Santa Barbara Independent 9/1/22

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Santa Barbara

SEPT. 1-8, 2022 VOL. 36 · NO. 868

PLUS: A Fond Farewell to Richard Parker Getting ‘Local’ in Montecito Racing Over the Rockies S.B. Studio Artists’ Tour New Police Chief Announced

The Kids Are Alright.

Are the Parents? Navigating Childcare in Santa Barbara by Zoë Schiffer Photos by Ingrid Bostrom


AGAINST ABUSE

IN SUPPORT OF C.A.R.E.4Paws’ Safe Haven Program Dog Wa

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Fun Activities

Sunday, September 18 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

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Elings Park • 1298 Las Positas Road, Santa Barbara Join C.A.R.E.4Paws, Domestic Violence Solutions and Elings Park —with or without your dog—as we raise funds and awareness for Safe Haven, a program that supports domestic violence survivors and their companion pets. Learn how this critical program prevents suffering and saves lives, and ways to get involved—including by fostering a pet in need! Advance tickets (adults: $25 / kids 12 and under: $10) and sponsorships available!

#DVAM: October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month! Help us break the silence: dvsolutions.org

SIGN UP & MORE INFO: CARE4PAWS.ORG/WALK-AGAINST-ABUSE

THANK YOU, SPONSORS!

Spooky Mulder and Poppy Tartlett • Lyn Proctor • Thomas & Lora Fisher • Dan & Darcy Keep 2

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SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

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2022 - 2023 Opening Week! Charley Crockett

Sun, Oct 2 / 7 PM / Arlington Theatre “Crockett is an old-school country music superstar in waiting.” Independent (U.K.)

From Ukraine

DakhaBrakha

Thu, Oct 6 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre “The group mixes everything from punk-pop to traditional Ukrainian songs in cool yet beguiling textures... utter brilliance.” NPR Presented in association with Direct Relief, UCSB Dept of Music and UCSB MultiCultural Center

SW!NG OUT

A Joyce Theater Production Directed by Caleb Teicher Sat, Oct 8 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre

“A sweeping ride through contemporary swing dance... Captivating... Extraordinary.” The New York Times

David Gergen

Sacre by Circa

Hearts Touched with Fire: How Great Leaders are Made

Wed, Oct 12 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Tue, Oct 11 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

“Rock stars of the circus world.” The List (U.K.)

“David Gergen knows power, and he understands leadership… An invaluable guide to making things – good things – happen.” – Jon Meacham

Pulsating with tension and infused with dark humor, this distinctive production brings Stravinsky’s seminal Rite of Spring to the circus stage.

Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune

There’s still time to subscribe and save up to 25% www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org | Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

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health baby Know what to expect

welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

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Sign up for our interactive, mobile messages to guide you through weeks 20-40 of your pregnancy and then to your baby’s first birthday.

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Education messages, specific to your due date or baby’s birthday, are delivered by email or text help you:

Baby Boys

• Know what to expect when you deliver and what’s normal for your baby

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Rony Valdez II, 7/17/2022 Traxson Straub, 7/23/2022

• Receive evidence-based health information directly from your care providers

Los Olivos Nolan Francis Merlo, 7/4/2022 Santa Barbara Jacob Ruiz, 6/10/2022

• Stay connected to your hospital throughout your pregnancy and during your baby’s first year

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It’s easy to sign up! Visit:

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TABLE of CONTENTS

Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Rodrigo Hernandez, Koss Klobucher, Melea Maglalang, Emma Spencer, Finnegan Wright Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

19

Name: Zoë Schiffer Title: Contributor

The Kids Are Alright. Are the Parents? Navigating Childcare in Santa Barbara by Zoë Schiffer

2ND FEATURE

A Fond Farewell to Richard Parker

COURTESY

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

SPEAKING UP FOR PARENTS

volume 36, # 868, Sept. 1-8, 2022

24

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 32

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 ON THE COVER: Luke, Rachel, Jack (top row), Reis, and Edith (bottom row) DePass. Photo by Ingrid Bostrom. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

You’re originally from Santa Barbara but recently lived in the Bay Area. What brought you back? I moved back in December to have a baby. Originally, my plan was to return to Oakland in May, when my maternity leave ended. Right after my daughter was born, I just thought, “There’s no way.” I need my mom! How did you identify the families to profile for this week’s cover story? My goal was just to find people from different backgrounds who had different options available to them in terms of childcare. I interviewed a bunch of families and picked five who I felt like had unique but relatable perspectives. What did you and your husband wind up doing for childcare? We ended up finding a family friend, Jill, to watch the baby about 20 hours a week. She’s incredible — every single day, I wake up and think, “Our household would grind to a halt if Jill left us.” My husband and I both work full-time, so we juggle the other hours between a nanny share, family, and trading off with whoever isn’t in a meeting.

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

PARALLEL STORIES

Textured Poetry: Multi-layered, Multi-lingual Explorations with Patricio Ferrari and Forrest Gander

SUNDAY | SEPTEMBER 11 | 2:30 PM Too often we hear that something is lost in translation, but who talks about what can be gained in the process, especially in relation to poetry? Join polyglot poet, translator, and literary editor Patricio Ferrari and Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, translator, and novelist Forrest Gander in a conversation about poetry and the art of translation. Drawing from their own work, they will share examples— between languages—from Portuguese (Pessoa), French (Pizarnik), Spanish (Bracho), and Kannada (Kumudendu) as well as from their own works of textured poetry. Book signing to follow.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net

Location: Mary Craig Auditorium, Santa Barbara Museum of Art, 1130 State Street

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/$10 NON-MEMBERS Purchase tickets online at tickets.sbma.net. INDEPENDENT.COM

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PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until September 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


AUG. 25-SEPT. 1, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

Modoc Trees Granted Temporary Reprieve I N G R I D B OSTROM

TRANSPORTATION

COURTS & CRIME A child was knocked down by a vehicle near 65 Nectarine Street in Goleta at around 2:49 p.m. on Tuesday, the Sheriff ’s Office reported. The child had traumatic injuries and was rushed to the hospital, where he died. The address is a few houses down from the small park on Nectarine. The collision is under investigation. Sheriff’s detectives are investigating a reported robbery and kidnapping that occurred August 23 in the 4900 block of Carpinteria Avenue. Two suspects with weapons reportedly approached a victim outside of a business and forced them into their vehicle. They then drove the victim to a bank and made them withdraw cash before fleeing. Sheriff’s officials said releasing additional details would compromise their investigation, which remains ongoing.

T

he showdown pitting a new bike lane against existing trees along Modoc Road shows no sign of abating, as about 40 people protesting the number of trees that would be felled to make way for the project showed up this past Saturday carrying signs and making a joyful noise. In response, county planners and public works officials have agreed to delay the date for certifying the project’s environmental analysis by about two months. What was initially planned for September 13 in front of the board of supervisors will now take place in November.

In that time, County Supervisor Gregg Hart — in whose district the proposed bike lane would run — is hoping the opposing sides can find some middle ground between what Hart described as their mutually exclusive all-or-nothing approaches. “I’m hoping people can talk, schmooze, and give peace a chance,” he said. Already, county officials have reduced the maximum number of trees that could conceivably be removed from 63 to 49. Of particular concern is the stretch of stately canary palms that line the eastern

side of Modoc. It all depends on how much of an easement the bike lane is allowed into a 25-acre preserve that runs alongside the road. That land belongs to the Land Trust, which thus far has expressed serious environmental reservations about allowing the bike path to encroach on the property. Without that easement, Chris Sneddon of the Public Works Department said as many as 29 canary palms could be at risk. With an easement, he said, the number could be as low as zero. —Nick Welsh

CITY

elly Ann Gordon is the City of Santa Barbara’s new police chief, the council announced Tuesday. She officially assumes the position September 19. “I look forward to serving the Santa Barbara community and being a part of this amazing team of policing professionals,” Gordon said in brief remarks to the council. “My first priority is to get to know my people in the police department and our community — both residents and businesses. Together, we will work hard to continue to strengthen our collaborative relationships, achieve common goals, and remain dedicated to keeping our community safe.” Gordon has 26 years of policing under her belt, the city said in a statement, most recently as chief of the Monterey Park Police

Department in the San Gabriel Valley, where she oversaw a staff of approximately 150, including 78 sworn officers, and a $23 million budget. There, the city said, Gordon implemented a co-response Neighborhood Engagement Team that focused on addressing individuals with mental health needs and those experiencing homelessness. In her statement to the council, Gordon also said she looked forward to working with Santa Barbara’s Police and Fire Commission “as we move forward with expanded oversight and transparency, which I think is very important.” Gordon began her law enforcement career with the Los Angeles Police Department in 1996. She left L.A. in 2000 for the Montebello Police Department, where she

HEALTH The CDC updated its recommendations on limiting the spread of COVID-19 in K-12 classrooms by loosening many restrictions and leaving most decision-making to local governments or individuals. In the Santa Barbara Unified School District, masks are recommended but not mandatory, and students will no longer need to quarantine if they have been exposed to the virus. Instead, the CDC advises anyone exposed to wear a mask for at least 10 days and get tested.

PEOPLE

RYA N P. C RUZ

City Announces New Police Chief K

The Santa Barbara County District Attorney’s Office has dropped all charges against UC Santa Barbara student Justin Asinobi, who was arrested in February for allegedly planting hidden recording devices in other people’s homes. Prosecutor Megan Chanda told the Daily Nexus that because evidence suggests Asinobi may have committed additional crimes he could be charged for, the prosecution “opted not to prosecute him to avoid jeopardizing a larger case should they pursue one.”

S.B. Police Chief Kelly Ann Gordon

worked her way up the ranks to lieutenant. In January 2017, she was hired by Monterey as a captain. Gordon has also worked with FEMA’s Urban Search and Rescue Team for more than 20 years, and as a Canine Disaster Search Specialist, her deployments included the World Trade Center after 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Ike, and Hurricane Rita.

—Indy Staff

Judge Tim Staffel, who for the past 24 years banged the gavel in Santa Maria’s department number three, stepped down from the bench this week after a judicial career that spanned everything from small-claims cases to death penalty trials. Staffel was appointed to the bench in 1998 by then Governor Pete Wilson after having served two terms representing Lompoc at the Board of Supervisors. Staffel, a conservativeleaning Republican, often contended that Lompoc and the North County in general got the short end of the stick from the then-liberal majority dominated by the South Coast. For a brief stretch of time, he helped tip the supervisors’ balance of power in favor of the north county, teaming up with fellow conservatives Mike Stoker and Willy Chamberlin. Ernie Zampese, the onetime Santa Barbara High School football star who later helped revolutionize the passing game of professional football, died this past week at the age of 86. CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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on the carpet for favoritism” over a difference of only “a couple thousand bucks.” “That’s tough for me to hear,” he said. “That’s not cool.” Parity, he said, did not mean identical; it meant close. Supervisor Gregg Hart argued that elected department heads do not face the same market pressures as appointed department heads; people run for elected office for reasons of public service, not just financial reward. People don’t step down as DA to take a better-paying job for another jurisdiction. “That just doesn’t happen,” he insisted. Supervisor Das Williams added that he couldn’t just pack his bags and run for supervisor in Los Angeles County. But appointed department heads, he said, can. He acknowledged struggling to approve the 5 percent raise for appointed department heads when most county employees got 2.5 percent. That meant giving people who make three to four times more than the people working under them raises three to four times bigger. But he did so, Williams said, in order to attract and retain qualified departmental leadership. Ultimately, Dudley was given a 3.5 percent pay increase to bring her at the same level as Macuga and Van Mullen. But the rest of her peers among the elected department heads saw no additional bump beyond the 2.5 percent. The dust-up was perhaps predictable. Never before in county history has the district attorney made less than the Public Defender. And the bad blood between Macuga and Dudley is an open secret on the fourth floor of the county administration building. Macuga has pushed hard for criminal justice reforms since taking the post six years ago, especially so in the wake of the George Floyd murder two years ago. Dudley has balked at some of the reforms, insisting that public safety considerations are paramount. Dudley — a former Head Start instructor who emerged politically as a champion for women and children subjected to sexual and physical abuse — was not accustomed to being pushed by county supervisors on both sides of the aisle to do more than she deemed prudent. Dudley has bristled at the experience. With the 3.5 percent increase, the District Attorney will now make $257,406 annually. The Public Defender will make $259,076, and the County Counsel will make $257,406.

n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D EDUCATION

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County Sues UCSB over Housing Shortfall PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

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C

iting UCSB’s chronic failures to address the acute housing needs generated by the campus’s growing student population, the Santa Barbara County supervisors voted 5-0 in closed session Tuesday to sue the university. Technically, the lawsuit alleges the campus violated the terms of UCSB Chancellor Henry Yang a 2010 agreement known as the Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) if members and 1,400 staff. To date, the camand when its student enrollment exceeded pus has built 1,500 new units of housing. 25,000. County housing planners contend That’s 3,500 short of the agreement. In the that number has been exceeded and that past, the campus has argued that it hasn’t really exceeded the 25,000 mark, pointing out there are always 10 percent fewer students in the spring than when they enroll in the fall. In addition, they have until 2025 to build the housing. In the past few years, Chancellor Henry Yang has highlighted the massive dormitory promised by billionaire investor Charlie Munger, known alternately as Munger Hall or “Dormzilla.” As initially designed, the dorm would stand 11 stories efforts to get UCSB officials to explain how off the ground and house approximately and where they intend to build the requi- 4,500 students. This proposal has become a flashpoint of considerable controversy, site housing have gone for naught. “Despite numerous attempts by the especially by those concerned by a lack County to secure a reliable timeline as to of bedroom windows and the emergency when UCSB will build the required hous- evacuation logistics posed by so many ing, there is no timeline or commitment students. by UCSB for when the requirement will UCSB spokesperson Kiki Reyes conbe addressed,” stated County Supervi- tended the university has been involved sor Gregg Hart, in whose district UCSB in good-faith discussions with the county is located. “Litigation was the only path over student housing since experiencing remaining to compel UCSB to act upon “significant and unanticipated undergradtheir obligation.” This is the second of such uate enrollment increases several years ago lawsuits filed against UCSB because of the at the behest of the State of California.” housing issue. Two years ago, the City of “The University and the County have Goleta sued on identical grounds. a shared goal of providing more on-camThe LRDP was an attempt to negoti- pus housing for our students,” Reyes conate an orderly path by which UCSB could tinued. “We look forward to continuing gradually increase enrollments from our discussions with the County and are 20,000 students to 25,000. Beyond the hopeful that any lawsuit does not result in additional 5,000 students, the agreement needless and expensive litigation, instead allows the campus to expand by 336 faculty of ongoing collaboration.” —Nick Welsh

Litigation was the only path remaining to compel UCSB to act upon their obligation. —Supervisor Gregg Hart

Riccardo Muti

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NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 7 Although small in stature, Zampese scored 34 touchdowns for the Dons in 1953 and would later be described by the Los Angeles Times as “a work of art” while playing as a running back for USC. Troy Aikman, quarterback of the Cowboys when they won the Super Bowl in 1995 with Zampese as assistant coach, praised him in an Instagram post Monday, calling him “one of the brightest offensive minds in the history of the game … many of his offensive concepts are still being used to this day.”

BUSINESS The ongoing quest to bring a restaurant back to Goleta Beach is now the subject of a lawsuit that claims the current developers broke their

SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 2023, 7:30PM

CAMA in conjunction with the Lobero Theater Foundation present contract with a former partner, stole her ideas, and committed fraud along the way. Alicia Whitney, who founded the Sea Legs restaurant group in Huntington Beach, is suing her former, longtime employee Omar Khashen and his business partner Joe “Diggs” Dies for breaches of contract and fiduciary duty, misappropriation of trade secrets, and fraud. Khashen and Dies have been remodeling the former Beachside Café into a new establishment since winning the bid nearly one year ago. The lawsuit is reportedly unconnected to the recent construction delays. “We want the public to understand that this matter is not related to our delayed opening timeline, which was brought on by construction setbacks, and we are moving forward with the project in full,” said Khashen in his statement. n

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AUG. 25-SEPT. 1, 2022

ENERGY

Second Crack at Oil and Gas Well Buffer PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

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anta Barbara’s State Senator Monique Limón is taking another swing at regulating the distance between oil and gas wells and schools, homes, hospitals, and other community centers. A 3,200-foot distance was proposed by Governor Gavin Newsom in his June climate proposals, indicating he would sign the bill if it passed the Legislature, said Limón and her co-sponsor, Senator Lena Gonzalez (D– Long Beach). Limón had written a similar bill in 2021 proposing a 2,500-foot setback, as well as a ban on new fracking, cyclic steaming, and well acidizing. It failed in committee by two Democratic votes—those two, Ben Hueso of San Diego and Bob Hertzberg of Van Nuys, are now being pressured by ads to

support the bill, according to Politico. This time around, Limón has the governor’s backing for Senate Bill 1137, which would prohibit state agencies from allowing well drilling or changes to oil and gas production in the 3,200-foot zone. The pollution coming from the 125,000 oil and gas wells in the state affect 2.7 million people, 90 percent of whom are people of color. “This policy will not only protect Californians,” Limón said, “but it will rectify long-standing injustices for the communities that have borne the brunt of our dependency on fossil fuels.” While the bill gained immediate support from environmental organizations, it also met immediate opposition from the California Chamber of Commerce. The chamber argued the bill would kill jobs in the oil and gas industry, which employed 3,000 people across 15,000 active and inactive wells within 3,200 feet of homes. The Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), however, expressed itself to be pleased with the end-of-term “frantic sausage-making” that produced Newsom’s 3,200-foot proposal. The NRDC blogged that SB 1137 included reworking existing wells, which make up the majority of the oil and gas work in California, and would protect residents currently affected by oil infrastructure. —Jean Yamamura

COURTS & CRIME

County Sees High Murder Rate in 2021

T

he annual statewide reports on crime — including homicide, use of force, and juvenile justice statistics—were released earlier this week by the California Department of Justice, revealing details on Santa Barbara County’s crime rate in the midst of larger trends across the state. “Good data is a cornerstone of good public policy,” said California Attorney General Rob Bonta in a statement released Thursday. “While crime rates remain significantly below their historical highs, property and violent crimes continue to have devastating consequences for communities across the state.” Here in Santa Barbara, the number of homicides jumped from eight in 2020 to 18 murders last year, matching its highest total since 2015. Over the past 10 years, Santa Barbara has fluctuated between six and 18 murders for an average of 12.1 homicides per year. In 2021, the county’s homicide rate per 100,000 people was reported at 1.4. In comparison, Ventura County reported 20 homicides last year, and Los Angeles County reported the highest total in the state at 600. The deadliest county per capita was Kern County, where 124 total murders brought the homicide rate to 13.7 for every 100,000 people, the highest rate of any county since 2015. 10

