Santa Barbara Independent 11/03/22

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Performed to Live Music

Bill T. Jones/ Arnie Zane Company What Problem?

Bill T. Jones, Artistic Director

Tue, Nov 15 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre “Visually and sonically stunning.” The New York Times This new work from Tony Award-winning MacArthur “Genius“ Bill T. Jones features a live original score and excerpts from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s I Have a Dream speech.

Nominated for three Grammy Awards and three Americana Music Association awards

Allison Russell

Wed, Nov 16 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall “Her abstract poetry mixed with a literal mind is just unbelievable…this is one of the best conceptual albums I’ve ever heard” – Brandi Carlile A member of Birds of Chicago and Our Native Daughters, Russell’s solo album Outside Child was released in 2021 to critical acclaim, topping The New York Times’ Best Of list.

Santa Barbara Debut

Matthew Whitaker Thu, Nov 17 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall “What this prodigy can do better than anything else, and arguably anyone else, is play piano, organ and keyboards.” DownBeat

Jazz Series Lead Sponsor: Manitou Fund Presented in association with UCSB Global Engagement, as part of International Education Week

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535

Special Thanks

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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The Fund for Santa Barbara | Community Celebration

offers huge thanks

to the many sponsors, donors, volunteers, and guests who helped raise over $210,000 to help us advance progressive change at our 29th Annual Community Celebration.

Voices Translation and Interpreting Ser vices

Event Co-Hosts: Chelsea Lancaster and Wendy Sims-Moten Donna & Patrick Will

Events Manager: Elly Iverson Staff Marcos Vargas, Executive Director / Patricia Solorio, Associate Director / Andrés Armenta,

Office Manager / Executive Assistant / Alina Rey Keswani, Development & Communications

Manager / Kathleen Knight, Capacity Building Manager / David Melendrez, YMC Coordinator / Alex Murkison, Development Associate / Tania Reyes, Grant Programs Manager Interns Peyton Bivona / Sam Gilman

1219 State St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 | 120 E. Jones St. Suite #110, Santa Maria, CA 93454 | (805) 962-9164 | fundforsantabarbara.org 4

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporter Ryan P. Cruz Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Callie Fausey, Melea Maglalang, Zoha Malik, Lola Watts Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

volume 36 # 877, Nov. 3- 10, 2022

COVER STORY

25

Where the Wild Things Really Are

UCSB Professor Peter Alagona Discovers Why So Many Creatures Now Call Cities Home by Matt Kettmann

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 ON THE COVER: Photo by NPS. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

IN AN ANDEAN OASIS Indy reader Craig Harris recently traveled to Urubamba, a town in the Sacred Valley of southeastern Peru.

CRAIG HARRIS

TABLE of CONTENTS

“At an elevation of 10,000 feet, the region produces the best white corn (known as choclo) in the world,” he writes us. “And nestled in the Andes, it offers some of the best hiking in the world—from Machu Picchu to Choquequirao to the Salkantay, it’s a trekker’s paradise.” “Urubamba is full of delicious food,” Harris said. “Plates include beef tenderloin a los aromas — meat in creamy blue cheese and coca orange sauces accompanied with garlic fettucine (my favorite). You can also sample alpaca meat or cuy (guinea pig), a local favorite.” “The local indigenous population, known as Q’eros, holds a strong presence throughout the valley. They dress in traditional attire and are descendants of the Incas. … The massive mountain of Chicón overlooks Urubamba. On a clear day, one can see for miles the beauty of this Andean oasis.”

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

WE GROW GOOD TIMES

290 STORKE RD #G, GOLETA, CA (805) 770-3275 // LIC#: C10-0000813

OFFERING PICK-UP &

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23rd Annual 25th Annual

Santa Barbara Empty Bowls Support our neighbors in need at the beloved community soup fundraiser.

Sun, Nov 13 • 11am-3pm

Sun, Dec 5 • 11am-3pm Foodbank Warehouse • 4554 Hollister (next to Page Youth Center) Foodbank Warehouse • 4554 Hollister (next to Page Youth Center)

• Join friends in person • Choose your bowl • Gourmet soup to go

• Join friends in person • Choose your own bowl • Festive raffle • Gourmet soup to go • Exclusive restaurant discounts • Handmade ceramics marketplace • Warehouse tours • Festive raffle • Warehouse tours • Handmade holiday marketplace

Tickets: $30 Tickets: $30

FoodbankSBC.org/SBEB22 FoodbankSBC.org/SBEB21 Or scan code with smartphone

David and Julie Siegel • Thomchin Family Foundation

and Don Thompson • Carolyn and Philip Wyatt BenMary Page Youth Center • Katherine Bower • Katherine Bower • Susan and Jeff Bridges • Barbara Ford • NS Ceramic Brylen Technologies, Inc. • California Learning Center • Leon and Elizabeth Olson • Maryan Schall • Village Properties Clay Studios • Danyel Dean & Peter Castellanos • Eji Experiences • Food from the Heart • Ford Family • Sadie Hall • Susan Hersberger • Cyndee Howard • Donnalyn Karpeles • Elizabeth & Leon Olson • Susan Rose • Santa Barbara Airbus • David & Julie Siegel • Mary Thompson

THANK YOU, THANK YOU, SPONSORS!

SPONSORS!

PARALLEL STORIES Mecca: Susan Straight

THURSDAY | NOVEMBER 17 | 5:30 PM The New York Times award-winning author Susan Straight returns to read from her latest and much lauded novel, Mecca. Set in Southern California’s inland and high desert area, this is a story of freeways, wildfires, secrets, and struggles that is a love song for a place and its people. Told from different points of view in interwoven narratives, Mecca speaks of loneliness and grief, family, and home, and the ways in which language, with its power and peculiarities carries a culture’s hopes and fears. With courage and grace, Straight looks closely at the California few see, pushes deep into the difficult territories of the past few years, and shifts how we see the land and each other. Book signing to follow.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net

Location: Mary Craig Auditorium, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/$10 NON-MEMBERS | Purchase tickets online at tickets.sbma.net. 6

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NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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Endorsements

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To read the full versions of our endorsements, visit independent.com/endorsements-2022. U.S. CONGRESS 24th Congressional District: Salud Carbajal

STATE ASSEMBLY 37th District: Gregg Hart

GOLETA

Goleta Union School District, Area 1: Richard Mayer Goleta Union School District, Area 3: Emily Zacarias Hope School District, Area 5: Frann Wageneck

City Council, District 2: James Kyriaco

Santa Barbara City College Board of Trustees: Jonathan Abboud, Marsha Croninger, and Charlotte Gullap-Moore

Measure B (One Cent Sales Tax Hike): Yes

County Board of Education, Area 1: Marybeth Carty

Measure C (Ban on Sale of Flavored Tobacco Products): Yes

PROPOSITIONS

City Council, District 1: Luz Reyes-Martín

CARPINTERIA City Council, District 5: No Endorsement Measure T (General Plan and Zoning Designation): No

LOMPOC Mayor: Jenelle Osborne

SOUTH COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDS Santa Barbara Unified School District, Area 1: Gabe Escobedo Santa Barbara Unified School District, Area 4: Rose Muñoz

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON 104th Concert Season

MASTERSERIES AT THE LOBERO THEATRE SEASON SPONSOR:

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022, 7:30PM

HÉLÈNE GRIMAUD

, piano

Internationally acclaimed French pianist Hélène Grimaud returns to the Lobero stage for a transformative recital performance featuring Schumann’s Kreisleriana, Op.16, along with a selection of evanescent miniatures by Chopin, Debussy, Satie, and Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov, which, in Grimaud’s own words, “conjure atmospheres of fragile reflection, a mirage of what was—or what could have been.” Sponsor: Alison & Jan Bowlus Co-Sponsors: CAMA Women’s Board • Nancy & Byron K. Wood Concert Partners: Stephen Cloud • Raye Haskell Melville • Maureen & Les Shapiro

Lobero Theatre Box Office ⫽ (805) 963-0761 ⫽ lobero.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA

Proposition 1: Constitutional Right to Reproductive Freedom: Yes Propositions 26 and 27: Legalized Gambling: No to Both Proposition 28: Music and Arts Funding for Public Schools K-12: Yes Proposition 29: Establishes Minimal Medical Staffing Requirements for Dialysis Centers: No Proposition 30: Income Tax to Fund Electric Vehicle Rebates: No Proposition 31: Bans Sale of CertainFlavored Tobacco Products: Yes

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Working for our

students and

our community! Endorsed by: Sen. Monique Limon Fmr. Sen Hannah-Beth Jackson Santa Barbara Women’s Political Committee Montecito Journal

www.voteyes4moore.com

Paid for by Gullap-Moore for SBCC Trustee 2022 FPPC# 1450730 INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until November 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


OCT. 27 - NOV. 3, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CANNABIS

Supes Greenlight Two Cannabis Projects

COU RTESY

COURTS & CRIME

Reject Appeals to Santa Claus Lane’s Roots Dispensary and Nojoqui Farms Cannabis Cultivation Project COU RTESY

Joe Armendariz—has been hired to function as lobbyist for the new dispensary—the first of six slated to be located in the county’s unincorporated land mass. Zimmer and Bozanich have sparred heatedly and personally in the weeks preceding Tuesday’s hearing with taking potshots at the ethics of the other. To the extent any such pyrotechnics were on display Tuesday, it was between Zimmer and Supervisor Das Williams, who represents the district in question. He took issue with opponents whose approach, he complained, was “attack, attack, attack!” Zimmer objected PUTTING DOWN ROOTS: The proposed Roots Carpinteria cannabis dispensary is one step closer to opening on Carpinteria’s Santa and sought to respond, but her Claus Lane. allotted time was exhausted. She did note that the “institutional case, the supervisors were told by opponents bias” in favor of approving the dispensary by by Nick Welsh uesday’s Santa Barbara County Board there were two such sites, both surf camps county staff was so intense it constituted “a of Supervisors meeting wasn’t all that catered exclusively to students under 18. rolling due process violation.” Supervisor Bob Nelson, no cheerleader Supervisors Steve Lavagnino and Gregg about cannabis, but for much of its duration, it certainly felt like it was. of the cannabis industry, noted that traffic Hart both described visiting cannabis disWhile the debate at times got convoluted studies showed that a new coffee shop at the pensaries at various times and being struck and contentious, the punch line of the day site would increase traffic twice as much as by how professionally run they were. was short and simple. The supervisors gave the proposed dispensary would. Should the Lavagnino—now concluding his third term their collective thumbs-up to two cannabis supervisors reject a coffee shop from occu- in office—noted he was invariably the youngprojects that had been previously approved pying the vacant space once home to an art est person present aside from dispensary staff. by the county’s Planning Commission and gallery? he wondered. subsequently appealed by their neighbors. Nelson also took issue with the opponents’ argument that the surf camps constituted sensitive receptor sites. As the father of three teenage sons and a former high school teacher, Nelson said, he was keenly mindful of Farther up the coast about four miles south the looming temptation posed by drugs like of Buellton, a blueberry farmer and rival Barring a reversal by the California Coastal cannabis. While the surf camps operated out cannabis grower took exception to the Commission, a new cannabis dispensary of storefronts 150 feet from the proposed dis- approval given to a new 20-acre cannabis dubbed Roots Carpinteria will soon be going pensary site, Nelson argued the actual teach- grow secured by the Nojoqui Farms Caninto the sprawling beachside shopping area ing took place on the beach itself, located well nabis Cultivation Project at the former site located on Santa Claus Lane. The supervisors beyond the 750-foot buffer zone. of the Sunburst organic farms. At issue was The battle over Santa Claus Lane, however, how much water the new cannabis operation unanimously approved this project — bitterly fought by some of the merchants, appears far from over. The legal representative would use and whether that glass—metamany nearby residents, and one of the major and chief spokesperson for the opposition phorically—was half empty or half full. Agents for the operation argued that they’d commercial owners in the shopping com- has been Jana Zimmer, a former member of plex—rejecting arguments made by oppo- the California Coastal Commission, not to be using only one-half as much water as the nents that the additional traffic generated by mention a former attorney with the County former organic produce farm and that they the new dispensary would overwhelm the Counsel’s Office. Zimmer, ever a formidable had 10 years’ worth of water use records to already-strained parking capacity of the sur- foe, left no stone unturned or any argument back it up. left unstated, establishing along the way a Representatives of a nearby blueberry rounding beachfront environs. This added strain, the dispensary’s crit- voluminous record upon which she can take farm owner—and a neighboring cannabis ics contended, would effectively limit beach her case to the Coastal Commission on what’s operator—were not impressed. The Nojoqui Farms’ operation, they claimed, would still be access to the untold number of visitors who regarded as an all but certain appeal. Zimmer’s nemesis throughout was the drawing down the groundwater basin upon make the Santa Claus Lane Beach so populated every summer weekend. They also county’s former de facto cannabis czar, Den- which they all must rely. By law, they insisted, argued the dispensary would destroy the nis Bozanich, who played a pivotal role craft- the new cannabis operators should be allowed family-friendly beach vibe of Santa Claus ing the county’s cannabis ordinances after to pump water from the ground for only four Lane, violating in the process state and voters statewide voted to legalize the sale and months out of the year. county restrictions that barred dispensaries possession of recreational cannabis. BozaThe legal validity of that assertion, from opening shop within 750 feet of what nich — along with former Carpinteria city however, depends entirely on whether are known as “sensitive receptor sites.” In this councilmember and outspoken conservative the water pumped is defined as “surface

ROOTS CARPINTERIA DISPENSARY

NOJOQUI FARMS CANNABIS CULTIVATION PROJECT

The surviving driver in a fatal head-on collision, Kyle Nelson, 22, of Goleta, was arrested for gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, according to a statement from Buellton CHP officer Gabe Rodriguez. The crash occurred early 10/28 near the junction between Highway 101 and State Route 1 when Nelson, who was driving southbound at 80 mph, attempted to overtake slower traffic and “wantonly passed over solid double yellow lines,” speeding into oncoming traffic, according to Rodriguez. Nelson’s Ford Hybrid collided head-on with a Chevy Malibu carrying driver Jenna Causby, 19, and her passenger, Dorothyann Guthrie, 20, both from Lompoc. Both women were pronounced dead on the scene, and Nelson was taken to Cottage Hospital with major injuries.

COMMUNITY COU RTESY

T

Denise Hippach (pictured left) was sworn onto the bench by Presiding Judge Gustavo Lavayen (right) on 10/31, becoming the county’s first African-American Superior Court judge. Previously a senior deputy attorney with the County Counsel’s office, Judge Hippach has an extensive résumé since graduating from the USC School of Law and passing the bar in 2003. She served as a prosecutor in Riverside County and in Canyon County, Idaho, as well as with the Idaho Attorney General’s Office. She was a panel attorney for California’s Judicial Council’s indigent appellants program, a staff attorney with L.A. Dependency Lawyers, and Deputy County Counsel for L.A. County. She was appointed by Governor Gavin Newsom to take the place of retiring judge Jim Herman.

Mutual aid is a common precept among firefighting agencies, but these past several months found an entire contingent from the Chumash Fire Department staffing the U.S. Forest Services’ Figueroa Mountain station—help they were thanked for during a 10/27 ceremony at the station. The Chumash department is often called away on calls for mutual aid — 50 sorties to fires in 10 states so far this year—but this one was a staffing duty and closer to home: “This is historically Chumash land,” said JP Zavalla, fire chief for the department, “and we have many sacred sites here in the Los Padres National Forest. The Chumash Fire Department and the U.S. Forest Service have a common

CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news.

CONT’D ON PAGE 10 

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OCT. 27 - NOV. 3, 2022

COURTS & CRIME

Judge Slams ‘Sit-Lie’ Ordinance

A

federal judge has ruled that Santa Barbara’s “sit-lie” ordinance, which bans homeless people from sitting or lying on portions of State and Milpas streets, qualifies as “selective enforcement” and is constitutionally insupportable. “The Santa Barbara ordinance does not provide a rational basis for distinguishing between people sitting while dining outside, people sitting on the sidewalk to watch a parade, and homeless people sitting to rest their legs,” wrote federal judge David Carter in an opinion recently published in Westlaw. “This ordinance appears to ban homeless people from ever sitting down when the City has left them no alternative.” Judge Carter contended that City Hall could have made a more constitutionally supportable case for the ordinance by grounding it in legitimate public health concerns, such as blocking intersections or access to fire hydrants. Instead, he noted, the ordinance created exceptions for people “patronizing a commercial establishment conducted on a public sidewalk.” The ordinance was enacted in recent years in response to people on the streets sitting and lying on heavily trafficked sidewalks. The ordinance does allow sitting and lying between 2 a.m. and 7 a.m., prompting Judge Carter to opine, “The ordinance requires homeless people to remain standing for 19 hours a day. When they are finally allowed to sleep at 2 a.m., it is only for five hours, no

Endorsed by

Paid Political Advertisement; Paid for by Gregg Hart for Assembly 2022

DERRICK CURTIS PRODUCTIONS

BASSH 2022

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 9

THE ART AND SOUL OF DANCE

goal of protecting our resources here.” Full story at independent.com/chumash-fire.

CITY

PHOTOGRAPHY

The City Council on 11/1 held an unscheduled performance review of City Attorney Ariel Calonne, who’s been on paid leave since late July following an undisclosed incident inside the City Attorney’s Office. HR Director Wendy Levy said she could not discuss the content of the review, nor if any action was taken by the end of it. Assistant City Attorney Sarah Knecht is continuing to function as City Attorney in Calonne’s absence, Levy said. Calonne was hired in 2014 and earns approximately $280,000 a year. The City Attorney is one of two positions over which the City Council—and not the City Administrator—has direct hiring and firing authority.

FRITZ OLENBERGER

FRIDAY & SATURDAY

PUBLIC SAFETY

NEW VIC THEATER 33 W. Victoria St., SANTA BARBARA Tickets are on sale at the New Vic Theater.

805-965-5400 https://store.ensembletheatre.com/events THE INDEPENDENT

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CAR P I NTE R IA-SUMMER L AN D FI R E DE PARTME NT

NOV. 11 & 12, at 7:30 PM

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matter how cold and dark the night may be. “However, unlike the city-wide bans in Jones and Martin,” Judge Carter went on, “the Santa Barbara ordinance applies in only one area of the City. This geographic limitation may ultimately mean the ban does not violate the Eighth Amendment; it may simply scatter unhoused people from downtown Santa Barbara to residential areas without adequate shelter.” The ruling was rendered this past August in response to a motion by City Hall to dismiss a federal lawsuit filed on behalf of three homeless individuals by L.A. civil rights attorney Stephen Yagman, who accused the City of Santa Barbara of waging a “eugenics campaign against the poor.” Ironically, Judge Carter’s ruling does not resolve the issue that gave rise to Yagman’s initial filing, the city’s oversized vehicle ordinance. Even more ironic, at least according to Tom Shapiro, the city’s chief litigator, is that Judge Carter ruled on an issue that Yagman never brought up in his legal papers. As a result, Shapiro said, the city never presented argument or evidence in defense of the sit-lie ordinance. “This isn’t a final ruling on anything,” Shapiro stressed. “We have evidence to present. We have an argument to make. And we will be responding.” Yagman stated he intends to file a restraining order to stop City Hall from enforcing —Nick Welsh the sit-lie ordinance.

A white Tesla Model Y was found in the Carpinteria Salt Marsh early 10/31. An engine crew with Carpinteria-

Summerland Fire Protection District was the first dispatched to Sand Point Road, a private road along the ocean between Padaro Beach and Carpinteria. Firefighters found the vehicle stuck in four feet of water. Later in the day, the Sheriff’s Office found the registered owner of the vehicle, who “thought he would go driving on the beach,” Sheriff’s spokesperson Raquel Zick related, “and got stuck.” No charges were being brought, she said, and it was the owner’s responsibility to remove the car. No hazardous materials were found to have been spilled into the marsh, said Noah Tunney, a battalion chief with the Carp-Summerland fire department. A 68-year-old man was killed after overturning his Chevy Silverado pickup off the 154 just east of Zaca Station Road on 10/27. According to a report from Buellton CHP officer Michael Griffith, the man was driving eastbound on the highway around 4 p.m. when, “for unknown reasons,” he stopped on the southbound shoulder and allowed his truck to “travel down a steep dirt embankment” and eventually into a metal guardrail, causing his pickup to flip onto its roof. When emergency personnel arrived, the man was extracted and “after extensive life-saving measures” was pronounced dead on the scene. The driver’s name is being withheld pending notification of next of kin.

GOLETA The old bridge that traverses the reeds and shallows of Lake Los Carneros began to shiver underfoot about CONT’D ON PAGE 12 


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOUSING

RYAN P. C RUZ

Tenants Rally over High Rent

T

here’s nothing spookier than rent in Santa Barbara — at least according to one of the many handmade signs on display during the Rent’s Too High Tenants Rally held over Halloween weekend in front of the Santa Barbara Courthouse, where area residents feeling the squeeze from rising rents shared their own horror stories. The event was organized by the Santa Barbara Tenants Union, with several advocates from the Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE) also participating and sharing their own experiences working with residents. “The rent’s too damn high,” said Santa Barbara Tenants Union cofounder and CAUSE advocate Stanley Tzankov, “because we’re forced to commute farther, pack in tighter, and wait longer for repairs — if they even happen — and that’s just for those of us who haven’t already been pushed out of the region yet.” He encouraged the city to pass rent control, enforce penalties on landlords who evict illegally, provide support for legal representation for tenants, and dedicate funding for “truly affordable housing.”

Dora Maria Perez has been working with CAUSE for more than 20 years, helping advocate for tenants and inform them of their legal rights in disputes with landlords. During the rally, she shared the stories of several Spanish-speaking families in the area, including one family of four recently evicted from a studio apartment who moved into their landlord’s garage space “alongside garden tools,” Perez said, until they could find a new home. In addition to applying pressure to local and state leaders — including the four city councilmembers who have voted against rent control — the speakers at Saturday’s rally encouraged tenants to form their own “tenant associations” with neighbors to inform themselves of their rights. The City Council has traditionally been split on the issue of a rent cap, but with the state’s annual rent cap of 10 percent expected to expire, tenant advocates are hoping that Santa Barbara will pass its own local cap soon. “After 2030 there’s no limit,” CAUSE organizer Wendy Santamaria said. “They can raise it to anything they want.”

48TH ANNIVERSARY SALE WEEKEND Friday- Sunday, November 4, 5, 6

—Ryan P. Cruz

CANNABIS CONT’D FROM P. 9 water” — though pumped from underground — or subterranean in origin. By state law, surface waters are subject to greater protections. The appellants all insisted the water Nojoqui Farms would pump was surface in origin; Nojoqui Farms operators insisted otherwise. All parties buttressed their arguments with testimony of dueling geologists and hydro-geologists. Experts for the appellants claimed that the increased pumping would draw down water levels in Nojoqui Creek. The expert for the applicant claimed his numbers said just the opposite. Before it was over, the experts hired by the appellants would accuse the applicant’s expert of being a “pseudo-scientist.” The accused pseudoscientist countered by accusing one of his detractors, the blueberry farmer, of using far more water than he publicly admitted. The blueberry farmer denied the claim. Ultimately, the supervisors were persuaded that they lacked the jurisdiction to resolve the dispute over water rights. That

Chaucer's Books

call, they were informed by legal counsel, lay in the hands of the California Water Control Board or the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. And these agencies, the supervisors were told, could only weigh in after the supervisors had given the Nojoqui Farm operators the green light. Supervisor Joan Hartmann objected that this process was “ass-backwards.” It was all well and good, she said, for the Nojoqui Farm operators to share their water use rates with the county every two months, she said. But what recourse was there if the increased pumping reduced the water levels in the creek? With California shifting from a “mega drought” into what is now known as a “giga-drought,” she argued, greater caution was called for especially given that Santa Barbara ranked in the state’s top one percent for vegetable and fruit cultivation. Hartmann was the only supervisor to vote against the new cannabis project; even she termed her opposition a “protest vote.”

n

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Consulting Group. The report concludes that housing production has suffered because of a lack of available land, an environmentally prohibitive land-use culture, and the South Coast’s inordinately large number of college-aged students and retired seniors, creating a higher demand for either highly subsidized units or high-end luxury units, respectively.

PUBLIC HEALTH Now that so much testing for COVID-19 is done through home kits and cannot be officially tracked through lab reports, the presence of the virus in wastewater has become an important indicator of its presence in the Santa Barbara community. Since the earliest days of the pandemic, the city’s wastewater division at El Estero Water Resource Center incorporated testing for the virus into its routine water-quality examinations. The most recent findings show the virus edging upward — though Dr. Lynn Fitzgibbons, an expert in infectious diseases, was not too alarmed yet: “One week is probably too little to tell us much.” Full story at independent.com/sewage-surveillance. Pacific Pride Foundation is holding a Second Dose Monkeypox Clinic on 11/7, 2-5 p.m., at its Santa Barbara office (608 Anacapa St., Ste. A). Individuals who received the first vaccine must wait 28 days for their second dose. Pacific Pride’s press release states there’s no need to start the series again if a long interval lapses between the first and second doses. The medication is limited in availability, and priority is given to people — ages 18+ only — who meet eligibility requirements set by the state, generally based on exposure. According to the County of Santa Barbara, 17 confirmed cases have occurred countywide. See pacificpridefoundation .org/mpx. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ELECTION 2022

W

ith less than a week before next Tuesday’s elections, roughly 17 percent of Santa Barbara County’s registered voters have turned in their ballots. To the extent party affiliation matters — and in Santa Barbara, it does — registered Democrats had turned in nearly twice as many ballots as their Republican counterparts as of October 28 — roughly 20,000 Democratic cast ballots to 11,200 by Republicans. Declined-to-state ballots made up 8,400 of the rest. Of the nearly 39,600 ballots, roughly 31,000 were cast by voters older than 50. Of those, nearly twothirds were age 65 or older. And 79 percent were White. With few contested high-profile races on the ballot, it’s uncertain what kind of a last-minute push can and will be mustered in the last few days. County elections czar Joe Holland said he expects 150,000 to 160,000 more ballots to be cast by this November’s mail-in election deadline. Of the county’s 233,879 registered voters, 110,362 are Democrats, 65,537 are declined-to-states, and 57,980 are Republican. More than half — 151,914 — are White, and 70,154 are Latino. While more than

half — 110,000 — are older than 50, 65,000 registered voters are 18-34. To a remarkable degree, many key local races were decided before a single ballot was cast in this June’s primary. Two supervisorial candidates — Steve Lavagnino and Laura Capps — faced no opposition at all, likewise for John Savrnoch, soon to be the county’s next district attorney. The race for Assembly — pitting Democratic Party stalwart and county supervisor Gregg Hart against Republican Mike Stoker, who most recently served as a Trump appointee as the head of the Western Regional EPA and takes credit for originating the chant “Lock ’er up” — was never infused with any sense of palpable urgency even though the seat was vacant. Thus far, Hart has reported raising nearly $600,000 — with unions and organized labor providing the bulk of that — while Stoker reported having raised $245,000, with $13,668 still in the bank. On the South Coast, the races generating political heat are school board showdowns between cultural conservatives and progressive-tilting candidates. —Nick Welsh

SALUD CARBAJAL

U.S. Congressmember, 24th District

GREGG HART

State Assembly, 37th District

LUZ REYES-MARTíN

Goleta City Council, 1st District

JAMES KYRIACO

Goleta City Council, 2nd District

MONICA SOLORZANO

Carpinteria City Council, 1st District

AL CLARK

Carpinteria City Council, 5th District

GLORIA SOTO

Santa Maria City Council, 3rd District SB County Board of Education, District 1

MARSHA CRONINGER

SB City College Trustee, Area 5 COU RTE SY

J

Endorsed candidates for November 2022

MARYBETH CARTY

BUSINESS

Tri-County Produce Property Sells for $9.7M

Voter Guide

ohn Dixon, proprietor of Tri-County Produce since 1985, has broadened the ownership of the 1.35 acres the 46-year-old market sits on and added a trio of real-estate investors who paid $9.7 million, he confirmed on Tuesday. In an official statement, Dixon said he’d added partners “to help me figure out what is the next best step,” adding that “I have not sold the Tri-County Produce business.” At age 61, Dixon said he was considering retirement in the next 10 years from the business he and his father, Jim, acquired in 1985. As he con- Tri-County Produce proprietor John Dixon sulted with financial planners and real estate experts, “An important thing I have the city, including residential. He, his partlearned is that selling our real estate without ners, and possibly other investors would a plan for Tri-County Produce makes no be engaged in long-term planning, and “I sense—and neither does selling a business am looking into ways to someday transfer without selling the property.” the Tri-County business, potentially to the Dixon’s new partners are Austin Herlihy staff,” Dixon wrote in an email. All things and Chris Parker of Radius Commercial considered, the only thing he promised was Real Estate and Steve Leonard, the “godfa- that the produce market would continue for ther” of Pacifica Capital Investments. Her- many years as it has before. lihy, asked for comment, said the project “The staff and our loyal customers are was Dixon’s legacy and wanted to give him really my priority in determining the best his moment. “I can say that we are excited to future for Tri-County Produce,” Dixon said. begin this partnership with John Dixon and In fact, his longest tenured employee, Roke his thoughtful vision to continue the legacy Fukumura, will celebrate his 100th birthday on November 27 at Tri-County, where he of Tri-County Produce.” Dixon recognized that the land could has worked for the past 32 years. “I hope you be considered “infill” property and could can join us in that beautiful monumental provide “needed real estate resources” for event,” Dixon said. —Jean Yamamura

GABE ESCOBEDO

SB Unified School District Trustee, Area 1

ROSE MUNOZ

SB Unified School District Trustee, Area 4

RICHARD MAYER

Goleta Elementary School Trustee, Area 1

EMILY ZACARIAS

Goleta Elementary School Trustee, Area 3

KATHLEEN WERNER Goleta Water District 2

FINAL WEEK TO VOTE -- MAIL BALLOTS BEFORE NOV 8

Early Voters Skew Old, White, Democrat

SPENCER BRANDT

Isla Vista Community Services District Alex Padilla, U.S. Senator Gavin Newsom, Governor Eleni Koulanakis, Lt. Governor Shirley N. Weber, Secretary of State Malia M. Cohen, Controller Fiona Ma, Treasurer Rob Bonta, Attorney General Ricardo Lara, Insurance Commissioner Sally J. Lieber, Board of Equalization Tony K. Thurmond, Superintendent of Public Instruction

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welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls Buellton Camila Mar Delgado, 9/2/2022 Goleta Lena Sol Lee, 9/7/2022 Isabella Eliana Hernandez, 9/27/2022 Gianna Aaliyah Carrillo, 9/30/2022

Cottage Celebrates NICU Graduates

Lompoc Monique Avalos, 9/22/2022 Santa Barbara Eleanor Ruby Tennant, 9/1/2022 Penelope Yvette Martinez Muñoz, 9/17/2022 Lucia Estrada, 9/24/2022 Kinsley Lynn Powell, 10/4/2022 Analayah Silvia Anaya, 10/6/2022

Baby Boys Buellton Jackson Alexander Craig, 9/11/2022 Goleta Levron Natan Cohen, 9/2/2022 Cristián James Davin, 9/7/2022 Mason Wang, 9/27/2022 Robin James Brown Gifford, 9/29/2022 Porter Jan Renga, 9/29/2022

Hundreds of Cottage Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) graduates and their families joined Cottage Health physicians and nurses at the Santa Barbara Zoo for a NICU family reunion filled with tender memories, the fun of seeing each other again, lunch, games and face painting.

