Santa Barbara Independent 8/11/22

Page 1

FREE

Santa Barbara

AUG. 11-18, 2022 VOL. 36 · NO. 865

The Fertile Images of Angela Perko Late-Blooming Artist Finds Fruitful Inspiration in The Place of Hidden Things by Roger Durling Photos by Ingrid Bostrom

PLUS:

Axe Marks the Spot on State So Long, Vin Scully Tiny-Home Village Opens Kevin A. Short Paints the Sea In Memoriam: Ryan Leone


SO LD O U T

2

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


Single tickets on sale now! More than 40 spectacular events to choose from..

Emanuel Ax - Leonidas Kavakos - Yo-Yo Ma, Jan 27

From Ukraine

Lang Lang, Feb 27

Tig Notaro, Jan 21

Ballet Preljocaj, Swan Lake, Feb 25 & 26

DakhaBrakha, Oct 6

Carla Morrison, Oct 27

Nina Totenberg, Feb 7

David Gergen, Oct 11

Amor Towles, Feb 2

The Linda Lindas, Oct 15 Soweto Gospel Choir, Nov 2

Visit us online to view the full 2022-2023 lineup. www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu | (805) 893-3535 INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

3


art matters lectures

september 1 Julius Caesar as Second Founder of Rome & the Evolution of the First Imperial Forum

Chris Hallett Professor of Roman Art, Department of History of Art University of California at Berkeley

october 6 Lucia Moholy: Documentary Absurdities

Jan Tichy Artist, Educator, and Associate Professor School of the Art Institute of Chicago

november 3 What Might Have Been: The Promise of Thomas Cole’s Late Career

Frank Kelly Curator of American Paintings National Gallery of Art

december 1 Looking at Impressionism and Thinking About Climate Change

Harmon Siegel Junior Fellow Harvard Society of Fellows

first thursdays, 5:30–6:30pm mary craig auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art

Single tickets: $10 SBMA Members; $15 Non-Members Free to students with valid ID & Upper Level Members

1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday 11 am–5 pm Thursday 11 am–8 pm www.sbma.net Image credit: Colossal head of Julius Caesar from Trajan’s Forum in Rome, early 2nd century AD, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Naples.

4

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desks in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net. For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Rodrigo Hernandez, Koss Klobucher, Melea Maglalang, Emma Spencer, Finnegan Wright Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

21

volume 36, # 865, Aug. 11-18, 2022

COVER STORY

BACK IN BLACK RICKY BIGGS

TABLE of CONTENTS

Name: Roger Durling Title: Contributor

The Fertile Images of Angela Perko Late-Blooming Artist Finds Fruitful Inspiration in The Place of Hidden Things by Roger Durling

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 34 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 ON THE COVER: Angela Perko. Photo by Ingrid Bostrom. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

We’re really happy you’re writing for the paper again. What was it about Angela Perko’s work that brought you back to reporting? I think Perko is one of the best-kept secrets in our city and one of our greatest artists. I also love her story, which is quintessential Santa Barbara: she ran (with her husband) the Lost Horizon bookstore and eventually found, among the books, her true calling. When and how did you first experience Perko’s paintings? What was your immediate reaction to them? I’m an avid gallery visitor, and I came across her work at Sullivan Goss. I was lured by her vivid colors and was hooked by her great sense of storytelling. Her paintings are dense and with so much to discover. I love getting lost in her work. Most people think of you as a film guy, but you clearly have an eye and appreciation for painting. (I’m thinking back to your cover story on Hank Pitcher.) What is it about that particular art form you admire? Great question! As you may know, I teach film at City College, and one of the aspects that attracts me the most to cinema as an art form is composition — how elements are arranged on the movie frame. But in film, those elements are constantly in flux. I greatly admire how painters are able to convey so much information and inspire us by placing things on a single canvas. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

Got a Dream? Santa Barbara Body Therapy Institute congratulates Sophia Dennison in her team's world record row to Hawaii. Imagine your possibility: • flexible hours • great pay • making a difference

Class starting AUGUST 15TH

Steve, RN Cottage Health Emergency Department

SOPHIA DENISON

Massage Practitioner Grad

Santa Barbara Body Therapy Institute Where lives change. 805-966-5802 516 North Quarantina St • www.sbbti.com

cottagehealth.org/kindness INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

5


AUG 4-11, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COMMUNITY

Fiesta Returns in Full Force

WI KIMEDIA

F R ITZ OLEN B ERG ER

COMMUNITY Iconic Australian singer/ songwriter and actor Olivia Newton-John, 73, died 8/8 in her Santa Ynez Valley home after a years-long battle with breast cancer. NewtonJohn was arguably best known for her breakout role as Sandy Olsson in Grease alongside John Travolta but was also a prominent singer/songwriter throughout the 1970s and ’80s. Newton-John was first diagnosed with breast cancer more than 30 years ago; though her cancer went into remission, she was diagnosed again in 2017. Newton-John is survived by second husband, John Easterling, and her daughter, Chloe Lattanzi.

