Santa Barbara Independent 10/6/22

Page 1

FREE

Santa Barbara

OCT. 6-13, 2022 VOL. 36 • NO. 873

Celebrating

STEARNS WHARF 150-Year Anniversary Honors the Pier’s Past and Present

ALSO

Mountain Drive: Still Alive S.B.’s Growing Esports Scene CAMA’s Worldly Symphonic Parade Voices: A Yes for Measure B Tamar Shawarma & Greek Church Gyros


Certificates. Now in lofty or liquid.

2.70

2.25

2.70% APY* $100,000 min 2.60% APY* $100 min

A liquid certificate gives you flexibility.

2.45% APY* $100,000 min 2.35% APY* $100 min

$100 minimum opening balance

%

Up to

APY*

9-month certificate:

%

APY*

12-month liquid certificate:

New money and active checking required.

Add money any time, and withdraw up to 50% of the balance daily without penalty.

New money required.

Stop by or open an account online at kinecta.org/cert Goleta – 805.968.1876 145 Santa Felicia Dr. *Annual percentage yields (APY) are accurate as of 9/16/2022. All certificates: The minimum balance to open share certificates and obtain APY is $100. A certificate is a fixed rate, fixed term account and the stated APY applies to the initial term. The APY assumes all dividends remain in the certificate until maturity. APY may change without notice until the account is opened. Dividends are compounded monthly and fees may reduce earnings. At maturity, certificate will automatically renew at the prevailing certificate rate. For complete account terms and conditions refer to the Agreements and Disclosures booklet. 9-month certificate: New money required. A penalty is imposed for early withdrawal. Rate bonus: Members who open a 9-month share certificate may be eligible for a 0.25% APY rate bonus if they have an active checking share with Kinecta at time of maturity. An active checking share is defined as an account which receives at least one external deposit (transfers from Kinecta shares do not count) of $0.01 or more and has at least three (3) additional transactions monthly. The rate bonus is paid at the time of certificate maturity in the form of a dividend payment. Bonus may be subject to IRS tax reporting. Member may receive a 1099 Form from Kinecta for the bonus. Member is solely responsible for the payment of any applicable taxes. Please consult a tax professional. Offer may be modified or canceled by Kinecta at any time. 12-month liquid certificate: Additional deposits are permitted at any time prior to maturity. Liquid share certificate allows for daily penalty-free withdrawals of up to 50% of the start of day balance as of 12:00am. Withdrawals exceeding 50% of the start of day balance are subject to penalties. Membership required. Federally insured by NCUA.

2

Bank | Borrow | Insure | Invest THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


David Gergen

Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders are Made Tue, Oct 11 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre Former White House adviser and CNN analyst David Gergen traces the journeys of iconic leaders from Winston Churchill to John Lewis to Greta Thunberg.

Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune

Sacre by Circa Wed, Oct 12 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall “Rock stars of the circus world.” The List (U.K.) Pulsating with tension and infused with dark humor, this distinctive production brings Stravinsky’s seminal Rite of Spring to the circus stage.

Laird Hamilton in Conversation with Rory Kennedy Sun, Oct 16 / 7:30 PM Arlington Theatre

The Linda Lindas

Sat, Oct 15 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Ranging in age from 11 to 17, The Linda Lindas are ascending rock’s new feminist front, sharing the stage with indie heroes like Best Coast, Money Mark and Bikini Kill and shredding through songs about identity, friendship, power and cats.

Explore the courage, ambition and talent that push a person to greatness in an evening with big-wave surfer, renowned innovator and American icon Laird Hamilton.

Presented in association with Girls Rock Santa Barbara

Carla Morrison Thu, Oct 27 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Latin Grammy Award winner and international sensation Carla Morrison is renowned for her raw, emotional retellings of heartbreak and loss.

The Nrityagram Dance Ensemble Wed, Oct 19 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall One of the premier Indian dance groups performing today, the Nrityagram Dance Ensemble’s captivating performances have earned them a spot on The New York Times’ Best Dance of the Year list two years in a row.”

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org | Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

3


SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY CO-PRESENTS

Carmina Burana

Song, Dance, & Symphony A COLLABORATION WITH THE SYMPHONY, STATE STREET BALLET & THE GRANADA THEATRE Saturday, October 15, 2022 | 7:30 PM Sunday, October 16, 2022 | 3 PM In a spectacular tour-de-force Season Opening, The Symphony continues its impactful tradition of performing arts collaboration to create new experiences for the community. More than 150 performers from State Street Ballet, Santa Barbara Choral Society, Quire of Voyces and Sing!, the Music Academy’s children’s chorus join The Symphony on stage. REPERTOIRE Gabriel Fauré | Pavane featuring State Street Ballet in a ballet choreographed by SSB Resident Choreographer, William Soleau Camille Saint-Saëns | Bacchanale from Samson and Delilah Carl Orff | Carmina Burana THE ARTISTS State Street Ballet, William Soleau, Choreographer SB Choral Society, Jo Anne Wasserman, Director Quire of Voyces, Nathan Kreitzer, Director Music Academy’s Sing! children’s chorus, Erin McKibben, Director Nir Kabaretti, Conductor PRINCIPAL CONCERT SPONSORS Signature Sponsor: Brooks & Kate Firestone

2022/23 SEASON SPONSORS 70th Anniversary Season Sponsor: Sarah & Roger Chrisman

Artist Sponsor: Duncan & Suzanne Mellichamp

70th Anniversary Season Corp. Sponsor:

Selection Sponsors: Chris Lancashire Ruth & John Matuszeski Wallin Studios Drs. Fred & Linda Wudl

70th Anniversary Grand Venue Sponsor:

YOUR SEATS ARE WAITING! Tickets start at $35 Order online at bit.ly/CBInd or scan the QR code OR call the Granada Box Office 805.899.2222

TheSymphony.org

2022/23 SEASON UP NEXT:

November 19, 2022 Wisdom of the Sky, Water, Earth

4

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

December 31, 2022 New Year’s Eve With The Symphony

INDEPENDENT.COM

January 21, 2023 Plains, Trains & Violins

February 18, 2023 Transformation

March 18, 2023 John Williams: A Cinematic Celebration


TABLE of CONTENTS

Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Callie Fausey, Melea Maglalang, Lola Watts Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

23

Celebrating Stearns Wharf 150-Year Anniversary Honors the Pier’s Past and Present by Indy Staff

SECOND FEATURE

A Santa Barbara resident since 2 years old, Carl Perry, who shot many of the photographs for this week’s cover story on Stearns Wharf, recalls one day during high school when the bioluminescence was so strong that he and some friends decided to jump off of the pier into the water. “Swimming around was cool, until the light started to glow from below us,” he explained. “There was a pair of seals darting around us. Mind-blowing, and a little scary. I’ll never forget it!” CARL PERRY

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporter Ryan P. Cruz Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

ALWAYS TAKE THE CAMERA

volume 36, # 873, Oct. 6-13, 2022

31

Mountain Drive: Still Alive by Nick Welsh

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 43 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 ON THE COVER: Stearns Wharf. Photo by Carl Perry. Design by Jinhee Hwang.

Today, Carl is pursuing photography full-time, focusing on live music with hopes of being hired by a band for a tour. He’s also putting together a book about his time at Revolver Pizza, which he helped open during the peak of the pandemic. And while working on this week’s story, he was scouting the harbor for a good wide shot for Stearns Wharf. “I came across a crowd of people watching the fire department rescue a guy out of the sewer!” said Carl. “I had all my gear with me, so I ended up staying and getting some shots of that, which ended up as a story! Yet another reason I always carry a camera.” See carlperryphoto.com. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

In a reading and discussion of his collection of 13 new short stories, the inimitable T.C. Boyle, Santa Barbara resident and bestselling writer of Talk to Me and Outside Looking In, ”messes with us” as the book inscription from Willie Dixon’s I’m Your Hoochie Coochie Man promises. A virtuoso of the short form, Boyle returns to share with us inventive and masterfully told short stories characterized by his always biting satire, resonant wit, and a boundless, irrepressible imagination. Book signing to follow.

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

5


6

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


Endorsements U.S. CONGRESS

24th Congressional District: Salud Carbajal STATE ASSEMBLY 37th District: Gregg Hart GOLETA City Council, District 1: Luz Reyes-Martín City Council, District 2: James Kyriaco Measure B (One Cent Sales Tax Hike): YES Measure C (Ban on Sale of Flavored Tobacco Products): YES CARPINTERIA City Council, District 5: No Endorsement Measure T (General Plan and Zoning Designation): No LOMPOC Mayor: Jenelle Osborne SOUTH COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDS Santa Barbara Unified School District, Area 1: Gabe Escobedo Santa Barbara Unified School District, Area 4: Rose Muñoz Goleta Union School District, Area 1: Richard Mayer Goleta Union School District, Area 3: Emily Zacarias Hope School District, Area 5: Frann Wageneck Santa Barbara City College Board of Trustees: Jonathan Abboud, Marsha Croninger, and Charlotte Gullap-Moore County Board of Education, Area 1: Marybeth Carty

O

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

ver the next few weeks, the Santa Barbara Independent will be rolling out our endorsements for the November 2022 election. Check our Election 2022 section for continuing information on other candidate races, city measures, and state propositions. As always, the Independent only endorses in races that we have researched carefully. In this installment, we are focusing on Carpinteria’s Measure T and City Council race.

Measure T (General Plan and Zoning Designation): Vote No It wasn’t so long ago that the Venoco Oil Company tried to bypass the City of Carpinteria’s protective development review process in order to gain back-door approval for 35 slant drilling wells right off the city’s coast. Since Venoco knew the city’s elected leaders would never agree to such a proposal, the company decided to take its case — filled with glitteringly unfounded promises of $200 million in new tax revenues — directly to the voters in the form of a ballot initiative known as Measure J. Let the people decide, the oil company urged. What’s wrong with a little direct democracy? Venoco soon found out the answer. The company and their Measure J got slaughtered at the polls. It didn’t help that one of the great oil spills of the last century exploded in the Gulf of Mexico at the same time Venoco sought to assure Carpinteria voters that the risks of offshore drilling were infinitesimal. But even without that spill — brought to you by British Petroleum Oil — Measure J was a bad idea whose time was over. The historic battle over Measure J, in part, illustrates why we are deeply opposed to Measure T, now on the ballot this November. Its true intention is to stop a two-story hotel on Linden Avenue from being built. The hotel in question would be on land that is currently two downtown public parking lots. One is zoned Commercial Planned Development and Open Space. The other, merely Open Space. If voters were to

approve Measure T, it would change the zoning for both lots allowing only recreational open space. No residential uses would be allowed. In other words, no hotel. In our estimation, Measure T is too clever by half. Nowhere in its text, for example, is the proposed hotel — known as the Surfliner — even mentioned. We think proponents of ballot measures should be upfront about what they’re doing and why. Of even greater concern is Measure T’s unwarranted effort to bypass the city’s design review process. Carpinteria is famous for how fiercely protective its residents are of their community’s character and way of life. They show up and they vote. They don’t go quietly into any developers’ good night. And they elect councilmembers who reflect Carpinteria’s community sentiments or else. We get it; not everyone likes hotels. For many residents, a new downtown hotel where beachfront parking is currently located qualifies as too much too fast. But there is another way to look at this that is a positive for the whole city. We like the idea that the hotel is located strategically close to Carpinteria’s Amtrak station. Visitors can come and go by train. Train tourism, it’s actually a thing. Although Carpinteria’s finances are in pretty good shape, $651,000 per year in new bed tax revenues is nothing to sneeze at. And since the proposed hotel must still go through an additional city approval process, this will be the opportunity to demand community benefits. For example, require the hotel provide gathering space for Carpinteria groups and nonprofits to meet and hold celebrations. This is the time to ensure Carpinteria citizens get the best design possible and the best deal too. We are confident that can be achieved and this is not the time to shut down the whole process. We say that because it’s taken seven long years to get the proposed project to this point. Say what you like about the hotel, but there’s no credible evidence to indicate this plan has been crammed down the community’s throat. There have been no backdoor subterfuges or end runs around the system. No, this has been a city-sponsored project from the very start and there have been umpteen procedural votes every step of the way and each one has been held publicly out in the open. In fact, the development team was only brought in three years ago. One member of that team — reviled by some proponents of Measure T as “an outsider” — has lived in Carpinteria

continued on pg. 9

COU RTESY SU R FLI N E R I N N

Endorsements So Far

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Surfliner Inn rendering

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

7


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON

CAMA 104TH SEASON OPENING CONCERT

104th Concert Season

INTERNATIONAL SERIES AT THE GRANADA THEATRE SEASON SPONSOR: “Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla has taken the city of Birmingham and its orchestra by storm, and the playing is gorgeous. Hers will surely be one of the world’s great conducting careers.” –Mark Swed, LA Times

SAGE PUBLICATIONS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2022, 7:30PM

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, conductor Sheku Kanneh-Mason, cello

“Sheku plays as though born to his instrument. Talent like this comes along rarely….greatness feels within reach.” –Mark Swed, LA Times

PRE-CONCERT LECTURE Jennifer Kloetzel, Professor, UCSB Department of Music Sullivan Goss Art Gallery, 11 E. Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara Doors open 5:45PM ⫽ Lecture 6:00–6:40PM Presented by the CAMA Women’s Board

The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, one of the world’s great orchestras, is conducted by Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, following her time with the Los Angeles Philharmonic as a Dudamel Fellow, Assistant Conductor, and Associate Conductor. British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason became a household name in 2018 after performing at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, watched by nearly two billion people globally.

PROGRAM: RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis SIR EDWARD ELGAR: Cello Concerto in E Minor, Op.85 MIECZYSŁAW WEINBERG: “Jewish Rhapsody,” from Festive Scenes, Op.36 CLAUDE DEBUSSY: La Mer The Board of Directors of Community Arts Music Association dedicate this concert to the memory of Her Majesty The Queen Elizabeth II and of Her Majesty’s 70 years of service to the people of the United Kingdom, the Realms, and the Commonwealth. Principal Sponsor: Bob & Val Montgomery Sponsor: CAMA Women’s Board Co-Sponsors: Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher • Beth & George Wood Zegar Family Fund

Granada Theatre Box Office ⫽ (805) 899-2222 ⫽ granadasb.org COMMUNIT Y ART S MU S I C A S S O C I AT I O N O F S A N TA B A R B A R A 8

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


Endorsements

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH with his family for seven years. Of course, in Santa Barbara County,living in one place for seven years may not qualify anyone as a true “local,” but it certainly doesn’t qualify him as an “outside developer” either. Carpinteria’s planning commission and city council should be allowed to do what they were elected and appointed to do. Review the proposed hotel, make it better, or vote it down. It’s their job, and they should be allowed to do it. Measure T would rezone the two parking lot parcels to make them recreational open space. As such, they’d need to be rezoned to allow for the proposed hotel. And under Measure T, that would require a vote of the people. That strikes us as overkill. Cities are living, breathing organisms that need to be able to act with nimbleness and flexibility. That means a functioning city government, which, fortunately, Carpinteria has. Measure T would undermine a thoughtful, time-consuming, democratic process. Carpinterians rallied to the defense of their city’s development review process in the face of Venoco’s cynical threat with Measure J back in 2010. We hope they’ll do so again.

Carpinteria City Council District 5: No Endorsement Technically this is a three-way race, but to our mind, it’s really a choice between councilmembers Al Clark and Gregg Carty, two men who have served with distinction for 16 years. Both Clark — a 35-year resident of Carpinte-

ria — and Carty — a 60-year resident — have dedicated themselves to serving the greater Carpinteria community; both have demonstrated personal bravery in protecting what they believe makes Carpinteria, Carpinteria. It pains us greatly that district elections have forced these two men to compete against one another for one council seat, forcing residents to choose between two excellent candidates. And we regret that we cannot full-heartedly recommend one man over the other. As a result, we are offering no endorsement. Both men played major roles in the passage of a recent sales tax bump that generates up to $4 million a year in additional revenues for City Hall. Clark played a key role winning passage of Carpinteria’s pioneering vote to ban reusable plastic bags, and Carty pushed for the end of Styrofoam cups at the city’s annual Avocado Festival. Both Clark and Carty pushed the city to ban chain stores from downtown, a major step in preserving Carpinteria’s smalltown charm. Of the two, Clark — a registered Democrat — has been the most fiercely protective against the threat of what he terms “overdevelopment.” Often, Clark, smart, acerbic, and analytical, casts the sole dissenting vote. When Caltrans and SBCAG were telling Carpinteria to take it or leave it over the freeway widening and the design of new freeway exits, Clark called their bluff at the bargaining table. He also pushed for Carpinteria’s ordinance restricting vacation rentals demonstrating an ability to work with others to move the needle. However, we’re troubled by Clark’s lack of directness when it comes to Measure T, the ballot measure that would effectively kill the hotel without ever mentioning it by name. Clark has always opposed the hotel and is the only member of the council not to sign the ballot language opposing Measure T. As he explains it, Clark neither supports nor opposes Measure T. We’re not sure how that can be. Do the citizens of Carpinteria really need to be protected from their elected representatives? Carty, a registered Republican until becoming an Independent in recent years, has always sought to balance a healthy business climate with preservation of Carpinteria’s small-town charm. He is less focused on the specter of overdevelopment and more about creating a new community center, which also provides a place for seniors to meet. On the council, Carty is soft-spoken and congenial. He is more willing to work with the Chamber of Commerce to promote business in Carpinteria than Clark, who tends to view that organization with a jaundiced eye. However, when Venoco Oil took its slant drilling proposal directly to the ballot box in 2010, Carty strongly opposed it even though his sister-in-law was leading the charge on behalf of the oil company. Given Carpinteria’s small-town politics, that had to have been tough. When Carty and Clark were elected 16 years ago, they ran as part of the same slate. Over time, however, their differences have become more apparent, with Carty finding his niche as part of a more pro-business majority and Clark consigned to the role of loyal slowgrowth opposition. While we could not come to consensus on our endorsements, we hope this exercise in head-scratching helps you with your decision. n

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8 at DE LA GUERRA PLAZA from 10:00 AM-2:00 PM Join us for our annual free public event dedicated to connecting community members with local affordable housing non-profit agencies and service providers. 30+ Community Agencies & Supportive Service Providers Informative Housing Workshops Tenant & Landlord Resources ADU Resources Workforce Housing Information Music & Entertainment Local Food Vendors Activities for Kids & Families

For more information, scan or visit our website at www.housingsantabarbara.org Santa Barbara Community Housing Corporation

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

9


CLAIM DEADLINE: DEC 31, 2022

Attorney Advertising

Abused by Clergy in California? These individuals have been accused of child sexual abuse in California.

Fr. Vincent V. Cavalli

Br. Damien Chong

Br. Gerald Chumik

Fr. Richard T. Coughlin

Fr. Daniel J. Cremins

Fr. Sean Cronin

Fr. Mario Walter Cimmarrusti

Fr. John V. Coffield

Fr. Christopher Fr. Owen da Silva Cunningham (de Silva)

Fr. Eugene J. Colosimo

Br. Bernard (Berard) Connolly

Fr. John V. Cosgrove

Fr. Bernard Fr. Wallace J. Fr. John H. Dabbene Daley Dawson

Fr. Patrick John Cotter

Fr. Harold DeJonghe

NOT PICTURED Fr. Delfin Babilonia Fr. Victor Balbin Fr. Robert Bond Fr. Jerome Bouska Fr. Harold F. DeLisle

Fr. Joseph B. Di Peri

Msgr. James Dolan

Fr. Jesus Jesse Dominguez

Fr. Francis Dowd

Br. Donald DuFour

Fr. Albert J. Duggan

Fr. Franklin Buckman Fr. James Cairns

If you have information regarding alleged abuse or its cover-up involving these men, ACT NOW.

Contact us Confidentially

1-800-ITS-TIME

TM

Lawsuits were filed in California involving these alleged perpetrators. The vast majority of claims against these individuals have not been fully evaluated in a civil or criminal court. The allegations should not be considered proved or substantiated in a court of law. All individuals should be considered innocent until proven guilty. 10

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

AndersonAdvocates.com 12011 San Vicente Blvd, Suite 700 Los Angeles, CA 90049


SEPT. 29-OCT. 6, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

RYAN P. C RUZ

COMMUNITY

Iranian Community Protests for Human Rights

TRANSPORTATION The 101 divides the Goleta community to the north and south, a gap the city hopes to bridge with a new bike and pedestrian path running under the highway. The fate of the project — and its $18 million grant — was in suspense for two weeks after Councilmember Roger Aceves said on 9/20 he couldn’t support the project without more information. Two councilmembers had to recuse themselves as they lived near the project, requiring Aceves’s “yes” vote on 10/4 to reach the necessary majority. An arborist identified trees slated for removal, costs and funding were quantified, and affected habitats were named — satisfying Aceves and gaining the needed three votes.

ZOHA M ALI K

OUTDOORS

WOMEN, LIFE, FREEDOM: Nastaran Fathollah holds a chunk of hair she cut off during Saturday’s protest for women’s rights in Iran, following the death of Mahsa Amini, who was killed while in police custody in Tehran.

S

anta Barbara’s Iranian community has been protesting the past two weeks — with daily demonstrations at the UC Santa Barbara campus organized by the Iranian Academic Community (IAC-UCSB) — and last Saturday, the group took over the corner of State Street and Cabrillo Boulevard to join in worldwide demonstrations for women’s rights in the west Asian country. The protests were sparked by the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who was arrested and killed in police custody in Tehran in

September for failing to properly wear a hijab. Women have burned their hijabs or chopped off their hair in symbolic acts of defiance. Nastaran Fathollah, above, a Santa Barbara resident and mother of three, helped lead the crowd in chants before taking a pair of scissors to her long black locks. “Women in Iran cannot show their hair,” Fathollah said, to cheers from the crowd, “so I will cut mine now.” Read more and see more images of the event at independent.com. —Ryan Cruz

GOLETA

PEOPLE

PAU L WE LLM AN FI LE PHOTO

Philanthropist Leslie Ridley-Tree Dies

Leslie Ridley-Tree

L

eslie Ridley-Tree, Santa Barbara’s one-woman powerhouse of philanthropic giving, died this week at the age of 97. Since moving to Santa Barbara in 1988, Ridley-Tree has given away untold hundreds of millions of dollars. In person, Ridley-Tree, with her signature shock of preternaturally red hair, was direct, shrewd, funny, and blunt.

Santa Barbara’s Thousand Steps to the beach reopened last Thursday following a six-month-long closure. After the cliff-face stairway in the Mesa neighborhood, which was originally built in 1925 and actually has about 150 steps, began crumbling from coastal exposure and regular use, the city took measures to repair the damage. The steps will close again briefly for additional work either this fall or winter to add an apron at the beach level to protect the stairs’ structural integrity.

When Sansum CEO Kurt Ransohoff first approached Ridley-Tree about donating to what’s since become the new cancer center, she teased him for not asking for more. Ultimately, she would donate $10.7 million. Ridley-Tree’s name is attached to pretty much every major institution in Santa Barbara, from UCSB to City College, from the treatment of alcoholism to Alzheimer’s care. A onetime violin player turned torch singer, she gave generously to the arts as well. She was a sustaining and compassionate donor to Casa Esperanza, the former homeless shelter on Cacique Street, not only writing big checks but volunteering every week to work in the kitchen. The Ridley-Tree wealth stemmed from an airplane repair and parts company her husband, Paul Ridley-Tree, started in Chatsworth. Endowed with a gravitational attraction to leadership, Ridley-Tree told the Independent in a 2018 interview, “I take over,” adding, “And I try to do what’s best for the people without being too aggressive.” Of her career in philanthropy, Ridley-Tree commented, “I don’t think of myself as a philanthropist. I think of myself as having the enormous privilege of sharing.” —Nick Welsh

Few voices were heard opposing the City of Goleta’s new street-striping plan for Hollister Avenue in Old Town at a meeting held on Thursday at the Goleta Community Center. Several who expressed relief that something was finally being done made the only statements that were applauded by the roughly three dozen people there that evening. Not only has the need for changes along Hollister been jawed over for 30 years, but the accident rate there is high — four times the state average for collisions and three times the average for collisions resulting in injuries.

PUBLIC SAFETY A single-vehicle rollover in Lompoc on 9/28 resulted in two major injuries — to the 18-year-old female driver and 8-year-old female passenger — and the death of a 10-year-old female passenger, according to a CHP report. The crash occurred shortly before 8 a.m. on Highway 1, just south of Santa Lucia Canyon Road, where an SUV veered off the right shoulder and rolled into heavy brush. The driver “made an unsafe turning movement” at an undetermined speed, according to the report, causing the SUV to flip multiple times and “ejecting the two passengers.” Alcohol and drugs are not considered a factor in this crash. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

11


SEPT. 29-OCT. 6, 2022

HEALTH

COU RTESY

VA Secretary Explains New Toxic Exposure Testing and Treatment

VA VISIT: Congressmember Salud Carbajal (left) was joined by Veterans Affairs Secretary Denis McDonough on Tuesday at Santa Barbara’s Veterans Administration Clinic.

V

Walk to End Alzheimer’s Santa Barbara Chase Palm Park Saturday, Nov. 5 | 10AM

alz.org/walk

eterans Affairs Secretary Denis McDonough and Congressmember Salud Carbajal visited Santa Barbara’s Veterans Administration Clinic on Tuesday to talk with the medical staff about the new toxic exposure testing and treatment bill that President Biden signed on August 8. The cabinet secretary was touring clinics in Carbajal’s district—in San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and the new Ventura clinic that opened on September 27—to spread the word about the new program. Carbajal was a co-sponsor of the bill, which McDonough said could cost $400 billion over 10 years. According to McDonough, the 3.5 million veterans who had tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as Vietnam veterans who experienced hypertension after being exposed to Agent Orange, were eligible

to benefit from the testing and treatment program. McDonough, who served in the National Security Agency and as the White House Chief of Staff during the Obama presidency, encouraged all eligible veterans to file for the program, even those who were not sure they would qualify, because they’d be helping their “battle buddies” by completing the picture of the toxins they’d encountered overseas. In the “Honoring Our Promise to Address Comprehensive Toxics” (PACT) pilot program, about 40 percent of the 15,000 participants were thought to have been exposed. The exposures included burn pits, Agent Orange, radiation, and contaminated water at Camp Lejeune, a VA flyer explained. Vets can access care at VA.gov/PACT and 1-800-MyVA411 (1-800698-2411). —Jean Yamamura

SPORTS

COU RTESY

Running Back Breaks SBCC Record HOW TO TRA I N YOU R B R AIN THE MENTAL SIDE OF SPORTS

Tim Van Haitsma, Westmont associate professor, chair of the kinesiology department, and a lifelong runner, speaks about mental strength training within sport performance. TIM VAN HAITSMA Thursday, October 13, at 5:30 p.m. Community Arts Workshop (CAW) 631 Garden Street Sponsored by the Westmont Foundation

12

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

RECORD-BREAKING: SBCC running back Brandon Smith rushed for a school-record 260 yards on 33 carries against Glendale.

S

BCC running back Brandon Smith etched his name among the program’s all-time greats by breaking the single-game rushing record with 260 yards on 33 carries at Glendale on Saturday. Smith’s performance boosted the Vaqueros, who have now won four consecutive games, to a 30-14 victory. “If you didn’t see our game on Saturday, you missed the single finest effort by a young man that I’ve been around in 37 years,” said

SBCC coach Craig Moropoulos. “That was a great example of a man amongst boys.” The outstanding production is nothing new for 5'11'' 215-pound Smith. The victory over Glendale was the third consecutive game he has exceeded 109 rushing yards. Smith has rushed for 654 yards on 89 carries so far this season, which comes out to a whopping 130.8 yards per game. —Victor Bryant


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

PUBLIC SAFETY

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON

Man Rescued from Storm Drain

104th Concert Season

CAR L PER RY

MASTERSERIES AT THE LOBERO THEATRE SEASON SPONSOR:

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2022, 7:30PM

JUILLIARD STRING QUARTET

Founded in 1946 and hailed by the Boston Globe as “the most important American quartet in history,” the Juilliard String Quartet—celebrating its 75th Anniversary this season— continues to inspire audiences around the world. Ronald Copes, former faculty member in UCSB’s Department of Music, has played with the Juilliard String Quartet since 1997. In May 2022, the Quartet named violist Molly Carr to its ensemble. UP THE DRAIN: The Santa Barbara Fire Department rescued an unidentified man from a storm drain on Friday.

N

umerous City Fire units sped to the Harbor when a call came in on Friday at 1:30 p.m. that a man was trapped in a storm drain and that the tide was rising. The man had apparently crawled in from the other end of the tunnel and found himself in a very tight space, said Kevin Corbett, public information officer for City Fire. Over his head was a heavy grate atop which a truck was parked in the Waterfront parking lot. Passersby heard him calling for help, Corbett said, and the Harbor Patrol was able to reach the truck owner, who moved his vehicle.