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Statewide, the murder rate has risen by 7.2 percent, but the 2,361 murders reported in 2021 is still “significantly below California’s historical high” of 4,095 homicides in 1993, Bonta said. In addition to the homicide report, the state released a report on use of force across California. In 2021, there were 628 incidents that involved the use of force across the state. Of the 660 civilians involved in these incidents, more than half of the individuals (50.6 percent) were Hispanic. For Santa Barbara County, there were a total of seven incidents involving 12 officers and eight civilians. In those seven incidents, four ended in injury and the other three resulted in a civilian death. Four of the incidents were in response to calls for service, two were reported as “crimes in progress,” and one was the result of a traffic stop. Law enforcement agencies use these reports to better implement new policies and respond to growing trends specific to each community. The annual reports are typically released in July, but the release was pushed back this year due to a recent overhaul of the state’s electronic reporting to a new system known as the California Incident-Based Reporting System (CIBRS). To view the complete reports, visit oag.ca.gov/ crime. —Ryan P. Cruz


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CITY

Library Expands Operating Hours During Construction

S

taff at the Santa Barbara Public Library’s downtown location continue to adapt to a three-phase construction project that has forced several adjustments to browsing and pickup hours while the building’s main level undergoes major excavation for a new ADA-compliant elevator. Starting Tuesday, after several weeks of limited pickup windows, a portion of the main level will reopen with expanded browsing hours of 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily and 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. on Thursdays. “Most libraries would have just closed, or moved everything off-site,” said Library Services Manager Molly Wetta, who has worked in Santa Barbara for the past six years. Wetta remembers helping her previous library through a restoration project in Lawrence, Kansas, where it was forced to completely shut its doors and move its collections to a recently vacated Borders location nearby. Santa Barbara has been able to retain most of its services and all of the staff, Wetta continued, and has adjusted by offering more programs at the Eastside location, which Wetta said has become the

FD383

“hidden gem” after its own renovation in 2020. In the Central location, temporary walls currently block off much of the main level, and electrical cables line the space. Staff members are tucked away in makeshift desk areas, and books are stashed in boxes. Despite the construction crews humming about, staff is still running business as usual with pickup and hold requests continuing to pour in. “We’re pulling holds as fast as they come in,” Wetta said. The limited browsing sections include fiction, young adult, nonfiction, and graphic novels, but Wetta said the library will be opening more sections as construction continues. It’s still too early to offer a solid timeline for the work, Wetta said, but barring any extra supply chain issues, construction could be finished next summer. The lowerlevel staff area will likely be finished first, and the ADA-compliant elevator will be the last part of the three-phase project to be finished. For updates on construction and hours, visit library.santabarbaraca.gov. —Ryan P. Cruz

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WEATHER

County Issues Heat Warning COU RTESY

H

ot days and nights settled into Santa Barbara County on Wednesday morning and will last through next Monday night, according to the National Weather Service. The heat will bring the dangers of heat exhaustion to residents, but also to hikers on the mountain trails. The steep and rocky paths that crisscross the Santa Ynez Range have been known to bring down athletes and novice hikers alike from dehydration and heat stroke. This past May, 17-year-old Jake Parks went for a hike near Jesusita Trail with his friends, and despite having lots of water with them, he died in the hospital with his temperature registering as high as 106 degrees, said his mother, Jenni Parks. She has been working to get the word out ever since: “It was an 80, 85 degree day down here in town, just like we’re going to get this weekend,” she said. “My hope is to educate everyone. Jake was the most amazing kid, but he and his friends had no idea what the signs or the symptoms were.” Heat exhaustion can develop into lifethreatening heat stroke: “When people are exerting themselves in the heat and start to feel sick, they need to get in the shade and douse themselves with the water they’re carrying to cool down,” said Dr. Robin Malone, an emergency doctor at Cottage Health. “And you want to drink water and electrolytes before you become thirsty, because thirst means you’re becoming dehydrated.” The best time to go hiking is during the

TRAIL TRAGEDY: This past May, 17-year-old Jake Parks died from heat illness after hiking near Jesusita Trail.

cooler parts of the day — early in the morning or in the evening, said Kevin Hess with the Search and Rescue team: “It’s a lot hotter in the mountains than it is at the beach, so be prepared.” Temperatures in the Santa Ynez Valley are forecast to reach up to 100 degrees during the Labor Day weekend, and into the eighties and nineties on the Santa Barbara side of the mountains. Nighttime temps are around 60 degrees and up. Cooling centers at the Carpinteria, Goleta, and Buellton libraries will open, and also at the Buellton Senior Center, if staff is available. More detailed information is at readysbc.org. —Jean Yamamura

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Hoist with His Own Pintard

IF YOU BUILD IT: We live in the age now of “zombie glaciers.” “Heat domes” have now

replaced “heat waves.” Thank God for baseball. It’s a sport that miraculously jacks you up and calms you down all at the same time. More to the point, thank god for the Santa Barbara Foresters and their manager Bill Pintard. Over the past 27 years, Pintard and the Foresters have won with such relentless regularity that the thesaurus ran out of superlatives when describing how good they are. This season, the Foresters won the National Baseball Congress World Series, held every year in Wichita, Kansas. Out of the 12 times the Foresters made it to the series, they’ve won 10. No other team in the league comes close. Having swept the last three, Pintard and the Foresters can now lay claim to the most holy of sports accolades, the sacrosanct three-peat. The Foresters have become a bona fide sports dynasty. What sets them apart is they’re a dynasty that’s fun. They play with a disciplined abandon, in which calculated — and sometimes even stupid — risktaking is encouraged. There’s a kamikaze joy in how the Foresters run the bases, coming at opponents from all directions. They steal all the time. It’s not as much about being fast as it is about studying the tendencies of the other side and pushing things. It’s about forcing errors, jumping when you know an off-speed

pitch is on the way, stretching singles into doubles, and running out drag bunts. Pintard, a classic Catholic school survivor, was forced the hard way to learn the difference between sins of omission and commission. So, too, have his players, but without all the downer theological overtones. They’re encouraged to take wild-ass chances. Better that than play it safe. “You don’t fear failure,” Pintard said, “because you’re absolutely going to fail in this game. You learn to deal with it and move on.” It’s also about knowing when to take “dumb” chances. You do it early in the game. Early in the season. Guys who find themselves getting tossed out in June, Pintard says, have a way of making it safely on base by the time July rolls around. Shrewd, smart, and funny, Pintard knows how to build chemistry. He talks to players; he learns their dogs’ names. He’s a storyteller; he’s a teacher. And he has a keen eye for baseball talent. Over the years, 65 of his players got drafted into the big leagues. The New York Yankees pay Pintard to scout local talent. The Angels wanted to hire him as an advance scout, which would have put him on the road eight months out of the year. What sets Pintard apart is enthusiasm. His is not merely the infectious kind; it’s more like a pandemic. “I don’t have to create it,” Pintard says with a shrug. “It’s how I was born.” That’s a good thing. Pintard has to hustle to keep the team financially afloat (it’s a sixfigure-a-year operation), find host families

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for players (during the pandemic, that was far from easy), and keep the mound and the plate up to snuff. On occasion, Pintard has found himself having to clean up the Pershing Park bathrooms after a game. “Ten championships and a three-peat,” Pintard said, “and I get to clean up the bathroom.” The success of the Foresters turns the age-old koan — “If you build it, will they come?” — on its head. (That was stolen, by the way, from Field of Dreams, one of Kevin Costner’s two great baseball movies.) The Foresters, it turns out, are already here; now they need a better place to play. It’s the equivalent of having the New York Philharmonic Orchestra here in town, but we make them play in a church basement. I like Pershing Park as much as the next guy, but the Foresters have to share the field with City College baseball players, flag-football players, soccer players, and City League softball players. Throw in the squirrels and gophers and all their holes, and it’s a full-employment act for orthopedic surgeons. After the sun goes down and the lights go on, admittedly, there’s no place more magical than Pershing Park, sandwiched snugly between the mountains and the sea. Under the klieg lights, you can see every molecule of rosin squeezed out of the pitcher’s bag; the light is so sweepingly cinematic that Sergio Leone would weep. But before the sun goes down, it’s a whole other story. Sightlines are obliterated by a slicing solar glare

that renders about a third of the play all but invisible. And the best you can say about the field’s seating capacity is not much, because there’s not much of it. The San Luis Obispo Blues — the Foresters’ rival — typically draw 500 to 1,000 fans. If the Foresters get 200 at a game, that’s a lot. Why the difference? Because the Blues have a place where that many fans can come. Once upon a time — for about 30 years — Santa Barbara boasted a minor league baseball park over on Laguna Street. That field was done in by neglect, age, and the elements, but mostly by the advent of televised sports. That’s not coming back. But maybe Pershing could be reconfigured with a horseshoe structure of stands to allow more seating. “Don’t say ‘stadium,’ ” Pintard cautions with a laugh. “It’s a ballpark.” With Santa Barbara’s movers and shakers now intent on saving downtown by injecting more “experiential” elements into it, I’d say the Foresters easily qualify as a great experience. It would anchor that part of the waterfront as a great place to go. And when the Foresters are not using the field, there’s no shortage of other teams that could. It was great that Mayor Randy Rowse saw fit to honor the Foresters and Pintard this Tuesday. But in addition to a proclamation, City Hall should think seriously about Pintard’s dream of fixing up Pershing Park. Just remember his mantra: “It’s a ballpark, not a —Nick Welsh stadium.”

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for info and to register go to awcsb.org 12

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SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

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OPINIONS CONT’D

JOHN DARKOW, COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN

Letters

How to Lower Rents

W

hy do rents keep increasing while buying a home is out of reach for working folks? Investors, often large investment companies, have purchased millions of homes and are renting them out for a profit and to pay off the mortgages. A couple of changes could lower rents and the cost of homes at the same time. Eliminate tax deductions for interest on mortgages for homes held by investors unless they live in them! Impose a windfall profits tax on those same properties, both on the profits and the value when —Rowland Lane Anderson, S.B. sold.

IRA a Triumph

G

iven the difficulties of American politics today, the lockstep opposition from Republicans and the overwhelming financial and political power of vested interests, the Inflation Reduction Act is a triumph. While this legislation will jump-start the transition away from fossil fuels, on its own it will not get us to our climate goals fast enough. Despite the devastating impacts carbon pollution creates, fossil-fuel interests continue to do all they can to keep their business model going, leaving all the costs of the disease, death, and planetary disruption they cause to be borne by the public. Greenhouse-gas emissions continue to climb. Oil and gas companies continue to spend millions extracting ever more product. For decades, economists have promoted a carbon tax as the only policy that could reduce emissions at the speed and scale necessary. While consumers and businesses may choose clean energy, until the prices of fossil fuels include the costs of the damages they cause, they will continue to be used. No matter what actions the U.S. may take, the climate crisis is a global problem needing a global solution. Here again, economists have long recommended a policy solution: a border carbon pollution tariff. The European Community and Canada are beginning to implement such a policy. If enacted by the U.S., the world’s leading economy, it would incentivize all nations, including China, to price carbon pollution. Once the price of fossil fuels reflects their true costs, they will be driven out of the market and quickly replaced by clean, affordable, renewable —Robert Taylor, S.B. energy.

Flags for Ukraine

R

egarding the local heroes supporting the Ukrainian fight for democracy, we should also

honor Tom Moyer, who has been placing Ukrainian flags at State and Las Positas daily and near Storke and Hollister on weekends. He’s been organizing volunteers ever since Russia attacked. Like his father who fought in WWII, Tom, like others of us, support Ukraine and seek to defend democracy in our country and abroad. A shoutout to Tom. Your efforts are appreciated.

—Mike Hackett, S.B.

An Insurance Win

I

live in Santa Barbara’s 93103 zip code. I recently received a non-renewal letter from Farmers Insurance on my home for being in the wildfire area. Two weeks prior to receiving this notice, I had received a notice from Farmers that wildfire coverage was added to my policy. On the non-renewal notice were a few different reasons for the notice. I contacted my agent, and she said it was an underwriting decision. I explained that none of the reasons applied to me, to no avail. I contacted the Department of Insurance with my complaint. Recently I got an email for the DOI saying my issue has been resolved and my policy will be renewed. I just wanted to get this information out to people who may be in the same situation but don’t know to —Julie Hayden, S.B. argue or fight it.

Garden Pollutants

I

wonder what year the ban against gasoline-powered leaf blowers was passed in Santa Barbara. I wonder why we continue to allow our gardeners to use gasoline-powered tools when we are facing the devastating effects of a rapidly warming planet due to fossil fuel use. Do these tools have emission controls like cars, or do they produce more pollutants than cars? I wonder why our gardeners don’t adopt electric garden tools. I wonder what it takes to make meaningful changes. Climate change aside, wouldn’t it be nice to have neighborhoods that aren’t pumped full of foul, deadly fumes every day? —Michelle Rainville, S.B.

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obituaries John Edward Ellis 8/18/1950 - 8/8/2022

John Edward Ellis passed away at his home in North Pole Alaska on the 8th of August, he was 71. Born and raised in Santa Barbara California, John attended Santa Barbara High where he played varsity football. After graduating in 1968, John received his wastewater and water treatment operator certifications and went to work for the City of Santa Barbara. After a brief marriage in the early 1970s, John packed-up his pickup and headed to Alaska hoping to find work on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Instead, John found himself in the small town of North Pole where, as luck would have it, they needed someone to run their Water and Sewer Departments. John served as the Utility Supervisor in North Pole until 1977 when he went to work at the new Earth Resources Company (later MAPCO) refinery. John stayed at MAPCO until 1992 before taking a job at Petro Star in Valdez where he stayed until he left the industry in 2003. Even while working in Valdez, John maintained a connection to North Pole, spending long hours commuting the 360 miles between his two homes. John embraced Alaskan life and the opportunities it offered. He was happiest on his own, or with a few close friends, taking hunting and fishing trips into the wilderness, navigating streams and rivers in his home-built boat. A large and bearded man, John would sit on the stern, denim shirt unbuttoned no matter the weather, one hand on the outboard and the other holding a cigarette: he was the image everyone in the Lower 48 pictures when they think, “Alaskan”. Like his father, John was adept at fixing everything from broken engines to leaking roofs. For many years he made and sold jewellery and was an avid SCUBA diver. His one unful14

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filled dream was opening a diving resort somewhere in South America. Although even he admitted that it would probably be far too hot for him down there. John was well known for telling long stories while holding a bottomless cup of coffee. He had an open heart and often helped his friends and strangers alike. He was a very giving and generous man. John was exceptionally well read and knowledgeable on many subjects, particularly physics. In his later years, he found increasing comfort in his religious beliefs. John is survived by his stepmother Audrey, stepbrother Mark Lewis and his four-legged companion Slippers. A memorial will be announced at a later date

Mary Lou Hale Smitheram

12/27/1928 - 8/6/2022

Mary Lou Hale Smitheram (“Lou”) passed away peacefully at home on August 6, 2022 after a few years of declining health. She was 93 years old. Mary Lou Hale was born in Prescott, Arizona on December 27, 1928 to parents Virgil and Mary Lyons Hale. She was the middle child of the family, with older sister Margaret Jean and younger sister Vicki Ann. Lou spent her younger years in both Prescott and Phoenix, Arizona before her family relocated to the San Francisco Bay Area. She graduated from Mills College in Oakland, California in 1950 and subsequently received a Master of Arts degree from Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. In 1977 she accomplished a long-term goal of receiving a Doctor of Philosophy degree

SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

in Spanish Literature from the University of California Santa Barbara. This accomplishment is especially noteworthy as Lou was a full-time working mother while completing the doctorate program. In 1952, Mary Lou Hale married Robert Crowell Smitheram (“Bob”). Bob and Lou made their home in Santa Barbara where they raised three children. The two were married for 35 years until Bob passed away unexpectedly in 1987. In 2007, Lou married Augusto Pravia Cerrud. Lou worked at several schools and universities in the Santa Barbara area, including Laguna Blanca, Marymount, Westmont College, and in the University of California Santa Barbara library. After retiring from UCSB she worked in the Cottage Hospital library. Lou was a dedicated and active parishioner at Trinity Episcopal Church, a member of St. Mary’s Retreat House, and a longtime volunteer at the Goleta Valley Historical Society. She sang with the Edelweiss Choir and was a member of Friendship Force. Lou spoke several languages, which aided her in her many travels. Lou loved to research family history, tap dance, paint, and write. However, most of all, she loved to read, passing this love of books on to her children and grandchildren. Lou is survived by her second husband, Augusto Pravia Cerrud, her children Robert Smitheram (Chiyan) of Santa Barbara, Anne Laurence (Peter) of Danville, and Mary Smitheram-Sheldon (Matthew) of San Mateo, six grandchildren – Robbie Zhang-Smitheram, Jessica and John Laurence, and Maryanne, Christopher, and Amanda Sheldon, and stepgrandsons Noah and Ramon Wang. She is also survived by nieces, nephews, grandnieces, great-grandnephews, and several cousins. Lou is predeceased by her parents, her husband Robert Smitheram, her sisters Jean Pearson and Vicki Riley, and her beloved grandson James Laurence. A memorial service celebrating Lou’s life will be held on Saturday September 3, 2022 at 3:30 PM at Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State Street, Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to Trinity Episcopal Church in Lou’s name.

