translating to The Silk Ladder), the one-act, 1812-vintage example of operatic farsa comica popular in Venice circa the early 19th century. Comic or not, the compact operatic enterprise is rife with Rossini’s elegant melodic bel canto inventiveness and character playfulness, as laid out in librettist Giuseppe Maria Foppa’s dizzy tale of romantic convolutions. One of many reasons to catch the next installment of Opera Santa Barbara’s rich and varied season is its locally grown heroine, soprano Jana McIntyre, in the role of Giulia, the epicenter of a comic tangle of love interests. McIntyre is no stranger to OSB, having a memorable turn in Handel’s Semele last season, and, during the COVID lockdown, in the company’s venturesome “drive-in” production of Don Pasquale in April 2021. Other key figures in La Scala di Seta, with the company’s stalwart leader Kostis Protopapas in the lead, are tenor Christian Sanders and baritone Efraín Solis. In the director’s chair is Josh Shaw, who was behind OSB productions of Don Pasquale and The Barber of Seville in recent years, and the orchestra will be conducted by Alexandra Enyart, heard in the Lobero last season in charge of the innovative, transgenderthemed contemporary opera As One. From contemporary work to obscurities from the early 19th century, from staple repertoire to surprise elements, OSB continues to raise the bar on what an opera company can and should be, even in Santa Barbara. —Josef Woodard

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

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Tickets starting

DECEMBER 1-18

@ $40!

“A whole new take on a well-known tale.” –DC THEATER ARTS

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33 West Victoria Street | Santa Barbara etcsb.org | 805.965.5400 SANTA BARBARA’S PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANY

THE UCSB EARLY CHILDHOOD CARE & EDUCATION SERVICES AND MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENT

Career Opportunity Awaits Director of Life Enrichment

We are looking for a dynamic and creative individual to join our Leadership Team. Our Director of Life Enrichment creates meaningful Resident programming for Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care and Skilled Nursing. The individual is responsible for the planning of on and off campus activities based on the Seven Dimensions of Wellness as well as oversee Resident transportation. A minimum of an Associate’s Degree and at least 2 years’ experience with aging services is required.

$1,000 Signing Bonus & Outstanding Benefits Package! Located on 48 acres in the heart of Montecito, Casa Dorinda is considered California’s Premier Retirement Community due to its historic beauty and its exceptional team of professionals providing the highest level of care and service to its residents.

For further information and to apply please visit www.casadorinda.org/careers or drop by to visit us. Or call Nikki at 805.969.8026

300 Hot Springs Rd. | Montecito, CA | 805.969.8625 Casa Dorinda is a private LifeCare community, type A CCRC, owned and operated by the Montecito Retirement Association, a nonsectarian, nonprofit, tax-exempt organization. State of California Licenses RCFE #421700160, SNF #050000112, CCRC Certificate of Authority #126.

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Sunday, Nov. 20 12-2 PM

Orfalea Family Children’s Center Please join the UC Santa Barbara’s Early Childhood Care and Education Services and the MultiCultural Center in welcoming the Monarchs back to their overwintering habitat. A family-oriented day of fun and learning is planned with hands-on activities, games, presentations, and performances, all connected to the fascinating and inspiring world of the monarch butterfly! IMPORTANT NOTES FOR VISITORS: • Those who do not feel well, or have tested positive for COVID RSVP within the week prior to the event, are asked to stay home. AT UCSB • Kids (and adults) who wish to wear butterfly wings/ SHORELINE costumes are encouraged to do so! FR EE AN D OP EN • Parking is limited: car-pooling is encouraged. TO TH E • NO pets, please! PU BL IC For more information or assistance in accommodating people of varying abilities contact the MultiCultural Center at 805.893.8411

FOR THE FULL 2022 EVENT CALENDAR: WWW.MCC.SA.UCSB.EDU


ARTS LIFE

S

anta Barbara’s beloved troubadour Spencer Barnitz can always be counted on to get the party started, and he’ll be doing just that at the Lobero on Friday, November 18. But this won’t be any regular old Spencer the Gardener show (as if there really is such a thing). The festivities are the culmination of more than a year’s worth of work on a documentary film celebrating Barnitz’s journey from surf-fueled lead singer of the ’80s band The Tan to riding the waves of the music industry for the past 40 years. In the documentary Hello Santa Barbara!, “we tried to not only tell the story of his life but also show what perseverance is and what keeps him going, and also show the power and beauty of music,” says Executive Producer Emile Millar, who is producing an album in conjunction with the film. The documentary addresses the ups and downs of Barnitz’s life — entertaining untold numbers of fans, but also surviving a major car accident, open heart surgery, and kidney failure. Millar says that while working on the film, “I feel a little bit closer to not only Spencer, but also to myself. I feel like we need to see people who’ve had struggles. … It’s a story of how dedication to a craft and love of music and community can keep your heart beating — no matter how many times it tries to stop.” The Lobero show is a thank-you to supporters who have funded a Kickstarter campaign but also will be filmed to become part of the documentary itself. “One of the things Spencer does is he involves the audience as a big participant in his shows,” says Production Manager Terri Wright. “It’s not just time spent up there performing; it’s denser; he’s engaging the community. … So, it’s perfect for celebrating locals because everybody’s

Spencer Barnitz performs a special show in support of the documentary about his life and a new album at the Lobero on Friday, November 18.

celebrated with him for all these years.” The production team, which also includes Director Robert Redfield, has big visions for future projects under their Hello Santa Barbara! label. “What really makes the community here is all of the creative talent and the hidden talents that have really created the whole lifestyle here. We want to celebrate that,” says Wright. As for Barnitz himself, he admits his first reaction was, “Why would I want to do that?” But making the documentary has been a time of reflection for the singer-songwriter. Asked what it will be like to see his life up on the big screen (premiering at Santa Barbara International Film Festival, if the producers have their way), Barnitz says, “The beauty of age — and I know you know this too — is I actually don’t care that much. I just hope that people like it. And I hope that I like it. … I’m stoked for these guys. Because there’s no doubt that I am the guinea pig.” He continues, “I truly believe this; I think everybody could have a movie about them. … All of us have strange things happen. Bad things. And if you’re looking at the human condition, you know, look no further —Leslie Dinaberg than your own hand.”

Glen Phillips Sings About Life With a Post-Pandemic Palette

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hen Glen Phillips brings his clean-toned acoustic guitar, versatile voice, friendly stageside manner, and wide-ranging songbook to SOhO, it seems like old home week. This room is a long-favored hometown haunt for the singer-songwriter/Toad the Wet Sprocket front man, and a venue where Phillips has honed his impressive craft as a warm and inviting solo artist. Last week, as Phillips hit the SOhO stage — with its upgraded sound system and fancier stage digs — he had bonus points of appeal going for him. He is still riding high in the live music afterglow after the pandemic lockdown/shutdown, when he was forced to go the streaming route. More importantly, he was on the literal brink of releasing a luminous new solo album, There Is So Much Here — his first solo release since the 2016 “breakup” album Swallowed by the New. His new collection, duly sampled at SOhO, is a multi-directional wonder, with Toad-esque tunes like “Big Changes” (with a delicious change-up in the bridge) and “Center of the Circle,” but also navigates some elegant pop maneuvers — with echoes of Paul Simon, Rufus Wainwright, and Randy Newman — on a should-be-classic song like “Call the Moondust.” The album’s title, There Is So Much Here, is lifted out of the moving “Sound of Drinking,” an appreciation of life in the face of COVID-ian catastrophe, which is one of the most profound post-pandemic songs I’ve yet heard. It resonated with a particular boldness and grace in the presence of a live audience at SOhO. Also in the evening’s song mix were a few morsels from the expanding Toad the Wet Sprocket catalog, INDEPENDENT.COM