The engine companies, heavy rescue company, hazardous materials unit, and battalion chief at the scene then attempted to use straps, crowbars, and cutting tools to remove the grate, but to no avail. They called in a tow truck, which wrapped a chain around the grate and pulled it loose. The man, who remains unidentified but appeared to be in his thirties, was helped out of the drain, where he’d become very cold as the sea water rose and flooded the tunnel over the course of about six hours. He was taken by ambulance to Cottage Hospital. —Jean Yamamura

ALBERGA, DVOŘÁK, AND BEETHOVEN Members of the Juilliard String Quartet will offer a MASTER CLASS to string students in the Department of Music at UC Santa Barbara on SUNDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2022, KARL GEIRINGER HALL, 2:00PM. Exclusive Sponsor: Bitsy & Denny Bacon

Lobero Theatre Box Office ⫽ (805) 963-0761 ⫽ lobero.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA

The Peaceful Sea

ENVIRONMENT

Turning Off the Gas

B

y a 3-2 majority, the county supervisors took the first step toward banning the use of natural gas in new residential and commercial developments in hopes of lessening the county’s cumulative greenhouse-gas footprint. Natural gas used for cooking and heating, the supervisors were told by their sustainability experts, accounts for fully one-third of the county’s carbon emissions, and natural gas — methane — is 25 times more environmentally destructive when it comes to climate change. There was considerable debate by dueling public stakeholders, but the outcome was never in doubt. The supervisors’ action puts the county on track to get ahead of new state rules and regulations soon to take effect, but only by a few years. The real fight will be over possible exemptions. Andy Caldwell of the Coalition for Labor, Agriculture & Business asked that agricultural operations be exempt. Activists with a host of environmental organizations argued there was little time left for the supervisors to act, given the pace of climate change. Natural gas, they noted, increased asthma in young children by 40 percent. The City of Santa Barbara, which passed

a similar measure within the last year, exempted laboratories, restaurants, and remodels. County planners have yet to address such carve-outs and promised an extensive public outreach process before they weigh in. Perhaps the most problematic sticking point for making the transition is whether the electrical grid upon which Santa Barbara currently depends can handle the additional demand. Supervisor Bob Nelson — who opposed the proposed new mandates — observed how earlier in the day, the supervisors voted not to require a Carpinteria cannabis grower to install odoreating carbon scrubbers in part because there wasn’t a reliable electrical supply for the energy-intensive devices. How could they now mandate a much more sweeping transition to electrical power? Nelson wondered. Supervisor Joan Hartmann highlighted the ever-present danger of gas leaks, noting that women are better at smelling them than their male counterparts. As far as mandates were concerned, she noted that building codes are chock-full of mandates — to ensure public safety — and that these codes are updated every three years as a matter of state law. —Nick Welsh

Paintings by Kevin A. Short “There is magnetism in looking at glare and the effects of sunlight [on water]—something magical and calming that makes our troubles seem smaller and our thinking become clearer.”—Kevin A. Short

August 11, 2022 - December 31, 2022 Sponsored by American Riviera Bank, Mimi Michaelis, June G. Outhwaite Charitable Trust, Alice Tweed Tuohy Foundation, and Wood-Claeyssens Foundation

SBMM Santa Barbara Maritime Museum

sbmm.org INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

13


An Evening to Explore

SEPT. 29-OCT. 6, 2022

CORONAVIRUS

Jodi House

COVID Numbers Are Down, Jehovah’s Witnesses Are Back

AT MOXI SKY GARDEN

T

he good news is that the numbers of COVID tests, positive cases, and people hospitalized are dropping throughout Santa Barbara County. By statewide standards, the county qualifies in the “low” tier. Accordingly, restrictions are being relaxed and more signs of a return to a time before COVID are beginning to appear. For example, the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Office has reinstated visitation at the county jail. And after a 30-month hiatus, the 560 members of the Jehovah’s Witness community have announced that they will resume their door-knocking efforts to spread the word within Santa Barbara city limits, adding that they supported the wearing of masks and vaccinations throughout the COVID pandemic, as it reflected the sacredness with which they regard life and the love they have for their neighbors. In the meantime, county supervisors voted to

Thursday, October 27th, 2022 FROM 5:30 - 7:30 PM MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation 125 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 We welcome you to join us on the rooftop at sunset to sip, savor and learn how Jodi House helps brain injury survivors thrive. Tickets are $35 and are available at: https://paybee.io/@jodihouse@3

Sponsored by

HOMELESSNESS Adriana & Igor Mezic

Brother, Can You Spare $10,000? DA N I EL D R E I FUSS FI LE PHOTO

AIMdyn Inc. Honey x Palm

Santa Barbara Rescue Mission

I

n the past year, local Santa Barbara governments spent almost $90 million trying to get people living on the streets — or in their cars — into housing. In that same time, private philanthropists spent $6 million. A white paper co-authored by Jon Clark of the Bower Foundation and Ben Romo — a local consultant specializing in political and philanthropic work — suggested a myriad of ways private donors can and are uniquely positioned to do more. Perhaps the most obvious need, Romo and Clark suggested, is helping keep people from becoming homeless in the first place. With COVID-inspired eviction protections poised to evaporate, that possibility is becoming more urgent. “A wave of new evictions has the potential to overwhelm the homeless-serving system,” they opined, “and undermine the efforts of many excellent organizations and strong leaders who have been successfully helping people escape encampments and other unsheltered situations.” 14

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

spend an additional $30,000 on a public information contract to keep the county website and dashboard with COVID factoids operating. Supervisor Bob Nelson cast what he described as a “symbolic” vote against the spending, saying the county needed to embrace the “new normal” in which COVID is an endemic rather than a pandemic. His was the only vote opposed. Supervisor Joan Hartmann noted that 400 people a day were still dying from COVID nationally — down from 3,000 at its peak. With winter coming, she argued, and so many potential variants and subvariants likely, the county’s public information effort remained necessary. Currently, there are 17 people hospitalized in Santa Barbara County with COVID; of those, one is in the ICU. To date, there have been 722 confirmed deaths since the pandemic was —Nick Welsh declared.

INDEPENDENT.COM

In the past two quarters, 346 eviction petitions have been filed in Santa Barbara courts. Government agencies spent $38 million helping thousands of county tenants pay their rents. But such agencies lack the flexibility and nimbleness to intervene in countless small but critical ways to keep those on the economic ledge from falling off. It may be something as simple as a car repair enabling someone to keep their job. Government is not equipped to step into that breach, Romo said. The level of services required, Romo cautioned, do not currently exist. Private philanthropists want their money to go somewhere it can have a positive tangible impact, he explained, and the narrative in many media descriptions is one of futility. In fact, he insisted, much more is getting done that might be obvious. In the past five years, 920 new shelter and housing units have come online. The good news is that in the first quarter of 2022, 253 homeless people got into some form of permanent housing. But the bad news is that in that same time, 428 people became homeless for the first time. Romo and Clark will be taking their case to the Foundation Round Table and targeting specific private donors to get involved. —Nick Welsh


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

ELECTION 2022

Carpinteria’s Big Choice: Al Clark, Gregg Carty, or Patrick O’Connor?

Al Clark

COU RTESY

COU RTESY

RYAN P. C RUZ

District Elections Bring New Look to Council Races; Longtime Councilmembers Face Off

Patrick O’Connor

Gregg Carty

by Ryan P. Cruz or the first time in its history, Carpinteria voters will cast their ballots for City Council candidates who live within their districts, not for at-large nominees who live anywhere in the city, as they have in previous years. Sparked by civil lawsuits in cities up and down the California coast, the move to district elections is intended as a move toward equality and representation, the idea being that in many cities, “communities of interest” — or groups whose voting power is unfairly diluted in at-large elections — would be better off if their collective voting power is kept within their respective district(s). But in towns with smaller populations, such as Carpinteria with its 13,000 residents, splitting into districts brings a new set of problems. In Carpinteria, it was nearly impossible to create more than one majority Latino voting district. Then there’s another wrinkle. While there are three council seats up on the ballot this year, only one of the races will be contested. Running unopposed in District 1 is Aliso Elementary School PTA president Mónica Solórzano and in District 3, also unopposed, is current councilmember Roy Lee. In District 5, however, a three-way race pits two longtime councilmembers — Al Clark and Gregg Carty — against the newest contender, Patrick O’Connor, an aerospace engineer and newly appointed member of Carpinteria’s Architectural Review Board. For the past 16 years, Clark and Carty have served together. In fact, when they first ran and were elected for council in 2006, they were part of the same ticket: the “A-B-C” team of Al Clark, Brad Stein, and Gregg Carty. They have agreed on several initiatives, including the sales-tax bump “Measure X” that yields almost $4 million a year for the city’s general fund. Over the years, the two have taken different directions, most recently over the much-contested hotel project the Surfliner Inn. Clark has been the only member of City Council to vote against the hotel, while Carty has called the project a step toward “sustainable tourism” for Carpinteria. The Independent spoke with all three candidates in District 5 to help Carpinterians make their most well-informed choice. To check our endorsements (or non-endorsements), view the endorsements section of our website.

F

AL CLARK Vice Mayor Al Clark may be best known for his campaign

slogan, “Keep Carpinteria, Carpinteria,” but he has also made a reputation for being a force on the Finance Committee and a voice for the opposition on several projects. Never afraid of being the sole opposing vote, Clark has been a vocal opponent of the Surfliner Inn and worries that the town is on the brink of overdevelopment. The 39 proposed rooms he said were too big for the corner spot — he prefers a 20-room maximum — and the fact that it was to be built on city-owned lots meant that it was a “city development” in his eyes. Although he has not publicly weighed in on Measure T — the ballot initiative that, if passed, would rezone the two city lots in question, effectively killing the hotel project — he was the only member of the council who did not sign the city’s “Argument Against Measure T,” in which the other four councilmembers urged a vote “no” on the measure, to allow the city review process to decide the Surfliner’s fate. In council meetings, Clark, who has lived in Carp for 35 years, bases his comments on both staff reports and public input, urging other councilmembers to take a step back and see what the community actually wants. He is big on affordable housing development and critical of short-term rentals. “People don’t have a place to live,” he said. “About a third of our houses, nobody lives in.” While he opposed the Surfliner, he likes the idea of The Palms restaurant being restored into a smaller-scale hotel, as long as the city ensures the current rental residents will be given relocation assistance. “Carpinteria is a wonderful place,” he said. “It’s about the people. They really care about the place they live in.”

GREGG CARTY Councilmember Gregg Carty, who was city mayor during his first and second terms, has lived in Carpinteria for more than 60 years; attended Canalino Elementary School; was in the first junior high class of what is now known as Carpinteria Middle; and was a star athlete at Carpinteria High School, where he graduated in 1972. He served on the city’s Architectural Review Board for a dozen years and has been on the city council since 2006. This year, he said he was a bit disappointed to see that he was going to have to run against his friend and colleague in the new district elections. “It’s kind of a nightmare,” he said. “I’m running against somebody I used to run with.” The contest has divided the neighborhood they share,

he said, and created a new dynamic where front yards have become a lawn-sign battleground. Carty hopes to help guide the city as it evolves to include more modern amenities. It’s important to foster growth and a sustainable tourist industry, he said, while keeping the city’s values and identity. A strong supporter of new developments in the downtown area, such as the 700 Linden Avenue marketplace, the Palms Hotel project, and the Surfliner Inn, Carty believes the city can’t afford to keep saying “no, no, no” to new projects. Carty has also been a big supporter of the Measure X sales tax initiative, which is more than 70 percent tourism dollars, and says that people coming and spending money is great for the city, especially when local businesses such as The Plow and Lucky Llama are flourishing downtown. On council, he has immersed himself in the city workings and fostered relationships with city staff and management. In recent years, his voting record has teetered toward supporting business, but with a focus on mom-and-pop businesses. He hopes to keep working with other councilmembers to achieve a community center, and is partnering with councilmember Roy Lee to push for a dedicated senior center — something he says the community is severely lacking. Most of all, he says, he wants to be given a chance to help shape the future of the city. “Carpinteria is a gem on the California coast,” he said. “It is a precious place.”

PATRICK O’CONNOR Aerospace engineer and the newest member of Carpinteria’s Architectural Review Board Patrick O’Connor may be the newest to the city out of all three candidates, but he is determined to help the city streamline its slow-moving development process. O’Connor moved to Carpinteria nine years ago after buying a Victorian home on 8th Street, and he became a regular at city review boards, where he found some of the processes too clunky. “I think there’s a lot of ways to improve community development,” he said. “I think there is a way to improve the way decisions are made.” During COVID, he spent a lot of time diving deep into the inner workings of project development. Last week, he was selected by the council to take the open position on the Architectural Review Board, where he will serve if not elected to council. He said that while campaigning, he has heard a “universal frustration with community development processes,” and he hopes to change the way the public and city staff interact. The new downtown developments are a “once-in-a-generation” opportunity to repurpose existing properties, he said, and he hopes to be a part of the city process going forward. n

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

15


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Dog Stars Chasing an Autumn Moon

TICKLED IVORIES: The painted pianos are

back. For more than 10 years now, they magically appear on State Street around this time, usually but not always near busy intersections. They offer portals in invisible storms, an invitation for a musical dalliance, even for those who don’t play. Maybe especially for those of us who don’t play. If we’re lucky, these pianos — warbly of voice and never quite in tune — will be up for a couple of weeks. The sound of “Chopsticks,” Bartók, and Elton John will fill the air. Or maybe it will be a whole lot of random plinkety-plunk chasing each other across the keyboards like a cartoon cat chasing a cartoon mouse. It doesn’t matter. Total strangers will gather around these sonic campfires. For a moment, we will show off and laugh nervously, off-leash from our demographic silos. In that moment, we will not be strangers. Will the species be redeemed? Maybe not, but some great music will be born. For my money — and of course, it’s not — this is the single most effective investment anyone could imagine for State Street. Yesterday, I passed a middleaged woman coaxing what I imagined was “Into Each Life Some Rain Must Fall” from a yellow upright. She missed a few notes, but it was still beautiful. “If only,” I thought, and walked on. That morning, the Los Angeles Times informed me California just recorded the dri-

est three successive years in recorded history, which for rain, it turns out, began in 1896. Naturally, I felt the urge to call up Joshua Haggmark, the city’s de facto and preter-

naturally cheerful water czar. What does this mean for Santa Barbara? I wanted to know. Haggmark, also preternaturally responsive, had this to say. Nothing and everything. The good news is that the last three years are not the driest on record for Santa Barbara. The bad news is that this doesn’t matter. That’s because eight of the last 10 years have been unusually dry. As a result, Lake Cachuma — where most of our water comes from — hasn’t spilled in 12 years. It used to spill every three. The state water system — for which we spending umpteen millions a year — has gotten so questionable that some board members are officially fretting the pipes could start to corrode because soon no water will be going through them. That’s a first. Or could be. People living in the City of Santa Barbara are okay, at least for the time being, because 23 years ago, they had the sense to vote to build a desalination plant that could never have gotten approved in today’s environmental and regulatory climate. In the past few months, platoons of construction workers have been busy inconveniencing our lives by digging up city streets and laying 10,000 feet of new water

pipes — 24 inches in diameter, in case you’re

interested. These will connect the desal plant — located in the industrialized zone just off the waterfront — to the Cater Water Treatment Plant located up and over Highway 192. From there, the desalinated water can be gravity-fed into every city household. Right now, it can only be pumped to households in the city’s lowlands. Normally, I’d say this was the smartest $20 million City Hall spent, but in this case, most of the money comes from an insurance settlement over damages done to our water system by the Thomas Fire. In droughts past, the city bought supplemental water from massive ag operations that made more money selling water at exorbitant rates than growing cotton in the Mojave Desert. (And we wonder why we have a drought.) Given that the Colorado River is drying up — and Lake Mead and Lake Powell are only 25 percent full — the competition to buy water from those cotton and alfalfa growers is fierce. The good news — if you happen to live in the City of Santa Barbara — is that 25 percent of the water in Lake Cachuma belongs to the city. The other good news is that city water customers are using 26 percent less than they were in 2013. That’s roughly 40 gallons a day indoors. The bad news is that Governor Gavin Newsom wants everyone to cut back by 25 percent, but not from 2013. He wants it from two years ago. For people on the South Coast — who never really stopped

conserving — that will translate to a 36 percent reduction. If push comes to shove, that shoe could get real tight. Or as they used to say, that’s a lot of yellow that will need to mellow. And if things stay real dry, we have the capacity to triple the capacity of the desal plant. That, however, would be extremely expensive. In the meantime, Haggmark is fielding phone calls from people who claim they can harvest water from fog, or want to cover the surface of Lake Cachuma with plastic balls to prevent water loss due to evaporation that takes place. Up at the Gibraltar Reservoir, there was talk of covering the surface with solar panels to do the same thing, but it turns out there’s no connection to the grid up there. Given Santa Barbara’s New Age proclivities, I’m surprised we have no born-again shamans leading us in collective rain dances. In the Ozarks, I am told, some people entice the skies by hanging dead snakes belly-up on fence posts. I can’t swear by either method. In this context, maybe we can consign the pianos now colonizing State Street to the cause. The timing, it turns out, is just about right, coming only one month before our socalled “rainy season” is scheduled to begin. By my reckoning, the worse we play, the more effective we’ll be. The skies will open up if only to shut us up. Those pianos? They’re something beauti—Nick Welsh ful.

Stearns Wharf is Celebrating its

150th ANNIVERSARY!!

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8th, 2022

The celebration will feature exciting events from 11:00 am to 7:15pm

Visit stearnswharf.org for complete details

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

16

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


OPINIONS ENERGY WAR RUSSIA BY SCHOT, DE VOLKSKRANT

Letters

Gateway Educational Services

Presents: Services Gateway Educational Presents: Gateway Educational Services Presents:

Town Hall Hall Webinar Webinar on on the the state state of of education education Town andHall African American students in Santa Santa and African American students Town Webinar on the state ofineducation Barbara County Barbara County and African American students in Santa

Dr. Dr. Sucari Sucari Epps Epps

Barbara County

Dr. Sucari Epps

Dr. Dr. Anna Anna Everett Everett

Dr. Anna Everett October October 17, 17, 2022 2022 ✦ ✦ 6:30-8:00 6:30-8:00 PM PM ZoomOctober Required https://bit.ly/3e59jyB 17, 2022 ✦ 6:30-8:00 PM Zoom Pre-Registration Pre-Registration Required https://bit.ly/3e59jyB

Zoom Pre-Registration Required https://bit.ly/3e59jyB Moderator: Dr. Anna Everett, Emeritus Faculty UCSB and SBCC Trustee

Moderator: Dr. Anna Everett, Emeritus Faculty UCSB and SBCC Trustee

Speaker: Dr. Faculty Sucari Epps Moderator: Dr. AnnaGuest Everett, Emeritus UCSB and SBCC Trustee Guest Speaker: Dr. Sucari Epps Topic: Special Education Black Students Guest Speaker: Dr.and Sucari Epps

Topic: Special Education and Black Students

Topic: Special Education and Black Students Invited Panelists:

Invited Panelists:

Invited Panelists:

Dr. Hilda Maldonado SBUSD Dr. Dr. Hilda Hilda Maldonado Maldonado SBUSD

SBUSD

L Pu

Dr. Darrin McDuffie Dr. Diana Roybal Dr. Ray Avila SMBSD GUSD SB County SELPA Dr. Darren Darrin Dr. Dr. Dr. McDuffie Darrin McDuffie McDuffie Dr. Diana Diana Roybal Roybal Dr. Ray Ray Avila Avila info@gatewayeducationalservices.org SMBSD GUSD SB County SELPA

SMBSD

GUSD

info@gatewayeducationalservices.org

SB County SELPA

info@gatewayeducationalservices.org

Embrace Diversity

received a flier in the mail from a Goleta I recently Union School District Trustee candidate that I

found extremely disturbing. In her flier, Caroline Abate not-so-subtly blames education in racial and sexual diversity for harming the mental health of children. She further implies that it leads to behavior that threatens school and public safety. She implies that it is the cause for teen suicide, school fights, bullying, and vandalism. She also uses some key terms that would imply that racial diversity is not welcome, like the term “patriotic unity.” In her letter, she also attempts to think for the reader, implying that certain concepts are common knowledge. I would contend that teaching people about diversity helps eliminate these very elements she is choosing to blame behaviors on. Understanding our differences makes it easier to come together as a community and have appreciation for each other. Trying to deny the existence of a large portion of our community does not prepare our kids for the real world. It impairs their ability to navigate our society with understanding and empathy. So, sorry Caroline Abate, I will not be voting for you and your close-minded view of our diverse, rich, beautiful community here in Goleta. —Jonas Marquez, Goleta

Loss of Habitat

’m probably not the best judge of habitat since I Iconsider enjoying a Corona in the sand at Shore-

line Café to be connecting with nature. And I’m not a preservationist who needs everything to stay the same so that I can feel good about the future. But I am sensitive to the delicate balance we must all maintain to protect the most vulnerable: honeybees, monarchs, renters. With that in mind, I am discouraged with the recent loss of habitat in Santa Barbara. It reminds me of what I witnessed many years ago as a young man home from college. While I was away at school, my parents did what many Midwestern folks do: They sold the house, packed the U-Haul, and moved to Florida. They landed in Cocoa Beach just as the Space Shuttle boom took shape nearby at Cape Canaveral. The area was exploding in population, good jobs, and development. The swamps were being drained, and subdivisions were sprouting everywhere. On each trip to see my family, another golf course or strip mall appeared where there used to be sawgrass marshes

and pine forests — now housing developments with gates and beautiful landscaping. It is with that perspective and unfortunate memory that I experience the recent changes in my downtown neighborhood. Investors are finding that older two-bedroom/ one-bath houses are a steal at $1.4 million. They just need to remove the natural inhabitants and give the place a shine. Air conditioners and large-screen TVs are delivered to empty houses. New fences. Landscaping. Stainless-steel BBQs. Fresh coats of paint. Everything a four-week makeover can offer. And always with a new key box on the front porch. The neighborhood is looking fabulous. It’s just missing the inhabitants — the teachers, young professionals, landscapers, retired housepainters, and mechanics. The neighbors I used to meet at the Mission Creek bridge to help scrub off the latest round of graffiti. The friends we made over drinks in the driveway. The parents of all those dogs we met. We’re missing the most important part of the neighborhood — the neighbors, our friends. Today, my former neighbors drive in from Lompoc or Oxnard, and I occasionally see them at Starbucks or Joe’s. Their jobs are still here; they just lost their nest. We’re evicting the character and the characters, and I miss them. Preserving habitat is important whether for the butterflies at Ellwood or for the lower middleclass downtown. I’m not sure what it will take, but whatever we’re doing today sure seems like Florida. Maybe that is why is has been so humid lately.

Open Everyday from 9 am to 9 pm OpenEveryday Everydayfrom from 99 am am to Open to 99 pm pm Corn Maze • Hayrides • Farm Animals Corn Maze • Hayrides •99Farm Animals Open Everyday from am to 9 pm Open Everyday from am to 9 pm Corn Maze • Hayrides • Farm Animals

TONS OF PUMPKINS! Corn Maze ... M-F open at 3pm, Sat & Sun open at 9am. Open M-F from 12 noon to 7pm, Maze closes dailyopen 1OF hour prior to pumpkin patch closing. Corn Maze ... M-F at P 3pm, Sat & Sun open at 9am. T ONS OF UMPKINS! T ONS P UMPKINS! Sat & Sun 10am to 7pm Maze closes daily 1 hour prior to pumpkin patch closing.

ONS OF PUMPKINS! TTONS ons of umPkins !Animals CornT Maze Hayrides FarmAnimals Corn Maze ••Hayrides ••Farm OF PUMPKINS! Corn Maze ... M-F open at 3pm, Sat & Sun open at 9am. Maze closes daily 1 hour prior to pumpkin patch closing.

Corn CornMaze Maze Maze... ...Maze ...M-F M-F M-Fcloses open openat atat 3pm, 3pm,at Sat Sat &&Parking Sun Sun open open atat9am. 9am. 9am. Entrance & atat Entrance & Parking at daily 6:45pm Corn open 3pm, Sat & Sun open Maze closes daily hour prior to pumpkin patch closing. Entrance & Parking Mazecloses closesdaily daily111hour hourprior priorto topumpkin pumpkin patchat closing. Maze patch closing.

LANE LANEFARMS FARMS LANE FARMS LANE FARMS PRODUCE STAND Entrance&&Parking Parking Entrance atat PRODUCE STAND PRODUCE STAND PRODUCE STAND 308 Lane 308S.S.Walnut Walnut Lane LANE LANE FARMS FARMS 964-3773Lane 308 (805) S. Walnut (805) 964-3773 PRODUCE STAND PRODUCE STAND LaneFarmsSB.com (805) 964-3773 LaneFarmsSB.com 308 308 S. S.Walnut Walnut Lane Lane LaneFarmsSB.com

(805)964-3773 964-3773 (805) LaneFarmsSB.com LaneFarmsSB.com

—Brian Fahnestock, S.B.

More Cruise Ships

the 16 cruise ships scheduled for Santa BarOfbara, among them are 10 Princess ships. The

Princess line has just been charged with violation of probation following a 2017 “criminal conviction for environmental crimes.” This is no time to talk about future subcommittees or resolutions. Decisions must be made now to stop or at least reduce the number of ships coming —Sally Hearon, S.B. to Santa Barbara. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

2 Lessons For $45 CALL 805.963.6658 TO SCHEDULE

Special for new students only * May only be used once * INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

17


obituaries Margaret Jean Sbaraglia

3/22/1927 - 9/20/2022

Margaret Jean Sbaraglia passed away on the morning of September 20, 2022. She was a loving and generous wife, mother grandmother and great grandmother. Margaret Jean Ruklic was born March 22, 1927 in Seattle, Washington to Anthony and Margaret Alta (Meehan) Ruklic. Margaret who went by “Jean” was the first of three children. She spent her youth in Chicago and Renton, Washington graduating from Renton High School in 1945. Jean moved to Los Angeles where she worked in retail until landing a job running the library at Radioplane where she met the love of her life Ugo Sbaraglia who was an engineer there. They married in October 1957 and lived in the San Fernando Valley. In 1960 they adopted their son Michael Anthony and then in 1962 they adopted their daughter Jennifer Cecilia. The family moved to Santa Barbara in 1968 when Ugo took a position at AeroSpacelines building the Guppy cargo aircraft. Jean spent her time keeping the house up and volunteering at San Roque School where her children were enrolled. When her kids started high school Jean began working at Robinsons Department Store as a department manager where she spent more than twenty years. Jean and Ugo travelled extensively spending time with Ugo’s family in Italy and spending time in exotic locales such as Tahiti, Hong Kong, Singapore, Ireland and the Yucatan. They took up skiing and spent many happy winter days on the slopes in the Tahoe area. They also spent many weekends sailboat racing where Jean crewed for Ugo on their sailboat “Avanti”. When Ugo passed in 1999 Jean continued to travel with friends and family and focused her attention on her children and grandchildren showering them with love. Her focus was always on family and her generosity was endless. She had a loving spirit and was always there to help. Her final few years were spent at Valle Verde Health Center after a tragic fall. Jean is survived by her sister Patricia Hargrove, brother Thomas Ruklic, her children Michael Sbaraglia (Ann) and Jen18

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com nifer Thomas (Michael). Her six beautiful grandchildren, Daniel (Heather), Lauren (Nathaniel), Christina (O’Neill), Luke (Kaitlin), Jacob (Seanna), Elijah and nine great grandchildren. A graveside service will be held for Jean on Friday, October 7th at 11:30 am at Calvary Cemetery on Hope Ave. Please visit Jean’s tribute page at https://mcdermottcrockett. com/tribute/details/294574/ Margaret-Sbaraglia/condolences. html if you would like to leave some words for the family on the Tribute Wall for Margaret.

Topanga. A memorial service for John was held at the Fellowship Club at the Mental Wellness Center by his friends and staff there on September 26. The family is grateful for the loving service put on by John’s friends and staff there, and for the four past years when John occupied a comfortable apartment at the Mental Wellness Center building on Garden Street. Donations in John Winter’s name may be made to the Mental Wellness Center, 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara 93101 c/o the John Winter Memorial Fund.

Helene Willey

3/27/1938 - 9/24/2022

John Sherman Winter 4/16/1964 - 7/16/2022

John Winter was tragically killed when a car struck him after running up on the curb in front of St. John’s Hospital in Oxnard, where John was waiting. He was 58. John grew up in the Willow Glen neighborhood of Santa Barbara, with many friends who found him creative in his leadership in their activities. His teachers appreciated his intelligence and his sense of humor that never crossed the line into class disruption. He was always popular for his warm and generous ways with people. John attended San Marcos High School and had a successful freshman year at UCLA, but returned home that summer with symptoms that led to a diagnosis of severe mental illness. The symptoms from his illness cut short most of the hopes and plans John had for his future, but he dealt with them with much courage, and his relationship with his family remained strong. His family, grieving our loss of our beloved John, are Jan Winter mother, in Santa Barbara; Sarah Winter, sister and her husband Panos Zagouras and daughter Alexia in Connecticut; John’s aunt Lynn Nichols, cousins Rod and John Nichols and Lee Nichols Naftali, all of Santa Barbara. John’s father Don Winter lives in

OCTOBER 6, 2022

Helene passed away on September 24, 2022 in Santa Barbara. She was born March 27, 1938 in Sherbrooke, Quebec to Luna (Dole) and Oscar Daigneault. She grew up there and later in Greenlay, along the St. Francis River. Her childhood was boisterous and near idyllic, filled with many siblings, Saturday evening radio broadcasts of “Hockey Night in Canada”, a slew of local kids, visiting cousins, and lots of horseplay—with attendant stories that were told, re-told, and revised over time. After high school, at the ripe old age of 17, Helene moved to Joliette, Quebec, where she was the sole teacher for a multi-grade, one-room schoolhouse. She then returned to nursing school in Sherbrooke. Upon graduation, she was recruited and moved to Santa Barbara to take up a nursing position at Cottage Hospital. During her early years in Santa Barbara, she lived with a group of other nurses in a large house on the Upper East Side, within walking distance to the hospital. She loved nursing and the community of friends. In 1962, Helene married Charles Willey, a young lawyer, and they soon began a family. Helene delighted in the role of mother. She was an active, supportive, and engaged parent, helping run a neighborhood preschool, acting as room mother for numerous classes, doing multiple stints as Cub Scout den mother, serving as PTA President (SBHS), and attending and promoting her children’s many sports activities, all the while presiding over a menagerie of pets: a succession of dogs, the odd cat, a pygmy goat, a duck with a protective streak, chickens, rabbits, hamsters, turtles, fish, rescued crows, a raccoon, and

INDEPENDENT.COM

a chatty African Grey parrot. Helene was an excellent cook and also loved to bake—her coffee cake, cinnamon rolls, and apricot horns were family favorites. She believed maple syrup was its own food group and she was an early adopter of nutrition-focused eating. Helene was engaged in the larger community, serving two terms on the Santa Barbara County Grand Jury and volunteering as a Courthouse docent. She was also a devoted member of the Junior League and took pride and pleasure in helping produce the annual rummage sale for several years, as well as guiding the Santa Barbara Junior League cookbook to print. Helene loved to travel (throughout the U.S. and Canada, Ireland, Scotland, England, France, and Switzerland) and was occasionally adventurous (Nepal to visit one son, New York City to visit another). She enjoyed her book club and when hosting, she always served meals that were thematically linked to the particular book. Helene was loyal, opinionated, a fan of teasing and being teased, and she liked to laugh. Family was everything to her and she was a fantastic mother and a devoted grandmother. She will be missed. Helene is predeceased by her parents and four siblings (Dwight, Malcolm, Joanne, and Dianne). She is survived by siblings Marilynn, Stephen and David; her children Stephen (Gretchen), Heather (William), Brent, and Scott (Laurel); and grandchildren Ryan, Cole, Blake, Lucien, Sian, Caden, Katrine, and Theo. Services will be private. If inclined, please consider a donation to VNA Health – https://vna. health/.

