Santa Barbara Independent 9/8/22

Page 1

FREE

Santa Barbara

SEPT. 8-15, 2022 VOL. 36 · NO. 869

+

A Requiem for MCASB Kayla Day’s Comeback Diablo Canyon Gets Reprieve Conception Manslaughter Charges Dropped

Art, Activism,

Awareness, and

Every Brilliant Thing A Compassionate Focus on Mental Health Issues by Josef Woodard


ONEPLANT.LIFE

BUY 1 GET 1 FOR $1

9.14.22

*CARTS*

9.15.22 // 4PM-8PM

BUY 2 & GET THE 3RD FOR $1

FRIDAY-MONDAY BUY 2 & GET 1 FOR $1

290 STORKE RD #G, GOLETA, CA (805) 770-3275 // LIC#: C10-0000813

SCAN TO VIEW OUR ONLINE MENU

*KANHA GUMMIES ONLY. SALE 9.2.22-9.26.22*

F LO L O W ER F R DA AY A Y FLOWER FL OW WE FR FRIDAY RIID BUY 2 & GET THE 3RD FOR $1

NEW

2 SCHOOL

BACK K

EVENT

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH

*MANAGEMENT RESERVES ALL RIGHTS . WHILE SUPPLIES LAST*

PARALLEL STORIES

Textured Poetry: Multi-layered, Multi-lingual Explorations with Patricio Ferrari and Forrest Gander

SUNDAY | SEPTEMBER 11 | 2:30 PM Too often we hear that something is lost in translation, but who talks about what can be gained in the process, especially in relation to poetry? Join polyglot poet, translator, and literary editor Patricio Ferrari and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, translator, and novelist Forrest Gander in a conversation about poetry and the art of translation. Drawing from their own work, they will share examples— between languages—from Portuguese (Pessoa), French (Pizarnik), Spanish (Bracho), and Kannada (Kumudendu) as well as from their own works of textured poetry. Book signing to follow.

Location: Mary Craig Auditorium, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/$10 NON-MEMBERS Purchase tickets online at tickets.sbma.net. 2

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net


2022 - 2023 Opening Week! Charley Crockett

Sun, Oct 2 / 7 PM / Arlington Theatre “Crockett is an old-school country music superstar in waiting.” Independent (U.K.)

From Ukraine

DakhaBrakha

Thu, Oct 6 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre “The group mixes everything from punk-pop to traditional Ukrainian songs in cool yet beguiling textures... utter brilliance.” NPR Presented in association with Direct Relief, UCSB Dept of Music and UCSB MultiCultural Center

SW!NG OUT

A Joyce Theater Production Directed by Caleb Teicher Sat, Oct 8 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre

“A sweeping ride through contemporary swing dance... Captivating... Extraordinary.” The New York Times

David Gergen

Sacre by Circa

Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders are Made

Wed, Oct 12 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Tue, Oct 11 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

“Rock stars of the circus world.” The List (U.K.)

“David Gergen knows power, and he understands leadership… An invaluable guide to making things – good things – happen.” – Jon Meacham

Pulsating with tension and infused with dark humor, this distinctive production brings Stravinsky’s seminal Rite of Spring to the circus stage.

Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune

There’s still time to subscribe and save up to 25% www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org | Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

3


SANTA BARBARA ART AUCTION

Featuring

Respected Santa Barbara Area Artists John Carlander • David Holt • Ellie Freudenstein • Dan Schultz • Ruth Ellen Hoag Jimmy Lee Sudduth • Jean Charlot • Ford Ruthling • Mathurin Moreau

ONLINE AUCTION SEPTEMBER 11 TH 11AM

REGISTER TO BID NOW! By scanning the QR code

Or by visiting sbsos.care/estate-sales

Presented By SB SOS LLC

S E N I O R C O N C I E R G E R E LO C AT I O N D O W N S I Z I N G • E STAT E S A L E S • C L E A N O U T S • R E A L E STAT E

(805) 946-0060 At the end of moving there was not one box left in our new home. I can’t imagine going through this difficult process without the SB SOS team, they were a godsend. – Susan

CALL US TODAY! FOR ALL YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS

FOR ALL YOUR RELOCATION NEEDS

SB SOS LLC

4

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

DEBORAH SAMUEL www.DeborahSellsSB.com

INDEPENDENT.COM

DRE# 02119798


TABLE of CONTENTS

Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Rodrigo Hernandez, Koss Klobucher, Melea Maglalang, Emma Spencer, Finnegan Wright Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

17

Name: Don Brubaker Title: Web Content Manager

Art, Activism, Awareness, and Every Brilliant Thing A Compassionate Focus on Mental Health Issues by Josef Woodard

ARTS FEATURE A Requiem for MCASB

25

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 FOOD & DRINK. . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

A&E Previews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

ON THE COVER: Jonny Donahoe. Courtesy photo. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

COURTESY

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

WEB WIZARD

volume 36, # 869, Sept. 8-15, 2022

What’d you do before you joined the Independent? I’ve had the good fortune of working at a handful of Santa Barbara institutions over the last decade or so, from Handlebar (barista) to the Lobero (artist hospitality manager). Most recently, I was doing archival work for a Hollywood director on the Riviera who will remain nameless…. Explain to readers what a web content manager does day-to-day. Day in and day out, all-star co-manager Cat Kelley and I rise to the challenge of overseeing the Independent’s cyber kingdom. A newly written piece to be formatted for the website? We’re on it. Breaking news that could benefit from an eye-catching graphic before being pushed to socials? Say less. The daily newsletter needs to be populated with a carefully curated selection of articles that both inform and enlighten? Three words: Web. Content. Manager. From tactfully preparing a place for each piece in the digital realm to the ongoing maintenance of social media platform presence, web content managers are the harbingers of news in a digital era. What do you do outside of work? Outside of the Independent I’m often doing anything musical! I play in an indie band called Middle Names and deejay around town quite a bit (@donny_bru). Though I love to perform and entertain, I’m also partial to life’s calmer moments, usually with a vibey record and/or enticing read. And, of course, I spend an overwhelming amount of my time as my daughter’s number-one fan. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

FRUIT TREE & PLANT SALE ALL CITRUS, FRUIT & AVOCADO TREES 40% OFF

ALL OUTDOOR & INDOOR PLANTS 50% OFF

Limited to stock on hand

Sale September 8 - 19, 2022

805-965-4619

18 N Milpas St., Santa Barbara

Grow the Pros GrowWith With the Pros

Monday - Friday: 6:30 AM - 5:30 PM Saturday: 6:30 AM - 5:00 PM Sunday: 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

5


Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON 104th Concert Season

SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE SEPTEMBER 9

Riccardo Muti

Gustavo Dudamel

Chicago Symphony Orchestra ⳼ LA Philharmonic Juilliard String Quartet ⳼ Hélène Grimaud City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra Romero Guitar Quartet ⳼ Augustin Hadelich Curtis Symphony Orchestra ⳼ Filharmonie Brno

SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 Granada Theatre (805) 899-2222 ⳼ www.granadasb.org Lobero Theatre (805) 963-0167 ⳼ www.lobero.org

FOR SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS CALL CAMA (805) 966-4324 OR VISIT WWW.CAMASB.ORG

C O M M U N I T Y A R T S M U S I C A S S O C I AT I O N O F S A N TA B A R B A R A 6

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


SEPT. 1-8, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COURTS & CRIME

Manslaughter Charges Dismissed Against Conception Captain

DAN I EL DR EI FUSS

Judge Permits Refiling of Charges, Feds May Opt to Appeal by Jean Yamamura abor Day in Santa Barbara will long be remembered for the 34 people who died in a boat fire off Santa Cruz Island. But this year, on the day before the third anniversary of the tragedy aboard the Conception, the federal court dismissed the seaman’s manslaughter charges against the dive boat’s captain, Jerry Boylan. Civil lawsuits have blamed the fire on the ship’s owners and inadequate Coast Guard inspections, but the legal arguments that led to the dismissal of the criminal charges against Boylan—without prejudice, which means the government may bring new charges—revolved around whether he had to be found guilty of negligence or of gross negligence. Boylan’s public defenders argued that when it came to criminal acts, the government had to allege gross negligence, as per the plain meaning of criminal negligence described by legal dictionaries, treatises, and case law. In response, the prosecutors listed the failures on Boylan’s part both before and during the fire as demonstrating his “misconduct, negligence, or inattention to his duties,” as described by the manslaughter statute. Though Boylan was a longtime and respected captain for boat owner Truth Aquatics, most of his crew was new; their experience ranged from one prior trip to about two years. Prosecutors alleged none of them received fire suppression training from their captain, and they didn’t know where the firehoses and pumps were on the ship. Also, Boylan did not set a night watch, even though he knew a fire broke out aboard the Conception’s sister ship the October before. The National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB) cited the lack of a night watch as one of the main factors that allowed the fire to consume everyone belowdecks. In describing Boylan’s behavior, prosecutors stated his words and actions were only

L

of escape. After a crewmember woke to smoke and fire below on the main deck, he awakened the crew, and chaos ensued. Boylan called, “abandon ship” or “everyone out,” and the four crewmemIN MEMORY: A memorial at Santa Barbara Harbor remembers each of the bers jumped to the main 34 people who died aboard the Conception on September 2, 2019. deck, one breaking his leg. Boylan placed mayday calls at around 3:14 jurisdiction; another section was for ship’s offia.m., then leapt into the water. Prosecutors cers—and is commonly known as seaman’s allege he didn’t use the boat’s PA system to manslaughter—which Boylan was charged notify the passengers of the fire. Instead, he under. Because the Seaman’s Manslaughter yelled for his crew to jump into the water and Statute’s Section 1115 and the “gross neglito lower the skiff to get away. One crewmem- gence” standard hasn’t been interpreted by ber who wanted to go back on deck to rescue the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, where passengers told prosecutors that Boylan said, California cases are heard, Wu drew a parallel to the cases involving the other section, “We can’t save them.” Boylan’s actions weren’t the only ones that Section 1112. He observed that the difference doomed the Conception. The NTSB could between “slight” negligence as compared to not positively conclude the tangle of electri- gross negligence was one of “a degree, so gross cal cords charging lithium-ion batteries were and wanton, as to be deserving of punishto blame for starting the fire, but the wires ment,” quoting a case called Barbeau. Judge and batteries were high on the list of poten- Wu then wrote: “It is difficult for this Court tial causes. The agency noted that some of to understand why gross negligence would the marine-grade wiring in the galley, where be required for an involuntary manslaughter the fire started, had been replaced by below- conviction under Section 1112 but not for a standard household wiring. Nearly all of the conviction under Section 1115.” families of the victims have sued the Coast Judge Wu did recognize striking language Guard for missing key problems during its from a case in Louisiana’s Fifth Circuit about inspections of the Conception, including the Section 1115 and simple negligence as applying inadequate escape hatch that led only to the to commercial vessels operated by those who galley where the fire was roaring early that “daily have the lives of thousand[s] of helpless September morning. Legislation since the human beings in their keeping.” The passenConception fire has pushed the Coast Guard gers belowdecks on the Conception had two to implement stricter standards for overnight ways out, and both were on fire on September 2, 2019. Prosecutors assert some were awake, passenger vessels. As far as the ruling that prosecutors failed dressed, and trying to escape as the captain to allege gross negligence against Boylan, the abandoned ship. The Ninth Circuit will likely have a chance difference between gross negligence and negligence was seated in the common law under- to rule on the issue of negligence or gross negstanding of manslaughter, Judge George Wu ligence for Boylan. The government planned to appeal the judge’s ruling, said Thom explained in 12 packed pages of reasoning. Two sections of the federal homicide stat- Mrozek, spokesperson for the U.S. Attorney’s n ute were in question: One included maritime Office in Los Angeles.

ENERGY

The Diablo Is in the Details Legislature Votes Overwhelmingly to Extend Life of Nuclear Plant by Nick Welsh ome jokes are too bitter even for irony. Last week, after much arm-twisting, both houses of the state legislature voted overwhelmingly in favor of Governor Gavin Newsom’s last-minute effort to extend the life span of PG&E’s twin domed nuclear

S

power plants at Diablo Canyon by five years. With a slashing heat wave poised to punish California for the indefinite near future, Newsom argued compellingly that without Diablo Canyon’s steady stream of carbon-free electricity—they produce one-ninth of the state’s total electrical output — brownouts

COU RTESY

PUBLIC SAFETY

and blackouts could wreak havoc on the fifthlargest economy on Planet Earth. Just three days later—even with the passage of this monumental policy change — 2,300 residents of San Luis Obispo County, home to the Diablo Canyon Plant, experienced a five-hour brownout. Both sides — for and against the bill—claimed the power interruption demonstrated the rightness of their argument. It is all too obvious that the grid-busting threat posed by the convection thermals unleashed by the current heat wave CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

The search continues for a Ventura man reported missing after hiking Trespass Trail near Gaviota on 9/4. Tim Sgrignoli (above), 29, was hiking with his girlfriend in more than 110-degree heat. Sgrignoli reportedly left to get help for his partner, who was experiencing heat exhaustion, and left her with his own cell phone. County Fire crews began an extensive search, and Sgrignoli’s girlfriend was located and rescued by helicopter. According to authorities, Sgrignoli may have been spotted close to the 101 and 1 highways near Gaviota Pass; he was wearing shorts and no shirt. The Sheriff’s Office identified the one-year-old boy struck and killed by a car in Old Town Goleta 8/30 as Munir Delgado of Goleta. According to the Sheriff’s Office, Delgado was struck by a car on Nectarine Avenue not far from a neighborhood park shortly before 3 p.m. When emergency personnel arrived, he had already suffered traumatic injuries and was rushed to the hospital, where he later died. Drugs or alcohol were not a factor in the collision, and authorities said the driver of the vehicle remained on scene. There are no pending charges. The man struck and killed by a big rig truck on Highway 101 in Goleta early 9/1 has been identified by the Sheriff’s Office as Paul Douglas Larson, 30, of Lompoc. Larson was reportedly crossing from the right shoulder to the center divider when he was hit by a southbound semitruck, according to CHP. The driver of the big rig, who immediately stopped and called 9-1-1, was not injured or suspected to be under the influence of any drugs or alcohol. The incident caused major traffic delays, with a temporary closure of southbound lanes and bumper-tobumper traffic throughout the morning. The motorcyclist killed in the 8/31 crash on Highway 101 in Santa Barbara has been identified as Joshua Latham, 31, of Ojai. Latham was driving a Yamaha motorcycle and “traveling in and out of all traffic lanes, at a high rate of speed,” according to CHP, when he collided into the left rear of a Honda CRV just south of the Salinas Street off-ramp and was ejected onto the roadway, where he died. The driver of the Honda, a 61-year-old woman from Ojai, was reportedly uninjured. The crash is under investigation by CHP.

TRANSPORTATION The Santa Claus Lane Bikeway project will be built between the freeway and the railroad tracks and will include a bikeway and turnaround, according to a statement from Kirsten Ayars at SBRoads .com. The construction will force closures on several CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

7


SEPT. 1-8, 2022

COURTS

Girls Inc. Victim of Bait-and-Switch? 2022

EMM A SPEN C ER

Lawsuit Alleges Development Firm Broke Promise to Lease Ortega Street Property Back to Nonprofit 17

LET'S CLEAN UP OUR COAST!

Goleta & Isla Vista Campus Point Devereux Ellwood Bluffs/ Beach Goleta Beach Haskell's Isla Vista Streets San Jose Creek

Santa Barbara

Arroyo Burro (Hendry's) Butterfly Beach East Beach- Chase Palm Park East Beach- Volleyball Courts Hammonds/Miramar/Fernald Carpinteria & Summerland Leadbetter Carpinteria State Beach Oak Park Carpinteria Creeks Sandspit/Harbor Gaviota Coast Jelly Bowl West Beach Lookout Park El Capitan State Lompoc Rincon County Beach Beach Gaviota State Jalama (Bates) Santa Claus Lane Beach Refugio State Santa Rita Hills (Padaro) Beach Tajiguas

ExploreEcology.org/ccd ExploreEcology.org/ccd @ExploreEcology @ExploreEcology @ExploreEcology @ExploreEcology

8

THE INDEPENDENT

@SBCoast @SBCoast @SBCoast @SBCoast

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

GONE GIRLS: Girls Inc. was given 90 days to vacate the Ortega Street property after development firm Presidio Capital Partners resold the property to Providence, a private Christian school by Tyler Hayden irls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara was the victim of a real estate bait-andswitch, a new lawsuit alleges, in which a development firm purchased the nonprofit’s Ortega Street property with a promise to lease it back to Girls Inc., only to flip it to another buyer who then forced the organization out. “This is hard for us,” said Girls Inc. CEO Jen Faust, of litigating the dispute after talks between the parties failed. “But at this point, we feel it is the best way to stand up for our rights.” The suit, which alleges misrepresentation, breach of contract, and other civil violations, seeks to rescind both sales and also asks for damages. Robert Forouzandeh, an attorney representing the development company, Presidio Capital Partners, called the lawsuit “frivolous” with “absolutely no basis in fact.” The buyer, Providence School, also said the complaint had no merit. “[W]e are vigorously defending against the action as we take all appropriate legal steps to protect the school,” said Head of School Soo Chang. The saga began in July 2021 when Girls Inc., grappling with pandemic-related losses in revenue and looking to reduce overhead, decided to sell the Eastside property it had occupied for 65 years and use the proceeds to support a new and nimbler way of serving the community through on-site partnerships with schools, community centers, and other youth programs. The nonprofit decided it would look for a buyer who would allow Girls Inc. to remain at the property for at least a year, and up to two and a half years, as it gradually wound down operations with as few disruptions as possible. The property was listed that September, and by October, Girls Inc. had received an offer of $7.75 million from Providence, a private Christian school that planned on building a new campus for its middle and high school students. Girls Inc. declined the offer, however, when it learned Providence would not be able to abide by the extended leaseback requirement, the lawsuit states. Shortly thereafter, Girls Inc. received a second offer, this time from Presidio Capi-

G

tal Partners, who offered $7.5 million. But unlike Providence, the complaint continues, Presidio said it was willing to give Girls Inc. the time it needed to relocate and reorganize, as the company expected it would take at least two years to secure the necessary city approvals to construct the new housing it was planning for the site. Based on that representation — which Girls Inc. says was made multiple times to multiple boardmembers in numerous emails and conversations — the nonprofit agreed to sell to Presidio. Escrow closed February 11, 2022. Just five days later, the lawsuit claims, Presidio sold to Providence in an all-cash transaction for $8 million, representing a quick $500,000 profit. Negotiations between Presidio and Providence had apparently been taking place throughout the escrow period, the lawsuit states, with Girls Inc. intentionally kept in the dark. “Girls Inc. was stunned to learn the faith and confidence it had placed in Presidio was broken,” the complaint says. “In addition to Presidio’s broken promises, Providence, knowing the reason that Girls Inc. decided against accepting its offer, decided to then circumvent Girls Inc.” On April 8, Providence gave Girls Inc. 90 days to vacate the property. The quick and unexpected notice wreaked havoc on the organization, Faust said. Programs had to be suddenly shut down and curriculums modified, she explained, with clients and their families blindsided by the news. “These are vital services that help girls stand up for themselves and navigate the world,” she said. The nonprofit’s staff of 50 was also left in the lurch, Faust said. “So much has been taken away from so many people,” Faust went on, noting the Eastside organization serves more than 1,200 Santa Barbara County residents every year. “The resources that should be going to support girls and teens are instead being diverted to this really unfortunate situation. It’s more than disappointing for us — it’s heartbreaking.” The case is being heard by Judge Colleen Sterne. The next hearing is scheduled for October 10.

n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

Suspicious Circumstances in Montecito Murder Get More Mysterious he mysterious and suspicious circumstances surrounding the suspected homicide of 96-year-old Montecito resident Violet Evelyn Alberts this May just got more mysterious and suspicious. During last week’s Board of Supervisors hearing on the status of the District Attorney’s Real Estate Fraud task force, it came out that Alberts had been targeted in an alleged real estate fraud scheme concocted by Pauline Macareno, a Porter Ranch Violet Evelyn Alberts real estate operator, a few months prior to Alberts’s demise. Moreover, it a result, Macareno remains in custody. was revealed Alberts had filed legal action According to a court document filed by Bail Boys, Macareno repeatedly failed to against Macareno in March of this year. Macareno is currently being held in check in with the bail company daily, a Santa Barbara County Jail on charges of condition of the bail. The defendant was identity theft, forgery, theft from an elder, “explicitly reminded” of her responsibility and burglary, all involving a change of title to do so no fewer than seven times. Macareno allegedly had effectuated on Another red flag, according to the bail Alberts’s $4 million Montecito residence. agent Atiana Duran, was that Macareno These crimes allegedly took place between had initially used a North Hills property September 2020 and March 2022. Sheriff ’s for her bail collateral that was listed as the investigators are still investigating the cir- business address for Violet Evelyn Alberts cumstances surrounding Alberts’s death. LLC, the very entity by which the allegNo related charges have been filed against edly fraudulent conveyance had taken Macareno. Alberts lived alone and the cir- place. Duran expressed concern about cumstances of her death were deemed to using property associated with the alleged be “suspicious” by sheriff ’s investigators victimization of Alberts as bail collateral who found her body early on the morn- against charges of real estate fraud and ing of May 27. In July, the Sheriff ’s Office identity theft. Duran also speculated that Macareno announced it was treating her death as a had sought to conceal this property’s homicide. How Alberts’s path crossed with murky association with that alleged fraud Macareno’s remains unclear, but at some from the bail bond company by submitpoint Macareno reportedly transferred ting an application to substitute another the title of Alberts’s home to a new entity property as collateral. In this case, the sub— Violet Evelyn Alberts LLC — reportedly stitute property, a Santa Paula garage, was without Alberts’s knowledge or consent. It already in financial default. was that action that gave rise to Alberts’s Macareno is now represented by criminal defense attorney Ron Bamieh, who lawsuit against Macareno. Initially, Macareno had been released explained he’d only just received the dison $1 million bail for the identity theft and covery documents and could not comfraud allegations, but on August 8, The ment other than to say he’d “do a hell of a Bail Boys Bail Bonds revoked her bail; as job” representing his client. —Nick Welsh

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 7 roads and ramps between Summerland and Carpinteria over the next few months, with closures working on alternating schedules to allow drivers to access driveways along Carpinteria Avenue, Ayars said, and both the turnaround and bike-path portions of the project will be built at the same time to limit the effects of the road closures.

COURTS & CRIME S.B. Police arrested Dillon James Joseph Johnson, 34, on 9/1 on murder and numerous felony narcotics charges stemming from the fentanyl-induced overdose death of a 30-year-old male whose body was discovered behind a building on the 100 block of State Street on 4/29. This is the first time anyone has been charged with murder in connection with a fentanyl overdose in the county.

ASTRONOMY TALK SERIES FREE PUBLIC TALKS FROM LEADING FIGURES IN SCIENCE

COU RTESY

T

L AS CUMBRES OBSERVATORY PRESENTS

Described in police documents as a “transient,” Johnson was arrested on the 7100 block of Hollister Avenue and booked at the County Jail, with bail set at $1 million.

TRAILS The County Riding and Hiking Trails Advisory Committee met 9/6 to discuss a disputed proposal to change part of the McMenemy Trail in the foothills above Montecito. The new route would move the trail to the north down a canyon and along a scarp to join the San Ysidro Trail. The Montecito Trails Foundation’s Ashlee Mayfield explained the existing switchbacks had erosion issues, while opponent Dave Everett stated the new route had stability issues. The Advisory Committee decided they would get the full picture at the meeting on 10/10.

Throwing DART(s) at Asteroids: NASA’s First Planetary Defense Mission Dr. Tim Lister

DART Investigation Team Member and LCO Senior Scientist

Talk followed by a meet-and-greet with the speaker

Tuesday September 13, 7:00p The New Vic Theater

33 West Victoria Street, Santa Barbara

For more Information see lco.global/events First come, first served, no reservations taken Doors open at 6:30p

It’s Our

45th Anniversary Come Celebrate September 10 4:30-7:00PM Join the Environmental Defense Center in our downtown courtyard to celebrate 45 years of work protecting our climate, community health, and this beautiful stretch of the coast.

TICKETS: $45 for our 45th! Advanced tickets required and include 1 dinner and 2 drink tickets. For sliding scale tickets contact EDC at 805-963-1622 x100 FOOD & DRINKS: Dinner by Buena Onda Empanadas Drinks from Lieff Ranch Wine & M. Special Brewing Co. LIVE MUSIC: Ensamble Vientos del Sur

MORE INFO & TICKETS: www.EnvironmentalDefenseCenter.org/45 www.EnvironmentalDefenseCenter.org/

n INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

9


How to Read Now

SEPT. 1-8, 2022

READS

with Elaine Castillo

a community event from Santa Barbara Public Library

Join us for a discussion with author Elaine Castillo, whose recent collection of essays How to Read Now “explores the politics and ethics of reading, and insists that we are capable of something better: a more engaged relationship not just with our fiction and our art, but with our buried and entangled histories."