COURTESY

JOSEF WOODARD

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hile Santa Barbara’s autumn concert calendar has been unusually and thankfully dense in the classical and pop realms, jazz has been late to the party. Next week, however, jazz fans finally have reason to get out of the house — two reasons, in fact, with the arrival of the ever-popular Django Festival Allstars at the Lobero Theatre on Tuesday, November 15, and crowd-pleasing young keyboardist Matthew Whitaker, playing Campbell Hall on Thursday, November 17. Both shows, though radically different in focus, fall under the category of populist jazz, appreciable by die-hard fans and occasional jazz dabblers alike. Local jazz fans can also take heart in the fact that these shows are tantamount to a kinder, gentler on-ramp to fuller jazz concert seasons coming next year to both the Lobero and, via UCSB Arts & Lectures, Campbell Hall. Django Reinhardt, the wild and sweet-spirited virtuoso who lorded over the so-called (and now politically incorrect) label of “gypsy jazz,” lived from 1910 to 1953 and recorded a treasure trove of sides with the Hot Club of France and beyond. After his death, Reinhardt’s mystique and mythology seeded a virtual and cult-like subculture of guitarists playing in his style and aspiring to his elevated musicality on his instrument. That subculture has carried on and thrived on its own self-generating fuel of inspiration, mostly beneath the surface of the mainstream jazz scene. Occasionally, a guitarist such as Biréli Lagrene has risen into a more general view. To savor the cream of the crop in that world, one can’t go wrong with the Django Festival Allstars, which has wowed and filled the Lobero a few times in the past. The current line-up features Samson Schmitt — son of acclaimed Django-phile guitarist Dorado Schmitt — along with violinist Pierre Blanchard, accordionist Ludovic Beier, rhythm guitarist Doudou Cuillerier, and bassist Antonio Licusati. At the Monterey Jazz Festival in late September, I happily caught the young, gifted, and charismatic dynamo Matthew Whitaker (who happens to be blind but doesn’t let that condition hinder his high-stepping energy resources). Moving easily from piano to B3 Organ and other keyboards in between, Whitaker deftly led his band through infectiously soulful material and some tricky arrangements, swaying all the way. Jazz is the umbrella term suitable for the world of Whitaker, who specializes, among other areas, in the sprightly angularity of Thelonious Monk music (check out his duet with Jon Batiste on “Bye-Ya,” from his 2021 album Connections). But R&B, soul, and gospel are never far behind. His set in Monterey included originals, and original takes on such old favorites as Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On” and a climactic blast of Earth, Wind & Fire’s “September.” No doubt, he’ll have a gripping, party-timing effect on the Campbell Hall crowd. Jazz to come in 2023: at the Lobero, Arturo Sandoval (February 10), Preservation Hall Jazz Band (March 3), Charles Lloyd’s 85th Birthday (March 10), The Derek Douget Band (April 8), Tierney Sutton Band (May 12); at Campbell Hall, Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour (January 29), and ARTEMIS (April 23); and at the Granada, Wynton Marsalis Quintet (April 4). —Josef Woodard

COURTESY

Hello Santa Barbara! Spencer Doc and Concert

FALLING INTO JAZZ, AT LAST

Matthew Whitaker at Monterey Jazz Festival

CONT’D

Glen Phillips has a new album and an upcoming benefit show with Toad the Wet Sprocket.

including the “greatest hits” “All I Want,” “Windmills” and “Crazy Life.” (Heads-up: Toad will make a rare hometown appearance at the Marjorie Luke Theatre on December 8 in a benefit for the nonprofit Doctors Without Walls). At SOhO, Phillips also reached out to a local friend and comrade in musical crime, Jesse Rhodes — a wonderful singer-songwriter-producer and former leader of Stegosaurus, who really should get out to play more often. Rhodes half-reluctantly came up to play his strikingly fine song “Trees,” by direct request of the star of the show. Philips has always had a slightly melancholic romantic and peacenik streak, demonstrated on this night by his opening and closing bookend songs. His beauteous anti-materialist ode “Don’t Need Anything” guided us gently into the show, and his crepuscular balladeer version of Elvis Costello’s “(What’s so Funny ’Bout) Peace, Love, and Understanding” eased us out —JW of the show, and out into the good night.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF NOVEMBER 10

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): When you Aries people are at your best, you are driven by impeccable integrity as you translate high ideals into practical action. You push on with tireless force to get what you want, and what you want is often good for others, too. You have a strong sense of what it means to be vividly alive, and you stimulate a similar awareness in the people whose lives you touch. Are you always at your best? Of course not. No one is. But according to my analysis of upcoming astrological omens, you now have extra potential to live up to the elevated standards I described. I hope you will take full advantage.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): In my experience, you Tauruses often have more help available than you realize. You underestimate your power to call on support, and as a result, you don’t call on it enough. It may even be the case that the possible help gets weary of waiting for you to summon it, and basically goes into hiding or fades away. But let’s say that you, the lucky person reading this horoscope, get inspired by my words. Maybe you will respond by becoming more forceful about recognizing and claiming your potential blessings. I hope so! In my astrological opinion, now is a favorable time for you to go in quest of all the help you could possibly want. (P.S.: Where might the help come from? Sources you don’t expect, perhaps, but also familiar influences that expand beyond their previous dispensations.)

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Sometimes, life compels us to change. It brings us some shock that forces us to adjust. On other occasions, life doesn’t pressure us to make any shifts, but we nevertheless feel drawn to initiating a change. My guess is that you are now experiencing the latter. There’s no acute discomfort pushing you to revise your rhythm. You could probably continue with the status quo for a while. And yet, you may sense a growing curiosity about how your life could be different. The possibility of instigating a transformation intrigues you. I suggest you trust this intuition. If you do, the coming weeks will bring you greater clarity about how to proceed.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): “We suffer more often in imagination than in reality,” wrote ancient Roman philosopher Seneca. That’s certainly true about me. If all the terrible things I have worried about had actually come to pass, I would be unable to function. Luckily, most of my fears have remained mere fantasies. What about you, fellow Cancerian? The good news is that in the coming months, we Crabs will have unprecedented power to tamp down and dissipate the phantasms that rouse anxiety and alarm. I predict that as a result, we will suffer less from imaginary problems than we ever have before. How’s that for a spectacular prophecy?

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Poet Matt Michael writes, “Sure, the way trees talk is poetry. The shape of the moon is poetry. But a hot dog is also poetry. LeBron James’ tomahawk dunk over Kevin Garnett in the 2008 NBA Playoffs is poetry. That pothole I always fail to miss on Parkman Road is poetry, too.” In accordance with current astrological omens, Leo, I’d love for you to adopt Michael’s approach. The coming days will be a favorable time to expand your ideas about what’s lyrical, beautiful, holy, and meaningful. Be alert for a stream of omens that will offer you help and inspiration. The world has subtle miracles to show you.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo author Michael Ondaatje was born in Sri Lanka but as a child moved to England and later to Canada. His novel Running in the Family describes his experiences upon returning to his native Sri Lanka as an adult. Among the most delightful: the deluge of novel sensory sensations. On some days, he would spend hours simply smelling things. In accordance with current astrological omens, I recommend you treat yourself to comparable experiences, Virgo. Maybe you could devote an hour today to mindfully inhaling various aromas. Tomorrow, meditate on the touch of lush textures. On the next day,

bathe yourself in sounds that fill you with rich and interesting feelings. By feeding your senses like this, you will give yourself an extra-deep blessing that will literally boost your intelligence.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You evolved Libras understand what’s fair and just. That’s one of your potencies, and it provides a fine service for you and your allies. You use it to glean objective truths that are often more valuable than everyone’s subjective opinions. You can be a stirring mediator as you deploy your knack for impartiality and evenhandedness. I hope these talents of yours will be in vivid action during the coming weeks. We non-Libras need extra-strong doses of this stuff.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Here are tips on how to get the most out of the next three weeks: (1) Be a master of simmering, ruminating, marinating, steeping, fermenting, and effervescing. (2) Summon intense streams of self-forgiveness for any past event that still haunts you. (3) Tap into your forbidden thoughts so they might heal you. Discover what you’re hiding from yourself so it can guide you. Ask yourself prying questions. (4) Make sure your zeal always synergizes your allies’ energy and never steals it. (5) Regularly empty your metaphorical trash so you always have enough room inside you to gleefully breathe the sweet air and exult in the earth’s beauty.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I straddle reality and the imagination,” says Sagittarian singer-songwriter Tom Waits. “My reality needs imagination like a bulb needs a socket. My imagination needs reality like a blind man needs a cane.” I think that’s great counsel for you to emphasize in the coming weeks. Your reality needs a big influx of energy from your imagination, and your imagination needs to be extra wellgrounded in reality. Call on both influences with maximum intensity.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Sometimes, Capricorn, you appear to be so calm, secure, and capable that people get a bit awed, even worshipful. They may even get caught up in trying to please you. Is that a bad thing? Not necessarily — as long as you don’t exploit and manipulate those people. It might even be a good thing in the coming weeks, since you and your gang have a chance to accomplish big improvements in your shared resources and environment. It would take an extra push from everyone, though. I suspect you’re the leader who’s best able to incite and orchestrate the extra effort. .AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you have been posing as a normal person for too long, I hope you will create fresh outlets for your true weird self in the weeks ahead. What might that entail? I’ll throw out a couple of ideas. You could welcome back your imaginary friends and give them new names like Raw Goodness and Spiral Trickster. You might wear fake vampire teeth during a committee meeting or pray to the Flying Spaghetti Monster to send you paranormal adventures. What other ideas can you imagine about how to have way too much fun as you draw more intensely on your core eccentricities?

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): I suspect you will have metaphorical resemblances to a duck in the coming weeks: an amazingly adaptable creature equally at home on land, in the water, and in the air. You will feel comfortable anywhere you choose to wander. And I’m guessing you will want to wander farther and wider than you usually do. Here’s another quality that you and ducks will share: You’ll feel perfectly yourself, relaxed and confident, no matter what the weather is. Whether it’s cloudy or shiny, rainy or misty, mild or frigid, you will not only be unflappable — you will thrive on the variety. Like a duck, Pisces, you may not attract a lot of attention. But I bet you will enjoy the hell out of your life exactly as it is.