PUBLIC SAFETY

EMM A SPENC ER

Las Noches de Ronda at the Santa Barbara County Courthouse

MI KE EL IASON/SBCO FI R E

A

fter two summers of severely scaledback or canceled events, Old Spanish Days Fiesta returned in full force this year, with a renewed spirit and a brandnew parade route that drew thousands along Cabrillo Boulevard for Friday’s El Desfile Historico and Saturday’s El Desfile de los Niños. Locals and visitors alike also turned out in droves for the weeklong festivities, which included La Fiesta Pequeña at the Old Mission, Celebración de los Dignatarios at S.B. Zoo, Las Noches de Ronda at the County Courthouse, the Fiesta Stock Horse Show & Rodeo at Earl Warren Showgrounds, and the various makers’ markets and mercados spread throughout Santa Barbara. “This weekend went fantastic,” said Maria Cabrera, La Presidente of Old Spanish Days’ Executive Committee for 2022. “It was a wonderful Fiesta.” But the highlight of Fiesta may very well be the fact that the Santa Barbara Police Department reported no serious crimes or emergencies over the entire five days of

El Desfile Histórico on Cabrillo Boulevard

partying. Police spokesperson Sgt. Ethan Ragsdale said there were “no major criminal matters, serious injuries, or fatalities” directly related to Fiesta. Out of 181 total calls received, the SBPD issued 119 citations and made 58 arrests, he said, with the most common crimes being open container violations and disorderly conduct, which includes

“drunk in public and some small verbal or —Ryan P. Cruz physical fights.” For the full story, see independent.com/fiesta-recap. For more of Fritz Olenberger’s Fiesta photos, see independent.com/fiesta-2022-in-photos. For more of Emma Spencer’s El Desfile Histórico photos, see independent.com/fiesta-parade-2022.

HOUSING

A

this Monday, August 8. As openings go, this one was softer than cats’ paws. As of day one, six residents had been moved off the streets or out of vehicles and into what’s alternately described as “cabins,” “tiny homes,” or, more bureaucratically, “interim supportive housing.” Whatever

one chooses to call this tightly packed, intensely designed community of prefabricated homes — each one 64 square feet with windows, a bed, a chair, a desk, heating and air conditioning, and a door that locks — it ranks as Santa Barbara’s boldest effort to address the needs of Santa Barbara’s CONT’D ON PAGE 8 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. 6

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

The Annie Fire, which broke out 8/4 in the foothills above Goleta near the 1700 block of Glen Annie Road, was successfully contained on 8/5. About nine acres total were consumed by the fire, which was largely in grasslands just above the county–Los Padres National Forest border. Firefighters from the Forest Service, County Fire, Carpinteria-Summerland, and Montecito responded to the scene, with two fixedwing tankers and a pair of helicopters dropping Phos-Check and water on the fire. According to Los Padres Forest Service spokesperson Andrew Madsen, the cause of the blaze was undetermined. S.B. COU NTY FI R E

It’s Showtime DignityMoves Opens Doors for Homeless Guests at S.B. Street Digs by Nick Welsh fter hosting three gala ribboncutting events since last November, DignityMoves finally began admitting the first homeless clients into its groundbreaking new tiny-home village located at 1016 Santa Barbara Street early

Public Health confirmed two additional cases of monkeypox in Santa Barbara County adults on 8/9, and both remain in isolation. Currently, the total number of confirmed monkeypox cases in the county is three, with the first case being confirmed on 8/3. Public Health said it has completed contact tracing with these persons to identify anyone who may have had close contact with them. Persons identified in contact tracing are being monitored for symptoms and the risk to the public remains low. Full story at independent.com/two-new-cases.