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Rudy Martinez Aguilera 2/27/1933 - 1/9/2022

Rudy Martinez Aguilera passed away peacefully at home with Ann, his wife of 68 years, at his side. He was 88 years old. Rudy was born Feb 27, 1933, in Riverside, CA, to Pete and Natividad Aguilera. He was preceded in death by his parents, his sister Margaret Gonzales, and brother Frank Aguilera. Rudy is survived by his siblings, Gloria Avalos, Mary (Joe) Ortega, Larry Aguilera, Joseph (Cheryl) Aguilera, and Amanda (Rick) Solis, and numerous cousins. He is also survived by his four children, Pat (Sue), Mickey, Ruth, Rose, his 3 grandchildren, Marissa Aguilera Green, Anthony and Giuliana Giardino, and two great-grandchildren, Mason and Macie Ann Green. In Fall 1952, Rudy enrolled at UC Santa Barbara, and soon married his HS sweetheart, Ann Salazar. In January 1955 he graduated with the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Junior High Education. While teaching at Santa Barbara Junior High full time, Rudy earned his Master of Arts Degree in Education. Rudy will be forever grateful to his 9th Grade teacher, Miss Cora Paradis, for insisting that he continue his education. She was a great inspiration. Rudy Started teaching at SBJH where he served as Head Counselor, Vice Principal, and as Principal during his 34th years. Before retirement, Rudy then served as Principal of Santa Barbara High School, and then Goleta Valley Junior High School, 2 years at each campus. Rudy’s delight was family and activities that taught his children to appreciate each other, and to be respectful, generous and fair. But most of all to find joy in life and be grateful. He had a great patience with little ones and a loving manner with his growing children. Rudy learned to work from a very young age and continued to do so in every job he held, also maintaining good grades in his studies. He loved sports and was a member of the Referee Association that served in local high schools and colleges. He loved travel and enjoyed many

memories with his wife Ann. He loved dancing, reading and history, particularly WWII. Rudy also loved music, Jazz and Mariachi music. Important to him was the Lord and he lived a joyous life in gratitude. In remembrance of Rudy’s life, the family asks that any charitable donations be made to Cambridge Drive Community Church, 550 Cambridge Drive, Goleta, CA 93117

Princess Diana

7/1/1961 - 8/31/1997

In Memoriam After 25 years, your spirit lives on. You will not be forgotten. Perhaps your loved ones should consider Prince Hamlet’s words: “There are more things in heaven and earth…than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

Ernest William Tack 6/5/1939 - 8/24/2022

Ernest William Tack, age 83, was called peacefully to his eternal home on August 24, 2022 in Santa Barbara, CA. Ernest is survived by his wife Patricia and 5 sons: Michael, Stephen, Patrick, John and Robin, and 2 daughters: Michelle and Stephanie, 11 grandchildren: Luke, Christian, Stephen, Noah, Robin, Leah, Sydney, Sophia, Diana, Michelle and Gloria and 4mgreat grandchildren: Damian, Zach, Shantasta and Tailey and sister Judith. Graveside Service at Santa Barbara Cemetery on Thursday, September 1st at 1:15pm.


obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Larry Robert Matthews

Frank Bavaresco

Long time Santa Barbara resident Larry Robert Matthews passed away on July 11, 2022 with his daughter Zoraetta at his side. A kind and gentle spirit, Larry was born in Pennsylvania March 9, 1940. He was one of many brothers and sisters, who grew stronger together as a result of their circumstances. As a teenager he moved to California where he would enlist in the Navy as soon as he was able. He described his time with the Navy as one of the best times of his life: honor, comradery, stability, and the chance to travel the world. Larry maintained his sense for adventure throughout his life, whether it be backpacking in the Rocky Mountains or living abroad in France. He loved to explore new places but always called Santa Barbara home. In the summers he could be found walking Hendry’s Beach, having breakfast at the Summerland Beach Cafe, or attending the French and Summer Solstice festivals. He was an avid cyclist, tennis player, and loved to dance. In his later years he loved spending time with his grandkids at the beach and the Santa Barbara Zoo. He is dearly loved by friends and family who considered him a source of advice and wisdom. He leaves behind his sisters Brenda, Yvonne, Beverly, Donna, and his brother Barry; his two daughters Zoraetta and Rosalie; his three grandchildren Nashay, Christopher, and Oliver, and four great-grandchildren: August, Charlotte, Max, and Azalea. Donations are requested in lieu of flowers to an Alzheimer’s research organization of one’s choosing. A Navy memorial service will be held for Larry in January, with an intimate ceremony on the Santa Barbara channel islands to follow.

Frank (Frankie) Bavaresco passed away peacefully on August 25, 2022. Born and raised in Santa Barbara, Frank was the only son of Luigi (Bocia) and Mary Bavaresco. He grew up on the Eastside, along with other Italian immigrant families, including his cousins Ernie, Dickie and Dennis Zampese, whom he considered brothers. For someone who didn’t speak a word of English until the start of grammar school, he loved to brag to family about how he became class president at Santa Barbara Junior High. Upon graduation of Santa Barbara High School’s class of ’53, Frank was drafted into the Army and was stationed in Hawaii. After being discharged from the Army, Frank returned to Santa Barbara in search of work and love interests. That’s where Flora Lucato came into the picture. Frank and Flora’s families had known each other for a long time, and they grew up together. But it took dating other people and elapsed time to realize that your true love lived right across the street. And that’s how Flora Lucato became Mrs. Frank Bavaresco on June 18, 1960. In the meantime, Frank got a job as a maintenance worker for the Santa Barbara Parks and Recreation Department. It turned out to be a job that he worked at for 50 years. And out of those 50 years at Parks & Rec, Frank only took 1 day of sick leave for poison oak. It was Flora who called in on his behalf. When Frank’s boss heard about his sick day, he actually drove over to their house because he didn’t believe it to be true. When Frank was not working, he had a love affair with gardening. And no one could compete with the way he grilled chicken and tri-tip with help from Flora’s basting brush made of rosemary and sage. Mostly, in his spare time, Frank looked forward to spending time at home with family and friends in the neighborhood. He particularly enjoyed his walks down the street, hanging out in Bob’s

3/9/1940 - 7/11/2022

3/6/1935 - 8/25/2022

garage with Guba and Art (aka Tico’s Bar) and drinking the only beer variety allowed – Bud and Coors Light. Frank may have lived his life simply, but he was someone who was definitely well liked and respected. Frank is survived by his wife Flora of 62 years, daughters Sharon Soto and Lisa Richter, sons-in-law Peter Soto and Kurt Richter, sisters-in law Barbara Bianchi (Dave & nephew Darren) and JoAnne Lucato (niece Rayanna), as well as grandchildren Jonathan (Liz), Weston, Misty (Cam), Samantha and Sabrina. Frankie, Dad, Nonno – while you may be gone in body you are certainly not in spirit. Your words of wisdom will forever play out in our minds. So now it’s our turn to say to you what we frequently heard you say to us: “Be good, get along with each other, and watch your step”. Mass services will be held on September 9, 2022 at 10am at the Old Mission Santa Barbara. Burial immediately following at Calvary Cemetery.

Steven Eric Schwartz 11/27/1956 - 8/16/2022

Born in Sheepshead Bay Brooklyn 11/27/56 Middle child of Erwin and Joan. Younger brother to Tedd and older brother to Gary(myself) We were a Middle Class Jews from Brooklyn Lived in apt Enjoyed outdoors, camping, sailing Steve was always different, he didn’t seem to fit in in the typical sense he did not like sports He was more interested in science. He enjoyed popular mechanics and science magazines. Steven skipped a grade and was extremely intelligent

academically and in a worldly sense. He won the NYC science fair 1968 Froze a gold fish using liquid nitrogen And brought it back to life ( for few seconds) But was disqualified later as the judges felt it was a bit gruesome and for using a live animal He went to Brooklyn college and in 1972 He marched on Washington to impeach Nixon as he was very much against the war in Vietnam. he was a inspired by the works of Dylan and later Springsteen ) At age 16 he hitchhiked across US. I remember letting him with off my with my dad at GWB route 80 with a sign” California “ go west young man “”“Horace Greeley once said Steven wound up in SB, a place he call home for the rest of his life. He returned to NY that fall told my dad he was transferring to UCSB, where he eventually graduated with a degree in environmental science. Steven never for worked “the man” as he would say something he was proud of. He had a variety of jobs out in SB over the years He managed property Anapamu house for 47 yrs (First sleeping in a sleeping bag in the shed ) He owned a successful back hoe contracting business He was able to buy house with the help of my mom Joan Basson which we dubbed the Basson house on Bath st He started a successful car business known as “Mustang Dreams ” Locating classic muscle cars all over the west coast and sending them to Europe He was a simple guy to say the least A minimalist before his time He loved a few things 1st Suzanne who he called “small unit “ The Love of his life he would say Next was Burning man and all it embraced He lived by the ten principles all of his life Amongst the Burners he finally felt he fit it It just seem to make sense to him He is survived by me his brother Gary His niece and nephews Eric, Danielle and Zachary Schwartz Suzanne Cuddy, significant other

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Ronald Walter Chase 11/9/1932 - 8/21/2022

Ron was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Walter and Adeline Chase. He graduated from Detroit’s Aero Mechanics High School. Ron served in the Korean War as an Army Mechanic. After getting out of the service, Ron came to Santa Barbara where he met and married Janice Cota, a Santa Barbara native. Ron worked for Hendry Brothers Blacksmith Shop until the shop closed. He then opened his own small business, Ron Chase Welding. Ron was a renowned Certified Master Welder and later worked for Western Welding in Goleta. His welding career was capped off by becoming an instructor at Santa Barbara City College. His students remember his principle teaching of “Safety First.” Ron was an accomplished piano and accordion player. In addition to the local piano group, he was a co-founding member of the Accordion International Music Society of Santa Barbara. Ron and his fellow musicians performed at many musical functions around town. His musical playing exuded the joy of life he carried in his heart. Ron was preceded in death by his parents, and his wife Janice. He is survived by his companion Georgia Martin; his children, Valerie, Loretta, Michael, Katrina, Donald, and Eric; and his three grandchildren, Ronald, Taylor, and Ashley. Ron will be remembered for his love of people and always taking time to check up on his friends, colleagues, and acquaintances. Ron will be greatly missed.

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Opinions

CONT’D

Rent Control Will Harm the Poor

voices

The Santa Barbara County SELPA (SBCSELPA) and its member districts actively seek out all individuals with exceptional needs, ages birth through 21, including infants and children enrolled in parentally placed private schools. Special education programs are available to all eligible students with disabilities, ages birth to 21 in Santa Barbara County.

Affordability in Santa Barbara Is a Myth

A

BY JEFFREY HARDING

The supply of rental housing will stagnate because rent controls dis-incentivize developers from building new rental housing.

COURTESY

recent Voice, “Rent Stabilization Is a Necessary Tool,” is an exercise in polemics. It picks three studies by progressives, which ∙ Landlords will have more difficulty in financaddress policy and are not based on economic modeling, that they claim support rent control, ing or refinancing their properties when loans yet they ignore the 81 percent of economists who concome due because of lower profit margins. cur that rent control is a bad idea. I will concede that criminalizing rent increases ∙ A significant expansion of staff will be necwould be an effective tool to prevent rising rents. essary to enforce these controls, imposing a Landlords would be committing a criminal act by substantial new cost on a budget-challenged raising rents beyond what is permissible. Governcity. While this is dismissed by the authors, ments would have the power to fine them, sue them, the rent-control department of Santa Monica arrest them, seize control of their property, or even (a city the same size as Santa Barbara) has a $6 confiscate their property. million annual budget and a staff of 25, includThe problem is that there are major negative conseing attorneys, a hearings officer, and support quences to rent controls: Rent control would harm the staff, plus five rent-control board members. It’s very people the authors thought they were helping. not a small bureaucracy. Rent control is not something new on the planet. ∙ Based on the experience of other rent-conVarious schemes of rent and price controls go back trolled markets, it is likely that such controls millennia. Economists have studied rent control prowill ultimately have very little impact on rising grams in the U.S. for many decades. It’s rare in academia for scholars to agree unanimously on anything, rents. The authors say this time will be different but economists almost unanimously agree that rent because they advocate “smart” rent control. control is a bad idea. The authors, Professor Alice It is interesting that the article O’Connor, a history professor, relies on the University of Minand Rich Appelbaum, a sociology nesota study of Minneapolis professor, intentionally ignore the upon which to base their claim negative consequences of rent conthat rent control could “work.” trol because it doesn’t fit into their Minneapolis has no rent control progressive social justice ideology. and, based on the study’s data, it They dismiss offhand the conhas a relatively healthy, competiclusions of a fellow UCSB profestive rental market. Nowhere in sor, Peter Rupert, former chair of the 63-page report does it menUCSB’s Economics Department, tion the impact of rent controls who studied the economic literain St. Paul, the “Twin City” right ture on rent control and concluded across the river. St. Paul voters approved a strict rent-control that rent control has never worked Jeffrey Harding law. As a result, new construcanywhere, ever. tion of apartments shriveled up, Why doesn’t rent control work? It basically worsens the housing situation by reducing rental properties declined in value, and developers the supply of rentals. Here are some results gleaned walked away from ongoing projects. I’m sure that the authors would say their “smart” rent control would from studies of rent control: avoid such bad consequences. The reality is that there is no solution to the peren∙ Landlords will be more selective in choosing tenants. Landlords operate on very thin mar- nial Santa Barbara “housing crisis.” We like our town gins in Santa Barbara. Making it more difficult the way it is and don’t wish to ruin it with massive to evict tenants and to raise rents will cause apartment blocks or the ADUs jammed down our them to be more selective, making it harder for throats by Sacramento. Forget low-cost rentals: In an poor renters to qualify for housing. expensive city famous for blocking new development, it just can’t be done. You can’t blame landlords for that. ∙ Lower profitability margins on investment Yet progressives demonize landlords as greedy combined with rent caps would lead some capitalists because they seek “profit maximization.” landlords to reduce maintenance costs, which Without the possibility of maximizing the profit of one’s investment, there would be no rental properties. will lower housing quality. Waving the bloody shirt of “profit” is part of the pro∙ Tenants will be reluctant to move from rent- gressive playbook to rile their base against landlords. controlled properties, which tends to freeze the Helping poor renters is society’s problem. The fair rent-controlled rental market, leaving fewer solution is for the community to subsidize rents for apartments available for rent. the poor. Instead of imposing an unfair hidden tax on landlords, the citizens of Santa Barbara should ∙ A substantial reduction in tenant mobility back an increase of the sales tax to provide the funds occurs as a result of rent control. to subsidize poor renters. Otherwise, rent control will just make it worse for the poor and for Santa Barbara. ∙ The beneficiaries of rent controls in Southern

California have been mostly middle-income, educated white folks rather than poor immigrants. We should expect the same here.

CHILD FIND PUBLIC NOTICE

Jeffrey Harding is a real estate investor and a former attorney and adjunct real-estate investment professor at SBCC.

If you are concerned about your child’s development or have reason to believe your child needs special education due to a physical, mental, emotional, learning or speech problem, you may contact either the SELPA office or your local school district Special Education Department if you have questions about referring a child for special education services. Santa Barbara County Special Education Local Plan Area Office (SELPA) 5385 Hollister Avenue, Bldg. 7 Mailing Address: 5385 Hollister Ave., Box 107 Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Or phone (805) 683-1424

SE BUSCAN NIÑOS AVISO PUBLICO SELPA del Condado de Santa Barbara (SBCSELPA) y los distritos afiliados buscan a todos los niños con necesidades excepcionales entre 0 y 21 años de edad, incluyendo bebés y niños inscritos en escuelas privadas por sus padres. Los programas de Educación Especial están disponibles para todos los estudiantes con discapacidades entre 0 y 21 años de edad en el Condado de Santa Barbara. Si usted está preocupado acerca del desarrollo de su hijo o tiene la mínima razón de pensar que su hijo necesita servicios de educación especial debido a problemas físicos, mentales, emocionales, de aprendizaje o de habla, comuníquese con la oficina de SELPA o con el Departamento de Educación Especial de su Distrito Escolar si tiene alguna pregunta acerca de referir a un niño para servicios de educación especial. Condado de Santa Barbara Oficina Local de Educación Especial (SELPA) 5385 Hollister Avenue, Bldg. 7 Mailing Address: 5385 Hollister Ave., Box 107 Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Or phone (805) 683-1424

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The Kids Are Alright. Are the Parents?

COVER STORY

Five Families Explain How They Are Navigating Childcare in Santa Barbara by Zoë Schiffer Photos by Ingrid Bostrom

Cruz Fossek, Leila Drake, and Chris Fossek

Jordan, Bella, and Woody Loggins

A

t a certain point between pregnancy and child-

birth, my vision of how I would care for my daughter disintegrated. Before she was born, I assumed I would take two months off for maternity leave and then return to work and drop her off at daycare. As my due date approached, I confidently told my husband that if I had to choose between interviewing a source and nursing a baby, I wanted to interview the source. Then she was born. “I have spent a lot of time wondering why neither parenting nor the pandemic has been universally radicalizing,” wrote Jia Tolentino in a recent article in the New Yorker. But to me, it was. Overnight, I went from being someone who prioritized my career and organized my life around achieving professional success to being a person who would gladly sacrifice my job and my body for the well-being of my child. In other words, I became a mother. Fortunately, or unfortunately, depending on how you look at it, such a sacrifice was not warranted, or possible. When my husband and I moved from Oakland to Santa Barbara, our rent tripled, and we needed my job to stay afloat. I no longer felt comfortable dropping my child off with a stranger. But I couldn’t afford to take care of her instead. Instead, when my leave ended in May, my husband and I were faced with a decision: Who would take care of the baby? In Santa Barbara, we quickly learned, the question is fraught. A survey of childcare providers suggests 1,100 parents are on waitlists for preschools. If we were lucky enough to get a spot, we could expect to pay upward of $1,481 a month for full-time care. This could change for some families. In June, Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill that will provide families in California with one year of free pre-kindergarten by the 202526 school year. “After lagging behind other states, California suddenly leads the nation in expanding quality preschool,” Bruce Fuller, a professor of education at UC Berkeley, told

Luke, Rachel, Jack (top row), Reis, and Edith (bottom row) DePass

EdSource. Starting this fall, the Santa Barbara Unified School District’s transitional kindergarten program will be open to every 4-year-old turning 5 by February 2, 2023. In the wake of more extensive funding, however, the burden falls on parents to decide how much they are willing to pay for childcare and education. “What price do you put on someone giving your child undivided attention?” asks Pilar Cruz, a 24-year-old single mom who works for the Department of Social Services. “I would pay whoever is looking after and loving my child millions of dollars, if I could,” says Leila Drake, an advancement manager at the Music Academy of the West. And who wouldn’t? The Independent interviewed five families, all with different childcare setups, about how they are navigating this terrain:

PILAR CRUZ

Work: Santa Barbara County Department of Social Services Child: Damián, 14 months old Childcare: Full-time home care with Celeste Family Daycare in Goleta Cost: $16 a month, subsidized by CalWORKS Pilar: I started working again when Damián was 4 months old. At the time, I worked at a restaurant. He was too little for me to trust anyone with him. You hear so many scary stories about what happens at daycare. I didn’t feel comfortable leaving him with anyone besides Grandma and Grandpa—I wouldn’t even leave him with my sisters or aunts and uncles. So I was paying $700 out of pocket for Damián’s grandma, his dad’s mom, to watch my son every month. I would have to leave work to breastfeed. If he got sick, I would have to take time off. It was crazy; I don’t even remember most of that time. I mean, I was barely sleeping. I have pictures, so I know I was there. But it was hard. It was really hard.

Pilar and Damián Cruz

After taxes, I really don’t make all that much. It was getting to the point where I wasn’t making enough to support myself or my son. I think I had $20 for two weeks left after my bills and childcare. Then my friend told me about this program [CalWORKS] that she used to pay for daycare for her son.

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CONTINUED» SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

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I ended up getting approved for full-time care. Now I pay like $4 a week. And he loves it. If I could, I would work from home. Even if that would be hard, like having to figure out how to distract him to get work done — I know working from home wouldn’t be perfect. But I think just being able to watch my own son would be my goal. I want to be present. I had my son because I wanted him — I didn’t want to have to give him to someone else to watch.