This Giving Tuesday, the Santa Barbara Independent will encourage our readers to participate in Giving Tuesday by highlighting area nonprofits and their great work in our newsletter, in print, and online. Deadline to participate: Thursday, November 17 Visit independent.com/ givingtuesdaylisting for more details

Homework: What’s the unfinished thing you most need to finish? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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contributes to a positive and efficient work environment on behalf of colleagues, students, families, and our Goleta Union School District community. General Description: Goleta Union School District is seeking an experienced Paraeducator Special Education‑ Level I to work under the direction of their assigned administrator and certificated staff, by assisting in providing instruction and supervision to individual students or small groups of students; observes, monitors and reports student progress regarding academics, social skills, and behavior; performs related duties as assigned. Requirements: • High School Diploma/GED and one of the following (per ESEA): ‑ Two years of college (48 units) ‑ A.A. degree or higher ‑ Passing Status of the GUSD Basic Competency Exam or the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) • First Aid Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • CPR Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • Behavior Management Certification (e.g., CPI) Apply Online at: www.gusd.us We look forward to having you as part of our Goleta Union School District team!

PARAEDUCATOR SPECIAL Education – Level 2 (PSE‑2) Our Ideal Candidate: A committed professional with a nurturing and patient demeanor who enjoys working with elementary aged children in need of specialized assistance. A team player who contributes to a positive and efficient work environment on behalf of colleagues, students, families, and our Goleta Union School District community. General Description: Goleta Union School District is seeking an experienced Paraeducator Special Education‑ Level I to work under the direction of their assigned administrator and certificated staff, by assisting in providing instruction and supervision to individual students or small groups of students; observes, monitors and reports student progress regarding academics, social skills, and behavior; performs related duties as assigned; assist students in developing various self‑ help, social and community skills; assist students with essential life functions. Requirements: • High School Diploma/GED and one of the following (per ESEA): ‑ Two years of college (48 units) ‑ A.A. degree or higher ‑ Passing Status of the GUSD Basic Competency Exam or the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) • First Aid Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • CPR Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • Behavior Management Certification (e.g., CPI) Apply Online at: www.gusd.us We look forward to having you as part of our Goleta Union School District team!

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ACADEMIC PERSONNEL Provides direct analytical and organizational support while maintaining a high level of confidentiality and accuracy. Interacts with over 80 campus academic departments, other UC AP offices, and the Office of the President. Initial campus contact on general issues related to academic personnel. Uses strong analytic and organizational skills in working on multiple projects with frequent interruptions. Maintaining confidentiality in the course of all duties is critical for this position. Part‑time ‑ 20 hours per week, hybrid schedule. Reqs:Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience. 1‑3 years administrative work experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $27.68‑$32.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran

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CAMPUS DINING Under the general supervision of the Catering Chef, the Assistant Catering Chef assists in the preparation of food for catering events. Performs advanced culinary duties, quality assurance on all menu items, with attention to detail on presentation. Assists the Catering Chef with production planning, scheduling staff, purchasing, and supervision of the part time student culinary team. Reqs: Previous catering experience with a strong command of fundamentals or equivalent combination of experience. Demonstrated ability to organize and manage a high‑volume kitchen as well as produce specially requested menu items or equivalent combination of experience. Detail oriented, specialized in utilizing the freshest of ingredients and producing items from scratch with an artistic and innovative presentation or equivalent combination of experience. Experience in plated service, baking, appetizers, and hot/cold food buffets or equivalent combination of experience. Knowledge of state and federal safety and sanitation regulations regarding proper handling, storing, cooking and holding temperatures and proper use and cleaning of kitchen equipment or equivalent combination of experience. Ability to train others in these areas. Notes: Ability to lift up to 50 pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per day. Work hours/days may vary. Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $23.82 ‑ $27.36/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Application review begins 11/17/2022. Job #45052

ASSISTANT STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES ADVISOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Provides free non‑attorney‑client privileged legal education and information to currently registered undergraduate and graduate UC Santa Barbara students and student organizations. Coordinates and advises the internship program as well as other internal projects agreed upon with the Student Legal Services Advisor, the Legal Resource Center Committee and the Associated Students (A.S.) Executive Director. Secondary and tertiary advisor for the Legal Resources Center(AS LRC); and the AS Isla Vista Tenants Union (AS IVTU), respectively. Main functional areas for the Assistant

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Student Legal Services Advisor include Student Guidance and Education; Coordination of the Legal Resource Center Intern Program; Management and Supports the area’s Assessment. *As a purely educational and informational position, the Assistant Student Legal Services Advisor shall not practice law in this role and is strictly forbidden to legally represent, in any capacity: ‑ The Regents of the University ‑ Any student or student organization. Reqs: JD from a American Bar Association‑approved

law school. Must demonstrate abroad knowledge of multiple legal disciplines including but not limited to landlord / tenant law, interpretation involving the rental or leasing of housing property, immigration law, personal injury, dissolution, consumer complaints, sexual harassment, student/police relations, and other civil matters, and on criminal and traffic matters. Must have 3‑7 years experience using professional concepts to provide a variety of legal counsel including but not limited to campus students.

Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. The Legal Services Advisor shall not practice law or provide legal advice of any kind. This is a 75% time position. $68,475‑$78,937/Yr. at 75%. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,

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NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 10, 10, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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EMPLOYMENT gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44253

BAKER

CAMPUS DINING The Baker performs culinary duties such as mixing doughs and batters, shaping yeast breads and rolls, making pizzas, decorating desserts and preparing icings and fillings, serving up to 1,500 meals per shift. Insures that assigned responsibilities are accomplished and that high standards of food quality, service, sanitation and safety are met at all times. Assists with student training, food production and sanitation. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent combination of education and experience Work Experience: 1‑3 years: Knowledge of and experience with basic cooking/ baking techniques or equivalent combination of education and experience. Knowledge of safety and sanitation regulations regarding proper food handling or equivalent combination of education and experience. Ability to read and write English for the purpose of preparing food from recipe guidelines and producing reports or equivalent combination of education and experience.Ability to perform basic mathematical calculations including addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication needed for recipe development and other required functions or equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Ability to lift up to 50 pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per day. Work hours/days may vary. Satisfactory conviction history background check. 6:30 am – 3:00 pm Thursday – Monday (May Vary) $18.90/hr. ‑ $21.28/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44840

BIKE SHOP LEAD MECHANIC

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Responsible for organizing the day to day technical and repair aspects with the student mechanics of the Associated Students (A.S.) Bike Shop. The Lead Mechanic implements the training for student employees, outlined in the AS Bike Shop training manual, to student employees for the repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types and other rolling stock. Reqs: Must possess a broad knowledge and technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. Must be able to communicate about processes clearly and effectively to customers and staff in a fast paced work environment. Ability to complete mechanical tasks left uncompleted by Student Mechanics. Understanding or experience with community based bicycle spaces. 1‑3 years Technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. 1‑3 years Repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Campus Security Authority. $22.25‑$23.18/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national

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origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44251

BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER SENIOR

CENTRAL STORES Installs furniture systems, delivers heavy/delicate equipment, relocation of offices and labs, sets up public events and makes others general deliveries and pickups. Involves the management, long‑range planning, organization, coordination, oversight and / or performance of multiple operational activities and services for one or more buildings, including space planning, general maintenance, specialized facility systems and operations, call center triage and tracking of repair services, move planning and coordination, development of procedures, policies and communications related to infrastructure and safety. Applies skills and job knowledge in area of specialization; may adapt procedures, operations, techniques, tools, materials, and / or equipment to meet needs of area of specialization. Reqs: Works closely with departmental staff to efficiently relocate one person or whole departments while ensuring the work is completed in a timely manner. Operates a variety of power and hand tools in a safe and proficient manner. Delivers large, heavy or sensitive equipment using trucks with power liftgate, forklift, pallet jack and other specialized materiel handling equipment. Advises supervisor of any needed equipment or truck repairs and potential safety issues. Delivers and sets up rental equipment for all types of ceremonies and public events. Occasional weekend work is required. In all aspects of work, provides outstanding customer service, exercising good judgement, interpersonal and technical skills and is professional in every respect. Communicates well with clients, co‑workers and supervisor, promoting teamwork and positive relations. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Able to frequently lift up to 70 lbs. Occasional Weekends May Be Required. $22.73.‑ $26.64/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44821

COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING MANAGER

UCSB LIBRARY Manages all aspects of communications for this large research library, including copywriting, public relations, marketing collateral, social media, digital signage, and web content. Works closely with the Library’s Administration, Outreach, Development, and other departments to shape and share stories of Library impact and gain positive exposure for the UCSB Library on campus, in the local community, and beyond. Conceptualizes, writes, edits, and distributes articles, press releases, web copy, and announcements for

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NOVEMBER 10, 2022

diverse audiences across multiple platforms, using research and interviewing to present information clearly and accurately. Manages website content, trains content editors throughout the organization, and sits on the Website Working Group. Prepares and writes speeches or talking points for the University Librarian in her engagement with the public. Provides support and direction for Library staff and programs in their communications needs, ensuring control over the UCSB Library brand. Develops relationships with news media and serves as primary media contact. Works at the systemwide level to manage communications and web resources related to UC open access publisher agreements, collaborating closely with communications colleagues at other UC campus libraries. Supervises a Communications Team that includes a Graphic Designer, student assistant(s), and contract workers as needed. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in Communications or other relevant field or equivalent training and/or experience. 1‑3 years professional experience in marketing, communications, public relations, or publications. Note: Satisfactory completion of a conviction history background check. $68,700 ‑ $100,600/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44197