Lompoc Brendan Leiting, 9/9/2022 Warren Manuel Garcia, 10/7/2022

When a newborn needs specialized medical treatment, the Haselton Family Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Cottage Children’s Medical Center provides state-of-the-art medical care that makes all the difference for the tiniest and most vulnerable newborns.

At Cottage Children’s Medical Center we care for more than 12,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and 11 specialized outpatient clinics. Learn more at cottagechildrens.org.

The Home Page

14

Learn more at: cottagehealth.org/nicu

Santa Barbara Mateo Christopher Jimenez, 8/23/2022 Trayvonne Lee Horton, 9/6/2022 Paul Rowan Hofer, 9/15/2022 Oakley MacDonald, 9/15/2022 Charlie Jay Grant, 9/18/2022 Thomas Lee Adams IV, 9/22/2022 Ellis Jarrah Dvorak, 9/22/2022 Emilio Aziel Felipe Rosales, 9/25/2022 Lincoln David Cunningham, 9/29/2022 Santa Maria Daniel John Araiza, 9/25/2022

ON the Beat

Sarah Sinclair will give you the inside scoop on real estate, going behind the scenes each Sunday to see our region’s casitas, cottages, and castles.

On the Beat spotlights all-things music and music-adjacent newsletter/column by music and arts journalist-critic Josef Woodard

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NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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NEWS of the WEEK

OCT. 27 - NOV. 3, 2022

CONT’D

COURTS & CRIME

‘The End of an Era’? COU RTESY

Youth Orgs Push Back Against Decision to Merge Los Prietos Boys Camp Programs into Santa Maria Juvenile Hall

BREAKING CAMP: Los Prietos Boys Camp has operated in Santa Barbara County since 1945 but will soon close, and its programs will be moved into Santa Maria juvenile hall. by Ryan P. Cruz n 2017, teenager Sammy Chavoya found himself headed down the wrong path, on the wrong side of the law, and eventually stuck in the Santa Barbara County juvenile justice system. He was sent to Los Prietos Boys Camp, the 17-acre facility deep in the Los Padres National Forest that serves as a “lesser alternative” to the juvenile hall in Santa Maria, where more serious youth offenders are typically housed. Up at camp, far away from the distractions and temptations of life back in Lompoc, Chavoya was given the opportunity to take a step back and evaluate where he was headed in life. More than that, he was given access to counseling, group therapy, and classes that taught him new skills and empowered him to take control of his own life. Five years later, he is a student at West Los Angeles City College, studying film production with his mentor Scott Budnick — executive producer of Just Mercy, The Hangover, and Old School — and well on his way to starting his own career in filmmaking and storytelling. He recently returned from a trip to Boston, where he was part of a roundtable discussion with the Anti-Recidivism Coalition and Boston Celtics. It was a life-changing moment, he said, to travel across the country, visit a juvenile hall in Boston, and speak on his own life experience while sitting right next to Celtics superstar Jaylen Brown. Chavoya credits much of his turnaround to his time at Los Prietos and the weekly leadership programs led by local nonprofit Freedom 4 Youth at the camp, which he says were the “biggest factors” in his life. But with plans in motion to close the camp and instead move the programs into an underused wing at the Santa Maria juvenile hall, now known as the Susan J. Gionfriddo Juvenile Justice Center, Chavoya and advocates from Freedom 4 Youth are worried that future generations will lose out on a facility that has helped youth in Santa Barbara County since 1945. “If it closes, it will be the end of an era,” Chavoya said. “I would just give up on Santa Barbara; I could see so much potential being wasted.” The decision to close the camp is mostly due to declining population in the juvenile justice system, according to Tanja Heitman, chief probation officer of the county’s probation department. Decades ago, the county had three facilities for

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delinquent youth, with the camp housing 70-80 boys at any given time. Combined with both juvenile halls, there could be more than 200 youth detained in the county system. The Santa Barbara facility has since closed, and today, the number of detained youth is 29. At Los Prietos, there are currently three boys. With so few kids, Heitman said it made sense to combine the two facilities, and although the county explored “every option,” it was eventually decided to fold the programming at the camp into a remodeled unit at the juvenile hall. The updates will take place over the next year, during which the Probation Department will hold public meetings on what type of programs can be implemented at the facility. The plan is to create a new unit that would keep all the staff and resources from the camp, but now at the Santa Maria location, which she said would be more accessible for visitors. It will also allow more of the boys to enroll in the programs typically offered only at the camp. “What we all love about the camp is that it’s situated in the national forest,” Heitman said. “We can’t re-create that up in Santa Maria, but we can offer similar opportunities.” In recent years, the juvenile hall — and juvenile justice in general — has undergone reforms to make the system more geared toward rehabilitation than punishment. At the Gionfriddo Center, the cold, cell-block environments have been updated with couches, video games, and workout equipment. Now, one area is called a “Trust Unit,” where doors are unlocked and kids are given space to interact and move as they wish. Even still, some of the advocates with local youth organizations are unconvinced that the hall offers the same holistic freedom and natural solitude of the camp. “You can’t just put up a couch and call it a Trust Unit,” said Billi Jo Starr, cofounder of Freedom 4 Youth. The organization has been pushing for Probation to consider alternatives to closing the camp, like using the $1.5 million set aside for the Santa Maria juvenile hall remodel to instead make the camp secure and move the 26 kids from the hall to the camp. Since the juvenile hall’s operating budget is almost double that of the camp, Starr said, the move would be cheaper in the long run. “If we were really talking about fiscal responsibility, why would we not?” she said.

Heitman said it would be difficult to house kids from juvenile at Los Prietos because it’s technically not secure there and putting up the fences needed to secure the camp would impede wildlife. Overall, the location is not meant for the infrastructure of a juvenile center, she said. Jordan Waller is part of Freedom 4 Youth’s Lived Experience Executive Division and has spent time in both facilities. “Los Prietos is a way better experience than the hall,” he said. “I learned a lot there.” At the camp, Waller said he was enrolled in classes, oneon-one therapy, and group sessions and even joined a culinary program, where he eventually found a love for cooking. He now caters many of the organization’s events. “It was a better life and experience. You don’t get that when you’re locked down,” he said. In the juvenile hall, he said, youth are conditioned for incarceration. There’s a toxic environment that lends itself to fights and leads to more mental-health problems. “You’re not gonna be rehabilitated there,” he said. “You just feel like an animal. You don’t learn anything except ‘I’m bad,’ ” Chavoya said. “I’m not bad. What I did was bad.” There is also the feeling that the youth and their families were not involved in the decision-making process. The decision was somewhat buried in the Probation Department’s budget, and many community members only found out about plans after the choice had been made. Freedom 4 Youth’s director of development, Dylan Griffith, said that there were several viable alternatives to closing the camp. One of those options, he said, would be to expand the camp to accept youth from Ventura and San Luis Obispo counties, similar to the way the camp operated when it first opened. Another would be a change in state legislation that would allow young adult males ages 18 and 19 to qualify to serve their time at the camp, though Heitman said that similar legislation has stalled in the past. In an independent survey of individuals who have spent time at the camp or the hall, Freedom 4 Youth found that 100 percent of participants agreed that the living conditions at Los Prietos “provided them with a healthy environment where their mental and physical needs were cared for,” compared to 18.1 percent at the juvenile hall. More than 59 percent said they would prefer to close the hall over the camp, while zero percent said they would choose to close the camp. Heitman says she hopes to continue to work with the community and hold public meetings where everybody can provide input on what kind of programs they would like to see. She also encourages people to understand that both the camp and the hall have changed dramatically over the years. “A lot of people have this vision of the camp 10 years ago,” she said. A lot of the programs that were once flourishing — like the culinary, auto mechanics, and computer technology programs — have faded away without the population to enroll in them. The new challenges forced the department to “reenvision” what can be done with the resources available now, she said, and although the juvenile justice system is changing, she wants the community to stay involved with the process. “We all have the same goals. We all want the best for our kids,” Heitman said. “We want to give them educational and vocational options that excite them, so that when they return to the community, they come back with the best opportunities.” n

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

15


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

It’s Every Dog for Himself

MAXWELL’S SILVER HAMMER: Chances are, I wouldn’t have known Paul Pelosi had

he walked into my office a week ago. Of course, I know who he is now. Everyone does. He’s House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s 82-year-old erstwhile better half, the one who famously took a hammer blow to the skull by a deranged lunatic and imbiber of various right-wing conspiracy theories and lived to tell the tale. Like everyone else, I was “shocked and horrified” by the attack, though partly for reasons that have nothing to do with the fact that our national political discourse has grown indistinguishable from zombie apocalypse TV shows. For those of us inclined to binge, the $64 million question has become whether we are what we watch or we watch what we are. For me, there are personal reverberations to the attack. About eight years ago, my oldest brother, Philip, was attacked in his Maryland home and killed by someone wielding a hammer. It wasn’t pretty. His blood was on the walls. His teeth were on the floor. Thus far, the Montgomery County police have not managed to crack this case. My brother didn’t lock his doors. He didn’t even bother to close them. He was defiantly extravagant about the precautions he refused to take. He also never owned a cell phone. He didn’t have a computer. If you want to get away with murder, it turns

Re-elect

out, this is the profile of the perfect victim. Readers of this column have gotten to know Philip, albeit osmotically. He’s the one from whom I stole the Theory of Lee. For non-initiates, the Theory of Lee holds that anyone with the first, middle, or last name Lee — or any of its many variants — is disproportionately more prone to commit acts that are either criminal or sociopathic. My brother cultivated many bad habits. He was an unrepentant smoker, brands like Bull Durham, Lucky Strike, and Camel cigarettes. He ate eggs by the dozen and devoured whole packs of bacon in one sitting. When he went to movies, he doused his popcorn in so much butterine that the kernels all but bobbed on the surface. Yet his cholesterol levels were stellar. Philip was a great storyteller; he loved the English language and the English language loved him back. This may have been the only requited romance he ever had. Philip was a great writer. He wrote love poems to women upon whom he developed crushes safely from afar. Maybe he wrote the wrong poem to the wrong woman. Our family and his friends suspect otherwise. He had a creepy, menacing neighbor who lived down the street — we’ll just call him Albert — whom Philip allowed to use his basement to store stuff, but after

a while, friction ensued. Other neighbors also had had problems with Albert. I asked this Albert whether he killed my brother. “Why would I do that?” he answered. I explained my suspicions. Albert listened. If he was going to kill my brother over a thing like that, he replied, he would have killed a couple of other people in the neighborhood too. The fact that they were still alive, he concluded, was proof that he couldn’t have killed my brother. He should have been a Jesuit. In the course of that exchange, Albert told me he had served in military intelligence. As a consequence, he refused to take a lie detector test. He knew too well how the results could be skewed. Over the years, many well-meaning cops were assigned to the case. “I have his picture up on my wall,” one detective assured me. But there were other crimes. They cracked a big cold case about a couple of teenage girls who’d been abducted from a strip mall in the 1970s by meth head carnies. They wrote a book about it. The detectives liked Albert for it, they’d tell us, but then MS-13 — the Salvadoran street gang — would kill a bunch of people and they’d be re-assigned. A few months ago, my younger brother Joseph found a quarter placed with great deliberation on Philip’s gravestone. In some military circles, the placement of coins on gravestones is a tradition; the

coin used denotes the relationship of the person who placed it to the deceased. A penny, for example, means merely that the person who placed it knew the deceased. But a quarter? That means the person who placed it was with the deceased at the time of death. If this were a movie, the hairs on my neck would be standing at attention. The latest detective on the case took the quarter into custody and ran it through all the usual forensic tests. Nothing. I’d call that creepy and menacing. My brother was a knee-jerk contrarian. He worked hard never to be pigeonholed politically. He delighted in proclaiming that Sacco and Vanezetti were “guilty as sin.” He just didn’t think they should have been killed. He wanted nothing to do with any causes that required walking in large numbers with other human beings and chanting. He made a notable exception, however, when Barack Obama was inaugurated as president. Why am I writing about all this? I have no idea. Maybe because I’m writing this on Día de los Muertos. In my honkified upbringing, that’s All Souls Day. Take the occasion to eat something bad for you that tastes good. Try not to get so mad about stupid things. Think kind thoughts. And try to answer the question: Are we what we watch, or do we watch what we are? –Nick Welsh

4th Generation Goleta & Santa Barbara Local

James

F O R G O L E TA C I T Y C O U N C I L

ENDORSED BY

DEMOCRATIC WOMEN OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

Paula Perotte – Goleta Mayor Stuart Kasdin – Goleta Mayor Pro Tempore Salud Carbajal – Member of Congress Hannah-Beth Jackson – Former State Senator Gregg Hart – 2nd District County Supervisor Das Williams – 1st District County Supervisor Susan Salcido – County Superintendent of Schools Vicki Ben-Yaacov – Goleta Union School Board Richard Mayer – Goleta Union School Board Lauren Hanson – Goleta Water District Board Kathleen Werner – Goleta Water District Board Laura Capps – SB Unified School Board Wendy Sims-Moten – SB Unified School Board Jonathan Abboud – SBCC Board of Trustees Jennifer Smith – Goleta Planning Commissioner Janet Wolf, Former County Supervisor Susan Epstein, Former Goleta School Board Member

Margaret Connell – Former Goleta Mayor Kyle Richards – Goleta City Councilmember Monique Limón – State Senator Steve Bennett – Assemblymember Joan Hartmann – 3rd District County Supervisor Steve Lavagnino – 5th District County Supervisor Harry Hagen, County Treasurer-Tax Collector Sholeh Jahangir – Goleta Union School Board Farfalla Borah – Goleta Water District Board Bill Rosen – Goleta Water District Board Virginia Alvarez – SB Unified School Board Kate Ford – SB Unified School Board Rose Munoz – SB Unified School Board Anna Everett – SBCC Board of Trustees Robert Miller – SBCC Board of Trustees Jennifer Fullerton – Goleta Planning Commissioner John Savrnock, District Attorney Elect

16

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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AN

OPINIONS CONT’D

EPIC JOURNEY

40 YEARS

“MUSK BUYS T WIT TER” BY JEFF KOTERBA

Letters

IN THE MAKING

Just in time for Thanksgiving! A film full of life affirming beauty

Goodbye, State Street

A

fter 30 years, The Natural Café on State Street is closing its doors. The issues we have been dealing with since the day we opened have taken an extreme turn for the worst in the last few years. Homelessness, whether it is guest and staff interaction or aggressive panhandling, has always been challenging, but it has now turned into straight-up criminality. Consuming alcohol and drugs in public, using planters for toilets, camping in empty storefronts, or locking themselves in our bathrooms and showering, sleeping, and using drugs is an everyday occurrence. The rat problem has become intolerable. Look under any parklet and you will find rats’ nests. Food is just falling on them from above. The city has no program to address this. Did I mention the bicycles and skateboarders speeding down the closed street, running stop signs, and putting themselves and all pedestrians at risk? All these issues are exacerbated by COVID and the “parklets.” For the most part, they’re cheaplooking, trashy 2' x 4' wood structures that greatly diminish what was once one of the great main streets in the country. They were a great idea when we lost our dining room; no one expected this to go on for multiple years, much less permanently. We took our parklet down last month as it no longer looked good. The city has an outdoor dining program that is more than adequate. We have our dining rooms back. We need State Street back. Government’s job is to level the playing field. This parklet program favors the few at the expense of the many. We need to remove the parklets, clean up State Street, and police it. Why is it so hard for the city to do these simple things? Seems like Job #1 to me. —Kelly Brown, Founder/CEO, Natural Café, Inc.

In Total Aggravation

T

he closure of Loma Alta Drive is an unfortunate decision. I understand the safety concerns of a dangerous mudslide if we get heavy rains, but this early closure presents major problems. As a main artery for City College, the road gives direct access to campus for students and staff; McKinley parents and staff will need to drive around to Cliff Drive. They and Mesa commuters will bear the unnecessary hassle and resulting congestion. Imagine the amount of extra driving time, fuel burned, and pollution increased over the next four-six months. This appears to have been a unilateral decision

without the least effort to solicit the input from invested and inconvenienced parties. Other approaches are: Mitigate the danger by terracing the hillside or putting down jute and seeding; use half the road for one-way traffic until we get a quarter-inch of rain. This decision is extremely aggravating and creates animosity toward elected officials and city managers who impose their will on us without any public participation or due process. Please explain why this decision was made or at least postpone this foolishness until the need is apparent. —Paul Arganbright, S.B.

GRATITUDE REVEALED FILM PREMIERE

Saturday, November 19, 6:30 to 9pm, Tickets $10

Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 Cota St. Santa Barbara

Q&A following with Louie Schwartzberg

Say It Ain’t So

I

saw with astonishment and profound disappointment the Independent’s cover story “Star Map for the Soul.” Empirically, countless scientific studies have found that astrological predictions do no better than chance. Psychology is a serious part of science and the medical profession, but “astrological psychology” is not psychology, science, or medicine. Since astrology has no predictive value, using it to inform psychology necessarily means ignoring the science — and it is dangerous. Astrology grew out of a time when humans did not understand stars or planets, and we made up stories to try to understand the seemingly unpredictable world. Today, using the principles of science, we’ve extended our lifespans, cured diseases, and created devices that connect the whole world. Compare this to the contributions of astrology, the fruits of which are misguided decision-making. As we learned during the pandemic and our struggles with climate change, the public’s understanding of and comfort level with science is literally a matter of life and death. Promoting harmful nonsense masquerading as science does damage. Let’s improve scientific literacy, not erode it.

A community event Sponsored by

Santa Barbara Permaculture Network www.sbpermaculture.org

Remember to Vote!

VOTE Nov. 8th

Drop your ballot, in your SIGNED ENVELOPE in a Drop Box by 8PM November 8th!

Drop off your ballot, in your SIGNED ENVELOPE at any voting location or vote in person by November 8th!

—D. Andrew Howell, Astronomer, Las Cumbres Observatory and UCSB

For the Record

Mail your ballot, in your SIGNED ENVELOPE and postmarked by November 8th!

¶ Last week’s Poodle inverted the state school scores, which were 33 for math and 47 for reading. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

For Drop Box and Polling Place Locations or for Voter Assistance visit www.sbcvote.com A person entitled to register to vote must be a United States citizen, a resident of California, not currently imprisoned in a state or federal prison for the conviction of a felony, not currently found mentally incompetent to vote by a court, and at least 18 years of age at the time of the election. A person may preregister to vote if that person is a is a United States citizen, a resident of California, not currently imprisoned in a state or federal prison for the conviction of a felony, and at least 16 years of age.

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Santa Barbara County Registrar of Voters NOVEMBER 3, 2022

805-568-2200 sbcvote.com

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17


obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Colonel Thomas Ruben Hidalgo

Arthur Conrad Lucero 10/26/1938 - 10/17/2022

1920 - 2022

Barbara 'Bobbi' Didier Arthur Lucero, a Santa Barbara native who worked for 45 years for the Santa Barbara City School System, passed peacefully in the presence of his loving family on October 17, 2022. He was 83 years old. The cause of death was complications from a fall. Mr. Lucero was a larger-thanlife personality whose wit and humor delighted everyone he encountered. He was a father figure to many and well-loved in the Santa Barbara community. Besides working full-time, Art also worked weekends to save up for summer vacations with his family. His children fondly remember the annual camping trips and fun-filled adventures at the various amusement and National Parks. Having played football in high school and competed in city league fast-pitch softball, Art continued his love of sports by cheering for the Dodgers, Rams, and Lakers. In 1956, he married Georgetta Nava who he met in his 8th grade math class taught by Mr. Pezzati at Santa Barbara Junior High. Mr. Pezzati would later teach all four of his children and proudly claimed the title of “match maker” for the Lucero family. Mr. Lucero was a born leader and served as President of the California Schools Employee Association (CSEA) for many years. He received the Shining Star Award for his over 30 years of service to the Santa Barbara Boys and Girls club. He could always be found working and joking with his friends at the club’s booth during Fiesta. They raised thousands of dollars to support after school sports for Santa Barbara’s youth. Arthur Conrad Lucero was born in Santa Barbara California on October 26th, 1938. His father Arthur Lucero Sr. was a chef and restaurant owner. His mother Barbara Cordero was a caterer and SBHS cafeteria worker. In addition to Georgetta, his wife of 65 years, Art is survived by his daughters Lorraine Lucero, Cynthia (Fred) Bittle, Michelle (Robert) Huff, and his son Jimmy (Mary Cashman) Lucero, and his sister Carmen Holloway. He was adored by his 9 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, and extended family. He always referred to his growing beautiful family as “a work of Art”. He will be dearly missed. A celebration of Arthur Lucero’s life will be held in late December, the actual date has not yet been determined. 18

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1954 - 2022

Santa Barbara native son,

Barbara Jean Stevenson Didier died on April 20, 2022 at the age of 67. She leaves behind a better world for having graced the earth. There is much to be said about this special and multi-talented business, community, and family leader. She would want you to know she had a kind heart, a spiritual relationship, and a loving family. In her lifetime, she gave more than she received, yet believed herself to be the wealthiest woman in the world. She loved going for drives with the top up or down (nationally and internationally) and drinking in the beauty of Santa Barbara. She loved her family with all her heart. Her departure leaves a huge hole in the lives she touched. Her greatest gift was her love and appreciation for life, family, friends, children, nature, the arts, and the less fortunate. Her presence motivated others to be better people. Her work-related accomplishments included leadership roles with the State of Connecticut Office of Governor Ella Grasso, National Council on Alcoholism S.B. (now CADA SB), Cox Communications, and Santa Barbara County Association of Governments. She leaves behind her husband Paul, sister Pat, daughter Chelsea and stepdaughter Danielle, Grandchildren Kira and Kyle, and extended family in Montreal, Quebec City, and Connecticut. She was active with volunteer time and treasure with several Santa Barbara Charities, including CADA, Child Abuse Listening & Mediation, Cottage Health, Domestic Violence Solutions, Friendship Adult Day Care Center, Isla Vista Youth Projects, the Granada Theater, United Way of Santa Barbara County, and Visiting Nurses. Having seen much of the world, she is now home, in her final resting place. A rare individual, she will forever be in our hearts and on our minds. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to her favorite charitable cause: the Fun in the Sun program of United Way of Santa Barbara County.

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

Colonel Thomas Ruben Hidalgo, SBHS Class of 1938, passed away peacefully at his home, on October 22, 2022 at the age of 102 years. Born in 1920 to Tomas and Severa Hidalgo in Santa Barbara, CA. Preceded in death by both his parents, sisters, his brother and his loving wife of 72 years, Jennie Nieto Hidalgo. Jennie and Thomas were married in November of 1942 in Santa Barbara, CA where they lived and raised five children. Thomas began his military career by taking ROTC classes at SBHS where he competed and won a medal for Close Order Drill. He enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1939 and was sent to Europe with the 980th Field Artillery Battalion during World War II. He was engaged in battles and campaigns in Normandy, Northern France, the Rhineland, Ardennes, and Central Europe. He distinguished himself in service to his country by earning the Bronze Star, the American Defense Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, and European African Middle Eastern Campaign Medal. After being discharged in June 1945 with the rank of Staff Sargent, he went into business with his father and owned and operated Hidalgo Plumbing on Chapala Street in Santa Barbara. He and his father operated their plumbing shop until the early 1960s when the city bought their property. He was an avid Ham Radio Operator and maintained files on hundreds of contacts he had made throughout the world. In 1950 he was called again by the Army to serve in the Korean Conflict. In Korea he earned the Army Occupation Medal, the Korean Service Medal and a second Bronze Service Star. He was discharged in 1952 from his Korean Conflict duties with the rank of 1st Lieutenant. As an Army officer he continued his military career with the Santa Barbara National Guard where he was called upon many times throughout the years. Some of those additional duties included: assisting fire fighters during the Refugio Fire of 1955, helping to control the streets of Los Angeles during the Watts Riots of 1965 and during the burning of the Bank of America in Isla Vista in 1970. In November of 1977, by Executive order of the President of the United States, Thomas was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for outstanding service as a Citizen Soldier of the U.S. Army. He

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was the National Guard Battalion commanding officer of the 144th Field Artillery stationed at Santa Barbara. He later was stationed at the National Guard Armory in Los Angeles until his retirement in 1980 when he retired as a full Colonel. Our family is very proud to know that our father contributed so much to his country. After his Military retirement in 1980, he continued his civilian life working in the Plumbing Department of UCSB. He was a member of the Chancellor’s Advisory Committee where he negotiated for many of the contract benefits that the University employees enjoy today. He was very proud that he received the Chancellor’s Outstanding Employee of the year 3 different years. At the age of 72, he retired from the University in 1989. In September of 2015, Thomas went on the Honor Flight and visited the Capitol of the United States, Arlington Cemetery, and witnessed the changing of the guard. A trip that he would recommend to any Veteran to attend. Colonel Hidalgo is survived by his sons: Thomas E. Hidalgo and Robert J. (Annette) Hidalgo. His daughters: Cynthia Patricia (Ronald) Dugger; Stephanie Annette (Lawrence, deceased) Kubecka and Jacqueline Yvette (Michael) Wilson. Grandsons: Thomas M. Hidalgo, Brian P.(Debra) Coker and Sean T. Coker; Andrew S. (Major Cassandra, USAF) Hidalgo; Matthew (Kelly) Hidalgo; Joseph (Angeline) Hidalgo; and Marcus (Candace) Almendras, USN. Great granddaughters: Aubriana, Kylie and Savannah Coker; Gabrielle Almendras and Adrian Hidalgo. Great Grandsons: James and Theodore Hidalgo; Lawrence and Anthony Almendras and Gabriel Thomas Hidalgo. Arrangements are being made by Welch-Ryce Haider Mortuary with a viewing at the Mortuary at (15 E. Sola, Santa Barbara) at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, November 10, 2022 and following after, a graveside Full Military Honors Ceremony at the Santa Barbara Cemetery, 910 Channel Drive, Santa Barbara, at 1:15 p.m. He joins his maternal grandparents, parents, and his brother at the Santa Barbara Cemetery where he will be laid to rest in the Veteran’s Section. At this time, the ashes of his beloved wife, Jennie N. Hidalgo who passed on April 13, 2015, will be interred with Thomas. May they continue their marriage in eternity. In lieu of flowers, our father would request that when you see a soldier in uniform, or a Veteran, that you thank him or her for their service to our country.