Virtual Event Sunday, Sept. 18 3:00 PM

Santa Barbara Reads is funded through the annual support of the Santa Barbara Public Library Foundation. To learn more about the foundation and how to support SB Reads 2022, visit the Santa Barbara Public Library Foundation's website.

ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA

CALIFORNIA’S PREMIER WAGE & HOUR LAW FIRM. ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS OBTAINED OVER ONE HUNDRED AND NINTY MILLION DOLLARS ($190,000,000.00 ) FOR CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEES IN WAGE & HOUR CASES INVOLVING: · UNPAID OVERTIME · UNPAID WORK OFF THE CLOCK · MISCLASSIFICATION AS INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS · MEAL & REST VIOLATIONS · UNPAID MINIMUM WAGES ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS REPRESENTED BOTH EMPLOYERS AND EMPLOYEES FOR OVER 43 YEARS. EMPLOYEES – NO FEES UNLESS WE OBTAIN A JUDGMENT OR SETTLEMENT ON YOUR BEHALF. EMPLOYERS – IF YOU HAVE EMPLOYEES, YOU WANT OUR FIRM ON YOUR SIDE SE HABLA ESPAÑOL

Workplace Law and Related Litigation on Behalf of Employees and Employers. Santa Barbara · Ventura · San Luis Obispo. (805) 845-0864 · anticounilaw.com THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

PRESCRIBED HERBIVORY: The hills are alive with the sound of 900 grazing sheep in Tepusquet Canyon.

Smokey the Sheep

M

Scan to register

10

PUBLIC SAFETY COU RTESY CUYA M A L A MB

Santa Barbara

ove over, Smokey Bear; make room for about 900 sheep, specially programmed to devour around 400 acres of grasses in dangerous abundance beneath the steep oak canopies of Tepusquet Canyon. At least, that was the county supervisors’ message last week when approving a $250,000 contract with Cuyama Lamb LLC to do just that. Thus far, the sheep have devoured much of the grassy understory of 194 acres with another 200 to go. The sheep don’t feed on the pulpier chaparral that burns much hotter, but instead on the quick-flash grasses that burn without much provocation and spread in even a slight breeze. “They do a good job,” said County Fire Marshal Rob Hazard. When the sheep are through, he said, they leave a landscape that looks professionally weed-whacked and raked up. What would cost hand crews $5,000-$10,000 an acre to clear costs Cuyama Lamb LLC $500$800 an acre. Goats, Hazard said, are somewhat better in attacking the chaparral but are more prone to spreading the seeds of exotic and invasive species in their droppings. The term of art for this practice, Hazard noted

with rueful appreciation, is “prescribed herbivory.” This is just one ingredient in a much bigger, multi-pronged, multi-year plan to reduce the fire risk of 42,500 fire-prone acres of Tepusquet Canyon, for which $6.4 million in state and federal grants have been obtained. Hazard said another $1.9 million grant has just been secured to use sheep to clear about 3,000 grassy acres almost all the way from Gaviota to Montecito. “None of this is costing the county a dime,” Hazard stated. It all starts with cap-and-trade money generated by the state to reduce greenhousegas emissions in the first place and then trickles down to CalFire’s Climate Change Fire Prevention program. Also included in this package will be 32 miles of roadside fuel reduction, 2,064 acres of controlled burns, 138 acres for strategic fuel breaks, and the creation of community defensible space zones. But for now, it’s the sheep, all 900 of them. “It’s like painting the Golden Gate Bridge,” Hazard said. “You’re never done. You’re never out of the woods.” —Nick Welsh

ENVIRONMENT

Offshore Fracking Fight Continues

T

he fight against fracking off the California coast still isn’t over. Last Wednesday, the Department of Justice asked for a new hearing to again hash out whether an environmental review is required before fracking and acidizing permits are given to oil companies. Their moving papers are deeply in the regulatory weeds but argue that the appeals court ruling could affect offshore wind energy. Back in 2012, the Environmental Defense Center (EDC) discovered the feds had issued 51 permits to frack and acidize offshore wells, including in the Santa Barbara Channel. “Put simply,” said EDC Chief Counsel Linda Krop, “we caught the government issuing permits for these really risky and polluting practices on our platforms. They’ve been told twice now that they can’t do that until they follow the environmental laws. But instead of doing that, they keep asking for relief ... they keep fighting us,” Krop said on Thursday. One of the red herrings in the feds’ latest petition is the implication that offshore

fracking is gone. Krop agreed the existing permits had expired but said the only reason no new permits had been issued was because the EDC had won an injunction to block them until environmental review was completed. And the oil companies definitely wanted to resume well stimulations; they’ve intervened in the case against environmental review and asked for exemptions from the ban. The petition also warns that the precedent set in the appeals court ruling could affect permits for offshore wind. “They’ve never brought this up before,” Krop said. “To get the second bite at the apple, they have to show that the appeals court was not only wrong but that it’s important. They’re trying to elevate the importance of this by expanding this to wind.” The ruling didn’t seem to be affecting offshore wind permitting, however. Krop pointed out that federal leases off Humboldt and Morro Bay recently got approval from the California Coastal Commission. —Jean Yamamura


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D LABOR

Millennials’ Wage-Rent Gap Highest in S.B.

T

he Santa Barbara–Santa Maria metropolitan area won the dubious distinction of having the biggest gap between wages and rents for millennial renters out of all mid-size cities detailed in a recent housing report issued by Filterbuy, a national company that sells home air filtration systems. Using data accumulated by the U.S. Census Bureau, Filterbuy concluded that in the Santa Barbara–Santa Maria market, millennial workers — ages 24-39 — made 61.5 percent less than what they needed to afford renting a one-bedroom apartment without spending more than 30 percent of their wages as rent. According to the data provided by Filterbuy, wage earners in Santa Barbara would need to take home $87,080 in order to pay only 30 percent of their earnings on a median-priced one-bedroom apartment. In second place on Filterbuy’s list of the

DIABLO CANYON CONT’DFROMP.7 have exposed the vulnerabilities of the state’s electrical grid. Lobbying was intense on all sides. Although the bill — SB 826 — would sail through with 101 aye votes and only four against (16, including Santa Barbara’s State Senator Monique Limón, would abstain), the environmental opposition exacted some concessions. The license for the Avila Beach facility was for only five years, not the 10 years that Governor Newsom first proposed. (For proponents such as Santa Barbara Congressmember Salud Carbajal, supporting the massive wind energy project now under consideration off the coast of Morro Bay, that’s significant.) Under the revised plan, the California Coastal Commission would have some limited permitting authority; initially, there had been no room for any such oversight. And lastly, the Governor agreed to throw in $1 billion in additional funding for solar power and other non-carbon-based forms of energy. (That brought the total of such investments approved in the last day of this year’s legislative session to $54 billion.) What still remains is the $1.4 billion forgivable loan the State of California will extend to PG&E to secure the permits necessary to extend its licenses with the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission to the years 2024 and 2025. This loan, however, will be paid out in phases. If PG&E fails to secure any portion of the $6 billion the federal government seems intent on setting aside to keep the plant humming, then the state would cut its losses. Critics of the bill contend that those federal funds are eligible only to power plants suffering financial hardship; Diablo Canyon, they insist, does not meet that requirement. In the face of intense opposition and the prospect of staggering environmental mitigation costs, PG&E had negotiated a deal with a coalition of environmental organizations in 2016, agreeing not to seek license renewal. Shortly thereafter, the state legislature would ratify this deal. Last week’s action changes all that.

top 15 cities with the highest wage-rent gaps in the country was Oxnard at 51.1 percent. Among bigger cities, Los Angeles ranked first, San Francisco fifth, and San Jose seventh. During COVID, the gap between what it cost to rent and the pay for millennial workers narrowed somewhat because of emergency rent control ordinances and emergency tenant protections. But nationally, rents have jumped by 17.6 percent since 2021 and another 6.7 percent in 2022. Wages have gone up somewhat because of the COVID-induced shortage or available employees, but not nearly enough to offset years of wage stagnation. According to Filterbuy’s report, median hourly wages have increased by 6 percent since 2014, while median rents have gone up 25 percent throughout the United States in that same time. —Nick Welsh

Legislators representing the Central Coast have been emphatically ambiguous in their reaction to the bill. Congressmember Carbajal is wary of anything that might intrude upon the Morro Bay wind project. The shorter-term license extension, Carbajal stated, helps do that. Still, he voiced concerns. “But the right decision in a crisis, if made without adequate outreach and thought, can still be a wrong one,” he stated. Since Newsom first floated the idea in April, Carbajal pushed the governor to reach out far more than he had to the San Luis Obispo community. Newsom’s outreach, Carbajal said, had improved since then, but he added that many key decisions remain to be made before the plant can be relicensed. “I have made it clear that consistent outreach to the Central Coast,” he said, “was necessary.” State Senator Monique Limón did not vote for or against the bill but rather chose to abstain. Limón expressed pride that her involvement prior to the vote led to improvements to the bill, but she said the final draft does not fully address her concerns related to safety and ratepayers. The final bill, she said, did not guarantee reliability and allowed “a level of shareholder profit” that caused her pause. “I have concerns about the storage of spent nuclear waste,” she said, “and the proximity of the plant to four seismic fault lines and limited ratepayer protections.” Assemblymember Steve Bennett voted for the bill but expressed reservations of his own in an interview two weeks before the vote. Bennett was not happy that the state failed to push for the production of alternative green energy sources as soon as it knew Diablo Canyon was going offline. But as a practical matter, he understood the outcome was a foregone conclusion. Supply-chain issues have slowed down the transition from traditional carbon-based energy sources to alternative sources. In that context, Bennett said he would push to maximize the use of hydrogen technology as a vehicle to store solar and wind energy during peak use hours — typically the early evening when the sun n has gone down.

ONE COMMUNITY BRIDGE PROJECT

“HONORING ORTEGA PARK” WITH

GRAMMY AWARD WINNING CHICANO FOLK ROCK

QUETZAL PLUS

LA ALMA DE CALIFORNIA

RICARDO SANCHEZ - LOS ALACRANES COUGAR ESTRADA - LOS LOBOS JUAN ZARAGOZA - MARIACHI LAS OLAS RUBEN MARTINEZ - MARTINEZ BROTHERS

GRUPO FOLKLORICO HUITZILLIN

“LAND ACKNOWLEDGEMENT” RESISTENCIA MEXICAYOTL CHALCHIUHTLICUE MC DJ FRANK RAMIREZ

FREE ADMISSION

1:00PM SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 17TH

MARJORIE LUKE THEATER 721 EAST COTA STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

11


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

No Country for Old Dogs

DISTANT KARMA: It may be worth recalling how members of the California delegation at the 2016 Republican convention that nominated Donald Trump for president were stricken with the viru-

lent norovirus virus. This induces an especially explosive form of retching and diarrhea. Nature, it seems, was trying to warn us. Mercifully spared from this outbreak was Santa Barbara perennial Republican warhorse Mike Stoker, ever ebullient in both his ambition and enthusiasm. Seized by the passions at that convention, Stoker famously launched the chant that would shake the world. “Lock ’er up,” he shouted to the crowd. “Lock ’er up,” the crowd shouted back. It was like church. The “’er” in Stoker’s equation, of course, was Hillary Clinton, the Democrat candidate running against Trump for president. The ostensible reason for locking ’er up had something to do with Clinton’s stubbornly stupid insistence upon using her own private e-mail server and BlackBerry devices instead of the federal government’s when she served as Secretary of State under Barack Obama. This reckless disregard for basic security protocol, it was breathlessly intimated at the time, somehow implicated Clinton in the deaths of four Americans killed during an attack on the American Embassy in Benghazi, Libya, which took place 10 years ago this week. Since then, we have mercifully expunged all memory of Benghazi —and the attendant “Benghazi-gate” scandal. See, the brain does heal itself.

But at the time, Benghazi was the subject of more government hearings, investigations, inquests, probes, reports, and leaks than perhaps any time in human history. It was for a very long moment the single most overreported story in American journalism. It may still be. But no, it did not help Trump beat Clinton, as Clinton herself has long insisted. Instead, it helped Clinton — always her own worst enemy despite the Vast Right Wing Conspiracy that in fact has dogged her every step — beat Clinton. And she did so decisively even though she won

3 million more votes than he in the popular count.

So why dredge all this up now? Two obvious reasons. First, Mike Stoker is back. This time, he’s running for State Assembly in November against Gregg Hart, the 2nd District county supervisor, an experienced bureaucratic apparatchik, and long the Democratic Party’s resident grown-up in the room. When deciding between these two, I think “Lock ’er up” qualifies as a relevant data point. I suspect it’s the main reason Trump later appointed Stoker to run the West Coast Division of the Environmental Protection Agency. Second, what’s now unfolding at Mar-a-Lago with the boxes of classified documents Trump took as mementos of his days in the White House makes anything Clinton did — or even may have done — pale in comparison. On a scale of severity, Clinton’s offenses were akin to forgetting to lock your car at night and perhaps

leaving your lights on. Trump’s transgressions, by comparison, are like leaving the uranium pellets needed to power the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in a shopping cart in a Costco parking lot alongside several boxes of the best screw-top Chablis. If I have it right, Clinton ran about 30,000 emails through her personal server related to her work as Secretary of State along with another 30,000 or so personal ones. Not one of these work emails indicated they contained classified information. In fact, it turned out, 110 should have been stamped classified — 65 of them were later deemed “Secret” and 22 “Top Secret.” Another 2,100 were reclassified, after the fact, as “confidential” info. The FBI undertook two investigations. Twice it found Clinton guilty of sloppiness and carelessness; twice it concluded no criminal charges were warranted. Had Clinton heeded advice offered early on, she would have put all work communications on a government-protected server, but she chose not to. For that, “Lock ’er up?” Okay, then what about the 300 obviously marked classified documents over which Trump is now claiming after-the-fact executive privilege. Some of these contain such top secret information that the agents executing the search needed their clearances upgraded just to look at them. Some of these are so top secret that they remain off-limits to many high-ranking Biden administrators. Now the Washington Post — yes, I know,

the lick-spittle lackey doormen for the Deep State — reports some of the documents contain details about the nuclear capabilities and military defenses of unnamed foreign governments. Yes, it’s true there’s a dangerous tendency to overclassify documents. But all these were clearly and dramatically marked as “classified.” About the only things missing were the radioactive skull and crossbones. As a result, files including the identity of “human assets” might have been strewn around Trump’s country club along with his news clippings and old underwear. I like Mike Stoker. I can’t help it. It’s a failing of mine even though he declined — however graciously — to participate in a candidates’ forum jointly sponsored by the League of Women Voters and the Independent were I to have moderated. He said I was too biased. My feeling was hurt, but truthfully, I was also relieved. Those things take a lot of work. And he wasn’t wrong. As far as Republicans go these days, Stoker is the one-eyed man among the army of the blind. To his credit, he’s never espoused Trump’s Big Lie that the 2020 election was somehow stolen. To the extent election fraud may have taken place, I believe Stoker said, it was not sufficient to change the results. In today’s context, that qualifies Stoker as a moderate Republican. For this, we should be grateful? As for the upcoming candidates’ forum between Hart and Stoker, I’m hoping whoever moderates asks Mike to explain “Lock ’er up.” I’m hoping he might amend that to “Lock him up, too.”

If I had a farm, I wouldn’t bet it.

—Nick Welsh

PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

12

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until September 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


OPINIONS CONT’D MONTE WOLVERTON, BAT TLE GROUND, WA

Letters

Landlords in the Black “

L

andlords operate on very thin margins in Santa Barbara.” That’s the first of many unsupported claims made in the Voice titled “Rent Control Will Harm the Poor” in last week’s paper. Not just unsupported; in my experience, it’s laughably untrue. My landlords have been consistently and significantly in the black, a circumstance that’s not hard to achieve when the house has been owned for more than a few years. Oh, but wait, his bio says the author, Jeffrey Harding, is a real estate investor and adjunct real-estate investment professor. The author’s concerns are driven by a “real estate as an investment” agenda, not “real estate as a place to live.” In many markets, 20-30 percent of recent single-family home sales have been to investors, with the intent of offering them for rent. Minimizing the down payment, as an investor would seek to do, means maximizing the monthly rent to cover the costs of servicing a larger mortgage. These are the people Mr. Harding is watching out for. For each category of Santa Barbara rentals (single-family homes, apartments, etc.), I would like to see the following breakdown for purchases made for investment purposes: percent bought within the last three years, percent owned for five years, percent owned for 10 years, and so on to 25 years. These data would speak to the profit margins on which Santa Barbara landlords operate.

—David Jonathan, S.B.

Vote for Democracy

D

uring the January 6 hearings, we’ve heard from former members of the Trump administration and Republican state officials about how Trump and his allies worked together to try and overthrow our democracy because the 2020 presidential election didn’t go their way. Now, they’re working to make sure all of our elections go their way in the future, whether we vote for them or not. Already, Trumpers in office have changed state laws to weaken our freedom to vote and threatened Republican election administrators who won’t go along with them. Now, they’re running candidates for key election administration offices, from secretary of state to county clerk. Should they win their elections this fall, these officials won’t hesitate to overturn future elections if they or their MAGA allies lose. This completely undermines the tenets of our

democracy. The only way we’re going to protect our elections is to fight back and make our voices heard. We have to cast our ballots in the upcoming midterm elections. It’s up to us to hold election deniers accountable at the polls and elect democracy defenders up and down the ballot on November 8. —Jessica Barene-Gutierrez, S.B.

Taxing the Sun

I

n case you were not aware of this, the utility companies are trying to create a solar tax for households that have solar panels! This actually affects everyone and not just people who have panels (I personally do not have solar panels). From my research, it will be a solar tax between $300 and $600 a year. It would be based on the amount of solar energy you make and consume. The more solar energy you make, the higher the tax. This includes apartment buildings, new homes built with solar, and solar-powered batteries. By adding this additional burden on California residents interested in solar, we will actually disincentivize efforts to reduce a carbon footprint. This does not make any sense to me. I am sure you do not need me to tell you that the utility companies only care about profits and not people — or climate change for that matter. If Californians continue to place solar panels on their own roofs, we can also help protect open space instead of converting open space into utility-scale solar farms. We have all seen the endless “sea” of utility-scale solar farms while driving through the California deserts. The utility companies make tons of profit off of those government-subsidized utility-scale solar farms out in the desert. The people of California need to tell Governor Newson to choose the people and not the utility companies. If you are still interested, follow: solarrights.org/utilityprofitgrab.

2.50

%

APY1

5-MONTH CD

For a limited time, earn a guaranteed interest rate with a CD (certificate of deposit). A $10,000 minimum balance is required. To get started, contact the Preferred Banking Office nearest you or scan the QR code to learn more.

—Amy Plesetz, Carpinteria

For the Record

¶ The year the News & Review started was 1972, not 1975 as noted in last week’s story on cofounder Richard Parker.

firstrepublic.com/CD

Santa Barbara, 1200 State Street, (805) 560-6883 The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

1 Offer is subject to change without notice and applies for one term only. Annual percentage yield (APY) is effective as of publication date. Penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal. $10,000 minimum balance required. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

13


obituaries John Joseph Cornejo 6/26/1953 - 8/29/2022

John Joseph Cornejo, 69, of Santa Barbara CA, passed away on August 29, 2022. John’s battle against cancer ended in the care of hospice while surrounded by loving family. He was born on June 26, 1953 in Santa Barbara CA, to Jose and Guillerma Cornejo, who preceded him in death. His formidable years were spent in Goleta, Casmalia, and Dos Pueblos Ranch among wide open spaces which served as a playground for him and his siblings; birthing his great love of nature. He worked with the US Forest Service as a park ranger, Circle Bar B Ranch, drove as a city school bus driver, as well as at the Santa Barbara Zoo helping with the elephants and as train operator. John retired from a career at the City of Santa Barbara as a Water Front Maintenance Facility Worker at the harbor. After his retirement John stayed busy as a camp host at Tuckers Grove Park and worked as a mechanic at the Botanical Gardens where he could be seen in the company of his faithful dog Samantha, who accompanied him to work every day. His love of the outdoors, gardening, camping, fishing, and animals in addition to his amazing mechanical aptitude were present in each pursuit of John’s pastimes, hobbies, and jobs. He was a long-standing member of the Bravados Motorcycle Club of Santa Barbara. There was a time when he was never far from his bike, always ready for adventure, and equipped to take on life to the fullest. He loved to travel and was able to created lasting bonds of loyal brotherhood with club members creating a lifetime of great stories to recount. Another passion of John’s was photography; he leaves a legacy of photos which chronicled the loves he fostered in combination with the journeys he made. He enjoyed capturing pictures of family vacations, get togeth14

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com ers, camping trips, his work life, the numerous rides he participated in, and countless nostalgic moments from every phase of his life. Each picture attests to the nurturing bonds he cultivated with his children, the women he loved, the family he was a part of, and the spirit with which he embraced and loved life. The most memorable things about John were his easy-going disposition, his ability to always have a smile on his face, his friendly mannerism, the fact he was such a soft, gentle, and kind-loving soul. He will be greatly missed. John is survived by his partner of 17 years, Rita Martinez, his children Tealeye Cornejo, Theasha Cornejo-Gonzalez, Ira Cornejo, step son Shane, grandkids Ivette, Steven, Gabriel, JessieRae, and step grandkids Marisa and David, as well as his numerous and extended family members. Interment will be held the 16th of September 2022, 3:00 PM at Santa Barbara Cemetery: 901 Channel Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93108.

Esther H. Baum

10/31/1928 - 8/6/2022

Esther H Baum passed away on Saturday, August 6 in Santa Barbara at the age of 93. Esther was born on October 31, 1928 in Chicago, Illinois to Barney E. Hokin and Dorothy L. Schwartz. She was a loving and dedicated partner to her husband, Robert K. Baum, M.D., for 71 years. Esther was born into a large family which came to the USA from Eastern Europe between 1882 and 1921 settling in Chicago and becoming teachers, retail store owners, delicatessen proprietors and metals middlemen. She attended Shakespeare and Kenwood Elementary Schools, Hyde Park High School, and the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana, receiving her Bachelor of Arts Degree from Roosevelt University in Chicago in 1950. Later when her sons, David (Denice) of Los Angeles and Frank (Colleen) of Maui were

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

completing high school, she obtained her master’s degree in library science from Immaculate Heart College in LA. She served a short time as acting head librarian at that college then was employed by the Los Angeles Library System as a reference librarian. After taking classes with Master Calligrapher, David Meckelberg, Esther became an accomplished calligrapher in her own right, and used those skills throughout her professional and personal life. An avid bibliophile from an early age, she worked as a volunteer in the library at the elementary school where her sons were students and was active in the PTA. Esther’s love of reading continued for decades. In 1973 she opened Banbury Book Shop in Woodland Hills, which became known as a top class independent bookstore where the employees read and were knowledgeable about the books that they were selling and the personalized attention paid to customers was without equal. She was forced to sell the store eleven years later when the big box chain stores opened just a few blocks away. A published author of children’s stories, Esther became a literary agent and helped aspiring writers develop their writings for publication. Thereafter she went to work as a physician’s aide in her husband’s surgical specialty office until he elected to retire in 1992. The couple moved to Santa Barbara and a new home on Coronada Circle which they purchased on their 40thanniversary. Dr. Bob joined a surgical group in the tricounties for 5 years finally retiring completely in 1996. They cruised extensively to distant ports and spent many Septembers in Hawaii to celebrate anniversaries, first on Kauai and then after their first grandson, Jason, was born on Maui. Granddaughter Jessie (Kerry Kullback) was born in 1989 and grew up near Esther’s home in Woodland Hills. As they got older they joined their parents and grandparents on cruises to see the world and enjoy the good life onboard the ships. Esther served nine years on the Santa Barbara Parks and Recreation Commission, worked on the redevelopment of Chase Palm Park, participated in the Pearl Chase Society, took courses at the Adult Education School serving two terms on

INDEPENDENT.COM

their board of directors and served on several other charitable committees and boards. She was diagnosed with mixed dementia in early 2010 and she and her husband moved to Maravilla Senior Community where she remained from 2012 to her passing. She is survived by her younger sister, Francine Hokin Katz of San Marino, CA. and many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Services were held at Congregation B’nai B’rith on August 12, 2022 followed by private interment at Santa Barbara Cemetery. A celebration of life is planned for October. Donations may be made to the Rabbi’s discretionary fund at Congregation B’nai B’rith or to your charity of choice.