CONFERENCE DINING ASSOCIATE

CAMPUS DINING Under the supervision of the Conference Dining Manager, plans, organizes and manages dining and catering content for assigned, moderately complex summer conference programs on campus and at University‑owned apartments. The Conference Dining Associate interacts with a diverse clientele, including University professors and commercial program directors, to assess and determine how a program’s dining and catering needs can be met by our services and facilities, or other on and off‑campus resources. Serves as a planning consultant to event organizers to ensure that all dining and catering details have been considered, working with the client’s needs and budget parameters, developing a comprehensive services package that includes vendor contracts. Reqs: Two to three years of experience and strong knowledge in event planning and management in the hospitality sector. Exceptional customer service skills with ability to cultivate professional business partnerships. Proficiency with Microsoft applications and general database management. Ability to learn specialized software systems quickly. Working knowledge of Google Workspace. Notes: Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Overtime may be required from May‑August to meet the operational needs of the department. Work hours/ days may vary during the summer season. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39/ hr.‑$30.65/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Application

review begins 11/17/2022. Job #45073

CONFERENCE MANAGER

CONFERENCE & HOSPITALITY SERVICES The Conference Manager serves as a key member of the Conference & Hospitality Services team in Housing, Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises sharing responsibilities for the overall program which includes planning, management and administration of all conferences and the provision of meeting management services. Ensures smooth‑running, effective events, including successfully recognizing and resolving potential, and real, problems in a timely manner using tact, sensitivity, discretion, and political acumen. The Unit provides meeting management and hospitality services to 20,000+ residents and commuters in 100+ programs. Reqs: 4‑6 years’ experience in the field of conference and/or event management, including negotiating contracts, group insurance requirements, using conference/ event management database, and developing customized program budgets. 1‑3 years’ experience in running and/or assisting with the execution of a marketing campaign and a passion for industry‑leading marketing technologies, tactics, and best practices. Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) as well as Google Suite (Drive, Sheets, Forms, etc), and Conference Management software applications (residential, room scheduling, planning, financial, etc). Ability to provide specialized and customized full meeting management services. Ability to compile conference data in order to produce departmental summary reports. Previous experience in a customer service industry as well as working with different service levels like Housekeeping, Maintenance, Grounds to ensure excellent customer results. Ability to work under pressure and to prioritize workloads to meet demands. Knowledge of academic conferences and familiarity with a University campus. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. UCSB is a Tobacco‑Free environment. After hours work required May‑September. Ability to respond to after hours phone calls. Occasional travel. $75,105 ‑ $82,920/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44914 DECKERS IN Goleta, CA seeks Demand Planner – Fashion Lifestyle Group (UGG & Koolaburra) 100% remote. To apply visit: www.deckers. com/careers Ref. Job # BJ‑0997

Manages all administrative aspects of graduate admissions, student funding and employment including hiring of Teaching Assistants and administration of fellowships. Provides timely and detailed information and reports to faculty, and serves as liaison to multiple departments on campus such as Graduate Division, the Office of the Registrar, the Office of International Students and Scholars, and more. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience. Strong organizational skills and the ability to handle multiple tasks under pressure of deadlines, large workload, and frequent interruptions. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44951

GROUNDSKEEPER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Groundskeeper maintains grounds and landscape duties around eight residence halls, four dining commons and five residential apartment complexes. May be assigned other duties (including those in other areas) to accomplish the operational needs of the department. May be required to work schedules other than Monday through Friday, 7am to 3:30pm, to meet the operational needs of the department. Complies with department safety and illness programs as implemented by supervisor and/or co‑workers. Professional Expectation/Attitude Standard/Customer Service Promotes customer service programs in the Grounds unit to residents/ clients. Completes job duties in a manner that demonstrates support for Housing and Residential Services. Reqs: Minimum of three years experience in grounds maintenance or equivalent experience. Must be able to follow oral/written instructions. Ability to perform minor repairs on small equipment. Some knowledge of irrigation and drip systems. Experience with the use of tractors, small lawn mowers, edgers, power sweepers, roto‑tillers and chainsaws. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Mon‑Fri 7:00am‑3:30pm. $18.93/hr.‑$22.20/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44227

HVAC MECHANIC GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATOR

HSSB ADMIN SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for independently coordinating and managing all aspects of the Graduate Program in the Department of History. Provides knowledgeable and holistic advice to prospective, incoming, and current graduate students.

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and monitoring systems. Makes working drawings and control diagrams for heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment. Work with others as part of a team. Provide direct customer service to campus community. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. 3‑5 years experience repairing and servicing commercial or institutional HVAC mechanical equipment. Possession of EPA Universal certification. Notes: Must be able to take night and weekend call‑backs. EPA Universal Technician Certificate. Hours and days may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $41.80/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/28/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44352

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Working on a zone maintenance team composed of all trades, incumbent performs HVAC maintenance work. Installs, repairs, maintains, and inspects heating, ventilating, air conditioning and pneumatic systems and equipment. Installs, repairs and maintains pumps, air compressors, steam and hot water boilers, heating and boiler tubes, heat exchangers, fans, dampers, hydraulic units, control

LAB SAFETY SPECIALIST

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Under supervision performs a variety of duties related to the EH&S Laboratory Safety Program. Performs laboratory safety inspections and audits. Manages UCSB hazardous materials Business Plan program elements. Serves as lab personal protective equipment program coordinator. Assists with emergency preparedness/response activities. Reqs: 1‑3 years environmental, chemical or safety experience. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Requires current “HazWOPER” certification. Must be medically qualified to wear a filtering face‑piece respirator. Must be willing to work and respond to emergencies involving potentially hazardous chemicals and radioactive substances. $62,300.00‑$75,000.00/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Application review begins 11/28/2022. Job #44785

LABORER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Under the supervision of the Assistant Superintendent, performs a variety of custodial tasks and other related duties. Handles all heavy lifting and moving tasks, the moving of all furniture out of classrooms, offices, labs, and the replacement of all furniture. Required to perform custodial duties in zone, and campus‑wide as necessary. Reqs: Ability to understand and apply University and Department policies and procedures to specific situations. Ability to exercise sound judgment in solving problems. Ability to accomplish work within deadlines; may handle more than one project at a time. Able to follow oral and written instructions. Ability to perform heavy manual tasks. Able to observe and use safe working conditions. Note: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean

DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. May be required to wear a UCSB‑provided uniform. 4 days, 10 hour shifts. Days are rotated every week. 8:00pm ‑ 6:30 am $20.96 ‑ $28.76/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Application review begins 11/21/2022. Job #44700

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Notes: Credentials verification completed and passed before employment and date of hire. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory background check completed and passed before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Office Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patience care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Days and hours are M‑F, 7:45am‑4:30pm (may be required to work TH evenings until 7:00pm). $23.97/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43395

PHLEBOTOMIST

STUDENT HEALTH Performs phlebotomy and laboratory procedure set‑ups for a university health care laboratory facility. Responsible for preparing report forms and patients’ samples for transport to a referral laboratory. Maintains working levels of laboratory supplies, stocks supplies, performs daily and periodic preventative maintenance, washes glassware, cleans countertops, performs record keeping duties of the reception desk as needed and maintains the cleanliness of the entire laboratory area. Reqs: Must have a California Phlebotomist license at all times during employment. Must be familiar with the various types of equipment specific to phlebotomy and specimen processing and the disposal handling of medical waste. Two years’ experience working in a medical office or laboratory required. Notes: To comply with


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EMPLOYMENT Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough. Working hours are Monday through Friday 8:30am – 5:30pm. May be required to work earlier or beyond normal working hours depending on clinical or laboratory needs. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. $26.15/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44152

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING / NANOFABRICATION FACILITY Under the general direction of a Project Scientist, the engineer will develop new fabrication processes and establish process control on a variety of nanofabrication research tools in the facility, including thin film deposition, inductively coupled plasma etching, and projection lithography. Develops new or improved fabrication processes, with priority given to processes that will impact the largest number of users in the facility and new equipment characterization. Performs direct hands‑on processing jobs for internal and external users of the facility, developing or repeating fabrication processes as needed. Provides engineering advice and guidance to faculty, graduate student researchers and external researchers. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. 4‑6 years experience with all aspects of cleanroom wafer processing. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check $90,000 ‑ $112,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42340

(CONT.)

to meet continual deadlines while making allowances for interruptions. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Strong computer skills demonstrating the use of Microsoft Office programs, Google Calendar, and Google Docs/ sheets. Ability to apply a high level of sound, independent judgment, tact, ingenuity, and resourcefulness in overseeing assigned areas, including working with managers and customers, and solving problems during the course of daily business. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a member of a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39‑ $34.90/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44905