Parker James Matson 5/1/2000 - 11/10/2021

It’s with a heaviness in our hearts we announce the loss of our beloved Parker James Matson on Wednesday, November 10, 2021. Parker was born on May 1, 2000, in Santa Barbara, where he later attended Santa Barbara High School and Santa Barbara City College. Parker was known for his quick wit and sense of humor. He enjoyed woodworking with his Grandfather (Jim Kindron), playing baseball, fishing, camping, hiking, spending time with family, making us all laugh, and of course anything that has to do with rockets and space, especially black holes. Parker was one of the smartest people we know. He was so full of life and there was never a dull moment with him. Some of our best memories are when Parker tried to make us all laugh by doing some crazy thing he thought up. Whether is was showing us videos of him riding his bike off the Santa Barbara Stearn’s Wharf, jumping out of a tree in his tighty whities into the snow, sticking his finger into a pot of boiling water and laughing so loud that everyone around could hear him so we couldn’t get enough air in our lungs because we were all laughing so hard. Parker made all the struggles in life worth it. Parker’s voice and laugh were some of our favorite sounds. We’ve never met anyone who could resist his laugh because it was so infectious. He was the light, the brains and the laughter in our family. Parker is survived by his mother, Christine Matson and his twin sisters, Ella Rose Kindron and Sophia Grace Kindron (from Austin, Texas), his Grandmother, Barbara Kindron (from Santa Barbara), his Aunt and Uncle, Lorrie and Larry Belletti and his cousin Amber Belletti (from Santa Barbara). His Uncle and Aunt Daniel and Jill Kindron and his cousins Taylor and Bree Kindron (from San Diego). UNTIL WE MEET AGAIN OUR SWEET BOY Services will be held on Saturday, November 5 at 2:00pm at the First United Methodist Church at 305 East Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Followed by a reception that will be held at the church.


obituaries Alexander Low Stribling

9/13/1927 - 10/20/2022

It is with great sorrow to announce that Alexander (Aleck) Low Stribling, born on September 13, 1927, at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, California to his parents, William F. Stribling and Mary Jane ( Paterson) Stribling, passed away on October 20, 2022, in Solvang, California. As a child, he was raised on Riven Rock Estate in Montecito, California, where his parents were employed and lived. Aleck’s love of plants stemmed from the lush gardens and flowers he was exposed to on the estate as a child. His childhood in the hills of Montecito helped to develop his love for hiking and hunting, causing him to eventually travel throughout his life from his home to the plains of Africa and the rest of the world. Aleck also cherished his years in the Cub and Boy Scouts. His mother even served as Den Mother. After graduating from Santa Barbara High School in 1945, Aleck joined the Navy as part of the United States Naval Construction Battalions (Seabees). On his return to Santa Barbara, he continued to develop his carpentry skills, working around the city. He was proud to say he worked on the Santa Barbara Mission and other Montecito and Santa Barbara landmarks. Aleck married his high school sweetheart Louise Ellen (Aylesworth) Stribling on October 27, 1946. They built their first home together on a 1 ½ acre lot at the end of Stoddard Lane in Montecito. Aleck still had his love for flowers, especially cymbidium orchids. After his day job as a carpenter, he worked with local orchid collectors and growers in exchange for bulbs and plants. Ultimately, he started Aleck’s Orchids. As his business expanded and it grew exponentially, Aleck and Mr. E Gallup became partners and formed the world-renowned Gallup & Stribling Orchids, where he was President and grower. Continuing to use his knowledge of carpentry, Aleck built Gallup & Stribling from the ground up including but not limited to countless acres of greenhouses. After many years of family camping trips to Lake

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Nacimiento, Aleck used his skills to build his family a vacation home where they spent holidays and vacations. He loved the memories that his family made with him there and it was a place close to his heart. After 50+ years and retirement approaching, he and his wife, Louise, were wondering what they could do to keep busy. They both had a love for animals, so when Aleck came across a magazine article on miniature horses and after attending a miniature horse show, they were hooked—coming home with 3. Now growing out of their place, they looked to Solvang where they bought 20 acres and built another worldrenowned business, “Quicksilver Miniature Horse Ranch ”. After years of making the rounds on the miniature horse show circuit (from Texas to Colorado to Calgary, Canada) and the passing of his wife, Louise, Aleck sold the ranch and moved to Atterdag Retirement Village where he lived out his remaining years. Aleck was known to his family and friends as a true family man. He supported his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren’s endeavors throughout his life. Family was the most important thing to him. Family time and holidays were a favorite of Aleck’s, and he loved having family together. Aleck was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Louise; brother, Bill; sister, Nell; and daughter-in-law, Gail (Hoke) Stribling. He leaves behind his three sons Rodney (Teresa), Jim (Rita), and Randy (Lori Jo). His 8 grandchildren Jamie Stribling, Mark Stribling, Rochelle Hicks (Bryant), Joleigh Obrien (Brandon), Denise Stribling, Braden Stribling (Ashley), Katie Emery (Alton), Casey Stribling (Mandy), and 15 great-grandchildren. Graveside services will be held at 1:15 P.M. on Monday, November 7, 2022, at the Santa Barbara Cemetery, with a Celebration of Life to follow. Arrangements entrusted to Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Home. Please consider a donation in Aleck’s memory to Mini Therapy Horses, which can be found at https://www. minitherapyhorses.com/donate or 26500 Agoura Rd. Suite 102-460 Calabasas, CA 91302.

Lucille Tico

7/10/1932 - 8/14/2022

Lucille (Lu) Warner Tico was the best kind of legend. Singular yet interconnected, gentle yet strong; giving, wise, utterly irreplaceable. Born into a set of premature twins at Cottage Hospital on July 10, 1932, Lu and Carolyn Warner’s journey began with a jolt: their mother, Virginia Warner, passed away in childbirth. In a tradition of resilience and benevolence that would go on to emerge through Lu’s own life, Helen “Lollie” Warner–Virginia’s teenage sister–adopted the twins with their older sister, Celia, who was not yet two years old. She raised all three girls with the help of their maternal grandmother, Nelle Warner, thus beginning a legacy of strong women who used the challenges of life to connect more deeply, to empathize, and to lean in. Lu was raised on Acme Poultry farm on Modoc road, in what was then rural Santa Barbara, spending summers at Ojala springs. She attended Goleta Union, Hope School, La Cumbre Junior High and then Santa Barbara High School, where she acted as class secretary, and also met Bob Tico—descendent of Fernando Tico, a Catalonian cattle rancher who received the original land grant to the territory now known as Ojai—and promptly began passing notes about him with her best friend, Sally. She and Bob became a couple. When they briefly broke up, Lu burned her diaries in a fit of teenage passion, and rekindled her passion for jitterbug dancing. When they reunited, Bob was too proud to go dancing; but regardless, there was no keeping them apart, and they eloped to the Little Chapel Around the Corner in Las Vegas, NV on April 16, 1951. The closest thing to a photo is a paper calendar with the date circled around it, marking the spot in time. A family began here. Not long after their wedding, Lu and Bob relocated to Anchorage, Alaska, where he was stationed at Fort Richardson during the Korean War. It was cold, and probably isolating—but Lu always described it as a great adventure, as the most “exotic” place she’d been. They conceived their

first child, a boy named Randall (Randy), and were given leave to return to California; Lu delivered in the same hospital where she was born, where her grandchildren and great-grandchildren would eventually be born as well. Before they left Alaska, Lu remembers sitting on long bus rides to get to the army doctor— bouncing over the bumpy roads, pregnant and without a seatbelt. When they did fly home, she rode in the back of a cargo plane. Lu’s motherhood journey began as many did at that time: full of wholesomeness, and another child less than two years later. When their daughter Terri came into the world, she and Randy explored the same neighborhoods their parents had roamed, and the Ticos built their family home on Eucalyptus Avenue, where they also raised their third child, Richard (Rick). Lu lived there—with her twin sister Carolyn next door for many decades—every day of her life. It was a home filled with love; the sound of the screen door slamming, piano music wafting, the smell of chocolate-chip cookies or a fresh Cachuma Lake fish fry, and multigenerational laughter. The spare bedroom provided respite for countless family members, as well as many musicians over the years—introduced to the family through Randy, a Santa Barbara musician—who needed a soft place to fall. Lu’s home provided more than just a bed, or a warm meal; it was her attitude, and her unflinching commitment to seeing the best in everyone, that made her a safe person. Lu’s choice to connect foremost with someone’s humanity, to see people as works-in-progress, always worthy of patience and a kind gesture, gave us space to be ourselves. There’s no telling how far that ripples out. There are no limits to that kind of love. Lu’s bountiful generosity did not stop with her family or friends, and over the years, she found ways to give back to the community through her gifts. While she did enter the work force, Lu’s true passion was crocheting. As a dynamic duo with Carolyn, who taught knitting, Lu’s mastery of her craft extended far beyond Christmas gifts; in addition to countless scarves, blankets, and even a blue-ribbon winning doll bed, Lu crocheted more than 200 infant caps for the neonatal unit at Cottage Hospital. She kept a photograph of each one, laminating them into a binder, flipping through it and wondering how the families were doing—all strangers, but each holding children in the same building where she and her sister were nursed to

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health. Like the babies, each hat was unique. Leave it to a twin to understand the importance of feeling individual. Throughout her long and healthy life, Lu never missed an opportunity to make a card for someone’s birthday (complete with a specific theme), to record your favorite TV show, or pick up and/or drop off a kid. We used to call her car trips “Grandma’s wild rides,” because she’d do whatever it took to get us there on time, right down to calling out green things at every red light. When leaving her house, one was almost always covered in glitter. She was patient. She was incredibly creative. And in the final years of her life, she began to process larger relationship dynamics—investigating her own patterns, reflecting on difficult decisions—almost as a way of cleaning house, of paving the way for the next journey, and proving that curiosity never gets old. Lu was part of a generation that, among many other things, knew the value of hard work, and prioritized tradition. She loved Santa Barbara, and spent her entire life deepening roots here, making it better in the quietest—yet impactful—ways. As her generation continues to fade, they will remain in our memories; in the unparalleled quality of a big band record, or in the choice to slow down and appreciate what it truly means to have a life welllived. Lucille Tico never figured out how to use a cell phone, but she figured out how to be at peace in this life. It wasn’t flashy. It wasn’t fancy. But it was contagious, and it is not forgotten. Lu passed gently in her home on August 14, 2022, surrounded by family. She is survived by her children, Randy, Terri (Mike) and Rick (Jacqueline); grandchildren Diegas (Jessica), Gamaiel (Rebecca), Jenna (Nicholas), Elena, and Julian; and greatgrandchildren Isei, Evia, Milena, Ayin, and Felix. In addition to family, VNA Home Care, Dr. Gloria Hadsall at Sansum Clinic, and “Team Lulu”—Lana, Margie, Linda, Jeff, Fran, Carla, and Shawn—all cared for Lu. A service will be held at Unity of Santa Barbara (227 E. Arrellaga St.) on November 13, 2022 at 1:00 p.m.

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obituaries M.A. Rasmussen

1935 - 2022

M.A. Rasmussen died in September at the age of 87. She lived a jam packed life – full of interests and adventures that spanned decades and locales. She was a dynamic and creative soul – and it seemed everything she turned her attention to was an outlet for her creativity. Born in Yakima, WA, she eloped with her soon-to-be-husband to CA when she was 17 – and by the time she was 20, she had 3 children. Even though her children were all under the age of 3, she still managed to write poetry, go to nightschool, and hang out with well known Beat-Poets. The poets Gael Turnbull, Cid Corman, and Basil Bunting she counted as friends. When the family moved to a house a block from the ocean in Oxnard, she learned to scuba dive and surf the waves. She brought home so much abalone that her kids were sick of eating it; and once she came home with a swordfish. She became a single mother when she was 23. Her move to Santa Barbara and her marriage to her second husband, Paul opened whole new worlds. She and Paul created gardens for veggies and flowers and she became enamored with succulents. There was always at least one cat in the house, and often snakes, mice, hamsters, lizards – not to mention the various chickens in the yard who were named after opera characters- Tosca, Aida and Brunhilde. Through the Adult Ed program – she took many many classes – made dulcimers, was a part of the Great Books courses for years, took language and guitar classes. She played recorders, crumhorn, guitar, dulcimer and took part in the Ancient Music Society concerts. She would often bring baked goodies with her – those ‘blondies’ and brownies were always a big hit. One year, she knitted huge thick sweaters for everyone in the family; she beaded necklaces, painted renditions of microscopic plankton on a table top, fostered wounded raptors ( red tailed, golden, sparrow hawks), delved into clay and threw pots, made platters and fired pieces at the pot-wars up on Camino Cielo in the early ‘60s. She and Paul were avid cyclists – and completed many a Century and Double Century rides – often on a tandem. With her three swimming buddies – she won many records for Masters Swim meets. Being in the pool wasn’t enough for her Piscean spirit – she loved kayaking around the harbor, and later, took up wind-sailing along East Beach. The High Sierras called to her, and every summer she took the family backpacking -until she and her sprained ankle were air20

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com lifted by helicopter from the High Sierra Trail. She never did like flying. She loved the outdoors – she seemed to know all the birds and flora and fauna and would exclaim excitedly “look look! A red Tanager!!” Or “There! A ruby throated hummingbird!!” When one of her daughters got into Balkan Folk Dancing in the late ‘60s- MA embraced the music and the fancy footwork and became a regular on Thursday nights at Oak Park. She and her folk dancing friends would hit the thrift stores after Sunday afternoon folk dancing at the beach. And she loved poetry – reading, writing, teaching. As a poet, she published in many small presses and brought her skill and passion for poetry to children via the California Poets in the Schools program. Her three children received so many gifts from their remarkable mother – and each of them, in turn, offered her gifts in their own ways. One gifted M.A. with her first Abyssinian cat, one gifted M.A. with grandchildren and one encouraged M.A. to pick up the pen and write poetry again. M.A. was outspoken, irreverent and could be quite hilarious. She left a lasting impression on those who knew her – and she will be dearly missed. And yet – in her own words – she is still among us: When I come back look for me under the trees in the duff popping up with spring in mushroom nests or scaling trees slowly on lichen frosted trunks year by year until I drape pendant in my green and lacy shawl When I come back I will be found in hummer’s nests first in the rough out parts, small twig and leaf and later as soft fluff from tiny feathers woven smooth to cradle spotted eggs sure camouflage at forked branch end and after that I will march down the canyon walls in all the golden splendor of a million wild nasturtiums as I escape from civil gardens up above I’ll bide my time, mark this season’s trail with many wrinkled seeds and next year come triumphant up the other side into gardens once again When I come back A celebration of her life will be held in early March, 2023 contact Tere Carranza for details : terecaz108@gmail.com

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

Julie Antelman

3/30/1935 - 10/15/2022

Julie Antelman, born March 30, 1935, passed away peacefully on October 15, 2022 with her loving family by her side. She is survived by her three children; Kristin, Gretchen, and Erik; and six grandchildren; Megan, Ben, Tim, Christopher, Dakota, and Keegan. Julie MacElwee was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, studied history at Reed College and graduated from the University of Minnesota. She began her career at the KSTP radio station in Minneapolis, for which she received a “broadcast pioneer” award in 1998. She met Gordon Antelman (d. 1994) on a blind date and they married in 1958. The young couple lived in Minneapolis, briefly in Cambridge, and spent a year in Copenhagen where Gordon was as a visiting processor. They then settled in Hyde Park, Chicago, where they raised their family and Julie built her career at the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, serving as executive assistant to several directors. Julie was active in a swimming club, enjoying early morning swims to far-out bouys in Lake Michigan, competing and winning titles in her age group. After retiring in 2004, she moved to Santa Barbara to join her partner, Dr. William Ure (d. 2022), a retired internist and longtime resident of Santa Barbara. Julie was a lifelong lover of classical music and opera, a faithful subscriber to the Lyric Opera of Chicago and then the Los Angeles Opera. She forged deep friendships and camaraderie over her love of music. She was intellectually curious and accomplished. She read widely – current events, history, novels, mysteries – and proudly completed the NYT Sunday crosswords weekly. She was also a card shark, playing competitive bridge and enjoying games (also joyfully competitive) with family on vacation. Bucket list travel and adventure motivated Julie for many years after Gordon passed, and she never shied away from offthe-beaten-path destinations and experiences. She did several stints with Habitat for Humanity, linking weeks of building houses to history-focused trips. She touched down in many countries – Eritrea, Ethiopia, Tajikistan,

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Botswana, Portugal, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. Julie visited Gretchen’s family in Bangladesh, Tanzania, Indonesia and Uganda, where she shot the Nile’s class five rapids and trekked ten hours to see the Ugandan mountain gorillas (not all in one day!). She accompanied her good friend Nora Schaeffer to China to adopt Emma and has been a grandmotherly presence in Emma’s life ever since. Stateside, she zip-lined with Erik’s family in Massachusetts, and for her 80th birthday it was Julie’s idea to get a matching tattoo with her granddaughter Megan, a small acacia tree on their ankles. Julie, known to them as Didima or Mana, was a devoted and beloved grandmother to her six grandchildren. She fostered a great love for literature in Megan, and charmed all the teachers at Megan’s boarding school in Carpinteria (in fact, over ten years later, they still ask about Julie). Julie was fortunate to have another grandchild nearby years later when Ben moved to Santa Barbara. She was always a constant in all their lives, no matter how far away; when Ben was 8-years old they talked on the phone every day (to be fair, it was required because she was an executive of the company he founded, National Office Supply Systems, aka NOSS). Julie cherished her pianist grandson, Tim, who was the only one in our immediate family who could truly “speak music” with her; he performed a private Zoom concert of the Goldberg Variations for her just weeks before her death. She taught Chris how to “shoot the moon” in Hearts and he inherited her uncanny ability to do it more often than anyone else. With each baseball season, Julie would stay involved in Keegan’s baseball career on family Zoom meetings and texting, sending him baseball-related articles she saw in various newspapers. She supported and encouraged Dakota’s love of writing and learning, sitting with him to edit childhood short stories and essays during family vacations. Julie loved to meet new people. She delighted in stories and what they revealed. After she moved to Vista del Monte, her family often heard stories from her new friends, shared over meals or morning coffee in the library. It has been a comfort to her family to hear what we loved about her echoed through her friends in Santa Barbara. All who knew Julie feel blessed to have felt in full force her kindness, her wry and delightfully silly sense of humor, her intellect, her great pride and love for her family, and her special knack for living life to its fullest. Her family will host a Zoom memorial on November 26, 2022. Contact Kristin Antelman (kantelman@gmail.com) for details

Syante Villa

5/21/1936 - 9/29/2022

Friend, mentor and long-time Santa Barbara resident Syante (Sylvester, Chalchi) Villa passed peacefully on September 29th. Syante will be remembered for his kindness, his deep- wisdom and his sense of adventure and humor. He was a man of action who cared about people and lived by his principles. Sy was born in Los Angeles. California May 21, 1936. He attended local schools there including UCLA, where he earned a PHD. in Clinical Psychology Syante became an active participant in the Chicano Movement and was instrumental in creating three neighborhood healthcare clinics in the East Los Angeles area and was the director of the East Los Angeles Health Clinic. He was also part of a team of medical professional that developed a program to deliver healthcare to migrant workers and rural communities. For his contribution, Syante was received in ceremony and honored at the White House by then President Richard Nixon. He also served on the Board of Directors for the Santa Barbara Community Health Clinics. Sy served honorably in the U.S. Army in the late 1950’s to the sixties and was also a marathon runner who was selected to be on the U.S.Olympic track and field team for the City Of Los Angeles. Syante moved to Santa Barbara in the early 60’s where he lived on East Mountain Drive and was part of the bohemian/hippie culture that developed there. He loved playing his conga drums and was a part of the Banana Road/Adobe potluck/ Mountain drive scene. When Monika and Syante met, they were attached at the hip. They married in 1995 the moved to Germany to be with Monica’s daughter, Katja for one year. Syante hated the cold but he was so sweet and patient regardless and endured it. He was so impressed by old rocks that represented 1,000 year old monuments. He gave us a new perspective on the Keltics and history.

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obituaries Not only was he highly intelligent and knowledgeable, he was open minded despite not speaking any German at all. Then in 1996 we went back to the U.S. and he was the most kind and loving grandfather to Katjas two children. Sy made the long trip to the high desert weekly to where Katja and her family relocated, then again to the central coast as well. He never once complained. He was simply a very patient and consistent presence in our lives and will live forever in our hearts. Syante Villa married Monika Engelhardt on the Summer Solstice, 1995. They traveled together in Germany where he met his German family and lived with his new step-daughter, Katja in Heidelberg, where Monika worked as a teacher. Syante’s passion to study other cultures was expressed in his interest of the Celtic Culture. He also taught German youth about the Mayan Calendar and their symbols like Hunab Ku, the Giver of Movement and Measure. After the extraordinary cold winter that year they traveled from Germany to Spain for a Spring Break. Back to the U.S. they took care of their grandchildren, Julian and Hannah. Together they enjoyed the beautiful outdoors hiking and camping. This connection was a loving, lifelong bond until Syante’s passing. Besides long-distance running and drumming, Syante developed skills in painting and expressed his creativity not only in political art but also in colorful nature painting. No matter how clear his political viewpoint was, he never raised his voice to convince others of his own opinions. He was a soft spoken man ahead of his times. Sy was also an actor who played a native american in Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, and a shaman in Pinata Party. Syante is survived by a son, David Villa, Retired Colonel, U.S. Air Force; and by sisters Mariane and Patricia and by many nieces and nephews and grandchildren and is missed so much by his wife Monika and daughter, Katja, and Wonono Rubio.

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Mary Louise Mendoza 2/11/1933 - 9/20/2022

Mary Louise Mendoza, beloved mother, passed away peacefully on September 20, 2022, at her daughter’s home surrounded by her loving family. Mary was born in 1933 and lived to be 89 years old. Mary was the daughter of Daniel and Elisa Mendoza from Santa Barbara, California. She loved the natural beauty of her hometown so much that she lived there her entire life. As a child, she had great affection for her family and the many gatherings with relatives that lived nearby. Her childhood was filled with celebrations with wonderful food, music, dance, and the best hospitality. Mary’s elders were known to be of the finest musicians and cooks in Santa Barbara. Those memories she carried and frequently talked about throughout her life as some of the best times and days of her childhood. At a young age, Mary became a natural protector; she would watch over the younger children and make sure they were cared for and did not get in harm’s way. The adults noticed this was so important to her that they gave her the nick name “abuelita,”- Little Grandma. In high school, it was not surprising that Mary’s favorite subject was childhood education. As a teen, she continued her love of music and dance. She would tell stories about the good times she and her friends had at the Carrillo Recreation Center, where she loved to jitterbug and became a skilled volleyball player. After graduating high school and at the young age of 18, she married her high school sweetheart, Raymond William Ward. They had five children together. Mary enjoyed being a wife, mother, and homemaker. She engaged in the domestic activities of managing a large family, while also becoming emersed as a volunteer in the Parent Teacher Association (PTA) and as a room mother. Mary made a beautiful home for family and extended her caring nature to other neighborhood children and friends. When she and her husband divorced, she was of the first in her family and community to face the challenges of managing a large family while re-entering in the workforce. She rose to the

challenge with determination and dignity. Mary enrolled in training programs and served as a keypunch operator and then worked for Electronic Data Systems, Santa Barbara City Schools, and Jostens. In 1979, Mary returned to school and became a Certified Nursing Assistant to provide private duty for individuals in end-of-life care for 16 years until her retirement. She did this with the same care and compassion that was such an inherent part of her nature. Mary also found a supportive spiritual community in that of Jehovah’s Witnesses. She was baptized in 1968 and spent over 50 years devoted to attending meetings and going out in service with her cherished friends and community. Her favorite bible verse was Joshua 24:15 “But as for me and my household, we will serve Jehovah.” Mary was resourceful and loyal to her family, friends, and community. Her strong spirit of resilience and compassion was passed on to her children. She was a fierce protector and wise teacher making sure her children were well taken care of, protected, valued, and prepared to be out in the world as humble, respectful, and responsible human beings. But what put a real sparkle in her eyes was spending time with her grandchildren and great grandchildren. While she suffered for years with dementia, she never forgot to ask about all the kids, the little ones, and to make sure before she went to sleep each night that she “knew” each of them were safe and sound before making her prayers. Mary was in prayer much of the time during her last weeks with us, she believed in prayer and prepared herself and her family well for her journey ahead. Mary was preceded in death by Daniel and Elisa Mendoza (Parents), Phillip Mendoza (brother), Markie Mendoza (brother), Eddie English (nephew), Angie Mendoza (niece) and Raymond Ward, Sr. (Husband). She is survived by her three siblings, Daniel Mendoza, Charlie Mendoza, Martha English. She is also survived by her five children: Raymond Ward, Jr., Matthew Ward (Kristina Ward), JanMarie Ward (Roger Bessey), Paulette Luhui Isha Ward (Mati Waiya) and Susan Fountain (Larry Fountain), 11 Grandchildren: Ryan Ward, Kyle Ward, Felicia Ward, Lucianna Ward Medolla (Jerry Medolla), Robby Bessey (Courtney Sanders), Justin Olmstead (Jessica Olmstead), Jonathan Bessey (Jennie Schmidt), Jonathan Olmstead (Ashley Olmstead), Janel Limbasan (Joel Limbasan), Tano Cabugos (Maralyn Vasquez), Michael Fountain (Gloria Fountain), and 8 Great Grand-Children: Bryce Ward, Lynnaea Medolla, Kiyan Medolla, Jayla ‘oqho’s Olmstead, Sinaxkun Cabugos, Melania Bytheway,

Leceia Limbasan, and Elena Limbasan and many nieces, nephews and cousins whom she adored. An open memorial service will be held at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses at 805 N. Quarantina Street, Santa Barbara, California on Saturday, November 12, 2022, at 1:30 pm. An open gravesite internment will be held at the Santa Barbara Cemetery at 901 Channel Dr. on Monday, November 14, 2022, at 10 a.m. directly followed by a reception at the Veteran’s Memorial Hall at 112 West Cabrillo Boulevard.