KATHERINE GUZMAN SANDERS AND JULIAN SANDERS Work: The Sanderses owned Café Ana. It closed during the pandemic. Now, Katherine works part-time for the Botanic Gardens and Julian works for the Rosewood Miramar Beach hotel. Children: Norah, 3 years old, and Alma, one year old Childcare: Bright Start Preschool and part-time mother’s helper Cost: $3,900 a month (Julian’s dad helps them pay for Bright Start)

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Katherine: Our work situation is different than most people’s. Most people, their partners come home from work by the end of the day and they can kind of tagteam the hardest part of the day. But Julian works from 2 p.m. to midnight usually, so our nanny, Paige, comes from 3 to 7 p.m. and helps me with the evening routine: dinner, bath time, and bed. When we found Paige, we thought we’d just keep her through the newborn period, but she just ended

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Julian: The days Katherine goes to work, I have both girls by myself. I get home at midnight, so I’m in bed around 1 a.m. and then the kids are up by 6:30 a.m. We get breakfast going around 7 and then think of something to do for the day. Usually, we’ll go for a walk and then get back in time for Alma to nap, which is the only time that I can take a shower before I get ready for work. But at the same time, Norah is there. She’s pretty good at independent play, and we’re not afraid of watching TV or using an iPad. So we let her play some games on those as well, which she really enjoys. Paige [the nanny] is great at managing the girls; we trust her so much. So that’s probably the best thing, that we’ve found someone that we trust enough to be with them all the time. She really has become a part of the family. Editor’s note: After the interview, Katherine and Julian found out their nanny would be leaving them. They’re now on the hunt for a new helper. Katherine, Alma, Norah (on shoulders), and Julian Sanders

SEAN HAYES BAND

20

up making so much sense for our family. Just having the mental capacity to breathe for a minute while she’s watching the girls — I don’t know if I’d be able to do it without her. Power to all the women who do it with two or more by themselves. It’s crazy. I get to cook dinner and enjoy cooking dinner, which is really huge — I think that’s a mental-health thing for me. I still get to garden; I get to step out of my house without my kids for two seconds and get into the backyard. Our nanny actually makes more money than I do. We can barely afford her, but we both have just decided that she’s just so important in our lives that we make it happen.

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Family-to-Family, weekly starting September 21, 2022 C O V E R S T COORVYE R S T O R Y Woody, Bella, and Jordan Loggins

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The class will also cover information on illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression and other mental healthstarting conditionsSeptember and is taught by Family-to-Family, weekly 21,trained 2022teachers who are also family members that know what it is like to have a loved one struggling with a mental health disorder. Family-to-Family is a free, eight-session education program for family members of adults living with a mental health disorder and is designed to help family members understand and

loved through one whileNAMI, maintaining their ownAlliance well-being. Thesupport class istheir offered the National on Mental Illness, which is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for The class will also cover information on illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, those affected by mental health disorders. Classes will be in person in both Santa Barbara major depression and other mental health conditions and is taught by trained teachers who and are Santa followingthat all know County Health andone COVID requirements. alsoMaria, family members what it is likeDepartment to have a loved struggling with a mental health disorder.

This class is included in SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and The class is offered through the by National Alliance on Mental Illness, which is the Practices. Pre-registration is NAMI, required calling the number below. nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for those affected by mental health disorders. Classes will be in person in both Santa Barbara and Santa Maria, following all County Health Department and COVID requirements. This class is included in SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. Pre-registration is required by calling the number below.

www.namisantabarbara.org

www.namisantabarbara.org

JORDAN AND BELLA LOGGINS

Work: Jordan works part-time in flavor development at McConnell’s. Bella works in project management. Child: Woody, 16 months old Childcare: Part-time nanny share with three other families Cost: $1,200 a month Jordan: My job was amazing and allowed me to extend my maternity leave and then come back part-time when Woody was about 7 months old. For us, cost was probably the largest factor because I don’t make that much money. So we were figuring out, basically, is it worth it for me to go back to work? Is my income going to benefit us enough to have it be worth it versus having me just stay home with Woody? Ultimately, I do make a little more than our nanny, Anna, but not that much. I also was weighing the mental-health aspect of it feeling really good to be doing something else outside the home. I love spending time with Woody, but I love going to work too. Our nanny is great. Woody loves her, he loves spending time with her, and she’s really reliable. I get to see them interact, so I have a good sense of what things are like when I’m not there. It’s really nice to just feel like I trust the whole dynamic. Childcare in this country is so expensive, though. I just don’t understand how to break the cycle or do it any better. It’s so, so hard. We are privileged and live in a place where we have family in town. My sister takes my kid once a week. We have a really dreamy situation. And our nanny, I think, should be making way more than she makes. She does so much for us. And it’s still bordering on cost-prohibitive for us. Anna Hartog (the nanny): I majored in sociology in college and learned a lot about child development, which got me interested in infants and babies. It’s great; I love being a nanny and creating bonds with the children, and it’s nice to have the flexibility that comes from working with multiple families. That said, living here is a struggle for a recent college graduate. I make about $4,000 a month, and my boyfriend and I pay $1,925 in rent every month. But I can make it, and I wouldn’t be able to do that without being a nanny.

TO PREREGISTER, CONTACT: Ramona Winner, NAMI Family Advocate, rwinner@mentalwellnesscenter.org Mental Wellness Center, 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, 805-884-8440, ext. 3206 TO PREREGISTER, CONTACT: Ramona Winner, NAMI Family Advocate, rwinner@mentalwellnesscenter.org Mental Wellness Center, 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, 805-884-8440, ext. 3206

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Santa Barbara County is Celebrating

TELL US YOUR CHILDCARE STORY

Want to share your own experience with finding childcare in Santa Barbara? Email info@independent.com with the same information you see in these profiles (your name, work, child’s name and age, and type of childcare and its cost) and 200-300 words on what you considered when deciding your setup, what the biggest challenge has been, what you like best about your childcare arrangement, and if it has impacted your career positively or negatively. Please also include a photo, if you like.

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Community partners include: Aegis Treatment Centers, Cal-SOAP, CAUSE, CenCal, Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse, Family Service Agency, Fire Department, Future Leaders of America, Good Heart Recovery, Good Samaritan, Housing Authority, NAACP, New House and Paragon Academy, Pacific Pride, Police Department, Public Health, Sanctuary Centers, Transitions Mental Health Association, Unity Shoppe, YouthWell

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SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

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Leila Drake, Cruz Fossek, and Chris Fossek

LEILA DRAKE AND CHRIS FOSSEK Work: Leila is an advancement manager at the Music Academy of the West. Chris is a musician. Child: Cruz, 2-and-a-half years old Childcare: Full-time preschool at the Learningden Cost: $1,740 a month Leila: Cruz was born during COVID, so at first we actually had a lot of time where neither of us were employed and we got to be with him. Then when I went back to work full-time and Cruz was still too young for daycare, we had part-time help from Chris’s mom. I worked from home when he was 8 months old, and that was really hard. Even if Chris’s mom was here and I was in another room, if I heard him crying, I just couldn’t concentrate. It was really hard to separate and focus on work when the baby was upset in the other room. I just feel like, if I’m here, I should be with him. When he was old enough for daycare, we decided we wanted him to get the social

aspect of going somewhere else. We wanted him to be somewhere that was safe and loving and fun, and where he could play with other kids. The first day, I was so nervous and anxious. It was like, he’s just gonna go be in his own little world away from us for the first time! The teachers took him in pretty quickly, and I made it all the way back to the car before I cried. He was fine, though—the way the teachers interact with the kids is great, and knowing the way the kids play together is so comforting.

Chris: Parenting, I feel like it’s a divide-andconquer situation; you have to trade off. Leila: That’s not really how I envisioned parenthood. I thought it would be, you know, the three of us together all the time, but that’s not possible. Chris: I feel like even if you have more resources, you just end up doing things that separate you more from your child. So it makes it easier because you have more time to do what you want to do. But then you’re not around your child as much. So I don’t think it really makes it easier. It just makes it different.


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Luke, Rachel, Jack (top row), Reis, and Edith (bottom row) DePass

RACHEL DEPASS AND LUKE DEPASS Work: Rachel is starting a company called Cohero that connects parents with coworking pods. Luke works in tech. Children: Jack, 7 years old; Reis, 4 years old; and Edith, 2 years old Childcare: Jack is in 2nd grade at Washington Elementary. Reis is in preschool at Cliff Drive Care Center. Edith is home with Rachel and Luke. Cost: $750 a month Rachel: When Jack was born, my husband had been at a startup, working 12- to 15- hour days in an office. He ended up taking paternity leave, and during that time, everything, perspective-wise, changed. He was like, “There’s no way I’m going to just leave the house for 15 hours and miss seeing Jack and miss being part of this unit.” So he ended up leaving his job and building his own company, consulting. The plan for me was to continue working in an office. But once I started to be in the office, after my maternity leave, I felt really emotional, and I didn’t want to do it anymore. That first day, I remember I sat at my desk and my manager asked me how I was doing, and I just burst into tears. It probably took less than a month for my boss and me to figure out a way for me to start working from home with a flexible schedule. I would work at night, mostly. And Luke and I would tag-team throughout the day being with Jack. And then by the time he was in bed, we’d both have our laptops out, and our couch would be our co-working office. Then, when he was old enough, Jack started school. When the pandemic hit and everything was virtual, Jack got a school-issued iPad,

which he didn’t even know how to use. We had to teach him how to sign into Zoom and press mute and stuff. The first few days, he was depressed. He would sit there for hours. They expected a 5-year-old who had never sat in front of a computer that long to sit and listen. It was hard for everybody. It was really hard for the teacher and hard for the kids too. And as parents, it was really hard to watch him be so miserable and not make those connections in person. We ended up joining a pod. One of the parents in our class sent an email, and she had found a teacher and another friend in the class to do it with. It turned out to be the best thing for him because he made his best friend, ever. It was three boys in the pod, and it was such an intimate, close learning situation. It really helped him come out of his shell. One of the other kids was so similar to Jack, but also very opposite. He was really outgoing, and it activated this other side of Jack that he wasn’t comfortable with before in preschool. He was like, “Oh, I really like this kid. And this is how he acts.” My priority has never really been careerfocused. It’s always been more about how both me and my partner provide for our family while maintaining a balance. With our creative and technical backgrounds, we knew that we could have the best of both worlds where we could really excel career-wise without losing focus on our ultimate goal, which is just to go to the beach with our kids as much as possible.

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HEAR MORE ON OUR PODCAST Cover story author Zoë Schiffer joins The Indy: A Podcast producer Molly McAnany on this week’s episode. Listen at independent .com/the-indy or wherever you stream your n podcasts.

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SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

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23


FEATURE

Many Thanks, Richard Parker Independent Founding Member Retires and Bids Us Goodbye COURTESY

COURTESY

by Nick Welsh

As a philanthropist, Parker would help give away $55 million to progressive organizations throughout the country. For about 20 years, some of that that money would profoundly affect the tilt of Santa Barbara’s politics.

Even as a young man, Richard Parker was fixated on the inequalities between those that have too much and those who have not enough. Here, he poses with a copy of his book, The Myth of the Middle Class, which decried a problem that’s grown only more problematic and expansive in the subsequent years.

I

remember my first impression of Richard Parker. “No one,” I thought, “should be that comfortable in their own skin.” But he was. Or in that moment, he seemed to be. Richard Parker had just walked into a meeting room at La Casa de la Raza in 1984 to address an exceptionally agitated gathering. He’d flown 3,000 miles cross-country to join this meeting, the purpose of which to decide what to do with the financially desperate Santa Barbara News & Review, a worker-owned and collectively operated newspaper that was started in 1975 as an unabashedly leftist progressive voice for the Santa Barbara community. The question before the group was: Should they sell it or just pull the plug? The decision, it turned out, would have far-reaching consequences, since the News & Review was one of the foundational publications out of which the Santa Barbara Independent would later spring. At the time, however, the apprehension and distrust in the room was palpable. Half the people there — past and current News & Review reporters, writers, editors, artists, designers, photographers, salespeople, and business managers—believed the other half was there to sell them out. I had the dubious distinction of being the last editor of this experiment in collective journalism. Richard Parker, it turns out, had been the very first. In fact, Parker played a pivotal role in midwifing the birth of the News & Review. In between came many smart, talented, dedicated newspaper people, many of whom were in the room that day. The News & Review was where many of us came to be who we would eventually become. Over the years, the paper had published some ground-shaking investigative reporting.

24

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SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

A district attorney would be forced from office because of his associations with real estate speculators implicated in an arson scheme uncovered by the News & Review. A prominent counter-cultural commune would be exposed as a cult whose leaders were amassing firearms for target practice and “selfdefense.” And the paper had a field day when a developer was caught on tape trying to bribe a new county supervisor to allow massive development along the Gaviota coast. Did such an enterprising newspaper have to be sold? Some of the collective’s shareholders were dubious. At one point, there’d been talk of the prior employees taking over the paper from the current workers and running it themselves. Conversely, there had been muttering about shutting down the paper should the old guard try such a maneuver. Naturally, nothing came from any of this. But it conveys the pitch and tone of the gathering into which Parker stepped. The $64 million question at the time, of course, was who should buy the paper. Parker was there at that meeting as a prospective investor along with Marianne Partridge—then best known for her work at the Village Voice and Rolling Stone. She had moved to Santa Barbara when she married a descendant of Santa Barbara’s historic De la Guerra family, and together with a third friend, they wanted to buy the News & Review. Two other offers were also on the table. One was very serious. Anyone who’d ever worked six months at the News & Review could vote; the longer one worked there, the more votes they had to cast. It wasn’t business; it was personal. Parker made his pitch. I don’t remember much of what he said. Mostly, I was blown away by the ease and command

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with which he said it. He was charming; he was glib; he was funny. But he was more than that. He was eloquent. The son of an Episcopalian minister, Parker could preach. So in that moment, he preached about the values everyone there held in common and the passions we shared in keeping the News & Review afloat. I can’t say for certain his sermon changed anyone’s mind. But the temperature in the room decidedly dropped. Later, Marianne Partridge would also address the assembled multitudes. I remember her talking about alienation and how a community newspaper could remedy its corrosive effects. Stylistically, she embodied all the careening improvisational chaos of a good stand-up comedian. She was dazzling. But afterward, Partridge’s car would not start. Somehow, I found myself dragooned into helping her push it down Montecito Street. Another writer was behind the wheel, waiting for the right moment to pop the clutch. This was not an auspicious metaphor, I told Partridge as we pushed. She shrugged. I’d be well-advised, she cautioned, not to put too much stock in metaphors. That was funny advice, I thought, coming from an editor. Ultimately, the Parker-Partridge package would prevail. (Another investor, Richard Grand-Jean and his wife, Christine Doudna, were also involved and remain so to this day.) Pretty much from that moment until earlier this year, Richard Parker, Marianne Partridge, and I have been pushing that car—or variants thereof—nonstop in our own different ways. Throughout its sometimes tortured trajectory, the News & Review would morph from the worker-owned collective that Parker helped found in 1975 to the privately owned incarnation of the same that Partridge would run. Then, in 1986, it would fuse with the Santa Barbara Weekly to become the Santa Barbara Independent. The rest, as they say, is mystery. I mention all this because earlier this past year, Richard Parker, now 75, decided the time had come to sell his shares in the Independent to Sonos cofounder John MacFarlane and to exit, stage left, from the paper’s ownership structure and retire from his responsibilities as a member of the board of directors. Parker also just stepped down from the Kennedy School at Harvard, where he taught as a senior fellow and lecturer the past 30 years and was voted three times by his students as professor of the year.


COURTESY

Over the years, the Independent has weathered the boomand-bust cycle endemic to print journalism in America. In addition, we’ve had all the usual ownership disputes, lawsuits threatened and delivered, and attempted buy-outs. If that weren’t enough, we’ve all had to grapple with the impacts of the pandemic. And then there are the more profoundly unsettling realities of how people now get their news and what they’re willing to pay for it. Throughout all this, Parker never succumbed to the “journalism is dead” pessimism popular with the sky-is-falling set. He held steady. As an owner, Parker was first and foremost committed to the mission of community journalism. He was never passive. At times, admittedly, it could get crazy-making. But Parker also came up with suggestions and new ideas the paper could try. Above all else, he was engaged. “He stood by the paper in tough times and good times,” said Marianne Partridge, the Independent’s editor-in-chief and Parker’s longtime journalistic dance partner. “He was a stand-up guy, and he really stood up for the paper.” Parker was never about cutting costs just for the sake of saving money; it was always about maintaining the economic viability of the paper so it could serve as an agent for progressive social change and as an instrument for community journalism. “Words matter,” Parker said. “Words have consequences. Look at the changes someone like [Rupert] Murdoch has made with Fox News. But it goes the other way, too. I got into journalism to help make change in this community. The Independent has provided a consistent progressive liberal voice. When I moved here in the 1970s, this town was solidly Republican and very, very good-old-boy conservative. Now look at it. A paper can help change a community. This validates the reason I went into journalism and not the ministry.” Parker grew up in Hermosa Beach in a neighborhood then populated by $10,000 homes and white-collar aerospace workers. Parker’s father was an Episcopal minister. The 10 Commandments, as preached in the Parker household, bore an uncanny likeness to the policies of the New Deal as espoused by Franklin Delano Roosevelt. At its core, there was an abiding concern about the essential inequality in the division of spoils as dished out by the American economy. Parker graduated from Mira Costa High School in 1964, from Dartmouth University in 1968 with a degree in economics, and from Oxford in 1972 with a PhD in the same field. Like many bent on a political and intellectual quest, Parker was drawn to Santa Barbara by the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, then a rambunctiously progressive think tank started by former University of Chicago Boy Wonder Robert Maynard Hutchins in the 1950s—and funded by the Ford Foundation. Its purpose was to give free rein to the questioning curiosities of Big Picture thinkers. Parker was especially drawn by the presence of John Cogley, a Catholic theologian, writer, political activist, and senior fellow at the Center, who converted to the Episcopalian church while with the Center. “He was a personal hero of mine,” Parker said. In its heyday, the Center was both a national and local force to be reckoned with. It was there that Parker—a fellow with the Center — would strike relationships with the bigger-than-life likes of Ping Ferry and Stanley Sheinbaum; the latter would run for Congress here in Santa Barbara in the 1970s and later make international history brokering the 1993 Oslo Accords between the PLO and Israel. These connections would forever alter the course of Parker’s own personal and political trajectory. Parker teamed up with young progressive journalists Becca Wilson and Jim Gregory and, using money put up by Sheinbaum and Ferry, helped create the Santa Barbara News & Review. The paper was run collectively by workers paid starvation wages who enjoyed the collective lifestyle. It was not a job, but a cause. And it would become the journalistic megaphone by which Santa Barbara’s flourishing anti-war,