Donna Marie (Polly) Aguirre 1/5/1959 - 8/28/2022

Donna Marie (Polly) Aguirre, 63, of Santa Barbara, passed away peacefully surrounded by her family and went to be with our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ on Sunday, August 28, 2022, in Santa Barbara. Donna was born at Vandenberg Airforce Base in Lompoc on January 5, 1959. She was raised in Lompoc and graduated from Lompoc Senior High School in 1978. Donna later moved to Santa Barbara where she met and married the love of her life, Raul Aguirre on September 9, 1989. In her early years, Donna worked at Odile’s Beauty Salon in Lompoc. She also successfully managed several restaurants in the Lompoc and Santa Maria area. Later she worked and was well known in the cosmetics department at Robinsons-May in Santa Barbara for ten years. Baptized Greek Orthodox, Donna consistently embraced her Greek heritage and culture with passion and was a faithful member of the Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church for a number of years. Donna is preceded in death by her father, Donald Ray Polly and father-inlaw, Raul Aguirre Sr. Donna is survived by her loving husband Raul; two daughters, Corinna Polly-Cortez and Krystle Schlegel (Josh), son Raul

Aguirre; two brothers, George Polly (Cathy) and Nick Polly (Jennifer); sister, Era Polly; sisters- in -law Aida Barnes (Greg), Irma Mera (Paco), Irene Glickman (Barry); brothers-in-law George Aguirre (Amy), Michael Aguirre (Jan), Richard Aguirre (Judy); her mother, Elene Tallman (Bob) and mother-in-law Stella Aguirre as well as numerous grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Donna’s love of children led her to operate “Donna’s Day Care” for ten years. Many of those children would later return as young adults to share memories with her. Donna showcased her culinary skills at BBQ’s and holidays with family. She loved to decorate for all holidays especially Halloween and Christmas. She always had a smile on her face and was always eager to join in family activities. Donna had a heart of gold, a genuinely kind spirit and a light that shined like no other. Fly with the Angels sweet Donna. You are so loved and will be missed by so many. Donna’s family wishes to extend their sincere thanks to the Sarah House of Santa Barbara for their loving care and compassion. The family is grateful to Father Bob Fox from the Santa Barbara Greek Orthodox Church for always being present for Donna especially in her last days. In lieu of flowers, the family requests contributions be made to the Sarah House, 2612 Modoc Rd., Santa Barbara, CA. 93105, in Donna’s memory. Viewing and Trisagion will be at 7:00 pm, September 8, 2022, at Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church, 1205 San Antonio Creek Rd., Santa Barbara. Funeral Services will be held at 10:00 am, September 9, 2022, at Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church. Burial will follow at Goleta Cemetery, 44 South San Antonio Rd, Santa Barbara followed by a Celebration of Life at Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church.

Deanna Alisa Vazquez 1978 - 1998

We miss you now as much as when you were taken from us. Love always Mom and Dad


In Memoriam

Eric Hansen 1971-2022

BY C O U R T N E Y S H A N N O N AND F R I E N D S t is hard to imagine this life without Eric

Hansen. A father, son, brother, friend, ocean-swimming enthusiast, history buff, lover of nature, drum circle devotee, and our very own flower guy, Eric Bryant Hansen was born January 29, 1971, in Bay City, Michigan, to Grant Hansen and Cynthia Richards. He moved with his family at age 3 to Santa Barbara and graduated Dos Pueblos High School in 1989. Eric had an infectious smile and a memorable ability to make people laugh, and through the lens of his curiosity, he felt comfortable speaking with anyone he met. There were no strangers to Eric Hansen. Eric contributed to our community in creative ways. He decided to work at his uncle’s video store on Mission Street instead of going to college, adding to the hubbub of conversation and nonstop critique about films of all genres that went on into the evening hours. A total film buff, Eric was dedicated to helping people pick out the perfect movie at the video shop. One year, Eric was hired onto the film production crew for Steal Big Steal Little, a movie written and directed by Andrew Davis and filmed in Santa Barbara County. Davis reflected, “We were fortunate to have Eric help as a great production assistant on the film. We all remember what a sweetheart and outrageous, creative character Eric Hansen was. He lived life with passion and integrity, and worked tirelessly on his many jobs, causes, and passions.” Davis recalled that Eric shot video with Patrick Fourmy and organized material on nefarious government operations, including Iran Contra. “I met Eric in the 1980s when we took TV production classes together,” Patrick Fourmy said. “He was always a very kind, generous, and intelligent person—lending a hand to others and priding himself in being philosophical and unique. Eric, we miss you.” Patrick’s brother Christian played in the drum circle at Chase Palm Park together with Eric, and they spent a great deal of time hiking in the mountains and into the back country: “Eccentric, Eric had no problem being Eric,” Christian Fourmy said. “Many a local knew him from the video store or drum circle, and if you didn’t, you probably saw him on the road riding a beater bicycle wearing a Hawaiian shirt with a basket of flowers for sale. “Eric had a profound influence in my life through his friendship and introducing me to his good friend and benefactor Patrick O’Donovan. Patrick would be crucial in starting the drum circle at Chase Palm Park. Over the next five years, hundreds would gather. “As for the mountains and the ocean, that may have been one of his greatest loves. In fact, fitness in general, he never stopped—whether it was riding up Gibraltar or Old San Marcos Pass, running up Rattlesnake Trail and hitting the cold pools, or swimming in the ocean. You are missed, Eric. See you up the road,” Christian said. Eric started his own flower stand at UCSB. His natural charm and desire to be helpful combined with his conversational spontaneity to make him a popular figure on campus. He’d pause at least once a day to jump in the surf or boogie board in any season. He loved being a part of and participating in Nite Moves, setting up the buoys and tents and working the beer garden.

COURTESY

I

The One and Only

2 Lessons For $45 CALL 805.963.6658 TO SCHEDULE

Special for new students only * May only be used once *

His friend Lowell Blank said, “I never saw Eric in a bad mood or heard an angry word from his mouth. He was always ready to engage in a friendly conversation. Eric was was a Santa Barbara institution, a child of the universe, marching to the beat of his own drum.” The greatest joy of his life came in March 2008 when Brody Hansen was born to Eric and Courtney Shannon. Eric was a devoted father. He and Brody were always out on bike rides, hikes, beach days, camping, and many adventures in and out of Santa Barbara. Eric was beloved by Brody’s cousins as a funny uncle, a leader of games, and a great gift giver. His family set down the things they would miss the most: Eric’s contagious smile and his poking fun until you laughed, his uncanny ability to remember historical facts, his compassionate heart for the homeless, his John Deere tractor bike he used to deliver flowers, his vintage Hawaiian shirts, his variety of parade costumes and bike decorations, his treasures found at yard sales, and his unending love for his son. In November 2021, Eric was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He fought like a warrior to have time to create as many fun memories as he could with Brody. Together they went camping in Big Sur, bike riding, swimming in the ocean, watched movies, and played video games. This past July 16, Eric was baptized at Saint Anthanasius Christian Orthodox Church, and he met with his priest regularly to receive communion. He departed this life peacefully under the care of Serenity House on Sunday, August 7, 2022. The sounds of a Rebelution reggae concert drifted into his room as he was surrounded by his friends and family: Brody; Courtney; Briana; his godfather, John Casey; Sebastian; Mark; Brody’s godmother, Michelle; and his brother, Todd. Shortly before passing, Eric’s face shone like the sun and his eyes widened. He smiled a great grin as if he were seeing his heavenly family waiting n for him. We love you, Eric!

JENNIE K. WELSH MEDIATION welshmediation.com (805) 259-8097

Learn Learnto to

Speak Speak Spanish Spanish

with withAlonso AlonsoBenavides, Benavides,ph.d. ph.d.

6 - juneor26,Online 2020 In april our Office Day and Evening Classes16 September 26–December and Saturdays

SPANISH

Join us,Details: have fun and find out how spontaneous spanishschoolsbca.com communication is more efficient and effective than canned dialogue or recorded conversations.

805-252-9512

www.sigloxxispanish.com

805-252-9512

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

12 sessions $350

One Hour/Week for 24 sessions $700 Private $336 $90 hr. weeks: Special semester package: Two for$980 12Hours/Week one-hour sessions 12 weeks: $622 SPANISH LANGUAGE Private one-on-one INSITUTE SIGLO 21 $95 per hour Santa Barbara Special package for 12 sessions: $980

Our method calls for small groups (6 maximum) CONVERSATIONAL and conversation as soon as it is possible 12

SIGLO XXI SPANISH LANGUAGE INSITUTE THE INDEPENDENT

15


Santa Barbara County is Celebrating Locally Owned and Operated

www.santacruzmarkets.com 2021

bestof

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St Celebrating recovery and wellness by providing addiction and mental health resources for individuals, families and By the bag communities.

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

BEST CORNER STORE!

Santa barbara

®

Winner Santa Barbara

HASS AVOCADOS BANANAS LONG GRA CHICKEN DRUMSTICKS BEEF TRI TIP ¢ $

$

Free

2

59

lb.

Chicken

r the o f d o Fo first 150 people!

49

99¢ ea.

PORK TRI TIP

MEXICAN PAPAYA

LEG QUARTERS ces $2.29 lb.

69 ¢

lb.

$

1

1

98¢ lb.

resour

PINEAPPLES

lb.

1

HOT TOMA

89¢ lb. $5.98 lb.ROMA TOMATOES ¢ Boneless lb.

lb. Local ent! m n Thin sliced i a t r e Ent r: speake $ a98 n llelb. n o d n Bra

MESQUITE

ea. SERRANO CHILES El Pato 7 oz.

T-BONE STEAKS

59

7#

$

89¢ $ lb. 99

Beef

PORK BUTT Raffle Prizes

Mahatma 2#

Fresh

5

89

BROCCOLI CROWNSFolgers 8 oz.

CUBED PORK

INSTANT C

$ $1.29lb. $2.98 lb. FUJI APPLES CARNE RANCHERA SOLE FILLET ¢ Springfield 15 o ROMA TOMATOES PEAS & CA lb. $4.98 lb. 99¢ lb. 8 Santa Cruz

89

5

MEDIUM YAMS the bag PORK CHORIZO By SEEDLESS GRAPES Springfield 8 oz BEEF TRI TIP ¢ WHIP TOP $ 49 59 lb.lb. Santa Barbara Health2 & lb. $1.49 $ $3.98 lb. 1 Wellness Resource Fair Minute Maid 59 PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE Monday, September 26, 2022

1

$Gardens 98 (4pm-7pm) Santa Barbara Sunken 1100 Anacapa St, Santa Barbara, CA

79

lb.

BWELLADPTeam@sbcbwell.org Chuck Madson 805-757-3487

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

Mahatma 2#

$

Mahatma 2#

LONG GRAIN RICE

LONG GRAIN RICE

69 ¢

lb.

lb.

7#

LEG QUARTERS

159

$ 99 1 FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL PINEAPPLES PINEAPPLES $ 89 LEG QUARTERS $ 89 2 $ 99 $ FACEBOOK 99 ¢ AND LIKE US ON 1 FOLLOW 2US ON INSTAGRAM lb.

lb.

Chicken

$

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

¢ 99 HAND • PRICES 49 ¢ ON$1 49DAYS $ 59 259 LIMITED TO STOCK 2EFFECTIVE 7 FULL 7#

Chicken

ea.

PORK BUTT

ROMA TOMATOES

89 ¢ lb.

lb.

Thin sliced

CARNE RANCHERA

FUJI APPLES

89

¢ $ Aegis 98 Treatment Community partners include: lb. lb. Centers, Cal-SOAP, CAUSE, CenCal, Santa Cruz Council on MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Family Service Agency, ¢ $ 49 lb. lb. BARBARA Fire Department, Future LeadersSANTA of America, Good 324 W. Montecito St Heart Recovery, Good Samaritan, Housing Authority,

5

59

2

PORK CHOPS

HEAD LETTUCE

El Pato 7 oz.

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

59

¢

1

lb.

1

Best $of 59

INSTANT COFFEE

®

winner Thin sliced

589

$

Springfield 15 oz.

PEAS & CARROTS

89 ¢

598

of

PORK CHORIZO SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 SANTA BARBARA $ 49 2 1 324324 Montecito St St W.W.Montecito Springfield 8 oz.

lb.

PORK CHOPS

59 ¢

®

WI

®

lb.

FUJI APPLES

Folgers 8 oz.

INSTANT COFFEE $

89

lb.

Santa Cruz

Minute Maid 59 oz.

89 NNER

2019

� CARNE RANCHERA

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

20 20

BEST

Santa Barbaralb.

El Pato 7 oz.

ea.

ROMA TOMATOES BEST ¢ SANTA BARBARA

PORK BUTT 2018

Folgers 8 oz.

$

69

MEDIUM YAMS

¢ lb.

589

Springfield 15 oz.

PEAS & CARROTS

89 ¢

¢ GOLETA WHIP TOPPING GOLETA lb. $ 49 1 5757 Hollister 5757 Hollister Ave Ave Minute Maid 59 oz. HEAD LETTUCE ORANGE JUICE ¢

59

Springfield 8 oz.

ORANGE JUICE ¢ $ Academy, 98 NAACP, New House and Paragon Pacific ea. $ 89 By the bag $ 98lb. Mahatma 2# lb. ea. $ 89 By the bag 3 3 Pride, Police Department, Public Health, Sanctuary featuring fresh bread daily from Now featuring fresh bread daily from Centers, Transitions Mental Health Now Association, Unity La Bella Rosa Bakery La Bella Rosa Bakery TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS Shoppe, YouthWell LIMITEDFROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND FROM OCTOBER 27TH DEALERS THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND TO lb.NO SALES lb. lb. LIMITED STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS 7#8 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 14 FROM SEPTEMBER GOLETA SANTA BARBARA Chicken Chicken SANTA BARBARA 5757 Hollister Ave 324 W. Montecito St SEPTEMBER 8, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM 324 W. Montecito St

1

BEEF TRI TIP $

THE INDEPENDENT

www.santacruzmarkets.com

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

lb.

16

$

ea.

Now featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery BANANAS BANANAS BEEF TRI TIP BEEF TRI TIP www.santacruzmarkets.com

More information:

ORANGE J

¢

2

79

$

59

LEG QUARTERS ¢

By the bag

79

Support1local people working at BANANAS BANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE BEEFlocally TRI ¢TIP owned businesses!

59 249

$

$BANANAS 99

49

MESQUITE CHARCOAL PINEAPPLES

PINEAPPLES LEG QUARTERS By the bag

1

99

$

2

89

Mahatma 2#

LONG GRAIN RICE

Mahatma 2#

$

Mahatma 2#

¢

LONG GR

$

lb. 7#

MESQUI

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

99


COVER STOR Y

Art, Activism, Awareness and Every Brilliant Thing Groundbreaking Show Brings Entertaining, Compassionate Focus to Mental Health Issues HBO

by Josef Woodard

Jonny Donahoe, who starred in Every Brilliant Thing in London, off-Broadway, and in the 2018 HBO special shown here, brings the play to Center Stage Theater September 23-25, as a benefit for New Beginnings Counseling Center.

T

echnically, the British play Every Brilliant Thing is a

one-man show, an acclaimed tour de force achievement by British comedian Jonny Donahoe, who inspires tears and laughter over the course of 75 minutes of inventive theater. But when the play lands in Santa Barbara’s Center Stage Theater (Sept. 23-25), audiences will quickly learn that the literal one-man show description is at least marginally incomplete. For one, audience participation reaches new heights of interactivity in the clever structural design of the play. More tellingly — and yet more abstractly — the play’s unseen character is a huge, quietly looming specter: a suicidal mother character and, by extension, the vast, broadly relevant topic of mental illness and its effect on both victims and family members. Those entities loom in the wings. And yet, somehow, the play works a delicate balancing act of lightness and compassion. Heralded as a sensation in London, off-Broadway, and streaming via a 2018 HBO special, the play, written by Duncan Macmillan with Donahoe, makes its Santa Barbara premiere with a fitting benefactor, as a fundraiser for New Beginnings Counseling Center.

In Silver Linings Playbook, one of the more prominent Hollywood films dealing with mental illness (and inspired by director David O. Russell’s experience raising a bipolar son), our protagonist (Bradley Cooper) measures baby steps of success in grappling with bipolar condition by noting successful moments in a figurative playbook. In Every Brilliant Thing, our protagonist, trying to bring life-affirmation to both his depressed mother and himself, creates an expanding list of “brilliant things” to make life worth living. On that list, which he starts at age 7 after his mother’s first suicide attempt and continues through his own depression-flecked adult life, are such nuggets as “kung fu movies,” “Laughing so hard you shoot milk out your nose,” and “Marlon Brando.” The audience is folded into the process, having been passed out cards and asked to read the lifeaffirmative “things,” and sometimes asked to play roles — a father, a girlfriend — in the evolving life of our protagonist. Key lines jump out of the play’s rolling text and fluid narrative, as when Donahoe suddenly utters a core value and message of the play we’re watching: “Advice to suicidal people: Don’t do it. Things get better.” From an empathetic angle, he also suggests, “If you make it to old age and you haven’t

been crushingly depressed, then you probably haven’t lived.” Kristine Schwarz, executive director of New Beginnings, points out that “subjects like trauma, grief, depression, and loneliness can be very isolating and often make it difficult for a person to articulate what they are feeling, and sometimes it is easier to express heavy emotions when we become — or ‘play at’ — being someone else, or by using music or drawing or an artistic depiction to communicate a profoundly overwhelming emotion. Somehow that makes it easier for others to be empathic. It can get people to think in a different way about the issue of mental health, or homelessness.” In considering the juncture of art and mental distress, it’s important to recognize that mental illness, in varying forms and degrees, has been woven into the very fabric of the creative process and of making art, throughout history. Schwarz notes, “The arts and entertainment have always been an effective way for those who suffer from mental illness to express themselves — van Gogh, Virginia Woolf, Frida Kahlo, Charles Dickens, Sylvia Plath, Picasso, Tim Burton, Woody Allen, Anthony Bourdain, etc. It is healing for some to share and help others in the process, (to make) n post-traumatic growth.” COVER

INDEPENDENT.COM

STORY

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

CONTINUED»

THE INDEPENDENT

17


COURTESY

Eyeing Mental Illness Through the Comi-Tragic Lens of Jonny Donahoe

Every Brilliant Thing is an interactive show that addresses depression, mental illness, and suicide, and the effects it has on those closest to us, using the many small but brilliant things we have to hold onto as a way to see the brighter side of life.

at his only personally-owned art gallery

Art & Wine Reception - September 24th

Come see the latest creations from the Official Artist of the Super Bowl, GRAMMY Awards, Olympic Games, & More!

529 State Street - Santa Barbara, CA

Saturday, September 24th 2:00pm - 6:00pm (805) 730-9109 www.fazzino.com - 3dstudio@fazzino.com 18

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

I was so impressed, on multiple levels, with the televised version of Every Brilliant Thing. I don’t believe I’ve ever experienced anything quite like it, in terms of its structure, audience engagement, and deft balancing of tragedy and comedy — not to mention showcasing the subjects of depression and suicide. Would you say this piece has changed your life, and do you see it as a theatrical experiment with a deep heart? Jonny Donahoe: It has definitely changed my life, and it’s very good of you to say such nice things about it. The show has such a “deep heart,” as you so kindly put it, I think because of the gravity of the subject matter. To talk about suicide onstage is so vital, and yet also could be dangerous if it was incorrectly handled. So we had to work and work and work at that to get it right and strike that balance. The audience engagement was an obvious theatrical thing to do for us. The first step you need to take to help yourself in a depression is to reach out, to share, and to commune, so we felt we had to make that happen with the audience live in the show. This television version was shot in 2018, after you were already deep into the play’s runs in the U.K. and New York. How has the piece evolved for you, especially in the gap between then and now, after the hollow chasm of the pandemic? Is there a new depth to the experience of performing it now? Well, this will be the first time I’ve performed it since the pandemic, so I’ll find out how that has changed the nature of the play and the audiences’ reactions. But I have found that, since we were all locked down, the very act of performing on a stage in front of an audience is an even deeper, more resonant and cathartic act for everyone — performer and audience. That was noticeably the case when I performed other shows earlier this year. I can only imagine it’ll be more so with Every Brilliant Thing.

As a central aspect of the piece, you really do interact with and feed off of the crowd in the round (love that scene with you singing as your keyboard is revolving). Is that always a refreshing element in each performance, and do you feel your work as a comedian has enhanced your natural ability to “work the crowd?” One intention of the show — a very long time ago when we were first making it — was to try to make something that would combine the very “live” and spontaneous style of a standup or improv performer, alongside the more technical, nuanced skills of a proper, real stage actor — to try to get the best of both worlds in one show. I knew a great deal less about real stage acting than I did about stand-up at the start, so it made sense to use the skills I had. I do think the improvisation and changes made every night keep the show very fresh and alive, and that makes it a better experience for everyone. Obviously, this is a project that both entertains and deals creatively with the pressing — and universal — issue of depression. Post-pandemic, the prevalence of mental illness, anxieties on different levels, has become even more an issue, globally. Do you have general thoughts about the potential interaction and therapeutic powers of the arts — theater, film, and beyond — and mental illness as a subject? I think in the seven or so years since I first performed this show and now, the world has changed dramatically. We seem now to be able and willing to talk more about mental health, and mental illness as a society, and we seem to have become more understanding of this issue. We appear in some ways to be better at talking, listening, helping…. But we’ve only chipped at the surface. There’s so much more to be done, and that’s one of the reasons I wanted to be performing this show again.


C OV E R S T O R Y Your Santa Barbara performance will benefit a worthy cause, New Beginnings Counseling Center. Is it gratifying to be able to directly impact and help organizations such as this in the line of your theatrical duty? Does it involve a sense of helping out at a ground level? Organizations like New Beginnings do such amazing work, and it’s very special for me to be able to do something that’s in any way beneficial to the charity and the people they work with. I’m just a silly comedian, really—and I don’t always have the skillset to do “ground-level” work, nor the patience or any of the other things needed to do such important work. Sometimes, you can feel a bit selfish just making theater, even if the work is about trying to help people. So this is a very special, important run of shows for me.

COVER STOR Y

After such a long investment in the intense world of Every Brilliant Thing, do you have a desire to lighten the load with acting or comedy projects of a more frivolous kind? I keep meaning to do that — just make something silly and fun. But you look out the window or catch the news and it’s hard to stay frivolous. When we’ve solved climate change, the number of children living beneath the poverty line, the mental health crisis, and Trump is in prison, maybe I can make a show about ice-cream and dancing. That’s a good aim for the future.

For more information and to purchase tickets for the fundraiser, visit sbnbcc.org/benefitseptember-2022.

Joshua Lab Manager

Exceptional salaries, benefits & career growth opportunities Mental Health, Work Life Balance and Wellness Programs Nationally recognized for Quality, Patient and Employee Satisfaction Find your next career at cottagehealth.org/ careers

COURTESY

New Beginnings, Still Beginning Anew After 50 Years

“At Cottage, I had the privilege of joining a dream team that elevates medical care to the highest level.”

Art Essentials Fall Creative Sale Wood Artist Panels Buy one Get one Free

Select paints 20 to 40% off

The team for New Beginnings’ 2019 fundraiser, a production of Food and Shelter, the fanciful but heartrending story of a homeless family splurging on a day at Disneyland, written by Emmy Award–winning writer Jane Anderson and directed by award-winning theater and film director Jenny Sullivan.

W

ith a track record exceed-

ing half a century, the New Beginnings Counseling Center (sbnbcc.org) qualifies as an anchoring presence in Santa Barbara’s mental wellness field. Its worthycause status is well-established. Hosting the famed Every Brilliant Thing, featuring its dynamic originator onstage dealing directly with the subject of mental illness, amounts to a beautiful, beneficial case of synergy. But the arts and arts-related philanthropic entities have long been a part of the New Beginnings world. It all began with a

surprisingly popular screening of the documentary Skid Row Marathon, about Los Angeles judge Craig Mitchell, who launched a running club for homeless people, addicts, and others sentenced to Skid Row. After the success of that event, New Beginnings Executive Director Kristine Schwarz said the Center “decided to embrace a new approach for our annual fundraiser where we utilized the arts and entertainment to engage with and educate our community about the critical issues we address in our work.” Since then, the Center has enlisted the help and dialogue from actors and CONTINUED»

Brushes 25 to 40 % off

Stretched Canvas 40 % off

WE HAVE 7000 SQUARE FEET OF ART AND CRAFT SUPPLIES. WE CARRY A LARGE VARIETY OF ARTIST PRODUCTS INCLUDING OILS, ACRYLICS, WATERCOLORS, GOUACHE, ENCAUSTICS, AND OTHERS. LARGE ASSORTMENT OF BRUSHES AND TOOLS. VAST ARRAY OF HANDMADE PAPERS. CRAFT AND SCULPTING SUPPLIES INCLUDING BAGS OF KILN CLAY. A LARGE CHILDRENS ART SECTION WITH SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE.