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: WILLIAM CARPER POEHLER AKA WILLIAM C. POEHLER & WILLIAM POEHLER NO: 22PR00531 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both WILLIAM CARPER POEHLER AKA WILLIAM C. POEHLER & WILLIAM POEHLER. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PAMELA M. POEHLER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Pamela M. Poehler be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 1/05/2023 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Steven A. Jung, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, 1021 Anacapa Street, 2nd Floor, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 882‑1443. Published November 3, 10, 17, 2022. Proof of Service by Mail The Served: Pamela M. Poehler, Trustee of the William and Pamela Poehler Living Trust

Lillian G. Poehler Christopher G. Poehler Heather K. Poehler Mary Lynn Mallen NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHAEL JEROME EDWARDS, AKA MICHAEL J. EDWARDS CASE NO.: 22PR00538 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MICHAEL JEROME EDWARDS, AKA MICHAEL J. EDWARDS. A PETITION FOR PROBATE HAS BEEN FILED BY Angelica Edwards in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: Angelica Edwards be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 12/15/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 10/17/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published November 3, 10, 17, 2022. Proof of Service by Mail by Christie A. Gabbert. Served: Angelica Edwards.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name : 805 DEFENSE IS BEING ABANDONED at 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 06/3/07/2021 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2021‑0001660. The

persons or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Amber Paresa, 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Elizabeth Bryson, 323 West Montecito Street, Apt C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Leana Gutierrez, 121 West Pueblo Street, Apt 7, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. The business was conducted as a general partnership. SIGNED BY AMBER PARESA, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 10/07/22, FBN2022‑0002505, E47. hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022.

the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002603. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACADEMIC EQUITY CONSULTING 1821 Gillespie Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mary Bucholtz (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MARY BUCHOLTZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002581. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DAYTECH COMPUTER SERVICES, 378 Ribera Dr, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Devon T Day (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY DEVON DAY, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002500. Published: October 20, 27, November 3, 10, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 DEFENSE, 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Amber K Paresa (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY AMBER PARESA, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002506. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NOVEL FITNESS SOLUTIONS, 4061 Foothill Road, Apt E, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Williams Strength LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY JULIA WILLIAMS, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002485. Published: October 20, 27, November 3, 10, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PACIFIC BUILDERS at 1128 Chino Street, A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; RLS Pacific Builders, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY RUBEN LOPEZ SOLIS, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 12, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002529. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CHRP DIAGNOSTIC, 4551 Oak Glen Drive, Unit F, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Kevin C Haeberle (same address), Lindsey N Haeberle (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY KEVIN HAEBERLE, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002564. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BYB REAL ESTATE,1290 Coast Village RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Brisaly Y Balderas, 451 Cannon Green Dr., Apt G, Goleta Ca 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY BRISALY BALDERAS, INDIVIDUAL. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002460. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: JHZ INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 5662 Calle Real #349, Goleta, CA 93117; James H Zbinden, 5731 Stow Canyon Rd., Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JAMES ZBINDEN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TRUST TRANSFER ACCOUNT at 2921 Holly Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael G Vilkin (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MICHAEL VILKIN, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002632. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY THERAPY at 85 West Highway 246, Suite 140, Buellton, CA 93427; Kathryn EM Fleckenstein (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY KATHRYN EM FLECKENSTEIN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002609. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALFREDO’S MOVING & DELIVERY at 283 Ellwood Beach Dr, Goleta, CA 93117; Fredy Lopez (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY FREDY LOPEZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by

E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002463. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RIVIERA WINE COMPANY at 59 Industrial Way, Buellton, CA 93427; Margerum Wine Company, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DOUGLAS MARGERUM, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002612. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HUNTER ENTERPRISES at 4700 Stockdale Hwy, Ste.120, Bakersfield, CA 93309; Hunter‑Dooley Family Investments LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liabilty company. SIGNED BY KENNETH H. HUNTER, III, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002643. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOSPICE OF SANTA BARBARA, 2050 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 100, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Hospice of Santa Barbara, Inc. (same address), Compassionate Care Center, Compassionate Care of Isla Vista, Compassionate Care of Santa Barbara County, Compassionate Care of Carpinteria, Compassionate Care of North Santa Barbara County, Compassionate Care of the Central Coast, Compassionate Care of Goleta, Compassionate Care of Santa Barbara, Compassionate Care of the Santa Ynez Valley. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DAVID SELBERG, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002617. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LA VISTA CONSULTING, 1020 La Vista RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. Stephanie K Ochoa (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY STEPHANIE OCHOA, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 31, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002678. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: COOPER COLLINS SMITH REALTY,18 Canon Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Cooper & Smith Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY NATALIE COLLINS‑SMITH, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on November 4, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002717. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAMANTHA HARRIS, 2635

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State St, Apt. T3, Santa Barbara 93105 This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SAMANTHA HARRIS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 31, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office

of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002677. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 101

DELI, 130 N Calle Cesar Chavez, #22, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Angie M Park, 2053 Mandrill Ave, Ventura, CA 93003. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY ANGIE M PARK, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE JONNY D. WALLIS NEIGHBORHOOD PARK SPLASH PAD AND IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. 9111 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., Monday, December 5, 2022, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 nonrefundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bidopportunities. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plantings and equipment necessary to construct and deliver the specified JONNY D. WALLIS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PARK SPLASH PAD AND IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. 9111. Work includes the construction of a new splash pad, seat walls, fencing, basketball court surfacing, installation of prefabricated shade structures, installation of security cameras, fencing and all project associated clearing, grubbing, grading, asphalt, concrete, drainage, utility connection, fencing, signage, irrigation and landscape work. The contract period is one hundred (100) Working Days. Deadline to submit Requests For Information (RFI) electronically to jplummer@ cityofgoleta.org is 5:00 pm on Monday, November 21, 2022. A Pre-Bid Meeting is not scheduled for this project.

County on October 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002592. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HAWT HANKS 7083 Del Norte Drive, Goleta, CA 93117; Nathan Van Etten(same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY NATHAN VAN ETTEN Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002638. Published: November 10, 17, 23, December 1, 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASEY KENDRICK ALBERT‑HALL CASE NUMBER: 22CV03848 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a

change of name(s) FROM: CASEY KENDRICK ALBERT‑HALL TO: CASEY ALBERT HALL. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING DECEMBER 7, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: OCTOBER 19, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10,

17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: TRACY ROCHESTIE, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03587 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: TRACY ROCHESTIE TO: TRACY PEREGRINE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING NOVEMBER 28, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a

newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: October 14, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published October 27, November 3, 10, 17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG, 1338 Portsuello Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. CASE NUMBER: 22CV03635 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG TO: LEANDER DEAN LOVE ANDEREGG. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the

Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed or submitted to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received or postmarked within three (3) City business days after the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR JONNY D. WALLIS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PARK SPLASH PAD AND IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NO. 9111.” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class “A” Contractor’s license, or specialty licensing in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 22300, the successful bidder may substitute certain securities for funds withheld by CITY to ensure performance under the Contract or, in the alternative, request the CITY to make payment of retention to an escrow agent. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact JoAnne Plummer in writing at jplummer@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA ___________________________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: November 10, 2022, and November 17, 2022 62

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petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING NOVEMBER 30, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: AUGUST 16, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27TH, NOVEMBER 3, 10,17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ANDREI ALEKSANDROVICH PERVOV NUMBER: 22CV03903 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: ANDREI ALEKSANDROVICH PERVOV TO: ANDREI ALEXANDER. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at

the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING DECEMBER 5, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: OCTOBER 19, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 17 2022

CALLING FOR BIDS 1. OWNER: MONTECITO UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 2. PROJECT IDENTIFICATION NAME: 2223‑1 Construction of Foundation for Modular Restroom 3. PROJECT LOCATION: 385 SAN YSIDRO ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108 4. PROJECT DESCRIPTION Installation of a concrete foundation and landing at the restroom building and repair of adjacent decomposed granite walk.

Grading of the area around the building to provide drainage per plan and relocation of existing boulders on site. Completion of utility connections under a separate contract. Provide signage and door stops. This project is anticipated to start approximately February 1, 2023 and is anticipated to be completed by May 21, 2023. Concrete Foundation Summary: Construction of foundation for Modular Restroom Building (restroom building is fabricated

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PUBLIC NOTICES 01‑NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