A vehicle traveling northbound on Highway 101 veered off the road and crashed into a tree near the El Sueno Road exit on 8/7, according to County Fire spokesperson Captain Scott Safechuck. The CONT’D ON PAGE 9 


AUG 4-11, 2022

BUSINESS

Axe-citing Times for State Street Downtown Enjoying New Business and Bullish Outlook

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON 104th Concert Season

EMM A SPEN C ER

Experience the wonder of hearing the world’s finest classical music performances live in concert in Santa Barbara.

Riccardo Muti

Gustavo Dudamel

international series

SEASON SPONSOR:

at the Granada Theatre

SAGE PUBLICATIONS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2022, 7:30PM AXE MARKS THE SPOT: The State Street Axe Club opened Fiesta weekend with a steady stream of customers lining up to hurl hatchets down divided lanes at wooden targets. by Tyler Hayden tate Street has a little more pep in its step these days thanks to a handful of new and exciting — if a little unconventional — businesses arriving downtown. The State Street Axe Club opened Fiesta weekend with a steady stream of customers lining up to hurl hatchets down divided lanes at wooden targets. “I always knew this was something that would be a hit here,” said owner Brett Michaelson, who previously opened an axe-throwing location in Los Angeles. “People want things to do; they want entertainment, but there was nothing to do downtown but drink after 8 p.m.” Each hourly session costs $35 and includes training from certified “axe-perts” to avoid any “axe-idents,” explained Michaelson. “We use lots of lame axe puns,” he said. Participants must be at least 10 years old, and staff at the site, which stays open until midnight on the weekends, make sure the adults haven’t had too much to drink. “We keep it safe,” Michaelson said. “And it’s really a lot of fun.” Up the road at Paseo Nuevo, the Aloha Fun Center is gearing up to open in the next couple of months. Originally scheduled to begin operations earlier this year on the ground floor of the old Macy’s building, the hybrid roller rink, laser tag, and arcade ran into a major snag when it discovered that city code required additional restrooms triggered by the change of use from “retail” to “large assembly.” Construction plans were resubmitted for review this week, city officials said, and staff anticipate finishing their review by early next week. Aloha representatives said it will take roughly one to two months to complete the restroom work once the permit is issued. “We are excited to see this adaptive reuse of retail space and a family- and kid-oriented experiential activity in the downtown,” said Jason Harris, Santa Barbara’s economic development manager. “This is one of several new businesses oriented to entertainment, families, and added diversity of experiences that downtown needs now and in the future.” Harris pointed to a handful of other businesses and initiatives that fit the same

S

bill, including sidewalk music, a revamped library plaza, the Xanadu Skate Boutique that will support the Aloha Fun Center and Santa Barbara’s burgeoning skate scene, and Bungalo 805: Little’s Lounge & Social Club. “For me, being a mom has been a beautiful gift layered with constant challenges and struggles,” states Bungalo 805’s founder, Erin Kanaley, on the company’s website. “One of the things we find most challenging is going out with the boys.” For the kids, she said, the private space will feature a playroom, toy bar, books, games, art supplies, instruments, Wi-Fi, snacks, changing tables, high chairs, and other amenities. And for adults, there will be guest speakers, classes, events, game nights, and happy hours. In its second quarter market report, Hayes Commercial Group also appeared bullish on State Street’s continued recovery after years of lagging retail followed by the gut punch of COVID. “There have been five State Street leases to date in 2022, which is more than we have seen in recent years,” the report said. “In notable deals from Q2, Vuori leased the former Wendy Foster space at 833 State Street” — a highly visible corner at State and Canon Perdido — “and Tamsen Gallery leased 911.5 State Street” Nevertheless, Hayes said, the 900 block continues to struggle mightily, with seven storefronts currently vacant. Those vacancies account for more available space than Coast Village Road, the Funk Zone, the Waterfront, and Milpas Street combined, the brokerage noted. In its own second quarter report, Radius Commercial Real Estate commented on the positive impacts of the pedestrian promenade. “Live music near eateries continues to invigorate the experience and attract both locals and tourists to downtown,” it said. “Satellite, Sama Sama, and the Good Lion all had large crowds on a Tuesday night due to deejays and bands creating a lively atmosphere on the closed street. Overall, decreasing vacancies and other notable trends like growing e-bike traffic all continue to point to the positive effect the partial street closure has had on downtown State Street,” Radius n said.