George Donald Riemer 9/23/2022

On Friday, September 23, 2022, George Donald Riemer, loving husband, father and grandfather, passed away at the age of 84 at his home in Santa Barbara, CA. Born to George Charles Riemer and Hildegarde Ida Riemer, he was raised in New Hyde Park, NY. George graduated from Hobart College in 1959 with a degree in Economics, where he was a member of Kappa Sigma fraternity. He then joined the U.S. Marine Corps and completed Officer Candidates School at Quantico, VA. He served from 1959 to 1962 in the Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, and as Provost Marshal at Twentynine

Palms, CA. After completing his service, George began a successful career in Human Resources with JCPenney, Pan American World Airways, Phillip Morris, and Miller Brewing Company. As he loved to tell the story, while on a business trip in Africa for Pan Am, George met a lovely stewardess named Marlene Stoll. They were both living in New York City at the time. After a whirlwind romance, they were wed in 1966 in Marlene’s hometown of Seattle, WA. Marlene and George were happily married for 56 years and raised three children. George’s jobs took the family to Commack, NY; Richmond, VA; Weston, CT; and Milwaukee, WI. He held the position of Corporate Vice President for Phillip Morris and Miller Brewing Company. After retiring from Miller in 1996, George and Marlene moved to Santa Barbara, CA, where they had a wonderful life and enjoyed many lasting friendships. George was active at La Cumbre Country Club in Santa Barbara, as his favorite activity in retirement was golfing. He chaired several golf leagues and held the record for having played the most rounds of golf in a year at La Cumbre. George was known for his great sense of humor, his infectious laugh, his fierce determination, and his generosity. He enjoyed family gatherings at his home in Santa Barbara, as well as in Hawaii and Colorado, and relished spending time with his three children, seven grandchildren, relatives and close friends. His favorite place in the world was the terrace at his home in Hope Ranch, where he loved to watch the airplanes and the sunset over the ocean. He was especially proud of hosting his three childrens’ weddings at his beautiful home. He was also known for his philanthropy. He actively supported several non-profits in Santa Barbara, including Santa Barbara Foundation, Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara Rescue Mission and Hillside House. George is survived by his wife Marlene Riemer; sister Katherine Riemer Hartnett (John); daughter Elsa Riemer Abookire (David); sons Eric Riemer (Kristina) and Ernie Riemer (Megan); and grandchildren: Sophia Riemer, Skylar Abookire, Kelsey Riemer, Jayden Abookire, George Riemer, Hannah Riemer and Elsie Riemer. The family wishes to express their gratitude to Cottage Hospital, Valle Verde, TheKey and VNA Hospice of Santa Barbara for George’s loving care. Donations in memory of George may be sent to Santa Barbara Foundation. The family will hold a private memorial at a later date.


obituaries Joseph Carl Mastroianni

9/24/1941 - 9/17/2022

Joseph Carl Mastroianni passed away on September 17th after a brief illness. He was 7 days shy of his 81st birthday. Joseph died on his terms with peace and dignity. He took his last breath listening to his favorite music with family by his side. Born in Brooklyn, NY to Carl Mastroianni and Madeline Tassi, he is predeceased by his sisters Lois Capua, Celia Mastroianni, and brother Richard Mastroianni. He leaves behind his brothers Ronald, Guy, and James Mastroianni, his sister Mary Ingoglia, his children David, Mark and Steven Mastroianni, Traci Currier, Carmen Higgins, and Damian Mastroianni, and their significant others, several nieces, nephews, grandchildren and great grandchildren or “greats” as he referred to them. Joseph was raised in his teens by his grandfather and surrogate father, soon to be father-in-law “Spud” Towse, who took him under his wing. In 1969 Joseph and his brother Ronald reunited with their birth father and met their new step mother Marian and three new siblings in the UK. After Joseph and Donna divorced, and Spud’s untimely death in 1976, Joseph and 2nd wife Ann (Perotti) and her daughter, Carmen moved to California. Ann and Carmen later returned to Massachusetts and Joseph remained in California. There Joseph met and married Leslie Taylor. The two adventured to Spain where they adopted their son Damian. Joseph studied classical guitar and became lifelong friends with his fellow classmate and mentor José Maria Gallardo Del Rey. Joseph lived an extraordinary life from flying Medivac helicopters in Vietnam, being told he would not walk again and nearly dying of infection after being hit by a car in NYC, only to cycle across America from Santa Barbara, CA to Woburn, MA. The accident in NYC cost him everything but he embraced a non-materialistic lifestyle. He raised huge sums of money for various causes in his beloved Santa Barbara and Carpinteria. He worked tirelessly with the

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com homeless for 8 years with New Beginnings (a source of great joy for him) and spent countless hours on the phone with whomever needed his infinite wisdom and advice. There will be a Celebration of Life Memorial Service on October 22, 2022 in Danville, NH and on November 5th in Santa Barbara, CA. The details will be shared on Joseph’s Facebook Page, or you may email traci.currier@ gmail.com for Danville, NH or james.e.mastroianni@gmail. com for Santa Barbara, CA for celebrations.

Ellen Denise Rook Jacobs

12/18/1930 - 9/17/2022

Ellen Denise Jacobs of North Hollywood, CA, passed away peacefully and surrounded by love in the comfort of her home on September 17, 2022 at the age of 91. Denise was a beloved daughter, sister, friend, mother, aunt, grandmother, and greatgrandmother, and was cared for deeply by the wonderful staff of Vitas Hospice leading up to her final days. She was preceded in death by her late husband, Michael Jacobs of Downey, CA. She was born on December 18, 1930 to her loving parents, the late Arthur and Ellen “Nell” (Kitson) Fitzgerald, the second born and last surviving of their seven children. Denise was the loving and devoted mother of Dr. Thomas Rook; Denise Rook; Barbara Rook; Arthur Rook and his wife Stacey (Sutter); Maribeth (Rook) Byerley; Patricia (Rook) Amboian and her husband Michael; Stephen Rook and his wife Sharon (Rook); Frank Rook and his husband Brian Harkins. Adoring grandmother to Davis Rook and Anna Rook Del-Rosario and her husband Ben; Jessica Byerley, Malia (Byerley) Carter and her husband Bryant, Sadie Byerley and Alec Byerley; Mike Amboian and Megan Amboian; Emily Rook and Rachel Rook. Treasured great-grandmother to Jasmine Byerley. Denise is survived by her sisters-in-law Kaye Fitzgerald; Rosemary Fitzgerald; Lori Rook; Sylvia Rook; Alma Jean (Rook)

Pettit; and Chris Mandic along with her brothers-in-law Tom Cousins; Joseph Rook and his wife Karolyn, and many nieces, nephews and dear friends. Denise is taking her journey into eternal life joining her daughter Jacqueline “Jackie” Rook, daughter-in-law Nina (Wilding) Rook, son-in-law David Byerley; brothers Edward Fitzgerald and his wife Rose, Raymond Fitzgerald, Joseph Fitzgerald, Robert Fitzgerald and his wife Marge; sisters Geraldine (Fitzgerald) Cousins, Ethel (Fitzgerald) McDonough and her husband Chuck; Denise’s ex-husband and father of her children Thomas E Rook; Tom’s siblings Robert Rook, William Rook and wife Joy and second wife Julie, James Rook, David Rook and his wife Mae, sister Marie (Rook) Andrejasich and her husband Frank, sister-in-law Valerie, and brother-in-law Jerry Pettit. Denise was raised in Chicago, IL where she married Tom. Together they started their family before moving with their nine children to Los Angeles California in 1967. Denise worked outside the home with positions at Security Pacific National Bank and Shamrock Carpets. Her most important and fulfilling job, however, was Household CEO which she held for more than 30 years. This position had Denise working from her home as an accountant, event planner, child care, nurse, chef, housekeeper and teacher along with multiple other duties. Her home always had an opendoor policy and she often made enough food to feed the entire neighborhood. Everyone was welcomed into her home with a big hug and warm smile, and she provided a loving second home to all the “George’s and Sally’s” of the world. Denise loved being with family and friends, enjoying the outdoors and taking long walks appreciating God’s creations. She also enjoyed sports and stayed a true Chicago White Sox and Chicago Bears fan. She loved playing cards, especially Bridge and Pinochle, while also enjoying bowling and her time on several bowling leagues over the years. Denise was born and baptized in Visitation Parish, Chicago, IL, where the tight knit community became her extended family and was the founding inspiration for her Catholic beliefs. Denise’s unwavering faith in God is the foundation in which she lived her life, and was a comfort to her in her final years. When she had moved to Los Angeles in

1967 the St. Gregory Parish filled the role as her extended family and was a source of great friends and support which she relied on strongly. Denise loved to entertain, congregate, celebrate, and support others. After she moved to North Hollywood, she selflessly gave her time and volunteered at the church she loved, St. Charles Borromeo. When she was not at the church her willingness to give generously of her time had her traveling from Los Angeles to Santa Barbara, Sonoma, Boston and Chicago where she would visit with, celebrate with, and help her family and friends. Denise was sincerely loved and will be truly missed. “May the Lord hold you in the hollow of His hand” Donations can be made to the “Jackie Rook Memorial Scholarship Fund” Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara – www.sbscholarship.org

Alvinn Cupid Lee Wallace

10/10/1960 - 9/17/2022

Alvinn Cupid Lee Wallace was born October 10, 1960 to the union of Cyrus and Burretta (Hill) Wallace in Hanover, Jamaica. Alvinn’s primary education began at Burney Mount School, followed by Cornwell College for high school, and finally attending the University of Connecticut, majoring in business. In 1982, Alvinn moved to Santa Barbara, California, finding employment with Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital as an x-ray technician. While working there, he began a carpet cleaning business, which he expanded to a full service cleaning company serving the Los Angeles, Ventura, and Santa Barbara counties, owning and

INDEPENDENT.COM

operating this business until this present time. Alvinn had a special affection for his church in Jamaica, Gurneys Mount Baptist Church , and continued his love for the church by becoming a member of the Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church where he attended faithfully for 31 years, and served as a deacon, president of the laymen’s department, and member of the Men’s Chorus, as well as volunteering his time and talents to the edification, and up[keep of the building. In addition to owning and operating a business, Alvinn also dedicated his time to serving several organizations in the community. In 1997, Alvinn became a member of the Kiwanis Club of Santa Barbara, serving as their Distinguished President and Super Distinguished Lieutenant Governor. Finally, he continued his dedication to serving the community by joining the Santa Barbara Elks Lodge #613, as Loyal Knight, second vice president, and Chairman of the Board. Alvinn is preceded in death by his parents and sister, Laurette Hamilton. His memory and legacy will continue to be cherished by his wife of 24 years, Bernice, daughter Marsha Marie Wallace-Satterlee (Christopher), son Cyrus J. Wallace, granddaughter, Stella Marie Satterlee; sisters, Joy Wallace, Beverly Cunningham, Gaynor Wallace Brooks, nephew Garey Whittaker (Michelle), niece Tonia Whittaker, great-nephew Garey Jr. Garrison and Trayvon Whittaker of MonLego Bay, Jamaica, father-in-law and mother-inlaw, Pastor and Sister JB Ficklin Jr, sister-in-law Gayla FicklinKerr (Lennox), brother-in-law James Ficklin; goddaughters Dalilah Russell, Olivia Lavrov, Morganne Watson, many friends who were in essence an extension of his family, along with dedicated employees, and business associates who became true friends. Services will be held on Friday, October 7, 2022 at 11:00AM, at the Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church, located at 430 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, and entrusted to McDermott Crockett Mortuary, 2020 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara, CA. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that a charitable donation be made in his memory to the Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church Building Fund.

OCTOBER 6, 2022

Continued on p.20 THE INDEPENDENT

19


LOMPOC DISPENSARY & CONSUMPTION LOUNGE FREE Delivery on all orders no minimum spend

obituaries Francis John Shields 1/16/1936 - 8/23/2022

• Designate your delivery time! • The ONLY legal consumption lounge on the coast! Offering live entertainment 4 nights a week and available for bachelor/bachelorette, birthday, and launch parties! Complimentary beverages and snacks.

We deliver to: • Santa Barbara • Santa Ynez • Montecito • Solvang • Goleta • Buellton

Best prices and range to choose from - check us out on Weedmaps and Google Reviews • 7% back of total purchase in rewards dollars to spend in-store. Join our VIP Membership for special perks • 20% off first visit, 30% off second visit, 40% off third visit off one of your selected items! • Present this ad in store or on delivery and you will get a Free Gift!!!

SCAN TO TRY THE ERBA APP FOR ONLINE ORDERING MADE SIMPLE! Monday - Sunday 8AM - 10PM 805-742-8787 www.erbamarkets.com/erba-lompoc 1101 East Ocean Ave, Lompoc CA, 93436 License # C10-0000374-LIC

20

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Leonard Earl Atkins Francis John Shields, known to his friends and family as Frank, Dad, Uncle and Grandpa, was born January 16, 1936 in Cheboygan, Michigan. He passed away in his home in Desert Hot Springs on August 23, 2022, after a hard-fought battle with esophageal cancer. He was in the presence of his family. Frank was a devout Catholic. He played basketball for Aquinas College and graduated from the University of Detroit with a BSEE in Electrical Engineering. Frank worked as an electrical engineer. He designed memory controller chips and supported the guidance system for the Apollos in the 1960’s and 1970’s. He was also a chip designer for the Onstar system. Frank married Celine Knowlton in Kalamazoo Michigan in 1958, and had 4 children: Mark, Mary, Paul, and David. After graduating from U of D he was employed by General Motors and worked/lived in Milwaukee and the Boston area prior to moving to California in the early 60’s. Celine passed away at the age of 32 from leukemia in Santa Ana, California. Frank married Robin (Rodgers) in 1970, and had a fifth child, John. Frank and Robin loved to go camping, read maps, drive across the country, feed birds and listen to music. Frank especially loved to complete puzzles, enjoyed all sports and read voraciously. Frank is survived by Robin, his wife of 52 years, his brother Tom, his children Mark, Mary (Lawry), Paul, David and John and his 16 grandchildren. He loved his family. He will be missed greatly by all. Memorial will be held Tuesday November 15, 10am @ Goleta Beach.

11/21/1926 - 8/15/2022

Leonard “Len” Earl Atkins of Santa Barbara, CA passed away on August 15, 2022, at the age of 95 from end stage Alzheimer’s disease. He is survived by his wife Jane for 66 years, five sons, and grandchildren. Len’s life began with a keen interest in music, playing many musical instruments with amazing skill, favoring the piano and marimba which he continued to do all his life. After serving in World War 2, Len studied religion and education at the University of Southern California and graduated with a master’s degree in education. Leonard’s life was dedicated to helping others. Len taught elementary students, students with disabilities at Hillside House, and students with behavioral problems at Devereux. Len was a member and leader of many clubs and organizations such as Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts of America, Kiwanis Club, March of Dimes, Board of Directors for “Work Inc”, Recording Books for the Blind, Rehabilitation Center at Cottage Hospital, and served as a Santa Barbara City Parks, Fire, and Police Commissioner. His cheery, friendly, helpful nature was a joy to his family and everyone he met, as was the music he played, the comics he drew, the puzzles he created, and all he did to impart knowledge and make life more enjoyable. Len was a true renaissance man…artist, musician, teacher, husband, and father. He will be missed. Services will be held privately with his family.


Opinions

CONT’D

Vote Yes on Measure B

voices

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

Endorsed by the...

COURTESY CITY OF GOLETA

The Penny Tax Stays in Goleta for Roads, Safety, and Clean Beaches

“...we think that the whole county will benefit greatly by keeping Marybeth Carty on the County Board of Education.”

Additional endorsements... SB Democratic Central Committee SB Women’s Political Committee SB Democratic Women Planned Parenthood Central Coast

I

BY PAULA PEROTTE f you care about Goleta’s future, please join

me in voting YES on Measure B on this year’s ballot. I’ve lived in Goleta for more than 40 years with my husband, Peter, raising our children — and helping with our parents and grandchildren — in this community we love. Committed to the wellbeing of the Goodland, I’ve served on many boards, including First 5, the Santa Barbara Area Safety Committee, the Santa Barbara Metropolitan Transit District, Home for Good, numerous PTAs, and for the past 12 years on the Goleta City Council, including the last four years as mayor. Along the way, I’ve learned so much about the key issues our city faces when it comes to public safety, roads and infrastructure, housing affordability and homelessness, the environment, and more. To be clear, I am not speaking out as Mayor, nor on behalf of the City Council or the City of Goleta, even though four of our five councilmembers support Measure B. I am speaking as a committed, informed Goleta resident who wants to see Goleta receive sufficient revenue in order to serve our residents’ and businesses’ basic needs that are currently way underfunded. There are two main reasons Goleta needs more revenue to preserve our city’s character and safety. The first is the backlog of key projects. For example, we need more than $6.5 million annually just to maintain our roads in their current condition, and even more to improve them. In addition to the $8 million we have already secured for earthquakeproofing and structural issues, our Goleta Community Center will need several millions more to update basics such as heating and cooling systems, wiring, sound systems, bathrooms, and parking lot. And we need nearly $2 million for increased police service costs. To keep parks, creeks and beaches, and community spaces clean and safe, we’ll need more than $2 million more. The second is that Goleta suffered major losses of revenue. The pandemic slowed our economy and tax receipts. We lost millions in State Redevelopment

funds, such as the $10 million Goleta had to spend to end Old Town flooding. And as most everyone knows, as a condition of becoming a city 20 years ago, Goleta had to agree to give up one-third of our sales tax and 50 percent of our property tax each year to the county, $7 million now and rising forever into the future. Did you know that, currently, our sales tax is the lowest of any city in the county? Ours is 7.75 percent while Santa Barbara, Santa Maria, Lompoc, and other cities are 8.75 percent or even higher. So we bring in fewer sales tax dollars than our sister cities. Measure B is the answer to addressing our backlog and our revenue shortfall. It would add just one percent to our current sales tax — a mere penny per dollar! If passed, Measure B would raise $10.6 million per year, all of which would go to Goleta and none to the county. It’s likely that nearly half of the added revenue would come from the many nonresidents who shop here (and who already pay 8.75 percent or more when they shop at home). It’s important to note that the tax wouldn’t go into effect until 2024, by which time the economy should be much improved and inflation down. Also, essential expenses like gas, groceries, and medicines would not be subject to the tax at all. The newly generated revenue is expected to focus on several key areas: public safety to deal with local crime and support firefighting; roads and infrastructure; recreation needs; and for protecting our creeks, watersheds, and coast, to keep our beaches safe and clean for our families. Goleta has grown quickly, and it has been a challenge to provide the infrastructure and services that the city needs to serve our increasing population and businesses in a fiscally responsible way. Raising our sales tax just a penny on the dollar, just as other local cities have done, will enable us to stop “kicking the can” down the road in providing good roads, public safety, and safe and clean beaches. I ask you to join me in supporting Measure B by voting YES when your ballot arrives in October. Let’s give Goleta the revenue it needs to continue to be the Goodland! n

HTTP://MARYBETHCARTY.NET EXPERIENCE . INTEGRITY. COMMUNITY AD PAID FOR BY: MARYBETH CARTY FOR SBC BOARD OF EDUCATION 2022 JEN COOPER/TREASURER.226 E CANON PERDIDO #D.SANTA BARBARA.CA 93101

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

21


Prospective students and families, join us!

O PE N HO U SE

RSVP and view all admissions events on our website!

Sunday, October 16th 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Take a tour, Hear from students & parents, Speak with teachers & coaches, Enjoy a taco lunch! "Mini-sessions" will cover info on the following topics: Personalized Tuition Model College Counseling Program Course Placement Process

Your Journey. Our Mission.

Faculty & Student Q & A Panel 12 p.m.

4000 La Colina Road

Santa Barbara

805.967.1266

www.bishopdiego.org

“Spectacular, uplifting music in the grand style of a Rodgers & Hammerstein or Lerner & Loewe Musical.” — Chris Daniels, The Show Report

DIRECTED BY FOUR TIME TONY WINNER

COREY BRUNISH STARRING

MATTHEW PATRICK DAVIS, DEBORAH ROBIN AND MARY MILLBEN

OCTOBER 12th - 23rd EVENINGS 7:30 MATINEES 1:30 At Center Stage Theater

751 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT CENTER STAGE Theater Box Office W, Th, F or at CenterStageTheater.org or at TheLincolnsofSpringfield.com 22

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


Cover S t o r y

Celebrating 150 Years

of Stearns Wharf The Past and Present of One of California’s Last Working Wooden Piers

W

hether you venture there once a year with visiting friends or

Saturday's Birthday Bash

frequent its wooden walkways every day, Stearns Wharf serves as both the symbol and soul of Santa Barbara. It offers the most picturesque place to view back upon our city, providing new memories for countless tourists and locals every day, and yet it’s also central to the modern Santa Barbara we know and love—without Stearns Wharf, many of our buildings would not exist, nor would our still-thriving fishing culture and economically crucial hospitality scene. To celebrate its 150th anniversary, we present this collection of stories for you to enjoy. Tyler Hayden explores the wharf ’s history, Matt Kettmann provides a rundown of the businesses that exist today, and Terry Ortega offers a memoir of growing up with Stearns as a frequent place of fun.

C ARL PERRY

The 150th birthday bash for Stearns Wharf is on Saturday, October 8, 11 a.m.-7:15 p.m. There are tall ship cannon battles, a regatta, live music, history talks, an opera performance, face-painting, scavenger hunts, boat rides, a clam chowder competition, fireworks, and plenty of deals planned for the celebration. See all the details at stearnswharf.org.

The Man Who Opened Santa Barbara’s Front Door John Peck Stearns Transformed a Sleepy Adobe Town into a Bustling American City

W

by Tyler Hayden

COURTESY

hen John Peck Stearns, an East Coast transplant, proposed building a wharf in Santa Barbara, “people generally made it a fashion to regard him as a dreamer and a fool,” a journalist wrote at the time. “It was the theory, widely held, that a wharf would not stand up under the assaults of waves and wind, and that the man who would put his money into it was simply sinking it into the sea.” But Stearns would not be deterred, and in 1872, using redwood from Santa Cruz, a crew out of Hueneme, and a loan from Col. W.W. Hollister, he built the structure that brought vibrant commerce and throngs of visitors to Santa Barbara and transformed it from a sleepy adobe town to a bustling John Peck Stearns American city. Stearns was born in 1828, a member of one of the oldest lineages in Massachusetts, who traced their roots to 1630 English immigrants. Large families seemed to run in the Stearns households—his father was the 23rd child in his family, and Stearns was the 11th in his own.

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

23


3.50

%

APY1

4-MONTH CD

For a limited time, earn a guaranteed interest rate with a CD (certificate of deposit). A $10,000 minimum balance is required. To get started, contact the Preferred Banking Office nearest you or scan the QR code to learn more.

firstrepublic.com/CD

Santa Barbara, 1200 State Street, (805) 560-6883

1 Offer is subject to change without notice and applies for one term only. Annual percentage yield (APY) is effective as of publication date. Penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal. $10,000 minimum balance required. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender

Celebrate

150TH ANNIVERSARY Join us to celebrate this iconic Santa Barbara structure that has served as a focal point to the community for years. In honor of its 150th anniversary, please share a photo, new or old, of your favorite memories at Stearns Wharf. All photo submissions will be entered in a giveaway to win passes to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History and Sea Center. Photo submissions are open through Wednesday, November 2.

INDEPENDENT.COM/STEARNSWHARF

24

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

COURTESY

At age 22, like so many young men back then, Stearns headed west, first settling in Illinois before pulling up stakes and moving to California during the Gold Rush. But unlike his contemporaries, Stearns ignored the lure of precious metal and became a teacher while taking up the study of law. After passing the bar, he was elected to two terms as District Attorney for Santa Cruz County and, toward the end of the Civil War in the 1860s, was appointed an assistant assessor by the federal government. In 1867, for reasons unclear, Stearns forsook his budding career and relocated with his wife, Martha, to Santa Barbara to open the county’s first lumber yard, situated on the southwest corner of State and Haley streets. Perhaps he heard the region was ripe for settling, and that it was experiencing an early building boon. The city’s population at the time was around 1,500, with about 500 American residents and the rest of Spanish, Mexican, and Chumash descent. Though his business venture quickly proved successful, something irked Stearns. The 500-foot Chapala Street Wharf, which had recently opened, was too short for large ships to tie up, and big pieces of cargo — like lumber — were simply thrown overboard and floated with lines to shore. The process was lengthy, laborious, and often damaged the wood. Stearns also didn’t appreciate paying lighterage fees. Passengers, too, had difficulty making land. They had to be rowed to shore, and depending on the weather and skill of the ferriers, sometimes ended up in the drink. Stearns initially tried to persuade the Chapala operators to extend their wharf, even offering to pay for the work, but he was rebuffed. So he took matters into his own hands and approached Hollister, Santa Barbara’s leading philanthropist and businessman, “who had great faith in Mr. Stearns’s vision and judgment,” a reporter from the era stated. Hollister loaned Stearns $41,000 to build a 1,600-foot wharf with an agreed payment schedule of $500 a month for seven years. Despite major storms, heavy damage from one of Santa Barbara’s only recorded tornadoes, and other disasters — like when a Chinese junk in rough seas crashed through the wharf, tearing nearly half of it away — he never missed a payment. He also cut freight weights in half. “Of course the wharf was a success and made money from the start,” another historical account says. It put the Chapala Street Wharf out of business, “and then a queer trait of human nature manifested itself — the people who had been calling Stearns a fool began showing their envy and jealousy because of his success. It became the fashion to knock him as hard as it had been to poke fun at his plans.” The ill will culminated in the Board of Supervisors slapping a $50 monthly fee on the wharf. Stearns was outraged. “I’ll never pay it!” he famously declared. When another storm ripped away dozens of pilings and rendered the wharf inoperable, Stearns refused to make the repairs until the fee was rescinded. Feeling pressure from panicked merchants and city officials, the supervisors eventually buckled. The lumber that flowed into Santa Barbara would soon replace adobe and brick as Santa Barbara’s building material of choice. When the train arrived, Stearns built a rail wyre where the Sea Center now stands so freight could be loaded and unloaded from schooners directly onto flatcars without skipping a beat. But it was hardly just goods and materials that Stearns Wharf brought to the city. It also brought people. Droves of them. Before it was built, and before the train tracks were laid, the only practical way in and out of the region was by stagecoach, a long and dusty journey. Large coastal steamers could now park right at Santa Barbara’s

doorstep, which they did on an almost daily basis. A well-read book published in 1872 — California for Health, Pleasure and Residence: A Book for Travellers and Settlers by Charles Nordhoff — was also a major windfall for the city. “Santa Barbara is on many accounts the pleasantest of all the places I have named; and it has an advantage in this, that one may there choose his climate within a distance of three or four miles of the town,” Nordhoff wrote. “It has a very peculiar situation…. Santa Barbara faces directly south … with the sea and lovely islands in front of it and a range of mountains to the north…. Santa Barbara temperature is not extreme.” The wharf was by no means Stearns’s only venture. Along with Hollister, he helped found Santa Barbara College. He was very active in the Congregational Church, Masonic order, and Republican Party, becoming a delegate to the national convention. In 1888, he was elected mayor of Santa Barbara. Among the reforms he pushed through was putting the city’s first uniformed police on the streets. Stearns also got heavily involved in journalism. He became owner of the Santa Barbara Press when its owner was shot to death by an enraged reader. Stearns retired as president of the Stearns Wharf Company in 1898, after which he moved to Sonora to be near his daughter. He died there in 1902 at the age of 74 but was buried in his adopted hometown at the Santa Barbara Cemetery. Of course, the wharf continued on, slowly evolving from a site of heavy industry to one of tourism and leisure. It closed to the public for a time during World War II, and in 1944, a Hollywood syndicate including actor James Cagney bought the property for around $200,000. That era was short-lived, however, when the group discovered necessary repairs would cost more than the purchase price and would require more than 10 million board-feet of lumber. Santa Barbara furniture dealer Leo Saunders then purchased the wharf franchise, which by that point had grown to include two restaurants and a yacht club. Saunders frequently clashed with the city over sewer discharge that polluted nearby beaches, and in 1955, he relinquished control to a new group of buyers that included fishing magnate George Castagnola. Then, the oil industry arrived. But the 1969 spill, and a later fire that destroyed the Harbor Restaurant, conspired to close the wharf for nearly a decade. It reopened in 1981 under the auspices of the City of Santa Barbara, which runs it to this day. More than a million people now visit Stearns’s legacy every year, one of the oldest working wooden wharfs in California. And though its days as a shipping hub are over, memories of that era endure. “There is a fascination about the ships that never palls,” resident and Stearns Wharf stockholder Frank Smith said in 1922. “I like to be around the wharf and see the lumber schooners come in and unload and go on their way again. The wharf has been a very large part of my life, and it is a good deal like home to me.”

Special thanks to Neal Graffy, Michael Redmond, the Santa Barbara Historical Museum, and the City of Santa Barbara’s Waterfront Department for their contributions to this article.


Explore the Storefronts of Stearns Wharf

THANK YOU To our sponsors + guests for making MOXI@Night 2022 a success! Your generosity will help fund MOXI’s STEAM education + accessibility initiatives, opening doors to limitless creativity + exploration for ALL.

Supernova

Retailers, Restaurateurs, and Other Pros Who Work Above the Water Every Day

T

by Matt Kettmann

hough millions visit each year, only a dozen establish-

ments serve the crowds at Stearns Wharf. Here’s a brief introduction to them all, and an invitation to head out onto the planks to learn more about their shops, centers, and menus.