NOTIFICACIÓN DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA CONSEJO DE LA CIUDAD Audiencia Pública Híbrida– en persona y por Zoom 15 de noviembre, 2022, 5:30 P.M. LEYES PARA EDIFICACIÓN LOCAL ATENCIÓN: la reunión se realizará en persona y por la plataforma Zoom. El público también puede ver la reunión en el Canal 19 de Goleta y/o por internet en https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. POR LA PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA que el Consejo de la Ciudad de Goleta realizará una audiencia pública en la fecha establecida a continuación para la segunda lectura de la ordenanza siguiente según la Sección 50022.3 del Código de Gobierno: Una ordenanza del Consejo de la Ciudad de Goleta, California, enmendando los siguientes capítulos del Título 15 “Edificación y Construcción” del Código Municipal de Goleta: Capítulo 15.01 “Código de Edificación”, Capítulo 15.03 “Código de Electricidad”, Capítulo15.04 “Código de Plomería”, Capítulo 15.05 “Código de Mecánica”, Capítulo 15.08 “Código Administrativo”, Capítulo 15.11 “Código Residencial”, Capítulo15.12 “Código para Construcción Ecológica”, Capítulo 15.15 “Código para Energía”, Capítulo 15.16 “Código Histórico”, Capítulo 15.17 “Código para Edificación Existente” y enmendar el Capítulo 15.19 “Código Internacional para el Mantenimiento de la Propiedad”, adoptando por referencia los códigos listados arriba en los Códigos de Estándares de Construcción del Estado de California y adoptando enmiendas locales para esos códigos. Como parte de la ordenanza, se proponen dos enmiendas locales nuevas como se describe a continuación: 1) que los permisos de construcción para todo tipo de ocupación, excepto para R-3 (residencia familiar única y residencia de dos unidades) y U (Utilidades) sean emitidos solamente para contratistas con licencia y 2) que se establezca un periodo de seis (6) años de expiración para todos los permisos de construcción. Se permite una audiencia para considerar establecer leyes de construcción local más estrictas que los estándares del estado según la Sección 25402.1(h)2 del Código de Recursos Públicos. INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LA AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA: FECHA Y HORA DE LA AUDIENCIA: UBICACIÓN:

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martes 15 de noviembre, 2022, a las 5:30 PM

Municipalidad de Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 y reunión de teleconferencia; esta reunión se realizará en persona y en Zoom (con instrucciones detalladas para la participación incluidas en el orden del día publicado)

COMENTARIO PÚBLICO: se anima a todas las personas interesadas a que ofrezcan comentarios públicos durante la audiencia pública en persona o a través del webinario Zoom, siguiendo las instrucciones listadas en el orden del día de la reunión del Consejo de la Ciudad. Se puede entregar comentarios escritos antes de la audiencia enviando un correo electrónico a la Secretaria Municipal en cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Los comentarios escritos se distribuirán al Consejo y se publicarán en la página de la reunión de la ciudad y del orden del día. DISPONIBILIDAD DE DOCUMENTOS Y CONTACTO CON EL PERSONAL: los reportes del personal y materiales relacionados para la audiencia del Consejo de la Ciudad también se publicarán en esta página web por los menos 72 horas antes de la reunión en el sitio web de la Ciudad en www.cityofgoleta.org. Para más información sobre este proyecto, comuníquese con la Oficial de Construcción Stephanie Spieler, llamando al 805-961-7552 o enviando un mensaje a sspieler@cityofgoleta.org o en buildinggroup@ cityofgoleta.org. Para preguntas en español, por favor comuníquese con Marcos Martínez llamando al (805) 562-5500 o enviando un mensaje a mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Nota: si usted denuncia la naturaleza de la acción descrita arriba en los tribunales, usted podría estar limitado solamente a aquellos asuntos que usted o alguna otra persona mencionaran en la audiencia pública descrita en esta notificación o en la correspondencia escrita entregada a la Ciudad en la fecha de o con anterioridad a la audiencia pública (Sección del Código de Gobierno 65009[b][2]). Nota: conforme con la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades, si necesita asistencia para participar en esta audiencia, por favor llame a la Oficina de la Secretaria Municipal al (805) 961-7505. Una notificación por lo menos 48 horas antes de la audiencia permitirá al personal de la Ciudad hacer arreglos razonables. Fecha de publicación: Santa Barbara Independent, 3 de noviembre, 2022, y 10 de noviembre, 2022.

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE GOLETA VALLEY COMMUNITY CENTER SEISMIC RETROFIT PROJECT DR 4308 (CIP NO. 9067) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“City”) invites and will receive sealed Bids up to but not later than 2:00 P.M. on 13 December, 2022 via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site which can be accessed at the CITY website link below, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 non-refundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http:// www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities. Bids shall be valid for a period of 90 calendar days after the Bid opening date. The City of Goleta (“City”) will select a single qualified Contractor to perform a structural retrofit of Goleta Valley Community Center. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, and equipment necessary to construct and deliver a finished GOLETA VALLEY COMMUNITY CENTER SEISMIC RETROFIT PROJECT – DR 4308 (CIP NO. 9067). The scope of work includes all work described in the construction documents, but is not limited to the following: Anchorage and strengthening of existing wood diaphragms and truss connections to existing concrete walls; extent of all existing “sprung” floor locations to be verified in field; patch & paint interior drywall and new exterior plaster; provide seismic bracing for non-structural elements; remove existing roofing in its entirety down to the existing plank sheathing, remove all existing roof crickets and built-up areas prior to installing new structural sheathing; provide new roofing system; repair deteriorated and damaged rafter tails and exposed wood elements; extend roof drains to drain into existing planter including selective demolition entrance planter; remove existing skylight and replace on a new curb; interior painted mural at the east wall of the Dining Room shall not be disturbed; removal of floor finishes as required to install new boundary and floor nailing; reinstall carpet following repairs; fully cooperate with all City agencies and others who might be working within the premise of the proposed project site; contractor to obtain building permit(s) from the City’s Building and Safety Division. Contractor shall pay for the permit fee. Plans have been approved by the Building and Safety Division; install electrical power and water connections for all contractors use. Provide and install one toilet, fencing with green screening around the construction site and dumpster/laydown area (if needed, with prior approval of location from City Engineer). Contractor is not permitted to use the existing restrooms, kitchen, or break rooms in the Goleta Valley Community Center building during the course of the construction.; the contractor is responsible to familiarize themselves with the existing utilities and electronic systems inside and outside the building project to facilitate their work on this project; the contractor is responsible for providing all required insurance, bonds, schedule of values, construction schedules, monthly updated schedules, attending weekly Owner, Architect, Contractor meetings, submitting monthly invoices, certified payrolls, three sets of closeout binders; contractor shall maintain during construction and provide final asbuilt drawings at completion of project; no excavations (such as for landscaping planters) directly adjacent to perimeter walls are permitted. The contract period is Ninety (90) Calendar Days. A mandatory pre-bid meeting for this project is scheduled on November 29, 2022, at 2:00 P.M. at the Goleta Community Center, 5679 Hollister Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117. This Structural retrofit scope of work of this project is funded by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) funds. Contractor is required to comply with all necessary reporting procedures as outlined in the granting agency guidelines. Bids must be submitted on the City’s Bid Forms. Bidders may obtain a copy of the Contract Documents from PlanetBids. To the extent required by section 20103.7 of the Public Contract Code, upon request from a contractor plan room service, the City shall provide an electronic copy of the Contract Documents at no charge to the contractor plan room. No bid will be accepted, nor any contract entered into, without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractor’s current registration with the Department of Industrial Relations to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the Department of Industrial Relations for the duration of the Project. Notwithstanding the foregoing, the contractor registration requirements mandated by Labor Code Sections 1725.5 and 1771.1 shall not apply to work performed on a public works project that is exempt pursuant to the small project exemption specified in Labor Code Sections 1725.5 and 1771.1. This Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations. In bidding on this Project, it shall be the Bidder’s sole responsibility to evaluate and include the cost of complying with all labor compliance requirements under this contract and applicable law in its Bid. Pursuant to sections 7000 et seq. of the Business and Professions Code, each Bidder must hold an active license issued by the California Contractors State License Board throughout the time it submits its Bid and for the duration of the contract in the following classification(s): Class A (general engineering contractor) or Class B (general building contractor). The Bidder or a listed Subcontractor must also hold an active Class C-22 (asbestos abatement) license. A Class C-7 (low voltage systems) license is required if scope of work affects existing or new low voltage systems. If the Bidder holds a Class B license, the Bidder (if it will self-perform the demolition work) or a listed Subcontractor must hold a Class C-21 (building moving/demolition) license. In addition, the Bidder or a listed Subcontractor must hold all applicable State certifications from the California Contractors State License Board and any necessary registrations from the Division of Occupational Safety and Health at the Bid Deadline. Substitution requests shall be made within 35 calendar days after the award of the contract. Pursuant to Public Contract Code Section 3400(b), the City may make findings designating that certain additional materials, methods or services by specific brand or trade name other than those listed in the Standard Specifications be used for the Project. Such findings, if any, as well as the materials, methods or services and their specific brand or trade names that must be used for the Project may be found in the Special Conditions. City shall award the contract for the Project to the lowest responsive, responsible Bidder as determined by the City from the BASE BID ALONE. City reserves the right to reject any or all bids or to waive any irregularities or informalities in any bids or in the bidding process. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For further information, contact Matthew Fore, General Services Director at mfore@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA ___________________________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: November 10, 2022, and November 17, 2022

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NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 10, 10, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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and installed under a separate contract). This project includes the installation of a concrete landing at the restroom building and the repair of an adjacent decomposed granite walk. Grading of the area around the building to provide drainage per plan and relocation of existing boulders on site. Provide signage and door stops. Utility connections are also under a separate contract. 5. BID DEADLINE: Bids are due on December 8 not later than 2:00 p.m. 6. PLACE AND METHOD OF BID RECEIPT: All bids must be made using the District provided bid forms and must be completed, sealed and turned in by the deadline. Bid packet will be provided at the job walk. Bids may be turned in by personal delivery, courier, or mailed via United States Postal Service and addressed to Montecito Union School District, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. ATTN: Virginia Alvarez 7. PLACE PLANS ARE ON FILE: Montecito Union School District, Business Department, Second Floor, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, www.tricoblue.com 8. ALTERNATES: If alternate bids are called for, the contract will be awarded to the lowest bid price on the base contract without consideration of the prices on the additive or deductive items. 9. MANDATORY JOB WALK: Meet at Montecito Union School Office on Monday, November 14, 2022 at