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, Music Director Sheku Kanneh-Mason, cello

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2023, 7:30PM

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Riccardo Muti, Music Director

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2023, 7:30PM

FILHARMONIE BRNO (of the Czech Republic) Dennis Russell Davies, Music Director

THURSDAY, MAY 18, 2023, 7:30PM

CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

(CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC/PHILADELPHIA) Osmo Vänskä, conductor Yefim Bronfman, piano

SUNDAY, MAY 28, 2023, 4:00PM

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC Gustavo Dudamel, Music Director Gabriel Cabezas, cello

masterseries at the Lobero Theatre

SEASON SPONSOR:

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2022, 7:30PM

JUILLIARD STRING QUARTET WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022, 7:30PM

HÉLÈNE GRIMAUD, piano

SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 2023, 7:30PM CAMA in conjunction with the Lobero Theater Foundation present

LOS ROMEROS ⳼ THE ROMERO GUITAR QUARTET “THE ROYAL FAMILY OF THE GUITAR”

in celebration of the Lobero’s 150th Anniversary (2/22/1873–2/22/2023)

MONDAY, APRIL 24, 2023, 7:30PM

AUGUSTIN HADELICH, solo violin SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW (805) 966-4324 ⳼ tickets@camasb.org

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

7


DIGNITYMOVES

CONT’D FROM P. 6 EMM A SPEN C ER

Best place to

AUG 4-11, 2022

Get Inspired Learn

Create

Collaborate Contribute Network Explore Thrive Work

IT TAKES A VILLAGE: DignityMoves began admitting the first homeless clients into its new tiny-home village at 1016 Santa Barbara Street on Monday.

Interested in working here?

Browse our job openings at jobs.ucsb.edu.

THANK YOU FOR NOMINATING US FOR BEST CONTRACTOR What an honor! Please keep us in mind for your final vote and your upcoming projects

kellowconstruction.com (805) 450-2427

8

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

chronically homeless people. Each day for the next two weeks, a handful of new residents will move in. When there are 35, capacity will have been achieved. “Nothing like this has been tried here before,” said Jeff Gaddes, project manager. That, if anything, is an understatement. Never before has such a concentration of homeless housing and services been placed in the heart of downtown Santa Barbara. The project’s immediate next-door neighbor is the investment firm of Morgan Stanley. The police station is half a block away, with the Santa Barbara District Attorney’s annex and the fabled courthouse almost spitting distance. Gaddes — who brings relevant work experience in the mental-health field and the concierge hotel industry — works for Good Samaritan, the Santa Maria–based social justice nonprofit. The County of Santa Barbara contracted that group to make sure the new community is wellrun. It will provide the services needed for residents to transition to long-term housing and will work to prevent the neighbors from being disturbed. The first night, Gaddes said, was both exciting and moving. With a full moon in the sky and the courthouse tower looming, he said, the whole thing felt magically real and unreal at the same time. The slow move-in is part of the plan to allow people accustomed to living in perpetual fight-or-flight mode to adjust to living within four walls and having three meals and clean bathrooms. “These are people who’ve been in survival mode,” Gaddes said. “Their level of exhaustion is extreme, both physically and emotionally. They just need time to rest.” There will be weekly visits from medical professionals working for Doctors Without Walls and from County Public Health, as well as Behavioral Health. Private security will be onsite 24/7, not to mention staffing by Good Samaritan. And there are rules. Curfew is at 9 p.m. No loitering or hanging around out front. No friends can hang around either. Drinking and drugs are not allowed. Nothing, as Gaddes explained, is to disrupt the peace and recovery of the residents who

will receive “enhanced case management.” Translated, Gaddes said, that means “understanding why a person is on the streets; it means giving them the space to tell their story.” Three of the first six people are women. The new residents ranged in age from their late twenties to their seventies. Many have been on the streets a very long time, some for decades. Several are well-known and immediately recognizable to people who walk on State Street with any regularity. Recruiting residents is not as easy as it may seem; trust has to be earned, a process that can take months of almost daily conversations. The project was sparked by a conversation that Terri Maus-Nisich, a highranking county administrator, had with a Santa Barbara resident who was describing the work of a Bay Area nonprofit known as DignityMoves. It was supported by younger entrepreneurs dedicated to getting people off the streets and into transitional housing. From that conversation, a $1.7 million construction proposal was made to the county, which agreed to kick in $700,000 of emergency federal funding made available during the pandemic. It also contributed the land, which until recently was a public parking lot operated for the benefit of the county Probation Department. The county set aside another $3.4 million, to be distributed over three years, to cover Good Samaritan’s costs for services, management, and administration. The hope is that this new community will provide temporary housing to 66 people a year — or 200 over three years. That pencils out to roughly $25,000 per person. Initially, the opening was slated to take place early this year. Then it got pushed back to June because the prefabricated structures were stuck in shipping containers stuck on cargo boats stuck in the Long Beach Harbor. Then there was a snafu with Southern California Edison that pushed back the June opening until August. For Gaddes, it’s showtime. Downtown residents will feel the difference, he said: “You’ll see people off the streets. In six months, here’s what I hope the story will be: ‘I forgot it was even there.’ ” n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D MONTECITO