Carl Westfall

12/23/1938 - 9/23/2022

It is with heavy hearts that we announce the unexpected passing of Carl Lawrence Westfall (also known as Pudge, Flucky or Chief) on September 23, 2022. Carl was born to Ruby Edna Davis and Carl Lorraine Westfall on December 23, 1938 in Santa Maria, California. He lived most of his elementary school years in Santa Maria, attended middle school in Carpinteria and High School in Santa Barbara. In 1957, he graduated from Santa Barbara High School. After his mother passed when he was 5 years old, he was blessed to have many close friends and family that guided and supported him, influencing his life in a very positive way. His Grandma Rose Westfall, Uncle Jack Westfall, Aunt Johnny Allred, Aunt Lillian Ball and the Robles and Craine families were an enormous part of his support system during his growing up years. In 1959, Carl met the love of his life and wife of 62 years, Clare Ann (Baldwin) Westfall, while hunting at The Kinatsey Ranch behind La Patera Ranch in Goleta. They were married on July 30, 1960 when Carl was 21 and Clare was 16. They welcomed 4 children together, Wendy, Carla, Sherri and Tate. Carl was extremely dedicated and talented in his trade. He worked for many construction companies over his 26 year career, including Solvang Cement, Ernest Hahn Construction, South Coast Construction, Blois & Cardoza, Lash and Tierra Construction. As an expert in concrete structures, he worked on many important projects during his career. In the late 1960s, Carl helped construct Storke Tower at UCSB. In the

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early 1980s, he worked on the construction and installation of the Dolphin Fountain at Stearn’s Wharf in Santa Barbara. He also helped build La Cumbre Plaza, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital and many of the parking structures in Santa Barbara. Carl mastered constructing catch basins and caissons, and built tennis courts and retaining walls. Carl was an avid sporting clay enthusiast, shooter, hunter, and outdoorsman. He won many awards for his exceptional shooting skills throughout his life, and was very well-known and respected in the sport. Carl was inducted in the California Sporting Clays Association Hall of Fame in 2013. This award has only been given to 8 people throughout the State of California. Carl was a lifetime member of Winchester Canyon Gun Club. He devoted much of his time to improving the club and mentoring young and new shooters. As an experienced hunter, Carl often travelled throughout the western United States on hunting trips with friends and family. Many of his fondest memories were from these trips. Carl impacted many lives with his wisdom, talent, sportsmanship, work ethic and kindness. He was a good man, husband, father and grandfather; one of honor and respect. Carl was a beloved and dedicated friend of many. His word was his word; he said what he meant and meant what he said. If you were ever lost in the backcountry, you would call Pudge because he would be able to find you. Carl is survived by his wife of 62 years, Clare Westfall; his daughter Carla Westfall Olson (David); 5 grandchildren, JR Magennis, Lauren Olson Armstrong (Paul), Cody Magennis, Andrea Olson Keefer (Neil), and Morgan Olson; 5 great grandchildren, Colton Magennis, Ryder Magennis, Leah Keefer, Ashlyn Armstrong, Carly Keefer and his hunting dog Ace. He also leaves behind his stepsister Janice Osborne and cousins Bobby Westfall (Clare), Judy Honeyman (Dave), Cheryl Gregory (Chase), Kim Westfall (Barbara), Jack Allred and Marla Freed. He is preceded in death by his son Tate Westfall and daughters Sherri Westfall Magennis and Wendy Westfall. Our family is comforted in knowing he lived a life he loved and that he is now with Tate, Sherri and Wendy, and other family, friends and dogs that have gone before him. A celebration of Carl’s life will be held on Friday, November 25th, 2022 at 12:00 at Winchester Canyon Gun Club located at 6622 W Camino Cielo, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Please RSVP at https:// wcgc.org/event-5010404

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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In Memoriam

Jorgia Bordofsky 1942-2022

BY DR. MICHAEL BORDOFSKY orgia Bordofsky died on Sep-

COURTESY PHOTOS

J

Freedom Rider

tember 28, “heading off to the happy hunting grounds,” as she liked to say. Never mind a little cultural appropriation; this turquoise-wearing Freedom Rider had earned a pass with a lifetime of bona fides. The oldest of four children, Jorgia grew up in Los Angeles. Her father, Joseph Siegel, was a veteran of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade; her mother, Mollie Siegel, was a nurse and lifelong progressive activist. Jorgia attended UC Berkeley but left early to join the movement to desegregate the South. She was one of 450 Freedom Riders arrested during the summer of 1961 in Jackson, Mississippi, and completed a 40-day sentence at the notorious Parchman penitentiary. In 1963, she married Allan Bordofsky, settling in New York, where In 1961, Jorgia Bordofsky was 19 and among the 450 Freedom Riders arrested she completed nursing school and in Jackson, Mississippi. Cheerful and kind, but also intense, she was often had the first of four children. They described as “a force of nature.” moved to California, eventually settling in Santa Barbara in 1972 to escape the L.A. smog. shadow of grief would follow Jorgia for the rest of Jorgia was cheerful and kind, but also intense; she her days. To cope, she immersed herself in books, was often described as “a force of nature.” Nowhere movies, lectures, and intellectual discussions with was this more apparent than in her parenting. She her many supportive friends. She was great company was a dedicated stay-at-home mother who had high and a great talker. No one had more opinions, recomexpectations and was not afraid to raise a voice (often), mendations, or advice than Jorgia. At every encounor even a wooden spoon (once). Children who mis- ter, she was ready with a book to share, a movie to behaved in the car would see their toys hurled out the recommend, or an article she had clipped. She was so window (the only time she littered) or be put out of sincere and enthusiastic that it was impossible not to forgive her being a know-it-all. In fact, she often did the car themselves to walk home. She insisted her family live in the top school district know it all — thanks to a near-perfect memory and a and that her kids have the best that school could offer. tremendous appetite to learn. She taught other mothers that when the school secreJorgia enjoyed screening documentaries for Santa tary sees you coming, she should say to herself, “Oh Barbara film festivals and Master Classes at the Music Academy. She was a docent at the Natural History shit, here she comes again.” Respect and hard work were also expected. A child Museum and was fascinated by Native American whose bed was unmade would be called home in the culture. She collected traditionally woven baskets, middle of the school day. And rather than receive and turquoise jewelry was one of her few material an allowance, her children did yard work — gaining indulgences. Traveling internationally was a special an understanding of the piece-work wage scale of treat that she only got a small taste of — too expensive immigrant Jews who toiled in garment factories at in her younger days, and too sad to do without Allan the beginning of the century — finding 10 dead snails later on. Closer to home, she enjoyed winter trips to Yosemite and annual camping trips to Montaña de for a penny. Jorgia saw untapped potential in every young rela- Oro, where she never tired of the coastal scenery and tive, neighbor, or passenger in her carpool, and she felt time with family and friends. it her mission to cajole them toward studying harder, To many, Jorgia was their first friend in town. becoming a better person, and being more helpful to People were drawn to her honesty and authentictheir parents. For the uninitiated, this might be off- ity. She was a particularly cherished mentor to her putting. But for most, they grew a fondness for Jorgia, daughters-in-law. She set high expectations, but then somehow understanding that this larger-than-life set aside judgment and was unflinchingly supportive woman cared about them in a way that was unusual once decisions had been made. She nurtured individual relationships with each of her grandchildren and special. Jorgia’s Jewish identity was important to her, but and young relatives, generous in all things, except her she eschewed superstition and mysticism. Science, compliments; these were usually spoken out of earrationalism, and journalism would inform her, and shot, making her praise that much more meaningful common decency would guide her. She had a streak when it got back around to you. of contrarianism and was often ahead of her time. For In living and in dying, Jorgia was fearless, resolute, more than 30 years, she worked as a Lamaze Child- and consistent. She talked about how death, like birth, birth Educator, preparing countless young couples for is a natural process that should not be over-medicalchildbirth and helping them understand that child- ized. In her last hours, she watched a UCTV feature birth is a natural process that should not be needlessly on women scientists. She presided over a family dinmedicalized. ner, and as she said her goodbyes and her thanks, she Allan died unexpectedly at the age of 59, and a admonished us one final time to “do good things.” n

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Santa Barbara


WILD Things Really Are

NPS PHOTO

COVER STORY

WHERE

THE

UCSB Professor Peter Alagona Discovers Why So Many Creatures Now Call Cities Home by Matt Kettmann

A

few years ago, while riding his bike home from his job teaching the next generation of environmentalists at UCSB, Peter Alagona came across a bobcat on the path between Atascadero Creek and Hidden Oaks Golf Club. Up to that point, his academic life as an environmental historian revolved around endangered species, as detailed in his first book, After the Grizzly: Endangered Species and the Politics of Place in California, which was published nearly a decade ago. After years of considering the elusive California condor, desert tortoise, and San Joaquin kit fox, the bobcat made Alagona curious about the wildlife that’s all around us, eating in our backyards, cruising our creekways, and sleeping in our parks. He dove into the burgeoning field of urban ecology, which analyzes, among other trends, how and why the animals we once considered so wild are now so comfortable in our cities. Last April, Alagona published the stories and studies that he discovered in urban areas across the United States as his second book, The Accidental Ecosystem: People and Wildlife in American Cities. Written in a style that’s accessible to everyday readers but with the rigorous attention to detail demanded by academics, Alagona’s book examines everything from headline-grabbers like Malibu cougars, skyscraper-dwelling eagles, and bipedal black bears to innocuous yet important critters like gnatcatchers, raccoons, and house sparrows. I’ve known Pete for more than 20 years now and have written about him for the Independent twice, about his endangered species book in 2014 and again in 2018 about his role as one of UCSB’s most popular professors. We caught up again this past June, soon after he’d returned from a trip to Tanzania, where he met with researchers from around the world working on the conservation of large carnivores. He was part of a team from California that’s seriously considering how best to reintroduce the grizzly bear to the Golden State, which is also the topic of his next book. We talked a little about that and a lot about The Accidental Ecosystem, which features lessons for professional planners desiring more holistic cities as well as everyday city dwellers who simply enjoy seeing possums amble across their back fence. What follows is a condensed and streamlined version of our conversation.

How did this book come about? I spent the first decade or so of my career focusing on endangered species. Most of those creatures are animals that, by definition, you almost

never see. Most are creatures that people fight about a lot politically, but they don’t come into contact with in their lives with any regularity. Then I became aware that this field of urban ecology was producing fascinating studies on urban wildlife and people’s interaction with it. It told me that there was a story to follow, and I spent the next several years figuring out how to tell it.

You certainly do cover the American map, with chapters covering bats in Austin, coyotes in Chicago, cougars in Los Angeles, bald eagles in Pittsburgh, and even gophers at Bushwood Country Club, among others. I’ve lived in big and small cities my whole life, and in all of those places, there are stories of increasing numbers and diversity of wildlife over the past few decades. Although the story in each place is a little different—the species are different, or the timing, or the geography is different—overall, if you put them together, there is this trend over time. The crazy thing is that this increase in wildlife in cities is not something that would have been predicted by the ecological theory that was out there. It came as a surprise to people that this happened. Only recently are we figuring out why this has happened, and it challenges some basic assumptions in conservation. Is Santa Barbara a hotbed for this? We are incredibly fortunate here to be surrounded by all these ecosystems and natural areas. But many cities, including some of the biggest cities in the United States, like New York, were built in places that were unusually biologically diverse and productive before the city was built. We’ve destroyed a lot, but many cities remain places where wild creatures naturally return. So Santa Barbara is an example of this, but I wouldn’t say it’s unique. You write about birds being one of the most familiar forms of urban wildlife and discuss unique challenges that they face, such as bird feeders and cats. So should we kill all the house cats? You put your finger on the most controversial thing in the book. I just want to be clear that I really like cats. I’m an animal person. I have a lot of pets. But you know what I don’t own? A cat. The reason is that I live in Santa Barbara and my doors and windows are wide open all the time. I believe cats should be

LIONS, PROFESSORS, AND BEARS: UCSB-based environmental historian Peter Alagona wrote a book about mountain lions in the Santa Monica Mountains (above) and many other species across the country that now live side-by-side with humans in urban landscapes.

kept indoors. It’s better for the cats. They will live longer and have healthier lives. When cats wander outside, there are consequences. They carry diseases that can be passed on to other animals—including people—and cats are efficient exotic predators. They kill a billion small animals every year in the U.S. alone, including birds, reptiles, and small mammals. Some are creatures we don’t want, like mice and rats, but a lot of native wildlife are victims, too. Anyone who loves both wildlife and cats should support keeping them apart. I love cats, but I strongly believe that all the evidence suggests that cats should be indoor pets. When your cat’s outside, you’re introducing an exotic apex predator into the ecosystem, and that’s gonna have a lot of consequences. This is also related to the book’s broad theme of the accidental ecosystem, where we’ve built cities that didn’t account for the creatures around us. I advocate moving from an accidental to a much more intentional urban ecosystem. What are the kinds of environments we can create that are more conducive for wildlife, people, and domesticated animals?

And what’s so bad about the bird feeder? Bird feeding can best be understood as a giant, crowdsourced experiment in wildlife management. It creates winners and losers. Some species or individuals benefit from it; some get drawn in and it becomes a crutch or even a trap. If you’re attached to your bird feeder, then, at the very least, you should commit

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to consistency and cleanliness. Bird feeders can be petri dishes for salmonella, and that’s something no one—including a bird—wants.

The book looks at how public perception changes over time. Eagles were once considered pests, and now people are okay if they snag a kitten or two because they appreciate their comeback. What explains that shift? You hit on something really important. In the 21st century’s human-dominated ecosystems, the ability of species to survive is, in many cases, directly related to people’s willingness to tolerate them. There’s a whole field of social science research on this issue of human tolerance for wildlife and what affects that. Tolerance is related to people’s interests, but also their values. Interests can change quickly, but values, which are formed in youth, usually don’t. Generations change, but individuals less so. That said, values toward wildlife have changed significantly over the last several generations, due to a range of forces including urbanization. In urban areas, people are more likely to be tolerant of wildlife if they have some educational background. This is a complex equation, but we are slowly moving toward a point where more and more people see wildlife in their communities not just as potential threats but as posing potential benefits and even opportunities. In Santa Barbara, people and institutions, including UCSB, dump a lot of poison into the environment to manage rodents regarded as pests. That doesn’t help over time, because rodents reproduce quickly, evolve tolerance, and often pass on these toxins to other, socalled non-target species, like bobcats. Maybe if we want fewer rats, we should have more owls and raptors, and we shouldn’t be putting blood thinner into the environment. There are smarter and more humane ways to accomplish these goals. You explain how the decline of hunting, which once helped pay for conservation, is contributing to the rise of urban wildlife. What is hunting’s role in the modern equation? Hunting has been at the center of wildlife conservation in the United States for more than 100 years. The concept is that you want a managed, sustainable population of wildlife for human use, either for sustenance or recreation or other ecological services. Hunting and fishing fees then help to pay for conservation. This model is on the decline, however, for two reasons: Hunting is not helpful as a management strategy around urban and suburban areas where it would be dangerous. And culturally, it is declining as a recreational activity. Hunting has a high barrier to entry, and when it isn’t a part of your family’s core culture and identity, it tends to wane over generations. We need a new set of tools. Hunting probably still has a place in many areas, but it’s no longer a one-stop shop or cure all for dealing with wildlife management.

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How should urban areas be dealing with wildlife management? I recommend two approaches: Individually, people can start to think more about how everything they do in their communities, from how they garden to how they drive, affects wildlife. In communities, one of the best things we can do is start to think in more focused ways about how to integrate wildlife into every aspect of county general plans, from parks to transportation to education and housing. Wild creatures tie all of these elements together and help you think holistically about the general habitat you’re creating for people. Some communities, like Boulder, are already doing this. But there are other cities like Chicago that are trying to think about wildlife corridors and the urbanwildlands interface too. There are also marquee projects, like the Annenberg Crossing in Ventura County, which is trying to create connectivity between the wildland areas in an enormous urban region by providing passage over the 101 freeway. Even the landscapes that are the most fragmented and most affected by humans can be pieced together in creative ways to allow animals to circulate through and thrive in these areas. The city of Philadelphia had an incident one morning where thousands of dead birds were on the streets when people got up for work. They had collided into a skyscraper overnight during their fall migration. This happens a lot, but it doesn’t get a lot of attention. So Philadelphia started a voluntary program, but one with a lot of buy-in, during those fall and spring migrations up the Atlantic flyway to reduce city light in a way that reduces bird collisions. You wouldn’t expect this in Philadelphia, but these are some of the little things that can be in your city or your county that can make a big difference for animals that are passing through. Taking these measures proactively will make our communities more livable, reduce carnage, increase thriving, and move us closer to the goal of intentional urban ecosystems. Would you say that our fates as humans are intertwined with our wildlife neighbors? That’s exactly right. We are used to thinking of animals as resources or pests


JANE KIM @ INK DWELL

COVER STORY

BIPEDAL BEAR: Illustrations such as this one of a black bear in New Jersey can be found throughout The Accidental Ecosystem.

when, in fact, we benefit a lot from seeing them as members of our community. We share space. We share resources. We share habits. Sometimes we even share disease. These are all things that affect us in ways that are hard for the average person to see on a daily basis. But they’re real. The more we’re intentional about urban wildlife, the better we’re all going to be.

It certainly feels like most of us are rooting for them at this point. When you see a creature that you don’t expect to see, we all know what that’s like. There’s a moment of surprise and wonder and you suddenly see the place where you live differently. Just a couple weeks ago, I was out late in the evening, and close to my house, I saw a fox run across the road. That’s not too unusual—people see foxes all the time. But I just remember that moment of being like, “Oh yeah, I’m sharing this space with these creatures that I never see, but they’re out there, making a living in my community just like I’m trying to do, and they’re doing their best to coexist with people in a densely populated space with lots of resources but also lots of hazards.” I respect that and I value that and it makes my life a little bit better to know they’re put there. It gives me perspective. Last but in no way least, are you still actively working on reintroducing grizzly bears to California? I wouldn’t say that we’re reintroducing grizzlies, since there are no plans to do so. But along with wonderful colleagues at UCSB and beyond, I’ve been working hard to advance the research on that front. We now know much more about California grizzlies, even though they’ve been gone for almost a century, than ever before. With that knowledge, of course, comes the question of what it would take to bring them back. I would leave that mainly to the policy makers, but what I can say is that 2024 is the 100th anniversary of their presumed disappearance in our state. It’s going to be an opportunity to talk a lot more about the past, and also the future.

Get tickets at sbzoo.org/zoolights Santa Barbara Zoo • (805) 962-5339 • Just off Cabrillo Blvd. at East Beach • sbzoo.org

What would be the ideal space? Grizzlies didn’t disappear from California due to habitat loss. They disappeared due to persecution during a time when most people had very different values than today, and when there were few conservation laws. Even now, there’s still probably plenty of habitat available to support a modest population of grizzlies in California—much more so than in places like Greece and Spain, where their close relatives still live today—as evidenced by our more than 35,000 black bears. There are something like 12 times as many brown (grizzly) bears in Europe as there are in the lower 48 U.S. states. So bringing them back is clearly not impossible. It would involve risks, benefits, hard work, and a long process. But ultimately, like most other wildlife issues, it would just be a choice that we, as a society, could make. For almost a century, we’ve been making one choice. Maybe at some point in the future, we’ll make a different one.

See peteralagona.com to buy the book and learn more. For info on the grizzly bear reintroduction movement, see calgrizzly.com.

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Please join us for a new and intriguing presentation concerning the universal language of music. Rarely seen musical film footage will be shown, much of which has been curated from a vast private archive. This music This Sat! (from past to present) absolutely connects us all!

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As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

THURSDAY CHELSEA ROCHELLE

THURSDAY 11/3

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

SUNDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

FISHERMAN’S MARKET Tuttle, out with 2022’s album Crooked Tree, will bring her contemporary sensibility to bluegrass and roots music to S.B. She will be joined by Dominick Leslie (mandolin), Kyle Tuttle (banjo), Bronwyn Keith-Hynes (fiddle), and Shelby Means (bass). 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E Canon Perdido St. GA: $41; VIP: $106. Email boxoffice@lobero.com. lobero.org/whats-on

11/3-11/6: The Taste of the Santa Ynez Valley: Four Days, Six Towns Join for a celebration of food and wine in Solvang, Santa Ynez, Los Alamos, Los Olivos, Ballard, and Buellton. Enjoy curated wine tastings, chef-driven dinners, lunches, hay and horse rides, music, hikes, classes, and more. Visit the website for the schedule and locations. $10-$150; passes: $300-$1,000. Email info@visitsyv.com. visitsyv.com/taste-of-the-santaynez-valley/ 11/3-11/6: S.B. Jewish Film Festival Catch the final three days of unique, high-quality films and documentaries that will showcase a wide range of dramas, comedies, full-length features, and shorts by American, European, and Israeli filmmakers. Visit the website for reception, coffee and bagel meetups, and the film schedule. New Vic Theater, 33 W. Victoria St. $15; passes: $154. Email info@ sbjf.org. sbjewishfilmfestival.org 11/3: One Night In Mae’s Closet: A Sip & Swap Event Clean out your closet to support The Auxiliary’s fundraising efforts. A one item donation (you may donate up to three) is required to swap it for one new item for you. Funds will benefit the Sing! Program and scholarships at the Music Academy’s annual Summer School & Festival. 4pm. The Music Academy, 1070 Fairway Rd. $50; early-bird admission: $100. tinyurl.com/ Sip-SwapNov3

11/3: 1st Thursday Art Walk Enjoy an evening of art and culture in downtown S.B. Venues will feature art openings and receptions, live music, lectures, wine tastings, and hands-on activities. 5-8pm. Downtown SB. Free. Call (805) 962-2098 or email info@ downtownsb.org. downtownsb.org/ events1st-thursday 11/3: Pop-Up Opera The SBMA and Opera S.B. will partner to present a season’s sampling of art and music with performance in the Museum’s galleries, inspired by SBMA’s collection and special exhibitions. 5:30-6:15pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@ sbma.net. sbma.net/events 11/3: A Biblical View on Environmentalism with Sandra Richter Professor of biblical studies and author of Stewards of Eden: What Scripture Says about the Environment and Why It Matters Sandra Richter will speak on environmental stewardship and how this contemporary concern is also an ancient one. 5:30pm. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. Free. Call (805) 565-6051. tinyurl.com/ SandraRichter 11/3: Fall Candle-Making Workshop Design your own custom scent for your 8.5 oz candle vessel (multiple selections available) that can be taken home for you to enjoy or gifted to someone special. Wine and snacks will be provided. 6-8pm. 118 Gray Ave. $75. Email info@goldenarrowgoods .com. goldenarrowgoods.com/events

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

cfsb.info/sat COURTESY

11/3:

11/3:

Sun.: Robert Heft & Dave Wilson, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 6864785.mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

11/3-11/6: Lost Chord Guitars Thu: José Antonio Rodríguez, 7:30-9:30pm. $20. Fri.: Pam & The Fisher Men, 8-11:30pm. $10. Sat.: Travis Larson, 8-11:30pm. $10. Sun.: Singer Showcase, 8-10:30pm. Free. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com

11/4: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254. urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

11/3-11/5: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Thu.: Something This Way Magic, 7-10pm. Fri.: Framers, 8-10pm. Sat.: Art of Funk, 8-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

Molly Tuttle & Golden Highway Native Californian Molly

11/3, 11/5: Eos Lounge Thu.: Rebūke, 9pm. $6.18. Sat.: Dirtwire: Ghostcatcher Tour, 6pm. $30.90. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410. eoslounge.com

Community Screening:

Spirited Away Enjoy director Hayao Miyazaki’s 2001 Academy Award–winning Japanese animated fantasy Spirited Away (Rated PG), which tells the story of 10-year-old Chihiro, who must find a way to return herself and her parents to the human world. 6:30pm. Libbey Bowl, 210 S. Signal St, Ojai. Free. tinyurl.com/SpiritedAwayNov3

11/3-11/5: 2022 Santa Barbara Laugh Festival This VIP stand-up comedy event will decide who is the funniest person alive with three days of laughs in categories such as Best Comedians of the 805, International Comedy Night, and S.B. Breakthrough Comedians of the Year. 7:3010pm. Backstage Comedy Club, 519 State St. GA: $35/per night; VIP: $50/per night. Ages 21+. santabarbaralaughfestival.com

11/4: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800. uptownlounge805.com/events 11/5: Old Town Coffee Joystix, 6-9pm. 5877 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Free. Call (805) 845-1550. otcoffeeshop.com/events/list/ COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

11/3-11/5, 11/7-11/9: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Evoflo X Oh Rose with Plastic Harpoons, 8pm. $12-$15. Ages 21+. Fri.: Jonathan Scales Fourchestra with Ben Betts, 9pm. $12-$15. Ages 21+. Sat.: Dirtwire: Ghostcatcher Tour, 9pm. $30.90. Ages 21+. Mon.: SBCC Monday Jonathan Scales Madness Jazz Band, 7pm. $15. Tue.: Dreamland-Celebration of Joni Mitchell Feat. Kimberly Ford, 7:30pm. 11/5: Third Window Brewing $15. Wed.: Pat & Lee-Ann Curren, 8:30pm. Co. RJ Bloke, 8pm; The Mutineers, 9pm. $12-$15. Ages 21+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 406 E. Haley St. Free. Call (805) 979962-7776. sohosb.com/events 5090. tinyurl.com/3rdWindow 11/4-11/5: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Cadillac Angels, 6-8pm. Sat.: Hoodlum Friends, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

11/6: Stow House Moneluv, 2-4pm. 304 Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. Free. Call (805) 681-7216. goletahistory.org/ sundays-at-the-ranch/

11/4-11/6: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Farm Truck, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Brian Black, 1-5pm; Jimi Nelson, 8:30-11:30pm.