ART ESSENTIALS

32 E. VICTORIA ST. | 805-965-5456 Mon-Sat • 10am-6pm, Sun • 11am-5pm BEST OF SB WINNER 25+ YEARS! INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

19


COURTESY

Join us in reading September’s book of the month! SEPTEMBER’S THEME:

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

Discussion:

COURTESY

Cheri Steinkellner interviewed Harrison Ford at a special event in 2018 to celebrate the 50th year of New Beginnings.

Wednesday, September 28, at 6pm on Zoom BOOK O F THE M O N TH :

Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead

The cast of Food and Shelter takes a bow.

Register at independent.com/ indybookclub

20

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

arts-related visitors including Harrison Ford, Julie Bowen, and Annabelle Gurwitch, and produced a Jane Anderson play at the New Vic, all helping to draw awareness and generate fundraising for the center. Zooming up to this year’s stellar fundraising event, Schwarz says, “In 2020, I was researching the subject of mental illness for our next event and came across Every Brilliant Thing and watched the documentary while the play was running off-Broadway, and I knew immediately that this was our next event. Unfortunately, COVID had other plans, but we are now finally able to bring Jonny to Santa Barbara after almost three years in the planning. “This is definitely not a customary way of talking about homelessness and mental illness necessarily, but each event has brought more and more community members to our organization and increased their understanding of these issues.” Special public events and celebrity guests aside, the year-round, day-to-day focus of the center’s efforts puts a special emphasis on working with an underserved clientele, in need of help but lacking financial resources to pursue it via conventional avenues. Making services available to those who can or can’t afford it, New Beginnings describes itself as “a nonprofit that provides lowbarrier mental health counseling, as well as supportive services for families, youth, individuals, aging adults and veterans; we are on a mission to help destigmatize mental health care and ensure it is accessible to all.” An all-volunteer team of counselors and clinical supervisors ensures that counseling sessions run an average of only $13. The Center’s services are more critical than ever at the moment. Schwarz says, “We have seen an unprecedented presentation of increased distress and a decrease in distress tolerance since the start of COVID. Services need to be accessible and affordable and

INDEPENDENT.COM

equitable. There are a number of community partners and collaboratives we work with who are working to increase access, through such organizations as YouthWell, the Mental Health Advisory Board, Be Well, Cottage Hospital, Mission Harbor Behavioral Health, Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics, and CenCal.” Art therapies are also entrenched in the Center’s list of projects and objectives. These include drawing, painting, collage, journaling, poetry, and fStop Foundation, a digital photography workshop created by former board member Terence Ford for First Responders and Veterans. Circling back to the essential message and method of Every Brilliant Thing, Schwarz says, “Most of us have experienced grief and rejection and fear, especially like in some of the situations depicted within the context of this play. Jonny’s reflections about depression and suicide and his resulting interactions with the audience are surprisingly funny without being irreverent or political or stigmatizing. There is a tenderness to his handling of the subject that the audience appreciates and respects. “Jonny also shows us how important and necessary and normal it is to want to talk about depression—how important interdependence is to our well-being. That it’s okay to have emotions about stuff that is really challenging and scary and painful, and it can help to feel better if you talk about it. And learning that through a story about someone you can relate to, connecting to the public through the arts in this way, is somehow anonymous and safe—and, in this instance, bonding n and compelling.”

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES ABOUT SUICIDE AND DEPRESSION: • National Suicide & Crisis Lifeline: call or text 988; 988lifeline.org • countyofsb.org/559/Suicide-Awareness-Prevention • 211santabarbaracounty.org/mental-wellness/ hotlines/suicide-prevention-hotlines • namisantabarbara.org


C ARLA AMURAO (FILE)

COVER STOR Y

Sat, Oct 29 | 6:00-9:00 PM Mental Wellness Center client and peer arts teacher Lesley Grogan at the Mental Health Arts Festival with her art display

Crazy Art Show Returns to De la Guerra Plaza After COVID Hiatus

I

n one of the many signs of life and cultural calendars in Santa Bar-

bara returning to a regularly scheduled programming, De la Guerra Plaza recently played host to a long-standing tradition, the Mental Health Arts Festival, a flagship event for the Mental Wellness Center (mentalwellnesscenter.org). In its 26th iteration, the festival once again served as a centrally located and very public display of the fruits of art therapy, deployed by many mental-health services in town but with an inspiring “street” presence in town. Apart from the annual exhibition’s literal public visibility, the tradition shows up in other forms, as it did through director Justin Rowe’s documentary Crazy Art, an Audience Choice Award–winning film screened at the 2010 Santa Barbara International Film Festival. Three of the schizophrenic artists profiled in the film — Rodger Casier, Trinaty Lopez Wakefield, and Lesley Grogan — were festival-featured artists Postponed during the pandemic, the return of the festival’s feast of art by patients and clients of the Mental Wellness Center (MWC) also provided a reminder of the increased attention on mental illness in the current stressinfused global environment. As the Center’s seasoned CEO Annmarie Cameron explains, the festival is “a much-anticipated event for the artists who participate in it. Beyond just being an arts festival, this event offers a unique opportunity for individuals living with mental illness to exhibit their creative talents, enhance their self-esteem, and be perceived as worthy and valuable members of our community.” “All too often, people living with mental illness are marginalized and not seen,” she said. “While others may focus on their differences or limitations, MWC chooses to see their attributes, their strengths and their resilience despite the often enormous odds against them.” Creative approaches to therapy and creative activities are central to the agenda of the MWC, now 75 years old, including art workshops at its Fellowship Club and weekly drum circles. Cameron believes that “creative work benefits many, if not all, people. Studies show that music, painting, and other material art forms contribute to brain functioning, not just for children but also for adults. The physical act of craftsmanship can be calming and help with anxiety and depression. For people battling internal voices, engaging in art puts those voices in the background, offering a brief respite. Creative work also allows people to access trauma when they have no words. In short, art helps form a road n map or vision that can advance recovery from mental illness.”

Experience a magical circus of surprises during the Museum’s debut adults-only (21+) Halloween celebration. Come in costume to crawl our creepy halls and spooky woods in a progressive party with a spectacular finale under the big top! Enjoy food and drink, performers, a live band, and dancing. Get creepy for the community during this frightening fundraiser; all net proceeds support the Museum’s nature and science education programs.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

sbnature.org/tickets

2559 Puesta del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105 805-682- 4711

CELEBRATE CREEK WEEK! SEPTEMBER 17-24, 2022

Learn about our creeks, watersheds, and ocean through a week of fun and educational talks, tours, volunteer events, and more!

SBCREEKWEEK SBCREEKWEEK.COM 2022-09-01 Independent 3x4.indd 1

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

21

8/29/2022 8:53:18 AM


RUSTY’S PIZZA PRESENTS h

c

ch

am

santa barbara airport kids zone with an all-inclusive wristband

be

2022 r of com

goleta fall classic car show presented by

the point market

saturday sept. 24 10 to 6 Girsh Park

sunday sept. 25

ce

st

sa

oa

nt

a

b

a r sou a b r t a

r e m

american riviera bank main stage

pie eating contest at noon headliner: area 51

10 to 5

signature flight support lemon lounge

safety street presented by

exxonmobil

featuring lemon ale

community west bank food court featuring sweet & savory lemon foods

PRESENTING SPONSOR

Purchase your all-inclusive kids activity wristband in advance for at LemonFestival.com

FREE ADMISSION

$5 OFF

SUNSHINE SPONSORS A

GROWER SPONSORS brought to you by the

LemonFestival.com 22

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


The Waiter by Ma

WWW.SBBEAUTIFUL.ORG

Jacaranda Award for Outstanding Community Sue Adams

Santa Barbara Beautiful 58th Annual COMMUNITY AWARDS Awards Celebration www.sbbeautiful.org

! s e n i h ! s e n i S h a S r a r a a b b r ar a B ta n B a S a t San

Playa de Santa Barbara Award for Environmen Foothills Forever

Beautification Awards

President’s Award: Cabrillo Pavilion,Invites 1118 E Cabrillo YouBlvdTo

The Artistic Groundbreaker: Access Theater

Jacaranda Award for Outstanding Community Service: Sue Adams Griswold Award for Philanthropy: John C. Woodward

Playa de Santa Barbara Award for Environmental Stewardship: Foothills Forever 58th Annual Awards

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 3—5PM

President’s Award: Cabrillo Pavilion, 1118 E Cab

COURTESY

Community Awards

President’s Award: Cabrillo Pavilion, 1118 E Cabrillo B Photo by Erik Spike Thiesmeyer

Cocktail Reception Awards For info•SEPTEMBER call (805) Celebration 965-8867 or email info@sbbeautiful.org SUNDAY, 18, 2022 • 3—5PM Live Entertainment

Music Academy – Marilyn Horne Main House & Kuehn Court ADMISSION IS $50/PERSON 1070 Fairway Rd, Santa Barbara, CA

Cocktail&Reception • Awards Celebration • Live Entertainment RSVP PAY ONLINE: Jacaranda Award for Outstanding Community WWW.SBBEAUTIFUL.ORG Admission is $50/person • RSVP | Pay online: www.sbbeautiful.org The Waiter by Marcia Burtt

COURTESY

I

Celebration

Community Awards

MUSIC ACADEMY 1070 Fairway Rd, Santa Barbara, CA

Storm Reading was presented at the Lobero in 2018, including original cast members Neil Marcus, Matthew Ingersoll, and Kathryn Voice. As Lathim notes, “Storm Reading is a classic example of how theater can impact people’s emotional and mental health. The show was enlightening, to say the least. It dispelled so many stereotypes and opened the minds of every audience it performed for. We received countless letters from people sharing their stories of how the show changed them through giving them new perspectives on their own lives and on those living with disabilities. Although Neil [Marcus] had a severe disability [dystonia] and had difficulty speaking, his incredible spirit blasted through and touched people. He was a role model of livNeil Marcus, Kathryn Voice, and Matt Ingersoll (lying down) in ing one’s true self.” the 1988 Access Theater production of Storm Reading Speaking more broadly about n the annals of Santa Barbara–based the- the expressive and therapeutic powers of ater concerned with, and populated by, theater, especially in dealing with rarely marginalized communities, the name broached subjects and communities, Lathim Access Theater looms large, with a repu- says, “I truly believe that theater can impact tation extending well beyond city limits. emotional and mental health in its audiences. Formed in 1979 by founder and director Rod Part of what made Access Theater wonderful Lathim, the company — starting humbly as and unique for me was that we were telling an all-volunteer group but elevating into a authentic human stories. Our civilization is nationally known equity group — was an built on storytelling to pass on cultures and intrepid organization daring to engage and practices and myths. Theater is such a magical employ actors with disabilities and to actively platform to touch people face-to-face in a live setting. This is something that our culture is develop “accessible” theater practices. Lathim says, “We were created to be a fully rapidly losing thanks to technology.” accessible theater, which meant that our doors n were open to all people, regardless of disability or having no disability. We worked primarily with people who happened to have physical disabilities and actors who were deaf, as well as able-bodied and hearing actors.” “We had a wonderful 18-year run,” Lathim says. The highlight was the play Storm Reading, which began its life in 1988 at the Lobero Theatre and ended up touring internationally for six years, giving Access Theater a national and global spotlight unprecedented in Santa Barbara theater history. A special 30-year anniversary of Neil Marcus reprised his role in Storm Reading at the Lobero in 2018.

Hugh & Marjorie Petersen Award for Art in Pu Plaza Granada Mural, 1214 State St Commercial Property: Unity of Santa Barbara, 227 E Arrellaga St Santa Barbara Commons / Public Open Sp Cabrillo Ball Field, 800 East Cabrillo Blvd Multi-Family Residence: Mayee Plaza, 226 Single Family Home: 2318 Anacapa St

Photo by Erik Spike Thiesmeyer

COVER STOR Y

Griswold Award for Philanthropy: John C. Woo

Sue Adams

Forwww.sbbeautiful.org info call (805) 965-8867 or email info@sbbeautiful.org

Jacaranda Award for Outstanding Community Griswold Award for Philanthropy: John C. Serv Wo Sue Adams Playa de Santa Barbara Award for Environme

Griswold Award for Philanthropy: John C. Woodwa Foothills Forever BEAUTIFICATION AWARDS COMMUNITY AWARDS COMMUNITY AWARDS PlayaBeautification de Santa Barbara Award for Environmental S Awards Art in Public Places: Plaza Granada Mural, President’s Award: Cabrillo Pavilion, 1118 E Cabrillo Blvd Foothills Forever 1214 State St President’s Award: Cabrillo Pavilion, 1118 E Cabrillo Blvd Hugh & Marjorie Petersen Award for Art in P Jacaranda Award for Outstanding Community Service: Commercial Property:Beautification UnityPlaza of SantaGranada Barbara, 227 E Arrellaga Awards Mural, 1214StState St Jacaranda Award for Outstanding Community Service: Sue Adams Sue Adams Hugh/Commercial & Marjorie Petersen Award for Art in Public Santa Barbara Commons Public Open Space: Property: Granada Mural, 1214 State Griswold for Philanthropy: C. Woodward Unity of Santa Barbara, 227 EStArrellaga St Griswold AwardAward for Philanthropy: John C.John Woodward Cabrillo Ball Park, 800Plaza E Cabrillo Blvd Commercial Property: Santa Barbara Commons de Santa Barbara for Environmental Stewardship: Foothills Forever PlayaPlaya de Santa Barbara AwardAward for Environmental Multi-Family Residence: Mayee Plaza, Barbara, 226 E De La227 Guerra St/ PublicStOpen S Unity of Santa E Arrellaga Cabrillo Ball Field, 800 East Cabrillo Blvd Stewardship: Foothills Forever Single Family Home:Santa 2318Multi-Family Anacapa St Commons Barbara / Public Open Space Residence: Mayee Plaza, 226

Cabrillo Ball Field, 800 East Cabrillo Blvd Single Family Home: 2318 Anacapa St Multi-Family Residence: Mayee Plaza, 226 E De Santa Barbara Museum of Art Single Family Home: 2318 Anacapa St

PLATINUM SPONSORS: Jeremy Bassan & Manuela Palaez Bassan, GOLD SPONSORS: Fess Parker Winery, Montecito Bank & Trust, NS Ceramic, Santa Barbara Geneological Society, VOICE Magazine SILVER SPONSORS: Casa Dorinda, Deborah L. Schwartz, Deep Sea Wines, Fess Parker Winery & Wine Country Inn, Harrison Design,ForLa info ArcadacallInvestment Inc, Lutah Maria Riggs Society, Mullen & Henzell L.L.P., (805) 965-8867 or email info@sbbeautiful.org Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, The Towbes Group

Happy Hour

Free for AWC Members Non-Members: $25 **head shots are an additional fee

Head Shots &

Wed, Sep 14th at 5:30 p.m.

351 Paseo Nuevo, Floor 2

for info and to register go to awcsb.org INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

23


SBH22_indyad_vertical.pdf

1

8/16/22

8:59 AM

AL

NU 1ST AN

TEDDY "BEER" CRAWL September is National Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, please help us support local families battling cancer by stopping by and grabbing a beer or two!

PARTICIPATING BREWERIES All of September INSTITUTION ALE $1 per charity tap pint purchase goes to TBCF

September 9th - 11th RINCON BREWERY 25% of "Teddy Bear" Ale sales donated to TBCF

LAMA DOG $1 per charity tap pint purchase donated to TBCF

TOPA TOPA BREWING CO. A portion of charity tap pint purchases goes to TBCF

O'MALLEY'S BAR 100% of Sierra Nevada Beer purchases go to TB C F

September 29th-Oct. 2nd VALIDATION ALE $1 per any pint purchase goes to TBCF C

Scan for more information

M

Y

TeddyBearCancerFoundation.org

CM

MY

tt

CY

LOCAL

CMY

K

HEROES

WANTED PLEASE NOMINATE a person you know who makes our community a better place to live and whose good works and deeds may otherwise go unsung.

SUBMIT AT: independent.com/local-hero Santa Barbara

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Friday, October 7

24

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


ARTS FEATURE

END OF AN ERA IN THE ARTISTIC NOW A REQUIEM FOR THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SANTA BARBARA (FORMERLY CAF): 1976-2022

PAUL WELLMAN

JOSEF WOODARD

prising Miki Garcia, whose nearly 13-year run at the helm was the longest of the organization’s history. That period also included ventures into performance art and off-the-wall/ radar art events organized by Heather Silva. This art-watcher’s random access memory search of shows in the institution’s space includes local-linked artists Keith Puccinelli, Jane Callister, Ro Snell, and Richard Ross, Nancy Gifford’s epic bibliophile mural “Lament” and “Hope,” ChanSchatz’s proto-computer art display in 2003, and shows with such thought-perking titles as Things That Turn Your Brain to Mush (2013) and assume vivid astro focus: avalanches volcanoes asteroids floods (2016). The 2018 exhibitions featured such memorable fare as the surf-splashed post-psychedelia of Barry McGhee: S.B. Mid-Summer Intensive and noted painter Cecily Brown’s Rehearsal. One of the most memorable exhibition adventures in the CAF era ventured outside of gallery walls, into the tempo-

Lara Favaretto’s Coppie Semplici (Simple Couples) — a site-specific installation of car-wash brushes, iron slabs, motors, electrical boxes, and wires — was one of the first shows from MCASB Chief Curator Abaseh Mirvali in 2019.

T

by Josef Woodard

PAUL WELLMAN

here is a hole in the center of Santa Barbara’s cultural identity. Perhaps more specifically, it’s a hole just left of center, where fresh, challenging, and contemporary ideas live and prosper. Just as the glimmerings of normal art world and cultural habits were returning earlier this year, in the promising twilight of the pandemic, the sad news of MCASB’s recent closure hit like the cold slap of harsh reality. The news shouldn’t have come as a huge surprise, given the financial shakiness of the operation in recent years, compounded by the damage done to cultural institutions by the COVID scourge. And yet the closure seems very personal, in terms of Santa Barbara’s collective art consciousness and institutional memory. The Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara — which spent three-quarters of its life as the Contemporary Arts Forum (CAF) before the name and

Rafael Perea de la Cabada’s Drawing Room exhibit at CAF in 2004

direction change in 2013 — bravely fought the fight to keep contemporary art a lively concern in a local art landscape that can drift off into tourist-town pleasantries and complacent genres. We needed it to stay engaged in the ever-evolving art realm about now. News of the museum’s closing ushers in a flood of memories for successive waves of art fans, artists of local and national interest, donors, idle (and sometimes befuddled) gallery hoppers, and others who have passed these nowshuttered portals. For me, as one who has reviewed more shows here than any other known human over these past four decades, the memory trail leads all the way back to 1980, a pivotal dream-awakening moment in the institutional saga. Back then, I sat at the kitchen table of artist and CAF co-conspirator Richard (Dick) Dunlap, working on my first article for the Santa Barbara News & Review (and the first of a long, rambling journalist-critic career to follow). Also at the table was artist and bon vivant John Tanner (both Tanner and Dunlap would have one-person shows at CAF in future years) and Betty Klausner. Klausner was the spark plug and dynamo who would lead the formerly itinerant “Forum” into its first official home, on the ground floor of the Balboa Building, also home to the News & Review at the time. A sense of idealistic and auspicious beginnings buzzed around the table, along with a stated mission of filling a void for contemporary art focus in this otherwise cultured town. Like-minded patrons and art support forces rallied to the cause, and CAF became an important spot on the fine art map between L.A. and S.F. The list of artists hosted there included the celebrated likes of John Baldessari, the Keinholzes, Wayne Thiebaud, and Craig Kauffman. On a more localized, sitespecific note, the galleries’ centralized location energized a “gateway to lower State Street” zone, and CAF-related parties could be found drifting across what was then De la Guerra Street to the original Mel’s, dive hangout to the art stars and hangers-on. Along came the massive Paseo Nuevo project and CAF’s move literally up, over, and upward to its final 3,500-squarefoot space upstairs at the Paseo, circa 1990. Starting in 2005, the directorial reins were handed to the dynamic and enter-

A peek into the museum’s final headquarters, a 3,500-square-foot space upstairs at Paseo Nuevo

rary site-specific domestic locales involved in what became three iterations of the Home Show. Originally conceived and organized by Klausner in 1988, sequels unfolded in due time, during the Nancy Doll–directed era in 1996 and Garcia’s model in 2011. One of my salient memories was of conceptual, industry/textile-minded artist Ann Hamilton’s installation on Yankee Farm Road, with eucalyptus-leaf-slathered walls and the artist herself lost in the deadpan action of ironing a heaving pile of shirts on a long table. In her brief stint as director, just pre-COVID lockdown, Abaseh Mirvali boldly presented the U.S. premiere of German artist-musician Ari Benjamin Meyers’s Kunsthalle fur Musik, for an ensemble of musician/performance artists engaged in a series of musical and conceptual actions, live in the gallery space — and outside of it — during this five-week run. The music-infused gallery setting recalled CAF’s earlier adventures with new and experimental music by Carl Stone, Phil Niblock, Paul Dresher, and Scott Johnson. Late last year, I was basking in the peculiar, understated splendors of Rasha Yaghmai’s Drifters, from Alexandra Terry’s short tenure as chief curator. I sensed a genuinely warming feeling of renewal, having escaped the COVID hunker-down and being gratefully back in this inviting, livedin gallery fueled by ideas made manifest. Thoughts of this landmark’s demise were unthinkable, then. Art of the now will have to fend for itself in our region. But one clings to hope that contemporary art-loving conspiracies will soon be hatched around well-appointed kitchen tables, or digital facsimiles thereof, in the 805. Art will still win out.

To view more photos of MCASB/CAF and its history, visit Independent.com.

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

25


LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 OCT 18

SEPT 28

Just Announced

A masterful storyteller who “observes the world with a clinically poetic eye.” - The NY Times

Artistic and Music Director, Heiichiro Ohyama Musical Advisor, Benjamin Beilman

EARL MINNIS PRESENTS &

An Intimate Evening of Songs and Stories with

OCT 28

Suzanne Vega

Just Announced

NOV 15 Just Announced

with Haley Johnsen

New Orleans native Andrew Duhon is a singer/songwriter with an undeniable voice, both weighted and soulful. The LA Beat writes “Duhon brings the craft of a master short story writer to his songs and in doing so creates a series of skillfully rendered vignettes.”

NOV 5

Django Festival Allstars “The sound of the legendary Django is irresistible and has influenced most of the great guitarists” - The Wall Street Journal

Throughout history, musicians and songwriters have been change makers. Their lyrics often carry the intention to educate and inspire. Music is a unifying force, a universal language, that has the ability to stimulate emotion, imagination, and even healing in listeners. Please join us as we experience this communal power.

Just Announced

THE INDEPENDENT

This long-anticipated homecoming concert features local legend Heiichiro Ohyama and three handpicked classical music luminaries – Benjamin Beilman (violin), Lucille Chung (piano), and Edward Arron (cello) – performing selected works by Dvořák and Fauré.

PRESENT

Andrew Duhon

26

Lobero Theatre Chamber Music Project

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

SEPT. 8-14

T HE

by

TERRY & VICTORIA ORTEGA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

THURSDAY COURTESY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

to enjoy local wines and other delicious beverages as well as hearty hors d’oeuvres and live music in the Center’s courtyard. Proceeds will support Friendship Center’s LEAP program (Life Enrichment Activity Program) for seniors with dementia. 4-7pm. Friendship Center, 89 Eucalyptus Ln., Montecito. $85. tinyurl.com/2022WineDown

FRIDAY 9/9

SATURDAY

9/10: Andrew Murray Vineyards Nataly Lola, noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 686-9604. andrewmurray

vineyards.com/Visit/Events

coldspringtavern.com

SATURDAY 9/10

9/9: Full Moon Sunset Nature Hike Reg-

9/10:

calendar/

Bobby, Finn, and Dave, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:304:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

cfsb.info/sat

ister online to join Ojai author and naturalist Lanny Kaufer to walk about 1.5 miles on a wellused dirt road with gradual elevation to gain to a vista point above the Ojai Valley where you can watch the sunset and the moonrise. 6-8:30pm. Location given upon registration. $35. Call (805) 646-6281. herbwalks.com

from the Tavern presents Eliza Gilkyson, 7pm. $34.16. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 6864785. mavericksaloon.com/event-

9/9-9/11: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Nombres, 6-9pm. Sat.:

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

of indie rock and Americana at large with Cat Power, who is out with the new album of covers titled Covers. Arsun (Sorrenti) will open the show with his folk-rock sound. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $49-$89. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on

9/9-9/11, 9/14: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Dusty Jugz, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Jimmy Rankin, noon-4pm. Wed.: Tales

sohosb.com/events

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

9/9: Cat Power, Arsun Take in an evening

9/9-9/11, 9/14:

Cosmo’s Midnight, Two Lanes, 8pm. $21$26. Ages 18+. Sat.: Triathlon, Katzú Oso, Sedona, 8pm. $17-$20. Ages 21+. Sun.: Jazz Society featuring M.O.B. Quintet, 1pm. Free. Wed.: Duckwrth, 8pm. $22. Ages 18+. 1221 State St. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776.