Coast Village Parklets in Crosshairs COU RTESY

Locally Owned and Operated

www.santacruzmarkets.com 2021

bestof

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

BEST CORNER STORE!

Santa barbara

®

Winner Santa Barbara

ROMA TOMATOES BANANAS LONG GRA DRUMSTICKS BEEF TRI TIP ¢ $ By the bag

$

2

59

Mahatma 2#

Chicken

lb.

Chicken

49

99¢ lb.

Beef

PEACHES & NECTARINES

LEG QUARTERS $5.98 lb. ¢

69

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 6 driver suffered life-threatening injuries, with the passenger sustaining moderate injuries and the car extensive damages. Both victims were extricated in five minutes with modern Holmatro tools and transported to Cottage Hospital. Caltrans was on scene as well, providing heavy equipment and assisting with the removal of fallen trees on the freeway.

REAL ESTATE Radius Commercial Real Estate observed strong commercial activity for the second quarter of 2022, marking 41 total sales with $254 million in volume. State Street welcomed three new properties — Taza Mediterranean, Zoe Bikinis, and Vuori— and two more sales also closed at 1019 and 1027 State Street. The report noted a strong demand for multifamily properties in South County, with sales closing on a 22-unit student housing complex in Isla Vista for $9.8 million, a nine-unit property at 2024 Anacapa Street for $4 million, and a 17-unit building at 111 North La Cumbre for $6.85 million. The largest commercial sale of the quarter was the QAD Campus in Summerland, which sold for $104 million.

doesn’t have the public parking structures to counteract the loss. The plan, they insist, was never sustainable. Councilmember Kristen Sneddon, whose district encompasses Coast Village Road, agreed the letter made “very compelling arguments that demonstratelb. how and why parklets on Coast Village Road should be considered Thinindependently sliced of the rest of the city and should be scaled back.” Sneddon said she’s heard from neighboring retailers and service businesses who have had a difficult time operating with the loss of parking in the limited corridor. lb. “And even though there is some parking in the backs of some buildings,” she said, “the uphill steepness Santa is just too Cruz much for some people.”

1

5

MESQUITE

$

1

ea. El Pato 7 oz. SERRANO CHILES

59

HOT TOMA

5

89

MANGOS

BACK RIBS

Folgers 8 oz.

INSTANT C

69¢ ea. $3.49 lb. FUJI APPLES

CARNE RANCHERA $

7#

69¢ lb. $2.29 lb.ROMA TOMATOES ¢ Beef lb.

PORK BUTT $

lb.

99¢ $ lb. 99

PORK CHOPS

98

$4.98 lb.

$

89

GREEN CABBAGE ¢

SOLE FILLET

69¢ lb.

lb.

—Tyler Hayden

$

1

98

lb.

Springfield 15 o

PEAS & CA

MEDIUM YAMS SEEDLESS GRAPES

Cruz PORK CHORIZOSanta PORK CHORIZO ¢ $ 49 59lb.lb. 2 lb. $2.98 lb $1.69 COURTS & CRIME PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE

79

S.B. COU NT Y SH ER I FF ’ S OFFIC E

A

large group of Coast Village Road merchants and landlords is imploring the Santa Barbara City Council to remove outdoor dining parklets along the main Montecito drag to free up muchneeded parking. “The rationale for this is simple,” states a letter signed by 25 business and seven property owners. “The conditions that created parklets’ temporary existence, namely indoor dining restrictions, haven’t been present since June 15, 2021, and thus are no longer required.” The group argues parking was extremely tight along Coast Village Road even before the pandemic, with the parklets —which have added 253 restaurant seats—now gobbling up 28 additional spaces, or approximately 20 percent of the area’s total. And unlike downtown Santa Barbara, Montecito

PINEAPPLES

T-BONE STEAKS

PARKLET PROBLEMS: Montecito retailers are pressuring the Santa Barbara City Council to remove outdoor dining at Coast Village Road restaurants like Lucky’s (above). lb.