Deep Sea Winery C ARL PERRY

Deep Sea pours the Conway family’s lineup of wines in flights or by-theglass and -bottle. “Our unique spot makes us the only tasting room in Santa Barbara that offers 360-degree views of the Pacific coastline, Channel Islands, Santa Barbara Harbor, and the Riviera,” said Gillian Conway, who opened her spot in 2011 (and recently expanded to the Ventura Harbor). “Going to work every day and looking out over the Deep Sea's Gillian Conway ocean never gets old. Every day, it’s slightly different, depending on the weather, but rain or shine, it’s always gorgeous.” It’s a workout hauling cases of wine up to their second-story spot, but there’s a bonus to the location that many don’t realize. “If you are kayaking or paddle-boarding by, you can call us and order a bottle of wine to-go,” said Conway. “We will lower a bottle of wine down to your vessel using a rope from our deck!” You may not be the only one trying to get close. “Last summer, a gray whale swam directly under the wharf and stayed to hang out for most of the day,” she said. “This was such an incredible sight. Everyone gathered around to watch him splashing in the water. We called it Wine and Whale Watching. I will never forget that!”

Anniversary Deal: Spend $150 on wines and get two flights for free. See conwayfamilywines.com conwayfamilywines.com..

S.B. Sea Center First opened in 1986, the Sea Center is “a highly interactive regional aquarium offering close encounters with marine animals from the Santa Barbara Channel,” explained Director Richard Smalldon, who likes the combination of being surrounded by the ocean and meeting new people from around the world every day. “It can take some effort to get out here, but the views are so worth it.” Part of the Museum of Natural History, the Center is involved in all sorts of projects, including the White Abalone Recovery Consortium. “We are working to save and restore the population of critically endangered white abalone along the California coast,” said Smalldon.

Anniversary Fun: The Sea Center is hosting an informational scavenger hunt, and participants will earn a special marine-themed prize. See sbnature.org/visit/sea-center sbnature.org/visit/sea-center..

Davies Charitable Trust Kay McMillan + Susan McMillan The Wolf Family The Wood-Claeyssens Foundation

Galactic

Solar

Marcia + John Mike Cohen Julianna + Tom Dain Lynda Fairly Lucky One Foundation, Lillian Hahn Irma + Morrie Jurkowitz Jill + Neil Levinson Alixe + Mark Mattingly Jillian + Pete Muller

David Bermant Foundation Melinda Goodman Kemp + Robert Kemp Lampson Team at Homeowner’s Financial Group Montecito Bank & Trust Mosher Foundation Union Bank Ventura Rental Party & Events

Signature Cocktail

Silent Disco

Nancy + Mike Sheldon

Laura + Geof Wyatt

Lunar

AB design studio Kelly + Kevin Almeroth Donna Barranco Fisher + Dr. Robert J. Kammer Bartlett, Pringle & Wolf Jill + Chad Chase ExxonMobile Hotel Californian Kopf Family Morgan Stanley Yvonne Rochon Pediatric Dentist Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Foundation David Tisdale Carrie Towbes + John Lewis Vivi + Paul Tziouvaras Andrew + Jill Winchester

Stellar

American Riviera Bank Bank of America Bella Vista Designs Inc. Carol + Alan Brumberger Channel Wealth, Justin Anderson Cutler’s Artisan Spirits Robin Gose + Chris Mosier HUB International Insurance Services Inc. Richard + Andrea Hutton Joel + Doreen Ladin Matthew Lloyd + Nini Muñoz Amy + Dan Meisel @NIGHT Riviera Ridge School Ginger Salazar + Brett Matthews Anne Smith Towbes Janis + Bill Spracher

Additional Support

Amber Weir Events BlueStar Parking Dan Encell Wine Demetria Wine Flair Project Foley Wines Lumen Wines Margerum Wine Company Seasons Catering The Silent DJ Stensland Design

@NIGHT

125 STATE STREET | SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 | 805.770.5003 | DEVELOPMENT@MOXI.ORG | MOXI.ORG

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER @NIGHT

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER

The City of Santa Barbara has two vacancies for Civil Service Commissioner. This is a volunteer position appointed by the City Council to serve on a panel of 5 commissioners. The Civil Service Comission hears and determines appeals involving the suspension, removal or dismissal of classified City employees. Though duties are primarily related to disciplinary hearings, the Commissioners must be qualified electors of the city of Santa Barbara. Application and additional information regarding this exciting opportunity are available using the QR Code. Applications are due by October 10, 2022. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

25


TRI-COUNTIES’ PREMIER EMPLOYMENT LAW FIRM ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS OBTAINED OVER TWO HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS ($200,000,000.00) FOR CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEES IN CASES INVOLVING: · UNPAID OVERTIME · SEXUAL HARASSMENT · WRONGFUL TERMINATION · WHISTLEBLOWERS · DISABILITY · UNPAID MINIMUM WAGE · MISCLASSIFICATION OF INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS · MEAL AND REST VIOLATIONS · LEAVES OF ABSENCE ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS REPRESENTED BOTH EMPLOYEES AND EMPLOYERS FOR OVER 43 YEARS. EMPLOYEES – NO FEES UNLESS WE OBTAIN A JUDGMENT OR SETTLEMENT ON YOUR BEHALF. EMPLOYERS – IF YOU HAVE EMPLOYEES, YOU WANT OUR FIRM ON YOUR SIDE.

Workplace Law and Related Litigation on Behalf of Employees and Employers Santa Barbara · Ventura · San Luis Obispo (805) 845-0864 · anticounilaw.com

THE PIANOS ARE HERE! PIANOS PAINTED BY: Giovanna Alyssandra Jennifer Chan Christian Hali Mina Haitsuka Katreece Montgomery Mountain View Elementary School (with artist Mandy Philips) Permatint Collective Dez “Deadstxle” Porter Brittany Ragan Irene Rinta Richard Stokes

10am - 10pm

PA R T N E R S :

AR

BARB TA

A

NCE

19 3

6

BOWL

P I A N O S O N S T A T E . C O M THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

S.B. Shellfish Company One of the most classic places to enjoy seafood on the planet, the Shellfish Company started as a fish market back in 1979 by the father-and-son team of Tom and Adam White. “We specialize in serving locally caught and sustainable shellfish,” said General Manager Sean Johnson, who’s enjoyed “dealing with the local fishermen over the years — a cast of colorful characters, for sure.” He’s also had plenty of fond rainy-day memories listening to Pink Floyd on the speakers, and he will never forget the time that waves crashed through the windows of Moby Dick next door during a storm. “The salty air takes a toll on all of the restaurant equipment — it’s a lot like working on a boat,” said Johnson as a hassle of wharf life, but they persevere. “Our team moves faster than any other restaurant staff west of the Mississippi!”

Moby Dick Restaurant

SI

26

Judi Bruskin of Nature's Own Gallery

Anniversary Deal: $1.50 cups of clam chowder. See shellfishco.com shellfishco.com..

S AN

P R O G R A M

Judi and Neil Bruskin are the last original shop owners on Stearns Wharf since it was remodeled into a retail and restaurant destination in 1981. “We sell shells, coral, minerals, fossils, gifts, and jewelry from the inexpensive to the exquisite,” said Judi, who said the most challenging aspect is finding a place to park, since vendors aren’t supposed to do so on the wharf itself. Her favorite memory after all these years? “Although I have seen countless beautiful sunsets and moonrises on the wharf, on this particular night, there were both on the same night,” she said. “It was almost comical how the people lucky enough to be there on that night were running back and forth to each side of the wharf trying not to miss the unbelievably stunning sight of both the sunset and the full moon rise. A truly remarkable moment.”

Anniversary Deal: 10 percent off tumbled stones. See stearnswharf.org/natures-own stearnswharf.org/natures-own..

SE HABLA ESPAÑOL

• • • • • • • • • • •

Nature’s Own Gallery

C ARL PERRY

ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA

INDEPENDENT.COM

Moby Dick opened in 1980 as a joint venture between hometown investors. “Without question, the best part of our business is its unique location on the wharf, with commanding views of the coastline, from the S.B. harbor to the city and the mountains behind it, and Montecito,” explained current General Manager Karl Hutterer, who once ran the Museum of Natural History. “After-hour drinks or a meal while looking out at the lights of the harbor and the city are a delight, and seafood seems to taste especially great when you are consuming it sitting over the waters of the Santa Barbara Channel.” It’s not always easy for parking or during storms — especially when they crash through your windows — but it’s a perfect place to

watch Fourth of July fireworks, the Parade of Lights around Christmas, and just general harbor traffic. They also claim to have the best clam chowder in town, as developed by the late, great Al Steinman.

Anniversary Deal: Free clam chowder tastings, with two-for-one prizes awarded to some commenters. See mobydicksb.com mobydicksb.com..

Celebration Cruises This company, which started in 2003, owns the Lil’ Toot harbor ferry, the 70-foot Azure Seas yacht, and Whisper Whisper,, our city’s only allelectric private charter boat, while partnering with S.B. Parasail to offer everything from happy-hour cruises to whale-watching to memorials at sea. “The wharf feels likes one of the few places left in Santa Barbara to have successfully retained its original charm,” said Director of Operations Rebecca Buel. “We love to be a part of what is many times a person’s first time on the water — or even seeing an ocean!” She loves telling the tale of Lil’ Toot: Toot: Formerly known as Captain Red, Red, she was discovered in Newbury Port, Massachusetts, by Captain Fred, who thought it would be perfect for S.B. He even custom-built her bubble machine.

Anniversary Deal: Free rides for kids on Lil’ Toot (with paid adult ticket) on October 8, 10:15 a.m.-4:15 p.m. Book online at celebrationsantabarbara.com.. celebrationsantabarbara.com

Mother Stearns Candy Company and Devil & the Deep Blue Sea “It is a trip back in time to get an all-day sucker, Black Jack gum, and saltwater taffy,” said Barbara Jo Carr, who owns the shop with Jim Carr. Their shop features 72 bins of chewable candies and more than 500 items, including hand-


dipped chocolates, fudge of various flavors, caramel apples, and popcorn. They also own Devil & the Deep Blue Sea, a gift and souvenir shop that opened in 1988. “We have a wild selection of magnets and shot glasses but want to stress the work of our local artists,” said Barbara Jo, explaining that their work includes jewelry, notecards, books, Christmas ornaments, soap, purses, clothing, walking sticks, and wind chimes.

“We lost the weight for our kids.”

witness all the “hard-working and dedicated night-shift Waterfront workers taking care of the wharf and keeping businesses secure.” See stearnswharf.org/Old-Wharf-Trading stearnswharf.org/Old-Wharf-Trading..

Char West & Great Pacific Ice Cream Co. C ARL PERRY

Minerva and Leonidas had tried everything to lose weight, but nothing worked. Their health was suffering, and it was impacting their daily activities, including playing with their children.

Anniversary Deal: Free taffy samples. See stearnswharf.org/motherstearns & stearnswharf.org/deep-bluesea.. sea

That’s when Minerva reached out to the Cottage Center for Weight Loss Surgery.

Stearns Wharf Bait & Tackle

Since bariatric surgery at Cottage in 2018, Minerva and Leonidas have lost a combined 250 pounds.

Family-owned by Reggie Drew since 2005, this small shop rents and sells fishing gear and supplies, fueling the anglers who work the end planks of the pier — but they’re also pretty popular for their apparel. “The best part is meeting Santa Barbara visitors from all over the world,” said Drew, and, of course, “Being able to witness guests of all ages reel in their first catch!”

To learn more about weight-loss surgery, visit cottagehealth.org/weightloss

Anniversary Deal: “Check us out all weekend for daily deals!” said Drew. See stearnswharffishing.com stearnswharffishing.com.. Char West's Francisco Aguilera

Madame Rosinka In 1951, Madame Rosinka began offering her palm-reading services to Santa Barbara, and her family’s spiritual consultancy is a mysterious icon of sorts for anyone who peers upon its door. (Or the one on East Canon Perdido Street.) Today, Madame Rosinka is the daughter of the original, but the services remain the same, focused on palm and psychic readings for both those who deeply believe and those who just want to be entertained. “It’s a family business that’s been going through the generations,” said the Madame, who’s typically there from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, running sessions that run from 30 minutes to an hour. “People come in and we give readings that are based on helping people get some clarity.” See stearnswharf.org/Madame-Rosinka stearnswharf.org/Madame-Rosinka..

Old Wharf Trading Co. / Topside Clothing While Old Wharf Trading Co. originally opened in 1978, Patrick Hartmann took over this “largest general merchandiser on the wharf ” in 2006. “We carry a curated selection of merchandise that we make an effort to keep pricing affordable for families,” said Hartmann, who is “fiercely loyal” to his employees, some of whom have been there since before he took over. He’s regularly delighted to arrive at his shop at 3 a.m. to

Francisco Aguilera’s eateries sell burgers, tacos, and “the yummiest fish and chips this side of the English Channel,” plus 32 flavors of ice cream and sherbets.

Anniversary Deal: Free chowder tasting noon-4 p.m. See stearnswharf.org/char-west stearnswharf.org/char-west..

The Harbor Restaurant & Longboards Fish importer Eugenio “Gene” Sanchez and restaurateur Francisco Ibanez bought this iconic property earlier this year. The Los Angeles–based friends, who are both originally from Chile, are preparing big plans, including a nightlife-focused tapas lounge, coffee bar, and gelato shop while updating both The Harbor’s fine-dining scene and Longboards’ casual burgers-and-beers vibe. “I import seafood from all over the world and sell from San Diego to San Francisco,” said Sanchez. “I am bringing all this expertise to have the best possible seafood at the restaurant.” Ibanez, meanwhile, has nearly 30 years of restaurant experience, with multiple locations in L.A. “The combination of both of our expertise is going to show very soon in what we are going to be doing with this building,” said Sanchez. “We will have a lot of different venues for everybody to enjoy.”

Make A Poem Cry: Creative Writing From California’s Lancaster Prison FREE PUBLIC EVENT

Speakers: Kenneth E. Hartman and Luis J. Rodríguez

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13 | 4:00 PM McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB Visit bit.ly/Poem-IHC for more information

Anniversary Deal: Free chowder tasting noon-4 p.m. See harborsb.com harborsb.com.. n INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

27


TSA IS NOW HIRING Positions starting at $21.38 per hour* Transportation Security Officers

Increase Your Value , Use Your Network & Negotiate to Get What You’re Worth

Free for AWC Members Non-Members: $25

A panel discussion led by Patricia Schwartz

with Amy Ramos and Luz Reyes-Martin

Wed, Oct 12th at 5:30 p.m.

351 Paseo Nuevo, Floor 2

for info and to register go to awcsb.org

What We Do Matters

at Santa Barbara Municipal Airport TSA offers great federal benefits: retirement plans health insurance paid on-the-job training

shift differentials pay increases in six months career growth potential

Apply online at

jobs.tsa.gov

Register at sbhra.org under Events Calendar! COME

JOIN

SBHRA

US

IN

SPEAKER

OCTOBER

PERSON! SERIES

20TH

11:30AM-1:00PM MARMONTE

PST

HOTEL

GUEST SPEAKER: CHARLES FELTMAN, AUTHOR OF ‘THIN BOOK OF TRUST: AN ESSENTIAL PRIMER FOR BUILDING TRUST AT WORK’ ‘A MUST READ THAT IS ACTIONABLE AND MEANINGFUL’ … GUEST SPEAKER ON BRENE BROWN’S PODCAST. WIN-WIN, ATTEND AND GIVE BACK TO SHRM FOUNDATION. LET’S MAKE A HR DIFFERENCE TOGETHER!

Members: $30 Non-members: $45 U.S. citizenship required. Equal opportunity employer. *Pay rate varies by location.

28

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


OCT 6-23

MY LIFE

Childhood Days on the Wooden Planks S.B. MARITIME MUSEUM

by Terry Ortega

armen C ones J The Beloved Opera—Reimagined

BOOK AND LYRICS BY

Oscar Hammerstein II MUSIC BY

Georges Bizet DIRECTED BY

Jonathan Fox

www.etcsb.org 805-965-5400

33 W Victoria St | Santa Barbara etcsb.org | 805.965.5400

SANTA BARBARA’S PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANY

M

y family has been in Santa Barbara since the late 1840s, so it’s quite possible that one or more of my ancestors strolled on Stearns Wharf in 1872, the year it was built. My grandparents and parents loved the waterfront, so my family spent many days walking the breakwater and swimming near the wharf. We also went on drives that invariably included stops at Shoreline Park, Thousand Steps, the Bird Refuge, and a drive onto the pier. My parents, sisters, and grandparents — seven of us in all — would squeeze into our burgundy Chevy Malibu and take off, with the windows rolled down and none of us wearing seat belts. When we drove onto the pier, I always stuck my head out the window and watched the sand below the wooden planks become dark water, a sight that caused me to scream every single time. My dad would drive extra slow, the tires would thump over every board and uneven spot, and my stomach would flip because my very young self was convinced that the weight of the car would cause the pier to collapse and plunge us into the water below. After surviving my near-death experience, we would walk along the boards, surrounded by the unmistakable smells of the sea and fish. I always peeked in the windows of Madame Rosinka’s mysterious parlor, fascinated by the crystal ball, magic crystals, and the statue of a palm with lines and

“heart,” “head,” and “fate” written on it, but what I most wanted to see was the fortuneteller herself. I remember selecting pieces of saltwater taffy from different bins in the candy store, but my favorite thing to do was to watch the crabs and lobsters bounce around the tanks in the window of what is now the S.B. Shellfish Company. I wondered if they were happy in there or if they had any inkling of what was going to happen to them. I never once thought of them as food. Our strolls would take us to the end of the pier to see if the anglers had caught anything. My sisters and I tried to get as near as we could to pelicans and gulls, and we dared to sidle as close to the edge as possible. Sadly, our visits to the wharf stopped in 1969 when the oil spill happened. I remember seeing pelicans and seagulls covered in oil on TV. We still visited the pier, but now it was mainly to see the progress of the rebuilding. The soles of our feet would be covered with tar. By the time the wharf had been rebuilt, I was 15 years old. Stearns Wharf has been a constant source of joy in my life and today remains a magical place to me, replete with sweet memories of life with parents and grandparents, sisters, my own children, and continued walks with my husband of 30 years. I haven’t driven on the wharf since 1969, but I still get a piece of taffy now and again, watch the pelicans, and wonder if the lobsters in the tanks are the ones I used to know.

OCT 15 -16, 2022

AIRSHOW PERFORMERS • USAF F-35 DEMO TEAM • RED BULL AIR FORCE

Santa Maria Public Airport

• PLANES OF FAME WARBIRDS • AND MORE!

CentralCoastAirFest.com

n

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

29


Santa Ynez Chumash & 50+ Tribes urge:

NO on Prop 27

NOProp27.com Ad paid for by Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians

30

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

best of Santa barbara 2022

®

PUBLISHES

OCTOBER 20, 2022

E A R LY A DV E RT I S I N G DEADLINES T H U R S DAY, O C T O B E R 13 @ NOON

Contact your Advertising representative at Advertising@ independent.com Santa Barbara


Mountain Drive: Still Alive NEELY FAMILY COLLECTION, GLEDHILL LIBRARY, S.B. HISTORIC AL MUSEUM

F E AT U R E

Historical Museum Explores Santa Barbara’s Bohemian Rhapsody by Nick Welsh Ervin’s “Eureka!” moment came when the granddaughter of a Mountain Drive settler called, asking to hear her grandmother’s oral history. Ervin quickly discovered there was not just one oral history in storage but a whole box of Mountain Drive oral histories totaling about 30 hours. “It jumped out at me as something special,” he said. “It hit me in the face.” At the same time, higher-ups within the museum — better known for its ultra-traditional approach to local history — had been encouraging Ervin to try something edgier. With this unexpected find, he was only too happy to oblige. Out of all this has come the exhibit opening at the museum October 6, bringing the much-mythologized Mountain Drive community — off the grid before there was even a grid to be off of — back from the ashes out of which it sprang. The guiding hand behind Mountain Drive was Bobby Hyde, a writer and utopian experimenter who extolled the virtues of living in and with nature with a passion bordering on the erotic. Hyde bought the land — then 50 acres of firecharred chaparral — for a song in 1940. After World War II, he and his wife and co-conspirator, Floppy Hyde, began looking for like-minded spirits who might fit into the brave

S. B. HI ST OR IC

LI BR AR Y,

DR IV E PA PE RS , GL ED HI LL

new world they had in mind. Hyde con-nected with GIs returning from World War II who were enrolling in classes at Santa Barbara College, then located on the Riviera. Those with whom he clicked were offered one-acre lots for unheardof-low down payments of $50, coupled with $50-a-month payments whenever they could afford them. Hyde — who described himself as a sculptor whose tool was a bulldozer — also offered to teach his new neighbors how to make adobe bricks and how to build improvised housing using those bricks in combination with salvaged building materials. Before all was done, about 40 structures would pop up from that steep and rugged landscape. But much more than makeshift homes — there were no building codes yet to constrain their inventive notions of housing — the Hydes set out to create a whole different culture. The Mountain Drivers, as they came to be known, were competent, creative, educated, self-reliant, independent-thinking people. Many were artists. Many had seen action in the war. One — an ophthalmologist with an office in town — was a former fighter pilot. He would design experimental aircraft upon his return. Later, he would also emerge as an evangelical champion of psychedelics. Another vet had been stationed in Berlin, working for military intelligence. That cultural exposure would change him forever, and he would seek to pay that forward by making wine on Mountain Drive and devising multiple festivities to be celebrated with a maximum of libation and hedonistic abandon. Famously, there were the grape-stomps with their grape-stomp queens — no clothes involved. There was Bastille Day to celebrate, as well as the birthday of Scottish poet Robert Burns, where haggis was served accompanied by as many bagpipers as could be cajoled. There were Renaissance Faires, cultural precursors to the Summer Solstice festival. There were the famous Mountain Drive Pot

MO UN TA IN

experiment in Bohemian living still remains lodged on Santa Barbara’s historical horizon, it’s as the orgy — Hot tubs! Wine stomps! Naked people! — most of us never got invited to. But when Chris Ervin took over as archivist of the Santa Barbara Historical Museum nearly four years ago — fresh off the boat from Orange County — he’d never even heard of Mountain Drive, the 50-acre utopian society of creative non-conformists that flourished here between the late 1940s and the early 1970s.

CH IA CO S

T

o the extent Mountain Drive’s exuberant

AL MU SE UM

This Dionysian-themed party scene was filmed for the movie Seconds, starring Rock Hudson, with Movie Wine Queen 1965 Leslie Hill shown in the prop grape vat, surrounded by Mountain Drivers.

Wars — dueling potters competing with each other — that drew such large crowds (3,000 people!) that the fire department felt the need to cancel the event in 1967. Music was everywhere; the drum circle was born on Mountain Drive and a homespun hybrid known as “browngrass” — reflecting the primary color of local vegetation — evolved for those more inclined to picking and fiddling. While not overtly political, Mountain Drivers relished satirical warfare, creating what was known as “The Jack Ash Society” to do battle with the John Birch Society of the early 1960s. The Jack Ashers boasted, for example, of stopping the instruction of the Eskimo language in local schools and of keeping whale blubber out of local butcher shops. Mountain Drive was, to be clear, a fantasy fueled for, of, and by the male imagination. Women were to be barefoot and pregnant or in the kitchen baking bread while the allmale members of the “Sunset Club” congregated to discuss the weighty issues of the day and, of course, drink. And they drank a lot. There was an “over the banks” club for residents who drove their cars over the side of the road after perhaps imbibing too much Pagan wine. The emotional hangovers experienced by children of alcoholics, however, are well-known and far more lasting than the hangovers their parents reckoned with. That was certainly the case for many of the children of the origi original Mountain Drivers. And for teenage girls, the experience of getting groped by drunk older men at a grape-stomp was notably less enjoy enjoyable than it was for those doing the groping. Ervin teamed up with Elias “Lee” Chiacos, who in 1994 wrote what’s still the definitive book on the Mountain Drive experience (Mountain Drive: Santa Barbara’s Pioneer Bohemian Community). Ervin had his gold mine’s worth of oral histories, but no photographs. Chiacos had tons. Somehow, they managed to select 50 for the Memories of Mountain Drive exhibit. For Ervin, the exhibit reflects more than Santa Barbara’s abiding hospitality for communities determined to remain off the beaten path. (Santa Barbara’s Hobo Jungle, the Sunburst community, and the short-lived Monarchy of Christania all come to mind.) Ervin sees it more as a compelling lens through which to view World War II’s impact on Santa Barbara. “A lot of these people were dealing with PTSD [post-traumatic stress disorder] before there was such a thing as PTSD,” he commented. “They’d gone to Europe and came back determined to live life on their terms and not some buttoned-down, conservative, by-the-numbers lifestyle. This is how they dealt with it.”

411

Memories of Mountain Drive is on view at Santa Barbara Historical Museum (136 E. De la Guerra St.) October 6-February 28, 2023. The Museum is open Wednesday-Sunday. Visit sbhistorical.org for hours and more information.

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

31


LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 Just Announced On-sale tomorrow 10.7.22

“Between her expressive, crystalline voice and astounding flat picking guitar skills, Tuttle has made history…” — Rolling Stone Country

Just Announced

NOV 3

Lobero Theatre Chamber Music Project Artistic and Music Director, Heiichiro Ohyama Musical Advisor, Benjamin Beilman

OCT 18

This long-anticipated homecoming concert features local legend Heiichiro Ohyama and three handpicked classical music luminaries – Benjamin Beilman (violin), Lucille Chung (piano), and Edward Arron (cello) – performing selected works by Dvořák and Fauré.

AEG PRESENTS

Vir Das OCT 20

OCT 13 32

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

INDEPENDENT.COM

Los Lobos

Jan 20 - Los Lobos Amplified Jan 21 - Los Lobos Acoustic

Andrew Duhon with Haley Johnsen

New Orleans native Andrew Duhon is a singer/ songwriter with an undeniable voice, both weighted and soulful.

“Duhon brings the craft of a master short story writer to his songs and in doing so creates a series of skillfully rendered vignettes.” – The LA Beat

OCT 28

CAMA PRESENTS

Juilliard String Quartet OCT 24 JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION

Haley Johnsen

¡FLAMENCO! SANTA BARBARA PRESENTS

Navajita Platea Noches de Bohemia and Friends

NOV 4


OCT.

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

6-12

T HE

by

TERRY & VICTORIA ORTEGA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

or email info@independent .com. tinyurl.com/1stThursdaySB

10/6: Art Matters Lecture: Lucia Moholy: Documentary Absurdi Absurdities Jan Tichy, associate professor in the Department of Photography, Art & Technology Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, will share his work and research on the writer and photographer Lucia Moholy. 5:306:30pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $10-$15. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@sbma .net sbma.net/events .net.

10/6: Sullivan Goss Opening Reception: John Nava: Florimar Fredericka Meek

10/6-10/12: Ensemble Theatre Company Presents Carmen Jones This thought-provoking

adaptation of the opera Carmen by Georges Bizet, with new lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, is reset in a parachute factory during 1940s World War II and features an African-American cast. Performances go through October 23. Thu., Tue.-Wed: 7:30pm; Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2 and 7pm. The New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $40-$84. Call (805) 965-5400 or email boxoffice@etcsb. org. Read more on p. 46. etcsb.org

10/6: Gallery Los Olivos Opening Exhibition: 2022 Blooms Take in a collection of plein air and studio paintings from artists Kris Buck and Deborah Breedon showing through October 31. Thu.-Mon.: 10am-5pm. Gallery Los Olivos, 2920 Grand Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 688-7517.

gallerylosolivos.com/events

10/6: The Book Den Celebrates 120 Years Happy birthday, Book Den! Stop by to see exhibits from Book Den history and have refreshments, with bookstore historian Charles Johnson on hand to discuss the Book Den and bookselling in S.B. 5-8pm. 15 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 962-3321. tinyurl.com/BookDen120Yrs

10/6: 1st Thursday Art Walk Stroll through participating galleries and venues that offer free access to visual and performing arts in a fun and social environment with receptions, lectures, wine tastings, and hands-on activities. 5-8pm. Downtown S.B. Free. Call (805) 962-2098

Visit the first solo exhibition in five years for Ojai-based contemporary painter John Nava that marks a return to floral still life, a subject that helped make him one of the country’s most important realist painters. The exhibition shows through November 27. 5-8pm. Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery, 11 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 730-1460.

sullivangoss.com/exhibitions

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

9pm. $18.54. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410. eoslounge.com

10/6: Pearl Social Jon Harris Jazz Trio, 7-9:30pm. 131 Anacapa St., Ste. B. Free.

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

10/6, 10/8: Eos Lounge Thu.: Ranger Trucco, 9pm. $6.18. Sat.: Cassian,

SUNDAY

Call (805) 284-0380.

pearlsocialsb.com/happenings 10/6, 10/8-10/9, 10/11: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Henry Rollins, 8:30pm. $30-$35. Sat.: Shwayze, 9pm. $25-$30. Ages 21+. Sun.:

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

centerstagetheater.org/shows

10/6: In-Person or Live-Stream: Candidate Forum for District 27 State Assembly Candidates Gregg Hart, S.B. County Supervisor representing the 2nd District, previously elected to four terms on the S.B. City Council; and Mike Stoker, who served on the S.B. County Board of Supervisors from 1986-1994, will be asked a list of questions and provided equal time to answer. 6-7:30pm. S.B. Woman’s Club Rockwood, 670 Mission Canyon Rd. Free. Call (805) 965-2422 or email league@lwvsantabarbara.org.

lwvsantabarbara.org Livestream: facebook.com/LWVSB

10/7-10/9: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Just Dave Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: The Regulars, 1-5pm; Tex Pistols, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Teddy Spanke,

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

S.B. Jazz Society featuring the A.C. Trio, 1-4pm. Tue.: ENT Legends presents NOTD with Grey Zeigler, 8pm. $15. Ages 18+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

10/7-10/8: Uptown Lounge Fri.:

10/6-10/8: Wylde Works Thu.: The Helios Collective. Fri.: Glenn Annie. Sat.: Lizardsmouth. 8-10pm. 609 State St. Free. penguin-wrasse-28e3.squarespace .com

10/8: S.B. Bowl Rüfüs Du Sol, 6:30pm. $46-$135. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

sohosb.com/events

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

The Trio, 5-7pm; InStone Duo, 8-11pm. Sat.: Heart & Soul, 8-11pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800.

uptownlounge805.com/events

10/7, 10/9: Arlington Theatre Fri.: Trey Anastasio Band, 7:30pm. $34$71. Sun.: Prince Royce, 7pm. $69-

cfsb.info/sat

FRIDAY 10/7

$369. 1317 State St. Call (805) 963-9580.

thearlingtontheatre.com

10/7-10/8, 10/12: Lost Chord Guitars Fri.: Claudia Nygaard, 8-11:30pm. Free. Sat.: South for Winter, 8-11:30pm. $15. Wed.: Alan Satchwell Jazz Trio, 7:30-9:30pm. Free.