11/7: The Red Piano Sugarmill Slim, 7:30pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439. theredpiano.com/schedule

11/3: UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Jack E. Davis: The Bald Eagle: The Improbable Journey of America’s Bird Using spectacular stories of founding fathers, rapacious hunters, heroic bird rescuers, and the lives of bald eagles themselves, Pulitzer Prize–winning author Jack E. Davis demonstrates how one bird’s wondrous journey provides inspiration today. Books can be purchased and signed. 7:30pm. Fleischmann Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free. Call (805) 893-3535 or email info@artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu/events

FRIDAY 11/4 11/4: First Friday Ecstatic Dance Experience a barefoot, substance-free, live deejay, get-down dance party. The music will loosely follow an ecstatic dance “wave” with slow and mellow music building to chaotic intensity, then stillness at the end. 7-9pm. Yoga Soup, 28 Parker Way. $15. tinyurl.com/FridayEcstaticDance

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

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SBCC THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT presents Showcase Presents a Student

COURTESY

T HE

7 OSCAR WILDE’S

IMPORTANCE 5

BEING T

EARNEST

11/4-11/6:

Out of the Box Theatre Company Presents Miss You Like Hell This new musical

(book by Pulitzer Prize winner Quiara Alegría Hudes and music by Erin McKeown) follows a whip-smart teen who takes a road trip with her free-spirited Latina mother when their relationship gets threatened by immigration policies. Suggestive material and language. The musical shows through November 13. Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.:

by Henry Lewis, Henry Shields Directed by Katie Laris and Jonathan Sayer

2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. Free-$35. Call (805) 963-0408 or email cstheater@sbcoxmail.com. Read more on pg. 43. centerstagetheater.org

SATURDAY 11/5

NOVEMBER 9-19, 2022 JURKOWITZ THEATRE | SBCC WEST CAMPUS www.theatregroupsbcc.com | 805.965.5935

Thank you toThank ourto our you season season sponsor: sponsor:

11/3 - 8:00 pm

EVOLFO X OH ROSE WITH PLASTIC HARPOONS SPONSORED BY KCSB 91.9 FM 11/4 9:00 pm

JONATHAN SCALES FOURCHESTRA WITH BEN BETTS STEEL PAN JAZZ/FUNK 11/5 - 9:00 PM

STAY CONNECTED

INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

Sunday LIVE 11/13 CAPTIONING @ 2pm

11/5: Walk to End Alzheimer’s 2022 Come together for an inspiring community event that celebrates a commitment to ending this disease. Start a team, join a team, or walk as an individual. Registration: 9am; ceremony: 10am; walk: 10:15am. Chase Palm Park, 323 E Cabrillo Blvd. Free. Call (805) 617-0226 or email lmleonard@ alz.org. tinyurl.com/2022EndAlzheimers 11/5: Tour of Coal Oil Point Reserve Join for a walk along the reserve trails with discussions of the cultural and natural history of the reserve and to explore wildlife that is only minutes from UCSB. 10am-noon. Coal Oil Point Reserve, UCSB, Slough Rd., Isla Vista. $20 suggested donation. tinyurl.com/UCSB-CoalOilPoint 11/5: Carpinteria Arts & Crafts Faire View and buy items created by artists in woodworking, basketry, painting, sculpture, printmaking, fiber arts, pottery, jewelry

DIRTWIRE GLOBAL ELECTRIC 11/7 - 7:00 pm

SBCC MONDAY MADNESS JAZZ BAND 11/8 - 7:30 pm

SURF-ROCK 11/10 - 8:00 pm

(((FOLKYEAH!))) PRESENTS:

THE DIP WITH CASSOWARY

FOLLOW US ON

11/9 - 7:30 pm

PAT & LEE-ANN CURREN

INSTAGRAM

CELEBRATION OF JONI MITCHELL FEAT. KIMBERLY FORD

@sbindependent

DREAMLAND

SOUL

FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

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11/5: Trekking Ambassadors 5K Fun-draising Trail Run-Hike This 5K is great for all experience levels to enjoy the trail run-hike at the San Antonio Creek Trail with shade for most of the course. There will be a raffle, chair massages, a bake sale, and body composition readings with proceeds going toward area organizations who provide solar lights and glasses to the Mount Everest region. 11am3pm. Tucker’s Grove Park, Area 5, 4800 Cathedral Oaks Rd. $45. Email TrekkingAmbassadors@gmail.com. tinyurl.com/5kFun-draising 11/5: Fall Community Potluck & Global Healing Meditation Gather as a conscious community for a family-friendly and heartfelt afternoon with a play area for the kids and a global prayer, a fire circle, a closing ceremony, and more. Bring food to share, enjoy music and make memories with your family and old and new friends. RSVP to receive address. 2-5pm. La Ladera Sanctuary. Free. Call (805) 284-2546 or email info@raganthomson.com. tinyurl.com/FallCommunityPotluck 11/5: Sedgwick Barn Dance and 25th Anniversary Celebration Put on your Western wear for the annual Barn Dance that will include food from Jill’s Place, wine and beer, square dancing, an artwork bandana, and more. 3-6:30pm. Sedgwick Reserve, 3566 Brinkerhoff Ave., Santa Ynez. $100. Email nrs-sedgwick@ucsb.edu. tinyurl.com/SedgwickBarnDance

11/5:

Bart’s Books Love & Rockets Book-Signing: Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez In honor of L&R’s 40th anniversary, cartoonists and brothers from Oxnard Gilbert and Jaime Hernandez will sign copies of their comic book where over the course of its multi-decade run, its characters have aged in real time, lending these stories a depth and weight that few literary works have achieved. RSVP to guarantee a spot. 5-6pm. Bart’s Books, 302 W. Matilija St., Ojai. Free. tinyurl.com/Love-RocketsHernandez COURTESY

DIRECTED BY SAUNDRA McCLAIN

11/5: Go To Hale: Quips & Clips — Sounds of Change Get an inside look on the music industry from your host Hale Milgrim with personal stories and film footage of his many years in the music industry, including his relationships with artists before and during his tenure as President/ CEO of Capitol Records. 6:52pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $20. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@ lobero.org. lobero.org/whats-on

and more. Music in the morning from the Ukulele Jammers and in the afternoon, the Americana Cats. 10am-4pm. Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Ctr., 865 Linden Ave., Carpinteria. Free. Call (805) 684-7789. carpinteriaartscenter.org/marketplace


NOV. 3-9

“Painting a Hat – Nakoaktok,” 1914, Edward S. Curtis

Storytelling Native People through the Lens of Edward S. Curtis

11/5: Park Brothers Classical guitar duo Alex and Wesley Park will perform a concert of brilliant technique and expressive artistry with S.B. County Teen Star winner Melody Hope Hilario to open the concert. 7:30-9:30pm. First United Methodist Church, 925 North F St., Lompoc. $5-$25. Email mollyfgerald@gmail.com. lompocconcert.org/2022-2023-season 11/5: Buttonwood Farm & Winery: Seeing Stars Bundle up to take in planets, galaxies, and star clusters of the night sky with educational guidance from the S.B. astronomical unit while enjoying Buttonwood wines and snacks. 7:30-9pm. Buttonwood Farm Winery, 1500 Alamo Pintado, Solvang. $20-$40. Call (805) 6883032 or email wineclub@buttonwoodwinery.com. tinyurl.com/SeeingStarsNov5 11/5: Mission Poetry Series: A Coming Home: Three Poets in Fall Listen to an afternoon of poetry from award-winning authors Chloe Martinez, Sara Borjas, and Rick Benjamin. The event will offer complimentary broadsides, poets’ books for sale, and the chance to meet the authors. 1-2:30pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 962-7653 or email info@sbplibrary .libanswers.com. tinyurl.com/MissionPoetrySeries 11/5: Dargan’s Irish Pub’s 25th Anniversary Join to celebrate Dargan’s 25th year anniversary with a live performance from Hollywood U2, The World’s Greatest U2 Tribute Show. 9-11pm. Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. $25. tinyurl.com/DargansAnniversary

SUNDAY 11/6 11/6: Nursery Chats: Native Planting Techniques Retail manager Matt Straka will present quick tips, tricks, and best practices for planting with California native plants. 9:30-10:30am. S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Free-$18. Call (805) 682-4726 or email info@sbbotanicgarden.org. tinyurl.com/NurseryChat 11/6: BeatoFest Join the celebration of the arts at the Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts with art exhibits, demonstrations, a wine bar, vegetarian food, and live music performances. 11am-4pm. Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts, 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. Call (805) 646-3381. Free. beatricewood.com 11/6: Mental Wellness Center Presents Project Reboot: Screen Time Initiative This three-part screen time program will kick off with a presentation with Project Reboot founder Dino Ambrosi and be followed by two Zoom sessions on November 13 and 20. Learn skills and habits aimed at reducing reliance on social media and tech screen time. High school students are free and can earn community service hours. 4:30pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 721 Cliff Dr. Students: Free; GA: $20 suggested fee. mentalwellnesscenter.org/project-reboot

MONDAY 11/7 11/7: Chaucer’s Author Talk and Book-Signing: Sandy Brown Author Sandy Brown will talk about and sign copies of his latest book Pilgrim Route: Hiking and Cycling the California Missions Trail from Sonoma to San Diego. 6pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. chaucersbooks.com/event

Nov 11, 2022–Apr 30, 2023 Influenced by the pictorialist movement of the early twentieth century, Edward S. Curtis set out to create a photo and ethnographic record of Indigenous peoples living in Western regions from the Mexican border to Alaskan shores. 100 years later, Indigenous people still contend with “Indian” stereotypes that are consequences of Edward Curtis’s vision. This exhibit endeavors to present his breathtaking photogravures within the context of American colonialism.

2559 Puesta del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105 sbnature.org/storytelling

Sponsored by Knight Real Estate Group of Village Properties, First Republic Bank, Kathleen Kalp and Jim Balsitis, Kelly and Tory Milazzo

11/7: Big Screen: The Golden Fortress An adaptation of his popular 1971 mystery novel, Satyajit Ray’s 1974 film The Golden Fortress introduces the director’s celebrated sleuth Feluda to the big screen in the first of many films and television shows. Join UCSB’s moderator Bhaskar Sarkar, Bishnupriya Ghosh, and Pujita Guha for a post-screening discussion. 7-9:45pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-4637. carseywolf.ucsb.edu/events/all-events

COURTESY

TUESDAY 11/8

11/8:

Joni Mitchell Birthday Tour with Dreamland Featuring Kimberly Ford Take in a rocking tribute to iconic singersongwriter Joni Mitchell with this seven-piece band of amazing area musicians who will play tunes like, “Both Sides Now,” “Blue,” “Help Me,” and more. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/ event INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

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31


Pulitzer Prize-winning Novelist

Jennifer Egan in Conversation with Pico Iyer Sun, Nov 6 / 3 PM (note special time) / UCSB Campbell Hall From the bestselling author of The Goon Squad, Egan’s work has been described as “Pitch perfect... possessing a satirist’s eye and a romance novelist’s heart” (The New York Times). Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Martha Gabbert, Siri & Bob Marshall, and Laura & Kevin O’Connor

Leading Global Risk Expert

Ian Bremmer Thu, Nov 10 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre “My go-to guru on geopolitics is here with a dose of insight and a dash of hope… Bremmer illuminates the possible paths forward on public health, politics, climate, and technology.” - Adam Grant “We are living in revolutionary times. Politics, geopolitics, technology, globalization are upending the established order. If you are wondering how to make sense of it all, read this excellent book.” - Fareed Zakaria

Lead Sponsors: Jillian & Pete Muller

Culinary Powerhouse and Global Food Icon

Nigella Lawson in Conversation with

KCRW’s Evan Kleiman Sat, Nov 12 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre

“Nigella Lawson still knows best... Her charmingly aloof yet unpretentious approach to cooking, food, and life has never resonated with home cooks more.” Harper’s Bazaar

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org 32

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Special Thanks


T HE

ALWAYS

WEDNESDAY 11/9

BEN CROP

11/9: Zoom Lecture: Danielle Whittaker The Santa Ynez Valley Natural History Society invites you to join evolutionary biologist Danielle Whittaker as she discusses her new book, The Secret Perfume of Birds: Uncovering the Science of Avian Scent, about the research of birds’ ability to produce complex chemical signals that influence their behavior. 7-8pm. Free. tinyurl.com/BirdPerfume

NE VER

ROUTINE.

Ben Watkins, Sydney Davidson, Grace Wilson and Augustus Muller

11/9:

AMAZING.

SBCC Theatre Arts Department presents The Importance of Being Earnest The talented SBCC students

will perform Oscar Wilde’s funny and engaging comedy about three couples navigating love with a little deception, flattery, and witty dialogue. Directed by Katie Laris. The play shows through November 19. 7:30pm. Jurkowitz Theatre, SBCC

LYLE LOVETT + JOHN HIATT

West Campus, 969 Cliff Dr. $10-$18. Call (805) 965-5935. theatregroupsbcc.com/current-season

DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS

COURTESY

NOVEMBER 12 | SATURDAY | 8PM

DAUGHTRY NOVEMBER 18 | FRIDAY | 8PM

11/6: Día de los Muertos Craft Day In collaboration with Mujeres Makers Market, join SBTHP to celebrate Indigenous and Latinx families by creating paper skeletons and tissue paper flowers, with face painting, a Catrina contest, poetry, and a community altar where you can place a photo of a loved one who has passed. Pan de muerto and Mexican hot chocolate will be served. Market: 10am-4pm; crafts: 11am-3pm. Casa de la Guerra, 15 E. De la Guerra St. Free. (805) 961-5378. sbthp.org/diadelosmuertos 11/6: Franklin Elementary School Día de los Muertos Celebrate Día de los Muertos and support Adelante Charter School PTSO (Parent Teacher Student Organization).11am. Franklin Elementary School, 1111 E. Mason St. Free. tinyurl.com/FranklinDDLM

SOLD OUT

LOS TIGRES DEL NORTE DECEMBER 2 | FRIDAY | 8PM

JOHNNY MATHIS DECEMBER 16 | FRIDAY | 8PM

Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER.

Welcome to Freedom INDEPENDENT.COM

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The Arlington Theatre

*2 SHOWS*

­ ­

The Arlington Theatre B A R B A R A ,

­

­ ­

S A N T A

­ ­

FREE ADMISSION

C A

• USA vs. Wales: Monday, 11/21 - 11:00am

See Full Game Schedule: ArlingtonTheatreSB.com Advance Preview 11/4: 11/4: 11/4: 11/4: 11/4 11/10: ONE PIECE ARMAGGEDON THE RETURN OF THE BANSHEES AFTERSUN BLACK PANTHER FILM RED TIME TANYA TUCKER OF INISHERIN WAKANDA FOREVER

Fiesta 5 • Camino Real

Paseo Nuevo

Fiesta 5

Hitchcock • Fairview

Metro 4

Metro 4 • Camino

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Nov 4-10, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

The Banshees of Inisherin* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:05, 7:45. Sat: 2:25, 5:05, 7:45. Ticket to Paradise (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:55, 7:30. Sat: 2:15, 4:55, 7:30. Lyle Lyle Crocodile (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:15. Sat: 2:05, 4:40, 7:15.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140

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One Piece Film Red* (PG13): Fri/Sat, Tue, Thur: 1:30-S, 4:15-D, 7:00-S, 9:00-S. Sun, Mon,Wed: 1:30-S, 4:15-S, 7:00-D, 9:00-S. Halloween Ends (R): Fri-Wed: 1:20, 10:05. Black Adam (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 2:20, 3:50, 5:20, 6:45, 8:15, 9:40. Sat/Sun: 12:55, 2:20, 3:50, 5:20, 6:45, 8:15, 9:40. Thur: 2:20, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40. Prey for the Devil (R): Fri-Wed: 2:30, 5:00, 7:25, 9:50. Thur: 2:30. Till (PG13): Fri-Wed: 4:05, 7:05. Smile (R): Fri-Wed: 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 10:00. Thur: 1:45. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever* (PG13): Thur: 3:15, 4:00, 5:00, 5:45/3D, 6:45, 7:30, 8:30, 9:15/3D, 10:15.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

The Banshees of Inisherin* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45. Tar (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:15, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 1:10, 4:15, 7:20.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Black Adam (PG13): Fri/Sat, Mon-Thur 4:00, 7:00. 34

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METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Aftersun (R): Fri: 4:00, 6:45, 9:15. Sat: 1:30, 4:00, 6:45, 9:15. Sun: 2:20, 5:00, 7:45. Mon-Wed: 5:00, 7:45. Black Adam (PG13): Fri: 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 9:30. Sat: 12:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 9:30. Sun: 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30. Mon-Wed: 5:30, 6:30, 8:30. Thur: 2:30, 5:30, 8:30. Smile (R): Fri: 4:15, 7:00, 9:45. Sat: 2:00, 4:15, 7:00, 9:45. Sun: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15. Mon-Wed: 5:30, 8:15. Thur: 2:45. Met Opera: LA Traviata* (NR): Sat: 9:55. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever* (PG13): Thur: 3:15, 4:15, 5:30/3D, 6:45, 10:15.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

The Return of Tanya Tucker* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 4:45, 7:30. One Piece Film Red* (PG13): Fri, Tue, Thur: 5:00-D, 7:45-S. Sat: 2:15-S, 5:00-D, 7:45-S. Sun: 2:15-S, 5:00-S, 7:45-D. Mon, Wed: 5:00-S, 7:45-D. Lyle Lyle Crocodile (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:30, 7:05. Halloween Ends (R): Fri-Thur: 8:05. Till (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:05. Sat/Sun: 2:05, 5:05. Prey for the Devil (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:35, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 3:10, 5:35, 8:00.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Armageddon Time* (R): Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:45, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:30. Good Night Oppy (PG): Fri-Sun: 1:40, 4:40, 7:15. Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:15. Tar (R): Fri-Sun: 1:50, 4:15, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 4:15, 7:45. Ticket to Paradise (PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:05, 5:20, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 5:20, 8:00.


living

Education

A Day in the Life of DP News

C ARL PERRY PHOTOS

p. 35

After their regularly scheduled morning broadcast, the DP News team sets up their equipment to cover that evening’s football game.

I

t’s Friday morning at Dos Pueblos High School, and the campus is already teeming. Kids have one eye on the school day ahead, the other on the weekend. Tonight is the biggest football game of the year for Dos Pueblos, against San Marcos, their crosstown rival from a few exits down the 101. That means groups of students are scrambling to decorate the Goleta school’s Greek amphitheater ahead of the lunchtime pep rally. Room T-3, home of student-run DP News, is a beehive of activity. The class, taught by Doug Caines and John Dent,

Where High Schoolers Run the Show by Ryan P. Cruz has been producing a daily news show every weekday that’s blasted to every classroom after the mid-morning break. As soon as the bell rings at 8:30, the excitement comes to a halt as the show’s executive producer, senior Gabriel Cassleman, takes control. The team needs to be set up by 9:20 a.m., in-studio and camera-ready. While Caines is officially the teacher, Cassleman runs the show. Each student in the class has their own job for the day—from creating graphics to writing the sports recaps to anchoring on-air—and over the next 50 minutes, they’re all on a shared mission to create a smooth, entertaining show. One student rushes to find B-roll from the video archive, while another puts the final touches on a package about the school’s Coding Club. Yet another runs outside to set up a GoPro camera in the amphitheater for a wide-angle timelapse of the pep rally prep; the shot eventually makes a nice five-second addition to the morning broadcast. Cassleman bounces around the classroom, answering questions and ironing out wrinkles as the clock ticks closer to nine. He’s been a part of the program for four years and has earned the full trust and confidence of his classmates and instructors. Even when Cassleman asks his teacher for confirmation on a script correction, Caines defers to the teen for final say. “If you approve it, it’s your script,” Caines tells him. By the time the green light goes on, the crew is ready and the show goes on without a hitch. But the work is far from done, because tonight is also a big night for the DP News team.

It’s the last home football game of the year and the last live sports broadcast for the video production crew. Since the beginning of the pandemic, live-streaming high school football has become the norm, especially with the rise of the subscription-based NFHS Network. But while most of the games are streamed via low-quality AI cameras—typically set up way atop the stadium and resulting in a zoomed-out and blurry image—the DP News live stream is top-notch HD broadcast, complete with custom on-screen graphics, replays, and live play-by-play commentary, completely run by the students. The team returns to campus a few hours before kickoff, and students begin lugging cases full of equipment from the classroom to the top of the bleachers at Scott O’Leary Stadium. Cables, computer monitors, cameras, microphones, and more are carried and then set up in a makeshift production booth, all wired through a TriCaster module that allows them to switch between feeds. Just as in the classroom, Cassleman takes charge. He’s joined by fellow seniors Logan Surper and Alison Togami, who run the switchboard and on-screen scoreboard; Richard Rackenbacher, who handles play-by-play commentary; and a handful of students who operate the four cameras, monitor sound levels, or run between the booth and the classroom to fetch extra equipment when problems inevitably arise. “Ninety percent of the time, something goes wrong,” Cassleman says. Tonight, it’s a stubborn video converter. Both on-field cameras are live and ready to roll, but one of the wide-angle cameras in the stands is refusing to show up on screen. Cassleman, Surper, and Togami switch cables and restart equipment as game time approaches. Togami has watched the broadcast evolve over the past four years and says she never gets bored working Friday nights. She says the high-level broadcast comes with a lot of responsibility, but that the end product is worth the trouble. “There’s a lot more work, but it’s a lot more special,” she says. By the time Dent returns with a couple of pizzas for the team, the cameras are all set and the stream is ready to go live. He asks for a check-in, but he already knows the crew has everything under control. The kids take a quick break and grab a slice before showtime. “They’re a really great team,” Dent says. “That’s what you hope for—give them experience and empower them to have

control. They run the class; they take charge. That’s the goal.” Dent is especially proud of the upperclassmen, who act as mentors to their younger classmates. “They inspire their own peers,” he says. Dent has been part of the program since 2004, when Dos Pueblos first started a daily news broadcast. In the early years, he ran the class with former baseball coach Dan Yokubaitis, who now runs a similar multimedia production program at Bishop Diego High School. More recently, Dent encouraged the school to bring in Caines, who has taught media and coached football in the county for the past 15 years. During the pandemic, Dent took a step back to teach the introductory classes and let Caines take the lead. The news program has also taken a cue from the success of the Dos Pueblos Engineering Academy, which has become one of the premier programs in the state through grant funding and eventually its own foundation. “In public education, it’s tough to get funding,” Dent says. Thanks to both federal grants and money through the Santa Barbara Education Foundation, the program has been able to purchase all the equipment necessary for both the daily news and live sports broadcast, and Dent says the program is always trying to keep up with the latest tech. “We’re always trying to upgrade,” he says. Each year, the program also takes a group of about 30 to a four-day journalism conference, where the students are immersed in news culture and surrounded by like-minded high schoolers. These days, with students growing up alongside a rapidly changing news and media environment, the kids themselves have become de facto experts on modern technology. “I’m not the expert in the room anymore,” Dent says. For now, Dent and Caines are happy they can sit back on a Friday night and enjoy the game while trusting their team has everything under control, and once again, the show goes off without a hitch.

See dpnews.org.

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TSA IS NOW HIRING Positions starting at $21.38 per hour* Transportation Security Officers

THE UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS CHILDREN’S EVENT

Sunday, Nov. 20 12-2 PM

Orfalea Family Children’s Center Please join the UC Santa Barbara’s Early Childhood Care and Education Services and the MultiCultural Center in welcoming the Monarchs back to their overwintering habitat. A family-oriented day of fun and learning is planned with hands-on activities, games, presentations, and performances, all connected to the fascinating and inspiring world of the monarch butterfly!

RSVP AT UCSB SHORELINE

IMPORTANT NOTES FOR VISITORS: • Those who do not feel well, or have tested positive for COVID within the week prior to the event, are asked to stay home. • Kids (and adults) who wish to wear butterfly wings/ costumes are encouraged to do so! FR EE AN D OP EN • Parking is limited: car-pooling is encouraged. TO TH E • NO pets, please! PU BL IC For more information or assistance in accommodating people of varying abilities contact the MultiCultural Center at 805.893.8411

FOR THE FULL 2022 EVENT CALENDAR: WWW.MCC.SA.UCSB.EDU

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Sports

living

Football Playoff Brackets Released LILY CHUBB

Nov 4 - 10 BEST DIRECTOR WINNER AT CANNES

Santa Barbara High running back Nathan Barrios powers through the San Marcos defense. The Dons will host Downey in their playoff opener on November 4.

T

he CIF Southern Section released the muchanticipated high school football playoff brackets on Sunday morning, bringing an end to the season-long suspense regarding divisional groupings. The dream of a CIF championship remains alive for two Santa Barbara area teams as Channel League cochampion Santa Barbara (9-1) will host Downey (8-2) in a Division 4 first-round matchup and Bishop Diego (7-3) will host Vista Murrietta (5-5) in the first round of Division 3.

CIF Championship Dreams Remain Alive for Two S.B. Teams by Victor Bryant “It was actually kind of interesting because I had heard all the rumors about there being an eight-team Division 1, and then a 12-team Division 1, and so you kind of scout things out based upon what you’re hearing, and all of a sudden it’s a 10-team Division 1,” said Bishop Diego coach Tom Crawford. “It was a little bit of a surprise to have Vista Murrieta as the opponent, but they obviously have a very strong tradition at that school and are playing in a really powerful league with Corona Centennial and the like.” The playoff brackets were based off of the CalPreps computer rankings, which ranked all of the teams in the Southern Section based on wins and losses, strength of schedule, and other criteria. The only question remaining was how many teams would be in Division 1 with perhaps the top two teams nationally in high school football, Mater Dei and St. John Bosco. Once it was determined that 10 teams would be in Division 1, the rest of the divisions, 2 through 14, were composed of 16 team brackets. The teams ranked 11th through 26th were put in Division 2 and 27 through 42 were put in Division 3. This continued all the way through Division 14. Bishop Diego was ranked 32nd and will host 37thranked Vista Murrieta. Santa Barbara was ranked 52nd and will host 53rd-ranked Downey. This playoff system was adopted last season and is intended to produce

competitive equity. “Obviously we’re in a hairy predicament in regards to playing up in Division 4, but I feel they are a good football team and I feel like we can compete with them,” said Santa Barbara coach J.T. Stone. “It’s definitely going to be a good first-round game for us.” Downey features 6' 4" Oregon State commit Aidan Chiles at quarterback. He is a four-star prospect according to 247Sports and is equally adept at punishing defenses by passing or running. Stone admitted the Dons haven’t seen anything like him during the regular season, but they are eager to confront the challenge. “I think our defensive coordinators are going to put together a good scheme to put our kids in the best position to compete in this game,” said Stone of slowing down Chiles. “We’re definitely going to respect the athlete — he’s really good.” The moral of the story is the better season you have, the tougher the playoff gauntlet you will likely face under the current playoff format. Whether or not the rankings formula has a team pegged correctly will ultimately play out on the field. “I’m not going to lie to you — I’m not a big fan of how CIF does it. When it comes to teams up here in Ventura County and Santa Barbara County, I don’t think they have enough information on the type of teams that we have up here,” Stone said. “It is what it is. We’ve been telling our kids since week zero, no matter who we get, we’ve got to play.” For Bishop Diego, Vista Murrieta is a tradition-rich program that is accustomed to playing and beating the best teams in southern California. The Mustangs have not had a good season by their standards but will still be a tough out. Vista Murrieta has about 90 players on its varsity roster. Bishop Diego has about 40. “It will be a real challenge for us to compete with them,” Crawford said. “From what we’ve seen so far, they are physical, large, and they’ve got a lot of depth, so we’re going to have our work cut out for us.” Santa Barbara will host Downey on Friday, November 4, beginning at 7 p.m. at Peabody Stadium. Bishop Diego will host Vista Murrieta on Saturday, November 5, at 7 p.m. at La Playa Stadium. n

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S.B. Wine Auction Grows into Weekend Affair T hough Direct Relief might be

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SANTA BARBARA WINE AUCTION

benefits

the fifth-largest charity in the United States (according to Forbes Magazine), that doesn’t mean the Goletabased nonprofit never endured lean times. In speaking about next weekend’s Santa Barbara Wine Auction, Direct Relief’s vice president Heather Bennett explained, “[Winemakers] Jim Clendenen and Frank Ostini started this connection between the Santa Barbara BIDS TO BENEFIT: The S.B. Wine Auction’s main event is the gala dinner at the Vintners Foundation and what was Ritz-Carlton Bacara, where celebrities like Jane Lynch (center) join the wine then Direct Relief International, industry in bidding on unique packages. and they helped us pay the bills when we really needed the support.” The main event, as usual, is the swanky, wineThat was way back in 2000, the year of the first soaked dinner and live auction at the Ritz-CarlWine Auction. While the Vintners Foundation’s ton Bacara on November 12. The gourmet meal biennial gala continues to support Direct Relief’s will be overseen by Michelin-starred Chef Daisy internationally minded efforts two decades later, Ryan — co-owner of Bell’s in Los Alamos and Bar it now also directly helps the region’s farmworker Le Côte in Los Olivos — and guests can bid on community by benefiting Community Health packages like a dinner with pinot pioneer Richard Sanford at San Ysidro Ranch or tickets to an L.A. Rams game plus an exclusive tasting experience at The Hilt. On November 11, however, those in town for the weekby George Yatchisin end — or hoping to get in on the action in less formal duds for fewer Centers (CHC) of the Central Coast. bucks — can support the causes by enjoying a new During the last auction in February lunch series, with Friday events at Pico Restaurant 2020 — held just before COVID changed every- (featuring Lumen Wines, of course), Presqu’ile, thing — the auction raised enough to cover nearly and SAMsARA. “The lunches are highlight40,000 vaccinations for farmworkers, which were ing vintners and their craft and also highlightdelivered in the fields during the height of the ing some of the best farmers in our area,” Gasca pandemic. The funding further supports CHC’s explained. “They give you a chance to sit with everyday work, which included 493,000 medical winemakers and owners in an intimate experivisits at 43 different medical facilities in Santa Bar- ence and learn about farming, about this region, bara and San Luis Obispo counties in 2021 alone. and about the dedicated people behind it all.” “I believe in our mission; I believe in bringing The weekend will pay tribute to the 2022 Vinthealthcare to our vineyard workers,” said Jessica ner Honoree: Grassini Family Vineyards. “I look Gasca, the owner of Story of Soil wines and the at our honoree winery from last year, the StolpVintners Foundation’s current president. “As a man Family, and I look at the honoree winery for Latina winemaker, with a family that emigrated this year, the Grassini Family, and have so much over from Mexico, I have an incredible amount of respect for them,” Gasca said. “Here you have respect for the people working our land and tend- two wineries that are acknowledging the people ing to our grapes. Talk about hard work! They that farm their land and give back within their deserve to be acknowledged, and raising money own companies with a profit-sharing program. for CHC to bring healthcare into our vineyards is They are connecting these people to our mission one of the ways we can do it.” of growing and making some of the best wines in Gasca’s leadership in adding the nonprofit as a the world and giving back to them, recognizing beneficiary triggered an auxiliary benefit as well: we couldn’t do this without them.” the CHC is now Direct Relief’s official local benGasca urges prospective attendees to step up, eficiary, tightening the globally impactful jug- have fun, and support the cause. “If we can make gernaut’s ties to the community where it’s based. a more sustainable community, then all of this The event’s evolution doesn’t stop there. While volunteer time was worth it,” she explained. “I’d the event was once just a one-night black-tie soi- do it more if I had the time.” ree, the 2022 Wine Auction will be a two-day fundraiser. See sbwineauction.org.