1

98¢ lb.

8

Springfield 8 oz

WHIP TOP $

1

Minute Maid 59

ORANGE J

¢

$

ea.

Now featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery BANANAS BANANAS BEEF TRI TIP BEEF TRI TIP www.santacruzmarkets.com

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

www.santacruzmarkets.com

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

Mahatma 2#

By the bag

Mahatma 2#

By the bag

LONG GRAIN RICE

LONG GRAIN RICE

TO STOCK HAND • PRICES 49 ON 1 49DAYS $ 59 259SantaLIMITED 2EFFECTIVE 7 FULL Sheriff’s detectives arrested Maria man ¢

$

¢

99

$

lb.

lb.

FROM OCTOBER MESQUITE27TH CHARCOALTHROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND PINEAPPLES PINEAPPLES $ 89 LEG QUARTERS Victor Olivera-Hernandez,LEG 21,QUARTERS on 8/4 after seizing 2 $ 99 $ ¢ ¢ 1 7#

Chicken

lb.

lb.

$

199

7#

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

Chicken

$

1 99

289

69illegal drugs from a El Pato 7 oz. 69 El Pato 7 oz. a massive amount of various HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE BUTTCurryer Street. ¢ ROMA TOMATOES PORK BUTT ROMA TOMATOES residence in the 100 blockPORK of North FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM AND LIKE US ON FACEBOOK 59 59 ¢ 59 $ 59 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE The seized drugs included$1 17,000 fentanyl pills, 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 1 Best Thin sliced $ 89 BEST Thin sliced $ 89 22.5 pounds of cannabis flower, grams of MDMA SANTA BARBARA 5 FUJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES Barbara Santa CARNE27RANCHERA CARNE RANCHERA R E N N I W ¢ ¢ 98 or ecstasy, 218 grams of $psilocybin mushrooms, $ 98 lb.

ea.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Folgers 8 oz.

20 20

of

89

lb.

three grams of cocaine, and hundreds of acid tabs. Santa Cruz MEDIUM YAMS CHORIZO Some of these dangerousPORK narcotics were found in $ 49 59 ¢ 2SANTAinBARBARA areas accessible to children324 living the residence. W. Montecito St PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE Olivera-Hernandez was booked $ 98into the Northern 79 ¢ 1 By the bag Branch Jail for child cruelty, unlawful possession of featuring fresh bread daily from ammunition, and possession ofNow narcotics for sales La Bella Rosa Bakery on an enhanced bail of $250,000. $ 59 lb.

lb.

lb.

ea.

BEEF TRI TIP

2

PEAS & CARROTS

89 ¢

LEG QUARTERS ¢

Santa Cruz

lb.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

ORANGE JUICE

PORK CHOPS

89

Santa Barbara

®

WINNER�

Springfield 15 oz.

lb.

MEDIUM YAMS

PEAS & CARROTS

89 ¢

¢ GOLETA WHIP TOPPING GOLETA lb. $ 49 1 5757 Hollister 5757 Hollister Ave Ave Minute Maid 59 oz. HEAD LETTUCE ORANGE JUICE ¢

59

Springfield 8 oz.

79 $ 89 working at 3 BANANAS LONG fresh GRAIN Now featuring bread RICE daily from BEEFlocally TRI ¢TIP La Bella Rosa Bakery owned businesses! $ 99 $ 59 lb.NO SALES TO DEALERS 1

By the bag 1 Mahatma 2# 389 Support local people BANANAS $

$

249

98

49

LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

LIMITED STOCKlb. ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM AUGUST7#11 THROUGH AUGUST 17

Chicken

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT.COM 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

$BANANAS 99

Mahatma 2#

ea.

lb.

¢

LONG GR

$

lb. 7#

MESQUITE CHARCOAL GOLETA MESQUI AUGUST 11,PINEAPPLES 2022 THE INDEPENDENT Ave 5757 Hollister 9

PINEAPPLES LEG QUARTERS

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

of

lb.

PORK CHORIZO SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 SANTA BARBARA $ 49 2 1 324324 Montecito St St W.W.Montecito

lb.

CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

®

Springfield 8 oz.

LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

Chicken

5

®

winner

Springfield 15 oz.

lb.

Folgers 8 oz.

lb.

lb.

2018

5

ea.