10/6-10/8: DramaDogs, a Theater Company Presents Collected Stories by Donald Margulies Fol-

low the relationship between Ruth (E. Bonnie Lewis), a professor and lauded writer of short stories; and Lisa (Felicia Hall), the graduate student she hires as an assistant who releases her first novel, unknown to Ruth, that is based on Ruth’s life as it ponders questions about consent, appropriation, and the ethics of taking artistic license. Thu.-Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 2 and 7pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. Pay what you want, suggested: $10; GA: $20-$25. Call (805) 963-0408 or email info@center stagetheater.org.

10/7: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Marika & the Ohms, 8-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

1-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez.

WEDNESDAY

1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com

“Barn Owl” by George Leclerc Le Comte de Buffon

10/7: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Lizardsmouth, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

10/7:

Exhibit Openings: A Parliament of Owls: 300 Years of Owl Illustration Did you know that a group of owls is called a “parliament”? Don’t miss this captivating display of original antique prints that traces 300 years of illustration of the owl family in this new exhibit that will show through February 5, 2023. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$18. Call (805) 682-4711. sbnature.org/visit/

Prince Royce

10/10: The Red Piano Carvin Jones, 7:30pm. GA: $25; VIP: $75. 519 State Street. Ages 21+. Call (805) 3581439. theredpiano.com/schedule

SATURDAY 10/8 COURTESY

/6 THURSDAY 10

ZACK MENDEZ

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

calendar

10/7: An Evening with The Wallflowers The Wallflowers, out with 2021’s Exit Wounds, their first album in nine years, will bring their timeless songwriting, storytelling, and alt/indie and classic rock sound to S.B. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $57-$67; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org. lobero.org/

Stearns Wharf 150th Anniversary Celebrate this

important piece of Santa Barbara history with specials offered by merchants, Little Toot water taxi narrated boat rides between the harbor and the wharf, a scavenger hunt, chowder tasting, Yacht Club parade of fleet, face-painting, and live performances from Opera S.B., Tequila Mockingbird, and Double Wide Kings, followed by a convocation and fireworks. Visit the website for the full schedule. 11am-7:15pm. Stearns Wharf, 217 Stearns Wharf. Free. Read more on p. 23. tinyurl.com/StearnsWharfOct8

tinyurl.com/Lil-TootReservation

whats-on

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

10/8:

Volunteer Opportunity

OCTOBER 6, 2022

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

33


SB County Fire Safe Council & UCSB Wildfire Prevention and Policy Lecture Series presents: The Arlington Theatre

Wildfire Preparedness Exposition

Coouunncciill & SSBB CCoouunnttyy FFiirree SSaaffee C &U UC CSSBB W Wiillddffiirree PPrreevveennttiioonnaannddPPoolilcicyyLLecectuturereSSereireisespprerseesnetnst:s:

WildfireBePreparedness Preparedness Exposition Wildfire Exposition Ready, Be Empowered, Be Fire Safe! Be Ready, Be Empowered, Be Fire Safe! Be Ready, Be Empowered, Be Fire Safe!

Friday October Friday October 14th 14th 4:30 4:30 pm pm--7pm 7pm "Why Have Humans Lost Control of "Why Have Humans Lost Control of Wildfire in the Western United States?" Wildfire in the Western United States?"

Saturday October 15th 11am - 5pm Saturday October 15th 11am - 5pm

­

­

Both At Ddays irect at ReDirect lief: 610Relief: 0 Wall6100 ace BeWallace cknell RBecknell oad, GoleRoad, ta CaliGoleta fornia At Direct Relief: 6100 Wallace Becknell Road, Goleta California

Keynote Speaker 4:30 - 5:30 pm, Reception 5:30 pm - 7 pm Keynote Speaker 4:30 - 5:30 pm, Reception 5:30 pm - 7 pm

­

Dr. Park Williams Dr. Park Williams

10/7: AMSTERDAM

10/7: LYLE LYLE CROCODILE

10/7: PRETTY PROBLEMS

10/7: THE STORIED LIFE OF AJ FIKRY

10/13: HALLOWWEN ENDS

Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Fiesta • Fairview

Hitchcock

Fiesta 5

Metro 4 • Camino

Join us for family friendly exhibits, activities, & speakers to learn Join us faobr ofaum &msp t liilvyinfrgieinndwlyildexfihreibtihtsr,eaatcetniveidtiecso,m uenaitkieerss to learn about living in wildfire threatened communities Free pizza, speakers, exhibits, and activities; Spanish translators available Free pizza, speakers, exhibits, and activities; Spanish translators available

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Oct 7 - 13, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

Please visit our website for more information: SBFireSafeCouncil.org

Please visit our website for more information: SBFireSafeCouncil.org/events Please visit our website for more information: SBFireSafeCouncil.org

2022-23 Season Tickets 10/22 On-Sale Now

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Lyle Lyle Crocodile* (PG): Fri: 1:45, 3:40, 6:15, 7:30. Sat: 12:30, 1:45, 3:40, 6:16, 7:30. Sun-Thur: 3:40, 6:15, 7:30. The Woman King (PG13): Fri-Thur: 4:25. Barbarian (R): Fri: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45. Sat: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45. Sun-Thur: 5:15, 7:45.

Wine Tasting & Yacht Tours

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140

October 8, 2022 - 4:00-7:00 pm Come join us for a wonderful evening of wine tasting from local wineries paired with hors d’oeuvres and desserts, while enjoying yachts across Marina 1 in the Santa Barbara Harbor. •Tour amazing motor and sailing yachts •Receive a custom wine glass with each ticket •Enjoy beer and sausage tasting too •Sample hors d'oeuvres, champagne, coffee, and desserts •Bid to win fabulous silent auction items Event Pricing - $80 You must be over 21 to attend. 34

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

In support of Santa Barbara Sea Shells, founded in 1948 to teach children the joy of sailing.

Tickets available at www.sbssa.org INDEPENDENT.COM

Amsterdam* (R): Fri: 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 6:15, 7:45, 9:20. Sat/Sun: 12:05, 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 6:15, 7:45, 9:20. Mon-Wed: 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 6:15, 7:45. Thur: 1:30, 3:10, 4:40, 7:45. Smile (R): Fri-Sun: 1:20, 4:15, 7:05, 9:50. Mon-Thur: 3:00, 5:45, 8:30. Bros* (R): Fri-Wed: 2:20, 5:15, 8:10. Thur: 2:20, Don’t Worry Darling (R): Fri-Sun: 12:55, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40. Mon-Thur: 2:30, 5:25, 8:20. Avatar Re-Release 3D (PG13): Fri--Thur: 12:45, 4:25, 8:00. Halloween Ends* (R): Thur: 5:30, 7:00, 8:10, 9:40.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

The Good House (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Pretty Problems (NR): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:15, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:45, 5:25, 7:45.

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Smile (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:20, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 5:20, 8:15 Avatar Re-Release 3D (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:10. 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:10, 7:45. The Woman King (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:25, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:20, 4:25, 7:30. Pearl (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:30, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 1:40, 5:30, 8:00. Halloween Ends* (R): Thur: 6:05, 7:00, 8:45, 9:40.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Lyle Lyle Crocodile* (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:45, 4:00, 5:20, 6:40, 7:55. Sat/Sun: 12:00, 1:20, 2:45, 4:00, 5:20, 6:40, 7:55. The Storied Life of AJ Fikry (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:20, 4:55, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 11:45, 2:30, 4:55, 7:30. Bros (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:35, 5:30, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 11:50, 2:35, 5:30, 8:15. Barbarian (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 3:05, 5:35, 8:05. Sat/Sun: 12:30, 3:05, 5:35, 8:55.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Amsterdam* (R): Fri: 1:55, 3:25, 5:00, 6:30, 8:05, 9:35. Sat: 12:20,1:55, 3:25, 5:00, 6:30, 8:05, 9:35. Sun: 12:20, 1:55, 3:25, 5:00, 6:30, 8:05. Mon-Wed: 1:55, 3:25, 5:00, 6:30, 8:05. Don’t Worry Darling (R): Fri-Thur: 1:45, 5:20, 8:15. Moonage Daydream (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:15, 4:40, 7:45.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Halloween Ends* (R): Thur: 5:00, 7:45.


T HE 10/8: Women’s March S.B. Join women and allies around the country for a National Day of Action to support reproductive rights for all. Don’t sit back and accept the attacks on women’s bodies, families, and freedom! There will be a voter registration table and Spanish and English translation available. Bring signs or make one on-site. #RALLYTHEVOTE. Noon. Corner of State and Anapamu Sts. Free.

facebook.com/WomenmarchSB facebook.com acebook.com/WomenmarchSB

10/8: Housing Santa Barbara Day 2022 This public event will connect community members with 30+ local affordable-housing nonprofit agencies and service providers. There will be local food vendors, activities for kids and families, music, and local dignitaries. 10am-2pm. De la Guerra Plaza, 8 E. De la Guerra St. Free. Call (805) 897-1049.

presents

4pm. Casa de la Guerra, 15 E. De la Guerra St. $35-$55. Call (805) 260-3223 or email adam@ folkorhcestraSB.com. folkorchestrasb.com

10/8: The 50th Annual S.B. Old-Time Fiddlers’ Festival Join the Goleta Valley Historical Society for all-day entertainment from some of the best old-time bands in the world. Enjoy free banjo and yodeling workshops, jam with musicians, participate in a contest, and try out banjos and fiddles and other old-time instruments at the Instrument Petting Zoo. 10am-5pm. Rancho La Patera & Stow House, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. $5-$20. Call (805) 681-7216 or email hattie@ goletahistory.org. fiddlersfestival.org

SUNDAY 10/9 “Burrowing Owl,” LAX, 2019

10/8: 34th Annual Wine and Yacht Tours Gala Tour motor and sailing yachts and meet the owners, and enjoy beer tasting paired with tasty bites and champagne. Bid on silent auction items with proceeds going toward the S.B. Sea Shells Sailing Association, a family organization fostering healthy, independent children by developing youth sailing skills. 4-7pm. S.B. Harbor Marina 1. $80. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/Wine-Yachts

10/6-10/8: Unite to Light the Night Attend one event or all three from a black-tie, under-the-stars evening to a multisensory art show and dance party or an art workshop for youth and adults along with an immersive art exhibition. Each evening will have a unique artistic program to raise awareness and funding for Unite to Light’s mission of clean, affordable light and energy to improve health, education, and prosperity. Thu.: Glow Gala. Fri.: Bright Bash; Sat.: Community Showcase. 6-10pm. S.B. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. Free. Email email@uniteto-light.org. tinyurl.com/UniteToLight

10/8-10/9: Folk Orchestra S.B. Listen to S.B.’s local 30-piece orchestra play an exciting program of bluegrass and Americana with songs such as “Jerusalem Ridge,”“The Blackest Crow,”“Shady Grove,” and more. Sat.: 6pm. El Presidio Chapel, El Presidio de Santa Bárbara State Historic Park, 123 E. Canon Perdido St. Sun.:

tinyurl.com/Howl-Dijinn

MONDAY 10/10 10/10: Science Pub: California’s Grizzlies In 1848, California contained an estimated 10,000 grizzly bears, and by 1925, all of California’s grizzlies had disappeared. Join UCSB Professor Peter Alagona, PhD, as he discusses the history and possible reintroduction of grizzlies in California. 6:30-8pm. Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 x172 or email jrolle@sbnature2.org.

by Henry Lewis, Henry Shields and Jonathan Sayer

TUESDAY 10/11 COURTESY

10/8: 38th Annual S.B. Vintners Festival Taste wines from 50+ winer-

.com

ence the full moon with inventive cocktails for purchase by mixologist Devon Espinoa. There will be personalized tarot card and rune readings, sounds by Val-Mar Records, and board games. RSVP online. 5-10pm. Djinn, Hotel Californian, 36 State St. Free.

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

housingsantabarbara.org

ies and enjoy regional cuisine from area restaurants, chefs, and food producers. The Bubble Lounge will offer the sparkling wines, live music, and culinary and viticulture demonstrations. Old Mission Santa Inés, 1760 Mission Dr., Solvang. Early entry: noon-4pm, $125. GA: 1-4pm, $75-$95. Vintners Visa Package: $130$160. Designated driver/under age 21: $25. Call (805) 688-0881 or email vf@ sbcountywines.com. sbcountywines

10/9: Howl: Hunter’s Moon Experi-

DIRECTED BY SAUNDRA McCLAIN

OCTOBER 14 -29

PREVIEWS OCTOBER 12 & 13

a t t h e G A R V I N T H E AT R E

www.theatregroupsbcc.com | 805.965.5935

Thank you to our season sponsor:

10/9:

Opening Exhibit Reception: Wildlife on the Edge: Hilary Baker Take a fanciful peek into the secret lives of the wild neighbors that can be hidden in plain view. See new acrylic paintings from Hilary Baker’s Predators series alongside a new series of animal portraits on birch wood. The exhibition will also include video and photography highlighting native wildlife in the urban landscape and information on efforts to improve wildlife habitats and how to better coexist with animals. The exhibition will show through March 6, 2023. 3-5pm. The Wildling Museum of Nature & Art, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call (805) 688-1082. RSVP to lauren@wildlingmuseum.org.

wildlingmuseum.org/exhibitions 10/9: Porsche Club of S.B.: 44th Concours d’Elegance View cars from vintage to modern with proceeds going toward local charities. Learn about the Porsche Club while you’re there. 9am-2pm. SBCC West Campus Lawn, 721 Cliff Dr. Free. Email sbrconcourschair@gmail.com.

tinyurl.com/PCA-SBR 10/9: Sunday Morning Live: Ed Begley Jr. Ed Begley Jr. will be honored by ECO Team and will speak in conversation with ECO Team founder and author Barbara Greenleaf about his personal journey as a sustainableliving activist who promotes earth-friendly ideas and products and discuss his 50-year Hollywood career. Breakfast: 8:45am; speaker: 9:45am. Congregation B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Rd. Free. Call (805) 964-7869.

tinyurl.com/EdBegleyJr

LIVE CAPTIONING Sun. Oct. 16 Matinee

10/11:

Full Moon Yoga & Sound Bath at the Carousel House S.B. Beach Yoga and

OCTOBER 7 - 13

instructors Carina Murillo and Danielle Elese invite all levels to experience deep relaxation through guided movement and sound in a beautiful setting. Bring a mat, any props you like to practice with, blankets, and an eye cover. 6:30-8:30pm. Carousel House, 223 E Cabrillo Blvd. $35. Call (805) 364-0410 or email hello@ santabarbarabeachyoga.com.

"A MUST-SEE" THE NEW YORK TIMES

tinyurl.com/FullMoonYogaSound

WEDNESDAY 10/12 10/12: The Theatre Group at S.B. City College Presents The Play That Goes Wrong This 2017 Tony Award–winning comedy follows the opening night of present day’s Cornley University Drama Society’s newest production, The Murder at Haversham Manor Manor, a 1920s whodunit where accident-prone thespians battle against all odds to make it through to their final curtain call, with hilarious consequences! The play previews October 12 and 13 and will show through October 29. 7:30pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 721 Cliff Dr. $10-$18. Call (805) 965-5935 or email sbcctg@sbcc.edu.

theatregroupsbcc.com

FRI: 5:15pm & 7:30pm SAT: 3:00pm & 5:15pm & 7:30pm SUN: 3:00pm & 5:15pm MON - THURS: 5:15pm & 7:30pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

35


GOOD TO SEE YOU 2022 SPOKEN WORD 10/7 8:00 pm

TIMBRE LATINO ENT. & ZAAANG PRODUCTIONS PRESENT

BANDA LANDIA DJS / BANDAS 10/8 9:00 pm

SHWAYZE WITH AZUARE

STAY CONNECTED

10/6 8:30 pm

HENRY ROLLINS

SO. CAL RAP 10/9 1:00 pm

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY FEAT THE A.C. TRIO 8:00 pm

NOTD WITH GREY ZEIGLER

SWEDISH ELECTRONIC 10/13 8:00 pm

FIELD DAZE / RAY & PAUL / BOY JONES ISLA VISTA ROCK 10/14 8:30 pm

FOLLOW US ON

10/11 8:00 pm

ENT LEGENDS PRESENTS:

INSTAGRAM

AMERICANA / ROCK

@sbindependent

JOHNNY IRION & US ELEVATOR

FUNK IT UP WITH AREA 51! FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776

2022 ’Tis The

Seasonguide publishing December 1, 2022

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael MA Michael H H Kreitsek, Kreitsek, MA

Michael HCounseling Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286

36

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

To be featured in our FREE EVENT LISTINGS, submit your holiday event at independent.com/tissubmissions To advertise, email advertising@independent.com


OCT. 6-12

Oh My Gourd!

ALWAYS

AMAZING.

NE VER

10/6-10/12 Big Wave Dave’s Pumpkin Patch Enjoy kids’ activities and photo opps as you find the perfect pumpkin, from mini to giant. Open through October 31. 10am-9pm. La Cumbre Plaza (Macy’s parking lot), 3805 State St. Free. Call (805) 218-0282.

bigwavedaveschristmastrees.com/pumpkin-patch

ROUTINE.

10/6-10/12: Lane Farms Pumpkin Patch Pick the perfect pumpkin and then enjoy hayrides, farm animals, tractors, educational displays, and the corn maze (closes daily at 6:30pm). Open through October 31. Weekdays: noon-7pm; weekends: 10am-7pm. Lane Farms, 308 S. Walnut Ln. Free. Call (805) 964-3773.

COURTESY

lanefarmssb.com

TYLER HENRY OCTOBER 21 + 22 | TWO NIGHTS | 8PM

10/6-10/12: Solvang Farmer Pumpkin Patch Immerse yourself in pumpkins, gourds, squash, corn stalks, hay bales, and the kids’ maze as well as the 140-acre corn maze! Open through October 31. 10am-6pm. Solvang Farmer Pumpkin Patch, 1035 Alamo Pintado Rd, Solvang. Free. Call (805) 350-8335.

LYLE LOVETT + JOHN HIATT NOVEMBER 12 | SATURDAY | 8PM

facebook.com/SolvangFarmerPumkinPatch

10/6-10/12: Santa Ynez Valley Scarecrow Festival Scarecrows will be displayed in the Santa Ynez Valley in the four main communities around Solvang (Buellton, Los Alamos, and Los Olivos) in hopes of winning the 2022 Harvest Cup. Visit the website to cast an online vote for the best and view the roster of business participants. Scarecrows on display through October 31. Free.

DAUGHTRY NOVEMBER 18 | FRIDAY | 8PM

syvscarecrows.com

10/6-10/12: Los Olivos Scarecrow Festival Walk around town to check out all the scarecrows—humorous, all-natural, and more—then vote for your favorite. Visit the website for locations. Scarecrows on display through October 31. Free.

losolivosca.com/syv-scarecrow-fest

10/6-10/12: Montecito Country Mart Honor System Pumpkin Patch Celebrate the season by picking out your pumpkin, then place your cash payment (for credit card payment, purchase at the Trading Post). Pumpkin prices range from $5-$20. Open through October 31. 7am-8:30pm. Montecito Country Mart, 1016 Coast Village Rd., Montecito. Free.

LOS TIGRES DEL NORTE DECEMBER 2 | FRIDAY | 8PM

montecitocountrymart.com/events

Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER.

Welcome to Freedom INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

37


welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Welcoming Babies for more than a Century

Baby Girls Carpinteria Brittany Leilani Barroso Hernández, 8/26/2022 Goleta Shira Aviva Tinsley, 8/6/2022 Lena Sol Lee, 9/7/2022 Lompoc Serena Davis, 8/8/2022 Camila Jemma Sanchez, 8/31/2022 Ojai Olive Marie Trujillo, 8/13/2022 Orcutt Evie Anne Markonis, 8/27/2022 Santa Barbara Ayleen Arslan Lopez, 8/3/2022 Noa Grace Gildea, 8/6/2022 Luna Sol Perez, 8/9/2022 Sare Su Isik, 8/16/2022 Grace Rose Olivo, 8/26/2022 Reid Violet Poljak, 8/31/2022 Eleanor Ruby Tennant, 9/1/2022

At Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital (SBCH), about 2,200 birthdays are celebrated every year as newborns are welcomed to the world. Brittingham Family Women’s Services at SBCH provides world-class care for infants and mothers: BIRTH CENTER

MOTHER-INFANT CARE

LACTATION SERVICES

• 12 birthing rooms, each with a Jacuzzi tub available for use during labor

• 19 private and 5 semi-private postpartum rooms

• 24/7 breastfeeding support

Baby Boys

• All nursing staff trained in lactation education, and lactation specialist consults available every day

Goleta Juan Eduardo Macias, 8/11/2022

• Sofa bed for support person to stay in room

• Mother-infant care in room to help with bonding and successful breastfeeding

• Obstetrics specialty operating suites

• Room service meal delivery options

• State-of-the-art equipment and adjacency to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

• Sofa bed for support person to stay in room

• Baby Friendly® care standards, including skin-to-skin bonding time as soon as possible after birth

• Baby-Friendly® care to support breastfeeding mothers and their infant

Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com

Contact advertising@independent.com for more details and in-print rates THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Montecito Caspian Shepard, 8/13/2022 Ojai Adrian Alexander Gonzalez, 8/23/2022

Santa Barbara Zane Alfredo Montoya Donato, 8/1/2022 Van James Rauber, 8/2/2022 Jasper Bennett Bigelow, 8/3/2022 Ty Alexander Hernandez, 8/10/2022 Learn more at: Robert William Geis V, 8/20/2022 cottagehealth.org/womens-services Alteo Ramiro Martinez, 8/24/2022 Rio Mora Davis, 8/25/2022 Aidyn Anthony Johnson, 8/27/2022 Kai Jackson Poljak, 8/31/2022

ARE YOU HIRING?

38

Santa Ynez Ruby Claude Nguyen, 8/5/2022

All Booked A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers. Sign up at independent.com/ newsletters


living

p. 39

Tech

INGRID BOSTROM

Scouting Our Esports Scene “[Esports practice] is actually quite similar to other sports, like football or baseball. We practice, learn strategies, and get used to playing with each other,” Hernandez said. “Gamers can often have a stereotype of being antisocial, but there’s actually a lot of great team spirit.” Mark Stockhoff is another passionate eSports player and mentor who wants to help level up Santa Barbara’s gaming scene, especially for the younger generations. He lives locally with his wife, Whitney, and two daughters and has been playing video games since adolescence. He appreciated it as a necessary and positive outlet for him as a “troubled 16-year-old,” and he eventually joined an esports team and became a top player in online tournaments. No longer playing competitively, Stockhoff provides mentorship, consulting, and gaming support — including video and podcast editing for gamers—through his esports company eConnXn. He’s intent on fostering a supportive and positive gaming community in town. “So many things come into play with video games. It’s competition, there’s endorphins, and “A lot of things I’ve taken from esports have been impactful in my whole life," said Mark Stockhoff. "I’ve had to learn how to trust people, build community with there’s achievement, too,” he said. “You also can feel people, how to resolve conflict, how to be on time and get through challenges, and how to keep my chin high when things get rough.” more free to be yourself.” Stockhoff recently merged this advocacy with his other passion—filmmaking—and produced a short film Esport athletes like McNees might play at home, with a ach McNees, 18, just started his freshman year at local club, or even join a larger team in an esports league in town, an esports drama called Game Face. The film highGeorge Fox University as a signed athlete. But he didn’t need summer workouts, new soccer where they compete in tournaments against others for prize lights a young boxer’s shift into competitive esports gaming cleats, or a tennis racket for this venture. That’s because he money and status. A number of national collegiate tourna- after injuring herself in the ring, and Stockhoff plans to make was signed to the school’s esports team, where he and dozens ments host tens of thousands of players from more than it into a full-length feature film in hopes to enlighten more people about the nuances and value of esports. of other students will represent George Fox in video gaming 1,000 schools each time. As home to enthusiastic gamers and even Trip Whether in the collegiate circuit or the broader esports tournaments—on computers and consoles like Xbox and community, “there definitely are names you know, like the Hawkins—the founder of Electronic Arts, the parent comPlayStation. really good players and teams who have won championships pany of EA Sports, which produces FIFA and other popular over and over,” McNees said. “Some have their own YouTube sports video games—why couldn’t Santa Barbara’s esports channels or have had their own [gaming] careers before scene evolve into something bigger? It seems there’s a taste for it, Hernandez said. He encourgoing professional.” Video streaming sites such as YouTube and Twitch are ages people to expand their perception of gaming and see by Camille Garcia hubs for watching pre-recorded or live esports content, that it’s much more than simply staring at a television screen including follow-along gameplays and videos teaching gam- or computer monitor for hours. “A lot of things I’ve taken from esports have been impactMcNees, who’s from Goleta and graduated in May from ing strategy and techniques. Some of the biggest YouTube Providence High School, was recruited to play Rocket League, gamers make millions of dollars each year and have hun- ful in my whole life. I’ve had to learn how to trust people, build community with people, how to resolve conflict, how a virtual soccer game played with rocket-powered cars dreds of millions of subscribers, or followers. What’s more, industry experts estimate esports will soon to be on time and get through challenges, and how to keep instead of “human” players. Because the university’s program is still small, he won’t garner more viewers than every other sports league in the my chin high when things get rough,” he said. “These are all very important life skills.” have his tuition fully paid for as a team member, but he’ll U.S., besides the NFL. As the esports industry evolves from being in the “wild In Santa Barbara, it has proven to be difficult to find a have the chance to win tuition money by playing in various gaming community outside of the virtual realm, said Nick wild west” to a more organized entity, Stockhoff said he’s also tournaments. “It seemed like a cool opportunity to be instantly slotted Hernandez, a student at Santa Barbara City College. This noticed a shift in the overall perception of gaming—for the into a community with other people with a similar interest,” rings even truer amid the recent closing of a beloved local better. “Before, you were a nerd. And then it finally got somewhat he said. “For me, it was like, playing video games as a sport in gaming center—Moo esports in Isla Vista—in June, he said. To remedy this, last fall, Hernandez founded the college’s culturally acceptable. It’s still not a hundred percent there,” he college? That sounds awesome!” You might not have heard of esports, and you probably first-ever esports club, which hosts team practices, meet-ups, said. “So we’ve gone from nerd to gamer … and now you’re a haven’t thought of those who play video games as athletes. and coaching sessions for its membership of more than 100 professional esport player; now you’re an athlete.” For McNees, it’s simple: esports is “more than just a But the world of competitive gaming is actually a growing, $1 people—college students and broader community membillion global industry, where people of all ages are making bers. There are similar efforts around town, including in high hobby,” he said. “It’s cool to be on the cutting edge of something big.” big cash playing video games like League of Legends, Fortnite, schools and at UCSB, which has a vibrant esports culture of n its own. and even Super Smash Bros.

Z

For These Players, Gaming Is Much More than a Hobby

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

39


THE ARTIST’S TABLE // ART SHOW

Ray Hunter, Incoming Tide

Ralph Waterhouse, Early Spring Sunset

Craig Nelson, Hendrys View

Enjoy a week-long art show in Fleischmann Auditorium curated by Diane Waterhouse. 15 celebrated local artists will be featured and proceeds from art sales support the Museum’s work to connect people to nature for the betterment of both. OCTOBER 1–9, 2022* // Details at sbnature.org/artshow

A R T I S T S

Entry included in paid Museum admission. Rebecca Arguello

Rick Garcia

Chuck Kovacic

Ann Shelton Beth

Derek Harrison

Beverly Lazor

Chris Chapman

Kerri Hedden

Craig Nelson

Rick Delanty

Ray Hunter

Sharon Schock

Camille Dellar

John Iwerks

Ralph Waterhouse

Listen Now

Ep. 64: As One Door Closes, Another One Opens for Art in Santa Barbara On this week’s episode, Molly McAnany speaks with

2559 Puesta del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93 105 *Museum closed on Tuesday, October 4.

artist Mary Heebner to chat about the early days of the recently closed Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara and Contemporary Arts Forum. Hosted by: Molly McAnany and Jennifer Yoshikoshi

The

Angry Poodle Start your weekend off right with the Angry Poodle in your inbox on Saturday mornings.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters

40

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Listen at

independent.com/theindy or wherever you listen to podcasts!