9:30 a.m. sharp. Attendance at the entire job walk is mandatory and failure to attend the entire job walk may result in your bid being rejected as non‑responsive. Contact OWNER for details on required job walks and related documentation. 10. This is a prevailing wage project. OWNER has ascertained the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which this work is to be performed for each craft or type of worker needed to execute this contract. These rates are on file at OWNER’s office, and a copy may be obtained upon request, or at www.dir.ca.gov . Contractor shall post a copy of these rates at the job site. ALL PROJECTS OVER $1,000 ARE SUBJECT TO PREVAILING WAGE MONITORING AND ENFORCEMENT BY THE LABOR COMMISSIONER. SCHOOLS LEGAL SERVICE NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS PUBLIC WORKS BID PACKET 1215 PAGE 2 of 1 It shall be mandatory upon the contractor to whom the contract is awarded (CONTRACTOR), and upon any SUBCONTRACTOR, to pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the contract. 11. A Payment Bond for contracts over $25,000 and a Performance Bond for all contracts will be required prior to commencement of work. These bonds shall be in the amounts and form called for in

the Contract Documents. 12. Pursuant to the provisions of Public Contract Code Section 22300, CONTRACTOR may substitute certain securities for any funds withheld by OWNER to ensure CONTRACTOR’s performance under the contract. At the request and expense of CONTRACTOR, securities equivalent to any amount withheld shall be deposited, at the discretion of OWNER, with either OWNER or a state or federally chartered bank as the escrow agent, who shall then pay any funds otherwise subject to retention to CONTRACTOR. Upon satisfactory completion of the contract, the securities shall be returned to CONTRACTOR. Securities eligible for investment shall include those listed in Government Code Section 16430, bank and savings and loan certificates of deposit, interest bearing demand deposit accounts, standby letters of credit, or any other security mutually agreed to by CONTRACTOR and OWNER. CONTRACTOR shall be the beneficial owner of any securities substituted for funds withheld and shall receive any interest on them. The escrow agreement shall be in the form indicated in the Contract Documents. 13. To bid on or perform the work stated in this Notice, CONTRACTOR must possess a valid and active contractor’s license of the following classification(s) C‑8 No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor

shall be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of § 4104 of the Public Contract Code, for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless currently registered with the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5. No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project (awarded after April 1, 2015) unless registered with the DIR. DIR’s web registration portal is: w w w. d i r. c a . g o v / P u b l i c ‑ Wo r k s / Contractors.html 14. CONTRACTOR and all subcontractors must furnish electronic certified payroll records (eCPR) to the Labor Commissioner monthly in PDF format. Registration at www.dir.ca.gov/Public‑Works/ Certified‑Payroll‑Reporting.html is required to use the eCPR system. The following notice is given as required by Labor Code Section 1771.5(b)(1): CONTRACTOR and any subcontractors are required to review and comply with the provisions of the California Labor Code, Part 7, Chapter 1, beginning with Section 1720, as more fully discussed in the Contract Documents. These sections contain specific requirements concerning, for example, determination and payment of prevailing wages, retention, inspection, and auditing payroll records, use of apprentices,

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom November 15, 2022, at 5:30 P.M. LOCAL BUILDING LAWS ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will hold a public hearing on the date set forth below on the second reading of the following ordinance in accordance with Government Code Section 50022.3: An Ordinance Of The City Council Of The City Of Goleta, California, Amending The Following Chapters To Title 15 “Building And Construction” Of The Goleta Municipal Code: Chapter 15.01 “Building Code”, Chapter 15.03 “Electrical Code”, Chapter 15.04 “Plumbing Code”, Chapter 15.05 “Mechanical Code”, Chapter 15.08 “Administrative Code”, Chapter 15.11 “Residential Code”, Chapter 15.12 “Green Building Code”, Chapter 15.15 “Energy Code”, Chapter 15.16 “Historical Code”, Chapter 15.17 “Existing Building Code, And Amending Chapter 15.19 “The International Property Maintenance Code” Adopting By Reference the Above-Listed Codes In The California State Building Standards Codes And Adopting Local Amendments To Those Codes. As part of the ordinance, two new local amendments are proposed as follows: 1) that building permits for all types of occupancies, except R-3 (Single-Family and Two Units Residential) and U (Utilities), be issued to licensed contractors only and 2) that a six (6) year expiration date be established for all building permits. a hearing to consider establishing local building laws more stringent than the statewide standards is allowed by Public Resources Code Section 25402.1(h)2. PUBLIC HEARING INFORMATION: HEARING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, November 15, 2022, at 5:30 PM

LOCATION:

Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda)

PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY AND STAFF CONTACT: Staff reports and related materials for the City Council hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www. cityofgoleta.org. For further information on the project, contact Building Official Stephanie Spieler at 805-961-7552 or sspieler@cityofgoleta.org or buildinggroup@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent November 3, 2022, and November 10, 2022 64

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payment of overtime compensation, securing workers’ compensation insurance, and various criminal penalties or fines which may be imposed for violations of the requirements of the chapter. Submission of a bid constitutes CONTRACTOR’s representation that CONTRACTOR has thoroughly reviewed these requirements. SCHOOLS LEGAL SERVICE NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS PUBLIC WORKS BID PACKET 1215 PAGE 3 of 1 15. OWNER will retain 5% of the amount of any progress payments. 16. This Project does not require prequalification pursuant to AB 1565 of all general contractors and all mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontractors 17. BID PACKET will be provided at the job walk to attendees. Advertisement Dates: October 27, November 3, 10, 2022 weekly editions. Virginia Alvarez (805) 969‑3249 x 420 EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6250 VIA REAL, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 NOVEMBER 29, 2022 AT 12 PM TIMOTHY ORTIZ‑ Bicycle, Boxes, Shoes, Totes, Power Tools, Tool Box, Entertainment Center, Cooler. PATRICK CASEY‑ Restaurant Equipment, Coke Machine, Sink. EVELYN BENTON‑ Bags, Shoes, Totes, Blankets, Lamp. ROGER HINKLEY‑BOXES, Totes, Train Set, Vacuum, End Table. MONIQUE CORDERO‑ TV, Bags, Boxes, Clothes, Totes, Wicker. CHERIEKA MORGAN ‑GOSSETT‑ Couch, Entertainment Center, Table, TV, Books, Boxes, Totes, Desk. HALEY HOME‑ Beds, Totes, Fan, Screen, Christmas Tree Stand Wheel. LAWRENCE BRENNEN, JR‑ Bicycle, Sink, Curio Cabinet, Chandelier, Musical, Instrument Cart. CHERRY POST‑ Table, Bags, Books, Boxes. AMANDA FROST‑ Bicycle, Boxes, Totes, Rain Stick. CHERRY POST‑ Boxes. JUAN CARLOS‑ TV, Bags, Bicycle. MARIA FRAGOSO‑ Dresser, Bicycle, Boxes, Totes, Bike Cart, Trophies, Kitchen Items, Stroller, Fan, CD’s. SUSAN SEMBER‑ Chair, Mattress, Boxes, Wall Décor. KARL CAMERON‑ Boxes, File Cabinet, Power Tools, Shelves, Totes, Power Strips, Helmet, Toaster Oven. JAMES STEVENSON‑ Shells, Boxes, Net, Shelves, Household Goods. MARIA RAPTIS‑ Bed, TV, Bags, Books, Boxes, Bedframe, Yarn, Cooler, Duffle Bag. SUSAN JOSEPHSON‑ Bed, Chair, Mattress, Table, Bags, Boxes, Totes, Pictures, Files, Clothes. RUSSELL SHEPPEL‑ Chair, Table, Bags, Boxes, Totes, Sports Equipment, Pinball Machine. SALLY BARTON‑ Chair, Couch, Dresser, Table, VCR, Boxes, Bags, Pictures, Clothes, Painting. THE AUCTION WILL BE LISTED AND ADVERTISED ON WWW. STORAGETREASURES.COM. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. November 30, 2022 at 3:30 PM ROBBIN PARRA queen bed, crib, boxes