ZACH LUCERO

on The Boundless Tour to perform tracks from his Grammy Award–nominated debut album, Coming Home; his Grammy Award–winning album, Good Thing; and his Grammy Award–nominated third album, Gold Diggers Sound, as well as the four-track collaborative EP, Texas Sun, with Khruangbin. The Swedish electronic band Little Dragon will open the show. 7pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $46-$126. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com/concerts

9/8, 9/10-9/11, 9/14: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Baynk,

WEDNESDAY

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

Friendship Center’s Wine Down 2022 You’re invited

9/8: Leon Bridges, Little Dragon Leon Bridges will be in S.B.

Play presents The Daily Fare and Steve Key, 8-11:30pm. $10. Sat.: Twanguero, 8-10:30pm. $20. Wed.: Jason Eady with Ben Danaher, 7:30-9:30pm. $15. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 3314363. lostchordguitars.com

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

9/8:

9/8-9/11, 9/14: Lost Chord Guitars Thu.: The Coffis Brothers, 7:30-9:30pm. $25. Fri.: Songwriters at

Duckwrth 9/9-9/10: Eos Lounge Fri.: DJ Holographic. 9pm. $6.18. Sat.: Soul Saturday: Yoga, DJs, Food 2pm. $16.07. 9/12: The Red Piano Church on Ages 21+. 500 Anacapa St. Call (805) 564Monday, Morganfield Burnett, 7:30pm. 2410. eoslounge.com 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439.

9/9: M.Special Brewing Co. theredpiano.com/schedule (S.B.) David Segall, 8-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. 9/13: S.B. Bowl Concert Nine Inch Mspecialbrewco.com Nails, Yves Tumor 5:45pm. $85-$135. 634 State St. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

Suicide Prevention Candle-

light Vigil In recognition of World

PCPA Presents Native Gardens Follow what

MICHELLE EVANS

happens in this hilarious comedy when a high-powered lawyer and his pregnant wife, a doctoral candidate, move next door to community stalwarts and a disagreement over a long-standing fence line spirals into a war of taste, class, privilege, and entitlement. Recommended for ages 13 and up. The play shows through September 17. 8pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $35.75-$60. Call (805) 9228313. pcpa.org/shows

Suicide Prevention Day, this event will honor the memory of those who have died by suicide, survivors, and those impacted by suicide and will increase awareness and sensitivity relative to mental wellness, suicide and suicide prevention. There will be music, speakers, candles, refreshments, and a resource table with therapists available to speak to interested persons. 6:30-8pm. Seal Fountain, 800 Linden Ave., Carpinteria. Free.

9/10: Figueroa Mountain Cornhole Tournament Come out and prove your cornhole skills! All games are first to 10. Double elimination … lose the first game, you’re still in for cash prizes. Fee includes one 16-ounce pint. 11am. Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co., 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. $20/team. Call (805) 697-7601 or email lo@figmtnbrew.com.

figmtnbrew.com/events

COURTESY

THURSDAY 9/8

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

hopenetofcarp.org

9/10: Soul Rejuvenation This three hour workshop will combine restorative yoga and Reiki hands-on healing channeling with the integration of sound healing and essential oils to rejuvenate the mind, body, and soul. Advance registration is required. 1-4pm. S.B. Yoga Center, 32 E. Micheltorena St. $75. Call (818) 415-0652. taniaisaac.com/events

Margaritas y Más Fes-

tival ‘22 Try unlimited tastings of tequila, mezcal, margaritas, and more along with food trucks with savory bites for purchase, live music, and jumbo lawn games. A portion of the funds raised will go toward S.B. High School Band Boosters. 1-4pm. Elings Park, 1298 Las Positas Rd. $65; $50 (group rate); designated driver: $30; parking $25. Ages 21+. tinyurl.com/

MargaritasMas2022

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

9/10:

Volunteer Opportunity

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

27


ALWAYS

AMAZING.

NE VER

ROUTINE.

join us!

Santa Barbara

Vintners

Festival ———--——-

HOME FREE

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2022 1PM - 4PM

SEPTEMBER 16 | FRIDAY | 8PM

SOLVANG, CALIFORNIA

OLD MISSION SANTA INÉS

Santa BarBara

Vintners

———--——-

for tickets and information

www.sbvintnersweekend.com

CHRISTOPHER CROSS SEPTEMBER 24 | SATURDAY | 8PM 9/8 - 8:00 PM

WE THE BEAT PRESENTS:

BAYNK

WITH COSMO'S MIDNIGHT + TWO LANES HOUSE FUSION 9/9 - 6:00 PM

! HAPPIER HOUR !

QUEEN NATION OCTOBER 1 | SATURDAY | 8PM

DJS HANNAH+IVY & COMFORT FOOD + FOOD/BEV SPECIALS 9/10 - 8:00 PM

Winter Gardening & Cooking Classes Do you like kids? Do you like to cook?

VOLUNTEER WITH US!

atozcookingschool.org

WE THE BEAT PRESENTS:

TRIATHALON

WITH KATZÙ OSO / SEDONA 9/11 - 1:00 PM

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY

FEAT M.O.B QUINTET

Follow us @atozcookingschool

9/13 - 7:00 PM

WRYN, PHILLIP ROGERS, MARA CONNOR, ALEXANDRA RIORDEN

TYLER HENRY

SB INDIE SONGWRITERS 9/14 - 8:00 PM

THE LIVING ROOM JAM HOSTED BY JASON LIBS

OCTOBER 21 + 22 | TWO NIGHTS | 8PM

FEAT. THE CONGREGATION, THE SB ALLSTARS, THE USUAL SUSPECTS 9/15 - 8:30 PM

THE RUNAWAY GROOMS / GROOVE SESSION JAM BANDS

Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER.

Welcome to Freedom

DARK DAZEY / GLENN ANNIE / GOLF ALPHA BRAVO FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com

9/16 - 8:30 PM

PSYCH ROCK GROOVES

28

ARE YOU HIRING?

Contact advertising@independent.com for more details and in-print rates


TICKETS

ON SALE

T HE

NOW!

MONDAY 9/12 COURTESY

COURTESY

SUNDAY 9/11

P A C I F I C C O N S E R VA T O R Y T H E A T R E

9/11:

Antonio Rey Making his S.B. debut, flamenco guitarist and composer and 2020 Latin Grammy winner for Best Flamenco Album, Flamenco sin Fronteras, Antonio Rey will show you why he is a true master of the guitar. 7pm. The New Vic Theater, 33 W. Victoria St. $45. Call (805) 965-5400. Read more on p. 37

kalakoa.com/flamenco.html

9/11: S.B. Museum of Art Parallel Stories with Patricio Ferrari and Forrest Gander: Textured Poetry: Multi-layered, Multi-lingual Exploratis

9/12:

Science Pub: Harnessing the Immune System to

Fight Cancer Come learn about advances

in cancer immunotherapy, cell therapy, targeted molecular therapy, and gene therapy related to blood diseases with hematologist and medical oncologist Julian Davis, M.D.. 6:30-8pm. Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. Call (805) 682-4711 x172 or email jrolle@sbnature2.org.

TICKETS 805-922-8313 | PCPA.ORG GROUPS* 805-928-7731 x.4150

*12 OR MORE

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

COURTESY

Polyglot (a person who knows and is able to use several languages) poet, translator, and literary editor Patricio Ferrari, will be joined by Pulitzer Prize–winning poet, novelist and essayist Forest Gander in a conversation about poetry, translation, the loss of linguistic diversity, and the lyric passion of pure sound. 2:30pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $5-$10. sbma.net/events

SEPT 9 - 28

Solvang Festival Theatre

TUESDAY 9/13

“Breathlessly seductive”

— THE NEW YORK TIMES

armen C ones J OCTOBER 6-23

9/13: S.B. Central Library Virtual Fiction Book Club All fiction lovers are welcome to talk about this month’s book, L.A. Weather by María Amparo Escandón, about one year in the life of a Catholic Mexican American and Jewish family in West Los Angeles in 2016. 5:30pm. Call (805) 962-7653 or email info@sbplibrary.libanswers.com.

tinyurl.com/VirtualFiction BookClub

WEDNESDAY 9/14 9/14: Tales from the Tavern Presents Eliza Gilkyson Two-time

BOOK AND LYRICS BY

Oscar Hammerstein II

Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter and activist Eliza Gilkyson will bring her folk, roots, and American sound to this extraordinary concert series and community cultural program. 7pm. Maverick Saloon, 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. $34.16. Ages 21+. Call (805) 697-6335.

MUSIC BY

Georges Bizet DIRECTED BY

Jonathan Fox

talesfromthetavern.com

Visit www.etcsb.org or call 805-965-5400 to subscribe today!

9/11:

Explore Ecology Beach Cleanup Bring your own supplies or use the buckets, plastic bags, and reusable gloves provided for your self-guided cleanup. Sign in at the Watershed Resource Center. Mask required for ages 2+. 10am-noon. Arroyo Burro Beach, 2981 Cliff Dr. Free. Call (805) 884-0459 or email jill@exploreecology.org. eventbrite.com/e/beach-cleanup-tickets-145795986721

33 W. Victoria St. | etcsb.org Box Office: 805.965.5400 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

29


SEPT 9 - 15

Sports

living

Kayla Day Is on a Comeback

"BARDEM SOARS" MIKE LAWRENCE/USTA

DEADLINE

FRI: 7:30pm SAT: 5:00pm SUN: 2:30pm MON, WED: 5:00pm TUES, THURS: 7:30pm

I

t’s here, somewhere. Kayla Day is sure of it. The Billie Jean King National Tennis Center spans 46.5 acres of Queens, N.Y., a sprawling complex of courts and buildings and concession stands, and for two weeks every August and early September, hundreds of thousands of people. But somewhere in this giant mass is a plaque that lists all of the past champions of the U.S. Open Girls’ Tournament. And on that plaque, next to the words “2016 champion,” it says “Kayla Day, United States.”

Young Tennis Pro Overcomes Injuries and Flagging Confidence to Restart Career

FRI: 5:00pm SAT: 7:30pm SUN: 5:00pm MON, WED: 7:30pm TUES, THURS: 5:00pm

by Michael J. Lewis

FRI: 2:45pm / SAT: 2:45pm / SUN: 12:15pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM 30

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

to American star Madison Keys, who predicted big things for Day. If anyone seemed destined to find immediate success on the WTA Tour, it was her. But things didn’t happen anywhere near as planned. Day has struggled with injuries, a wheelbarrow full of them. Elbow, hip, foot—you name it, Day has hurt it. Those physical woes led to mental confidence issues, and a whole host of defeats on the pro tour from 201820 followed. Her ranking plummeted, and she just couldn’t catch a break. She fell off the proverbial tennis map, and joked that the best thing about the hit 2018 movie Eighth Grade naming its lead character Kayla Day was “I saw people finally Tweeting about me again.” “I did think about quitting a little bit. I think every tennis player has at some point,” she said. “But I knew I was too young to leave, and I knew I would’ve regretted it if I did. I just had to find that love again.” Day found it and is most certainly on her way back. This season, she’s been able to play a full slate of tournaments as a pro, healthy, and has been grinding her way through the minor league events of the WTA. She’s gotten her ranking back up to No. 211, and in recognition of her efforts, the USTA gave Day a wild card into the U.S. Open Qualifying Tournament, the event a week before the big show where lower-ranked players try to get into the main draw. Day won one match here but fell in a tight threesetter in the second contest, so she’ll have to wait at least another year before getting back in the big spotlight of the Open.

“I’ve been looking all over for it, and I’m so mad I can’t find it!” she said last week with a laugh, upon her return to these hallowed grounds for the first time in five years. “Someone told me it was over by the Chase Center building, but I couldn’t find it over there. I don’t know, it’s gotta be here somewhere.” The plaque, and the period of time it symbolized, will always be special to the now 22-year-old Santa Barbaran. Six years ago, she rocketed to junior stardom with a dominating win at the tournament, capturing six matches, including a semifinal triumph over future U.S. Open women’s champ Bianca Andreescu, and dropping only one set. Day was a 5'8'' lefty with power and great touch at the net, with a bubbly personality off the court and a fierce killer instinct on it. At that same 2016 Open, she won a round in the women’s draw before falling

INDEPENDENT.COM


Sports cont’d

living

Still, just being here again made her smile ear to ear. “I was so excited to be back, and it feels so special and different to be here now,” Day said the day after her loss, sitting in a crowded outdoor terrace area on the grounds. “I thought about how special it would be to be back here, and then when I got here, it was just go, go, go, always something to go do or practice or play. So I made sure to take a moment and appreciate being back here again.” Day said she’s very far from the person she was at 16; who among us isn’t different six years later? She has embraced the challenges of life on the tour, adding a new coach last year in veteran pro Cecil Mamiit but also loving traveling by herself most of the time. (Day said she will always talk to and get advice from Santa Barbara’s Larry Mousouris, who has coached her since she was a little kid.) “It’s a flavor-of-the-month sport, tennis, and a lot of people have counted me out since they haven’t heard from me the last few years,” Day says with a smile. “But one of the things I’ve learned is the only person’s expectations I have to live up to are my own.” Mamiit, who has worked with Maria Sharapova, among others, said he’s been very impressed with his new charge’s professionalism on and off the court. “Her sense of organization, the way she conducts herself, and just her being open-minded about improving herself and her game has been terrific,” Mamiit said. “One thing we have done is utilized the opportunity that came about because of her struggles. She had a great platform [before] and now we’re building on it and looking forward.”

O P E R A SA N TA BAR BA R A

TO SCA

TICKETS STARTING AT $25!

Puc

cini

GR

AN A S at DA T ur HEA day T R , O E ct ob

‘I didn’t go through the grind of earning everything, and I wasn’t as developed as a person or a player.’ —Kayla Day Looking back, Day said perhaps things came a little too easily to her, too fast, once she rose to junior stardom. All the advantages that came with being an American-born prospect, like wild cards into big tournaments, may have robbed her of the opportunity to learn the hard way. “I didn’t go through the grind of earning everything, and I wasn’t as developed as a person or a player when I reached that level,” she said. “Of course at the time it was great getting into Indian Wells and events like that. But things did happen maybe a little too fast for me.” During her injury-riddled seasons, Day also had to watch as contemporaries from her junior career, like Andreescu, Sonia Kenin, and close friend Claire Liu, had big successes on the tour. “Comparison is the thief of joy, right?” she said. “Of course it was tough sometimes, seeing them win, but now it’s inspiring, like ‘If she did it, why couldn’t I?’” With her appearance and win in qualifying, Day’s ranking will be inside the Top 200 now, with Mamiit saying getting inside that mark will enable her to get into qualifying at other Slams. It’s another step on the long road back. “She’s found her identity and has that sense of clarity, very strongly now,” Mamiit said. “She’s growing as a tennis player and getting the kind of self-confidence you have to have.” “One step at a time,” Day said. “The rise may be a little slower this time, and maybe slower than I like sometimes, but it’s 100 percent good. “I’m very happy to be back.” n

er

Sta

E

1, 2 02 2

rr

ing:

le

Ca i n

d u c te

by :

n le

Pr s C i st Ko ond

6p

’s

m

os

ot

s pa a op

FOR Tickets: OperaSB.org or (805) 899.2222 Design: James Van Arsdale & Jinhee Hwang

Providing specialized functional fitness for seniors Balance and Strength Training Healthy Weight Loss Chair Based exercises Post Physical Therapy Care

29 W. Micheltorena St. WWW.AGELESSFITNESS.US team@agelessfitness.us

Call today to schedule your assessment

(805) 364-2017

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

31


The Arlington Theatre

­

REGISTER TODAY! 5K

10K

KIDS’ 1 MILE

­

9/9: UNFAVORABLE ODDS

9/9: THE STORY OF FILM

9/15: THE WOMAN KING

Fiesta 5

Hitchcock

Arlington • Metro 4 • Camino

Advance Previews 9/15: SEE HOW THEY RUN

9/15: PEARL

9/15: SPEAK NO EVIL

www.cfsb.org/walkrun2022

Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Camino

Fiesta 5

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Sept 9-15, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Honk for Jesus. Save Our Soul (R): Fri-Thur: 7:30. Where the Crawdads Sing (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:35. Sat/Sun: 1:20, 4:35. DC League of Super-Pets (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:25. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:25. Elvis (PG13): Fri-Thur: 4:15, 7:00.

OCT 1-16, 2022 $40 until September 12

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

STAY CONNECTED

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Featuring

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS @sbindependent

HITCHCOCK

ently An indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! hop since ently ASn indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! Shop since

@sbindependent

Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara THE INDEPENDENT

805.569.2323

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

The Story of Film (NR): Fri, Mon-Thur: 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 7:30. Gigi & Nate (PG13): Fri, Thur: 5:00, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:15. Sat/Sun: 1:15, 4:15.

Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

32

Barbarian* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:45, 8:20. Sat/Sun: 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:20. Medieval (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:05, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:10, 5:05, 8:00. Thur: 5:05. Spider-Man: No Way Home (Bonus Footage) (PG13): Fri, Tue-Wed: 4:55. Sat/Sun: 1:20, 4:55. The Invitation (R): Fri, Tue-Wed: 5:25, 7:55. Sat/Sun: 2:45, 5:25, 7:55. Thur: 5:00. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri,Mon-Wed: 4:40, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45. Thur: 4:40. Nope (R): Fri-Wed: 8:30. Bullet Train (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:15, 8:10. Sat-Mon: 2:20, 5:15, 8:10. The Woman King* (PG13): Thur: 3:00, 4:30, 6:0, 7:40, 9:15. See How They Run* (PG13): Thur: 7:50. Pearl* (R): Thur: 8:00.

@sbindynews

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri-Wed: 4:00, 7:00. The Woman King* (PG13): Thur: 4:30, 7:45.

METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Spider-Man: No Way Home (Bonus Footage) (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:20, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:00, 4:20, 7:45. Thur: 7:45. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 8:05. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 5:00, 8:05. Bullet Train (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:15, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:15, 8:15. DC League of Super-Pets (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:30, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:05. Thur: 4:30. The Woman King* (PG13): Thur: 3:00, 6:15, 9:20.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

The Invitation (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:20, 7:55. Sat/Sun: 2:45, 5:20, 7:55. Thur: 5:20. Orphan: First Kill (R): Fri-Thur: 8:05. Where the Crawdads Sing (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:10, 7:30. Sat: 2:15, 5:10, 7:30. Sun: 2:15, 5:10. Minions: The Rise of Gru (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:00. Sat: 2:05, 4:40, 7:00. Sun: 2:04, 4:40. Barbarian* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:45, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 3:00, 5:45, 8:15. Unfavorable Odds (PG13): Fri-Thur: 5:30, 7:40. Sat/Sun: 3:20, 5:30, 7:40. Speak No Evil (R): Thur: 7:55.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Honk for Jesus. Save Our Soul* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:30. Sat/Sun: 2:15. Three Thousand Years of Longing (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:55, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:35, 4:55, 7:45. Thur: 4:55. Nope (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 8:05. Sat/Sun: 4:45, 8:05. Elvis (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:15, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:25, 4:15, 7:30. Thur: 7:30. Medieval (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:55. Sat/Sun: 2:05, 5:00, 7:55. See How They Run* (PG13): Thur: 5:15, 7:45.


FOOD &DRINK

p.33

D’Alfonso-Curran Elevates Science Over Tradition

Y

ou might expect romantic tales of viticultural con-

Talking Enzymes with Veteran Power Couple Bruno D’Alfonso and Kris Curran For D’Alfonso, back in the day means 1980, when he got his first job as an assistant winemaker at Edna Valley Vineyards. He’d grown up in Glendale, the first generation American of an Italian family that toiled as stonemasons, shoemakers, mechanics, and carpenters. “They were people who worked with their hands,” he said. But Mom wanted Bruno to go to college, so he studied soil science at Cal Poly, where he learned that you could get a degree in winemaking, which he then did at UC Davis. Upon graduation, D’Alfonso itched to get back to his friends on the Central Coast and noticed a job posting for the new Edna Valley Vineyards. He was hired by renowned vintner Richard Graff, who’d founded Chalone Vineyard in Monterey County in 1966, and got to know then-owners Jack and Katherine Niven quite well. “They were the old guard, the greatest human beings — I just fell in with a very excellent group of people,” explains D’Alfonso of the Nivens and Graff, who died tragically in 1998 at age 60 upon crashing his plane near Salinas. “As far as I am concerned, the 1980s was the finest decade of California winemaking. I was right in the thick of it.” In 1981, D’Alfonso met Richard Sanford, who’d left Sanford & Benedict Vineyard to start Sanford Winery, which was being made at the Edna Valley facility. D’Alfonso was assigned to work for Sanford every Friday, which he did for two vintages. In 1983, Sanford asked D’Alfonso to become his fulltime winemaker. He took the job, and stayed for nearly a quarter-century, developing a world-class reputation for the wines of Sanford Winery along the way. In 2005, Sanford Winery was taken over by the Terlato family, prompting both Sanford and D’Alfonso to leave as part of the transition.

ES BOTTLARRELS &B

FOOD & DRINK

quest and testaments to age-old traditions when talking to wine industry veterans Bruno D’Alfonso and Kris Curran. But when sipping on crisp white wines made from grapes you’ve never heard of next to a walnut orchard outside of their winery on Santa Rosa Road in the Sta. Rita Hills, the conversation instead revolves around electrostatic sprayers, protein adherents, and protease enzymes. After nearly 65 combined vintages in the Santa Ynez Valley — during which they built up the reputations of legendary estates such as Sanford and Sea Smoke while developing their own brands — this power couple is firmly, even defiantly, focused on the molecular side of winemaking rather than the charming methods of yesteryear. “The science, the technology, the chemistry, the physics — we apply those to our winemaking,” says D’Alfonso. “I wasn’t that smart back in the day. I was more of a traditionalist. Now it’s different. Winemaking is totally an interventionist exercise for me.”

“I continually get asked about how my life was at that firmly on the global map of cult wine collectors. particular time, working with Richard Sanford and Rich“Bruno and I knew it was a great property, but we ard Graff during the best decades in California winemak- didn’t expect such a whirlwind situation,” said Curran. ing,” said D’Alfonso. “I’ve tried to distill it down to a word: “There are big, long stories about Sea Smoke, but ultiIt was an adventure. Like any adventure, the good, the mately, it boiled down to the fact that people were really bad, and the ugly were all involved. It was just a fantastic up for a very nice pinot noir from this area. It was the time to be alive.” right time, and was a real surprise for all of us. It was just The next move for D’Alfonso was obvious. A decade a kismet of timing.” earlier, in 1995, he started his own line of Italian varietal She left Sea Smoke in 2008 to work for Foley wines called Di Bruno. Then the family that owns RanEstate, where she stayed until 2010. Curran had cho La Viña, where he and Curran began started her own brand back in 1997, so, like living in 2000, offered to build them a D’Alfonso, her next move was clear as day. “Let’s winery on-site, completing that projjust focus on what we’re doing here at Rancho ect in 2007. La Viña,” she said. Curran, meanwhile, was charting The couple now makes a wide range of her own course. Born in Los Angeles wines under the umbrella of D’Alfonsobut raised in the Santa Ynez Valley, she Curran, which they launched in 2006. grew up familiar with wine culture, playing That label includes single-vineyard N TTMAN E polo with Brooks Firestone and his origiexpressions of pinot noir and chardonK T T BY M A nal winemaker Alison Green, working in nay, but also a zesty series of more obscure, aroMattei’s Tavern and other wine country resmatic white wines including loureiro, verdelho, arneis, taurants as a teenager, and particularly loving the 1988 vermentino, and grüner veltliner. Their other brands continue to thrive, including the original Di Bruno (ItalSanford chardonnay. After a year in Hawai’i trying to become a merchant ian varieties), Curran (pinot plus Spanish and more), and marine, she returned to the valley and met D’Alfonso Badge, which is a more affordable line. in 1990. She assumed that winemakers were only hired D’Alfonso bristles a bit when asked about what sets through family ties, but he explained that you could get a their wines apart in today’s crowded scene. “People are degree in the trade and be hired as a winemaker. They’ve trying to differentiate their wines through marketing rather than making better wine,” he said. “But we don’t been together ever since. In 1997, with an enology degree from Fresno State, really have a schtick. We are here to be extremely serious Curran was hired at Cambria Winery in the Santa Maria about what actually makes wine and how it develops. Valley. In 1999, she turned a horse barn into Koehler It’s not anything else but that. If you don’t know science, Winery, and then was hired by Bob Davids in 2000 you’re not gonna get there.” to help develop Sea Smoke Cellars. The brand quickly became a pinot noir sensation, putting the Sta. Rita Hills See d-cwines.com MACDUFF EVERTON

What follows is an edited excerpt from Vines & Vision: The Winemakers of Santa Barbara County, published in 2020 by Matt Kettmann and Macduff Everton.