50 years E s t . 1 9 7 1

IMPACTING CARPINTERIA FOR

50 years E s t . 1 9 7 1


VISION VISION MISSION MISSION

OUR VISION VISION OUR Em mp po ow we e rr e ed d gg ii rr ll ss ii n n aa n n e eq qu u ii tt aa b b ll e e ss o o cc ii e e tt yy E Inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold Inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold

P P U OR S P P RTT U O I S I Y Y H H

"As aa Girls Girls Inc. Inc. alumni alumni myself, myself, II know know how how "As special this this program program truly truly is. is. Currently Currently my my 77special year-old daughter daughter attends attends the the after after school school year-old program, and and II am am so so happy happy that that she she is is getting getting program, to experience experience the the support, support, wisdom, wisdom, confidence, confidence, to and strength strength that that Girls Girls Inc. Inc. provides provides for for young young and women and and girls girls in in our our community community -- it's it's women invaluable." invaluable." - Kelsey Crouse - Kelsey Crouse - Kelsey Crouse

WW

WW

Our mission mission of of inspiring inspiring girls girls to to be be strong, strong, smart, smart, and and bold, bold, is is realized realized through through programs programs that that Our empower girls and young women to achieve personal, social, political, and economic success. In empower girls and young women to achieve personal, social, political, and economic success. In partnership with local schools and community organizations, we focus on the development of the partnership with local schools and community organizations, we focus on the development of the whole girl. girl. Our Our comprehensive comprehensive approach approach helps helps girls girls to to value value themselves, themselves, take take risks risks to to discover discover and and whole develop their their inherent inherent strengths. strengths. The The combination combination of of long-lasting long-lasting mentoring mentoring relationships relationships and and aa proprodevelop girl environment environment with with research-based research-based programming programming equips equips girls girls to to navigate navigate gender, gender, economic, economic, and and girl social barriers, so they grow up healthy, educated, and independent. social barriers, so they grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

"I am am constantly constantly learning learning new new "I things about about myself myself and and about about things the world world around around me. me. Because Because the of Girls Girls inc, inc, II am am pushed pushed to to try try of new things, things, and and get get to to grow grow new tremendously as as aa result." result." tremendously -Monica Delgado, 12th grade -Monica -Monica Delgado, Delgado, 12th 12th grade grade

ER HE RE E M H A M IA I Y Y H H


OUR VALUES 8 INCLUSION

schools served in the community

139 + 150 Girls

Boys

learned about healthy sexuality

We provide equitable access to opportunities and resources based on the needs of those we serve.

11,855 lbs. provided 11,855

COMMUNITY

We share a responsibility to offer a welcoming, safe, and supportive environment that builds partnerships, trust, and connections to drive our mission.

Our community pantry launched in February 2022

20 Collaborative partners

We received an amazing network of support from local non-profit and business partners to help saturate the girls learning experience.

girls served in our 239 STRONG programs

9

girls participated in advocacy work

BOLD ADVOCACY

We are responsive and engaged in issues pertaining to the lived experiences of the girls we serve.

served in our Carpinteria Middle 23 girls School intervention outreach program

community

581 members served INTENTIONALITY

We offer a unique experience with the purpose of positively impacting lives.

Family Science Night Back to School/Volunteer Fair Back to School Night Thanksgiving Feast Family Garden & BBQ Summer Safety Night


DONATE VOLUNTEER ADVOCATE DONATE

Make a gift now to support the girls in our community! Create a lasting legacyopportunities through planned by In-person volunteer aregiving now available. Help naming the Girlsnext Inc. generation of Carpinteria a beneficiary of your inspire ofas leaders! estate.

Spread awareness of the Girls Inc. mission by sharing social Donateposts, through our secure website, by phone,and encouraging media resisting gender stereotypes, mail,girls or find us onlife Venmo the in your to be@GirlsInc-OfCarpinteria strong, smart, & bold. Make a gift now to support the girls in our community! Create a lasting legacy through planned giving by naming Girls Inc. of Carpinteria as a beneficiary of your estate. Donate through our secure website, by phone, mail, or find us on Venmo @GirlsInc-OfCarpinteria

FOLLOW ALONG

FOLLOW ALONG

girlsinc.carp Girls Inc. of Carpinteria Girls Inc. Carpinteria scanhere here to visit scan visitus usatat www.girlsinc-carp.org www.gilrsinc-carp.org

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria, CA 93013 BOARD OF DIRECTORS 805.684.6364 | girlsinc-carp.org Jacquelyn Pawela-Crew, President Angelina Lane, Vice President Orlando Hernandez, Treasurer Katie Convoy, Secretary

E s t . 1 9 7 1

5315 Foothill Road Carpinteria, CA 93013 805.684.6364 girlsinc-carp.org

Caroline Alarcon Terri Allison Peter Dugre Hayley Fedders John Franklin Chris Jacobs Lori Pearce Diana Rigby Anupama Sharma April Simpson Bianca Vega Jamie Collins, Executive Director


My Life

living

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street

There’s a Lot to Love in Lompoc

The City Has a Rich History, But What’s Happening Now? by Cynthia Carbone Ward

That’s exactly what I wanted to learn about. Standing in this beautiful museum surrounded by history, I find myself wondering what’s new. I’ve done interviews with local old-timers, and I’ve met with members of the Lompoc Valley Historical Society, and I know that Lompoc is a city that honors its past. But what have all these stories led to? What’s going on here now? I wander over to the Lompoc Valley Art Association’s Cypress Gallery at 119 E. Cypress Avenue, a vibrant venue with ever-changing exhibits of work by outstanding local artists. On this occasion, I happen to meet Elizabeth Monks Hack, whose gorgeous oil and mixed-media paintings on sewn canvas are currently on display. One abstract painting depicts a blue house with a lemon-yellow roof, and a glorious burst of sky, and I am certain that if I could look at that picture every day, it would be impossible to feel sad. And guess what? Cypress Gallery is having its fall show September 29 through October 30, with a reception on Sunday, October 30, from 1-3 p.m. Another of the artists, Beverly Ann MessengerHarte, whose Zen-like work is inspired by bamboo, suggests that I go over to a music store called Certain Sparks, located at 107 South H. I’m happy to oblige, especially if preceded by a stop at the friendly Southside Coffee Shop next door. I do enjoy strolling past some of the downtown murals, one of which depicts a zealous group of

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

COURTESY

I

’d been visiting an elderly friend in Lompoc and decided to stop by the Lompoc Museum at 200 South H Street on my way back. I’m very fond of little local museums, and this one is a truly fine haven, lovingly curated. Housed in a handsome 1910 Carnegie Library building, its extensive collection of Chumash artifacts in the main hall is a window into the remarkable culture of the area’s indigenous people. Downstairs, there’s an eclectic gallery of exhibits focused on pioneer and natural history, including displays about the flower industry, diatomaceous earth mining, and townspeople of days gone by, looking stern and sepia-toned in antique photographs. There is all of this and so much more, but except for me and museum director Lisa Renken, the place is empty on this Thursday afternoon. “Even before the pandemic, Septembers tended to be slow,” Lisa tells me, “but you never know what the day will hold. Last weekend and much of the summer were very busy. Lompoc itself is going through big changes.”

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Featuring

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

ently

An independ

Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS! Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

women yanking a saloon off its foundation in 1883. Lompoc was established as a temperance colony, and fanatical efforts to keep the town dry and respectable were applauded and well documented. At Certain Sparks, I meet the dynamic Randall Sena, who explains its beginnings as a recording studio that grew to offering music lessons and concert events. In 2017, he helped establish the Certain Sparks Music Foundation to provide scholarships for instruments and lessons to youth in the community, and there’s a monthly open mic event for young people. While in the neighborhood, I thought I’d say hello to Ben Barrick, of New Lows, across the street at 104 Ocean. New Lows specializes in art, apparel, skateboards, sign making, and custom screen printing. The printing is their bread and butter, but they also host small exhibits and provide space for artists to work. I ask Ben what’s going on with Lompoc. “Lompoc is thriving,” he replies, unequivocally. “I’ve lived here most of my life, and it’s as good as I’ve ever seen it.” Ben is an insightful observer. He notes that the unbridled proliferation of cannabis dispensaries has had a downside, but he isn’t buying into a lot of negative hype. Crime? He’s pretty sure young people would rather be skateboarders than gang members. He’s seen how food trucks and vendors gather on Food Truck Friday and turn the town into a veritable festival. There are art nights and singer-songwriter nights, and plenty of ideas brewing. Now I’m on a roll, and I can’t resist checking in with my friend Harvey Green, a resident of Lompoc for 42 years and a fellow former teacher. Harvey is unusually well acquainted with the city’s past and present. He lives in an 1879 Victorian house built by Lompoc’s founder, W.W. Broughton, that he has turned into a popular Airbnb, and he is an enthusiastic ambassador. He tells me about the Lompoc Theater Project, an ambitious renovation of the 1927 movie theater on North H Street, with plans for shows and events. He also mentions the Bodger Trail in the south foothills overlooking the city, with its panoramic views of the Lompoc Valley, just a fiveminute drive from downtown. And new leads keep coming up. I am left with the impression that we’ve hardly scratched the surface. Stay tuned. There’s a lot to love here. Lompoc is changing, and so are we all. n

805.569.2323

(Regular $25 Exam & X-Ray value of 218) limited time offer

expiration date - 6/5/22

805 560 0123

JENNIE K. WELSH MEDIATION welshmediation.com (805) 259-8097

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

41


Locally Owned and Operated

www.santacruzmarkets.com Chicken

HASS AVOCADOS

98¢ lb.

69¢ ea.

Trimmed

PINEAPPLES¢

RA o St

LEG QUARTERS

$4.98 lb.

49 $2.99

PORK SPARE RIBS

JALAPENOS

$2.98 lb.

$ lb. 99 89¢ ea.

LARGE SHRIMP

RUSSET POTATOES

$5.98 lb.

$1.69¢ lb.

BEEF TRI TIP

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

lb.

ea.

1

59 ¢

5 lb. Bag

89

Marinated

C

BROWN ONION

PORK ADOBADA

M

Y

$2.98 lb.

69¢ lb.

Beef

MEXICAN PAPAYA lb.

CM

89

T-BONE STEAK

¢

MY

CY

CMY

89¢ lb.

$5.98 lb.

K

59 79

89 ¢

¢ lb.

¢

ea.

featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

¢ D TO STOCK 49 ¢ ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL 49DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND lb.

$

lb.

99 FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM 1 99 69 ¢ AND LIKE US ON$ 1FACEBOOK ea.

89

ea.

59

¢

¢

lb.

89 59

bestof

BEST 20 20

2018

Best of

®

®

winner

Winner

®

WINNER�

lb.

89 ¢

SANTA BARBARA SANTA BARBARA Montecito St St 324324 W.W.Montecito

¢ lb.

79 ¢

®

59 ¢

lb.

89 ¢

Santa Barbara

lb.

89 W I N N E R ¢SANTA BARBARA

Santa Barbara

Santa barbara

¢

89 ¢

¢ GOLETA GOLETA lb. 5757 Hollister 5757 Hollister Ave Ave

59

79 Support local people working at Now featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery locally businesses! ¢ owned

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

¢

ea.

ea.

49

bread daily from sa Bakery

ES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS UGH NOVEMBER 2ND

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

42

2021

LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS

FROM OCTOBER 27TH DEALERS THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND TO lb.NO SALES

49 ¢

LIMITED STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 6 THROUGH OCTOBER 19

SANTA BARBARA

THE INDEPENDENT 324 W. Montecito St

$

GOLETA

OCTOBER 6, 2022

99

5757 Hollister Ave INDEPENDENT.COM

$

lb.

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

99


FOOD &DRINK

p. 43

INGRID BOSTROM PHOTOS

Wowed by Tamar’s Pita Pop-Up at Third Window

SHAWARMA MAN: Chef Logan Jones is preparing various wraps under the banner of Tamar at Third Window Brewing every week.

I

just wanted to make a good piece of food that I could put in someone’s hands and they would be like, ‘Wow this is delicious,’ ” explains Logan Jones of Tamar Central Coast Shawarma, his Middle Eastern pop-up at Third Window Brewing Company. That goal may seem simple, but it’s exactly what I felt during my first experience trying his meticulously prepared food. With a wood-fired oven baking homemade pita, a spit roasting chicken to perfection, and an array of handmade sauces and farmers’market-fresh vegetables generously enhancing each dish, the lunch-only menu at Tamar is more than

Chef Logan Jones Moves from Fine Dining to Middle Eastern Cuisine by Rebecca Horrigan

delicious — it’s filling a major gap in the diversity of Santa Barbara’s cuisine. After graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in New York, Jones took the traditional path into the restaurant industry, working in fine dining around Los Angeles at such hotspots as Mora, Bavel, and The Tasting Kitchen in Los Angeles. Most recently, he served as chef de cuisine at The Lark in Santa Barbara, but he felt his real calling was in sandwiches. “I always wanted to make food that was pleasurable to me, that I could eat again and again and really feel satisfied by it,” Jones said. After meeting Third Window’s owner Kris Parker during a Priedite Barbecue pop-up at Bell’s in Los Alamos, Jones was offered the opportunity to make his lunchtime dreams come true. After months of R&D and help from his wife, who does all of the accounting, Jones went all-in on his concept. In April, he started popping up at Third Window for lunch from Monday to Wednesday, and quickly amassed a loyal following.

With one bite of his Central Sandwich — its woodfired pita filled to the brim with crispy falafel, hummus, cabbage salad, tomato, cucumber, and amba tahini, served with a side of Iranian mixed pickles and a spicy herb sauce called zhoug — I was blown away. In the same way that a downpour of rain feels after a drought, this meal was full of exciting new flavors that refreshed and reinvigorated me. I immediately began plotting my next trip back. “It’s a small menu, so I’m able to focus on the individual things as much as I’d like to,” Jones explained. Ordering online is available, and options include sides of freshly fried falafel, pita, or hummus, as well as Logan’s favorite dish, The Istanbul. This satisfying creation consists of yogurt-marinated chicken shawarma, cabbage salad, tomato, cucumber, sumac onions, tahini sauce, and amba aioli, served with those zippy pickles and zhoug and wrapped up in that fantastic pita. Said Jones, “I eat it almost every day, and I crave it still.” In addition to the regular items, Jones creates a “farmers’ market special” each week. “It’s a way to challenge myself and keep Tamar fresh and desirable,” Jones explained.

During my visit in late August, I indulged that week’s special of caramelized, last-of-the-season peaches nestled atop a gorgeous mixture of lemon, cucumber, whipped farm cheese, serrano chile, lemon basil, and orange blossom honey vinaigrette, served with that incredible pita. Actually, it’s the best pita I’ve ever had. I had to ask what his secret was. “It’s a 72-hour process and, with that long fermentation time, the flavor really develops. The wheat flavor’s really pronounced,” Jones said. “The way we work the dough produces this really great crumb structure.” In the future, Jones hopes to open a brick-and-mortar restaurant, which would serve both lunch and dinner. In the meantime, he’s enjoying seeing his dream become reality, working with his family and nurturing the mutually beneficial relationship with the folks at Third Window. “I trusted myself that I would be able to figure it out,” Jones said of his uncharted path to opening Tamar. With one bite of his food, one can trust he’ll be able to make his other dreams come to fruition as well.

Tamar serves at Third Window (406 E. Haley St.) every MondayWednesday, noon-4 p.m. Call (805) 242-3894 or see tamarsb.com.

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

43


Santa Barbara

Gyros Back at Greek Grab ’n’ Go

EATS & DRINKS

DoThis

All you can eat “Buffet” is back Mon to Sat 11.30am to 2.30pm

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm 1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) • (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

JORGE LOSADA

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

A snapshot view of the best of local culture and fun happenings in the worlds of music, theater, visual art, film, dance, books, lectures, and more from Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters

OCTOBER 6, 2022

Greek Festival at Oak Park, the St. Barbara Greek Orthodox Church decided in the fall of 2020 to host a less social but still culturally relevant fundraiser by selling traditional, homemade meals to the community under the banner of Greek Grab ’n’ Go. They repeated the formula in the spring of 2021, and now it’s back again, with orders — which range in price from $5 for dolmas and donuts to $50 for a full dinner platter — being accepted until October 16 for pickups at the church on October 29 and 30.

by Matt Kettmann

CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

THE INDEPENDENT

A

fter 46 summers of hosting a wildly popular

Order by October 16 for End-of-Month Fundraiser

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service.

44

FOOD & DRINK

FLAVOROFINDIASB.COM • 805 682 6561 • 3026 STATE STREET

INDEPENDENT.COM

The event introduces many Santa Barbarans to the strikingly beautiful campus — stark white and blue structures, with colorful mosaics, set against our rugged mountains — and raises ample money for the church, which supports well-building in Tanzania, among other outreach efforts. “The real success is that it brings our congregation together in a communal way,” said Dr. Ernest Kolendrianos, a retired pediatrician and member of the congregation for half a century. “They have fun doing it, and they’ve inherited the recipes from their parents and grandparents.” He was introduced to these foods while growing up in Virginia, surrounded by 60 other Greek families. “I might as well have been in a little Greek village,” he said. “All the customs and foods were preserved.” He’s volunteered in the church’s administration for years, but he readily admits, “I happen to be the choir director’s husband. That’s my status in the church primarily.” There is hope that the festival may one day return, but there remains hesitation with COVID lingering. Those decisions are now up

to the next generation of church leaders. “We’re blessed that this younger group of people have taken this on,” said Kolendrianos. He shares his Grab ’n’ Go ordering advice below. Gyros: “Gyro means ‘to turn’ because usually the

meat is prepared on a roll that’s turned,” said Kolendrianos of this meat-on-pita sandwich with tomato, onion, and shredded lettuce. “But the secret of the gyro is that tzatziki sauce, which has strained yogurt, cucumber, lemon juice, olive oil, a little garlic, and sometimes dill. That combination really gives an incredible flavor. The gyro is the Greek equivalent of the hamburger, if we put it in those simple terms, but it is considerably more flavorful.” Spanakopita: This savory, usually triangular

phyllo dough pie is stuffed with feta and spinach. “For vegetarians, this is an ideal offering,” he said. Dolma: These rice-stuffed grape leaves are “are

low in calories and high in vitamins with lots of fiber,” said the doc, noting the leaves are harvested earlier in the season when they are tender. Fakes: This is a vegetable soup based on brown

lentils. “It’s a great soup for autumn, with an earthy flavor,” said Kolendrianos.

Baklava: Layers of phyllo dough are stuffed with chopped walnuts and honey in this tooth-stinging treat. The congregants in charge will make 40 to 50 pans of it for the event, working from dawn to near dusk to get it done. “It’s very laborintensive, but it’s enjoyed very much,” he said. Loukoumades: These Greek donut holes are cov-

ered in honey, cinnamon, and sometimes nuts or seeds. “Loukoumades are making a big dent in baklava!” laughed Kolendrianos.

See the full menu and place your order by October 16 at greekgrabgo.com.


Fresco Café Opens Downtown

HARBOR & SEAFOOD FESTIVAL: The 19th

annual Santa Barbara Harbor & Seafood Festival is almost here again after a two-year hiatus due to the COVID pandemic. On Saturday, October 15, the public will once again have the chance to celebrate the Santa Barbara Channel’s bounty and the fishermen who harvest it. This free event runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., luring seafood lovers to Santa Barbara Harbor for one of our community’s most well-attended events. According to the festival’s organizers, it is timed to celebrate the opening of lobster season and showcases fresh, regional seafood in addition to live music, maritime education, free boat rides, children’s activities, vessel tours, and more. This year, the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum (SBMM) has announced that it will participate in the Harbor & Seafood Festival by reducing its admission fees to $2 per person. In addition to its usual exhibits and educational activities, SBMM is partnering with Get Hooked for the festival to host a ceviche stand on

NEW CARP SEAFOOD: Reader Doyle tells

me that Zookers at 5404 Carpinteria Avenue has posted an ad on Craigslist that says they are opening a new meat and seafood shop in Carpinteria. They are reportedly looking to hire a butcher and counter service person for the new venue. KINDNESS AT FARMER BOY: “There are still

great humans out there,” says reader DeeDee. “My friend and I got together recently at Farmer Boy for breakfast. We got to talking to two nice older gentlemen next to us about Arizona and their memories of Sedona. They left after their breakfast, and when we went to pay our bill, we found out that these gentlemen had paid for our breakfast! How sweet is that? We don’t even know their names! 2022 has been a rough year with Dad passing and Mom being so sick, so these gentlemen have no idea what a blessing they are. Wherever you are, thank you and God bless you. Kindness is powerful.”

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

Opening Reception for Lifting the Veil Reception, curator tours and an opportunity to learn more about the American Religions Collection. 4:00 PM Tuesday, October 11 UCSB Library, Special Research Collections 3rd Floor, Mountain Side Free and open to the public.

FOOD & DRINK

Fresco Café is leaving their longtime home in Five Points Shopping Center for a new place next to the Lobero Theatre at 23 East Canon Perdido Street, the former home of Sevtap Winery. The popular eatery opened September 29 in the El Centro building. Fresco’s catering service has been put on hold until early November during the transition to their new facilities. The old kitchen was much larger and they are downsizing, so Fresco is in the process of adjusting to that. They still offer NEW HOME: Santa Barbara icon Fresco has finished relocating pastries and other baked goods, from uptown to downtown, next to the Lobero Theatre. and the number of offerings instore has been reduced. Prices have been “revised a little bit,” but they the Museum’s front patio. Be sure to stop are having specials every day and all the by and try some ceviche, fresh from the favorites on the menu have returned, Santa Barbara Channel. including what might be my numberone sandwich on the South Coast: the BEACH LIQUOR CLOSES: “Say goodbye to Hot Mushroom Combo. New sand- a Carpinteria icon,” says reader Deni. wiches include pulled pork, bánh mì, “Beach Liquor closed their doors Octoand eggplant parmesan. On Fridays, ber 3rd. They lost their lease. The landthey now offer a lobster roll, which is lord is going to build something else in deshelled, steamed, big-chunk lobster; its place (super sad!)” mayo; celery; and lemon juice on a brioche bun. Daily specials include two CAFÉ 154 CLOSES: This just in from reader soup specials, a salad special, fish spe- Dianne: “My coworker told me that Café cials, entrée specials, calzone specials, 154 (Sansum Building on Foothill) has and pizza specials. closed, with a ‘Permanently Closed’ sign Hours are Monday-Wednesday, 11 up!” I called their phone number and it a.m.-6 p.m.; and Thursday-Saturday, 11 is disconnected, and I noticed that their a.m.-8 p.m. web page has been taken down.

JOHN DICKSON

L

ast June, I announced that

Career Opportunities Await Line Cooks

Tired of working late night shifts?

Different Shifts Available in our Upscale Restaurant or our Bar & Grill.

5:00am-1:30pm | 6:00am-2:30pm 10:00am-6:30pm | 11:00am-7:30pm

Starting Wage - $21.00 to $24.00/hr, DOE $1,000 Signing Bonus & Outstanding Benefits Package! Located on 48 acres in the heart of Montecito, Casa Dorinda is considered California’s Premier Retirement Community due to its historic beauty and its exceptional team of professionals providing the highest level of care and service to its residents.

For further information and to apply please visit www.casadorinda.org/careers or drop by to visit us. Or call Scott at 805.969.8171 or Nikki at 805.969.8026

300 Hot Springs Rd. | Montecito, CA | 805.969.8625 Casa Dorinda is a private LifeCare community, type A CCRC, owned and operated by the Montecito Retirement Association, a nonsectarian, nonprofit, tax-exempt organization. State of California Licenses RCFE #421700160, SNF #050000112, CCRC Certificate of Authority #126.

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

45


DIMENSIONAL DIMENSIONAL NOTIONS NOTIONS AND AND MOTIONS MOTIONS

L I F E PAGE 46

GET READY FOR GHOSTS ALONG THE COAST COURTESY

JOSEF WOODARD PHOTOS

uses and reimaginings. and spangled variations on such antiquated Materials and social com- objects as View-Masters and Rolodexes mentary matter in Halpern’s (jumbo facsimiles, with interactive hand art, a twist-up on printmak- cranks), she engages in vivid cultural crossing tactics blending plexiglass, talk between nostalgia, retro-futurism, and a aluminum, silk, linen UV candy-coated brand of ritualism. Her large, prints, diffused photographic neon-green “flipbooks” mimic antique imagery, and other means. film technology with her personal abstract Ostensibly two-dimensional, prints, while the sparkly View-Masters house her intriguing art expands its hyper-color-infused, symmetrical images of scope and messages via loaded semi-psychedelia. texts printed on the floor Seizing attention in a corner, “Suspen(a rarity in this space), and sion” makes its sensory point with a sculpsuch voluble titles as “ONCE tural mass of plastic and mirrors, suggesting I TASTED TIME I NEVER a frozen splash, a deconstructed royal crown, WANTED ANYTHING or both. A goopy animated GIF lurks inside ELSE, AND THAT IS WHAT on a small screen, optically multiplied with “Suspension” by Evelyn Contreras, on view at Atkinson Gallery I’M DOING HERE. THIS mirrors and evoking an energy source of through October 19 IS THE ONLY WAY I CAN some pagan worship, with Silicon Valley’s p at Santa Barbara City College’s AtkinPROVE IT. ROLLING IN blessing. In Contreras’s art, elegance of finish son Gallery, visitors may notice a cer- THE SHIT OF TIME LIKE A DOG ROLL- mixes symbiotically with funk. tain built-in contextual irony. What ING IN DEAD FISH AT THE BEACH.” —Josef Woodard is likely the local art space blessed with the And… scene. Dramatic impact appears in a more sur- Evelyn Contreras’s and Tamar Siegfried Rosa Halpern’s most dazzling panoramic view — harbor below and mountains beyond—also boasts face level way in Contreras’s playful yet prob- exhibit is on view at Atkinson Gallery through October gallery.sbcc.edu. a curatorial agenda generally embracing ing work. Hand-crafting brightly colored 19. For more information, visit gallery. challenging contemporary art, and anything but pretty, scenic pictures. Savoring art here, post-ish pandemic, is especially satisfying in the absence of the long-standing Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara’s sad, recent demise. In the Atkinson’s current two-person exhibition, the overview is fittingly both wide and in-house: Evelyn Contreras and Tamar Siegfried Rosa Halpern are SBCC art program alums who ventured upward and outward on their artistic paths. Contreras earned her MFA at the University of Texas at Austin, while Halpern’s MFA was at Columbia University. They bring separate but complementary aesthetics to the room, in which Work by Tamar Siegfried Rosa Halpern is on view at SBCC’s Atkinson Gallery. conventional media are subjected to fresh

U

In 1875, composer Georges Bizet premiered a sweeping opera called Carmen. Almost a century later, famed Broadway hard-hitter Oscar Hammerstein II created a 20th-century adaptation of the piece, the big-budget musical Carmen Jones. Still concerned with the lives of the proletariat, Carmen Jones is the story of a woman working in a parachute factory during World War II who is caught between her desire for two men: a soldier and a prize fighter. “The most obvious difference is that it’s an all-Black cast,” says Fredericka Meek, who plays Carmen in the upcoming Ensemble Theatre Company production. “Carmen is a young woman who loves love. She loves the chase. Once the chase is over, she moves on. At the start of the show, she’s bored, and Joe comes in on leave … he becomes the focus of her next chase.” Audiences will recognize the music from Bizet’s opera, but with new lyrics to tell the updated tale. Directed by Jonathan Fox, Carmen Jones remains a relevant story of the haves and the have-nots. Some may bristle at the idea of a white man writing a story about Black culture, but Hammerstein, who was Jewish, felt cultural kinship with African Americans in the wake of the Nazis. “He also likened African Americans to the gypsy people, the Roma people,” says Meek (in Bizet’s opera, Carmen was a gypsy). “He felt like African Americans were the gypsies of

46

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

the United States.” Fox and the ETC team have also taken pains to alleviate potential problematic elements in the script by de-stereotyping the characters’ diction. Meek calls it a big change that “elevates” the piece. “Putting on a show that highlights a woman of color is really important,” she says, “especially at this time, when there are so many things in the world that are against women, against women of color.” —Maggie Yates

ZACH MENDEZ

CARMEN JONES OPENS ETC SEASON WITH A SONG

Fredericka Meek stars as Carmen and Troy Wallace stars as Husky in the Ensemble Theatre Company’s production of Carmen Jones, directed by Jonathan Fox.

Carmen Jones runs at the New Vic Theater October 8-23. For more information, visit etcsb.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM

Meet some of the spirits haunting our local history at Elings Park this October. Six ghosts, lurking throughout the scenic oak groves and sweeping city views of Godric Grove, will be telling their stories to the public in Elings Park’s first annual Ghosts Along the Coast event, taking place the evenings of October 13, 14, and 16. Director of Elings Park and creator of the event Dean Noble hopes to provide the public with some “good spine-tingling ghost stories” throughout the fall season, and he says they’re perfect for ages 9 and up. Inspired by ghost walk events in other communities every fall, Ghosts Along the Coast will be a first for Santa Barbara. It is a 90-minute tour through Godric Grove, where six restless spirits — based on or inspired by real characters from Santa Barbara history — come to life to speak about their unfinished business in the human realm. The ghosts, all unusual characters and played by local actors, are a Prohibition-era bootlegger, a Japanese picture-bride from the 1920s, an enigmatic lighthouse keeper, a hobo from the Great Depression, an assassinated news editor, and a survivor of the historic Winfield Scott shipwreck. Not only does the event aim to provide eerie enjoyment for a diverse audience, but it also aims to tie the rich history of Santa Barbara to the present day. Despite the diverse group of inspired ghosts to be found along the walk, Noble notes that they are “just scratching the surface of history,” making the possibilities for Ghosts Along the Coast events in the upcoming years very exciting. —Lola Watts Tickets for Ghosts Along the Coast must be purchased in advance at coastghosts.brownpapertickets.com.