$

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

289

Mahatma 2#

LONG GRAIN RICE

$

Mahatma 2#

99


AUG 4-11, 2022

TRANSPORTATION

B OSC H AN D B ICYC LE

Legislative Threat Looms for Bike-Share

SANTA BARBARA HALF MARATHON STICK IN THE SPOKES: CalBike says a new state bill could require companies like BCycle to obtain up to $500,000 worth of insurance to cover the negligence of riders.

S

anta Barbara’s burgeoning electric-bikeshare operations could hit a serious pothole if the state legislature passes a bill — Assembly Bill 371 — that would require private bike-share companies to obtain insurance that would cover the cost of injuries and deaths caused by negligent riders. Statewide bicycle lobbyists with CalBike argue the additional costs could put “most, if not all shared micromobility systems out of business.” CalBike says the bill introduced by L.A. Assemblymember Reggie JonesSawyer could require companies like BCycle—which provides the flotilla of 180 white-basketed e-bikes that operate downtown and in certain neighborhoods— to obtain up to $500,000 worth of insurance to cover the negligence of riders. “We anticipate serious financial impacts to shared mobility operators,” said Jessica Grant, City of Santa Barbara’s transportation planner.

Jesse Rosenberg, spokesperson for BCycle, said it remain unclear what the bill’s impact will be, but stated, “The implications could be severe.” Whether or not that’s enough to put the Trek-backed company out of business, she said, “I cannot give you a simple yes or no answer. This is a much larger matter at hand that is being discussed internally.” The bill is currently bottled up in the Senate’s Appropriations Committee, where compromise language is being hashed out. On the table is just how much insurance operators would be required to provide. According to Grant, three accidents involving BCycle were reported last year; two were severe enough to require a visit to Cottage Hospital’s emergency room. This year, according to BCycle’s Rosenberg, there have been two accidents. Right now, BCycle does not provide insurance for such eventualities. “It is up to the rider,” Rosenberg stated. —Nick Welsh

BUSINESS

Montecito St. Hotel Annex Moves Ahead

T

he Architectural Board of Review on Monday gave a predominantly positive appraisal of a three-room hotel annex at 311 West Montecito Street, part of developer Ed St. George’s latest attempt at changing the face of the West Beach neighborhood by adding several interconnected hotels and annexes to the area. The board voted 5-2 in favor of moving the project along for further review by city staff despite some questions over the design. This is the latest in a 43-room, threepiece puzzle of a hotel that will be stretched across three locations on Montecito Street. The largest, a 34-room three-story main hotel at 302 and 308 West Montecito Street, was recently approved and received permits from the city. A smaller, nine-room annex with a parking structure on the corner of Montecito and Castillo streets was recently slammed by members of the Historic Landmarks Commission, where Commissioner Ed Lenvik called the building the “most pedestrian-unfriendly element of anything we can imagine.” The commission took no vote, and the project is expected to return for another review. 10

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

The much smaller three-unit hotel annex gained support from a majority of the boardmembers on Monday. The two members opposed, Richard Six and Board Chair Kevin Moore, said the project needed some clear direction before moving on to the next step. There were also concerns raised about the privacy and security of the location, which would force guests to make the walk across the street and to the main hotel on the corner for parking, check-in, and concierge service. Boardmembers were generally in support of the project’s size and scale, which called for three units each with their own kitchenette, living room, two bedrooms, and outdoor space. However, the board left comments for city staff and the project planners to consider before the project returns to the board for final approval. Specifically, the board asked to see “continuing development according to the guidelines along the streetscape,” some more in-depth photos of surrounding sites, and details regarding the hotel annex’s perimeter fencing and landscape materials. —Ryan P. Cruz


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COMMUNITY

Free School Supplies at Ortega Park RYAN P. C RUZ

FD383

Only our landlord is changing. Our location and commitment to your family remain the same. McDermott-Crockett & Associates Mortuary will continue serving Santa Barbara families as we have for over a century. We’re here for you whenever you need us, with personal care and attention each step of the way. 2020 Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105

(805) 569-2424 www.McDermottCrockett.com

BACKPACKS ARE BACK: The organizers and volunteers of last year’s school supply drive distributed nearly 300 backpacks filled with supplies to local students.