Biennial Fundraiser Supports Direct Relief and Community Health Centers


Performing J. S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations

COURTESY

se make the

Jean Rondeau, harpsichord Fri, Nov 4 / 7 PM / Hahn Hall, Music Academy “Rondeau is a wizard: forget grace, forget melancholy – this is brilliance.” Gramophone (U.K.)

Pre-concert Talk by Derek Katz, UCSB Associate Professor of Musicology

EASY & FUN FOOD: Dos Pueblos High senior Margherita Scussat is sharing her love of cooking healthy, affordable food through her nonprofit website CookItEasy.org.

CookItEasy.org

B

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

FOOD & DRINK

Margherita Scussat’s

6 PM / Hahn Hall Free to event ticket holders

orn to parents from Milan, Italy, where cooking fresh foods

See CookItEasy.org.

Listen at

—Matt Ketttmann

independent.com/theindy

from scratch every night is the norm, Margherita Scussat was dismayed to learn that not every American ate the same way. In fact, so many of her fellow high school students ate so horribly that she decided to show them how easy it was to eat healthy. During the summer before her sophomore year at Dos Pueblos High, Scussat launched CookItEasy.org, where she’s since uploaded more than 35 recipes based on ingredients that are both nutritious and affordable. “It’s a website to promote healthy home cooking, particularly among young people, especially college students who are living alone for the first time and juggling school and other responsibilities,” she explained. “Young people are known for relying too heavily on fast foods and pre-made foods, which have been proven by numerous studies to have negative health effects.” CookItEasy.org was quickly endorsed by the Santa Barbara Unified School District, and Scussat’s marketing efforts — which have been funded in part by donations from individuals and companies — also led to publicity in student outreach at UCSB, UCLA, and Stanford. She’s seeking the support of like-minded nonprofits to spread the word even further and is interested in taking her guidance into the real world. “It would be great to partner with some cooking schools and have some classes of my own,” said Scussat, who is now a senior at Dos Pueblos. Many of the recipes reflect favorites from her childhood, like pasta with mushrooms, but she also goes global, showing how to make tacos and tikka masala as well as presenting vegetarian and gluten-free alternatives. “I’m trying to prove that healthy home cooking can be fast and affordable,” said Scussat, who translates every recipe into Spanish. “It doesn’t have to be the burden that some people make it out to be.”

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l!I


I

HOP has completed its move

Join

Fill the Foodbank!

Fill the Foodbank! Food Drive Food DriveSaturday, November 19

Fil

Fo

10am - 2pm- 2pm Saturday, November 19, 10am

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need!

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need! Foodbank Sharehouse

Saturday, No 10am - 2pm

Foodbank Sharehouse 80 Coromar Drive, Goleta 80 Coromar Drive, Goleta Most needed items: Most needed items: • Nut butters Nut butters • Canned protein (tuna,Canned chicken, etc.) protein (tuna, • Whole grain cereal chicken, etc.) • Dried or canned beansWhole grain cereal Dried or canned beans • Frozen turkeys/chickens

Donate healthy fo

TURKEY DRIVE 2021

Frozen turkeys/chickens Foodbank Sha Everyone deserves a healthy holiday meal! 80 Coromar Dr

TURKEY DRIVE 2021

For more info, contact PAguirre@FoodbankSBC.org or visit www.FoodbankSBC.org Turkey Drive Oct 24 - Nov 23 Drop off 4554 Hollister Ave 7am-3pm

Everyone deserves a TURKEYS/CHICKENS! healthy holiday meal! Everyone deserves DROP OFF

Most needed items

a healthy holiday meal! Mon-Fri • 7am-3pm

DROP OFF

Nut butters Canned protein chicken, etc.) Whole grain cer Dried or canned Frozen turkeys/

thru Nov 24 for Thanksgiving delivery

DROP OFF TURKEYS/CHICKENS! TURKEYS/CHICKENS Foodbank Warehouse 4554 Hollister Ave

(Next to Page Youth Center)

Oct 24 -DRIVE Nov 23 2021 TURKEY

Sun, Nov 21 • 8am-1pm Mon-Fri • 7am-3pm thru Nov 24 for Thanksgiving delivery

All Saints-by-the-Sea

Everyone deserves 4554 Hollister83Ave Eucalyptus Ln 4554 Hollister Ave a healthy holiday meal! Our Lady of Mt. Carmel 7am-3pm Episcopal Church Foodbank Warehouse (Next to Page Youth Center)

Catholic Church

FOOD & DRINK

from 4765 Calle Real in Goleta (which will soon be a Chick-fil-A) to 7127 Hollister Avenue, Suite 30, next to Costco and the DMV, where Itsuki Restaurant was located from October 2012 until September 2021. Before Itsuki, it was the home of Baja Fresh where, back in my single days, and because I live around nearby, I ordered chicken tacos for lunch nearly seven days a week for years. But I digress. “We are happy to be near the university and to serve customers in this area,” says General GIFT TO THE GOODLAND: The first-ever Goleta IHOP has opened Manager Miguel Velasquez. near Costco in University Plaza. There are only a couple of other breakfast spots in this area, so IHOP is a and executive chef Brandon Boudet offers welcome addition. The restaurant appears his popular deep-fried turkeys and holiday to be a little smaller than the space they side dishes for takeout. In addition, paspreviously occupied, but I am told there try chef Ann Kirk will be offering a spread are plans to expand. In the addition to the of desserts to complete the Thanksgiving patio at the east end of the building, the feast. The 12–14-pound turkey feeds 6-8 eatery is planning to a create outdoor seat- people and costs $100. Sides (6-8 people) ing in a nook on the west side of the facil- cost $48 each and include Roasted Brussel ity. Alcoholic beverages will be available Sprouts with Applewood Bacon, Homelater in the month. made Fennel Sausage & Mushroom StuffIn 1958, Jerry Lapin, Al Lapin, and ing, Shaved Raw Brussels with Parmesan, Albert Kallis founded IHOP at 4301 West and more. Desserts (6-8 People) include Riverside Drive in Burbank, and now there Pumpkin Cheesecake with Bourbon are nearly 2,000 locations in all 50 states Caramel & Toasted Pecans for $48, Apple and around the world. The new Goleta Crisp with Oat Streusel Topping for $42, IHOP is open daily from 6 a.m.-10 p.m. and Sweet Cream Gelato (1 pint) for $12. Call (805) 562-0056 or visit ihop.com. Orders can be placed by calling (805) 7497400 and they will be ready for pickup on DOWNTOWN NATURAL CAFÉ TO CLOSE: The origi- Thanksgiving morning. nal Natural Café, located at 508 State Street, will close at the end of March 2023. Nick DINNER AT MONY’S: Reader “I Miss Rex of Welsh at the Santa Barbara Independent S.B.” reports that they stopped by Mony’s reports that owner Kelly Brown says the at 217 Anacapa Street and noted that it is issue of homeless people has veered from now offering dinner 4:30-8 p.m. Thursbeing merely difficult to one of “straight-up day-Saturday. Call (805) 895-2978 or visit criminality” and that the problem of rats’ monyssb.com. nests under parklets has become intolerable. The other locations will be open for BUDDHA BOWLS IS NOW DANK BOWL: I was bikbusiness as usual. ing with my son in Isla Vista for a special Halloween party for kids and noticed that SCOOP SCOOP: This just in from reader Terry: Buddha Bowls at 901 Embarcadero Del “I was in SCOOP on Coast Village Road Mar is now known as “Dank Bowl Kitchen.” last Saturday. I asked the nice guy behind Buddha Bowls opened in December 2013. the counter packing my ice cream if they Apparently, owner Daniel Dunietz kept were going to have the peppermint in facing customer confusion because BudDecember. He told me they are closing by dha Bowls is a name used for vegetarian December to reorganize, remodel, etc. He dishes and also suggests the cuisine is is looking for a job! I have noticed they inspired by Eastern traditions. The eatery have not been as busy as the previous own- offers neither. Dunietz says he originally ers were. Too bad.” chose the name “Buddha Bowls” because in Chicago, where he is from, the term is THANKSGIVING AT LITTLE DOM’S: Little Dom’s interchangeable with weed. He switched Seafood at 686 Linden Avenue in Carpinte- to Dank Bowl Kitchen because “dank” is a ria is bringing back its annual Deep-Fried slang term describing something as “excelThanksgiving Turkey, available for pre- lent,” especially marijuana, and it leaves the order now. Little Dom’s Seafood’s co-owner other connotations behind.

JOHN DICKSON PHOTOS

IHOP Opens in Goleta

Join us for

Join us for

1300 E Valley Rd

Sun, Nov 21 • 8am-1pm

DROP OFF TURKEYS/CHICKENS!

Learn more/Donate: All Saints-by-the-Sea Mon-Fri • 7am-3pm Episcopal Church FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime

For more inf or Turkey Drive Oct 24

83 Eucalyptus Ln

thru Nov 24 for Thanksgiving delivery

Foodbank Warehouse Our Lady of Mt. Carmel 4554 Hollister Ave Catholic Church (Next to Page Youth Center)

1300 E Valley Rd

Sun, Nov 21 • 8am-1pm

Learn more/Donate:

All Saints-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime 83 Eucalyptus Ln

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church 1300 E Valley Rd

Join us in reading November’s book of the month! NOVEMBER’S THEME: FA N TA S Y, S C I - F I

Wednesday, November 30, 6pm, on Zoom

Learn more/Donate: B O O K OF TH E M ON TH : FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime

The Lathe of Heaven by Ursula K. Le Guin

Register at independent.com/indybookclub

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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DECEMBER 1-18

Tickets starting

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“A whole new take on a well-known tale.” –DC THEATER ARTS

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BY

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For 3 decades, brother and sister Jeneda and Clayson Benally have been recording and touring, bringing their empowering organic conscious raising charged music to communities throughout Europe and North America. From the (Dine) Navajo Nation in Northern Arizona, Sihasin is an explosive duo of just bass, drums and vocals with a traditional Navajo backbone bridging folk, rock, world, pop and a little punk. Jeneda and Clayson Benally grew up protesting the environmental degradation and inhumane acts of cultural genocide against their traditional way of life. Their music reflects hope for equality, healthy and respectful communities and social and environmental justice. Sihasin is a rare band that does more than just perform. They leave their audiences with an exhilarating feeling of hope and respect and cultural appreciation. www.sihasin.com. Co-sponsored by AIICRC, CISM, and KCSB.

33 West Victoria Street | Santa Barbara etcsb.org | 805.965.5400 SANTA BARBARA’S PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANY

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For more information or assistance in accommodating people of varying abilities contact the MultiCultural Center at 805.893.8411

REGISTER AT UCSB SHORELINE FOR THE FULL 2022 EVENT CALENDAR: WWW.MCC.SA.UCSB.EDU


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

DEREK SHAPTON

t might be said that the seeds for the allowed me to appreciate what popular Speaking with Pico series risks she takes and how she is first sprouted in a class at UCSB. constantly challenging herself Religious Studies professor Nandini after every successful book to go Iyer (Pico Iyer’s late mother) had forin a radically different direction,” mer Arts & Lectures (A&L) Associate he says. “I think of it as a great Director Roman Baratiak as a student luxury, really, to concentrate in the 1970s. Baratiak became a very all one’s attention on the writer for a long time. And it becomes good friend of the family and brought Pico into the program in the 1990s. the richest and most intimate “It’s a real blessing for me to be part conversation.” of that,” Iyer shared via a Zoom interA prolific writer himself, Iyer view from his home in Japan. “Partly says, “I think one of the curiosities of the form that I’ve come to because I get to speak to people I would never speak to otherwise. … I know, partly by virtue of being never meet my inspirations or heroes, interviewed, is that many of us except when I come to Campbell Hall.” will say things on a public stage, This season’s interviewees include we would never say in private, Pulitzer Prize winners Jennifer Egan and that we wouldn’t say to our friends.” (November 6) and Tracy Kidder He doesn’t come to the stage (March 14, 2023), and actor, filmmaker, and animal behaviorist Isawith any notes or outlines. “It bella Rossellini (April 27, 2023). Past makes me think about things interviewees have included Philip in a way I never would, in the Glass, Elizabeth Strout, George Saunnormal run of conversation. So ders, Susan Orlean, Zadie Smith, and when I’m asking the questions, Salman Rushdie. my hope is that our guests will How does such an eclectic slate be grateful, suddenly, to be asked come to be? “I have my wish list. Often Pico Iyer’s popular Speaking with Pico series kicks off on November 6 when something quite piercing.” the writers I most idolized whom he interviews Jennifer Egan at UCSB’s Campbell Hall. The format is 75 minutes of I would never meet otherwise, like uninterrupted conversation. George Saunders, Zadie Smith, or Elizabeth While he doesn’t generally speak to his “The idea is that it will allow somebody to Strout,” says Iyer. “It’s a true collaboration subjects before the interviews, Iyer does really settle into a talk and forget that she immerse himself in their work. “I spend is on stage,” says Pico. “I think there’s a parwith A&L.” He estimates it’s about 50-50 between about six or seven months in intensive prep- ticular excitement in the tightrope walk of their suggestions and his own. “Last year, I’ll aration, and that itself is really interesting. I conducting a conversation on stage.” Adding, confess that Arts & Lectures suggested Vijay learn more about my favorite authors in a “I think the heart of interviewing is listening, Gupta, and I knew nothing about him. A vio- way that I never would otherwise,” he shares. and learning to be quiet, and following the linist, philanthropist, and brilliant speaker, “Jennifer Egan is a perfect example, conversation rather than trying to lead it.” he turned out to be one of the most inspiring because I had read her work before, but I —Leslie Dinaberg people I’ve ever met. And we’re now good never read seven of her books in quick sucfriends.” cession. These last few months have really See artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

Pulitzer Prize–winning novelist Jennifer Egan’s work resides at an interesting intersection of popular culture and literature (with a capital L). They’re ambitious, serious works that also are very funny and accessible. “To read a writer who has such a rich public scope, as well as such a sense of the private world, is rare. There are very few I know who combined those two. I think that’s one reason she’s become one of the most popular and cherished, respected writers in the country,” said Pico Iyer, who will interview Egan (The Candy House, A Visit from the Goon Squad) on Sunday, November 6, at Campbell Hall. Asked about her work, Egan said, “In the end, the only thing that matters to me is fun. I see myself as an entertainer, and I read fiction to escape into another world. My personal definition of ‘fun’ includes fresh language and ideas; without those things, a novel feels thin and won’t usually hold my interest as a reader. I get a lot of feedback to make sure my fiction is delivering the effects I want it to. One of those effects is often humor; I love to find the hilarity that results from following logical events to absurd extremes.” Egan, who also works as a journalist and teaches literature, said that both help inform her books. Journalism has broadened her knowledge. “I couldn’t

have written my books without it,” she said. “For example, there’s a lot about addiction in The Candy House, both to tech and to opioids. My knowledge about that comes from a story I worked on for the New York Times Magazine about women with opioid dependency who become pregnant. I spent months in and around methadone clinics and working with people in recovery, and they made a huge Jennifer Egan comes to impression on me.” Campbell Hall on Sunday, November 6. Teaching “has helped me to define the way I see fiction working in the world: as the dream life of the culture that makes it. There’s so much information baked into fiction, and I’m not sure there’s any better way to understand the interior lives of other human beings than to read it. It’s the prism that shows us everything.” —LD

See artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

PIETER M. VAN HATTEM

JENNIFER EGAN IS SERIOUS ABOUT FUN

L I F E PAGE 43

MISS YOU LIKE HELL TAKES US ON MUSICAL ROAD TRIP COURTESY

I

THE JOYS JOYS OF OF SPEAKING SPEAKING THE WITH PICO PICO WITH

Miss You Like Hell from Out of the Box Theatre Company is at Center Stage November 4-13. Beatriz and her teenage daughter, Olivia, embark on a cross-country road trip in Miss You Like Hell, a new musical produced by Out of the Box Theatre Company, directed by Samantha Eve. This mother and daughter duo haven’t seen each other in several years, and their already tenuous relationship is further burdened by Beatriz’s undocumented status and impending deportation. With book by Quiara Alegría Hudes (who also wrote the book for In the Heights, and the Pulitzer Prize–winning play Water by the Spoonful) and music by folk-rock artist Erin McKeown, Miss You Like Hell is a tour through America that celebrates love, diversity, and the unification of families — whether their separation is due to physical or emotional distance. While this musical does broach immigration issues, at heart it’s a story about the complexities of familial bonds. “Olivia is a strong-willed, intelligent girl whose difficult experiences have taught her to build up walls to protect herself,” says Larissa Mehlig of her character. “Her motivation is to regain the strength she used to find through the love of her mother, and see if it is possible to mend the parts of her that have been hurt or find the power to grow from them.” Michelle Hernandez, who plays Beatriz, describes her character as “a loud and proud Latina woman whose circumstances and choices have led to a complicated and strained relationship with her daughter. Beatriz is a whirlwind of excitement, passion, and fun, but we discover she is hiding some very serious secrets that expand the rift between her and Olivia.” Miss You Like Hell runs at Center Stage Theater from November 4-13. Audiences can expect music at the nexus between folk, rock, and contemporary musical theater. Featuring a cast of colorful characters from across the country, this musical journey invites audiences to “bring your drama; let’s hit the road!” —Maggie Yates

See centerstagetheater.org.

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Famed harpsichordist Jean Rondeau plays the complete Goldberg Variations at Hahn Hall on November 4.

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n the agenda according to the UCSB Arts & Lectures’ Hear and Now series, rising young classical phenoms and fresh “now-ish” ideas are granted a spotlight in the warming ambience of Hahn Hall on the Music Academy’s Montecito campus. That general agenda gets twisted only slightly with the arrival of much-acclaimed young harpsichordist Jean Rondeau, on Friday, November 4. For the evening’s entertainment, the keyboardist dips back into 18th-century baroque annals and presents the complete Goldberg Variations of J.S. Bach. The principal difference here is his periodcorrect use of the proper tool — the harpsichord of Bach’s day, versus the piano version made famous in the 20th century by Glenn Gould and other grand pianists. Something of a charismatic figure and radical virtuoso well-known for his dynamic live performances, the 31-year-old Frenchman is one of the current bright lights of the global harpsichord scene. He has recorded several albums, including a recent, meticulously faithful rendition of the Goldberg Variations on the Erato label, met with critical hosannas; and 2017’s Bach Dynasty. He has ventured into contemporary music, as well, giving the 2018 world premiere of the solo harpsichord piece Furakèla by the fascinating French keyboardist-

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composer Eve Risser, whose music deftly crosstalks between classical and jazz. The iconic Goldberg opus has very much been in Rondeau’s hands and on his mind lately. In the wake of the album’s release, his Santa Barbara debut on Friday is part of a busy U.S. tour with the Variations as his sole focus, culminating in an appearance in the midtown Manhattan classical music temple and proving ground that is Carnegie Hall. Last June, Rondeau presented the world premiere of the two-piano and percussionist piece UNDR, co-composed by himself and percussionist Tancrède Kummer, drawing direct inspiration from the Goldberg Variations. Never mind that a harpsichord recital in Santa Barbara is, in itself, an all-too-rare occasion. The chance to audience with one of the great living practitioners on the instrument, on the theme of one of the premiere jewels from J.S. Bach’s repertoire, no less, is an opportunity not to be missed. The 7 p.m. event at Hahn Hall also includes a pre-concert talk by Derek Katz, UCSB Associate Professor of Musicology, at 6 p.m. (free to event ticket holders). —Josef Woodard

See artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.


PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISING

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

FOR MY DAUGHTER

WEEK OF NOVEMBER 3

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): In the coming weeks, I encourage you to work as hard as you have ever worked. Work smart, too. Work with flair and aplomb and relish. You now have a surprisingly fertile opportunity to reinvent how you do your work and how you feel about your work. To take maximum advantage of this potential breakthrough, you should inspire yourself to give more of your heart and soul to your work than you have previously imagined possible. (P.S.: By “work,” I mean your job and any crucial activity that is both challenging and rewarding.)

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Here’s my weird suggestion, Taurus. Just for now, only for a week or two, experiment with dreaming about what you want but can’t have. And just for now, only for a week or two, go in pursuit of what you want but can’t have. I predict that these exercises in quixotic futility will generate an unexpected benefit. They will motivate you to dream true and strong and deep about what you do want and can have. They will intensify and focus you to pursue what you do want and can have.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Your most successful times in life usually come when all your various selves are involved. During these interludes, none of them is neglected or shunted to the outskirts. In my astrological opinion, you will be wise to ensure this scenario is in full play during the coming weeks. In fact, I recommend you throw a big Unity Party and invite all your various sub-personalities to come as they are. Have outrageous fun acting out the festivities. Set out a place mat and name tag on a table for each participant. Move around from seat to seat and speak from the heart on behalf of each one. Later, discuss a project you could all participate in creating.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): A Cancerian reader named Joost Joring explained to me how he cultivates the art of being the best Cancerian he can be. He said, “I shape my psyche into a fortress, and I make people feel privileged when they are allowed inside. If I must sometimes instruct my allies to stay outside for a while, to camp out by the drawbridge as I work out my problems, I make sure they know they can still love me—and that I still love them.” I appreciate Joost’s perspective. As a Cancerian myself, I can attest to its value. But I will also note that in the coming weeks, you will reap some nice benefits from having less of a fortress mentality. In my astrological opinion, it’s PARTY TIME!

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Leo poet Antonio Machado wrote, “I thought my fire was out, and I stirred the ashes. I burnt my fingers.” I’m telling you this so you won’t make the same mistake, Leo. Your energy may be a bit less radiant and fervent than usual right now, but that’s only because you’re in a recharging phase. Your deep reserves of fertility and power are regenerating. That’s a good thing! Don’t make the error of thinking it’s a sign of reduced vitality. Don’t overreact with a flurry of worry.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo author Siegfried Sassoon became renowned for the poetry he wrote about being a soldier in World War I. Having witnessed carnage firsthand, he became adept at focusing on what was truly important. “As long as I can go on living a rich inner life,” he wrote, “I have no cause for complaint, and I welcome anything which helps me to simplify my life, which seems to be more and more a process of eliminating inessentials!” I suggest we make Sassoon your inspirational role model for the next three weeks. What inessentials can you eliminate? What could you do to enhance your appreciation for all the everyday miracles that life offers you?

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You Libras have a talent that I consider a superpower: You can remove yourself from the heart of the chaos and deliver astute insights about how to tame the chaos. I like that about you. I have personally

benefited from it on numerous occasions. But for the next few weeks, I will ask you to try something different. I’ll encourage you to put an emphasis on practical action, however imperfect it might be, more than on in-depth analysis. This moment in the history of your universe requires a commitment to getting things done, even if they’re untidy and incomplete. Here’s your motto: “I improvise compromises in the midst of the interesting mess.”

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Fear is the raw material from which courage is manufactured,” said author Martha Beck. “Without it, we wouldn’t even know what it means to be brave.” I love that quote—and I especially love it as a guiding meditation for you Scorpios right now. We usually think of fear as an unambiguously bad thing, a drain of our precious life force. But I suspect that for you, it will turn out to be useful in the coming days. You’re going to find a way to transmute fear into boldness, bravery, and even badassery.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For decades, the Canadian city of Sudbury hosted a robust mining industry. Deposits of nickel sulphide ore spawned a booming business. But these riches also brought terrible pollution. Sudbury’s native vegetation was devastated. The land was stained with foul air produced by the smelting process. An effort to re-green the area began in the 1970s. Today, the air is among the cleanest in the province of Ontario. In the spirit of this transformation, I invite you to embark on a personal reclamation project. Now is a favorable time to detoxify and purify any parts of your life that have been spoiled or sullied.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The literal meaning of the ancient Greek word aigílips is “devoid of goats.” It refers to a place on the earth that is so high and steep that not even surefooted goats can climb it. There aren’t many of those places. Similarly, there are very few metaphorical peaks that a determined Capricorn can’t reach. One of your specialties is the power to master seemingly improbable and impassable heights. But here’s an unexpected twist in your destiny: In the coming months, your forte will be a talent for going very far down and in. Your agility at ascending, for a change, will be useful in descending—for exploring the depths. Now is a good time to get started! .AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Evolved Aquarians are often blessed with unprecedented friendships and free-spirited intimacy and innovative alliances. People who align themselves with you may enjoy experimental collaborations they never imagined before engaging with you. They might be surprised at the creative potentials unleashed in them because of their synergy with you. In the coming weeks and months, you will have even more power than usual to generate such liaisons and connections. You might want to make a copy of this horoscope and use it as your calling card or business card.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): I surveyed the history of literature to identify authors I consider highly intuitive. Piscean-born Anaïs Nin was my top choice. She used language with fluidity and lyricism. She lived a colorful, unpredictable life. No one better deserves the title of Intuition Champion. And yet she also had a discerning view of this faculty. She wrote, “I began to understand that there were times when I must question my intuition and separate it from my anxieties or fears. I must think, observe, question, seek facts and not trust blindly to my intuition.” I admire her caution. And I suspect it was one reason her intuition was so potent. Your assignment, Pisces, is to apply her approach to your relationship with your intuition. The coming months will be a time when you can supercharge this key aspect of your intelligence and make it work for you better than it ever has before.

Homework: Imagine you have taken a particular consciousness-altering drug. Imagine how it affects you. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

In my Child Psychology class at UC Irvine my professor stated one needs to hear something five times to retain it. That’s why I will ask several times, “Can a city have a soul?” First, I’d like to thank the soul (or souls) who had the long-range vision to build our Santa Monica Debris Flow Basin – 5 football fields long and 100 feet deep. This foresight saved us in the January 9, 2018, disastrous and deadly debris flow... which occurred while the massive Thomas Fire was still smoldering. This debris basin was filled to capacity. The Army Corps of Engineers spent months, working 24/7, emptying what they had built years ago. Das Williams said, “We dodged a bullet.” I’d say, due to this foresight, we narrowly escaped destruction. Long-range vision is missing in the intent to put this Surfliner Inn on our Downtown and Beach Parking Lot #3. By the way, there’s nothing “surflike” about this hotel. It’s a “Mini Rosewood Miramar.” And is anyone really listening to the actual description of this Lot #3?