EMAIL : ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

CAMA’S WORLDLY SYMPHONIC PARADE BEGINS

A month-long celebration of

Art, Music, Theatre and Design

JAKE TURNEY

October 1-31, 2022

Sheku Kanneh-Mason

T

o suggest an arc of continuity in terms of Santa Barbara’s recent cultural life, a highlight of the year so far in classical music came when the revered maestro Sir Simon Rattle appeared last spring, leading his current orchestra, the London Symphony Orchestra. That Granada evening, presented by CAMA (Community Arts Music Association) and Music Academy of the West, set a high bar for symphonic majesty and celebrity in the 805. On Monday, October 10, at The Granada Theatre, CAMA kicks off its impressive new season of globally renowned orchestras and chamber music settings with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, which Sir Simon effectively made famous during his long tenure at the helm. The circle continues, sometimes looping through Santa Barbara. Speaking of circles, Monday’s show, the first of nine concerts also including the return of the mighty Chicago Symphony (January 25, 2023), features a local return of British cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason, now all of 23, who made his Santa Barbara debut just last spring as duo partner with his gifted pianist sister, Isata Kanneh-Mason, at Campbell Hall. At the Granada, he appears as soloist on the Cello Concerto in E minor by Sir Edward Elgar. Incidental historical note: Elgar was the inaugural conductor of the Birmingham orchestra at its 1920 debut. Holding down the podium position at present is the dynamic young maestra from Lithuania Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, familiar in Southern California as the former assistant of the Los Angeles Philharmonic (which makes its annual CAMA appearance on May 28, 2023). Monday’s program menu also taps the double-dipping British music culture of Ralph Vaughan Williams’s Fantasia on a Theme by Thomas Tallis, along with Debussy’s

beloved La Mer and Mieczysław Weinberg’s “Jewish Rhapsody.” In Britain and the world over, Sheku Kanneh-Mason has quickly become an international sensation, and for what it is worth, he was the first Black musician to win the coveted BBC Young Musician competition in 2016. He landed in a global (and cosmic?) spotlight when he performed at the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wedding in 2018. That starry turn touches on another local connection, once removed, given that the royal pair, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, now call Montecito home. The cellist is also a musician with a broad repertoire and taste, as demonstrated on his new Decca album Song. Here, his diversified yet somehow cohesive playlist spans J.S. Bach, Burt Bacharach (a closing take on “Say a Little Prayer”), Stravinsky, Beethoven, a premiere recording of British composer Edmund Finnis, Olivier Messiaen’s poignant Quartet for the End of Time, “Cry Me a River,” and more twists and turns. He serves as cellist and co-songwriter on “Same River,” with his singer-songwriter partner Zak Abel supplying the sole vocal on a determinedly diverse and mostly instrumental adventure. CAMA’s upcoming season, a heartening return to its former glory after pandemic restrictions, is chockablock with calendarmarking high points. Among them, the Juilliard String Quartet (October 24), Hélène Grimaud (December 7), the Dennis Russell Davies–conducted Filharmonie Brno (February 13, 2023); and the Romero Guitar Quartet (March 4, 2023). CAMA is alive, well, and kicking off a high cultural season with a British accent come Monday at the Granada. —Josef Woodard

Adelante charter school ptso presents/presenta

domingo, 6 de noviembre sunday, november 6 1111 e. mason st., santa barbara • 11 am - 4 pm free event! music, food, arts & crafts, bounce houses and more

¡evento gratis! musica, comida, manualidades, brincolines y mas

See camasb.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

47


PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

48

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until October 31, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF OCTOBER 6

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): When you Aries folks are at your best, you are drawn to people who tell you exactly what they think, who aren’t intimidated by your high energy, and who dare to be as vigorous as you. I hope you have an array of allies like that in your sphere right now. In my astrological opinion, you especially need their kind of stimulation. It’s an excellent time to invite influences that will nudge you out of your status quo and help you glide into a new groove. Are you willing to be challenged and changed?

TAURUS

(April 20-May 20): Author Toni Morrison thought that beauty was “an absolute necessity” and not “a privilege or an indulgence.” She said that “finding, incorporating, and then representing beauty is what humans do.” In her view, we can’t live without beauty “any more than we can do without dreams or oxygen.” All she said is even truer for Tauruses and Libras than the other signs. And you Bulls have an extra wrinkle: It’s optimal if at least some of the beauty in your life is useful. Your mandate is summed up well by author Anne Michaels: “Find a way to make beauty necessary; find a way to make necessity beautiful.” I hope you’ll do a lot of that in the coming weeks.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Philosopher Alfred North Whitehead said, “It requires a very unusual mind to make an analysis of the obvious.” I nominate you to perform that service in the coming days, both for yourself and your allies. No one will be better able than you to discern the complexities of seemingly simple situations. You will also have extraordinary power to help people appreciate and even embrace paradox. So be a crafty master of candor and transparency, Gemini. Demonstrate the benefits of being loyal to the objective evidence rather than to the easy and popular delusions. Tell the interesting truths.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Cancerian poet Lucille Clifton sent us all an invitation: “Won’t you celebrate with me what i have shaped into a kind of life? i had no model. i made it up here on this bridge between starshine and clay, my one hand holding tight my other hand.” During October, fellow Cancerian, I propose you draw inspiration from her heroic efforts to create herself. The coming weeks will be a time when you can achieve small miracles as you bolster your roots, nourish your soulful confidence, and ripen your uniqueness.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Rob the Astrologer: This morning I put extra mousse on my hair and blow-dried the hell out of it, so now it is huge and curly and impossibly irresistible. I’m wearing bright orange shoes so everyone will stare at my feet, and a blue silk blouse that is much too high-fashion to wear to work. It has princess seams and matches my eyes. I look fantastic. How could anyone of any gender resist drinking in my magnificence? I realize you’re a spiritual type and may not approve of my showmanship, but I wanted you to know that what I’m doing is a totally valid way to be a Leo. —Your Leo teacher Brooke.” Dear Brooke: Thank you for your helpful instruction! It’s true that I periodically need to loosen my tight grip on my high principles. I must be more open to appreciating life’s raw feed. I hope you will perform a similar service for everyone you encounter in the coming weeks.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): How to be the best Virgo you can be during the coming weeks: (1) You must relish, not apologize for, your precise obsessions. (2) Be as nosy as you need to be to discover the core truths hidden beneath the surface. Risk asking almost too many questions in your subtle drive to know everything. (3) Help loved ones and allies shrink and heal their insecurities. (4) Generate beauty and truth through your skill at knowing what needs to be purged and shed. (5) Always have your Bullshit Detector with you. Use it liberally. (6) Keep in close touch with the conversations between your mind and body.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Libran approach to fighting for what’s right shouldn’t involve getting into loud arguments or trying to manipulate people into seeing things your way. If you’re doing what you were born to do, you rely on gentler styles of persuasion. Are you doing what you were born to do? Have you become skilled at using clear, elegant language to say what you mean? Do you work in behalf of the best outcome rather than merely serving your ego? Do you try to understand why others feel the way they do, even if you disagree with their conclusions? I hope you call on these superpowers in the coming weeks. We all need you to be at the height of your potency.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “One bad apple spoils the rest” is an idiom in the English language. It refers to the idea that if one apple rots as it rests in a pile of apples, the rest will quickly rot, too. It’s based on a scientific fact. As an apple decays, it emanates the gas ethylene, which speeds up decay in nearby apples. A variant of this idiom has recently evolved in relation to police misconduct, however. When law enforcement officials respond to such allegations, they say that a few “bad apples” in the police force aren’t representative of all the other cops. So I’m wondering which side of the metaphor is at work for you right now, Scorpio. Should you immediately expunge the bad apple in your life? Or should you critique and tolerate it? Should you worry about the possibility of contamination, or can you successfully enforce damage control? Only you know the correct answer.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Sagittarians know best how to have fun even when life sucks. Your daily rhythm may temporarily become a tangle of boring or annoying tasks, yet you can still summon a knack for enjoying yourself. But let me ask you this: How are your instincts for drumming up amusement when life doesn’t suck? Are you as talented at whipping up glee and inspiration when the daily rhythm is smooth and groovy? I suspect we will gather evidence to answer those questions in the coming weeks. Here’s my prediction: The good times will spur you to new heights of creating even more good times.

Join us in reading October’s book of the month! OCTOBER’S THEME:

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

Discussion:

Wednesday, October 26, at 6pm on Zoom BOOK OF T HE MONT H :

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin

Register at independent.com/ indybookclub

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): More than you might realize, people look to you for leadership and regard you as a role model. This will be extra true in the coming weeks. Your statements and actions will have an even bigger impact than usual. Your influence will ripple out far beyond your sphere. In light of these developments, which may sometimes be subtle, I encourage you to upgrade your sense of responsibility. Make sure your integrity is impeccable. Another piece of advice, too: Be an inspiring example to people without making them feel like they owe you anything.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Rapper-songwriter Nicki Minaj says, “You should never feel afraid to become a piece of art. It’s exhilarating.” I will go further, Aquarius. I invite you to summon ingenuity and joy in your efforts to be a work of art. The coming weeks will be an ideal time for you to tease out more of your inner beauty so that more people can benefit from it. I hope you will be dramatic and expressive about showing the world the full array of your interesting qualities. P.S.: Please call on the entertainment value of surprise and unpredictability.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-March 20): Author Robertson Davies declared, “One learns one’s mystery at the price of one’s innocence.” It sounds poetic, but it doesn’t apply to most of you Pisceans—especially now. Here’s what I’ve concluded: The more you learn your mystery, the more innocent you become. Please note I’m using the word “innocence” in the sense defined by author Clarissa Pinkola Estés. She wrote: “Ignorance is not knowing anything and being attracted to the good. Innocence is knowing everything and still being attracted to the good.”

Homework: Reward yourself with a gift for an accomplishment few people know about. Testify: Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 6, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

49


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

CLASSIFIEDS S A N T A

B A R B A R A

I N D E P E N D E N T

Reaching 68,000 Readers Each Week

EMPLOYMENT ADMIN/CLERICAL ISLA VISTA Community Services District website: Islavistacsd.ca.gov 970 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista POSITION: IVCSD Management Assistant ABOUT THE IVCSD: Isla Vista, CA is a close‑knit oceanside town along the South‑Central Coast in Santa Barbara County. It is known for its youthful atmosphere and the adventurous spirit of its residents. The Isla Vista Community Services District (IVCSD) was formed in early 2017 (Pursuant to Government Code § 61250) after decades of struggles for self‑governance by the residents of this unincorporated community. The District adopted 2022‑2023 budget includes $1.3 million for community facilities and programs, public safety services, a rental housing mediation program, a community beautification program, a compost collection service, and more. We have a small staff of a General Manager, Community Engagement Director, Community Spaces Manager, Compost Collective Manager, IV Beautiful Manager, and interns; along with many contractors and community partners. The IVCSD Management Assistant will support the General Manager in the administration of the District internal operations. JOB DESCRIPTION: Process biweekly payroll. Assist District accountant and General Manager with accounts payable & receivable. Maintain communication with vendors. Develop an understanding of the District record retention policies; organize and maintain District records (contracts, resolutions, employee files, minutes, etc). Assist General Manager in the creation of documents: contracts, resolutions, policies, etc; and in maintaining the District policy manual and the policy development process. Also assist in performing the Secretary/ Clerk duties for the Board, including Brown Act agenda noticing, meeting minutes, and agenda creation. Assist General Manager with problem solving operational roadblocks and efficiencies. Work on special projects as assigned by the General Manager. This position may include work on some weekends and evenings, for example to assist with Brown Act noticing. KNOWLEDGE OF: Google Suite; Drive, Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, etc with advanced‑level functions; Trello as a work management tool (trainable); Office administration norms and practices; Some knowledge of local government in California is preferred but not required; SKILL/ABILITY TO; Write strongly, clearly, and effectively for both external communication and internal communication. Apply an understanding of a body of standardized information, regulations, procedures, and operations to general administrative work. Use judgment and initiative to select and apply the most appropriate guidelines and to make minor deviations in guidelines and processes to adapt to specific cases. Listen to and understand lengthy and technically complex questions, complaints, and explanations. Differentiate between decisions management assistant is empowered to make and those that should be referred to a higher level. IDEAL CANDIDATE: Has the willingness to understand and be a part of the Isla Vista unique community culture. Can work independently with multiple priorities/tasks. Maintains a friendly, professional and approachable demeanor. Keeps internal matters confidential. Is responsive and

50

corresponds with colleagues, constituents, and stakeholders in a timely manner. All employees of the IVCSD are public servants of Isla Vista and represent a community investment in good governance. As such, employees shall strive to be efficient in their service and conduct themselves professionally and courteously in all dealings with the public and fellow employees. IVCSD Policy Manual. EXPERIENCE & EDUCATION: A bachelor’s or associateâs degree from an accredited College/University, or equivalent experience, is preferred but not required. 2 years of experience working in an office environment is preferred but not required. PAY: $36.00/hr for 20 hours per week. Silver PPO health insurance (value of $7,550/year), provided 30 days after hire. Retirement ‑ Required participation in a 457(b) retirement plan, 9% employer contribution and 3% employee contribution. Receives 7.5 vacation days per year, sick days provided. Hourly | Benefited, At‑will position Important Dates: Recruitment Opens: September 28, 2022 Deadline for Applications: October 13, 2022 Invitations to Interview: October 14, 2022 Interviews Conducted: October 17‑21 2022 Target Hire Date: October 24, 2022 Position requires a background check. How to Apply: Submit an application here: https:// forms.gle/TecKr8sKmSbxAY5P8 Email the General Manager your resume and cover letter: generalmanager@ islavistacsd.com The Isla Vista Community Services District provides equal employment opportunities to all employees and applicants for employment without discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, gender, sexual orientation, age, national origin, physical or mental disability or veteran status.

COMPUTER/TECH PROCORE TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. has multiple openings in Carpinteria, CA. Telecommuting permitted from anywhere in the U.S. SENIOR BUSINESS INTELLIGENCE ANALYST, Job # US‑2022‑03‑004AS: Identify business intelligence, reporting, & data analysis needs. DIRECTOR OF PRODUCT, Platform Flexibility, Job # US‑2022‑02‑PR Scale customizable solutions for new markets & customer segments. Build a platform that empowers the personalization of user experience for a broad range of stakeholders, fitting the needs of a diverse array of markets. STAFF SOFTWARE ENGINEERS, Job # US‑2022‑02‑005/ Job # US‑2022‑02‑006AS Evolve our existing codebase from monolithic Rails application into modular system with clear, well enforced domain boundaries & coherent public interface. Reference job # & Mail resume to: Attn: Global Talent/DN/P‑1, Procore Technologies, Inc., 6309 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013. An EOE.

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

EDUCATION

PARAEDUCATOR SPECIAL Education – Level 1 (PSE‑1) Our Ideal Candidate: A committed professional with a nurturing and patient demeanor who enjoys working with elementary aged children in need of specialized assistance. A team player who contributes to a positive and efficient work environment on behalf of colleagues, students, families, and our Goleta Union School District community. General Description: Goleta Union School District is seeking an experienced Paraeducator Special Education‑ Level I to work under the direction of their assigned administrator and certificated staff, by assisting in providing instruction and supervision to individual students or small groups of students; observes, monitors and reports student progress regarding academics, social skills, and behavior; performs related duties as assigned. Requirements: • High School Diploma/GED and one of the following (per ESEA): ‑ Two years of college (48 units) ‑ A.A. degree or higher ‑ Passing Status of the GUSD Basic Competency Exam or the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) • First Aid Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • CPR Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • Behavior Management Certification (e.g., CPI) Apply Online at: www.gusd.us We look forward to having you as part of our Goleta Union School District team!

PARAEDUCATOR SPECIAL Education – Level 2 (PSE‑2) Our Ideal Candidate: A committed professional with a nurturing and patient demeanor who enjoys working with elementary aged children in need of specialized assistance. A team player who contributes to a positive and efficient work environment on behalf of colleagues, students, families, and our Goleta Union School District community. General Description: Goleta Union School District is seeking an experienced Paraeducator Special Education‑ Level I to work under the direction of their assigned administrator and certificated staff, by assisting in providing instruction and supervision to individual students or small groups of students; observes, monitors and reports student progress regarding academics, social skills, and behavior; performs related duties as assigned; assist students in developing various self‑ help, social and community skills; assist students with essential life functions. Requirements: • High School Diploma/GED and one of the following (per ESEA): ‑ Two years of college (48 units) ‑ A.A. degree or higher ‑ Passing Status of the GUSD Basic Competency Exam or the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) • First Aid Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • CPR Certification (Infant, Child, Adult) • Behavior Management Certification

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

(e.g., CPI) Apply Online at: www.gusd.us We look forward to having you as part of our Goleta Union School District team!

PLAYGROUND SUPERVISOR Our Ideal Candidate: A committed professional with a nurturing and patient demeanor who enjoys working with elementary aged children, who is friendly, caring and passionate to help keep our children safe. A team player who contributes to a positive and efficient work environment on behalf of colleagues, students, families, and our Goleta Union School District community. General Description: Goleta Union School District is seeking Playground Supervisor’s that under the direction of an assigned principal, supervises a variety of students activities and monitors students’ behavior at school, e.g., in the cafeteria and restrooms, at gates, on the playground, in hallways on campus, and in parking lots; performs a variety of routine clerical duties in support of assigned students; supervises students on campus suspension and detention. Requirements: • High School Diploma/GED • Experience working with groups of children in an organized environment is desirable Apply Online at: www.gusd.us We look forward to having you as part of our Goleta Union Schoo l District team!

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

LETTERS & SCIENCES ACADEMIC ADVISING Has expert knowledge in current university and college degree requirements, and in college policy, procedures and precedents related to undergraduate matters. Contributes to design, implementation and evaluation of revisions in university or college policy or procedure. Analyzes and acts independently on petitions for exceptions to college and university policy. Uses knowledge to advise students in developing educational plans that will help identify and achieve life and career goals. Supervises students in academic difficulty and develops appropriate action plans. Acts as Dean’s representative to assigned academic departments and, in that role, advises departments on changes and additions to courses and academic requirements for majors. Provides support and training to departmental undergraduate advisers. Advises College of Letters and Science Faculty Executive Committee on departmental revisions to majors and courses. Also responsible for various programs and implementation of academic policy as assigned. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience. Experience

in a higher education administration, student services, or academic role. Demonstrated experience working with a diverse student population. Experience in academic advising in higher education program/college/or school. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,100 ‑ $57,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39433

experience. Must possess excellent written and verbal communication skills and the ability to analyze an issue, research the procedures and policies, and use good judgment to implement policy. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43403

BUSINESS OFFICER

BILLING ASSISTANT ACADEMIC PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

SOUTH HALL ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Administers all academic personnel activities for the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Linguistics. Is responsible for all academic merit and promotions cases, faculty recruitment and appointment cases, recruiting and hiring temporary lecturers, and UCPath payroll. Responsibilities include working with the Office of International Student and Scholars on visa requests, assisting visiting scholars, facilitating leave requests in a timely manner, attending trainings, and maintaining a working knowledge of the Academic Personnel Manual and campus Red Binder. Works closely with faculty, the Department Chair, and the College of Letters & Science Senior Academic Personnel Analyst. Reqs: High School diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative

$24.61/hr ‑ $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43334

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Using a computerized receivable system known as BARC, provides customer service to students and parents. Assists in financial tasks, such as daily balancing and preparation of financial journals for a variety of ongoing operational programs such as payment plan activity, private/agency loans & scholarships, short‑term loans, and agency billing. Provides campus department support with non‑student BARC account set‑up and processing. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent experience. Experience working in an administrative, clerical, or operations role providing general financial support and customer service. Demonstrated working knowledge of administrative procedures and processes. 1‑3 years experience working with Microsoft Office Suite, including word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications. Requires good verbal and written communication skills, active listening, critical thinking, multi‑task, and time management skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check.

INTERDISCIPLINARY HUMANITIES CENTER The Interdisciplinary Humanities Center (IHC) is a center serving the humanities, fine arts, and the humanistic social sciences. Under the general direction of the IHC Director, the Business Officer (BO) is responsible for the full range of administrative management functions of the IHC. Management responsibilities encompass IHC administration, support services, technical support services, contract and grant management, purchasing and financial management, staff personnel, facilities maintenance and renovation, and safety programs. Long‑term planning in the areas of financial management. Owing to the complexity of the funding lines for the IHC, the BO must successfully engineer the effective and proper expenditure of IHC funds in ways that most efficiently utilize the funds for the intended purposes and in a timely fashion. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Financial management and forecasting experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $68,700‑$78,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS !!OLD GUITARS WANTED!! GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN, Etc. 1930’s to 1980’s. TOP DOLLAR PAID. CALL TOLL FREE 1‑866‑433‑8277 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 1‑877‑649‑5043 (AAN CAN) BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855‑761‑1725 BECOME A published author. We want to read your book! Dorrance Publishing trusted since 1920. Consultation, production, promotion & distribution. Call for free author’s guide 833‑719‑3029 or visit dorranceinfo.com/acp BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920. Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http:// dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) CREDIT CARD Debt Relief! Reduce payment by up to 50%! Get one LOW affordable payment/month. Reduce interest. Stop calls. FREE no‑obligation consultation Call 1‑855‑761‑1456 (AAN CAN) DID YOU KNOW Newspaper‑generated content is so valuable it’s taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted, copied, edited, and emailed countless times throughout the day by others? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV FOR $79.99/mo for 12 months with CHOICE Package. Watch your favorite live sports, news & entertainment anywhere. First 3 months

of HBOMax, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and Epix included! Directv is #1 in Customer Satisfaction (JD Power & Assoc.) Some restrictions apply. Call 1‑888‑641‑5762. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV SATELLITE TV Service Starting at $74.99/month! Free Installation! 160+ channels available. Call Now to Get the Most Sports & Entertainment on TV! 877‑310‑2472 DISCOUNT AIR travel. Call Flight Services for best pricing on domestic & international flights inside & from the US. Serving United, Delta, American & Southwest & many more. Free quote! Have travel dates ready! 844‑951‑2014 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23 1‑866‑566‑1815 (AAN CAN) DO YOU owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 877‑414‑2089. (Hours: Mon‑Fri 7am‑5pm PST) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Help Find Missing Kids! Call 1‑888‑491‑1453. (CalSCAN) ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off EntirePurchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑424‑7581 (Cal‑SCAN) HUGHESNET ‑ Finally, super‑fast internet no matter where you live. 25 Mbps just $59.99/mo! Unlimited Data is Here. Stream Video. Bundle TV & Internet. Free Installation. Call 866‑499‑0141 NEVER CLEAN your gutters again! Affordable, professionally installed gutter guards protect your gutters and home from debris and leaves forever! For a FREE Quote call: 844‑499‑0277 NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 1‑855‑667‑0380 (Cal‑SCAN) PAYING TOP CA$H FOR MEN’S SPORT WATCHES! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 888‑320‑1052 PAYING TOP cash for men’s sportwatches! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona,

EMPLOYMENT consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 42849

CATERING SUPERVISOR

CAMPUS DINING The Catering Supervisor is responsible for event preparation and supervision. Acts as onsite manager at events throughout the year. Acts as onsite manager at events throughout the year. Core job responsibilities are Event Set‑Up, Student Staff Management and Event Management. Responsible for adhering to budgeted labor costs while also ensuring the highest degree of excellence in service and meeting the client’s needs. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. 1‑3 years of demonstrated ability to organize and manage a variety of events while maintaining a high standard of excellence, including ability and willingness to prioritize and make necessary adjustments for last minute events, or equivalent combination of experience. Proven ability to train, schedule and supervise student

GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 833‑603‑3236

Request free no obligation quote. 1‑877‑539‑0299

PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator. $0 Money Down + Low Monthly Payment Options. Request a FREE Quote ‑Call now before the next power outage: 1‑844‑439‑5645 (SCAN)

TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920‑1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877‑589‑0747 (AAN CAN)

PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator $0 Down + Low Monthly Pmt Request a free Quote. Call before the next power outage: 1‑844‑334‑8353

TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 866‑243‑5931. (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET). Computer with internet is required.

PROTECT YOUR home from pests safely and affordably. Pest, rodent, termite and mosquito control. Call for a quote or inspection today 844‑394‑9278 PUT ON your TV Ears & hear TV w/ unmatched clarity. TV Ears Original ‑ originally $129.95 ‑ now w/ this special offer only $59.95 w/code MCB59! 1‑833‑530‑1955 SAFE STEP. North America’s #1 Walk‑in tub. Comprehensive lifetime warranty. Top‑of‑the‑line installation and service. Now featuring our free shower package & $1600 off ‑ limited time! Financing available. 1‑855‑417‑1306 SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 1‑844‑410‑9609! (M‑F 8am‑8pm Central) (Cal‑SCAN) SPECTRUM INTERNET as low as $29.99, call to see if you qualify for ACP and free internet. No Credit Check. Call Now! 833‑955‑0905 THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. CNPA’s Advertising Services’ power to connect to nearly 13 million of the state’s readers who are an engaged audience, makes our services an indispensable marketing solution. For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing an election is how campaign dollars are spent. Get the best ROI by using our deep relationships in every community in California. Our on‑the‑ground knowledge is indispensable to campaigns that want results. For more info on multi‑market ethnic and non‑ethnic solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option.

VIVINT SMART security. Professionally installed. 1 connected system for total peace of mind. Free professional installation! 4 free months of monitoring! Call to customize your system. 1‑833‑841‑0737 WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833‑664‑1530 (AAN CAN)

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES ESTATE SALE Multi Family Assorted furniture, beautiful hutch, quality queen sleeper, and reg sofas, queen bed, rocking chairs, oak desks, tables, wrought iron glass coffee table, garage yard and antique tools, kitchenware, linens, clothes, vintage collectible treasures, books, and much more, all inexpensively priced! 5377 Agana Drive SB Saturday, October 8th 8am‑1pm

CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be

served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California at all times during employment. Master’s degree from an accredited school of social work; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Three years of post‑master’s experience; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Licensed Clinical Social Worker license at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience and within limits of the grant. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

Sunrise 6:59 Sunset 6:30

Low

High

High

Thu 6

1:53 am -0.3

8:33 am 4.7

1:53 pm 1.1

7:54 pm 5.8

Fri 7

2:31 am -0.2

9:01 am 4.1

2:40 pm 1.3

8:45 pm 5.7

Sat 8

3:05 am 0.0

9:29 am 5.3

3:25 pm 0.1

9:34 pm 5.4

Sun 9

3:37 am 0.5

9:57 am 5.6

4:08 pm 0.6

10:21 pm 5.0

Mon 10

4:07 am 0.1

10:24 am 5.7

4:51 pm 0.3

11:09 pm 4.6

Tue 11

4:35 am 1.6

10:51 am 5.7

5:35 pm 0.2

11:59 pm 4.1

Wed 12

5:02 am 2.0

11:18 am 5.6

6:20 pm 0.3

5:25 am 2.6

11:46 am 5.4

7:10 pm 0.5

Thu 13

12:55 am 3.8

9D

17

25 D

31 H source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Finished at the Bottom” -- bottom row on your keyboard, that is.