SMART WINES: Kris Curran and Bruno D’Alfonso rely on decades of combined experience to explain their reliance on innovation in the cellar. “The science, the technology, the chemistry, the physics,” explained D’Alfonso, “we apply those to our winemaking.”

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

33


e funk zon

Tech Team Powers

FOOD & DRINK

COURTESY PHOTOS

Validation Ale

A

ttention to detail can be everything. Brian Deignan,

co-owner of the Funk Zone’s new Validation Ale with his wife, Briana, lamented the sad state of bathrooms at too many breweries. “We built twice as many as the city asked,” Brian proudly states. “It’s like a museum in there.”

Questioning Craft Brew’s Status Quo by George Yatchisin Those palatial bathrooms are just one data point to show that this couple took their tech background and rethought the ways of beer and restaurants. The two met while at GoTo Meeting; Brian most recently worked at AppFolio, while Briana has been working at Zoom since before it was a verb, as she put it. That put them in a perfect position financially to go for their dream, but it also gave them a unique perspective. Briana says, “Coming into an industry with no experience, we got to question the status quo.” That questioning began with the concept behind the beers they make — each beer in a category such as light/hoppy/not hoppy/dark is either validated or vying. If a vying recipe knocks off a validated one by selling more pints, the latter beer is off the list. “We are putting the power back into the customer’s hands,” Briana points out. “Humans love competing, and it gamifies the experience.” Of course, that means the tasty Imperial Lager you had one visit might be gone the next. The Deignans — along with their head brewer, Ryan Hensley, who does bring 34

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

years of industry experience from places like Figueroa Mountain, Pizza Port, and Rough Draft — are ready for that, too. “We want to be a place for the education and exploration of beers,” Briana says. “If someone came in and asked for a Blue Moon, we would ask them, ‘What do you like about Blue Moon?’ and then go from there.” Brian says the general categories also help, asserting they sold out of a Belgian blonde in a surprisingly quick two days because people were drawn to it in the “light” category. “Most people haven’t had the opportunity to experiment,” he points out. “We want to make the place safe for even the Coors drinkers.” The Deignans also wanted to be sure the grub was as good as the brews and again innovated on that end. They knew Matt Marsit and Kaity Dean, as they were frequent visitors to Brass Bear, where the couple worked at the time. “They approached us, and it was the perfect match,” Brian recalls. “Essentially, they are set up as an entrepreneurial business inside our entrepreneurial business.” Just like the beer menu, the food menu will change frequently based on the sales data. Also arranged into clever sections — Fingers, Hands, Bowls, and Specials — it currently ranges from burgers to lobster rolls to salmon salad. Brian admits he has high hopes for Validation’s food with Marsit as head chef and Dean running kitchen operations, for he says, pointing to his neighbor across Anacapa Street, “We want to be good enough to compete for the overflow from places like The Lark.” Ultimately, Brian says, “I know it’s a cliché, but we want to be someplace for everybody. We’ve got the ‘singles bar’ window looking out into the Funk Zone, we have the wall of screens for the sports fan, we have the gender-neutral bathrooms to show we’re a place of inclusivity, and we’ve got the best water in the world.” Figuring they had to build a great RO filtration system for the water they were brewing with, the Deignans also ran the system to a tap in the restaurant. Briana says, “It’s important to remain hydrated while drinking beer.” And if that seems motherly, there’s also this — Validation opened July 14, and Briana gave birth to the couple’s second daughter on July 27. So they see it as a family business, too, as you can bring kids to a restaurant and not to a tech office. “Eventually, they will be our bouncers,” Brian jokes. “Our 3-year-old could be one now.”

INDEPENDENT.COM

n


COURTESY

Santa Barbara

EATS & DRINKS Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service.

WORLD’S SAFEST RESTAURANT: Shepherd Center in Carpinteria, a city that is home to the “world’s safest beach,” has debuted its newest eatery: Lao Thai Restaurant.

Lao Thai Restaurant Opens in Carpinteria

L

ao Thai Restaurant, offering Laotian and

MARTY’S PIZZA CLOSES: It appears that Marty’s Pizza

at 2733 De la Vina Street, a local icon since 1984, has closed. In April, I reported that its building is slated to be demolished as part of a De la Vina Street bridge replacement project. I was told at the time that they were closing in the fall and do not plan to reopen. Sometimes the process of figuring out if a restaurant is actually closed can be a little tricky since nobody is around to confirm it. Marty’s website and Yelp say they are open for business as usual, but their phone

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm

number and online ordering system are disconnected, and reader Primetime says he has seen their store looking dark and lonely during posted business hours. PIZZA MY HEART CLOSES: Pizza My Heart at 6533

Trigo Road in Isla Vista has closed. The restaurant opened in October 2012. Rumor has it that a dispensary will replace it, though reader Eric says the space is still listed as available for lease. GOLETA IHOP CLOSES: Reader Primetime let me

know that IHOP at 4765 Calle Real in Goleta has closed. The IHOP at 1701 State Street (RIP Frimples) is open for business as usual. The former Goleta IHOP property now begins a transition to become the second South Coast outlet for Chick-fil-A. Fortunately, a new IHOP opens in Goleta later this year at 7127 Hollister Avenue near the DMV and Costco, in the former home of Itsuki.

FOOD & DRINK

Thailand cuisine, has opened in the Shepherd Center at 1017 Casitas Pass Road in Carpinteria, the former home of Phoevermore, which closed last January. The ambiance is casual with just a few wall hangings in addition to monitors that show photos of Thailand, Laos, and food. “At Lao Thai Restaurant, we offer meals of excellent quality and invite you to try our delicious food,” says the family behind this new gem. “The key to our success is simple: providing quality-consistent food that tastes great every single time. We pride ourselves on serving our customers delicious genuine dishes.” Lunch specials (about $15) include cashew nut chicken, ginger and vegetables, kra prow, garlic pepper sauce, mixed vegetables, pa-ram, prick king, pad thai, eggplant basil garlic and chili, seafood platter, pineapple curry, and curries. Main dishes (about $16) include mixed vegetables (sautéed with cabbage, snow peas, garlic, onions, mushrooms, and carrots), garlic pepper (sautéed with garlic pepper sauce), pa-ram (spinach topped with peanut sauce), eggplant (Japanese eggplant sautéed with garlic, chili, and Thai basil), kaprow sweet basil and chili (sautéed with chili, garlic, bamboo shoots, onions, carrots, and Thai basil), ginger and vegetables (sautéed with ginger, garlic, onions, mushrooms, and carrots), cashew nuts (sautéed with Thai chili paste, onions, and cashew nuts), and prick king (panfried in the prick king curry paste with green beans and coconut milk). Hours are Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, noon-9 p.m.; and Sunday, 5-9 p.m. Call (805) 318-9287 or visit laothaiusa.com.

CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) • (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

Jeuveau™ - the New Botox™ For as li5le as $9 a Unit*

A magic eraser for frown lines, crow's feet, forehead lines and more

SAIGON IN FIVE POINTS MOVING TO CHAPALA: Reader

Roger says that at Saigon Vietnamese Restaurant in Five Points Shopping Center, a sign indicates that they moved on August 30 to Chapala Street. Reader Brendan adds that on their website their address is now listed as 721 Chapala Street, the address of Sachi Ramen, which he believes has the same owner.

Before 25 Units

Two Weeks Later

Before 10 Units

Seven Days Later

VEGAN CHEF CHALLENGE: Presented by animal

advocacy organization Vegan Outreach, the third annual Santa Barbara Vegan Chef Challenge runs October 1-31. As veganism becomes more mainstream, restaurants nationwide are adding options to accommodate their growing number of vegan patrons. Vegan Chef Challenge is a month-long event showcasing new vegan menu items created by chefs at local restaurants. Typically, 10 to 30 restaurants take part, and the dining public is encouraged to vote for their favorite dishes. The majority of restaurants keep at least one popular vegan item on their regular menu after the challenge concludes. Winning dishes will be announced in early November. For challenge updates, visit veganchefchallenge .org/SantaBarbara.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

The maker of Jeuveau is helping you erase those "11s", reduce forehead lines and smooth crows feet by offering $40 off your treatment. That means if you get the 20 unit minimum (most clients need more than 20 units) at our already low price of $11 a unit, your cost will be $180! Or $9 a unit! Jeuveau lasts just as long as Botox. Starts to work a few days faster than Botox. Units are the same! Call 805.452.1252 or go to: edmanclinic.net to set up an appointment. All procedures performed by Dr Edman personally! *$40 off discount requires signing up for Jeuveau Rewards Program in office or being an exisang Rewards Program members with an award available. Minimum purchase of 20 Units required. No advance purchases or rain checks. One $40 reward available to each customer. Price before discount $11 per unit. Dr Edman reserves the right to change price at any ame.

107 West Gu+errez Street edmanclinic.net 805.452.1252 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

The #1 SB Weight Loss Center on Yelp!

THE INDEPENDENT

35


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

PRAYER FLAGS & A TALE OF LONGING MACDUFF EVERTON

I

Artist Mary Heebner prepares the pieces for Prayer Flags & A Tale of Longing.

climate change, environmental distress, extinctions, and social migration.” The exhibition consists of Heebner’s twosided prayer flags; a spiral-bound artist’s book, Prayer Flags & A Tale of Longing; and a booklet, Elemental Offerings—all of which originated with Heebner’s travels to India to see how prayer flags were made. Prayer Flags & A Tale of Longing, a limited-edition book, is handwritten in cursive (“I wrote and rewrote the text dozens of times before I could get a nearly perfect page. I felt

like a monk!” said Heebner) and printed on letterpress, with hand-painted, foil-stamped covers. “This story is derived from journal notes I made in 1993 during a trip to Sikkim, an Indian state bordering Bhutan, Tibet, and Nepal, and specifically to Rumtek Monastery. Upon reviewing my notes in 2019, I realized that they told a tale about longing. What are we longing for when we encounter another’s culture and other ways of being in the world? What do we expect from the experience, and why?” said Heebner. The tales’ accompanying prayer flags are presented together as a set in a ribboned cotton pouch inside an acrylic sleeve. The booklet, Elemental Offerings, contains Heebner’s five prayers to the elements, printed digitally, accompanied by a colorful set of five cotton flags, and placed in a cotton pouch. Heebner’s artworks are held in numerous public and private collections, including the Santa Barbara and San Francisco Museums of Art, the U.S. Library of Congress, the National Gallery of Art, the New York Public Library, and UCSB’s Art, Design & Architecture Museum, as well as its Special Collections Library. —Leslie Dinaberg

The Architectural Foundation Gallery (229 E. Victoria St.) hours are Saturdays from 1-4 p.m. and by appointment. For more information, visit afsb.org. MACDUFF EVERTON

nspired by a combination of her travels, concern for the planet, and reflections during the recent pandemic, multimedia artist Mary Heebner’s new exhibition, Prayer Flags & A Tale of Longing, is on view at the Architectural Foundation Gallery from September 10 to November 5, with an opening reception on Friday, September 9, from 5-7 p.m. Discussing the inspiration for her book, Prayer Flags & A Tale of Longing, Heebner said it came in the midst of the COVID pandemic. “This prolonged period of distress is also a time of reflection, perhaps of hope. Mother Earth is certainly taking a breather, as we suffer our losses and envision how best to move forward, as it becomes unavoidably clear that this whole world is connected, is one, and that there is no return to what we called ‘normal’—only a move forward, with eyes wide open, somewhat together.” Heebner’s daughter Sienna Craig, an anthropologist whose work focuses on culturally Tibetan areas in Mustang, Nepal, and abroad, taught her that the colors in traditional Tibetan prayer flags refer to each of the five elements—yellow for earth, green for air, red for fire, white for water, and blue for aether. “So I set about writing my own prayers to those elements as I reflected on them during this era of global warming,

Two-sided prayer flags by Mary Heeber

Students aren’t the only ones getting back to the books this fall. The annual Planned Parenthood Book Sale is back, in person, at the Earl Warren Showgrounds Exhibit Hall September 15-25. This awesome book sale is a great place to stock up on bestsellers, fiction and nonfiction favorites, children’s books, cookbooks, and all sorts of unusual titles like Throw the Damn Ball: Classic Poetry by Dogs, Normal Is Just a Setting on Your Dryer, The Sex of a Hippopotamus: A Unique History of Taxes and Accounting, and Moonwalking with Einstein, as well as a large inventory of puzzles, CDs, and DVDs among the rows and rows and rows of books. Not only are there 100,000 gently loved, well-priced, and impressively organized books, all of the proceeds support Planned Parenthood California Central Coast’s mission of providing families in our community with a wide range of vital education and health-care services such as wellness exams, cancer screenings, and reproductive care.

Admission is free, parking is free, and the main sale starts at 10 a.m. on Friday, September 16. Avid bookworms may also want to attend the opening night Preview Sale on Thursday, September 15, from 4-9 p.m., where a $30 donation gives you the very first chance to Planned Parenthood’s annual book sale—and its mighty team of volunteers—are back in action. peruse and purchase titles. —LD

For information, visit ppcccbooksale.com or call (805) 722-7870.

ERIC MADRID FILE PHOTO

BOOK THE DATE FOR PLANNED PARENTHOOD’S ANNUAL BOOK SALE

L I F E PAGE 36

ANGELA PERKO & ROGER DURLING IN CONVERSATION INGRID BOSTROM

MARY HEEBNER’S LATEST WORK IS ON VIEW AT ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION OF SANTA BARBARA GALLERY

Angela Perko's The Place of Hidden Things exhibit Don’t miss what’s sure to be a lively and entertaining event with artist Angela Perko in conversation with Roger Durling, who wrote the comprehensive cover story about Perko for the August 11 issue of Santa Barbara Independent. Held at Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery, where Perko’s show, The Place of Hidden Things, is on view through September 26, the conversation will delve into Perko’s inspiration and process behind her newest body of work. Her recurring interest in depictions of women is particularly vivid in a collection of 17 10"x 10" paintings included in the exhibit, each one spotlighting a fertility figure from a different historical culture. “The idea to paint a series was inspired in part by Kehinde Wiley’s ‘Equestrian Portrait of Prince Tommaso of Savoy-Carignan.’ I admired the painting when it was displayed at our local [Santa Barbara] museum. For me, it seemed that Wiley was attempting to visually fill a gaping hole in our mythology in a most grand and dramatic fashion… The little women are not grand, but together they tell an absolutely essential human story,” shared Perko. The self-taught artist has been represented by Sullivan Goss since 2005. She and her husband, Jerry Jacobs, also own the Lost Horizon bookstore in Montecito, which provides an endless stream of ideas to inform her work. This is her ninth solo exhibition with the gallery and her third to concentrate on her own mytho-historical ideas. Always a well-informed and enthusiastic interviewer, Durling is the executive director of the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, as well as a professor of film studies at Santa Barbara City College, and an arts journalist for the Santa Barbara Independent. This special event takes place on Saturday, September 10, at 4 p.m., at Sullivan Goss Gallery (11 E. Anapamu St.). Tickets are free, but seats are limited and registration is requested. Register at tinyurl.com/ eveningwithangelaperko. —LD

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 36

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


a&e | PREVIEWS TV

A GOLD STATUE FOR THE GOLDEN AGE OF TELEVISION COURTESY

Our First Annual Roundup of Reviews of the Emmy Nominees

I

can still remember being stuck at home with mono when I was in elementary school, and all day — every single day, on all FOUR of our channels — the Watergate Hearings were the only thing to watch on TV. Now there’s so much great stuff to stream that it’s easy to take it for granted. To help you sift through this embarrassment of riches, we’ve

compiled our first-ever collection of Emmy preview/reviews for some of the big shows that will be honored at the 74th Emmy Awards on Monday, September 12. Some of the highlights include The Beatles: Get Back — nominated for Outstanding Documentary or Nonfiction Series — about which art critic Josef Woodard wrote,

“To cite Peter Jackson’s stunning Beatles documentary Get Back as the year’s greatest music doc — or even one of the best films, generally — somehow falls short of identifying its special status.” Woodard also appreciated jeen-yuhs: A Kanye Trilogy, and takes us through the pros and cons of not one, but two Britney Spears documentaries. Also getting high props from our critics were The Andy Warhol Diaries, which Callie Fausey calls, “a heartfelt, sexual, and fascinating peek into a once-private world”; and 100 Foot Wave, an obsession-with-surfing documentary that Koss Klobucher found “worth the watch.” A super-strong selection of ripped-from-the-headlinesinspired drama got high praise from our reviewers, including Dopesick, which Ellie Bouwer writes is “frustrating and heartbreaking, and greatly informative about an extremely dark time in American history.” As I wrote in my review of The Dropout, “Watching Amanda Seyfried transform herself into Elizabeth Holmes the person and then ELIZABETH HOLMES the CEO is undoubtedly one of the most amazing performances I’ve seen this year.” As for the drama selections, in a category that includes Squid Game, the most-streamed show in Netflix history, Succession, with a field leading 25 Emmy nominations, and Stranger Things, which Bouwer describes as “emotional, relatable, and deeply nostalgic,” there truly is enough here to keep viewers happily binging through the winter, at least. —Leslie Dinaberg

See full versions of these reviews and others online at bit.ly/3Bk7pTy as well as a handy ballot to make your own Emmy Award winner predictions.

LEGENDARY LATIN GUITARIST ANTONIO REY COMES TO SANTA BARBARA One of Spain’s Best Guitarist-Composers to Delight Flamenco Fans

F

lamenco music and dance fans are in for a history-making special treat this weekend. International flamenco superstar Antonio Rey, one of Spain’s best guitarists and composers, will perform in Santa Barbara for the first time on Sunday, September 11. Rey says this is a don’t-miss event “because it will be a night of flamenco in its pure state.” He will play his own compositions from his 2020 album Flamenco Sin Fronteras, which won a Latin Grammy. In addition, he will play songs from prior albums such as Camino Al Alma and Colores Del Fuego. Guitarist José Tanaka, percussionist Diego Alvarez (a master cajón player), and dancer Maria Bermudez will join Rey on stage at The New Vic. They are all close friends and have performed together a number of times. Bermudez, a flamenco artist, director, choreographer, and teacher who runs the Maria Bermudez Flamenco Performing Arts Studio in downtown Santa Barbara, is particularly excited about the event. More than 30 years ago she moved to Jerez de la Frontera (recognized as the birthplace of flamenco) to immerse herself in the art form “full-on.” Now a master of the region’s complex and intricate dance style, she still lives there part-time. She has performed at many legendary venues, including the Hollywood Bowl, Lope de Vega in Seville, Lincoln Center in New York, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. She says it’s a privilege to perform with Rey, Tanaka, and Alvarez. “They are consummate artists. We all share our love for flamenco; it’s what we do; it’s our lifeline.” “I’m proud to be working together to bring an artist like Antonio to Santa Barbara together with the Flamenco Arts Festival,” says Mitch Chang (founder and owner of the Los Angeles Flamenco Festival, Kala Koa Entertainment, and

COURTESY

MUSIC

Mitch Chang Mortgage), who is producing the show in partnership with Santa Barbara’s nonprofit Flamenco Arts Festival. A fan of the S.B. festival from the beginning, Chang says, “It was a beautiful opportunity to experience so many incredible artists that have since gone on to become legendary. Those concerts will forever hold a place in my heart, and it is my wish that Santa Barbara locals will likewise walk away from this performance with their own special memories and a newfound thirst for discovering flamenco music and artists, both past and present.” Since its debut in 2000, the Flamenco Arts Festival usually happens every September, but the pandemic forced a pause in programming. Vibiana Pizano, the festival’s founder and president, explains that they instead launched a virtual event in April 2022 called Flamenco on Film, with eight different films showcasing various artists performing from Spain and in Santa Barbara. “Now, we are planning our return to live programming and hope to make an announcement in early 2023,” says Pizano. She adds, “This concert is important because it helps to promote flamenco music, which is a priority for the Flamenco Arts Festival. Our goal is to increase the knowledge, interest, and understanding of flamenco in our community not just through dance events, but also through music concerts.” — Cheryl Crabtree

Antonio Rey performs at The New Vic (33 W. Victoria St.) Sunday, September 11, at 7 p.m. For tickets, call (805) 965-5400 or visit store.ensembletheatre.com/events.

Antonio Rey

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

37


Introducing

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT’S

NICHE NEWSLETTERS Get exclusive content directly to your inbox from our editors

Sarah Sinclair will give you the inside scoop on real estate, going behind the scenes each Sunday to see our region’s casitas, cottages, and castles.

A snapshot view of the best of local culture and fun happenings in the worlds of music, theater, visual art, film, dance, books, lectures, and more from Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg.

A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers.

A Saturday morning newsletter with Nick Welsh’s award-winning opinion pieces.

An all-things music and musicadjacent newsletter/column by music/arts journalist-critic Josef Woodard.

Matt Kettmann’s Full Belly Files serves up multiple courses of food & drink coverage every Friday, delivering tasty nuggets of restaurant, recipe, and refreshment wisdom to your inbox.

Incisive news analysis and unmatched personal umbrage from Senior Editor Tyler Hayden. View the Backstory archive.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters 38

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 8

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries-born Kareem Abdul-Jabbar was one of the greatest basketball players ever. He excelled at most aspects of the game. Some experts say his rebounding was only average for a player his size—seven feet, two inches. But he is still the third-best rebounder in National Basketball Association history. And he played for 20 years, until age 40. What tips might Abdul-Jabbar have for you now? Here’s a suggestion from him that aligns with your current astrological omens: “Work on those parts of your game that are fundamentally weak.” The implication is that you have a lot of strengths, and now it’s time to raise up the rest of your skill set.

your heart to add its counsel to your head’s observations. Tenderize your objectivity. (2) Always be willing to be puzzled. Always be entertained and educated by your puzzlement. Proceed on the theory that nothing ever changes unless somebody is puzzled. (3) Practice, practice, practice the art of moderation. Do so with the intention of using it as a flexible skill rather than an unthinking habit. (4) Applying the Goldilocks principle will be essential. Everything must be just right: neither too much nor too little; neither overly grand nor overly modest.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): As a Taurus, you are always wise to be reverent toward your five senses. They are your glorious treasures, your marvelous superpowers, your sublime assets. In the coming weeks, they will serve you even better than usual. As you deploy them with all your amazement and appreciation unfurled, they will boost your intelligence. They will heighten your intuition in ways that guide you to good decisions. You will tune into interesting truths that had previously been hidden from you. I suspect your sensory apparatus will be so sharp and clear that it will work almost as extrasensory powers.

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There are blessings in every abyss. You, of all the signs in the zodiac, have the greatest capacity to find those blessings and make them yours. Likewise, there is an abyss in each blessing. You, of all the signs, have the most power to make sure your experiences in the abyss don’t detract from but enhance the blessing. In the coming weeks, dear Scorpio, take maximum advantage of these superpowers of yours. Be a master of zeroing in on the opportunities seeded in the dilemmas. Show everyone how to home in on and enjoy the delights in the darkness. Be an inspirational role model as you extract redemption from the messes.

GEMINI

SAGITTARIUS

(May 21-June 20) When you Geminis are at your best, you don’t merely tolerate dualities. You enjoy and embrace them. You work with them eagerly. While many nonGeminis regard oppositions and paradoxes as at best inconvenient and at worst obstructive, you often find how the apparent polarities are woven together and complementary. That’s why so many of you are connoisseurs of love that’s both tough and tender. You can be effective in seemingly contradictory situations that confuse and immobilize others. All these skills of yours should come in handy during the coming weeks. Use them to the hilt.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Author Jean Frémon says Cancerian naturalist Henry David Thoreau “always had two notebooks—one for facts, and the other for poetry. But Thoreau had a hard time keeping them apart, as he often found facts more poetic than his poems.” Judging from your current astrological omens, Cancerian, I suspect you are entering a time when facts will be even more poetic than usual. If you open yourself to the magic of reality, the mundane details of everyday life will delight you and appeal to your sense of wonder. Routine events will veer toward the marvelous. Can you bear to experience so much lyrical grace? I think so.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): “What good is it if you read Plato but never clean your toilet?” writes author Alice Munro. To which I add, “What good is it if you have brilliant breakthroughs and intriguing insights but never translate them into practical changes in your daily rhythm?” I’m not saying you are guilty of these sins, Leo. But I want to ensure that you won’t be guilty of these sins in the coming weeks. It’s crucial to your long-term future that you devote quality time to being earthy and grounded and pragmatic. Be as effective as you are smart.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “To love oneself is hard work,” declares Virgo author Hanif Abdurraqib. He adds, “But I think it becomes harder when you realize that you’re actually required to love multiple versions of yourself that show up without warning throughout a day, throughout a week, throughout a month, throughout a life.” Let’s make that your inspirational strategy, Virgo. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to refine, deepen, and invigorate your love for all your selves. It may be hard work, but I bet it will also be fun and exhilarating.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): How to be the best Libra you can be in the next three weeks: (1) Make sure your cool attention to detail never gets chilly. Warm it up now and then. Invite

SCORPIO

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): One of my favorite Sagittarians is practical mystic Caroline Myss, who was born with sun and Mercury and ascendant in Sagittarius. In accordance with current astrological omens, I’ve gathered six of her quotes to serve your current needs. (1) “There isn’t anything in your life that cannot be changed.” (2) “When you do not seek or need approval, you are at your most powerful.” (3) “Healing comes from gathering wisdom from past actions and letting go of the pain that the education cost you.” (4) “The soul always knows what to do to heal itself.” (5) “What serves your spirit enhances your body. What diminishes your spirit diminishes your body.” (6) “What is in you is stronger than what is out there to defeat you.”