DOWNTOWN AND BEACH PARKING Can a city have a soul? Regarding the argument that Yes on Measure T will irretrievably impact future zoning — well, I have personally experienced, here in Carpinteria, zoning decisions can be fluid. The property next door to mine recently sold. Determined by its lot size this property is zoned for 2 units. However, the Community Development Department, and eventually the City Council, decided to allow 4 units. Four units on a residential lot ‘technically’ zoned for a maximum of two units. The correct zoning law was decided to be legal-nonconforming and should have been a decision made initially at the highest level. Can a city have a soul? For so many years, so many Carpinterians have voiced their opposition to this hotel and have not been heard. Therefore, the Initiative Measure T became a last-gasp absolute necessity. Why? -A hotel, with a bar, directly next to RR tracks, is inherently dangerous! Even billionaire Rick Caruso realizes this and has a guard posted 24/7 next to the RR tracks at his Rosewood Miramar. -We are in a 1,200 year extreme drought. Hotels are notorious waterwasters. And a rooftop pool? Perhaps, with foresight, the best idea for Lot #3 might be installing open pavers – to collect our rare rainfall and help fill our challenged aquifers. Again, with gratitude to the people that knew to build the Santa Monica Debris Flow Basin, foresight regarding this hotel’s location is simply not wise: -It is in a designated Tsunami Evacuation Zone. -It is doomed to guaranteed sea level rise. -Because of its location, this inn could potentially become an expensive lawsuit liability for the city, the legal owner of the land. -A safe emergency escape route for the 700 Carpinterians who live on the ocean side of the RR tracks could, in an emergency, be dangerously affected by this development. I recently asked one of the owners of the legendary Spot how she felt about this inn: “Triste,” she said. “Muy triste.” Can a city have a soul? Please let go of this unsafe, unpopular project. Be the heroes that they’ll talk about someday. Heroes who demonstrated the long-range vision needed to preserve the soul of this small, sweet town.

Paid for by Alison Johnson P.O. Box 458 Carpinteria , CA 93014

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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PROFESSIONAL

ADMISSIONS & STUDENT AFFAIRS COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Assists with admissions, recruitment and student advising for three graduate programs in the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. Creates a supportive environment to foster academic productivity and professional growth for students and graduates. Assists the Admissions & Student Affairs Director with admissions, recruitment and student advising. Builds and maintains databases and records of prospective students, admitted students, and current students. Updates operating systems and implements new software to improve communication and workflow. Analyzes student progress, compiles reports and presents information, as requested. Plans and manages communications and marketing campaigns. Produces digital and print materials for outreach. Plans and hosts events and activities for students and alumni. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related area or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years of experience working in an academic setting. Solid knowledge of graphic design and email marketing platforms including Pardot and Constant Contact. Skilled in computer applications, including word processing, data management and analysis, and visual presentation software. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work during non‑business hours during special events and to travel periodically. $24.81 ‑ $28.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative

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Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44246.

ADMISSIONS & STUDENT AFFAIRS COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Assists with admissions, recruitment and student advising for three graduate programs in the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. Creates a supportive environment to foster academic productivity and professional growth for students and graduates. Assists the Admissions & Student Affairs Director with admissions, recruitment and student advising. Builds and maintains databases and records of prospective students, admitted students, and current students. Updates operating systems and implements new software to improve communication and workflow. Analyzes student progress, compiles reports and presents information, as requested. Plans and manages communications and marketing campaigns. Produces digital and print materials for outreach. Plans and hosts events and activities for students and alumni. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related area or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years of experience working in an academic setting. Solid knowledge of graphic design and email marketing platforms including Pardot and Constant Contact. Skilled in computer applications, including word processing, data management and analysis, and visual presentation software. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work during non‑business hours during special events and to travel periodically. $24.81 ‑ $28.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44246.

ASSISTANT STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES ADVISOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Provides free non‑attorney‑client privileged legal education and information to currently registered undergraduate and graduate UC Santa Barbara students and student organizations. Coordinates and advises the internship program as well as other internal projects agreed upon with the Student Legal Services Advisor, the Legal Resource Center Committee and the Associated Students (A.S.) Executive Director. Secondary and tertiary advisor for the Legal Resources Center(AS LRC); and the AS Isla Vista Tenants Union (AS IVTU), respectively. Main functional areas for the Assistant Student Legal

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Services Advisor include Student Guidance and Education; Coordination of the Legal Resource Center Intern Program; Management and Supports the area’s Assessment. *As a purely educational and informational position, the Assistant Student Legal Services Advisor shall not practice law in this role and is strictly forbidden to legally represent, in any capacity: ‑ The Regents of the University ‑ Any student or student organization. Reqs: JD from a American Bar Association‑approved law school. Must demonstrate abroad knowledge of multiple legal disciplines including but not limited to landlord / tenant law, interpretation involving the rental or leasing of housing property, immigration law, personal injury, dissolution, consumer complaints, sexual harassment, student/police relations, and other civil matters, and on criminal and traffic matters. Must have 3‑7 years experience using professional concepts to provide a variety of legal counsel including but not limited to campus students. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. The Legal Services Advisor shall not practice law or provide legal advice of any kind. This is a 75% time position. $68,475‑$78,937/Yr. at 75%. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44253

BAKER

CAMPUS DINING The Baker performs culinary duties such as mixing doughs and batters, shaping yeast breads and rolls, making pizzas, decorating desserts and preparing icings and fillings, serving up to 1,500 meals per shift. Insures that assigned responsibilities are accomplished and that high standards of food quality, service, sanitation and safety are met at all times. Assists with student training, food production and sanitation. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent combination of education and experience Work Experience: 1‑3 years: Knowledge of and experience with basic cooking/baking techniques or equivalent combination of education and experience. Knowledge of safety and sanitation regulations regarding proper food handling or equivalent combination of education and experience. Ability to read and write English for the purpose of preparing food from recipe guidelines and producing reports or equivalent combination of education and experience.Ability to perform basic mathematical calculations including addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication needed for recipe development and other required functions or equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Ability to lift up to 50 pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per day. Work hours/days may vary. Satisfactory conviction history background check. 6:30 am – 3:00 pm Thursday – Monday (May Vary) $18.90/hr. ‑ $21.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,

gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/14/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44840

BIKE SHOP LEAD MECHANIC

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Responsible for organizing the day to day technical and repair aspects with the student mechanics of the Associated Students (A.S.) Bike Shop. The Lead Mechanic implements the training for student employees, outlined in the AS Bike Shop training manual, to student employees for the repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types and other rolling stock. Responsible for ensuring staff’s adherence to safety standards in all repair procedures. Reqs: Must possess a broad knowledge and technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. Must be able to communicate about processes clearly and effectively to customers and staff in a fast paced work environment. Ability to complete mechanical tasks left uncompleted by Student Mechanics. Understanding or experience with community based bicycle spaces. 1‑3 years Technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. 1‑3 years Repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Clery Act : Campus Security Authority. $22.25‑$23.18/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 44251

BILLING ASSISTANT

STUDENT AFFAIRS & ADMIN SERVICES The Billing Assistant is the primary contact with the public for the Billing Office. Provides telephone and in‑person advising or problem resolution and complex transactions, often involving coordination with other departments or outside agencies. Maintains internal controls for students receiving funding from the Veteran’s Administration (The VA) coordinating with the Campus Veteran’s Certifying Official in the Financial Aid Office. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent experience; working knowledge in administrative procedures and processes including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. $21.28‑$30.17/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44541

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BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER SENIOR

CENTRAL STORES Installs furniture systems, delivers heavy/ delicate equipment, relocation of offices and labs, sets up public events and makes others general deliveries and pickups. Involves the management, long‑range planning, organization, coordination, oversight and / or performance of multiple operational activities and services for one or more buildings, including space planning, general maintenance, specialized facility systems and operations, call center triage and tracking of repair services, move planning and coordination, development of procedures, policies and communications related to infrastructure and safety. Applies skills and job knowledge in area of specialization; may adapt procedures, operations, techniques, tools, materials, and / or equipment to meet needs of area of specialization. Reqs: Works closely with departmental staff to efficiently relocate one person or whole departments while ensuring the work is completed in a timely manner. Operates a variety of power and hand tools in a safe and proficient manner. Delivers large, heavy or sensitive equipment using trucks with power liftgate, forklift, pallet jack and other specialized materiel handling equipment. Advises supervisor of any needed equipment or truck repairs and potential safety issues. Delivers and sets up rental equipment for all types of ceremonies and public events. Occasional weekend work is required. In all aspects of work, provides outstanding customer service, exercising good judgement, interpersonal and technical skills and is professional in every respect. Communicates well with clients, co‑workers and supervisor, promoting

teamwork and positive relations. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Able to frequently lift up to 70 lbs. Occasional Weekends May Be Required. $22.73.‑ $26.64/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44821

CASE RESOLUTION OFFICER

TITLE IX AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY COMPLIANCE Using independent judgment and maintaining an experienced level of professionalism knowledge and confidentiality, the Case Resolution Officer implements and maintains the University’s policies and procedures that pertain to Title IX by independently evaluating and simultaneously responding appropriately to multifaceted claims, which entail considerable risk in the event of audit and/or litigation, and the immediate needs of complainant(s), witness(es), reporting party or parties and respondent(s) for supplemental assistance with regard to interim protections and accommodations, if appropriate, and personal and/or emotional support resources. Will consider fully remote and hybrid schedule requests. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related field or equivalent training and/or experience. Two years of related experience, or

equivalent experience and training. Advanced knowledge of professional compliance and investigation standards. Demonstrated experience conducting investigations within complex organizations, including the ability to demonstrate political astuteness while conducting investigations. Demonstrated knowledge and ability to interpret federal and state equal opportunity and non‑discrimination laws, regulations and policies. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting requirements of Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $75,800 ‑ $92,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open unti filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job 44125

CONFERENCE MANAGER

CONFERENCE & HOSPITALITY SERVICES The Conference Manager serves as a key member of the Conference & Hospitality Services team in Housing, Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises sharing responsibilities for the overall program which includes planning, management and administration of all conferences and the provision of meeting management services. Ensures smooth‑running, effective events, including successfully recognizing and resolving potential, and real, problems in a timely manner using tact, sensitivity, discretion, and political acumen. The Unit provides meeting management and hospitality services


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Running or not. We are local to S.B. Foreign/Domestic. Porsche, Mercedes, Ford, Chevy etc. We come to you.

805-699-0684

EMPLOYMENT to 20,000+ residents and commuters in 100+ programs. Reqs: 4‑6 years’ experience in the field of conference and/or event management, including negotiating contracts, group insurance requirements, using conference/event management database, and developing customized program budgets. 1‑3 years’ experience in running and/ or assisting with the execution of a marketing campaign and a passion for industry‑leading marketing technologies, tactics, and best practices. Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) as well as Google Suite (Drive, Sheets, Forms, etc), and Conference Management software applications (residential, room scheduling, planning, financial, etc). Ability to provide specialized and customized full meeting management services. Ability to compile conference data in order to produce departmental summary reports. Previous experience in a customer service industry as well as working with different service levels like Housekeeping, Maintenance, Grounds to ensure excellent customer results. Ability to work under pressure and to prioritize workloads to meet demands. Knowledge of academic conferences and familiarity with a University campus. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. UCSB is a Tobacco‑Free environment. After hours work required May‑September. Ability to respond to after hours phone calls. Occasional travel. $75,105 ‑ $82,920/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44914

EMF ACCOUNTANT

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Reviews every new and continuing award, No Cost Extensions, and other award actions processed through the Extramural Funds (EMF) unit of the accounting office, for specific guidelines, reconciles indirect costs, and establishes new funds and account‑funds in the Chart of Accounts for State, Local, Private, and Federal Agencies. Distributes monthly overdraft notices to campus. Distributes monthly Award Closing Notices to campus. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Demonstrated ability to effectively present information verbally and in writing. Knowledge of analytical procedures used in accounting projects of moderate scope with the ability to apply more advanced accounting concepts to complete work assignments. Working knowledge of financial transactions and systems, as well as related policy, accounting, and regulatory compliance requirements. Working knowledge of common desktop/web applications. 1‑3 years of Accounting/Finance Experience. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39‑ $30.00/ hr. The University of California is

(CONT.)

an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open unti filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44265

FINANCIAL AND ACADEMIC PERSONNEL MANAGER

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for providing the full range of administrative management functions and services for the Departments of French and Italian, Germanic and Slavic Studies, Spanish and Portuguese, Programs in Comparative Literature and Latin American and Iberian Studies, as well as a number of centers and labs. PASC financial team manages a budget with annual expenditures of over $12 million. The management team consists of a director and two managers. Oversees all academic personnel transactions for ladder and temporary faculty recruitments, appointments, reviews, and leaves, using in‑depth knowledge of academic personnel policies to guide faculty and support staff. Financial responsibilities include overseeing all accounts within PASC, ensuring monthly review and reconciliation of ledgers, providing timely reporting, coordinating corrective actions, and ensuring compliance with University, Federal, and State accounting policies and procedures on all transactions. Establishes best‑practices for procurement, payroll, and accounts payable functions. Funds managed include a variety of state operating funds, gifts, endowments, fellowships, and grants. Supervises four support staff, and serves as back‑up to each of them as needed. Develops and implements operating policies and procedures as they relate to the overall departmental goals and objectives, interprets policy for the chairs of the departments supported by PASC, and serves as departmental liaison to other campus academic and administrative units. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and / or training. Understanding of accounting principles. Experience supervising employees responsible for financial reporting. $62,300 ‑ $75,000/yr. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44341

FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGER

THE CLUB & GUEST HOUSE The Food & Beverage Manager is responsible for the overall foodservice

of The Club & Guest house, a 150 seat dining facility with an event space, located within a hotel setting. The Food & Beverage Manager reports to the General Manager and will oversee all food and beverage service functions of The Club & Guest House. This role is crucial to ensuring The Club & Guest House is represented to both the campus and the surrounding community as an organization that provides the highest degree of customer satisfaction and standards of excellence in all aspects of guest services. The Food & beverage Manager will be responsible for the day‑to‑day food & beverage operations, event services planning and execution. Reqs: 4‑6 years of progressive experience in collegiate or high volume food service operations and/or hotel/ restaurant management. Thorough Knowledge in food service operations and sanitation regulations. A high degree of flexibility, energy, initiative, problem solving and resourcefulness. Demonstrated leadership abilities, customer service and communication skills, interpersonal savvy, strategic and organization agility, managing vision and purpose, innovation management and business acumen. Highly developed organizational skills, including attention to detail, accuracy, and ability to manage multiple and often conflicting priorities, meet deadlines and delegate with accountability. Financial and analytical skills to manage food cost, labor and controllable targets. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $67,500 ‑ $85,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38488

GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATOR

HSSB ADMIN SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for independently coordinating and managing all aspects of the Graduate Program in the Department of History. Provides knowledgeable and holistic advice to prospective, incoming, and current graduate students. Manages all administrative aspects of graduate admissions, student funding and employment including hiring of Teaching Assistants and administration of fellowships. Provides timely and detailed information and reports to faculty, and serves as liaison to multiple departments on campus such as Graduate Division, the Office of the Registrar, the Office of International Students and Scholars, and more. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience. Strong organizational skills and the ability to handle multiple tasks under pressure of deadlines, large workload, and frequent interruptions. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any

Sunrise 6:25 Sunset 4:59

other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44951

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Groundskeeper maintains grounds and landscape duties around eight residence halls, four dining commons and five residential apartment complexes. May be assigned other duties (including those in other areas) to accomplish the operational needs of the department. May be required to work schedules other than Monday through Friday, 7am to 3:30pm, to meet the operational needs of the department. Complies with department safety and illness programs as implemented by supervisor and/or co‑workers. Professional Expectation/ Attitude Standard/Customer Service Promotes customer service programs in the Grounds unit to residents/clients. Completes job duties in a manner that demonstrates support for Housing and Residential Services. Reqs: Minimum of three years experience in grounds maintenance or equivalent experience. Must be able to follow oral/written instructions. Ability to perform minor repairs on small equipment. Some knowledge of irrigation and drip systems. Experience with the use of tractors, small lawn mowers, edgers, power sweepers, roto‑tillers and chainsaws. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Mon‑Fri 7:00am‑3:30pm. $18.93/ hr.‑$22.20/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 44227

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Working on a zone maintenance team composed of all trades, incumbent performs HVAC maintenance work. Installs, repairs, maintains, and inspects heating, ventilating, air conditioning and pneumatic systems and equipment. Installs, repairs and maintains pumps, air compressors, steam and hot water boilers, heating and boiler tubes, heat exchangers, fans, dampers, hydraulic units, control and monitoring systems. Makes working drawings and control diagrams for heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment. Work with others as part of a team. Provide direct customer service to campus community. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. 3‑5 years experience repairing and servicing commercial or institutional HVAC mechanical equipment. Possession of EPA Universal certification. Notes: Must be able to

Continued on p. 49

Low

High

Low

Thu 3

7:25 am 4.8

1:09 pm 1.9

6:49 pm 4.8

12:37 am -0.1

Fri 4

7:54 am 5.2

2:00 am 1.2

7:49 pm 4.7

1:20 am 0.1

Sat 5

8:22 am 5.6

2:46 pm 0.5

8:42 pm 4.6

1:56 am 0.4

Sun 6

7:49 am 5.9

2:28 pm 0.1

8:32 pm 4.3

1:29 am 0.8

Mon 7

8:16 am 6.0

3:07 pm -0.2

9:21 pm 4.1

2:00 am 1.2

High

Tue 8

8:42 am 6.1

3:46 pm -0.4

10:09 pm 3.9

2:28 am 1.6

Wed 9

9:09 am 6.0

4:25 pm -0.4

11:00 pm 3.6

2:55 am 2.0

Thu 10

9:36 am 5.8

5:05 pm -0.2

11:57 pm 3.4

3:21 am 2.4

8D

16

25 D

30 H source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

GROUNDSKEEPER

HVAC MECHANIC

High

s tt Jone By Ma

“’Eh-Oh!” -- two letters not just for the Teletubbies.

Across

54. Musician/producer Ty ___ $ign 1. Quicker way to “count by” 56. Indie singer DiFranco 5. LBJ’s veep 59. *Honshu city deemed one of 8. Most proficient the world’s snowiest major 14. “Are you kidding?” cities (averaging 26 feet 15. “All applicants welcome” per year) letters 62. *Items containing free trial 16. “___ King” (Burger software, dubbed “history’s King spoof in a 2000 greatest junk mail” by a Vox “Flintstones” movie) article 17. *Current Maori-language 64. Actress Charlize who name for New Zealand guested on “The Orville” 19. *North African curvy-horned 65. 37-Across counterpart wild sheep that was released 66. Unkind in Texas in the 1950s 67. “MMMBop” band of 1997 20. Cul-de-___ 68. Pvt.’s boss 21. Egyptian Christians 69. “Animal House” group, for 23. Ghana’s neighbor short 24. Alternative to a business meeting, so to speak 26. Storefront coverings 1. “___ the night before 29. *Series of heart structures Christmas ...” that lead to the neck and 2. “Easy there!” head arteries 3. Quaker boxful, maybe 32. Fawns’ mothers 4. Sault ___ Marie, Ontario 33. Iron Maiden song that’s also 5. Valiant an instruction for some card 6. Overblown publicity games 7. Use a microwave on 37. Strand in a lab 8. “Defending liberty, pursuing 38. *New York Times film critic justice” org. whose Twitter name is still 9. ___-country (Florida Georgia “32 across” six years after Line genre) his name appeared in the 10. Ill-mannered crossword 11. ___ a good note 41. “There’s ___ in ‘team”’ 12. Amos Alonzo ___, coach in the College Football Hall of 42. Grueling workplace Fame 44. “Konvicted” hip-hop artist 45. *Tagline that distinguishes a 13. Hullabaloos concert or convention from a 18. Berry that makes a purple smoothie full-weekend affair 49. Hargitay of “Law & Order: SVU” 22. Anarchist defendant with Vanzetti 52. “Like a Rock” singer Bob 53. Hebrew phrase meaning “to 25. Chain members (abbr.) 27. Perk up, as an appetite the skies”

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

Down

28. Home in the sticks? 29. Throws in 30. “Game of Thrones” actress Chaplin 31. Competed with chariots 34. Back end of some pens 35. “Keep talking” 36. Vaguely suggest 38. “To Venus and Back” singer Tori 39. “Old MacDonald” noise 40. Sam with 82 PGA Tour wins 43. Clothes experts 44. 1600 Pennsylvania ___ (D.C. address) 46. Covering the same distance 47. Chew out 48. Edwardian expletive 49. County north of Dublin 50. Word on Hawaiian license plates 51. Soup that may include chashu or ajitama 55. Rowboat rowers 57. March Madness org. 58. Ceases to be 60. “Winnie-the-Pooh” marsupial 61. Quaint motel 63. Global currency org. ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1107

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 3,3, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

47 47


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: WILLIAM CARPER POEHLER AKA WILLIAM C. POEHLER & WILLIAM POEHLER NO: 22PR00531 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both WILLIAM CARPER POEHLER AKA WILLIAM C. POEHLER & WILLIAM POEHLER. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PAMELA M. POEHLER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Pamela M. Poehler be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested

person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 1/05/2023 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Steven A. Jung, Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, 1021 Anacapa Street, 2nd Floor, Santa

Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 882‑1443. Published November 3, 10, 17, 2022. Proof of Service by Mail The Served: Pamela M. Poehler, Trustee of the William and Pamela Poehler Living Trust Lillian G. Poehler Christopher G. Poehler Heather K. Poehler Mary Lynn Mallen NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHAEL JEROME EDWARDS, AKA MICHAEL J. EDWARDS CASE NO.: 22PR00538 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MICHAEL JEROME EDWARDS, AKA MICHAEL J. EDWARDS. A PETITION FOR PROBATE HAS BEEN FILED BY Angelica Edwards in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: Angelica Edwards be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 12/15/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 10/17/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published November 3, 10, 17, 2022. Proof of Service by Mail

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom November 15, 2022, at 5:30 P.M. LOCAL BUILDING LAWS ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will hold a public hearing on the date set forth below on the second reading of the following ordinance in accordance with Government Code Section 50022.3: An Ordinance Of The City Council Of The City Of Goleta, California, Amending The Following Chapters To Title 15 “Building And Construction” Of The Goleta Municipal Code: Chapter 15.01 “Building Code”, Chapter 15.03 “Electrical Code”, Chapter 15.04 “Plumbing Code”, Chapter 15.05 “Mechanical Code”, Chapter 15.08 “Administrative Code”, Chapter 15.11 “Residential Code”, Chapter 15.12 “Green Building Code”, Chapter 15.15 “Energy Code”, Chapter 15.16 “Historical Code”, Chapter 15.17 “Existing Building Code, And Amending Chapter 15.19 “The International Property Maintenance Code” Adopting By Reference the Above-Listed Codes In The California State Building Standards Codes And Adopting Local Amendments To Those Codes. As part of the ordinance, two new local amendments are proposed as follows: 1) that building permits for all types of occupancies, except R-3 (Single-Family and Two Units Residential) and U (Utilities), be issued to licensed contractors only and 2) that a six (6) year expiration date be established for all building permits. a hearing to consider establishing local building laws more stringent than the statewide standards is allowed by Public Resources Code Section 25402.1(h)2. PUBLIC HEARING INFORMATION: HEARING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, November 15, 2022, at 5:30 PM

LOCATION:

Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda)

PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY AND STAFF CONTACT: Staff reports and related materials for the City Council hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www. cityofgoleta.org. For further information on the project, contact Building Official Stephanie Spieler at 805-961-7552 or sspieler@cityofgoleta.org or buildinggroup@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent November 3, 2022, and November 10, 2022 48

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 3, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

by Christie A. Gabbert. Served: Angelica Edwards. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RUTH E. DOUGLAS AKA RUTH E. CARLSON AKA RUTH D. CARLSON NO: 22PR00508 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Ruth E. Douglas AKA Ruth E. Carlson AKA Ruth D. Carlson A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Mark Douglas in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Mark Douglas be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 12/8/2022 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. Historic Anacapa Courthouse. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jonathan P. Huber‑SBN 225809, Huber & Fox, P.C., 650 University Ave., Ste. 113, Sacramento, CA 95825, (916) 525‑7980. Published October 20,27, November 3, 2022.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name : 805 DEFENSE IS BEING ABANDONED at 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 06/3/07/2021 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2021‑0001660. The persons or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Amber Paresa, 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Elizabeth Bryson, 323 West Montecito Street, Apt C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Leana Gutierrez, 121 West Pueblo Street, Apt 7, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. The business was conducted

as a general partnership. SIGNED BY AMBER PARESA, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 10/07/22, FBN2022‑0002505, E47. hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DAYTECH COMPUTER SERVICES, 378 Ribera Dr, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Devon T Day (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY DEVON DAY, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002500. Published: October 20, 27, November 3, 10, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: NOVEL FITNESS SOLUTIONS, 4061 Foothill Road, Apt E, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Williams Strength LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY JULIA WILLIAMS, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002485. Published: October 20, 27, November 3, 10, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BYB REAL ESTATE,1290 Coast Village RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Brisaly Y Balderas, 451 Cannon Green Dr., Apt G, Goleta Ca 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY BRISALY BALDERAS, INDIVIDUAL. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002460. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: JHZ INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES 5662 Calle Real #349, Goleta, CA 93117; James H Zbinden, 5731 Stow Canyon Rd., Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JAMES ZBINDEN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002603. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 805 DEFENSE, 1233 Richelle Lane, H, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Amber K Paresa (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY AMBER PARESA, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002506. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CHRP DIAGNOSTIC, 4551 Oak Glen Drive, Unit F, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Kevin C Haeberle (same address), Lindsey N Haeberle (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY KEVIN HAEBERLE, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN

Number: 2022‑0002564. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACADEMIC EQUITY CONSULTING 1821 Gillespie Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mary Bucholtz (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MARY BUCHOLTZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002581. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PACIFIC BUILDERS at 1128 Chino Street, A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; RLS Pacific Builders, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY RUBEN LOPEZ SOLIS, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 12, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002529. Published: October 27, November 3, 10, 17, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TRUST TRANSFER ACCOUNT at 2921 Holly Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael G Vilkin (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MICHAEL VILKIN, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002632. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY THERAPY at 85 West Highway 246, Suite 140, Buellton, CA 93427; Kathryn EM Fleckenstein (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY KATHRYN EM FLECKENSTEIN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002609. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALFREDO’S MOVING & DELIVERY at 283 Ellwood Beach Dr, Goleta, CA 93117; Fredy Lopez (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY FREDY LOPEZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2022‑0002463. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RIVIERA WINE COMPANY at 59 Industrial Way, Buellton, CA 93427; Margerum Wine Company, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DOUGLAS MARGERUM, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002612. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HUNTER ENTERPRISES at 4700 Stockdale Hwy, Ste.120, Bakersfield, CA 93309; Hunter‑Dooley Family Investments LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liabilty company. SIGNED BY KENNETH H. HUNTER, III, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 26, 2022. This statement expires five years


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT take night and weekend call‑backs. EPA Universal Technician Certificate. Hours and days may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $41.80/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/28/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44352

LAB SAFETY SPECIALIST

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Under general supervision assists in developing laboratory safety programs including Laboratory safety reviews, training and new PI orientations. Implements comprehensive laboratory safety programs related to chemical and physical hazards and promotes safe behaviors and a good safety culture in assigned laboratories. Facilitates compliance with all applicable legal requirements, university policies and best practices. Specific safety programs include the Chemical Hygiene Plan, the personal protective equipment plan, safety training and awareness, and emergency preparedness and response. Educates and coordinates with the research community to facilitate these programs via a variety of outreach programs. Reqs: 1‑3 years environmental, chemical or safety experience. Advanced or expert knowledge/understanding of broad

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOSPICE OF SANTA BARBARA, 2050 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 100, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Hospice of Santa Barbara, Inc. (same address), Compassionate Care Center, Compassionate Care of Isla Vista, Compassionate Care of Santa Barbara County, Compassionate Care of Carpinteria, Compassionate Care of North Santa Barbara County, Compassionate Care of the Central Coast, Compassionate Care of Goleta, Compassionate Care of Santa Barbara, Compassionate Care of the Santa Ynez Valley. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DAVID SELBERG, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 24, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002617. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA STAR BALL, 115 Via Lee, Santa Barbara, CA 7020; Dance Junkie Productions Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY JOHN FISHPAW, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002390. Published: October 13, 20, 27, November 3, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SUNRISE AUTO, 5737 Thornwood Dr., Goleta, CA 93117; Scott Andersson, 945 Ward Dr. 29, Santa Barbara CA 93111. This

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range of EH&S fields and familiarity with all EH&S fields or equivalent experience / training. Advanced or expert knowledge and skill in applying and interpreting applicable local, state, and federal regulations and related standards, guidelines and, as appropriate, recommend organization policy or equivalent experience / training. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $62,300.00 ‑ $75,000.00/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44834

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Notes: Credentials verification completed and passed

before employment and date of hire. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory background check completed and passed before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Office Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patience care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Days and hours are M‑F, 7:45am‑4:30pm (may be required to work TH evenings until 7:00pm). Starting at $23.97/hr or salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43395

business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SCOTT ANDERSSON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 03, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002462. Published: October 13, 20, 27, November 3, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DE LA VINA LIQUOR, 2735 De La Vina St, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; De La Vina Liquor Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY BASSAM ABDULHAI, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002491. Published: October 13, 20, 27, November 3, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REDWOOD BAKERY, 3009 Paseo Tranquillo, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alicia S Preston (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY ALICIA PRESTON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 4, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002471. Published: October 13, 20, 27, November 3, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: EXOTIC CAR COLLECTION BY ENTERPRISE, 601 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Enterprise Rent‑A‑Car Company of Los Angeles, LLC, 333 City Blvd West, Suite 1000, Orange, CA 92868. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED

wide work authorization program and processes required by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Experience processing and responding to basic inquiries regarding payroll. Experience with an automated, integrated payroll system. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39 ‑ $30.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44248

PHLEBOTOMIST

STUDENT HEALTH Performs phlebotomy and laboratory procedure set‑ups for a university health care laboratory facility. Responsible for preparing report forms and patients’ samples for transport to a referral laboratory. Maintains

working levels of laboratory supplies, stocks supplies, performs daily and periodic preventative maintenance, washes glassware, cleans countertops, performs record keeping duties of the reception desk as needed and maintains the cleanliness of the entire laboratory area. Reqs: Must have a California Phlebotomist license at all times during employment. Must be familiar with the various types of equipment specific to phlebotomy and specimen processing and the disposal handling of medical waste. Two years’ experience working in a medical office or laboratory required. Notes: To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough. Working hours are Monday through Friday 8:30am – 5:30pm. May be required to work earlier or beyond normal working hours depending on clinical or laboratory needs. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $26.15/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants

PAYROLL ANALYST

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Uses critical thinking, analytical, and problem solving skills to research, analyze and develop solutions to a wide range of complex campus payroll and general ledger questions, issues, and concerns. Researches and troubleshoots business processes and system issues and demonstrates good judgment in selecting methods and techniques for obtaining resolution within tight deadlines. Uses critical thinking, analytical, and problem solving skills to administer the campus

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from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002643. Published: November 3, 10, 17, 23, 2022.