civil rights, and environmental activists spoke to themselves and the community at large. One day, Parker was taken out to lunch by Ferry — an outspoken political adventurer philanthropist not averse to stepping on toes, even if they belonged to FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover. Ferry told Parker he was leaving town and that Parker was to take over handling the affairs of an indescribably wealthy woman named Kit Tremaine, a onetime Mardi Gras queen then in the throes of a profound Richard Parker shown with his former Oxford classmate President Bill Clinton, whose economic inclinations political awakening. “I hewed a little too Republican for Parker’s taste was 25 years old,” Parker said. “I didn’t have a driver’s license.” Parker—along with CPA David Peri—helped form the she was working—indirectly—for Kit Tremaine. Parker didn’t merely witness and observe Santa Barbara’s nucleus of what would become the Sunflower Foundation, which harnessed Tremaine’s vast wealth, rooted in oil and political transformation from small-town Republican bastion lumber, into political causes. to environmentally minded progressive outpost; he helped engineer the essential political infrastructure that made it happen and sustained it. Parker left the News & Review after three years to see if he could salvage—with Stanley Sheinbaum’s money—what was left of Ramparts magazine, then known for biting leftwing commentary and cutting-edge investigative reporting. He quickly discovered he could not. He then helped found Mother Jones, the magazine that among other things exposed how Ford executive Lee Iacocca turned the Ford Pinto into a fiery death trap rather than insert a simple safety device that would have added $20 to the car’s cost. Along the way, he would advise the likes of Senator Ted Kennedy and Daniel Patrick Moynihan. In 1993, he became a senior fellow with the Shorenstein Center and lecturer at Harvard’s Kennedy School. In 2005, Parker published what’s emerged as the definitive biography of John Kenneth Galbraith, one of the most politically influential economists of the 20th century. As a Over time, Parker worked closely with Tremaine, helping writer, Parker has a gift for fusing touching details with genuguide her political and social philanthropy that ended up ine erudition. Parker’s interest in the subject makes obvious supporting some of the most influential progressive organiza- sense. Like Parker, Galbraith focused on the consequences of tions in Santa Barbara and the nation. When you are giving economic inequality. Parker tells war stories of late-night meetings with Galaway $55 million you can make quite an impact. Tremaine and Parker focused on social justice and civil braith and former President Bill Clinton. Even late at night, rights, leaving the environmental philanthropy to others. Tre- Galbraith — considerably older than Clinton and more maine’s money helped get the Neighborhood Medical Clinic’s liberal politically—could talk the famously vociferous exWestside offices opened. They underwrote the Santa Barbara president under the table. As one such encounter came to a Tenants Union, Network (a precursor of CAUSE) and ump- close, Parker recounted, Galbraith held a worn-out Clinton teen projects having to do with the civil rights of homeless in a two-handed clasp, leaned in close, and said, “What this people. If not for Tremaine and Parker, Santa Barbara would country doesn’t need is two Republican parties.” have had no Legal Defense Center, which routinely took Parker’s political journey started with journalism and the City Hall to court—and often won—over discriminatory News & Review. Now that he’s sold his shares in the Indepenpractices regarding the unhoused. They trained local home- dent and retired from Harvard, Parker is entertaining the idea less people in the art of political organization, and for years, of an RV trip across the country with his wife. “In this world Santa Barbara had the most politically mobilized homeless we’re living in, I don’t know what’s next. I still worry about free population on the planet. speech. I still worry about the surveillance state,” he said. “I’m Nationally, it was the same but on a much bigger scale. Tre- still very much about the paper.” maine was a major underwriter of Native American rights and Over the years, countless people have applied their creative helped bankroll organizations fighting U.S. military interven- energies at the Santa Barbara Independent. They’ve all had tion in places like El Salvador and Nicaragua. When one of my their own reasons for wanting to do so. But one of the big sisters got a job as an organizer working for the Committee in reasons there was an Independent to work at, was the steadfast Solidarity with the People of El Salvador in Washington, D.C., participation of Richard Parker. From all of us, thank you. n

'When I moved here in the 1970s, this town was solidly Republican and very, very good-old-boy conservative. Now look at it.' —Richard Parker

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ALWAYS

AMAZING.

The Arlington Theatre

NE VER

­

ROUTINE.

­

Advance Previews 9/8: 9/8: MEDIEVAL BARBARIAN

9/2: GIGI & NATE

9/2: HONK FOR JESUS. SAVE YOUR SOUL.

9/2: SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME

Hitchcock

Paseo Nuevo • Fairveiw

(Bonus Footage) Metro 4 • Camino

HOME FREE SEPTEMBER 16 | FRIDAY | 8PM

Fiesta 5 • Camino

Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Sept 2-8, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

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PESADO

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

SEPTEMBER 23 | FRIDAY | 8PM

CHRISTOPHER CROSS SEPTEMBER 24 | SATURDAY | 8PM

QUEEN NATION OCTOBER 1 | SATURDAY | 8PM

Honk for Jesus. Save Our Soul* (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Sat-Mon: 2:20, 5:00, 7:30. Breaking (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:45. Sat-Mon: 2:05. Three Thousand Years of Longing* (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 7:20. Sat-Mon: 4:40, 7:20. DC League of Super-Pets (PG): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:30, 7:05. Sat-Mon: 1:55, 4:30, 7:05.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Spider-Man: No Way Home* (Bonus Footage) (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:50, 8:15. Sat-Mon: 1:25, 4:50, 8:15. The Invitation (R): Fri, Tue-Wed: 5:00, 7:35. Sat-Mon: 2:20, 5:00, 7:35. Thur: 5:00. Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero (PG13): (Dub) Fri, Tue-Wed: 5:25, 7:55. Sat-Mon: 2:40, 5:25, 7:55. Thur: 5:25. Beast (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:55. Sat-Mon: 3:00. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri,Tue-Thur: 4:40, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 1:35, 4:40, 7:45. Nope (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 8:30. Sat-Mon: 5:30, 8:30. Bullet Train (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:10, 8:05. Sat-Mon: 2:10, 5:10, 8:05. Barbarian* (R): Thur: 7:55. Medieval (R): Thur: 7:35.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER.

Gigi & Nate (PG13): Fri, Thur: 5:00, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. Spin Me Round (NR): Fri-Mon, Thur: 7:30. Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (PG): Fri, Thur: 4:45. Sat-Mon: 2:00, 4:45.

ARLINGTON

Welcome to Freedom 26

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SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

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1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri-Thur: 4:00, 7:00.

METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Spider-Man: No Way Home* (Bonus Footage) (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:40, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 1:25, 4:40, 7:45. Beast (R): Fri-Thur: 7:55. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:00, 8:05. Sat-Mon: 1:55, 5:00, 8:05. Bullet Train (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:50, 8:15. Sat-Mon: 1:40, 4:50, 8:15. DC League of Super-Pets (PG): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:10. Sat-Mon: 2:30, 5:10.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Orphan: First Kill (R): Fri, Tue/Wed: 5:45, 8:15. Sat-Mon: 3:15, 5:45, 8:15. Thur: 5:45. The Invitation (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:30, 8:05. Sat-Mon: 2:45, 5:30, 8:05. Where the Crawdads Sing (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:50, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 1:55, 4:50, 7:45. Minions: The Rise of Gru (PG): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:40, 7:00. Sat-Mon: 2:20, 4:40, 7:00. Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero (Dub) (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Sat-Mon: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Barbarian* (R): Thur: 8:15.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Honk for Jesus. Save Our Soul* (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:50, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 1:40, 4:50, 7:45. Breaking (PG!3): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:30. Sat-Mon: 2:30. Three Thousand Years of Longing (R): Fri, Tue-Wed: 5:20, 7:55. Sat-Mon: 2:15, 5:20, 7:55. Thur: 5:20. Nope (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 8:05. Sat-Mon: 5:00, 8:05. Elvis (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:15, 7:30. Sat-Mon: 1:50, 4:15, 7:30. Medieval (R): Thur: 7:55.


SEPT. 1-7

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE

by

TERRY & VICTORIA ORTEGA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY

9/1-9/4:

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

you wish for” is the theme of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Brothers Grimm–inspired musical that follows the Baker and his wife, who journey through the woods to break the Witch’s spell that has left them childless. They cross paths with Cinderella and Rapunzel, their Princes, Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf, and so many more. Recommended for ages 8 and up. 8pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $43.50-$55. Call (805) 922-8313. pcpa.org/shows

Opera S.B. present this sampling of art and music with a pop-up performance of music from around the globe inspired by SBMA’s current exhibition Going Global: Abstract Art at Mid-Century. 5:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call (805) 963-4364.

Flume will bring his hypnotic, immersive, electronic, experimental hyperpop to S.B. with TSHA and Sega Bodega to open. One dollar per ticket will go toward climate change organizations. 6pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $42$72. Call (805) 962-7411.

sbbowl.com/concerts

9/1: Game Night at Paseo Nuevo Enjoy a warm summer evening in the courtyard playing jumbo chess and Jenga, cornhole, bocce, and open roller-skating with skate rentals. 5-8pm. Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free.

paseonuevoshopping.com/events

blues sound from Grammy-nominated singer/songwriter and guitarist Tab Benoit with special guest Nashville-based guitarist and singer JD Simo. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $39-$49; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761.

lobero.org/whats-on

9/2-9/5:

S.B. Stu-

dio Artists’ Open Studios Tour The Central Coast’s largest studio tour will feature the works of studio artists, along with exclusive access to the artists in their studios. Tickets and tour maps will be available at the S.B. Community Arts Workshop (SBCAW) all weekend. Proceeds will benefit the Alpha Resource Center. Opening Reception: Fri.: 5-8pm. Tour hours: Sat.-Sun.: 11am-5pm; Mon.: 11am-2pm. SBCAW, 631 Garden St. $25. Call (805) 280-9178.

9/2-9/5: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Hoodlum Friends, 6-9pm. Sat.: Grass Mountain, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.:

9/2, 9/3: Uptown Lounge Fri.: The Trio, 5-7pm; Brandon Kinalele, 7:3010:30pm. Sat.: DJ Chris, 8-11pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800.

Tina Schlieske and the Graceland Exiles with Sister Laura 9/7: Sandbar Sun-Dried Vibes, 3pm. 514 State St. Free. Call (805) 966-1388.

tinyurl.com/SundriedVibes

uptownlounge805.com/events

9/7: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Wed.: Sean Hayes Band, Matt

9/3: Andrew Murray Vineyards

Jaffe, 8pm. $20. Ages 21+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

Loren Radis, noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 686-9604.

sohosb.com/events

andrewmurrayvineyards.com/visit/ events

9/3: Painting at Santa Rita Hills Lavender Farm Join in the pictur-

9/1: Flume, TSHA, Sega Bodega Australian producer

Browne, 7pm. $46-$91. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

event-calendar/

SATURDAY 9/3

sbma.net/events

9/1, 9/3, 9/7: S.B. Bowl Concert 21+. Call (805) 358-1439. Thu.: Flume, 6pm. $42-$72. Sat.: Goo Goo theredpiano.com/schedule Dolls, 7pm. $45-$155. Wed.: Jackson

Carmen & The Renegade Vigilantes, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: JB & The Big Circle Riders, 8:30-11:30pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/

9/2: Lobero LIVE presents Tab Benoit Take in the gritty and soulful Delta

FRIDAY 9/2

9/5: The Red Piano RJ Mischo, 7:30pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages

9/2-9/3: Maverick Saloon Fri.:

cfsb.info/sat

COURTESY

9/1: Pop-Up Opera SBMA and

Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 3314363. lostchordguitars.com

Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1-4pm. Mon.: Tina Schlieske and the Graceland Exiles with Sister Laura, 1-4pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

PCPA Presents Into the Woods “Be careful what

9/1, 9/3, 9/7: Lost Chord Guitars 9/4: Zaca Mesa Winery Brad Thu.: Arwen Lewis, 7:30-9:30pm. $5. Sat.: Welker, noon-3pm. 6905 Foxen Canyon The Band Carter, 8-11:30pm. $10. Wed.: Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 688Matt McCarrin Jazz, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. 1576 9339. zacamesa.com

COURTESY

THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

JAY RAFTERY

1 THURSDAY 9/

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

esque lavender fields to sip delicious wine and capture the beauty of the landscape on canvas with assistance from a trained artist. No experience necessary. 10am-1:30pm. Santa Rita Hills Lavender, 1900 Tularosa Rd., Lompoc. $85. Ages 21+. Call (805) 395-6568.

9/3:

Suburbanoid Sound Bath Meditation on the Beach

Take a moment to relax and rejuvenate with a meditation experience that will feature a fusion sitar, Tibetan singing bowls, gong, chimes, vocals, and more. Bring a yoga mat or blanket to sit or lie down on. 9:3010:30am. Leadbetter Beach (left side of parking lot as you drive in), Shoreline Dr. $25. tinyurl.com/SuburbanoidSoundBath COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

tinyurl.com/LavenderPainting

9/3: Goo Goo Dolls The Goo Goo Dolls, out with their new album, Chaos in Bloom, will no doubt bring out the classics like “Iris,”“Name,”“Slide,” and more. Blue October, an American rock band from Houston, will open the show with their alternative indie sound. 7pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $45-$155. Call (805) 962-7411.

sbbowl.com/concerts

santabarbarastudioartists.com

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

27


O P E R A SA N TA BAR BA R A

TO SCA

TICKETS STARTING AT $25!

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Design: James Van Arsdale & Jinhee Hwang

Volunteer With Us!

(805) 692-2226 zoe@sbhabitat.org sbhabitat.org/volunteer

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Featuring

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

ently An indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! hop since ently ASn indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! Shop since Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS! Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

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T HE

FRI

SEPT

SUNDAY 9/4

2

9/4: UCSB Carillon Summer Recital Bring a blanket or lawn chair and come listen to the bells ring from University Carillonist Wesley Arai, who will perform original works, plus an arrangement of classical and modern favorites. 2pm. Storke Tower, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-3230. music.ucsb.edu

MONDAY 9/5 9/5: Tina Schlieske and the Graceland Exiles with Sister Laura Take in original material as well as old R&B, rock, and soul sounds from this S.B.-based band that includes Tina’s sister and B-Side member Laura Schlieske. 1-4pm. Cold Spring Tavern, 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com/entertainment

9/6:

Chaucer’s Author Talk and Book-Signing: Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo Author

Tab Benoit with special guest JD Simo

“Benoit is one of the most impressive guitarists to emerge from Southern Louisiana and his guitar tone and style is easily recognized – as is his soulful voice. He wasn’t awarded B.B. King Entertainer of the Year (Blues Music Awards) for nothing.” – Rock and Blues Muse

Listen at

Leslie Rinchen-Wongmo will read from and sign copies of her book Threads of Awakening: An American Woman’s Journey into Tibet’s Sacred Textile Art, which is part art book, part memoir, and part spiritual travelogue. S.B. resident Marlénè Zoellner, MFT, will join her in conversation. 6pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787.

independent.com/theindy

TUESDAY 9/6

Tomorrow!

chaucersbooks.com/ event

COURTESY

WEDNESDAY 9/7

WED

SEPT

28

A masterful storyteller who “observes the world with a clinically poetic eye.” - The NY Times EARL MINNIS PRESENTS &

Suzanne Vega

An Intimate Evening of Songs and Stories with

PRESENT

GOLDENVOICE PRESENTS

with special guest

ARSUN

9/7:

Wharf Wednesdays Visit the wharf every first Wednesday

of the month to celebrate Stearns Wharf’s 150th birthday with merchant specials and live music from The Academy. 6-8pm. Stearns Wharf, 217 Stearns Wharf. Free. stearnswharf.org

SEPT 9

SEPT 15

VISIT LOBERO.ORG OR 805.963.0761 LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT

FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

INDEPENDENT.COM

John C. Mithun

@loberotheatre

Foundation

SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

29


living

Health

p. 30

COURTESY

Sansum Hosts Camp Wheez 2022

Community

S

ansum’s Camp Wheez celebrated its 45th year this August by welcoming 19 children for a week of asthma education. The free community program was hosted at First Presbyterian Church and offered campers the knowledge and skills to manage their asthma while leading active, healthy lives. Directed by Sansum Clinic Allergist and Immunologist Myron Liebhaber, the camp featured talks and demonstrations by volunteer doctors, allergists, respiratory therapists, and nurses. “We could not have

COURTESY

Library, WEV Team Up for Childcare Business Classes

asked for a more capable and wonderful group,” said Liebhaber. “This is a true community effort, and we’re incredibly grateful for the many donors, volunteers, and supporters who have made Camp Wheez possible for this long.” Campers participated in not only art projects and games but also the Lung Lab. Highlights included studying pig lungs to understand how the respiratory system works. —Melea Maglalang

COURTESY

Sports

M

Elings Opens Nine-Hole Disc Golf Course A

nine-hole disc golf course is now open at Elings Park. Family-friendly and free to play, it’s designed for beginners and offers sweeping views of the park, Hendry’s Beach, and Arroyo Burro Watershed. Access to the first hole is from the softball field parking lot. “The elevations are outstanding, and players should enjoy excellent strokes from our mesa into the arroyo below,” said Dean Noble, executive director of

30

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

Elings Park. “But the course’s biggest hazard are the epic views. Players have a tough time concentrating.” The course was proposed and funded by Bob Bryant of Bryant & Sons Jewelry, a longtime Elings Park supporter. Disc golfers Mike Evans and Noah Peresman designed it, and it was installed by the Sage Trail Alliance. For more information, including an overview of play and a glossary of disc golf slang, visit elingspark.org. —MM INDEPENDENT.COM

any working Santa Barbara families are using a combination of friends, family, and neighborhood providers to piece together care for their kids. The pandemic has made the need for more childcare options even more pronounced. In response, the Santa Barbara Public Library has partnered with Women’s Economic Ventures (WEV) to offer a free, fiveweek series of classes for aspiring small business childcare providers. Classes in Spanish were offered in the spring, and this fall, the Managing Your Own Childcare Business series is being offered in English. Classes begin September 12 and will be held virtually on Mondays from 6-8 p.m. “Providing high-quality early literacy classes has always been a library goal, and now we are working with community partners to expand our offerings to broaden our reach and impact,” said Library Director Jessica Cadiente. The library and WEV have collaborated over the past year to develop the curriculum. The series will cover everything from licensing to resources, marketing strategies, business administration, budgeting, pricing, and creating a business plan. The library also offers laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots for those who may not have the resources to access the virtual programs. They are available to anyone with a library card. Visit sbplibrary.org for more information. —MM


Sports

COURTESY

Can’t Keep Courtney Down

living SEPT 2 - 8 "REMINISCENT OF THE COEN BROTHERS… SLICKLY ENTERTAINING."

S

anta Barbara resident Courtney Barnes competed earlier this month in the annual TransRockies Run in Colorado, racing across 120 miles of steep terrain over the course of a week. Barnes placed first in five of the six stages—running about 20 miles each day and camping between stages—in the Women’s Solo Division. “It was something that was so far out of my bounds. I had never done anything similar to it,” Barnes said. “So I just approached it with having fun and wanting to enjoy every step. Overall, it was one of the best experiences of my life.”