Semaglu(de (generic Ozempic®) for Weight Loss Available Now ・Have you been struggling with weight loss? ・Afraid of taking s(mulant drugs for weight loss? ・Are typical weight loss drugs contraindicated for you? ・Do you have prediabetes? ・Are you considering bariatric surgery? Semaglu(de is the latest and best weight loss medica(on to be approved by the FDA. It acts to suppress your appe(te, but is not a s(mulant. In clinical trials, the AVERAGE weight loss was 15% over 68 weeks. We combine semaglu(de with our established weight loss program and are seeing even beSer results. Call 805.452.1252 for a free consult with Dr Edman to determine if this program is appropriate for you. Go to edmanclinic.net/semaglu(de for more details. Limited slots are available. Act Now!

107 West Gu+errez Street edmanclinic.net 805.452.1252

The #1 SB Weight Loss Center on Yelp!

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael MA Michael H H Kreitsek, Kreitsek, MA

Michael HCounseling Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I have always felt you Capricorns are wise to commune with rocks, dirt, mud, sand, and clay. I think you should regularly touch the actual earth with your hands and bare feet. If I’m out hiking with a Capricorn friend, I might urge them to sniff blooming mushrooms and lean down to kiss the exposed roots of trees. Direct encounters with natural wonders are like magic potions and miracle medicine for you. Moreover, you flourish when you nurture close personal relationships with anything that might be described as foundational. This is always true, but will be extra true for you in the coming weeks. Your words of power are kernel, core, gist, marrow, and keystone.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The coming weeks will be a favorable time to dream up creative solutions to problems that haven’t fully materialized yet. Then you can apply your discoveries as you address problems that already exist. In other words, dear Aquarius, I’m telling you that your uncanny facility for glimpsing the future can be useful in enhancing your life in the present. Your almost psychic capacity to foretell the coming trends will be instrumental as you fix glitches in the here and now.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): In the coming weeks, logic may be of only partial use to you. Information acquired through your senses might prove less than fully adequate, as well. On the other hand, your talents for feeling deeply and tapping into your intuition can provide you with highly accurate intelligence. Here’s a further tip to help you maximize your ability to understand reality: Visit a river or creek or lake. Converse with the fish and frogs and turtles and beavers. Study the ways of the crabs and crayfish and eels. Sing songs to the dragonflies and whirligig beetles and lacewings.

The Indy, Ep. 63: How Affordable Is Childcare in Santa Barbara? In this week’s podcast, Zoë shares her own experience as a new mother and debriefs the stories of five local families who have struggled through the financial and emotional burden of securing care for their children in Santa Barbara.

Listen at

independent.com/theindy or wherever you listen to podcasts!

Homework: Which of your past mistakes provided you with the most valuable lessons? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

39


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

CLASSIFIEDS S A N T A

B A R B A R A

I N D E P E N D E N T

Reaching 68,000 Readers Each Week

EMPLOYMENT COMPUTER/TECH PRINCIPAL SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER IN TEST sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Design & build a globally scaled web exp. for Sonos products. Req: BS+5 yrs. May work from home. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos. com (Reference Job code: SK0707) SENIOR DEVOPS DATABASE ENGINEER sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Ensure system availability & performance. Req: BS+5 yrs. May work from home. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: MB1223) SENIOR SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT ENGINEER IN TEST sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Work w/ members of Smart Speaker Team to deliver features. Req: BS+6 yrs. May work from home. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: AB0418)

CONSTRUCTION INSTALL HELPER: Entry Level position into the stone industry. No experience necessary, will train the right person. Contact Solid Rock Inc for more info or to setup an interview 805.617.3310

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE ALOE CARE Health, medical alert system. The most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice‑activated! No wi‑fi needed! Special offer call and mention offer code CARE20 to get $20 off Mobile Companion. Call today 1‑844‑ 790‑1673. (SCAN)

PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMIC COORDINATOR

Undergraduate Instructional Support Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Main duties will include implementing laboratory course material directives and to accurately prepare experiments for all teaching labs. Req; B.S. in Chemistry, Biochemistry or related field at time of application. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application deadline 9/16/22. https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/JPF02242. Posting will remain open until filled.

40 40

ADAPTIVE COMPUTING & ASSISTIVE TECH SPECIALIST

DISABLED STUDENT PROGRAM Provides assistive technology devices and adaptive computing systems and/ or adaptive technology, including training, to all eligible students with disabilities. Manage the Adaptive Technology Center (ATC) housed in the Davidson Library for use by students, staff, faculty and community members. Oversee and coordinate the operation of the local area network in the ATC. Serves as the campus resource person on web site accessibility. Evaluates campus web pages for ADA Compliance and consults with campus web masters to provide accessible web design techniques. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. 1‑3 years related experience / training. Experience with adaptive computing systems and adaptive technology. Experience working in higher education as well as experience working with persons/students with disabilities. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $27.68 ‑ $29.69/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 9/15/22. Job # 41860

APPLICATION PROGRAMMER

CAMPUS LEARNING ASSISTANCE SERVICES Hybrid position with excellent university benefits! We assist students in their mastery of UCSB course material through course‑specific tutoring and academic skills development. Will lead and participate hands‑on in the development and migration to new technologies of information systems and functionality, identifying strategies and opportunities for innovation and automation including cross‑ organization mission critical projects! You will perform software application design, development/implementation planning, programming and analysis, maintenance, support and training for modern Microsoft‑based web‑based client‑server distributed systems, legacy applications, data stores, interfaces, and processes for Student Academic Support Services cluster and program on campus. Reqs: BS in Computer Science, related field, or equivalent combination of education and experience. 3 years programming experience using .NET framework, Visual Studio, and Microsoft SQL Server. Full‑stack developer in .NET ‑ backend development using the .NET Server‑Side Framework and frontend development including HTML, CSS, and JS. Demonstrated experience developing for cloud‑based platforms including Microsoft Azure. Experience

THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 8, 8, 2022 2022

using best practices version control methodologies, continuous integration and deployment tools. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $82,000‑$90,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38932

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, BUSINESS SYSTEMS GROUP

ADMINISTRATIVE & RESIDENTIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Under the general direction of the Director, Data Services & Business Systems, Administrative & Residential Information Technology (ARIT), the Assoc. Director, Business Systems Support is responsible for the planning, coordination, and project management of all Business Systems Support within the Division of Administrative Services. As a member of the ARIT management team, provides leadership, direction and expertise with regard to the strategy of Business Systems Architecture and Design. The ARIT organization is responsible for the planning, development, implementation, and overall administration for information systems and related technologies for all departments of the UCSB Division of Administrative Services. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience / training. 4‑6 years Business Systems Support and Development. 4‑6 years Demonstrated experience leading change management activities and managing their impact across multiple units or departments. 4‑6 years Experience in the management of ongoing technology infrastructure acquisition and expansion, to include the identification and integration of suitable emerging technologies. Thorough knowledge of vendor‑provided business systems sufficient for strategic planning, technology assessment and direction. Knowledge of technical architecture, systems use, maintenance, and planning and integration strategies. Leadership / management skills, including abilities in persuasion / negotiation, mentoring. Proven ability to present complex business information. Ability to understand the process involved to adapt, integrate, and modify existing programs or vendor‑supplied products for use within a large and complex technical environment. Excellent oral and written communication skills, including the ability to effectively present technical topics to individuals and groups with potentially varied levels of technical sophistication. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $126,300 ‑ $146,900/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and

all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/19/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #42092

CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. This position is a grant funded position with an emphasis on crisis support services. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California at all times during employment. Master’s degree from an accredited school of social work; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Three years of post‑master’s experience; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Licensed Clinical Social Worker license at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience and within limits of the grant. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41572

CONTRACTS & GRANTS/FINANCIAL MANAGER

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Directs and supervises the departmental financial affairs including financial administration, purchasing, contract and grant administration, gift processing and administration, personnel and payroll management and accounting and personnel

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

systems development. Independently manages the financial administration of all research funds totaling over $58 million. Includes signature authority for all funds, proposal preparation, reconciling and analysis of financial reports, including monitoring and analyzing expenditures and spending and assisting principal investigators (PIs) with strategic planning, spending trends, and financial forecasting; provides specialized reporting, as needed. Advising faculty of proper university guidelines regarding financial matters. Establishes procedures and develops standards for the operation of financial functions to ensure that high service standards and audit requirements are met, including record retention. Responsible for compliance issues pertaining to the financial execution of awards. Prepares cost projections and other reports for extramural funds. Responsibilities include reviewing and monitoring all relevant departmental policies and procedures and adapting these policies and procedures to changing conditions. Incorporates changes in response to new applications, procedural, and/or policy changes to federal/ funding agency/university regulations and policies. Maintains current knowledge of contract and grant policies of the University and funding agencies. Serves on campus‑wide committees, workgroups and task forces in the areas of accounting, personnel, contracts & grants, gifts/ sponsorships, purchasing. Maintains thorough knowledge of financial UC processes, policies and procedures. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience. 1‑3 years experience independently developing research proposals/awards related to contract and grant management. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $62,300 ‑ $82,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and

all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39707

CRYOGENIC TEM MICROSCOPIST

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Duties and expertise include independent Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) handling and implementation of all acquisition protocols for negative stain and cryogenic data collection on High‑End Cryo‑TEMs (Tecnai 12, F20, Glacios, and Titan Krios), cryogenic sample preparation (VItrobot, Aquilos), keeping an up‑to‑date archive of metadata as well as handling all cryogenic sample inventories. Working with collaborators and lab members, guiding and training them on grids and sample handling. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree In Chemistry or related field or equivalent experience and/or training. 4‑6 years experience as a cryogenic TEM specialist. 4‑6 years independent high‑end TEM operations. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $75,000 ‑ $100,600/yr.; commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other

characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41509

DESKTOP & TECHNICAL SUPPORT SPECIALIST

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Works with minimal guidance performing tasks that provide a high level of computing functionality for desktop systems serviced by the Life Sciences Computing Group (LSCG). Installs and networks computing equipment in keeping with LSCG, UCSB and UC Office of the President policies. Researches, troubleshoots and resolves hardware, software and networking issues on Windows and Macintosh computers and other equipment such as printers, phones, tablets, and NAS devices for users in offices, research and instructional labs, and multi‑use facilities. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/ or equivalent experience/training. 1‑3 years experience administering and/ or troubleshooting issues related to systems, networks, and hardware or direct experience troubleshooting in production environments. 1‑3 years experience supporting both Apple and Intel based desktop and laptop hardware. Ability to troubleshoot issues with peripherals, communication issues, etc. 1‑3 years demonstrated experience working well with customers of varying levels of technical expertise in high‑pressure situations and moderately complex environments. 1‑3 years demonstrated

Continued on p. 42


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

|

MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS !!OLD GUITARS WANTED!! GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN, Etc. 1930’s to 1980’s. TOP DOLLAR PAID. CALL TOLL FREE 1‑866‑433‑8277 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) ALOE CARE Health medical alert system. Most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice‑activated! No wi‑fi needed! Special offer w/code CARE20 for $20 off Mobile Companion. 1‑855‑521‑5138 AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/ mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855‑761‑1725 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 1‑877‑649‑5043 (AAN CAN) BECOME A published author. We want to read your book! Dorrance Publishing trusted since 1920. Consultation, production, promotion & distribution. Call for free author’s guide 833‑719‑3029 or visit dorranceinfo.com/acp BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920. Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http:// dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) CREDIT CARD Debt Relief! Reduce payment by up to 50%! Get one LOW affordable payment/month. Reduce interest. Stop calls. FREE no‑obligation consultation Call 1‑855‑761‑1456 (AAN CAN) DID YOU KNOW Newspaper‑generated content is so valuable it’s taken and repeated, condensed, broadcast, tweeted, discussed, posted,

copied, edited, and emailed countless times throughout the day by others? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV FOR $79.99/mo for 12 months with CHOICE Package. Watch your favorite live sports, news & entertainment anywhere. First 3 months of HBOMax, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and Epix included! Directv is #1 in Customer Satisfaction (JD Power & Assoc.) Some restrictions apply. Call 1‑888‑641‑5762. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV SATELLITE TV Service Starting at $74.99/month! Free Installation! 160+ channels available. Call Now to Get the Most Sports & Entertainment on TV! 877‑310‑2472 DISCOUNT AIR travel. Call Flight Services for best pricing on domestic & international flights inside & from the US. Serving United, Delta, American & Southwest & many more. Free quote! Have travel dates ready! 844‑951‑2014 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23 1‑866‑566‑1815 (AAN CAN) DO YOU owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 877‑414‑2089. (Hours: Mon‑Fri 7am‑5pm PST) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Help Find Missing Kids! Call 1‑888‑491‑1453. (CalSCAN) ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off EntirePurchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑424‑7581 (Cal‑SCAN) HUGHESNET ‑ Finally, super‑fast internet no matter where you live. 25 Mbps just $59.99/mo! Unlimited Data is Here. Stream Video. Bundle TV & Internet. Free Installation. Call 866‑499‑0141 LONG DISTANCE MOVING: Call today for a FREE QUOTE from America’s Most Trusted Interstate Movers. Let us take the stress out of moving! Speak to a Relocation Specialist, call 844‑857‑1737 (Cal‑SCAN)

MY 20 yr old son’s insurance stopped paying for his sober living. I live in SB, I rent & work 2 jobs. I am asking for donations to go to his sober living. He’s committed to being sober and wants to finish the program, but I can’t afford it. (805) 695‑9753 Tina. NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 1‑855‑667‑0380 (Cal‑SCAN) PAYING TOP cash for men’s sportwatches! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 833‑603‑3236 PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator. $0 Money Down + Low Monthly Payment Options. Request a FREE Quote ‑Call now before the next power outage: 1‑844‑439‑5645 (SCAN) PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator $0 Down + Low Monthly Pmt Request a free Quote. Call before the next power outage: 1‑844‑334‑8353 PROTECT YOUR home from pests safely and affordably. Pest, rodent, termite and mosquito control. Call for a quote or inspection today 844‑394‑9278 PUT ON your TV Ears & hear TV w/ unmatched clarity. TV Ears Original ‑ originally $129.95 ‑ now w/ this special offer only $59.95 w/code MCB59! 1‑833‑530‑1955 SAFE STEP. North America’s #1 Walk‑in tub. Comprehensive lifetime warranty. Top‑of‑the‑line installation and service. Now featuring our free shower package & $1600 off ‑ limited time! Financing available. 1‑855‑417‑1306 SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/year! Call 1‑844‑410‑9609! (M‑F 8am‑8pm Central) (Cal‑SCAN) THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing an election is how campaign dollars are spent. Get the best ROI by using our deep relationships in every community in California. Our on‑the‑ground knowledge is indispensable to campaigns that want results. For more info on multi‑market ethnic and non‑ethnic solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@

cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. CNPA’s Advertising Services’ power to connect to nearly 13 million of the state’s readers who are an engaged audience, makes our services an indispensable marketing solution. For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@ cnpa.com THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1‑877‑539‑0299 TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920‑1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877‑589‑0747 (AAN CAN) VIVINT SMART security. Professionally installed. 1 connected system for total peace of mind. Free professional installation! 4 free months of monitoring! Call to customize your system. 1‑833‑841‑0737

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Sunrise 6:39 Sunset 7:09

High

Thu 8

3:02 am -0.8

9:38 am 4.4

2:36 pm 1.9

8:50 pm 6.5

Fri 9

3:41 am -0.7

10:09 am 4.7

3:24 pm 1.5

9:38 pm 6.4

Sat 10

4:16 am -0.4

10:40 am 4.9

4:12 pm 1.2

10:25 pm 6.0

Sun 11

4:50 am 0.1

11:11 am 5.1

5:00 pm 1.0

11:11 pm 5.5

Mon 12

5:22 am 0.6

11:42 am 5.2

5:49 pm 0.9

11:59 pm 4.8

5:53 am 1.2

12:13 pm 5.2

6:41 pm 1.0

Wed 14

Tue 13 12:52 am 4.2

6:21 am 1.8

12:45 pm 5.2

7:39 pm 1.1

Thu 15

1:59 am 3.6

6:46 am 2.4

1:21 pm 5.0

8:50 pm 1.2

3H

10 D

17

25 D source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Citing Your References” -- it’s not exactly how it looks.

WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833‑664‑1530 (AAN CAN)

REAL ESTATE MONEY TO LOAN RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 1‑818‑248‑0000. Broker‑principal DRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑ SCAN)

APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT STUDIOS $1440, Studios with patio $1500, 1BDs $1560, 1BDs with patio $1620, in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 805‑967‑6614

63. “___, said the fly” 64. Classic TV kid nickname, with “The” 65. Arctic, for example 66. Egg timer noise 67. Painter Magritte 68. Literature category 69. Wilder formerly of Depeche Mode 70. Throws in

33. Winter Olympics host country of 2006 34. Starts of news articles 1. Song by The Kinks 36. Saxophone range 5. Pan for gold, e.g. 38. Drawn-out drama 9. Dragged fishing net 41. Attribute for a unicorn, or, 14. Eye color location say, Fabio 15. Rainbow Bridge National 42. It may show support for Monument state a graduating student or a 16. Placed a curse on political candidate 17. Fathom divisions 47. Suffix for hydrox 18. Halliwell once known as 49. Nothing, to Nigel Ginger Spice 52. “Kung Fu ___” (2008 1. Raise up 19. “Doesn’t ring ___” animated film) 2. Cookie that collaborated 20. See66Across 54. “King” of snakes with Ritz in 2022 23. Go out to play? 3. Uhura’s rank on the original 55. Purplish brown 24. Performer’s booking 56. Barbara who played a TV “Star Trek” 25. Buck’s companion genie 4. “The Jetsons” dog 27. Undergarments in a drawer 5. Nickname used by at least 57. Back end 30. Reproductive part of a 58. Work too hard two boxers flower 59. Vesuvius’s Sicilian 6. Checklist bit 35. Kendrick who voices Poppy 7. Cost of a ride counterpart in the “Trolls” movies 8. Alternative to “person” or 60. Hit the tarmac 61. Saint Laurent of fashion 37. Feels lousy “place” 62. Get some morning 39. Bus driver’s itinerary 9. Marlo Thomas sitcom exercise, maybe 40. See8Down 10. “It’s Your Call” singer ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For 43. Bean or horse variety answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. McEntire Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1099 44. Dreamcast maker, once 11. Battle weapons 45. Suffix after “suit” or 12. TV bandleader and LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: accordionist Lawrence “wear” 13. “Bad” cholesterol initials 46. Spanish architect Gaudi 21. Worn-down pencil 48. Smallest chess piece 22. Insider’s offering 50. Fleur de ___ (Hubert 25. Defense Dept. tech agency Keller’s famed S.F. 26. ___ a million restaurant) 28. Goes on TV 51. Econ. indicator 29. Hit the sack 53. Riviera resort city 31. Tofu source, in some 55. See43Across places 62. Home of ancient 32. Stock Western prop Bethlehem

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 8,8, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

41 41


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT problem solving and critical thinking skills. experience working independently with varied tasks. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $27.67‑$29.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41517

EDUCATION OUTREACH MANAGER

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Responsibilities include coordinating science inquiry‑based activities in secondary schools: setting up schedules, organizing events, updating the website, fundraising, overseeing joint Master’s program, grant reporting, arranging meetings with all partner institutions https:// scitrek.chem.ucsb.edu. Req: BA in Chemistry, Biochemistry or a related field at time of application. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Deadline for applications 9/8/22. Apply online at https://recruit.ap.ucsb. edu/JPF02269. The posting will remain open until filled.

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR

COMPUTER SCIENCE The Financial Administrator is responsible for processing all types of reimbursements including supplies, entertainment, memberships, and travel. In addition, the Financial Administrator serves as department buyer for Gateway purchases and is responsible for the purchasing of supplies and equipment on departmental and extramural funding. Receives all merchandise. Contacts the end‑user to pick‑up items, and prepares invoices for payment. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. Demonstrated experience with accounting, purchasing and office management procedures. Ability to organize, coordinate and prioritize workload and work independently under pressure of deadlines. Ability to interpret and comply with complex policies and procedures. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/19/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 42012

42

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

FINANCIAL AND PERSONNEL ASSISTANT

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Manages all departmental fiscal activities and accounting systems for the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Latin American & Iberian Studies Program. Interprets policy and advises faculty, staff and students of proper university guidelines regarding policies for personnel, purchasing, entertainment and travel. Analyzes expenditures and spending patterns, resolving discrepancies. Reconciles financial transactions with the general and payroll ledgers. Produces accurate monthly cost projections and financial reports for management review. Participates in fiscal closing, budget projections and financial planning. Administers and coordinates employment activities and processes personnel actions for faculty, staff and students via the UCPath System. Ensures data integrity and compliance with University, Federal, agency and union policies. Maintains current knowledge of University policies and procedures of Accounting, Travel, Human Resources, Academic Personnel, Graduate Division, Purchasing and Business Services on all fund sources. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years financial work experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/14/22; open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41679

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING Independently serves as the reviewer for all reimbursements/payments processed in the ECE department. Prepares and processes recharge financial journals for two department recharge programs, and processes journal charges to ECE accounts from other departments’ recharge programs and central campus units. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative experience. Ability to organize and prioritize a high volume of process work. Accurate with data entry and attention to detail, particularly with financial data. Ability to focus in a busy and dynamic work environment with frequent interruptions. Must possess excellent communication, organizational, and computer skills including Microsoft and Google applications. Analytical skills including the ability to interpret policies and provide guidance on them. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41724.

THE INDEPENDENT

|

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER The Financial Assistant administers all financial activities for the Departments of Classics and East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, and the Humanities Administrative Support Center. Processes monthly review and reconciliation of ledgers, providing timely reporting, identifying and initiating corrective actions, and ensuring compliance with University, Federal, and State accounting policies and procedures on all transactions. In collaboration with management, establishes best‑practices for procurement, payroll, record retention, and accounts payable functions. Funds administered include a variety of state operating funds, gifts, endowments, fellowships, and grants. Requires considerable initiative, multitasking, communication, attention to detail, and problem‑solving abilities. Must possess a strong knowledge of UC and departmental policies and procedures as they relate to financial services. Advises faculty on policies and procedures that govern the full‑range of accounting processes, gift and award administration, and academic and staff payroll. Processes gifts and monitors endowment accounts. Responsible for assisting faculty with logistical arrangements. Reqs: Strong computer experience using Word and Excel. Excellent written and verbal communication skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61– $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41861

INSTRUCTIONAL APPLICATIONS PROGRAMMER

COLLEGE OF LETTERS & SCIENCE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Develops, enhances, and maintains web‑based instructional applications, including the campus‑wide learning management system and associated application modules. Codes, tests, implements, and maintains applications in a multi‑server LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) environment. Integrates securely with other applications. Plans and implements software updates using distributed version control. Provides operational support for escalated issues, bugs, and technical problems. Reqs:Bachelor’s Degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. 5+ years of experience in software development. 3+ years developing complex web application software. Experience and proficiency in PHP, MySQL, and HTML. Experience developing securely within a Linux/ UNIX environment. Experience using a distributed control versioning system, such as GIT. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $68,700 ‑ $100,600/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 37503.