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BY RICK A. SHORT, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002434. Published: October 13, 20, 27, November 3, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TOWER FINANCIAL SERVICE, 116 College, Suite A, Lompoc, CA 93436; Maralynn Diane Blair (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MARALYNN DIANE BLAIR, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on October 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002451. Published: October 13, 20, 27, November 3, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PG TRUCKING TRUCK DRIVING SCHOOL, 300 Storke Rd, Suite B; PG Trucking Inc. 8001 Westfield #115, Bakersfield, CA 93309. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY KEVIN FROST, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002416. Published: October 13, 20, 27, Nov 3, 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ANDREI ALEKSANDROVICH PERVOV NUMBER: 22CV03903 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the

will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 44152

PROCUREMENT ANALYST

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the general direction of the Materiel and Logistics Manager, the Procurement Analyst uses professional purchasing skills and concepts to manage procurement operation responsibilities, including forecasting, inventory management, purchase order creation, management and monitoring. Utilizing applicable software and databases, analyzes and reviews multiple procurement options. Analyzes and evaluates systems relating to Purchasing and Inventory Control. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent or equivalent combination of education and experience. 1‑3 years of procurement experience or equivalent experience. 1‑3 years of accounts payable and general ledger

experience or equivalent experience. Strong business communication and analytical skills. Excellent organizational skills and ability to prioritize work in order to meet continual deadlines while making allowances for interruptions. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Strong computer skills demonstrating the use of Microsoft Office programs, Google Calendar, and Google Docs/sheets. Ability to apply a high level of sound, independent judgment, tact, ingenuity, and resourcefulness in overseeing assigned areas, including working with managers and customers, and solving problems during the course of daily business. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a member of a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39‑ $34.90/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #44905

NOTIFICACIÓN DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA CONSEJO DE LA CIUDAD Audiencia Pública Híbrida– en persona y por Zoom 15 de noviembre, 2022, 5:30 P.M. LEYES PARA EDIFICACIÓN LOCAL ATENCIÓN: la reunión se realizará en persona y por la plataforma Zoom. El público también puede ver la reunión en el Canal 19 de Goleta y/o por internet en https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. POR LA PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA que el Consejo de la Ciudad de Goleta realizará una audiencia pública en la fecha establecida a continuación para la segunda lectura de la ordenanza siguiente según la Sección 50022.3 del Código de Gobierno: Una ordenanza del Consejo de la Ciudad de Goleta, California, enmendando los siguientes capítulos del Título 15 “Edificación y Construcción” del Código Municipal de Goleta: Capítulo 15.01 “Código de Edificación”, Capítulo 15.03 “Código de Electricidad”, Capítulo15.04 “Código de Plomería”, Capítulo 15.05 “Código de Mecánica”, Capítulo 15.08 “Código Administrativo”, Capítulo 15.11 “Código Residencial”, Capítulo15.12 “Código para Construcción Ecológica”, Capítulo 15.15 “Código para Energía”, Capítulo 15.16 “Código Histórico”, Capítulo 15.17 “Código para Edificación Existente” y enmendar el Capítulo 15.19 “Código Internacional para el Mantenimiento de la Propiedad”, adoptando por referencia los códigos listados arriba en los Códigos de Estándares de Construcción del Estado de California y adoptando enmiendas locales para esos códigos. Como parte de la ordenanza, se proponen dos enmiendas locales nuevas como se describe a continuación: 1) que los permisos de construcción para todo tipo de ocupación, excepto para R-3 (residencia familiar única y residencia de dos unidades) y U (Utilidades) sean emitidos solamente para contratistas con licencia y 2) que se establezca un periodo de seis (6) años de expiración para todos los permisos de construcción. Se permite una audiencia para considerar establecer leyes de construcción local más estrictas que los estándares del estado según la Sección 25402.1(h)2 del Código de Recursos Públicos. INFORMACIÓN SOBRE LA AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA: FECHA Y HORA DE LA AUDIENCIA: UBICACIÓN:

martes 15 de noviembre, 2022, a las 5:30 PM

Municipalidad de Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 y reunión de teleconferencia; esta reunión se realizará en persona y en Zoom (con instrucciones detalladas para la participación incluidas en el orden del día publicado)

COMENTARIO PÚBLICO: se anima a todas las personas interesadas a que ofrezcan comentarios públicos durante la audiencia pública en persona o a través del webinario Zoom, siguiendo las instrucciones listadas en el orden del día de la reunión del Consejo de la Ciudad. Se puede entregar comentarios escritos antes de la audiencia enviando un correo electrónico a la Secretaria Municipal en cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Los comentarios escritos se distribuirán al Consejo y se publicarán en la página de la reunión de la ciudad y del orden del día. DISPONIBILIDAD DE DOCUMENTOS Y CONTACTO CON EL PERSONAL: los reportes del personal y materiales relacionados para la audiencia del Consejo de la Ciudad también se publicarán en esta página web por los menos 72 horas antes de la reunión en el sitio web de la Ciudad en www.cityofgoleta.org. Para más información sobre este proyecto, comuníquese con la Oficial de Construcción Stephanie Spieler, llamando al 805-961-7552 o enviando un mensaje a sspieler@cityofgoleta.org o en buildinggroup@ cityofgoleta.org. Para preguntas en español, por favor comuníquese con Marcos Martínez llamando al (805) 562-5500 o enviando un mensaje a mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Nota: si usted denuncia la naturaleza de la acción descrita arriba en los tribunales, usted podría estar limitado solamente a aquellos asuntos que usted o alguna otra persona mencionaran en la audiencia pública descrita en esta notificación o en la correspondencia escrita entregada a la Ciudad en la fecha de o con anterioridad a la audiencia pública (Sección del Código de Gobierno 65009[b][2]). Nota: conforme con la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades, si necesita asistencia para participar en esta audiencia, por favor llame a la Oficina de la Secretaria Municipal al (805) 961-7505. Una notificación por lo menos 48 horas antes de la audiencia permitirá al personal de la Ciudad hacer arreglos razonables. Fecha de publicación: Santa Barbara Independent, 3 de noviembre, 2022, y 10 de noviembre, 2022.

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above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: ANDREI ALEKSANDROVICH PERVOV TO: ANDREI ALEXANDER. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING DECEMBER 5, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: OCTOBER 19, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 17 2022

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASEY KENDRICK ALBERT‑HALL CASE NUMBER: 22CV03848 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: CASEY KENDRICK ALBERT‑HALL TO: CASEY ALBERT HALL. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING DECEMBER 7, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once

each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: OCTOBER 19, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27, NOVEMBER 3, 10, 17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: TRACY ROCHESTIE, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03587 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: TRACY ROCHESTIE TO: TRACY PEREGRINE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING NOVEMBER 28, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100

Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: October 14, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published October 27, November 3, 10, 17 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG, 1338 Portsuello Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. CASE NUMBER: 22CV03635 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: LEANDER DEAN LOVE‑ANDEREGG TO: LEANDER DEAN LOVE ANDEREGG. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING Hybrid Public Meeting - Held in Person and via Zoom Monday, November 14, 2022, at 6:00 P.M. GENERAL PLAN CONFORMANCE DETERMINATIONS REGARDING THE ACQUISITION OF AN APPROXIMATELY 2-ACRE SIZED PARK WITHIN THE HERITAGE RIDGE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT (PROPOSED LOT 3) AND PROPOSED RIGHT-OF-WAY EXCHANGE ALONG LOS CARNEROS ROAD ADJACENT TO THE HERITAGE RIDGE DEVELOPMENT SITE PURSUANT TO SECTION 65402 OF THE GOVERNMENT CODE; APNS 073-060-031- THROUGH –043 ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a hybrid public hearing to make a recommendation to the City Council regarding the above-mentioned General Plan Conformance determinations regarding the acquisition of the approximately 2-acre park and the Right of Way Exchange along Los Carneros Road between Calle Koral and the Railroad/US 101 overcrossing. The date, time, and location of the Planning Commission is as follows: HEARING DATE/TIME: Monday, November 14, 2022, at 6:00 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda). PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Section 65402(a) of the Government Code requires that no real property shall be acquired by dedication or otherwise for street, square park, or other public purposes, and no real property shall be disposed of, no street shall be vacated or abandoned, and no public building or structures shall be constructed or authorized, until the location, purposes, and extent of such acquisition or disposition, has been submitted to and reported upon by the Planning Commission as to the conformity with the General Plan. The City Council will decide whether to accept the dedication and the vacations as proposed at a future public hearing. PROJECT LOCATION: The Heritage Ridge Residential Development site is located on the North Side of Camino Vista between S. Los Carneros and Aero Camino Roads (North of Willow Springs II); APNs 073-060-031 through -043. The site, located in the Inland portion of the city, has a Medium-Density Residential (R-MD) with an Affordable Housing Overlay Goleta General Plan land use designation and is subject to Design Residential (DR20) zone in the former Inland Zoning Ordinance (Article III). The site is current zoning Residential Medium (RM). ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: The acquisition of the approximately 2-acre park site and the proposed Right of Way exchange along Los Carneros Road between Calle Koral and the Railroad/101 overcrossing has been included in the analysis contained with the Final Environmental Impact Report (Final EIR) (SCH # 2015041014) associated with the Heritage Ridge Development Project. The proposed Final EIR has been prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code, §§21000 et seq.) the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 California Code of Regulations, §§ 15000 et seq.), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency for this project. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control TSC in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the Planning Commission meeting agenda. All letters/comments should be sent to kdominguez@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the Planning Commission hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Supervising Senior Planner Mary Chang at (805) 961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent November 3, 2022 50

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at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING NOVEMBER 30, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED: AUGUST 16, 2022, THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. PUBLISHED OCTOBER 27TH, NOVEMBER 3, 10,17 2022

PUBLIC NOTICES 01‑NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS 1. OWNER: MONTECITO UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 2. PROJECT IDENTIFICATION NAME: 2223‑1 Construction of Foundation for Modular Restroom 3. PROJECT LOCATION: 385 SAN YSIDRO ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108 4. PROJECT DESCRIPTION Installation of a concrete foundation and landing at the restroom building and repair of adjacent decomposed granite walk. Grading of the area around the building to provide drainage per plan and relocation of existing boulders on site. Completion of utility connections under a separate contract. Provide signage and door stops. This project is anticipated to start approximately February 1, 2023 and is anticipated to be completed by May 21, 2023. Concrete Foundation Summary: Construction of foundation for Modular Restroom Building (restroom building is fabricated and installed under a separate contract). This project includes the installation of a concrete landing at the restroom building and the repair of an adjacent decomposed granite walk. Grading of the area around the building to provide drainage per plan and relocation of existing boulders on site. Provide signage and door stops. Utility connections are also under a separate contract. 5. BID DEADLINE: Bids are due on December 8 not later than 2:00 p.m. 6. PLACE AND METHOD OF BID RECEIPT: All bids must be made using the District provided bid forms and must be completed, sealed and turned in by the deadline. Bid packet will be provided at the job walk. Bids may be turned in by personal delivery, courier, or mailed via United States Postal Service and addressed to Montecito Union School District, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. ATTN: Virginia Alvarez 7. PLACE PLANS ARE ON FILE: Montecito Union School District, Business Department, Second Floor, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, www.tricoblue.com 8. ALTERNATES: If alternate bids are called for, the contract will be awarded to the lowest bid price on the base contract without consideration of the prices on the additive or deductive items. 9. MANDATORY JOB WALK: Meet at Montecito Union School Office on Monday, November 14, 2022 at 9:30 a.m. sharp. Attendance at the entire job walk is mandatory and failure to attend the entire job walk may result in your bid being rejected as non‑responsive. Contact OWNER for details on required job walks and related documentation. 10. This is a prevailing wage project. OWNER has ascertained the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which this work is to be performed for each craft or type of worker needed to execute this contract. These rates are on file at OWNER’s office, and a copy may be obtained upon request, or at www.dir.ca.gov . Contractor shall post a copy of these rates

at the job site. ALL PROJECTS OVER $1,000 ARE SUBJECT TO PREVAILING WAGE MONITORING AND ENFORCEMENT BY THE LABOR COMMISSIONER. SCHOOLS LEGAL SERVICE NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS PUBLIC WORKS BID PACKET 1215 PAGE 2 of 1 It shall be mandatory upon the contractor to whom the contract is awarded (CONTRACTOR), and upon any SUBCONTRACTOR, to pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the contract. 11. A Payment Bond for contracts over $25,000 and a Performance Bond for all contracts will be required prior to commencement of work. These bonds shall be in the amounts and form called for in the Contract Documents. 12. Pursuant to the provisions of Public Contract Code Section 22300, CONTRACTOR may substitute certain securities for any funds withheld by OWNER to ensure CONTRACTOR’s performance under the contract. At the request and expense of CONTRACTOR, securities equivalent to any amount withheld shall be deposited, at the discretion of OWNER, with either OWNER or a state or federally chartered bank as the escrow agent, who shall then pay any funds otherwise subject to retention to CONTRACTOR. Upon satisfactory completion of the contract, the securities shall be returned to CONTRACTOR. Securities eligible for investment shall include those listed in Government Code Section 16430, bank and savings and loan certificates of deposit, interest bearing demand deposit accounts, standby letters of credit, or any other security mutually agreed to by CONTRACTOR and OWNER. CONTRACTOR shall be the beneficial owner of any securities substituted for funds withheld and shall receive any interest on them. The escrow agreement shall be in the form indicated in the Contract Documents. 13. To bid on or perform the work stated in this Notice, CONTRACTOR must possess a valid and active contractor’s license of the following classification(s) C‑8 No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor shall be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of § 4104 of the Public Contract Code, for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless currently registered with the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5. No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project (awarded after April 1, 2015) unless registered with the DIR. DIR’s web registration portal is: w w w. d i r. c a . g o v / P u b l i c ‑ Wo r k s / Contractors.html 14. CONTRACTOR and all subcontractors must furnish electronic certified payroll records (eCPR) to the Labor Commissioner monthly in PDF format. Registration at www.dir.ca.gov/Public‑Works/ Certified‑Payroll‑Reporting.html is required to use the eCPR system. The following notice is given as required by Labor Code Section 1771.5(b)(1): CONTRACTOR and any subcontractors are required to review and comply with the provisions of the California Labor Code, Part 7, Chapter 1, beginning with Section 1720, as more fully discussed in the Contract Documents. These sections contain specific requirements concerning, for example, determination and payment of prevailing wages, retention, inspection, and auditing payroll records, use of apprentices, payment of overtime compensation, securing workers’ compensation insurance, and various criminal penalties or fines which may be imposed for violations of the requirements of the chapter. Submission of a bid constitutes CONTRACTOR’s representation

that CONTRACTOR has thoroughly reviewed these requirements. SCHOOLS LEGAL SERVICE NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS PUBLIC WORKS BID PACKET 1215 PAGE 3 of 1 15. OWNER will retain 5% of the amount of any progress payments. 16. This Project does not require prequalification pursuant to AB 1565 of all general contractors and all mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontractors 17. BID PACKET will be provided at the job walk to attendees. Advertisement Dates: October 27, November 3, 10, 2022 weekly editions. Virginia Alvarez (805) 969‑3249 x 420

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: 22CVO3317 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): MARK ABRAHAMS, AN INDIVIDUAL, ALEXIS ABRAHAMS, AN INDIVIDUAL; and DOES 1 through 50, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): MACKENZIE HOLDINGS, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AND D. DE MORRELL, AN INDIVIDUAL NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota


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de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑1107 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): TIMOTHY J. TRAGER, SBN 145419, REICKER PFAU PYLE & MCROY LLP, 1421 STATE STREET, SUITE B, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101; 805‑966‑2440. DATE: (FECHA) 8/26/2022 CLERK, by (Secretario) /s/NARZRALLI BAKSH, DEPUTY (Adjunto). ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION ATTORNEY OR PARTY WITHOUT ATTORNEY (NAME AND ADDRESS): Attorney for Plaintiffs: TIMOTHY J. TRAGER, SBN #145419 Reicker, Pfau, Pyle & McRoy LLP, 1421 State Street, Ste. B, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. ttrager@rppmh.com.attorney for Plaintiffs SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PLAINTIFF: MACKENZIE HOLDINGS, LLC AND D. DE MORRELL DEFENDANT: MARK ABRAHAMS AND ALEXIS ABRAHAMS Moving Party Plaintiffs, MacKenzies Holdings, LLC and D. de Morrell filed their application for an order for publication on October 7, 2022. From the application and supporting evidence it appears to the satisfaction of the Court that an order for service by publication is permitted pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure section 415.50. IT IS ORDERED that service of the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) in this action shall be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Mark Abrahams and Alexis Abrahams by publication thereof in Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation published at Santa Barbara County, California, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that, if the address of the party to be served is ascertained before the expiration of the time prescribed for publication of the summons, the moving party shall forthwith mail to the party to be served a copy of (1) the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) identified above, (2) the complaint, petition, or motion for which notice is being served by this order, and (3) this order for publication. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. DATED: 10/10/22 JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT DONNA D. GECK SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: 22CVO3135 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, RICHARD R. ROMERO,

DANA FACTO, TRUSTEE OF THE BARBARA ROMERO REVOCABLE TRUST, DELPHINA ABBOTT, GAIL GORTON, MARK A. WILSON, SAM HOLROYD, JOHNNY WILSON, BARBARA J. ROMERO, GERALDINE ROMERO, TIMOTHY WILSON, PAULINE ZUNIGA, LOUISE CONNOLLY, TONY, ROMERO SOTO, RUSSELL LOPEZ, JIMMIE LOPEZ, ROBERT ROMERO LOPEZ, FAMONA ORTEGA, ARNULFO (ARNOLD), P. LOPEZ, MARGARET LOPEZ WILSON, VICKY HULL, ANNETTE LOPEZ, DONNA LOPEZ, KAREN LOPEZ GREENLEE, JUANITA VILLA JAUREGUI, MERCED ALCASAS ROMERO, TRINIDAD VILLA, NATALIE ROSE GARCIA, KENNETH VILLA, LEONARD VILLA, CHRISTINA CURTIS, ROBERT ANDREW ‘BUCK’ COTA, MCCORMICK, PATRICIA FALCON (MCCORMICK), THOMAS G. COTA, MARCIA COTA, JEFFREY COTA, JILL COTA, AND DOE DEFENDANTS 1‑50 IDENTIFIED AS ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE, OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): SUSAN ESTELLE JANSEN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de

la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Superior Court for the State of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney is LAW OFFICES OF PAUL R. BURNS, P.C., 2700 GIBRALTAR ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105, 805 708 7144 DATE: (FECHA) 8/15/2022 CLERK, BY (SECRETARIO) /S/YULIANA RAZO, DEPUTY (ADJUNTO). ORDER GRANTING EX‑PARTE APPLICATION FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS, CASE NO. 22CVO3135 Paul R. Burns, Esq. (SBN 230509)Solange D. Sanjueza (SBN289365) LAW OFFICES OF PAUL R. BURNS, P.C. 2700 Gilbraltar Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 paulburnslaw@gmail.com Attorneys for Plaintiff: Susan Estelle Jansen SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ‑ ANACAPA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PLAINTIFF: SUSAN ESTELLE JANSEN V. CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, RICHARD R. ROMERO ... AS ALL PERSONS UNKNOWN, CLAIMING ANY LEGAL OR EQUITABLE RIGHT, TITLE, ESTATE, LIEN, OR INTEREST IN THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN THE COMPLAINT ADVERSE TO PLAINTIFF’S TITLE OR ANY CLOUD UPON PLAINTIFF’S TITLE THERETO. DEFENDANTS. ORDER AFTER APPLICATION FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS On reading the filings and evidence consisting of Plaintiff Susan Estelle Jansen’s Application for Order for Publication of Summons and Declaration of Paul R. Burns, Esq., it satisfactorily appearing to me therefrom that Defendants: CATHERINE OTTESSON, MARIA M. MADELINE GRAND, ET AL Cannot with reasonable diligence be served in any other manner specified in Sections 415.10 through 415.4 of the California Code of Civil Procedure, and that the defendants are a necessary parties to this action. IT IS ORDERED that the Summons be served on the above named Defendants by publication in SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDANT, which is a local newspaper of general circulation in Santa Barbara County, California, hereby designated as the publication most likely to give Defendants actual notice of the action, and that the publication be made once a week for four successive weeks. FOR GOOD CAUSE SHOWN: IT IS SO ORDERED: DATED: 10/14/22 HONORARY COLLEEN K. STERNE JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING Hybrid Public Meeting - Held in Person and via Zoom Monday, November 14, 2022, at 6:00 P.M. HERITAGE RIDGE 332 RESIDENTIAL RENTAL UNIT PROJECT AND FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT CASE NO. 14-049-GPA-VTM-DP Located on the North Side of Camino Vista Between S. Los Carneros and Aero Camino Roads (North of Willow Springs II); APNs 073-060-031 through -043 ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a hybrid public hearing to make a recommendation to the City Council regarding the above mentioned Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR), and development project as described below. The date, time, and location of the Planning Commission is as follows: HEARING DATE/TIME: Monday, November 14, 2022, at 6:00 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) The Planning Commission will be acting in an advisory capacity to the City Council and will make a recommendation regarding the project components. The City Council will be the decision makers for this project at a public hearing that has not been scheduled yet. Additional public notice will be provided before the City Council hearing in the future PROJECT LOCATION: The unaddressed site, referred to as APNs 073-060-031 through -043, is located on the North Side of Camino Vista between S. Los Carneros and Aero Camino Roads (North of Willow Springs II); The site, located in the Inland portion of the city, has a Medium-Density Residential (R-MD) with an Affordable Housing Overlay Goleta General Plan land use designation and is subject to Design Residential (DR-20) zone in the former Inland Zoning Ordinance (Article III). The site is current zoning Residential Medium (RM). PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The applicants, FLT Heritage Ridge TG, LLC, GF Frontier, LLC., and the Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara, have requested approval from the City of the Heritage Ridge 332 Residential Rental Unit Project. Specifically, the proposal is for 332 apartment units (104 affordable senior and family units and 228 market rate units) with a State Density Bonus parking reduction concession; a 2-acre neighborhood public park with 13 parking spaces, a re-subdivision of the site from thirteen (13) lots into four (4) lots, and a General Plan Amendment to Figures 3-5 and 4-1 regarding Environmental Sensitive Habitat designation. The request is also to certify the proposed Final EIR, adopt the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program (MMRP), and adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations (SOC), pursuant to 14 California Code of Regulations § 15090. The requested approvals include: 1. Certification of the Final EIR, adoption of the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program (MMRP); and adoption of a Statement of Overriding Considerations (SOC), pursuant to 14 California Code of Regulations § 15090. 2. Adoption of a General Plan Amendment to remove an Environmental Sensitive Habitat Area designation on the property as shown in General Plan/Coastal Land Open Space Element Figure 3-5 and General Plan/ Coastal Land Use Plan Conservations Element Figure 4-1 based on several studies conducted for the site. 3. Approval of Vesting Tentative Map to consolidate the 13 existing lots from a previous industrial subdivision into three residential lots and one park lot. 4. Approval to vacate five roadway easements held by the City and acceptance of a new roadway easement (the official vacation of the five roadway easements will be subject to the public process for vacation of a public right-of-way pursuant to the Streets & Highways Code). 5. Approval of a Development Plan to allow the construction of 332 residential units (104 Affordable and 228 Market Rate units) with a State Density Bonus parking reduction concession; and 6. Approval of Park Fee credit of a 2-acre park proposed to be dedicated to the City. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: The proposed Final EIR has been prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code, §§ 21000 et seq.), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 California Code of Regulations, §§ 15000 et seq.), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency for this project. The Final EIR identifies and discusses potential impacts, mitigation measures, monitoring requirements, and residual impacts for identified subject areas. Significant and unavoidable impacts are identified in the issue areas of cumulative level Cultural Resources, project level short term Noise, and project Level Solid Waste. Potentially significant but mitigable effects on the environment are anticipated in the following areas: Aesthetics, Air Quality, Biology, Cultural Resources, Geology and Soils, Hydrology, and Transportation/Circulation. To approve the Heritage Ridge project, the City Council would need to adopt a Statement of Overriding Considerations in accordance with applicable law. A Preface has been added to the Final EIR that responds to the late comments received after the Notice of Availability of the Final EIR that was released in February 2022 and to summarize project changes that the applicant has proposed in response to comments received at the Planning Commission hearings in early 2022. No other changes were made to the Final EIR, and the conclusions identified remain the same. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control TSC in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the Planning Commission meeting agenda. All letters/comments should be sent to kdominguez@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the Planning Commission hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Supervising Senior Planner Mary Chang at (805) 961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent November 3, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER 3,3, 2022 2022 THE INDEPENDENT

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