VICTORIANO PEREZ Cleaning materials, clothing, furniture etc. JASON JOHNSON Personal items, mainly books. Boxes. SAMANTHA CAREY 5x10 GUY BERFIELD Boxes, furniture etc ROBERTO CATALAN personal KACI PRATI Household CHRISTINE BARRIOS bags boxes tv couches SAMANTHA CAREY boxes THE AUCTION WILL BE LISTED AND ADVERTISED ON WWW. STORAGETREASURES.COM. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: 22CVO3317 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): MARK ABRAHAMS, AN INDIVIDUAL, ALEXIS ABRAHAMS, AN INDIVIDUAL; and DOES 1 through 50, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): MACKENZIE HOLDINGS, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AND D. DE MORRELL, AN INDIVIDUAL NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por

escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑1107 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): TIMOTHY J. TRAGER, SBN 145419, REICKER PFAU PYLE & MCROY LLP, 1421 STATE STREET, SUITE B, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101; 805‑966‑2440. DATE: (FECHA) 8/26/2022 CLERK, by (Secretario) /s/ NARZRALLI BAKSH, DEPUTY (Adjunto). ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION ATTORNEY OR PARTY WITHOUT ATTORNEY (NAME AND ADDRESS): Attorney for Plaintiffs: TIMOTHY J. TRAGER, SBN #145419 Reicker, Pfau, Pyle & McRoy LLP, 1421 State Street, Ste. B, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. ttrager@ rppmh.com.attorney for Plaintiffs SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PLAINTIFF: MACKENZIE HOLDINGS, LLC AND D. DE MORRELL DEFENDANT: MARK ABRAHAMS AND ALEXIS ABRAHAMS Moving Party Plaintiffs, MacKenzies Holdings, LLC and D. de Morrell filed their application for an order for publication on October 7, 2022. From the application and supporting evidence it appears to the satisfaction of the Court that an order for service by publication is permitted pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure section 415.50. IT IS ORDERED that service of the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) in this action shall be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Mark Abrahams and Alexis Abrahams by publication thereof in Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation published at Santa Barbara County,


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California, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that, if the address of the party to be served is ascertained before the expiration of the time prescribed for publication of the summons, the moving party shall forthwith mail to the party to be served a copy of (1) the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) identified above, (2) the complaint, petition, or motion for which notice is being served by this order, and (3) this order for publication. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. DATED: 10/10/22 JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT DONNA D. GECK SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: 22CVO3135 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, RICHARD R. ROMERO, DANA FACTO, TRUSTEE OF THE BARBARA ROMERO REVOCABLE TRUST, DELPHINA ABBOTT, GAIL GORTON, MARK A. WILSON, SAM HOLROYD, JOHNNY WILSON, BARBARA J. ROMERO, GERALDINE ROMERO, TIMOTHY WILSON, PAULINE ZUNIGA, LOUISE CONNOLLY, TONY, ROMERO SOTO, RUSSELL LOPEZ, JIMMIE LOPEZ, ROBERT ROMERO LOPEZ, FAMONA ORTEGA, ARNULFO (ARNOLD), P. LOPEZ, MARGARET LOPEZ WILSON, VICKY HULL, ANNETTE LOPEZ, DONNA LOPEZ, KAREN LOPEZ GREENLEE, JUANITA VILLA JAUREGUI, MERCED ALCASAS ROMERO, TRINIDAD VILLA, NATALIE ROSE GARCIA, KENNETH VILLA, LEONARD VILLA, CHRISTINA CURTIS, ROBERT ANDREW ‘BUCK’ COTA, MCCORMICK, PATRICIA FALCON (MCCORMICK), THOMAS G. COTA, MARCIA COTA, JEFFREY COTA, JILL COTA, AND DOE DEFENDANTS 1‑50 IDENTIFIED AS ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): SUSAN ESTELLE JANSEN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You

can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta

a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Superior Court for the State of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is LAW OFFICES OF PAUL R. BURNS, P.C., 2700 GIBRALTAR ROAD,

SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105, 805 708 7144 DATE: (FECHA) 8/15/2022 CLERK, BY (SECRETARIO) /S/ YULIANA RAZO, DEPUTY (ADJUNTO). ORDER GRANTING EX‑PARTE APPLICATION FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS, CASE NO. 22CVO3135 Paul R. Burns, Esq. (SBN 230509)Solange D. Sanjueza (SBN289365) LAW OFFICES OF PAUL R. BURNS, P.C. 2700 Gilbraltar Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 paulburnslaw@gmail.com Attorneys for Plaintiff: Susan Estelle Jansen SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ‑ ANACAPA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PLAINTIFF: SUSAN ESTELLE JANSEN V. CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, RICHARD R. ROMERO ... AS ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO. DEFENDANTS. ORDER AFTER APPLICATION FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP) FOR CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT FOR RESIDENT ENGINEER, INSPECTION, PUBLIC OUTREACH, AND MATERIAL TESTING SERVICES FOR THE COMBINED EKWILL STREET AND FOWLER ROAD EXTENSIONS PROJECT AND HOLLISTER AVENUE BRIDGE PROJECT PROJECT NOS. 9002 & 9033 The City of Goleta Public Works Department invites you to submit a proposal to become eligible for the Construction Management for Resident Engineer, Inspection, Public Outreach, and Material Testing Services for the Combined Ekwill Street and Fowler Road Extensions Project and Hollister Avenue Bridge Project. Proposals shall meet the requirements and descriptions outlined in the RFP available through the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids Vendor Portal. Proposals must be received no later than 3:00 p.m., November 23, 2022, through the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids Vendor Portal. Firms interested in submitting a Proposal should go to www.cityofgoleta.org/cityhall/public-works/city-bid-opportunities and click on “Request for Proposals for Construction Management for Resident Engineer, Inspection, Public Outreach, And Material Testing Services for the Combined Ekwill Street and Fowler Road Extensions Project and Hollister Avenue Bridge Project.” Please submit any questions regarding this Request for Proposals through the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids Vendor Portal Online Q&A no later than 3:00 p.m. on November 16, 2022. Published: Santa Barbara Independent October 27, 2022 & November 10, 2022 ORDINANCE NO. 22-__ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING TITLE 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO PROVIDE OBJECTIVE DESIGN STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES TO IMPLEMENT STATE HOUSING LAW, CASE NO. 21-0005-ORD, AND DETERMINING THE ORDINANCE TO BE EXEMPT FROM CEQA At the meeting of the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) held on November 1, 2022, the City Council considered and conducted the first reading of an ordinance that would establish objective design standards within Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) and includes procedures for the processing of projects that qualify for objective, ministerial review under State law. A new Chapter 17.44 of the GMC is proposed that includes applicability and procedural standards as well as objective standards for site and building design, mixed-use development, and utilitarian elements. Definitions are also included, as are other associated amendments to Title 17. On November 15, 2022, at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, California, and on the virtual platforms made available on the City’s website and as posted on the City’s agenda for the November 15, 2022 meeting, the City Council will consider the second reading and possible adoption of this ordinance that would establish objective design standards within Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) and includes procedures for the processing of projects that qualify for objective, ministerial review under State law. A new Chapter 17.44 of the GMC is proposed that includes applicability and procedural standards as well as objective standards for site and building design, mixed-use development, and utilitarian elements. Definitions are also included, as are other associated amendments to Title 17. If adopted at the above-mentioned meeting, the Ordinance will take effect 31 days following such adoption by the City Council. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, November 10, 2022

On reading the filings and evidence consisting of Plaintiff Susan Estelle Jansen’s Application for Order for Publication of Summons and Declaration of Paul R. Burns, Esq., it satisfactorily appearing to me therefrom that Defendants: CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, ET AL Cannot with reasonable diligence be served in any other manner specified in Sections 415.10 through 415.4 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, and that

the defendants are a necessary parties to this action. IT IS ORDERED that the Summons be served on the above named Defendants by publication in SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDANT, which is a local newspaper of general circulation in Santa Barbara County, California, hereby designated as the publication most likely to give Defendants actual notice of the action, and that the publication be made once a week for four successive weeks. FOR GOOD CAUSE SHOWN: IT IS SO ORDERED:

DATED: 10/14/22 HONORARY COLLEEN K. STERNE JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE COMMUNITY GARDEN, SAN JOSE CREEK MULTI-PURPOSE PATH, AND ARMITOS PARK IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NOS. 9007 AND 9084 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., Monday, December 5, 2022, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 nonrefundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bidopportunities. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plantings and equipment necessary to construct and deliver the specified COMMUNITY GARDEN, SAN JOSE CREEK MULTI-PURPOSE PATH, AND ARMITOS PARK IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NOS. 9007 AND 9084. Work includes construction of a new community garden with raised garden beds, outdoor classroom, outdoor picnic area with pizza oven, installation of new playground equipment and surfacing material, constructing ADA accessible walkways, ramps and curbs, construction of the multi-purpose path and all project associated clearing, grubbing, grading, asphalt, concrete, drainage, fencing, signage and landscape work. The contract period is one hundred (100) Working Days. Deadline to submit Requests For Information (RFI) electronically to jplummer@ cityofgoleta.org is Monday, November 21, 2022. A Pre-Bid Meeting is not scheduled for this project. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed or submitted to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received or postmarked within three (3) City business days after the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR COMMUNITY GARDEN, SAN JOSE CREEK MULTI-PURPOSE PATH, AND ARMITOS PARK IMPROVEMENTS PROJECT NOS. 9007 AND 9084.” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class “A” Contractor’s license, or specialty licensing in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 22300, the successful bidder may substitute certain securities for funds withheld by CITY to ensure performance under the Contract or, in the alternative, request the CITY to make payment of retention to an escrow agent. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact JoAnne Plummer in writing at jplummer@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA _____________________________ Deborah Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: November 10, 2022 and November 17, 2022

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