LEAD BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER

CENTRAL STORES Schedules work requests and assigns work. Leads a crew in the delivery & installation of furniture. Delivers & uncrates (if required) heavy/delicate equipment which requires special handling, relocates offices and labs, delivers and sets up rental equipment. Consults with campus departments on job estimates. Responsible for coordination and supervising Furniture Services (FS) job requests and all administrative and operational decisions in the absence of the FS Supervisor. May perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. Reqs: Use of basic tools, moving equipment including pallet jacks and motorized forklift; warehouse management; staff supervision including student staff; and project and special events management. Ability to read, write and perform basic arithmetic calculations. Advanced mechanical aptitude. Ability to effectively prioritize tasks; may also prioritize work for lower level incumbents. Demonstrated skills in interpersonal communications; ability to instruct and mentor lower level staff, provide input on hiring, performance and disciplinary decisions. Experience with computers including email, Microsoft Word, and Excel. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Able to frequently lift up to 70 lbs. Occasional weekend work may be required. $24.67 ‑ $32.54/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #42045

PUBLIC SAFETY DISPATCHER

POLICE DEPARTMENT Monitors/operates all equipment and accesses all resources within the Dispatch Center. The majority of each shift is at the console monitoring radios and alarms, radio dispatching personnel, answering phones, computer input/retrieval using specialized software, including CLETS, alarm software, and 911/telephone software in addition to common Microsoft Windows‑based programs. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent education and experience. 1‑3 years of law enforcement agency experience or equivalent education and experience. Read, write, speak and understand English fluently. Proficient typing data/entry, familiarity with computer operations, excellent communication and Customer Service skills, ability to deal well with stress and stressful situations. Meet all other requirements for public safety dispatcher as established by the law and the Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Note: Ability to use vehicles, computer systems and other technologies and tools utilized by police agencies. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting req of Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. Ability to work in a confined work environment until relieved. Successful completion of a pre‑employment psychological evaluation. Successful completion of a six month in‑house training program. Ability to work rotating shifts on days, nights, weekends and holidays. Successful completion of the POST Dispatcher test. 30.91‑39.45/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 9/15/22. Job #40952

LOCKSMITH

MAINTENANCE‑ RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The locksmith performs journey level locksmithing tasks and related repairs/installations for the buildings maintained by Residential Operations. In compliance with H&RS goals and objectives, affirms, and implements the department Educational Equity Plan. Reqs: Fiveyears’ experience working at a journeyman level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. Notes: Five (5) years’ experience working at a journeyman level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. $39.71/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39424

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SAFETY & WELLNESS MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Plans, develops, implements and manages programs and activities for all aspects related to staff health, wellness and safety programs for over 750 HDAE FTEs, and occasionally for campus staff and faculty. Responsibilities include the management of the HDAE Injury Prevention, Safety and Wellness programs. Collaborates with campus partners to ensure departmental compliance with State and Federal requirements and to enhance Safety and Wellness Program offerings. Supervises Health Advocate (assistant) and Student Health Advocate assistants. Creates, establishes and evaluates safety and wellness campaigns. Collaborates and participates with departments to share information and resources and to continually improve safety and wellness programs. Reqs: 3 years experience in the field of safety and/ or wellness programs, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Bachelor’s degree or higher in Health Education, Biomechanics/ Kinesiology, Environmental & Occupational Health, Public Health, PT, or Occupational Therapy, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Excellent verbal & written communication skills. Demonstrated customer service experience. Proficient in Microsoft & Google Office Suite. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $32.56 ‑ $35.82/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 9/12/22. Job # 41742

SAFETY SPECIALIST PURCHASING COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT The Purchasing Coordinator is responsible for all purchasing transactions and recharges for the Bren School. Maintains working knowledge of University policies and procedures. Acts as liaison between campus administrative offices (Purchasing, Business and Financial Services, Central Stores, Academic Departments) and Bren School faculty, staff and students in purchasing matters. Maintains accurate records of all purchasing transactions. Processes travel documents for the School and prepares monthly recharges. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related area or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years of experience working in an academic setting. $24.61 ‑ $26.32/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41771

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Under the general supervision of the Industrial Safety Program Manager, develops, implements, manages, and identifies needs for a diverse set of campus‑wide occupational health and safety programs, including but not limit to: Shop Safety, Energy Isolation (Lock‑out/Tag‑out), Powered Industrial Trucks & Heavy Equipment, Machine Safety, and Crane & Hoist Safety. Additional areas of responsibility include performing job hazard and personal protective equipment assessments, developing and providing training and technical information, performing audits and compliance inspections, generating reports and corrective action notifications, providing injury prevention program assistance, implementing injury prevention strategies, and monitoring injury trends on campus. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/ or equivalent experience /training. Have completed all state courses and have a minimum of at least 3 years of relevant experience. Comprehensive working knowledge / understanding of a specific EH&S field including related laws and regulations, and general understanding of all EH&S fields. Excellent organizational skills to plan, organize, and prioritize multiple projects. Excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively in a diverse environment. Working skills in the appropriate use of technology and relevant scientific equipment as required. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work some evenings and

weekends. Must be willing to work with and respond to emergencies (on and off‑hours) involving potentially hazardous materials. $61,200 ‑ $95,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #37914 SENIOR BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYST sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA. Drive change in business processes & ent. apps. May work from anywhere in U.S. Req: BS+5 yrs. To apply: Carmen Palacios, Immigration Manager at carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: SR0508)

SR. CUSTODIAN‑ WEEKEND WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. Promotes a customer service environment to residence and clients. Assists with the development and maintenance of a work environment which is conducive to meeting the mission of the organization and supports the EEP. Responsible for completing job duties that demonstrates support for the Operations Team. Initiates communication directly with co‑workers and or supervisor to improve and clarify working relationship. Reqs: Working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable (Will train on all equipment and chemicals used.) Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Experience in a custodial cleaning operation or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Ability to read, writing and follow oral and written instructions. Notes: Able to lift up to 50 pounds. May be required to work schedules other than the assigned weekend schedule to meet the operational needs of the unit. Two positions available. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. 20.74 ‑ $22.44/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 9/12/22. Job # 41761

UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR

SOUTH HALL ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Coordinates all aspects of the undergraduate program for the English Department within the South Hall Administrative Support Center, Student Services unit. This includes approximately 600 majors and 100 minors. Advises students and faculty on all matters concerning undergraduate affairs; academic planning in the honors program, internships, independent studies, specializations, EAP studies, and other campus‑wide


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT resources. Identifies problems, has extensive knowledge, and is able to interpret campus policies, initiate new programs in the English Department, and meet the needs of the students while maintaining the goals and standards set by the department, Chair, Undergraduate Committee, SASC Director, Student Services Manager and campus administration. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training, 1‑3 years administrative experience and experience with advising/counseling. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.81‑$28.57/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/16/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41904

(CONT.)

releases and media advisories; pitches stories to media outlets and responds to media inquiries; identifies faculty experts and arranges media interviews. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Thorough knowledge of the concepts and principles of news, media communications and media relations. Proven written, verbal and interpersonal communication skills. Familiarity with the modern digital landscape. 2 or more years of experience in communications, working with news and media outlets and reporters. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work occasional weekends and evenings to meet the operational needs of the department. 68,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36478

RETAIL

WRITER, SOCIAL SCIENCES

OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS Writer for Social Sciences and Humanities and Fine Arts The Office of Public Affairs & Communication Provides multi‑platform coverage of UC Santa Barbara with a focus on the social sciences and humanities & fine arts. Responsible for working closely with the academic and research community on a wide range of functions and tasks related to the presentation of UCSB to the general public, campus community, and local, national, and global media through a variety of electronic and print means, including The Current website and UC Santa Barbara Magazine. With a goal of advocacy, conducts in‑depth reporting, including background research and interviews, and practices long‑form storytelling; prepares news

SERVICE

DR. J’S Bicycle Shop in Solvang is looking for a full‑time Assistant Store Manager to assist with our busy retail and service departments. The ideal candidate will be fitness‑minded, a self‑starter, well‑organized and employ great customer service skills. This person will also assist in helping to manage both the retail floor and the service department, determine work schedules for sales staff and service techs, assist owner with ordering, inputting and managing inventory. Passion and knowledge of bicycles is a bonus, but not a requirement. Competitive wages start out at $22/ hour depending on experience. Includes performance incentives and product discounts. If this sounds like you, please respond with an applicable work history resume and tell us why you are the best candidate! Contact: corey@drjsbikeshop.com

CLASSIC CARS

DIRECTORY WANTED EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FRENCH LESSONS. Learn and speak French with a native speaker. One on one, or groups. All levels welcome. 805.420.7896. excusemyfrenchclass@gmail.com.

HOME SERVICES DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23. 1‑866‑479‑1516 ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule free LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490

MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION VIAGRA users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Call Today 1‑877‑707‑5517 (AAN CAN) DENTAL INSURANCE ‑ Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance ‑ not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1‑888‑623‑3036 www.dental50plus.com/58 #6258 VIAGRA AND CIALIS USERS! 50 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00. 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 Hablamos Español

Running or not. We are local to S.B. Foreign/Domestic. Porsche, Mercedes, Ford, Chevy etc. We come to you.

805-699-0684

AUTO AUTO PARTS CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast ‑ FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1‑800‑245‑0398

CAR CARE/REPAIR DONATE YOUR CAR OR TRUCK TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

LUXURY CARS WANTED! OLD Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE 1‑707‑339‑5994. Email: porscherestoration@yahoo.com (Cal‑SCAN)

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

|

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: Wendy Ann Connor aka Wendy Connor Case No.: 22PR00414 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: Wendy Connor aka Wendy Connor A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: AMY CONNOR in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that: AMY CONNOR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 10/06/2022 at 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Electronically Filed: Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 08/15/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman, O’Gorman & O’Gorman, LLP, Attorney at Law, 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2, Goleta, CA 93117, 805‑967‑1215. Published August 25, September 1, 8, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MELLOW CLAY, 312 Ellwood Beach Drive, 53, Goleta, CA

93117; Sarah Yu (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY SARAH YU. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001842. Published: August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOCAL DESIGN COMPANY, 4317 Meadow Dr, Santa Maria, CA 93455; Stacy Vasquez (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY STACY VASQUEZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County

Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001882. Published: August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE SANTA BARBARA SALAD PROJECT, 1486 Aarhus Dr., M, Solvang, California 93463; Sabina Roan (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SABINA ROAN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 4, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E52. FBN Number: 2022‑0001954. Published: August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BIRD AND THE BEE COUNSELING, 6 Harbor Way, #142, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Brianne B Hughes

(same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY BRIANNE BILLUPS HUGHES, INDIVIDUAL. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002033. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA CHICKEN RANCH, 2618 De La Vina St, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; SBCR Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY MATT BENKO, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E.

Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002075. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE PHLEB MOBILE PHLEBOTOMY SERVICES, 219 Oceano Ave, 2, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Juan Cambron Perez (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JUAN CAMBRON PEREZ, CPT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002076. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ATRAINING 805 1329 San Andres

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom September 20, 2022, at 5:30 P.M. Fairview Business Associates and Torridon Development Agreement 420, 430, & 490 S. Fairview Avenue; APNs 071-130-057, -062, -061 City of Goleta Case No. 21-0002-ORD ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing on a Development Agreement between Fairview Business Associates/Torridon and the City of Goleta. The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, September 20, 2022, at 5:30 PM

LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PROJECT LOCATION: 420, 430, & 490 S. Fairview Avenue APN 071-130-057, -062, -061 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The subject property (APNs 071-130-057, -062, -061) consists of 3 separate parcels (4.63, 3.72, and 8.32 acres respectively) located at 420, 430, & 490 S Fairview Avenue, in the Inland area of the city. Yardi Systems is the current tenant. The property is zoned Business Park (BP) and the land use designation is Business Park (I-BP). The project was filed by agent Eva Turenchalk of Turenchalk Planning Services on behalf of Fairview Business Associates/Torridon (“applicant”). The applicant proposes a Development Agreement (DA) to provide an easement to the City to use 35 parking spaces located on the applicant’s property to be used for public parking in Old Town in exchange for DRB approval of the design of 25 additional parking spaces to be valid for the next 20 years. On April 25, 2022, the Planning Commission held a public hearing and recommended the City Council enter in the proposed Development Agreement with the applicant. The City Council is the final decisionmaker for the Development Agreement for the City. The Development Agreement would not need Coastal Commission approval as the site is located in the Inland portion of the City. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: A Notice of Exemption (NOE) has been prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et seq., CEQA), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 California Code of Regulations, §§ 15000, et seq., CEQA Guidelines), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency. The NOE is appropriate pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15061.b.3 because the act of approving a Development Agreement will not cause development of the project site itself. The project has been found to be exempt from CEQA since the project substantially conforms to the previous approval 98-DP-024 and its environmental document 96-EIR-05. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control TSC in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the City Council hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Associate Planner Travis Lee at 805-562-5528 or tlee@cityofgoleta.org or Kathy Allen, Supervising Senior Planner, at (805) 961-7545 or kallen@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. REVIEW PROCESS AND APPEAL: As noted above, on April 25, 2022, the Planning Commission recommended the City Council enter into the Development Agreement. The next step in the review process is a City Council hearing, which is the subject of this notice, to consider the request and render a decision on the Development Agreement. The City Council decision cannot be appealed. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent September 8, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 8,8, 2022 2022 THE INDEPENDENT

43


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Aaron M. Thomas 3910 Maricopa Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY AARON M. THOMAS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002083. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PACIFICA MEDICAL SPA SANTA BARBARA, 1722 State Street, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; DGK Holdings Santa Barbara, Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DANIEL GENE KOLDER MD, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002138. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FEDERAL DRUG COMPANY, 3327 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alice F MacDonald (same address). This business is conducted by a Trust. SIGNED BY ALICE MACDONALD, OWNER/ TRUSTEE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 12, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002017. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RANCHO SAN MARCOS GOLF COURSE, 4600 HWY 154, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; RSM Resort LLC, 17992 Cowan, Irvine, CA 92614, Rancho San Marcos Resort, RSM Golf Course, RSM Resort, San Marcos Golf Course, San Marcos Resort. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY RICHARD J. BATTAGLIA, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 04, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001952. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKSB, 715 Ramming Way, #A, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Sensational Kids of Santa Barbara, Inc., (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY KATHERINE E. TROLL, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER/ PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001997. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA ALLIANCE FOR COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION, 624 W Carrillo St, Santa Barbara CA 93101, Uffizi Order, (same address), SB ACT, Alliance for Community Transformation, ACT. This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY RANDY GOETZ, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara

44

|

County on August 31, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002164. Published: September 8, 15, 22, 29, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OOTYS SCOOTERS, 629 E Haley St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Ryan Neely, 279 Mountain DR, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY RYAN NEELY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 16, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0002038. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUNTAIN VIEW LANDSCAPING, 4844 Winding Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Mountin View Landscape Construction LLC (same address); SB Paver Pros. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY TYLER VALENZUELA, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002007. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIVINA BOUTIQUE, 1120 North G St, Lompoc, CA 93436; Maritza I Nava Lopez (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MARITZA NAVA LOPEZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001906. Published: August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022.

NAME CHANGE PETITION OF Annisa R. Mayer, 184 Middle Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, annisamayer@yahoo. com for change of name. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RAIF NIKOLAJ SNYDER,VALDEMAR LUKE SNYDER AND ELERI AVA SNYDER, TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02850 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RAIF NIKOLAJ SNYDER TO: RAIF NIKOLAJ MAYER FROM: VALDEMAR LUKE SNYDER TO: VALDEMAR LUKE MAYER FROM: ELERI AVA SNYDER TO: ELERI JOSEPHINE MAYER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING 10/3/2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 8, 2022

Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Divison. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated August 10, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE AMENDED APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: HYON SOOK CHOUGH, 3090 HIDDEN VALLEY LN, MONTECITO, CA 93108. CASE NUMBER: 22CV01952 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: HYON SOOK CHOUGH TO: HYON CHOUGH SINGER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 10, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 22, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: EVELYN SALM, 559 MOUNTAIN DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. CASE NUMBER: 22CV03133. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: EVELYN SALM TO: CODY CAMMBELL. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 17, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 26, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: AUTUMN LEIGH CHRISTMAN,

654 Mayrum Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. CASE NUMBER: 22CV02777 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: AUTUMN LEIGH CHRISTMAN TO: AUTUMN LEIGH WEBB. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 17, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: LINDSEY PAIGE SCHICK‑FULLER, 1153 CHURCH LANE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03136 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: LINDSEY PAIGE SCHICK‑FULLER TO: LINDSEY PAIGE FLOWERS. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 26, 2022, 10:00 AM, SB3. SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 26, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: JEAN MARIE KUJAN, 131 PALM TREE LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03072. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: JEAN MARIE KUJAN TO: JEAN MARIE ZEIBAK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 23, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CATERINA SANFILIPPO LEE, 804 MORENO ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 AND CHI HOON LEE, CASE NUMBER: 22CV02998. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SOPHIA SAGE LEE TO: SOPHIE SAGE LEE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 23, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 AMENDED A P P L I C AT I O N OF IMARI DEMETRIUS RUTHERFORD, 721 CLIFF DR., SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02347 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: IMARI DEMETRIUS RUTHERFORD TO: CALCULUS LUCIFER GOLIATH YALE TESSY. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING 9/26/22, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper

of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated August 15, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. PETITION OF ZANETA SEILEROVA 111 OCEANO AVE., APT E, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93109 Z A N E TA 1 1 1 @ H O T M A I L . C O M FOR CHANGE OF NAME. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF Zaneta Seilerova and Damian Samuel Seiler CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02729 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: ZANETA SEILEROVA TO: ZANETA SEILEROVA GOERKE FROM: DAMIAN SAMUEL SEILER TO: DAMIAN SAMUEL SEILER GOERKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING 9/26/2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Divison. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. SIGNED and Dated August 3, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. September 29, 2022 at 3:30 PM Cynthia Bollinger furniture, art, piano, household goods, boxes Jahseh Ahlem Business equipment Darin Myers Tools, clothes The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CAMILLA MELDAHL AKA CAMILLA MEHDAHL, an individual; ED ST. GEORGE, an individual; JAMES GELB, an individual; JAMES M. GELB, as Trustee of the 2010 James M. Gelb Revocable Trust, MARIO MELENDEZ, an individual;

MELENDEZ CONSTRUCTION, an Unknown business entity; MATTHEW CROTTY, an individual; FRANCES CROTTY, an individual; BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION, as Trustee under that certain Pooling and Service Agreement dated as of October 1, 1992 for RTC Commercial Pass‑Through Certificates, Series 1992 CHF; ROBERT L. LOVGREN, an individual; DOREEN J. LOVGREN, an individual, 6651 L.P., a California limited partnership; HARVEY H. WIPF, an individual; HARVEY H. WIPF, as Trustee of the Wipf Family Trust; BERNICE A. WIPF, an individual; BERNICE A. WIPF, as Trustee for the Wipf Family Trust; ERNEST G. GULSRUD, an individual; ERNEST G. GULSRUD as Trustee of the Gulsrud Family Trust; MURIEL GENEVIEVE GULSRUD, an individual; MURIEL G. GULSRUD, as Trustee for the Gulsrud Family Trust; CURTIS R. JAHNKE, an Individual; and DOES 1 through 100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING BY PLAINTIFF: (LO DEMANDANDO DEMANDANTE):

SUED ESTA EL

MARSHALL R. BERNES, an individual; MARSHALL R. BERNES, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust; JUDITH DANNETT, an individual; AND, ELINOR FISHER, an individual NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): Santa Barbara Superior Court, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Stephen Jamieson, SOLOMON SALTSMAN & JAMIESON; 426 Culver Blvd.; Playa Del Rey, CA 90293 Ph: (310) 822‑9848

your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia.

DATE: (Fecha) 1/13/2020 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/ Sarah Sisto, Deputy (Adjunto) SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV01717 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): FUNYAS MASIH; NSP TRANSPORTATION INC. (a business entity, form unknown); TORI ANNE THORNBURGH; and DOES 1 AND 25, inclusive YOU ARE BEING BY PLAINTIFF: (LO DEMANDANDO DEMANDANTE):

|

SUED ESTA EL

JOYCE DONALDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp),

Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); South County Court Division,Santa Barbara Superior Court‑Civil, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es):

Warren B. Treisman, Esq., 7183 Navajo Road, Suite I, San Diego, CA 92119; (619) 583‑1900

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF PROPOSED FINAL MND AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom September 20, 2022 at 5:30 P.M.

DATE: (FECHA) 5/4/2022 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/Johnny Aviles, Deputy (Adjunto)

SAN JOSE CREEK MULTIPURPOSE PATH PROJECT

ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION ATTORNEY OR PARTY WITHOUT ATTORNEY (NAME AND ADDRESS): Warren B. Treisman 7183 Navajo Road. Suite i San Diego, CA 92119 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Plaintiff: Joyce Donaldson Defendant: Funyas Masih, et al. Moving Party Plaintiff, Joyce Donaldson filed their application for an order for publication on July 15, 2002. From the application and supporting evidence it appears to the satisfaction of the Court that an order for service by publication is permitted pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure section 415.50. IT IS ORDERED that service of the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) in this action shall be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Tori Anne Thornburgh by publication thereof in Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation published at Santa Barbara County, California, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that, if the address of the party to be served is ascertained before the expiration of the time prescribed for publication of the summons, the moving party shall forthwith mail to the party to be served a copy of (1) the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) identified above, (2) the complaint, petition, or motion for which notice is being served by this order, and (3) this order for publication. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. Dated: 7/15/2022 Judge of the Superior Court Thomas P. Anderle

ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed Final Mitigated Negative Declaration (Final MND), SCH #2022070006, for the San Jose Creek Multipurpose Path project (described below) has been prepared and that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing to consider approving the Final MND and a Development Plan (Case 20220007-DP) for the project. The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www. cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME:

September 20, 2022 at 5:30 P.M.

LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PROJECT LOCATION: Along San Jose Creek, from Calle Real to Atascadero Bike Path and along State Route 217 (SR 217) shoulder; Public Right of Way including 071-035-CA, and multiple APN’s: 071-090-048, 071-090-047, 071-090-074, 071-090-083, 071-010-010, 071-090-082, 069-160-013, 071-200-011, and 071-140-055 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The proposed San Jose Creek Multipurpose Path consists of two segments. Northern Segment: This portion of the project extends from Calle Real under U.S. 101 and Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) to Armitos Avenue. Here, the Path would join the Class I facility near Armitos Park (to be constructed in 2023) which connects to the existing Class I path at Jonny D. Wallis Park. The northern segment would be a paved path approximately 2,400 feet in length ranging from 8-10 feet wide with shoulders ranging from 0-2 feet wide. Retaining walls will be located along sections of the path and range from 4-12 feet in height. The Northern Segment would be on the west side of San Jose Creek, within the floodplain but outside the active channel. It is anticipated that about 680 feet of the proposed path would be constructed within the existing San Jose Creek bank. This situation would occur where the proposed project crosses under the UPRR, US 101 and Calle Real bridges. Southern Segment: This portion of the project would be approximately 1 mile in length, ranging from 8-10 feet wide, with shoulders from 0-2 feet wide. A 2-foot wide, 3.5-foot-high standard concrete barrier with a bicycle/ pedestrian rail would separate the multipurpose path from SR 217. The multipurpose path would raise in elevation at the proposed 12-foot-wide bicycle/pedestrian bridge that would span over San Jose Creek and then transition to the SR 217 shoulder. The path will remain at grade with SR 217 for approximately 3,200 feet, at which point it will drop below the SR 217 grade for 1,066 feet as it approaches the proposed 14 ft. wide by 8 ft. high box culvert crossing under SR217. Approximately 1,500 feet of the southernmost portion of this segment is outside of City limits and located within Santa Barbara County jurisdiction. The project site’s land use designation according to the City’s General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan varies along the proposed route as follows: Northern Segment: Medium Density Residential, High Density Residential, Community Commercial, General Industrial, Planned Residential, and Open Space/Active Recreation; Southern Segment: Old Town (commercial), General Commercial, Business Park, Old Town, Service/Industrial, General Industrial, Mobile Home Park, Open Space, and Public/Quasi-Public. Surrounding zoning of the entire project site includes Design Residential DR-10 to DR-35, Light Industrial (M-1), Highway Commercial (CH), Professional Institutional (PI), Business Park (BP), General Commercial (CG), Old Town (OT), Service Industrial (IS) and General Industrial (IG). The request is to approve the Final MND, adopt the Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program (MMRP) pursuant to 14 California Code of Regulations §§ 15074, and approve a Development Plan for the project. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: The proposed project Final MND has been prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code, §§ 21000 et seq.), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 California Code of Regulations, §§ 15000 et seq.), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency for this project. The Final MND identifies and discusses potential impacts, mitigation measures, monitoring requirements, and residual impacts for identified subject areas. No significant and unavoidable impacts are identified as resulting from the project. Potentially significant but mitigable effects on the environment are anticipated in the following areas: Aesthetics, Biological Resources, Geology and Soils, Hazards and Hazardous Materials, Hydrology and Water Quality, Noise, Wildfire and mandatory findings of significance. The site is not listed on any hazardous waste facilities or disposal sites as enumerated under Section 65962.5 of the California Government Code (the “Cortese list”). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the City Council hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Ms. Teresa Lopes, Senior Project Engineer (Tlopes@cityofgoleta.org; 805-961-7563) or Laura Bridley, Contract Planner (Lbridley@cityofgoleta. org; 805-896-2153). For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@ cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. The proposed project Final MND is now posted on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, September 8, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 8,8, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

45 45