COURTESY

THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

FRI: 7:30pm SAT: 5:00pm SUN: 2:15pm MON / WED: 5:00pm TUES / THURS: 7:30pm

Runner Trades Track for Trails and More Balanced Life by Melea Maglalang The TransRockies Run marked Barnes’s entry back into professional racing after a year-long break. She said the experience reminded her of what got her into competitive running in the first place. “This was a big challenge, and it was something that I didn’t know if I could complete, let alone be good at,” Barnes said. “It opens up the door to do a lot of things that I might not have done before in the past.” Running has always been a big part of Barnes’s life. Born and raised in Kansas, she joined her high school’s cross country team and eventually ran Division 1 track and field for the University of Kansas. She competed at the 2018 U.S. Track and Field Championships, and her performance earned her a spot on the international team during the Europe vs. U.S.A. competition in 2019. Throughout her professional career, Barnes said she struggled with aspects of her identity as an athlete, especially after graduating college and thinking about what she wanted to do next. “When I hit the real world, I was like, ‘Okay, I want to have a lot of other things in my life,’ ” she said. When she moved to Santa Barbara last year, Barnes decided to take a “soft retirement” from running to focus on a balanced lifestyle away from her “sole identity” as an athlete. “I kind of gave myself a goal of not feeling like I had to run,” she said. “I wanted to really experience living here without associating it with running.”

Since she is a lover of the outdoors, it wasn’t long before Barnes started spending early mornings running in the mountains or along the beach. But for Barnes, these runs were different from the track—she didn’t have to worry about hitting her mile splits, calculating her times, or running under any kind of pressure. “Every track, you run in a circle like a hamster,” she explained. “[Trail running] was like a boundless opportunity to go and just be outside.” Soon after, she found a place within the local trailrunning community. “I’m continually getting pulled in that direction because the people are just so much more balanced in life,” she said. “They usually do a lot of things or have families, but whatever’s going on in trail runners’ lives, they’re badass to the bone.” During the TransRockies race, Barnes thought about the people who have supported her throughout her career. “A lot of [my experience] was enjoying the surroundings,” she said, “but also remembering all the people who got me [where I am].” She also remembered to have fun—just a week off work “frolicking in the mountains,” she said. Outside of running, Barnes finds other ways to be active through biking or yoga. She also enjoys adventuring with her husband and taking walks downtown with their pet husky. “You can be an athlete, but you can also be a mom or sister or friend or involved in your community—whatever it is,” Barnes said. “I like to always remind myself that I’m more than a runner.” n

FRI: 5:00pm / SAT: 7:30pm / SUN: 5:00pm MON / WED: 7:30pm TUES / THURS: 5:00pm

FRI: 2:45pm / SAT: 2:45pm SUN: 12:00pm / MON: 2:45pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

31


Super CuCaS Santa Barbara

®

Runner-Up

Food Meets Music at

Local in Montecito

VOTED SANTA

BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 27 YEARS

IN A ROW!

BREAKFAST

“I

EVERY DAY!

BURRITO $799

was something to do at night,” says Mike Sheldon, the owner of the new Coast Village Road eatery Local. As a music lover who played the drums in high school and college, Sheldon made sure that when they opened, Local would offer live music nightly. In fact, the music lineup is the first thing you will find when looking up their website. With the help of Executive Chef Jonathan McDermott, Sheldon’s love for cooking and live music have come together to create the perfect location for a summer evening, al fresco, in Montecito. Sheldon has always loved cooking and eating. He was going to go to cooking school when he was given the opportunity to become CEO of Goletabased tech company Curvature in 2004. “In my years at Curvature, I traveled all over the place, so I traveled a lot and ate out almost every night, so I fell in love with cuisine from all over the world,” Sheldon said. When he got home, Sheldon frequented the local Santa Barbara markets and cooked every night.

2018

Best of

Santa Barbara

®

winner

Micheltorena & Mesa Locations

e Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Fre Mesa Locations) (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena &

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626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028 6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806

EATS & DRINKS Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm 1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) • (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205. 32

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SEPTEMBER 1, 2022

n Montecito, what seemed to be missing most

INDEPENDENT.COM

Serving Up Comfort and Live Music on Coast Village Road by Rebecca Horrigan

Sheldon retired from his role at Curvature in 2017, and when COVID hit, he found himself in a position to make a change. When the space that was formerly Khao Kaeng became available, he jumped at the opportunity to open his first restaurant. Chris Chiarappa, Sheldon’s good friend and owner of such popular spots as Mesa Burger and Corner Tap, provided wisdom and support. Sheldon also put together a dream team of chefs to anchor the kitchen. “One of the fun parts is that we have a great team,” Sheldon said. Executive Chef Jonathan McDermott, previously at Sear Restaurant in Solvang; Jason Carter from Pure Joy Catering; and Adam Sanacore from The Lark all play a key role in creating the dynamic menu and ensuring each dish is meticulously prepared. Manager Romy Buhringer has a background in the wine industry, evident by the thoughtfully curated wine list. The selections are diverse and playful, with offerings like Dreamcôte’s sparkling grenache rosé and house wines created by artisanal winemaker Paul Lato, along with local favorites like Jonata’s velvety cabernet sauvignon, syrah, and petit verdot “Todos” blend. While Local’s list makes a point to feature several local wines, they also delve into wines from all over the world, echoing the menu’s international flavors. “Most of the dishes came out of my memory of eating somewhere or another,” Sheldon explained. “We’ve got fish and chips from London with a southern spicy twist; we’ve got fish tacos, which are local, but we also have crudos that you’d find in Singapore or Tokyo.” This world tour of tastes is not to be missed. The fried cauliflower florets nestled in an addictive garlic tahini whip and ladolemono sauce make a perfect starter. We also began our meal with the yellowtail crudo bathed in a bright broth of charred pineapple

Pan-seared salmon with black jasmine rice

and Fresno chile, the perfect palate-primer. Their seafood sings of the sea, which is no wonder since they work with local fisherman and the Santa Barbara Fish Market to find their freshest catch. “You can’t beat the fish tacos,” Sheldon said. “We use fresh Channel Islands rockfish, blackened.” Their pan-seared salmon is also a tour de force, featuring a coconut curry broth, broccolini, fried leeks, basil, and mint served with a deliciously nutty black jasmine rice. The citrus beet salad layered atop a bed of whipped ricotta and garnished with watercress, toasted hazelnuts, mint, orange, and ninja radish provides a mouthwatering example of what happens when fresh produce is placed in expert hands. “There’s a lot of fun to be had with local ingredients,” Sheldon said. The creative cocktail list complements each fullflavored dish and also aids in ushering in the dancing once the opening chords on the sweet baby grand piano are struck. Assistant General Manager Presley Marone hails from bartending at the Rosewood Miramar Beach and collaborated with Sheldon on creating a strong list of drinks. “Fifty percent of the drinks came out of my COVID chemistry experiments,” Sheldon explained of his research and development of the menu. Spicy marg lovers will enjoy the Hot off the Plancha, a tasty concoction of jalapeño-infused Arette Blanco tequila, Grand Marnier, lime, Ancho Reyes, and blood orange puree. Local beers on tap such as Topa Topa’s Spectro Hazy IPA offer a little something for everyone. If drinks aren’t your thing, the delectable array of desserts is sure to elongate the night. Linger over their silky peanut-butter pie or a seasonal cobbler topped with fresh ice cream, and get a little too comfortable on that cozy patio couch with cappuccino at your side. Local boasts a large TV inside as well as two outdoor TVs, and they are looking forward to increasing their game-day festivities. Their Sunday jazz brunch pairs the sweet sounds of local musicians with brunch favorites like avocado toast as well as more exotic fare like the Santa Barbara Hot Brown starring sourdough bread, roasted turkey, thickcut Nueske’s bacon, farmers’ market tomatoes, and sunny-side-up egg topped with Mornay sauce. “We’re going to try and keep it light, have fun, and keep the character of the place,” Sheldon said. With the warm and bubbly service, convivial spirit, incredible food, and entertainment, Local is the perfect spot to breathe some (night) life into Coast Village Road.

1187 Coast Village Rd.; (805) 770-2269; localmontecito.com

COURTESY

2018

Best of

ecito

mont


owners, Bion and Anna Rice, started collaborating with artists from near and far to create their labels when they launched the brand more than 20 years ago. Many of their bottles — mostly empty ones — still serve as decorations in my own house, as it was one of the first wine clubs I ever joined half a lifetime ago. In fact, a limited print of one of the earliest collabs with Christina LoCascio Larner looms over our dining table, a wine-as-paint piece that both my wife and I secretly jostled over buying as an anniversary gift during a wine club event until we realized we were both trying to do the same thing. (She won the race, but we both won the painting.) For Artiste’s upcoming release of sparkling rosé and chardonnay, the Rices are sourcing straight from downtown Santa Barbara. Those two bottles feature the environmentally ethereal paintings of Colette Cosentino, whose working studio and gallery is located at 11 West Anapamu Street. Cosentino is known for much larger works than what a wine bottle allows, but these particular pieces very much match the wines. The sparkler, which is based in chardonnay with a 10 percent carignane addition, sports a very fine mousse, with strawberry and light rose flavors playing against a steely minerality, complemented by the artist’s leafy label, which is titled “Fruits.” The chardonnay from La Presa Vineyard is laced in sunny apple and bright citrus tones, much like Cosentino’s green-and-yellow speckled piece “Greenbelt” that accompanies the bottle. “During the pandemic, I had the time and space to reflect on what Artiste really is and how I wanted the brand to expand and move forward in new ways,” said Anna Rice. “After working with artists from across the country for more than 20 years, being home in Santa Barbara during the lockdown allowed me to reconnect with my local Santa Barbara community.” That’s when she found Cosentino’s studio, and they were soon working together. The wines and a selection of Cosentino’s work are available at the Artiste Tasting Studio, 2948 Grand Avenue in Los Olivos, and via artiste.com. There will also be a special release party on September 9 at the Colette Cosentino Atelier, 11 West Anapamu St., which is open by appointment. See colettecosentino.com. —Matt Kettmann

FOOD & DRINK

C

elebrating fine art is a core mission of Artiste Winery, whose

WEEK

Artiste Winery x Colette Cosentino

COURTESY

r

Sip This

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SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT’S

NICHE NEWSLETTERS Get exclusive content directly to your inbox from our editors

Sarah Sinclair will give you the inside scoop on real estate, going behind the scenes each Sunday to see our region’s casitas, cottages, and castles.

A snapshot view of the best of local culture and fun happenings in the worlds of music, theater, visual art, film, dance, books, lectures, and more from Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg.

A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers.

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

S.B. STUDIO ARTISTS’ ANNUAL OPEN STUDIOS TOUR LOCAL ARTISTS OPEN THEIR DOORS TO THE PUBLIC THIS LABOR DAY WEEKEND

L I F E

COURTESY

that kind of closeness with techniques in Italy; Betsy Gallery (elizabeth people who are receiving gallery.com), a mosaic artist who combines your art; it kind of makes classical handmade Italian glass smalti and everything comfortable,” 24-karat gold tesserae with recycled porsaid Bennett, who works celain, ceramics, and found objects; Rob out of the Clay Studio in Robinson (robrobinsonart.com), whose Goleta, predominantly in expressive oil paintings reflect the world acrylics, oils, and pencils. around him; and Eric Saint Georges (ericBennett said she is saintgeorges.com), a Paris-born and -trained inspired by the people who sculptor and figurative artist. visit her studio. “When I’m All 28 of the participating artists will have creating, I’m only with their work on view at the opening recepmyself, and with the image tion and tour preview on Friday, Septemor with the painting that ber 2, from 5-8 p.m. at the Community I’m creating. When I’m Arts Workshop (CAW), 631 Garden Street. opening the studio, in a Participating studios will be open 11 a.m.-5 way, it’s great, because I’m p.m. on September 3-4, and 11 a.m.-2 p.m. meeting new people, and on September 5. Tickets are $25 and available I see their reactions. … at CAW (during the tour weekend only), Generally, I am very pri- or online at santabarbarastudioartists.com. vate, but then I’m putting Ticket sales benefit the Alpha Resource my soul right on the can- Center of Santa Barbara and Slingshot Art vas for everybody to take Gallery, a nonprofit whose mission is to it and interpret and love it empower individuals with intellectual and Artist Danuta Bennett is one of 28 local artists who will open their or hate it. But a lot of the developmental disabilities by supporting studios at the annual Labor Day Santa Barbara Studio Artists’ event. times when I talk to some- families, creating opportunities, and fosterbody who has never seen ing belonging. ffering an opportunity to peek behind my art before, they will notice different ele—Leslie Dinaberg the curtain and see where some of ments, they respond differently, our favorite artists create their work, and sometimes that allows me to Santa Barbara Studio Artists’ 21st Annual get inspiration for the next piece.” Open Studios Tour is a rare chance to visit Additional featured artists on the studios of 28 local painters, sculptors, the tour are: Dorothy Churchillpaper artists, collage, mixed-media, mosaic, Johnson (churchill-johnson.com), and assemblage artists—each one as unique who is known for mural-size and inspiring as the individuals themselves. contemporary realist oil paintFor Danuta Bennett (danutabennett ings; Cheryl Doty (doty-art.com), .com), who specializes in expressive, evoca- whose work includes abstract reptive realism and is one of this year’s featured resentational paintings, portraits, artists, the annual tour is more than just an still lifes, and figurative work; opportunity to sell her art. “Even though Angela Ferraro (angelaferraro there’s not always conversation about art, it is .com), who was classically trained still very warm and fun. And I kind of crave in tenebroso (light and shadow) oil Dorothy Churchill

TRICIA EVENSON’S T-SQUARED T-Squared is the new solo exhibit featured at the Santa Barbara Tennis Club (SBTC) from artist Tricia Evenson, on view from September 2 to October 5. While not quite a 180 career-wise for Evenson—who paints primarily in acrylics, having turned her creative focus to fine art in 2012, after decades of work as creative director and designer for prestigious clients such as UCLA, The Los Angeles County Museum of Art, USC, The Getty Center, and The Tournament of Roses, among others—the artist states, “I usually generate my art spontaneously and without conscious reasoning or a vision of what it will be once complete. My paintings are extemporaneous expressions of the energy that is flowing through me in the moment, and in my process, I am continually finding resonance with

the abstract and expressive use of texture, color, and light.” Works on view by the UCSB and Art Center College of Design graduate include T-Squared, a series that which represents the laws of nature and relates to the four elements of the physical world: earth, air, water, and fire. Evenson’s Scrap Patch series repurposes what would be scrap paintings, which are then cut into small squares and carefully rearranged, embellished, and glued to vividly painted canvases. Also on view is her Language of Water series, which explores divergent waterscapes. The SBTC gallery is open daily from 9 a.m.-7 p.m., with an artist’s reception on September 9, from 4:30-6 p.m. For more information, visit santabarbaratennisclub.com/art. —LD

Scrap Patch series by Tricia Evenson

INDY BOOK CLUB: HARLEM SHUFFLE BY COLSON WHITEHEAD

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Colson Whitehead novels have one thing in common: They all cleverly subvert genre expectations. His works include a coming-of-age novel (Sag Harbor), historical novels inspired by real-life horror that maintain realism (The Nickel Boys) or incorporate fantasy elements (The Underground Railroad), a post-apocalyptic zombie novel (Zone One) and even one about elevator inspectors that’s really a detective story (The Intuitionist). In his latest novel, Harlem Shuffle, Whitehead writes a fresh take on classic crime novels in his tribute to midcentury Harlem. Ray Carney is a Black man who graduates from college, opens a furniture store, and marries into a wealthy Strivers’ Row family with high expectations. When shadier opportunities present themselves, Carney is tempted. Tensions arise from his own struggles with just how “crooked” he will go in pursuit of prosperity and respect, knowing that the risks he takes could put his family in danger. It’s impressive how Whitehead develops a masterful heist while creating exciting — and sometimes hilarious — characters. Whitehead exposes the hypocrisy of the world by juxtaposing the respected elite and law enforcement against criminals they have much in common with, against the backdrop of Harlem’s gentrification. Readers far removed from the Harlem of the '60s can still relate to Carney’s “dorvay,” or the time after dinner with his wife and kids and snugly tucking them into bed, when he plans his crooked activities. A business and family man is one side of his persona, but he can’t deny his roots or his need for revenge against those that have wronged him. Anyone who has battled their own demons will appreciate Carney’s moral struggle as a character who defies categorization based on the classic tropes of good guys and bad guys. Join the Indy Book Club, a collaboration between the Santa Barbara Independent and the Santa Barbara Public Library, for a virtual discussion of Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead on Wednesday, September 28, at 6 p.m. on Zoom. Register at independent.com/ indybookclub. —Kim Crail, Santa Barbara Public Library

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 1

ARIES

Join us in reading September’s book of the month! SEPTEMBER’S THEME:

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

Discussion:

Wednesday, September 28, at 6pm on Zoom BOOK O F THE M O N TH :

Harlem Shuffle by Colson Whitehead

Register at independent.com/ indybookclub

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): In his poem “Autobiographia Literaria,” Aries-born Frank O’Hara wrote, “When I was a child, I played in a corner of the schoolyard all alone. If anyone was looking for me, I hid behind a tree and cried out, ‘I am an orphan.’ ” Over the years, though, O’Hara underwent a marvelous transformation. This is how his poem ends: “And here I am, the center of all beauty! Writing these poems! Imagine!” In the coming months, Aries, I suspect that you, too, will have the potency to outgrow and transcend a sadness or awkwardness from your own past. The shadow of an old source of suffering may not disappear completely, but I bet it will lose much of its power to diminish you.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): In his poem “Auguries of Innocence,” William Blake (1757–1827) championed the ability “to see a World in a Grain of Sand. And a Heaven in a Wild Flower. Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Taurus, you are primed to do just that in the coming days. You have the power to discern the sacred in the midst of mundane events. The magic and mystery of life will shine from every little thing you encounter. So I will love it if you deliver the following message to a person you care for: “Now I see that the beauty I had not been able to find in the world is in you.”

born Ursula K. Le Guin wrote, “What goes too long unchanged destroys itself. The forest is forever because it dies and dies and so lives.” I trust you’re embodying those truths right now. You’re in a phase of your cycle when you can’t afford to remain unchanged. You need to enthusiastically and purposefully engage in dissolutions that will prepare the way for your rebirth in the weeks after your birthday. The process might sometimes feel strenuous, but it should ultimately be great fun.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): As a Scorpio, novelist Fyodor Dostoyevsky was rarely guilty of oversimplification. Like any intelligent person, he could hold contradictory ideas in his mind without feeling compelled to seek more superficial truths. He wrote, “The causes of human actions are usually immeasurably more complex and varied than our subsequent explanations of them.” I hope you will draw inspiration from his example in the coming weeks, dear Scorpio. I trust you will resist the temptation to reduce colorful mysteries to straightforward explanations. There will always be at least three sides to every story. I invite you to relish glorious paradoxes and fertile enigmas.