REAL ESTATE MONEY TO LOAN RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 1‑818‑248‑0000. Broker‑principal DRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑SCAN)

APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT STUDIOS $1440, Studios with patio $1500, 1BDs $1560, 1BDs with patio $1620, in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 805‑967‑6614

(CONT.)

staff or equivalent combination of experience. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Must be able to drive a van and/or box truck. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Able to work flexible hours including nights and weekends. $46,100.00 ‑ $49,878.00/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/12/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43298

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Open until filled. Job #41572

DEAF TRANSLATOR INTERPRETER

STUDENT SPECIAL SERVICES The Interpreter/ Translator works between spoken English and American Sign Language and provides communication between UCSB students and faculty, staff, and students for academic classes, various meetings, and social functions related to academic and University sponsored activities. Reqs: RID National Certification. Notes: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. $62.92 ‑ $73.26/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/11/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43147

Continued on p. 52

Across

1. One of the former Dutch Antilles 6. H.S. diploma alternative 9. Oceanic movement 13. Hacienda homes 14. “Better Call Saul” costar Seehorn whose name is pronounced “ray” 16. Open up ___ of worms 17. *Casual term for a trio of great European composers 19. Half of a golf course 20. *Got a little rest 22. One of 17-Across 25. Simple 26. Feel discomfort 27. Greek vowels 30. “Please stay!” 31. Lip shiner 33. In layers 35. Percolate 36. *Variant bingo wins that are really just both main diagonals at once 37. “A horse is a horse” horse 41. Dealer’s request 43. Other song on a 45 44. When, colloquially 47. Lion’s exclamation 49. “Down with thee!” 50. Hubble with a space telescope named after him 51. Restaurant employee 53. *Requirement for drawing a dragon, according to Strong Bad (to add teeth, “spinities,” and angry eyebrows) 58. Like an easy job, slangily 59. *IRS forms used to report business income or loss INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

63. “Chocolat” actress Lena 64. “The Ballad of Reading ___” (Oscar Wilde) 65. Moroccan capital 66. Air France fleet members, once 67. Actor Sheridan of “Ready Player One” 68. Casual stroll

34. Former Canadian baseball player 36. “Dynamite” K-pop band 38. ___-To-Go (Fortnite item for immediate teleports) 39. Actress Falco 40. Woodland grazers 42. Half a “Mork & Mindy” signoff 43. Display of daring 44. Artworks painted on dry 1. Stage routine plaster 2. “Go team!” cheer 45. Anheuser-Busch nonalcoholic 3. Practical purpose brew 4. Unit of cookies 46. Fesses up proudly 5. Makes embarrassed 48. Blown away 6. Kinnear of “Little Miss Su 52. Five Pillars religion nshine” 7. “___ (Nothing Else I Can Say)” 54. Flavor enhancer that’s “king of flavor,” in Uncle Roger (2008 Lady Gaga song) videos 8. Good thing to stay out of 55. Aspiring doc’s exam 9. *Neutral-colored candies 56. Ship greeting discontinued in 1995 57. TV component? 10. Least welcoming 60. Fall back gradually 11. “Mother” metal performer 61. Orioles legend Ripken Jr. Glenn 12. “Romanian Rhapsody No. 2” 62. Part of many Quebec place names composer Georges Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For 15. Shakespeare’s Bottom had ©2022 answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. the head of one Reference puzzle #1103 18. Junkyard car’s coating LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 21. Clarinet relative 22. “Are you using your own ___?” (self check-out query) 23. Stir (up) 24. Lotion additive 28. Ended in ___ 29. Icelandic post-punk band ___ RÛs 30. Pediatricians, e.g. 32. *They’re actually different letters than the ones with the tildes

Down

OCTOBER OCTOBER 6,6, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

51 51


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT DIRECTOR, UCSB CAMPUS STORE

UNIVERSITY CENTER BOOKSTORE Under the general direction of the Associate Vice Chancellor, the UCSB Campus Store Director provides overall leadership to the Campus Store in the accomplishment of its academic and financial missions. Manages and develops a complex retail center responsive to the educational mission of UC Santa Barbara. Oversees an annual sales budget of $10 million, provides leadership and direction to 16 career and 85 student staff, serves as member of the UCen Directors/ Stakeholders team, meeting monthly to discuss building operations and events, and is an ex‑officio member of the UCen Governance Board. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. 5‑7 years of retail management experience. Broad knowledge of the organization’s processes, protocols and procedures with a focus on budget, account and fund management and / or personnel management under labor contract(s) and personnel policy. Ability to build and maintain relationships with stakeholders and business partners. Strong merchandising skills and proven leader in designing and implementation of traffic driving initiatives. Skills in organization and customer service to effectively manage multiple important priorities. Broad knowledge of financial analysis and reporting techniques, human resources, and risk management planning and /or accounting and payroll. Strong verbal and written communication skills; ability to influence/persuade all levels of staff. Proven ability to organize departmental work functions in an effective and efficient manner. Broad knowledge of common organization specific and other computer programs. Proven skills to quickly evaluate complex issues and identify multiple options for resolution. Demonstrated management and conflict resolution skills to effectively lead and motivate others. Notes: Must be able to work some evenings and weekends. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $91,300 ‑ $141,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/14/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43428 ETL DATA DEVELOPER sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Deliver timely & accurate data to the org. May work from home. Req: BS+5 yrs. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: SK0830)

52

will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/14/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43421

FINANCIAL ANALYST

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Provides management, leadership, and expertise pertaining to fiscal functions to the Associate Directors, Director and Managers. These functions include fiscal management, income and recharge accounts, billing and administration, payroll expenses and development of accounting systems for a budget in excess of 18 million dollar. Monitors departmental S&E and Payroll budgets; prepares reports and cost analyses; reviews monthly financial statements and analyzes spending patterns; oversees department payroll expenses. General areas of responsibility include: Ensures compliance with UC payment and income accounting procedures. Creates, maintains and analyzes financial and historical trend reports. Monitor compliance to Terms and Conditions for vendor blanket agreements. Assists with developing financial content for agreements and documents pertaining to Operations to accurately reflect service/product value versus cost of product or service rendered. Reqs: Associate’s Degree in related area, or equivalent experience and training. 1‑3 Years experience in AP, AR, billing and collections, or equivalent combination of training and experience Demonstrated budgetary and fiscal management skills. Strong communication, analytical, spreadsheet, and computer skills. Excellent organizational skills and ability to prioritize work in order to meet continual deadlines while making allowances for interruptions. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Responsible for managing all financial transactions on departmental operating budgets. Maintains current knowledge of policies of the University; Accounting, Travel, Purchasing and Business Services. Demonstrates flexibility in learning, interpreting, and adapting new policies and procedures. Maintains effective communication and individual working relationships with the Associate Directors and other HDAE Units. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $34.16 ‑ $35.58/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #42133

FINANCIAL ANALYST

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES Supports Transportation & Parking Services by performing investigative research and analysis of cash management practices, training requirements, and reconciliations. Assures that all PCI‑SS (Payment Card Industry Security Standards) are followed and adhered to for all transactional functions throughout the department in audit and reconciliation processes. Advises TPS management on implementing solutions and performing necessary training on cash management and

THE INDEPENDENT

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

FINANCE ASSISTANT

PROFESSIONAL AND CONTINUING EDUCATION Processes all financial transactions for Professional and Continuing Education, including accounts receivable and serves as a backup for accounts payable transactions. Generates invoices, track and record payments, make deposits, performs monthly reviews and reconciliation of ledgers, and ensures compliance with University, Federal, and State accounting policies and procedures on all transactions. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative work experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$26.32/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants

|

OCTOBER 6, 2022

policies/procedures. Performs research with the goal of identifying training needs for services/systems within the Department including the units of Permit, Event, and TAP Sales as well as Citation payments. Works with the management team to establish appropriate internal financial audit processes and practices. Conducts ad hoc financial analysis and/ or reporting for a wide variety of projects and systems. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area or equivalent experience and training. AP/ AR and general ledger experience or equivalent experience and training. Experience with computer applications, such as Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and any other related financial software. Experience reviewing, processing, and approving standardized financial data and transactions. Strong analytical skills with experience in making and communicating data‑driven insights. Strong interpersonal skills, attention to detail, organizational skills, effective verbal and written communication skills, sound judgment and decision making. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39 ‑ $28.65/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42831

Program in Comparative Literature. Prepares all documents for financial transactions. Interprets policy and advises faculty, staff and students of proper university guidelines regarding policies for personnel, purchasing, entertainment and travel. Analyzes expenditures and spending patterns, resolving discrepancies. Reconciles financial transactions with the general and payroll ledgers. Produces accurate monthly cost projections and financial reports for management review. Participates in fiscal closing, budget projections and financial planning. Administers and coordinates employment activities and processes personnel actions for faculty, staff and students via the UCPath System. Ensures data integrity and compliance with University, Federal, agency and union policies. Maintains current knowledge of University policies and procedures of Accounting, Travel, Human Resources, Academic Personnel, Graduate Division, Purchasing and Business Services on all fund sources. Reqs: High School diploma or GED. 1‑3 years financial work experience. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. 100% time until 6/30/2024, after which it may become a 50% time position. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/12/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43165

FINANCIAL AND BUDGET COORDINATOR

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

SOUTH HALL ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Provides financial support to the departments and programs in the South Hall Administrative Support Center. Duties include monthly ledger reconciliation, issuance of payments and reimbursements, travel, payroll, storage of records, posting, and processing of all financial records, etc. Responsible for monitoring all department/program accounts and generating reports and data as necessary. Updates and inputs all transactions in the GUS financial shadow system. Assists faculty, students, and staff with processing various awards, grants, and fellowships for research, student aid, and instructional purposes. Processes gifts and monitors endowment accounts. Responsible for arrangements and all financial aspects of conferences and events. Reqs: Knowledge and understanding of accounting and financial policies and controls. Experience working in a college or university setting. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/12/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43291

FINANCIAL AND PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Manages all departmental fiscal activities and accounting systems for the Departments of French & Italian and German & Slavic Studies, and the

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Responsible for purchasing, and other financial transactions for the Mechanical Engineering department, including, but not limited to travel reimbursements, entertainment, federal express and memberships. Ensures compliance to UC policies and procedures. Keeps current on related policies. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative experience. Must possess excellent communication, organizational, and computer skills including Microsoft and Google applications. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $28.27/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43373

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT SPECIAL SERVICES Responsible for all facets of employment and payroll activities. Serves as a liaison with academic departments, the campus accounting office, financial aid, and the Office of International Students and Scholars. Processes Personnel Payroll System transactions for student and staff employment. Processes biweekly and monthly payroll transactions and processes related leave reporting through the campus systems. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent experience. Payroll experience. Microsoft Office and Google Drive experience. Notes: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action

Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/11/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43153

FINANCIAL SUPPORT ANALYST

GRADUATE DIVISION Participates in the central administration of Graduate Student Financial Support across both fellowship and employment based fee remission programs. Develops and manages reporting for the administration of central fellowship funds, performs complex technical analysis and calculations to help generate campus resource allocations, develops and maintains the Division’s budget for student support in both current year and multi‑year contexts, and performs account reconciliation and fiscal close functions. Performs fiscal and financial system audit and compliance functions for both graduate fellowship and employment based fee remission functions. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Proficient with MS Office and database applications. Experience analyzing and reporting on large data sets. Requires understanding of accounting principles. Ability to perform financial and policy analysis. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $62,300‑$73,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/14/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 43425

GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATOR

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCE Responsible for managing all aspects of the two graduate programs (M.S. and Ph.D.) in a variety of emphases in Earth Science. Acts as department liaison to the Graduate Division. Assures that graduate students meet the academic, teaching and research requirements of both the department and the university. Identifies problems, suggests solutions, and develops procedures for graduate affairs. Advises approximately 50 students on all aspects of the graduate program. Administers and tracks annually block grant funds, TA allocations, recruitment funds, gift funds, and university policy and procedural information to graduate students, faculty, staff, applicants and potential applicants to the graduate program. Coordinates graduate recruitment, admission and orientation. Creates and manages a computerized database for all graduate student records. Reqs: High school diploma or GED. Ability to use various programs (Excel, Word, Google) to complete required tasks. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $26.32/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40859

HDAE SPECIAL PROJECTS ANALYST

HOUSING, DINING, & AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES (HDAE) The HDAE Special Projects Analyst provides a wide range of high level administrative, analytical, and project support to the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor and Housing, Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises (HDAE). Manages projects for HDAE on a wide range of topics from conception to completion, including setting objectives; developing processes; and planning, coordinating, directing, and implementing activities. Under the direction of the Chief of Staff, the incumbent will work independently and directly with cross‑unit stakeholders on short and long term special projects and initiatives, conducting in‑depth analyses and developing solutions that align with leadership priorities and business needs. Supervises one career Administrative Analyst. The Special Projects Analyst provides executive support in a one‑on‑one working relationship, anticipates needs before being told, understands priorities and sets deadlines accordingly, is engaged and committed to the goals of HDAE. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree and/or equivalent experience and training. Minimum of two (2) years experience providing executive level support and/or supervision. Strong experience providing a full range of high‑level independent administrative support combined with proven skill to coordinate complex activities and use independent judgment to organize and prioritize office functions. Ability to anticipate the needs of management. Ability to adapt to a wide range of leadership styles. Ability to use discretion and maintain confidentiality. Strong analytical / problem‑solving skills. Experience analyzing and identifying problems, independently resolving discrepancies with ability to recommend solutions, contributing effectively to support organizational objectives. Strong skills in researching and synthesizing large amounts of data for preparing sound and relevant proposals / analyses. Skill in independently researching, compiling, organizing, interpreting and selecting data and materials from various sources. Ability to accurately interpret and implement policies and procedures and effectively communicate and disseminate information. Ability to develop clear, concise, and accurate reports and recommendations for management. Proven ability to multi‑task with demanding timeframes. Proven organizational, office management, project management and administration skills. Extensive organizational, analysis and decision‑making skills to continually prioritize between long and short term needs, to tolerate rapid shifts in direction and competing demands and constant requests for priority changes from a variety of sources, keep track of ongoing projects and tasks simultaneously and meet multiple concurrent deadlines. Notes: Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $62,300‑$89,900/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/10/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43174

LEAD LABORER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Serves as working lead for team of Sr. Custodians, Sr. Building Maintenance Worker, student employees and seasonal workers, working various assignments. Responsible for work

assignment and quality, safety, employee training, building security, oversight of special projects and maintenance tasks, emergency response and customer service. Orders and distributes supplies, and equipment maintenance for building. Under the general supervision of the Custodial Supervisor or Residence Hall Manager, performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. Reqs: Minimum 3 years of custodial or maintenance work experience in an institution and/or commercial setting (college residence hall, hotel, resort, or school). Some computer experience, including Microsoft Office programs. Ability to motivate staff and maintain positive morale. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Experience in a customer service environment. Ability to communicate effectively with a diverse work force. Notes: Two positions available. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $21.33 ‑ $29.89/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/11/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43174

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Notes: Credentials verification completed and passed before employment and date of hire. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory background check completed and passed before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Office Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patience care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Days and hours are M‑F, 7:45am‑4:30pm (may be required to work TH evenings until 7:00pm). $23.97/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/14/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43395


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT NURSE PRACTITIONER‑ LIMITED

STUDENT HEALTH Responsible for gathering data, making hypotheses, identifying problems, implementing management plans and evaluation results of interventions both independently and collaboratively. The NP integrates health maintenance, disease prevention, physical diagnosis and treatment of common episodic and chronic problems in primary care with equal emphasis on health teaching and disease management. Reqs: BRN and current RN and Nurse Practitioner license, CA Furnishing license (DEA registration schedules 2‑5). Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting requirements of Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a BRN and current RN and Nurse Practitioner license, CA Furnishing license and DEA registrations 2‑5 at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violations is subject to disciplinary action. This is a limited at 40% position not to exceed 1,000 hours in a rolling one‑year period. Days/ Hours may vary but will equate to 16 hours/week. Student Health is closed between Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays. Salary commensurate with experience.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/17/22 Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43453

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT‑LIMITED

STUDENT HEALTH Works in a collaborative and collegial relationship with physicians, nurse practitioners and other clinical staff at UCSB Student Health. Responsibilities include evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of acute illnesses and injuries, providing brief mental health interventions, prescribing medications under the legal scope of practice and arranging follow up care. Procedures such as laceration repair, extremity splinting, incision and drainage of abscesses, wound care and management of IV fluids will be performed depending on training, experience and privileging by UCSB Student Health administration. Reqs:Current Physician Assistant license at all times during employment and DEA registration schedules 2‑5. Must be certified by the State Board of Medical Examiners or the National Board of Medical Examiners. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject

(CONT.)

to disciplinary action. This is a limited at 40% position not to exceed 1,000 hours in a rolling 12‑month period. Days/Hours may vary but will equate to 16 hours/week. Student Health is closed between Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/17/22 Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43450 PRINCIPAL TOOLING ENGINEER sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Setup, run & troubleshoot injection molding machines. May work from home. Req: BS+7 yrs. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: YL0615)

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

CLASSIC CARS

WANTED Running or not. We are local to S.B. Foreign/Domestic. Porsche, Mercedes, Ford, Chevy etc. We come to you.

805-699-0684

AUTO AUTO PARTS CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast ‑ FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1‑800‑245‑0398

CAR CARE/REPAIR

PROGRAM ADVISOR, RECIPROCAL EXCHANGES

EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM LOC Q UCEAP provides international education opportunities in over 40 countries to more than 5,000 UC students outbound and 1,500 Reciprocal exchange students each year. This position, under the direction of the Reciprocal Exchanges Director, completes routine assignments working toward mastery of tasks of moderate scope and complexity, with guidance from the supervisor. May exercise judgment within defined procedures and policies to determine appropriate action. Provides advising and administrative support in operational aspects of the work performed by the Reciprocity staff. Communicates on a daily basis with UC Study Center staff and partner university liaisons abroad, students and campus colleagues in a broad range of UC offices. Communication with students takes place remotely rather than in person. Supports the student’s program from pre‑application through return to the home university. Provides backup support for staff as requested. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent training and/or experience. Two years of office/clerical experience. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The UCEAP Systemwide Office is located in Goleta, CA (near UCSB). Position is eligible for remote or hybrid work arrangements. Work schedule to align with business hours, Pacific Time. Per UC policy, travel costs for non‑mandatory training and professional development will be reimbursed (up to) the expenses for travel to and from the UCEAP systemwide office (Goleta, CA) regardless of the elected remote work location. $24.64 ‑ $26.32/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/14/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 43192 SOFTWARE QUALITY MANAGER sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Engage perf team & act as voice of customer & quality org during dvlpmt process. May work from home. Req: MS+2 yrs. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: LP0114)

DONATE YOUR CAR OR TRUCK TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

LUXURY CARS WANTED! OLD Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE 1‑707‑339‑5994. Email: porscherestoration@yahoo.com (Cal‑SCAN)

SERVICE

DIRECTORY CAREGIVING SERVICES WANTED CAREGIVER ‑ Provides friendly companionship and assistance with daily personal care activities and household duties. Basic Salary: $30.05 per Hour 5 days a Week. Email,mewills07@ gmail.com.

HOME SERVICES DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23. 1‑866‑479‑1516 ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule free LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490

MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION VIAGRA users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Call Today 1‑877‑707‑5517 (AAN CAN) DENTAL INSURANCE ‑ Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance ‑ not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1‑888‑623‑3036 www.dental50plus.com/58 #6258 VIAGRA AND CIALIS USERS! 50 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00. 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 Hablamos Español

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DAVID HERMAN PAYNE NO: 22PR00407 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of DAVID HERMAN PAYNE. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Deena L. Lockhart in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Deena L. Lockhart be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 10/06/2022 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Deena L. Lockhart, J. Dan Lang & Associates, 5743 Corsa Avenue, Suite 213, Westlake Village, CA 91362; (818) 991‑7700, dan@jdlang.com. Published September 15, 22, 29 and October 6, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: EUNICE PALACIOS CASE NO.: 22PR00477 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: EUNICE PALACIOS. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Mark Watson in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: MARK WATSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 11/10/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 09/21/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg, Barnes & Barnes, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published October 6, 13, 20, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ALTON HAYES CASE NO.: 22PR00487 ELECTRONICALLY FILED, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, DARREL E. PARKER, EXECUTIVE OFFICER 9/30/2022, BY JAZMINE KILLIAN, DEPUTY. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: ALTON HAYES. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Marie Richardson in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that: Marie Richardson be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 11/14/2022 at 8:30 a.m. Dept: 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 312 East Cook Street, Building E, Santa Maria, CA 93454, Cook Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jerry J. Howard, Thyne Taylor Fox Howard, LLP, 205 East Carrillo Street, #100, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, 805‑963‑9958. Published October 6, 13, 20, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LUCILLE GENTRY LAFOND NO: 22PR00465 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of LUCILLE LAFOND, LUCILLE G. LAFOND, LUCILLE GENTRY LAFOND. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Samuel W. Lafond in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Samuel W. Lafond be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 11/10/2022 AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in

Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Connor C. Cote, Esq., 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, P.O. Box 20146, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146. (805) 966‑1204 Published September 22, 29, October 6, 2022. PETITION TO NOTICE OF ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ROBERT RYAN BAPTISTA NO: 22PR00431 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ROBERT RYAN BAPTISTA A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Mary Kathleen Baptista in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Mary Kathleen Baptista be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: on 10/13/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: L. Donald Boden, Griffith & Thornburgh, LLP, 8 East Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 805‑965‑5131. Published September 15, 22, 29 and October 6, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STUDIO DDK, 2023 Chapala Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Deborah D Karpinski (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by Deborah D Karpinski, Owner/Operator. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002303. Published September 22, 29, October 6, 13, 2022.

OCTOBER OCTOBER 6,6, 2022 2022 THE INDEPENDENT

53


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

(CONT.)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: JEANNE CERAMICS 1225 W Valerio Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Courtney J Reilly (same address); This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY COURTNEY REILLY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E54. FBN Number: 2022­0002325. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

CA 93108; Principled Business Solutions, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY MITCHELL MCCOY, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002337. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

93101; Centerline Counseling (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY JENNIFER TUCKER, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002212. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: ADV COMMUNICATION, 235 Winchester Dr., Goleta, CA 93117; Ammanjah M DeVries (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY AMMANJAH DE VRIES. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002290. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: ROYAL INDUSTRIAL SOLUTIONS, 2363A Thompson Avenue, Santa Maria, CA 93455; Consolidated Electrical Distributors, Inc.1920 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 75038. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DAVID T. BRADFORD, VICE PRESIDENT, SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002346. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: MOUSE POUCH, 5055 University Dr, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Purdy Made Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY RYAN PURDY, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 1, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002181. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONSOON FLORA, 5393 Agana Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Bryce R Augustine (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY BRYCE R AUGUSTINE, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002363. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLESSINGS ABOUND, 4598 Camino Molinero, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Laurie Gross (same address); Laurie Gross Studios. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY LAURIE GROSS, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 8, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002234. Published: September 29, October 6, October 13, 20, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SCHOOLEY MITCHELL OF SANTA BARBARA ‑ MCCOY, 546 Owen RD, Santa Barbara,

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CENTERLINE COMMUNITY, 710 West Sola Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, CA

with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002215. Published: October 6, 13, 20, 27, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: PARK VIEW RENTAL, 410 Covington Place, Goleta, CA 93117; Sylvia E King (same address); Terence S Hurt (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY SYLVIA E KING. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002151. Published: September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LEFT COAST ELECTRIC, 7020 Del Norte Drive, Goleta, CA 93117; Jilco Ventures (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY JILLIAN PROVAN, TREASURER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on September 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002353. Published: October 6, 13, 20, 27, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BRIGHTSTAR CARE SANTA BARBARA/SANTA YNEZ, 510 Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sirena Del Mar, LLC (same address); This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY SHARON HOLLAND‑PEREZ, OWNER/ DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002064. Published: September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: OMEGA REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENTS 819 Reddick Street, Suite D, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; California Omega Real Estate LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY JULIAN P MICHALOWSKI, MANAGER. Filed

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BRIGHTWATER MEDIA, 402 Venado Dr., Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jon Manning (same address); Julie Livingston (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY JULIE LIVINGSTON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL Hybrid Public Discussion – In Person and via Zoom October 18, 2022, at 5:30 P.M. LOCAL BUILDING LAWS ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at: https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will discuss the proposed adoption of the proposed 2022 Building Code and conduct first reading of the following proposed ordinance: An Ordinance Of The City Council Of The City Of Goleta, California, Amending The Following Chapters To Title 15 “Building And Construction” Of The Goleta Municipal Code: Chapter 15.01 “Building Code”, Chapter 15.03 “Electrical Code”, Chapter 15.04 “Plumbing Code”, Chapter 15.05 “Mechanical Code”, Chapter 15.08 “Administrative Code”, Chapter 15.11 “Residential Code”, Chapter 15.12 “Green Building Code”, Chapter 15.15 “Energy Code”, Chapter 15.16 “Historical Code”, Chapter 15.17 “Existing Building Code, And Amending Chapter 15.19 “The International Property Maintenance Code” Adopting By Reference the Above-Listed Codes In The California State Building Standards Codes And Adopting Local Amendments To Those Codes. As part of the ordinance, two new local amendments are proposed as follows: 1) that building permits for all types of occupancies, except R-3 (Single-Family and Two Units Residential) and U (Utilities), be issued to licensed contractors only and 2) that a six (6) year expiration date be established for all building permits. A hearing to consider establishing local building laws more stringent than the statewide standards is allowed by Public Resources Code Section 25402.1(h)2. In accordance with Government Code Section 50022.3, the public hearing associated with the adoption of local Building Laws is held at the time of the second reading of the ordinance. Notice of the public hearing will be provided separately. MEETING INFORMATION: MEETING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, October 18, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the meeting in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY AND STAFF CONTACT: Staff reports and related materials for the City Council hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www. cityofgoleta.org. For further information on the project, contact Building Official Stephanie Spieler at 805-961-7552 or sspieler@ cityofgoleta.org or buildinggroup@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent October 6, 2022 54

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 6, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

on September 8, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022­0002232. Published: September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022.

NAME CHANGE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NO. 22CV03343 Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara Petition of: Ourania Kalontoros AKA: Laraine, Kalonturos, Lurania K. Topakas, Ourania, K. Topakas, Ourania K. Topakas, Lurania Topakas, Lurania Kalonturos, Ourania Kalonturos for Change of Name TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Ourania Kalontoros filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Ourania Kalontoros to Ourania Lurania Kalonturos Topakas Ourania Kalontoros, aka, Laraine Kalonturos aka, Lurania K. Topakas aka, Ourania K. Topakas aka, Ourania Topakas aka, Lurania Kalonturos aka, Ourania Kalonturos to Ourania Lurania Kalonturos Topakas The Court orders that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: Date: October 28, 2022, Time: 10:00 am, Dept.: 4 The address of the court is 1100

Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Santa Barbara Independent Date: 09/08/2022 Donna D. Geck Judge of the Superior Court BSC222207 9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20/22 CNS­3624828# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: MARIA FRANCISCA AMELITA PAZ LANTZ, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03215 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: MARIA FRANCISCA AMELITA PAZ LANTZ TO: MARIA LANTZ LEVITT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 28, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks

prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 9/08/2022, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 22, 29, October 6 13, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: TEASHA ANN BERMAN, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03183 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: TEASHA ANN BERMAN TO: TEASHA ANN ROSENFELD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 27, 2022, 8:30 AM, DEPT SM 4, Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, 312­C East Cook Street, Santa Maria, CA 93454, Cook Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 8/29/2022, Jed Beebe, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 15, 22, 29, October 6, 2022.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640

NOTICE OF REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS FOR THE 2023 PRE-QUALIFIED CONSULTANT LIST FOR PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND RIGHT-OF-WAY SERVICES The City of Goleta Public Works Department invites you to submit a Statement of Qualifications (SOQ) to become eligible for the 2023 Pre-Qualified Consultant List for professional engineering, environmental, and right-of-way services relating to the following disciplines: • Project Management • Engineering, including: → Engineering Design → Drawing and CAD Services → Environmental Services (may be provided by a subconsultant) • Geotechnical Engineering and Material Testing • Traffic Engineering • Surveying • Landscape Architecture, Design, and Arborist • Environmental Planning and Permitting • Development Review • Construction Management, including: → Construction Management → Inspection → Testing (may be provided by a subconsultant) • Right-of-Way Services • Public Relations Services • Environmental Services, Planning and Permitting Services SOQs shall meet the requirements and descriptions outlined in the attachments available through the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids Vendor Portal. SOQs must be received no later than 3:00 p.m., October 28, 2022, through the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids Vendor Portal. Firms interested in submitting a SOQ(s) should go to www.cityofgoleta.org/cityhall/public-works/city-bid-opportunities and click on “Request for Qualifications for the 2023 Pre-Qualified Consultant List for Professional Engineering, Environmental, and Right-of-Way Services.” Please submit any questions regarding this Request for SOQs through the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids Vendor Portal Online Q&A. Published: Santa Barbara Independent October 6, 2022 & October 13, 2022


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. October 27, 2022 at 3:30 PM Gary Beynon Office equipment, business supplies Mishelle Cooper Household, personal Richard Schroeder personal The auction will be listed and advertised on WWW.STORAGETREASURES. COM. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

STATEMENT OF DAMAGES STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 931211107 Anacapa Division. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Elinor Fisher, an individual seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00, e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i. Other (specify) Lost income, incidental, and consequential damages $5,000,000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Date: April 30, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 931211107 Anacapa Division. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, an individual seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00, e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i. Other (specify) Lost income, incidental, and consequential damages $5,000,000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Date: April 30, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 931211107 Anacapa Division. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust, seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00, e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i. Other (specify) Lost income, incidental, and consequential damages $5,000,000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed

against you. Date: April 30, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 Anacapa Division. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Judith Dannett, an individual seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00, e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i. Other (specify) Lost income, incidental, and consequential damages, $5,000,000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Date: April 30, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 22CVO1717 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): FUNYAS MASIH; NSP TRANSPORTATION INC. (a business entity, form unknown); TORI ANNE THORNBURGH; and DOES 1 AND 25, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JOYCE DONALDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will

not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte

que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso.

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Plaintiff: Joyce Donaldson Defendant: Funyas Masih, et al. Moving Party Plaintiff, Joyce Donaldson filed their application for an order for publication on July 15, 2002. From the application and supporting evidence it appears to the satisfaction of the Court that an order for service by publication is permitted pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure section 415.50. IT IS ORDERED that service of the

summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) in this action shall be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Tori Anne Thornburgh by publication thereof in Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation published at Santa Barbara County, California, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that, if the address of the party to be served is ascertained before the expiration of the time prescribed for publication of the summons, the moving party shall forthwith mail to the party to be served a copy of (1) the summons, citation,

notice of hearing, or other document(s) identified above, (2) the complaint, petition, or motion for which notice is being served by this order, and (3) this order for publication. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. Dated: 7/15/2022 Judge of the Superior Court Thomas P. Anderle

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL Hybrid Public Meeting – Held in Person and via Zoom October 18, 2022 at 5:30 P.M. Santa Barbara Humane Society General Plan Amendment Initiation 5399 Overpass Road; APNs 071-220-031, -036, -024 Case No. 22-0003-GPA ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:/// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings.

The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); South County Court Division,Santa Barbara Superior Court‑Civil, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing to consider a General Plan Amendment Initiation for the Santa Barbara Humane Society. The date and time of the City Council meeting is:

The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Warren B. Treisman, Esq., 7183 Navajo Road, Suite I, San Diego, CA 92119; (619) 583‑1900

LOCATION:

DATE: (FECHA) 5/4/2022 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/Johnny Aviles, Deputy (Adjunto) ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION ATTORNEY OR PARTY WITHOUT ATTORNEY (NAME AND ADDRESS): Warren B. Treisman 7183 Navajo Road. Suite i San Diego, CA 92119

CITY OF GOLETA NOTICE OF NOMINEES FOR PUBLIC OFFICE AND MEASURE TO BE VOTED ON NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the following persons have been nominated for the offices designated to be filled at the General Municipal Election to be held in the City of Goleta on Tuesday, November 8, 2022. For Councilmember District 1 (Full term of four Years) Vote for no more than one:

For Councilmember District 2 (Full term of four Years) Vote for no more than one:

PROJECT LOCATION: 5399 Overpass Road; APNs 071-220-031, -036, -024 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: A General Plan Amendment (GPA) Initiation to consider a General Plan land use designation change from General Industrial (IG) to General Commercial (C-G), to allow Boarding Kennels as a conditionally permitted use for the site referenced above located in the Inland Zoning Area of the City. If the City Council initiates the GPA, the applicant would submit a formal application for a GPA and associated applications for City staff to further study the proposed GPA and proposed development on the site. Should a development project and GPA request reach the stage of action, the Planning Commission and City Council would consider the GPA, along with a development plan application at future hearings. The City Council decision on the initiation of the GPA does not suggest how the City Council may ultimately act on the GPA when it is brought forward for City Council consideration. The initiation of the GPA does not influence the City Council’s consideration of the GPA. This application was filed by Steve Fort of SEPPS, on behalf of the Santa Barbara Humane Society. PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/comments should be sent to cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing.

FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Travis Lee, Associate Planner, at (805) 562-5528 or tlee@cityofgoleta.org or Mary Chang, Supervising Senior Planner, at (805) 961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta. org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www. cityofgoleta.org.

Sam Ramirez, Planning Commissioner/Parent James Kyriaco, Incumbent Measures to be voted on: Measure B2022

Yes No

SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 48 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)).

Measure C2022 “Shall Ordinance No. 21-09, An Ordinance of the City of Goleta, California, banning the sale of flavored tobacco products within the City’s limits, be adopted?”

Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda).

DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the City Council hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org.

Roger S. Aceves, Incumbent Luz Reyes-Martin, Goleta Union School Board Member

“To support Goleta’s 9-1-1 response/crime prevention; clean-up trash in creeks to maintain coastal waters; address homelessness, fire risks from illegal encampments; maintain public safety, clean/maintain public areas; repair streets/potholes; increase recycled water use for parks; retain local businesses/jobs; maintain open spaces/natural areas and for general government use; shall a measure be adopted establishing a 1¢ sales tax providing approximately $10,600,000 annually until ended by voters, requiring public spending disclosure?”

HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, October 18, 2022, at 5:30 PM

Yes

Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

Dated: Thursday, October 6, 2022

Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent October 6, 2022

No

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER OCTOBER 6,6, 2022 2022 THE INDEPENDENT

55