SAGITTARIUS

(May 21-June 20): “The time you enjoy wasting is not wasted time,” said philosopher Bertrand Russell. I will add that the time you enjoy wasting is often essential to your wellbeing. For the sake of your sanity and health, you periodically need to temporarily shed your ambitions and avoid as many of your responsibilities as you safely can. During these interludes of refreshing emptiness, you recharge your precious life energy. You become like a fallow field allowing fertile nutrients to regenerate. In my astrological opinion, now is one of these revitalizing phases for you.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Author Zadie Smith praised Sagittarian writer Joan Didion. She says, “I remain grateful for the day I picked up Joan Didion’s Slouching Towards Bethlehem and realized that a woman could speak without hedging her bets, without hemming and hawing, without making nice, without sounding pleasant or sweet, without deference, and even without doubt.” I encourage Sagittarians of every gender to be inspired by Didion in the coming weeks. It’s a favorable time to claim more of the authority you have earned. Speak your kaleidoscopic wisdom without apology or dilution. More fiercely than ever before, embody your high ideals and show how well they work in the rhythms of daily life.

CANCER

CAPRICORN

GEMINI

(June 21-July 22): “My own curiosity and interest are insatiable,” wrote Cancerian author Emma Lazarus (1849– 1887). Inspired by the wealth of influences she absorbed, she created an array of poetry, plays, novels, essays, and translations—including the famous poem that graces the pedestal of America’s Statue of Liberty. I recommend her as a role model for you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. I think you’re ripe for an expansion and deepening of your curiosity. You will benefit from cultivating an enthusiastic quest for new information and fresh influences. Here’s a mantra for you: “I am wildly innocent as I vivify my soul’s education.”

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Blogger Scott Williams writes, “There are two kinds of magic. One comes from the heroic leap, the upward surge of energy, the explosive arc that burns bright across the sky. The other kind is the slow accretion of effort: the water-on-stone method, the soft root of the plant that splits the sidewalk, the constant wind that scours the mountain clean.” Can you guess which type of magic will be your specialty in the coming weeks, Leo? It will be the laborious, slow accretion of effort. And that is precisely what will work best for the tasks that are most important for you to accomplish.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Now that I’m free to be myself, who am I?” Virgo-born Mary Oliver asks that question to start one of her poems. She spends the rest of the poem speculating on possible answers. At the end, she concludes she mostly longs to be an “empty, waiting, pure, speechless receptacle.” Such a state of being might work well for a poet with lots of time on her hands, but I don’t recommend it for you in the coming weeks. Instead, I hope you’ll be profuse, active, busy, experimental, and expressive. That’s the best way to celebrate the fact that you are now freer to be yourself than you have been in a while.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In her book Tales From Earthsea, Libra-

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn novelist Marcia Douglas writes books about the history of her people in Jamaica. In one passage, she writes, “My grandmother used to tell stories about women that change into birds and lizards. One day, a church-going man dared to laugh at her; he said it was too much for him to swallow. My grandmother looked at him and said, ‘I bet you believe Jesus turned water into wine.’ ” My purpose in telling you this, Capricorn, is to encourage you to nurture and celebrate your own fantastic tales. Life isn’t all about reasonableness and pragmatism. You need myth and magic to thrive. You require the gifts of imagination and art and lyrical flights of fancy. This is especially true now. To paraphrase David Byrne, now is a perfect time to refrain from making too much sense.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): To be the best Aquarius you can be in the coming weeks, I suggest the following: (1) Zig when others zag. Zag when others zig. (2) Play with the fantasy that you’re an extraterrestrial who’s engaged in an experiment on planet Earth. (3) Be a hopeful cynic and a cheerful skeptic. (4) Do things that inspire people to tell you, “Just when I thought I had you figured out, you do something unexpected to confound me.” (5) Just for fun, walk backward every now and then. (6) Fall in love with everything and everyone: a D-List celebrity, an oak tree, a neon sign, a feral cat.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): A blogger who calls herself HellFresh writes, “Open and raw communication with your partners and allies may be uncomfortable and feel awkward and vulnerable, but it solves so many problems that can’t be solved any other way.” Having spent years studying the demanding arts of intimate relationship, I agree with her. She adds, “The idea that was sold to us is ‘love is effortless and you should communicate telepathically with your partner.’ That’s false.” I propose, Pisces, that you fortify yourself with these truths as you enter the Reinvent Your Relationships Phase of your astrological cycle.

Homework: What bold dream may not be beyond your power to achieve? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 36

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PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS MANAGER

COLLEGE OF CREATIVE STUDIES Experienced professional who provides advanced level academic advising to approximately 400 undergraduates in nine diverse majors in the College of Creative Studies. Monitors, oversees, and supervises the functions of the Student Affairs Unit. Identifies and solves undergraduate unit problems. Develops policies and procedures relating to the student affairs unit. Coordinates all undergraduate pre‑college applicant services for the College of Creative Studies (CCS) under the direction of the Dean and Assistant Dean for Administration. Responsible for all aspects of the students’ college career, from their initial contact with the College, through the admissions process, to their College requirements

and graduation. Oversees and maintains descriptions of College course offerings; student records; UC‑CCS admission requirements; class enrollments and scheduling. Conducts initial analysis of the academic record of both individual freshman and transfer applicants. Assesses the depth of academic preparation in consultation with the Dean and faculty, coordinates admission to the college via supplemental application based on faculty recommendations. Assists in establishing admission policies. Requires extensive knowledge of University, College and major requirements and procedures. Must have a current knowledge and clear understanding of the College’s courses and disciplines. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience. Notes: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. This position requires occasional evenings and weekend hours, as well as infrequent travel. $55,100 ‑ $68,875/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #41141

APPLICATION PROGRAMMER

CAMPUS LEARNING ASSISTANCE SERVICES Hybrid position with excellent university benefits! We assist students in their mastery of UCSB course material through course‑specific tutoring and academic skills development. If you join our team, you will lead and participate hands‑on in the development and migration to new technologies of information systems and functionality, identifying strategies and opportunities for innovation and automation. You will perform software application design, development/implementation planning, programming and analysis, maintenance, support and training for modern Microsoft‑based web‑based client‑server distributed systems, legacy applications, data stores, interfaces, and processes for Student Academic Support Services (SASS) cluster and program on campus. Reqs: BS in Computer Science, related field, or equivalent combination of education and experience. At least 3 years programming experience using .NET framework, Visual Studio, and Microsoft SQL Server. The position requires a full‑stack developer in .NET ‑ backend development using the .NET Server‑Side Framework and frontend development including HTML, CSS, and JS. Demonstrated experience developing for cloud‑based platforms including Microsoft Azure. Experience using best practices version control methodologies, continuous integration and deployment tools. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $82,000‑$90,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open

until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 38932

CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. This position is a grant funded position. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California at all times during employment. Master’s degree from an accredited school of social work; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Three years of post‑master’s experience; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Licensed Clinical Social Worker license at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience and within limits of the grant. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/8/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41572

CRYOGENIC TEM MICROSCOPIST

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Duties and expertise include independent Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) handling and implementation of all acquisition protocols for negative stain and cryogenic data collection on High‑End Cryo‑TEMs (Tecnai 12, F20, Glacios, and Titan Krios), cryogenic sample preparation (VItrobot, Aquilos), keeping an up‑to‑date archive of metadata as well as handling all cryogenic sample inventories. Working with collaborators and lab members, guiding and training them on grids and sample handling. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree In Chemistry or related field or equivalent experience and/or training. 4‑6 years experience as a cryogenic TEM specialist. 4‑6 years independent high‑end TEM operations. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $75,000 ‑ $100,600/yr. The University of California

is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/7/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41509

DESKTOP & TECHNICAL SUPPORT SPECIALIST

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Works with minimal guidance performing tasks that provide a high level of computing functionality for desktop systems serviced by the Life Sciences Computing Group (LSCG). Installs and networks computing equipment in keeping with LSCG, UCSB and UC Office of the President policies. Researches, troubleshoots and resolves hardware, software and networking issues on Windows and Macintosh computers and other equipment such as printers, phones, tablets, and NAS devices for users in offices, research and instructional labs, and multi‑use facilities. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. 1‑3 years experience administering and/or troubleshooting issues related to systems, networks, and hardware or direct experience troubleshooting in production environments. 1‑3 years experience supporting both Apple and Intel based desktop and laptop hardware. Ability to troubleshoot issues with peripherals, communication issues, etc. 1‑3 years demonstrated experience working well with customers of varying levels of technical expertise in high‑pressure situations and moderately complex environments. 1‑3 years demonstrated problem solving and critical thinking skills. experience working independently with varied tasks. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $27.67‑$29.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/8/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41517

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, REGIONAL GIVING

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT The Director of Development, Regional Giving (“Director”), for Southern California (San Diego and Orange County primarily) focuses on increasing philanthropic support to UC Santa Barbara by maximizing the interest, involvement and commitment of alumni, parents and friends as well as select corporations and foundations in the assigned regions. The Director focuses on the identification, cultivation, and solicitation of individual prospects, including alumni, parents, and friends of the University. Primary solicitation

focus will be based on a donor‑centric approach with emphasis on major gifts ($100,000 or more) and new and renewing Chancellor’s Council level gifts ($1,000 to $99,999). Designs and executes planned strategies for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewardship of gifts from individuals. Focuses about 80% time on activities directly related to the fundraising gift cycle. 20% time is focused on other activities related to fundraising, including events, volunteer committee management and administrative and managerial duties, such as planning and coordinating. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree. 4‑6 years of experience in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the major gift fundraising; experience in higher education preferred. Demonstrated track record of managing a portfolio of high net worth individuals, soliciting and securing major gifts. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must maintain valid CA DL and a clean DMV record. This is an annually renewable contract position. Flexibility and willingness to travel frequently. Ability to work some weekends and evening. $92K ‑ $103K/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41105

FINANCIAL AND PERSONNEL ASSISTANT

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Manages all departmental fiscal activities and accounting systems for the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Latin American & Iberian Studies Program. Interprets policy and advises faculty, staff and students of proper university guidelines regarding policies for personnel, purchasing, entertainment and travel. Analyzes expenditures and spending patterns, resolving discrepancies. Reconciles financial transactions with the general and payroll ledgers. Produces accurate monthly cost projections and financial reports for management review. Participates in fiscal closing, budget projections and financial planning. Administers and coordinates employment activities and processes personnel actions for faculty, staff and students via the UCPath System. Ensures data integrity and compliance with University, Federal, agency and union policies. Maintains current knowledge of University policies and procedures of Accounting, Travel, Human Resources, Academic Personnel, Graduate Division, Purchasing and Business Services on all fund sources. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years financial work experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic

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protected by law. Application review begins 9/14/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41679

GENERAL ACCOUNTANT 3

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Experienced professional in the General Accounting Office, responsible for general accounting functions such as analyzing, monitoring, preparing and reconciling financial information to reflect the condition of the organization and provide financial and other statistical data to control operations. Also may involve preparation of financial reports to meet internal and external reporting requirements. May include activities relating to developing, implementing and monitoring accounting systems, policies and procedures. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Thorough knowledge of accounting function, transactions, assignments and systems as well as related policy, accounting, and regulatory compliance requirements with experience equivalent to Accounting Analyst, professional accounting, accounting systems or auditing duties, including AR/AP experience, fund accounting knowledge, or equivalent combination of education, training and experience. Thorough knowledge of analytical procedures used in accounting projects of moderate to semi‑complex scope with demonstrated ability to independently gather, organize, and perform accounting‑related analysis to complete work assignments. Word processing, spreadsheet, and computerized accounting system experience are essential to this position. Advanced Excel knowledge and experience (macros, vlookups, pivot tables) as well as experience working with large data projects, data sets, and data extraction.Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $70,580 ‑ $76,100/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/8/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41485

LOCKSMITH

MAINTENANCE‑ RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The locksmith performs journey level locksmithing tasks and related repairs/ installations for the buildings maintained by Residential Operations. In compliance with H&RS goals and objectives, affirms, and implements the department Educational Equity Plan. Reqs: Fiveyears’ experience working at a journeyman level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. Notes: Five (5) years’ experience working at a journeyman

level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. $39.71/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39424

PRINCIPAL ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES UCSB’s Departmental Information Technology is looking for a Principal Electronics Technician to support major campus growth initiatives. The technician will share responsibility for the installation,maintenance and troubleshooting of the outside copper and fiber cable plant. Additional duties include coordinating with cable maintenance and installation crews on locating cable, cable tray, conduits, access panels, and manholes for the construction, adding and/or maintaining the cable plant, reviewing and verifying all completed work orders for accuracy of cable assignments, and recording all changes to both outside and inside cable plant. Experience with design and installation of high pair count copper cables, splicing fiber and troubleshooting, knowledge of theories and techniques involved in the implementation and maintenance of private and public telecommunications networks and telecommunications equipment operation and use. Reqs: High School Diploma. Fiber Optic, research, troubleshooting, electronic circuitry construction experience ‑ minimum of 1‑3 years. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $35.83 to $40.29/hr., commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 30409

PROGRAM ASSISTANT & IPEES COORDINATOR

ENVIRONMENT STUDIES PROGRAM Performs a wide variety of administrative duties in support of the Environmental Studies Program. Provides excellent customer service to all faculty, staff, and students. Coordinates the

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 1,1, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT Interdepartmental PhD Emphasis in Environment & Society (IPEES) program. Provides basic‑level web/technology/ marketing‑related support to staff, faculty, and students, and coordinates with our IT Department on department needs. Manages DSP exams, office schedules/assignments, and course evaluations for the Environmental Studies student services area, and assists with daily facility needs. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. 1‑3 years working in an academic or office setting. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. 25% of this 100% full‑time job is funded on an annual basis via IPEES Funding, with plans to renew and continue each fiscal year. $24.61/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 41091

PURCHASING COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT The Purchasing Coordinator is responsible for all purchasing transactions and recharges for the Bren School. Maintains working knowledge of University policies and procedures. Acts as liaison between campus administrative offices (Purchasing, Business and Financial Services, Central Stores, Academic Departments) and Bren School faculty, staff and students in purchasing matters. Maintains accurate records of all purchasing transactions. Processes travel documents for the School and prepares monthly recharges. Acts as a member of the Bren administrative team. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related area or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years of experience working in an academic setting. $24.61 ‑ $26.32/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/13/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #41771

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PHONE 805-965-5205

the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $32.56 ‑ $35.82/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 9/12/22. Job # 41742

SR. CUSTODIAN‑ WEEKEND WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. Promotes a customer service environment to residence and clients. Assists with the development and maintenance of a work environment which is conducive to meeting the mission of the organization and supports the EEP. Responsible for completing job duties that demonstrates support for the Operations Team. Initiates communication directly with co‑workers and or supervisor to improve and clarify working relationship. Reqs: Working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable (Will train on all equipment and chemicals used.) Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Experience in a custodial cleaning operation or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Ability to read, writing and follow oral and written instructions. Notes: Able to lift up to 50 pounds. May be required to work schedules other than the assigned weekend schedule to meet the operational needs of the unit. Two positions available. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. 20.74 ‑ $22.44/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Application review begins 9/12/22. Job # 41761

TECHNOLOGY AND PAY STATION ANALYST

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES Applies acquired job skills, policies, and procedures to complete substantive assignments/projects/tasks of moderate scope and complexity; exercising judgment within defined guidelines and practices to determine the appropriate action in support of hardware, automated parking systems, and network. Analyzes automated parking systems user requirements and programs system configurations. Works directly with system vendors and manufacturer representatives on warranties and parts exchanges. Maintains all security access and departmental key issuance. Works with Facilities Management Small Projects unit, Communication Services and outside vendors in completing various parking‑related projects. Ensures security and inventory of equipment. Applies professional business/technical support concepts to resolve hardware, software, and networking issues as they relate to the automated parking systems. Reqs: 5 years of experience working with hardware and software systems as well as secure data and revenue

THE INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER1, 1,2022 2022

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SAFETY & WELLNESS MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Plans, develops, implements and manages programs and activities for all aspects related to staff health, wellness and safety programs for over 750 HDAE FTEs, and occasionally for campus staff and faculty. Responsibilities include the management of the HDAE Injury Prevention, Safety and Wellness programs. Collaborates with campus partners to ensure departmental compliance with State and Federal requirements and to enhance Safety and Wellness Program offerings. Supervises Health Advocate (assistant) and Student Health Advocate assistants. Creates, establishes and evaluates safety and wellness campaigns. Collaborates and participates with departments to share information and resources and to continually improve safety and wellness programs. Reqs: 3 years experience in the field of safety and/or wellness programs, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Bachelor’s degree or higher in Health Education, Biomechanics/Kinesiology, Environmental & Occupational Health, Public Health, PT, or Occupational Therapy, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Excellent verbal & written communication skills. Demonstrated customer service experience. Proficient in Microsoft & Google Office Suite. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in

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systems or equivalent education. Ability to perform technical tasks associated with installation, maintenance and repair of field based hardware (and related software packages) parking pay stations, EMV and contactless credit card readers and communication systems both wired and wireless. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $26.86/hr ‑ 34.86/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #38967

WRITER, SOCIAL SCIENCES

OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS Writer for Social Sciences and Humanities and Fine Arts The Office of Public Affairs & Communication Provides multi‑platform coverage of UC Santa Barbara with a focus on the social sciences and humanities & fine arts. Responsible for working closely with the academic and research community on a wide range of functions and tasks related to the presentation of UCSB to the general public, campus community, and local, national, and global media through a variety of electronic and print means. With a goal of advocacy, conducts in‑depth reporting, including background research and interviews, and practices long‑form storytelling; prepares news releases and media advisories; pitches stories to media outlets and responds to media inquiries; identifies faculty experts and arranges media interviews. Employs digital know‑how in storytelling, communications and media relations. Reqs:Bachelor’s Degree Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Thorough knowledge of the concepts and principles of news, media communications and media relations. Proven written, verbal and interpersonal communication skills. Familiarity with the modern digital landscape. 2 or more years of experience in communications, working with news and media outlets and reporters. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work occasional weekends and evenings to meet the operational needs of the department. Up to 68,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36478

RETAIL DR. J’S Bicycle Shop in Solvang is looking for a full‑time Assistant Store Manager to assist with our busy retail and service departments. The ideal candidate will be fitness‑minded, a self‑starter, well‑organized and employ great customer service skills. This person will also assist in helping to manage both the retail floor and the service department, determine work schedules for sales staff and service techs, assist owner with ordering, inputting and managing inventory. Passion and knowledge of bicycles is a bonus, but not a requirement. Competitive wages start out at $22/hour depending on experience. Includes performance incentives and product discounts. If this sounds like you, please respond with an applicable work history resume and tell us why you are the best candidate! Contact: corey@drjsbikeshop.com

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: Wendy Ann Connor aka Wendy Connor Case No.: 22PR00414 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: Wendy Connor aka Wendy Connor A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: AMY CONNOR in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that: AMY CONNOR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 10/06/2022 at 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Electronically Filed: Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 08/15/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman, O’Gorman & O’Gorman, LLP, Attorney at Law, 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2, Goleta, CA 93117, 805‑967‑1215. Published August 25, September 1, 8, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAGNETIC MOON APOTHECARY,3937 Foot Hill RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Dion R Lyman, (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY DION LYMAN, FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001889. Published: August 11, 18, 25, & September 1 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GORJESS

BOUTIQUE, 1121 N. Poppy St, Lompoc, CA 93436; Jessica I Escalante (same address).This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JESSICA I ESCALANTE, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 5, 2022 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001963 Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MELLOW CLAY, 312 Ellwood Beach Drive, 53, Goleta, CA 93117; Sarah Yu (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY SARAH YU. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001842. Published: August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022.

BY BRIANNE BILLUPS HUGHES, INDIVIDUAL. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002033. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA CHICKEN RANCH, 2618 De La Vina St, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; SBCR Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY MATT BENKO, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002075. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LOCAL DESIGN COMPANY, 4317 Meadow Dr, Santa Maria, CA 93455; Stacy Vasquez (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY STACY VASQUEZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001882. Published: August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE PHLEB MOBILE PHLEBOTOMY SERVICES, 219 Oceano Ave, 2, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Juan Cambron Perez (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JUAN CAMBRON PEREZ, CPT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0002076. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE SANTA BARBARA SALAD PROJECT, 1486 Aarhus Dr., M, Solvang, California 93463; Sabina Roan (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SABINA ROAN. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 4, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E52. FBN Number: 2022‑0001954. Published: August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ATRAINING 805 1329 San Andres Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Aaron M. Thomas 3910 Maricopa Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY AARON M. THOMAS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 18, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002083. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: KUMON SANTA BARBARA, 3230 State St., Suite B, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; KM Discovery SBA (same address)This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY YO RI, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001920. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RANCHO SAN MARCOS GOLF COURSE, 4600 HWY 154, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; RSM Resort LLC, 17992 Cowan, Irvine, CA 92614, Rancho San Marcos Resort, RSM Golf Course, RSM Resort, San Marcos Golf Course, San Marcos Resort. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY RICHARD J. BATTAGLIA, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 04, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001952. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SAINT BARBARA, 814 W. Figueroa St, #B, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Stacy Baptista (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY STACY BAPTISTA. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 2, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001944. Published: August 11, 18, 25, & September 1 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as MJB ENGINEERING/CONSTRUCTION at 965 W Mountain Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Bruce T Hayashi (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED: BRUCE T HAYASHI, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). E29 FBN Number: 2022‑0001955. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BIRD AND THE BEE COUNSELING, 6 Harbor Way, #142, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Brianne B Hughes (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PACIFICA MEDICAL SPA SANTA BARBARA, 1722 State Street, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; DGK Holdings Santa Barbara, Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY DANIEL GENE KOLDER MD, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002138. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: FEDERAL DRUG COMPANY, 3327 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alice F MacDonald (same address). This business is conducted by a Trust. SIGNED BY ALICE MACDONALD, OWNER/ TRUSTEE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 12, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002017. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS

NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKSB, 715 Ramming Way, #A, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Sensational Kids of Santa Barbara, Inc., (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY KATHERINE E. TROLL, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER/ PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001997. Published: September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: 60’S & BEYOND, 6190 Manzanillo Drive, Goleta CA 93117; Richard D Emerson (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED: RICHARD D EMERSON. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001959. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022.

JOSEPHINE MAYER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING 10/3/2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Divison. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at

August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022.

NAME CHANGE PETITION OF Annisa R. Mayer, 184 Middle Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, annisamayer@yahoo.com for change of name. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RAIF NIKOLAJ SNYDER,VALDEMAR LUKE SNYDER AND ELERI AVA SNYDER, TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02850 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RAIF NIKOLAJ SNYDER TO: RAIF NIKOLAJ MAYER FROM: VALDEMAR LUKE SNYDER TO: VALDEMAR LUKE MAYER FROM: ELERI AVA SNYDER TO: ELERI

least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated August 10, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published August 18, 25, September 1, 8, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RAMIRO PALLEJA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01691 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RAMIRO PALLEJA TO: RAYMOND PALLEJA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must

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“Any Day Now” -- just not that day.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LEGACY PHILANTHROPY WORKS, 102 Hixon RD, Santa Barbara CA 93108; Legacy Philanthropy Works (same address) This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY CARL PALMER, BOARD MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 4, 2022 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001951 Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SQUARE COLORED JEWELRY at 1730 Mission Ridge RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Alicia B Holm (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED: ALICIA HOLM, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 22, 2002. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0001864. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: OOTYS SCOOTERS, 629 E Haley St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Ryan Neely, 279 Mountain DR, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY RYAN NEELY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 16, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0002038. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUNTAIN VIEW LANDSCAPING, 4844 Winding Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Mountin View Landscape Construction LLC (same address); SB Paver Pros. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY TYLER VALENZUELA, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002007. Published: August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DIVINA BOUTIQUE, 1120 North G St, Lompoc, CA 93436; Maritza I Nava Lopez (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MARITZA NAVA LOPEZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001906. Published:

Across

1. “Super” campaign orgs. 5. Bullwinkle, for one 10. Dr. Zaius, e.g. 13. “Nope” 14. Gazelle relative 16. Palindromic sibling 17. French scammer’s “find the potato” activity? 20. Olympic bike event since 2008 21. “Science Guy” Bill 22. Actress Tierney of “American Rust” 23. Grinding tooth 26. Sinclair Lewis preacher Elmer 27. “Thrilla in Manila” boxer 28. Accepts, as a challenge 32. Some tech grads, for short 33. Motto of the Really Long Word Club? 36. Drain slowly 37. Like some pomades 38. Upcoming Billy Eichner rom-com with an almost entirely LGBTQ main cast 42. Result of a Benedictine losing at Battleship? 45. 2010s dance fad 48. Hindering sort 49. 21st-century starter 50. Second-smallest continent 52. Inflated accommodation 54. Wear away 55. Former “Great British Bake Off” host Perkins

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58. Zero, in British scores 59. Prods fitness instructors? 64. Poetic word for “before” 65. Fairy tale finish 66. “Cabaret” actor Joel 67. Appeared in print 68. Lhasa ___ (Tibetan terriers) 69. Conditional suffix?

Down

1. Word with “well” or “shot” 2. “That makes sense” 3. Like some pandemic-era pickups 4. Curly’s replacement 5. Rap battle prop 6. U.A.E. neighbor 7. “Grand Ole” venue 8. “No Ordinary Love” singer 9. Santa’s helper 10. Eagle-eyed 11. Title Maurice Sendak kid whose name rhymes with his catchphrase “I don’t care” 12. Persuasive pieces 15. Italian fashion designer Giorgio 18. They’re marked at the auditorium 19. Actor McKellen 23. Cornfield noises 24. Peter Fonda’s beekeeper role 25. First half of a doubleheader, usually 26. Travel via ship 29. Liverpool football manager J¸rgen

30. Secretly tie the knot 31. Flavorful 34. Choose 35. Norah O’Donnell’s network 39. Tanks, based on the noise they make 40. “I’m buying!” 41. Road mark cause, maybe 43. Best for harvesting 44. “Lemon Tree” singer Lopez 45. More thought-provoking 46. Illinois hometown of Wayne and Garth 47. Malfunctioning 51. Pindaric poem 53. Supergroup leader with “His All-Starr Band” 55. Fitbit unit 56. Sport vehicles, for short 57. Rubik of puzzle cubes 60. “Busted!” 61. Show streaming interrupters 62. Co-op retailer for campers 63. Pt. of iOS ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1098

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 1,1, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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LEGALS

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file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING SEPTEMBER 9, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated July 26, 2022 by, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE AMENDED APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: HYON SOOK CHOUGH, 3090 HIDDEN VALLEY LN, MONTECITO, CA 93108. CASE NUMBER: 22CV01952 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: HYON SOOK CHOUGH TO: HYON CHOUGH SINGER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is

scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 10, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 22, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022

court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 23, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: JEAN MARIE KUJAN, 131 PALM TREE LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03072. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: JEAN MARIE KUJAN TO: JEAN MARIE ZEIBAK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CATERINA SANFILIPPO LEE, 804 MORENO ROAD, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 AND CHI HOON LEE, CASE NUMBER: 22CV02998. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SOPHIA SAGE LEE TO: SOPHIE SAGE LEE. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the

SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 23, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: LINDSEY PAIGE SCHICK‑FULLER, 1153 CHURCH LANE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013, CASE NUMBER: 22CV03136 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: LINDSEY PAIGE SCHICK‑FULLER TO: LINDSEY PAIGE FLOWERS. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 26, 2022, 10:00 AM, SB3. SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL Hybrid Public Meeting – Held in Person and via Zoom Tuesday, September 20, 2022 at 5:30 pm COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM (CDBG) 2021-2022 Draft Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:///cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct a hybrid public hearing on the date and time set forth below to consider the draft Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER) for the 2021-2022 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program year. The date and time of the City Council meeting is: MEETING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, September 20, 2022 at 5:30 PM MEETING LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda). Pursuant to the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) regulations, the City of Goleta has prepared the draft Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report (CAPER) for the 2021-2022 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program year. The CAPER provides an assessment of the City’s performance in meeting Fiscal Year (FY) 2021-2022 housing and community development goals as outlined in the previously adopted 2021-2022 Action Plan. Additionally, the CAPER discusses any changes the City anticipates making in the upcoming year as a result of the assessment of FY 2021-2022 annual performance. The City of Goleta encourages participation in the CDBG process. A copy of the CAPER is required to be made available to the public for review and comment for a fifteen (15) day period. The CAPER draft will be available for public review from September 5, 2022 to September 19, 2022. The Draft CAPER will be posted on the City’s website at Grants | Goleta, CA (cityofgoleta.org) and copies will be available for review at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta. All interested citizens and agencies are invited to attend the public hearing and/or submit comments on the draft CAPER. Comments should be submitted to: City of Goleta, Neighborhood Services Department, Attn: Shanna Dawson, 130 Cremona Drive Goleta, CA 93117 or emailed to sdawson@cityofgoleta.org by Noon on September 19, 2022. PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the City Council hearing will also be posted at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the CAPER or CDBG program, contact Shanna Dawson, Management Analyst at 805-690-5126 or sdawson@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Jaime Valdez at (805) 961-7568 or jvaldez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this Project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to the City on or before the date of the public hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b) [2]). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office, at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. If you need special assistance to contact City staff, please call 711 for the California Relay Service (CRS) for hearing impaired TTY/TDD. Date of Publication: September 1, 2022 (Santa Barbara Independent) 40

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

THE INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER1, 1,2022 2022

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in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 26, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. AMENDED APPLICATION OF IMARI DEMETRIUS RUTHERFORD, 721 CLIFF DR., SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103 FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02347 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: IMARI DEMETRIUS RUTHERFORD TO: CALCULUS LUCIFER GOLIATH YALE TESSY. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING 9/26/22, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated August 15, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published September 1, 8, 15, 22, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: AUTUMN LEIGH CHRISTMAN, 654 Mayrum Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. CASE NUMBER: 22CV02777 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: AUTUMN LEIGH CHRISTMAN TO: AUTUMN LEIGH WEBB. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 17, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: EVELYN SALM, 559 MOUNTAIN DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93103. CASE NUMBER: 22CV03133. TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: EVELYN SALM TO: CODY CAMMBELL. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be

heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 17, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: August 26, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published September 1, 8,15, 22, 2022 IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF VANESSA MALLMANN BARREIRO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02580 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VANESSA MALLMANN BARREIRO TO: VANESSA BARREIRO BERGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: September 14, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 7/26/22 Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FILED Superior Court County of Santa Barbara 08/01/2022. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer. BY Chavez, Terri, Deputy Clerk PETITION OF ZANETA SEILEROVA 111 OCEANO AVE., APT E, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93109 ZANETA111@ HOTMAIL.COM FOR CHANGE OF NAME. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF Zaneta Seilerova and Damian Samuel Seiler CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02729 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: ZANETA SEILEROVA TO: ZANETA SEILEROVA GOERKE FROM: DAMIAN SAMUEL SEILER TO: DAMIAN SAMUEL SEILER GOERKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING 9/26/2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Divison. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. SIGNED and Dated

August 3, 2022 by Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court. Published August 25, September 1, 8, 15, 2022.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CAMILLA MELDAHL AKA CAMILLA MEHDAHL, an individual; ED ST. GEORGE, an individual; JAMES GELB, an individual; JAMES M. GELB, as Trustee of the 2010 James M. Gelb Revocable Trust, MARIO MELENDEZ, an individual; MELENDEZ CONSTRUCTION, an Unknown business entity; MATTHEW CROTTY, an individual; FRANCES CROTTY, an individual; BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION, as Trustee under that certain Pooling and Service Agreement dated as of October 1, 1992 for RTC Commercial Pass‑Through Certificates, Series 1992 CHF; ROBERT L. LOVGREN, an individual; DOREEN J. LOVGREN, an individual, 6651 L.P., a California limited partnership; HARVEY H. WIPF, an individual; HARVEY H. WIPF, as Trustee of the Wipf Family Trust; BERNICE A. WIPF, an individual; BERNICE A. WIPF, as Trustee for the Wipf Family Trust; ERNEST G. GULSRUD, an individual; ERNEST G. GULSRUD as Trustee of the Gulsrud Family Trust; MURIEL GENEVIEVE GULSRUD, an individual; MURIEL G. GULSRUD, as Trustee for the Gulsrud Family Trust; CURTIS R. JAHNKE, an Individual; and DOES 1 through 100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): MARSHALL R. BERNES, an individual; MARSHALL R. BERNES, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust; JUDITH DANNETT, an individual; AND, ELINOR FISHER, an individual NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada


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telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): Santa Barbara Superior Court, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del

demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Stephen Jamieson, SOLOMON SALTSMAN & JAMIESON; 426 Culver Blvd.; Playa Del Rey, CA 90293 Ph: (310) 822‑9848 DATE: (Fecha) 1/13/2020 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/ Sarah Sisto, Deputy (Adjunto) SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV01717 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): FUNYAS MASIH; NSP TRANSPORTATION INC. (a business entity, form unknown); TORI ANNE THORNBURGH; and DOES 1 AND 25, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JOYCE DONALDSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case

by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, September 13, 2022 at 3:00 P.M. ATTENTION: The Virtual Meeting is held pursuant to Assembly Bill (AB) 361. The meeting will be Virtual because meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees. The public may only view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings and not in Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following projects: Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review Dahl Residential Patio and Deck 451 Kings Way (APN 069-511-009) Case No. 22-0032-LUP/DRB Caston Residential 1st and 2nd Story Addition 213 Old Ranch Rad (APN 079-570-053) Case No. 22-0026-LUP Storke Fuel Depot Carwash 370 Storke Road (APNs 073-100-008) Case No. 22-0014-LUP Pacifica Suites alterations 5490 Hollister Avenue (APN 071-330-014) Case No. 22-013-DRB IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice include new and continued items from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www. cityofgoleta.org. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, September 1, 2022

corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso.

The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); South County Court Division,Santa Barbara Superior Court‑Civil, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Warren B. Treisman, Esq., 7183 Navajo Road, Suite I, San Diego, CA 92119; (619) 583‑1900 DATE: (FECHA) 5/4/2022 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/Johnny Aviles, Deputy (Adjunto) ORDER FOR PUBLICATION SUMMONS OR CITATION

OF

ATTORNEY OR PARTY WITHOUT ATTORNEY (NAME AND ADDRESS): Warren B. Treisman

7183 Navajo Road. Suite i San Diego, CA 92119 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA Santa Barbara, CA 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Plaintiff: Joyce Donaldson Defendant: Funyas Masih, et al. Moving Party Plaintiff, Joyce Donaldson filed their application for an order for publication on July 15, 2002. From the application and supporting evidence it appears to the satisfaction of the Court that an order for service by publication is permitted pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure section 415.50. IT IS ORDERED that service of the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) in this action shall be made upon defendant, respondent, or citee Tori Anne Thornburgh by publication thereof in Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general

circulation published at Santa Barbara County, California, and that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that, if the address of the party to be served is ascertained before the expiration of the time prescribed for publication of the summons, the moving party shall forthwith mail to the party to be served a copy of (1) the summons, citation, notice of hearing, or other document(s) identified above, (2) the complaint, petition, or motion for which notice is being served by this order, and (3) this order for publication. A declaration of this mailing, or of the fact that the address was not ascertained, must be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. Dated: 7/15/2022 Judge of the Superior Court Thomas P. Anderle

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING Hybrid Public Meeting – Held in Person and via Zoom September 12, 2022 at 6:00 P.M. Objective Design Standards for Multiple-Unit and Mixed-Use Housing Projects Ordinance Case No. 21-0005-ORD ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:///cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing to consider a resolution recommending to the City Council adoption of Title 17 (Zoning) amendments related to objective design standards. Any recommendations from the Planning Commission will be provided to City Council. City Council will consider the recommendation at a later hearing to adopt any amendments to Title 17. The date, time, and location of the Planning Commission public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME: PLACE:

Monday, September 12, 2022 at 6:00 P.M.

Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda).

PROJECT LOCATION: The amended regulations would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Senate Bill 35 (SB 35) requires a streamlined, ministerial approval process for qualifying multiple-unit and mixed-use development, consistent with objective design standards. In order for a proposed development to qualify for this streamlined, objective review, the project must satisfy an extensive list of criteria, such as affordability levels, labor standards, and conformance with objective General Plan and zoning standards. Currently, the City does not have a set of solely objective design standards to apply should a project qualify under SB 35. The proposed ordinance would establish such objective design standards within Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) to address this need and includes procedures for the processing of projects that qualify for this type of review. A new Chapter 17.44 of the GMC is proposed that includes applicability and procedural standards as well as objective standards for site and building design, mixed-use development, and utilitarian elements. Definitions are also included, as are other associated amendments to Title 17. Environmental Review: The proposed Ordinance is not subject to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the CEQA Guidelines because the activity is covered by the general rule which exempts activities that can be seen with certainty to have no possibility for causing a significant effect on the environment because the amendments to Title 17 do not authorize construction of any building or structure but sets forth regulations that shall be followed. The proposed Ordinance is also exempt from CEQA pursuant to Section 15060(c)(3) of the CEQA Guidelines because the activity is not a “project” as defined in Section 15378(b)(5) as an organizational or administrative activity by government that will not result in direct or indirect physical changes in the environment. PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/comments should be sent to kdominguez@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Andy Newkirk, Senior Planner, at (805) 961-7544 or anewkirk@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact City staff at (805) 5625500 or espanol@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009[b][2]). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent, September 1, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 1,1, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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