P

arents preparing to send their children back to school will have opportunities to receive free clothing and school supplies from numerous organizations, including at school supply drives taking place this Saturday. Some groups, such as People’s Pantry, Catholic Charities, and Unity Shoppe, provide food, clothing, and other supplies year-round, while others organize large drives in the weeks preceding the beginning of the school year. One supply drive — organized by community members, the Santa Barbara High School Ethnic Studies Club, and the Ortega Park Youth Brigade — is set to take place at Ortega Park on Saturday, August 13, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. This will be the third annual school supply drive at the park,

and the groups have raised more than $3,600 to purchase more than 300 backpacks with school supply kits, including high school and elementary-aged school kits. For children and families within the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara County (HACSB), the group will also hold its own drive for free backpacks and school supplies on Saturday. This drive, however, is not open to the general public. To register, contact Leticia Zuniga at (805) 897-1059 or lzuniga@hacsb.org or Hector Avila at (805) 897-1044 or havila@ hacsb.org. For a list of locations that provide free clothing, see independent.com/ school-supply-drives.

Goleta is about to get sweeter! Come celebrate our new shop! Grand Opening Week August 19-26 Ribbon Cutting Ceremony August 19 at 9:30 AM

—Jun Starkey

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 9 Mary Alice Brown, 67, of Lompoc, was arrested for a hit-and-run that left one woman in critical condition in a parking lot outside of a discount dollar store in Lompoc on 8/8, according to Lompoc Police. A witness reported seeing a car knock the victim to the ground and drive over her before fleeing the area. The 51-year-old victim was airlifted to Cottage Hospital with injuries to her legs and chest, and as of 8/9 was listed in “critical, but stable condition,” according to Lompoc Police. Brown was arrested for felony hitand-run and booked in Santa Barbara’s Main Jail with bail set at $50,000. Lompoc Police officers arrested Lompoc man William Morales, 35, for attempted murder on 8/2 after he allegedly attacked staff and officers at a mental health clinic on East Ocean Avenue and attempted to set a room full of people on fire. The damage from the arson is estimated to be more than $10,000. Morales was booked into County Jail for attempted murder, assault with a deadly weapon, and resisting arrest on more n than $1 million bail.

Bring in this ad for a FREE gift with a purchase of $40 or more.*

*Exclusive to Goleta location. While supplies last.

#SeesTheDay

Camino Real Marketplace 7044 Market Place Drive Goleta, CA 93117 (Next to Tillys)

INDEPENDENT.COM 2022-RET-GO-Goleta-Collateral-Ad-4.583x6.166-final.indd 1

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

11

7/18/22 9:33 AM


U UPCOMING CRAFT TIME PCOMING C RAFT T IME PA C I F I C C O N S E R VAT O R Y T H E AT R E

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

at ink.paper. crafts

tickets

8/20 8/20 8/20 8/20

K

a aft ft ia ia et et

Adu A du Ho H o

p pyy aft aft

Every E very Tue Tue + Thur Thur Summer S ummer S Studio! tudio! E F iday iday H Hour Hour Craft! Craft! 3 5

11am11am11pm pm

m

Music & Lyrics by STEPHEN SONDHEIM | Book by JAMES LAPINE Originally directed on Broadway by JAMES LAPINE | Orchestrations by JONATHAN TUNICK

AUG 11 - SEPT 4 | Solvang Festival Theater TICKETS 805-922-8313 | PCPA.ORG GROUPS* 805-928-7731 x.4150

*12 OR MORE

percrafts.com | @ink.paper.crafts inkpa

Stay up to date

on everything the

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

is doing beyond our pages. Sign up for our weekly

EXTRA!

NEWSLETTER.

Independent.com/newsletters

12

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


NEWS of the WEEK

AUG 4-11, 2022

CONT’D

PUBLIC SAFETY

Massive Clearing Project Proposed for Los Padres B RYANT BAKER

Forest Service Seeks Controlled Burns and Tree Thinning Across 235,000 Acres

SAWED-OFF: Los Padres ForestWatch’s Bryant Baker is next to a 24-inch Jeffrey pine. Trees this size could be cut down by the Forest Service as part of forest health and fuels reduction work in Los Padres, which the environmental organization opposes. by Jean Yamamura f the past is anything to go by, out-of-control wildfires are a legacy Santa Barbara and the American West are facing as climate changes dry out the landscape and result in little or too much rain and many dead or dying trees. While the properties of people living in the foothills and mountains are most at risk from a big wind-driven fire, even downtown Santa Barbara faced evacuation west of Garden Street at the height of the Jesusita Fire in 2009, as did Montecito and Goleta in subsequent fires. Every year, dozens of smaller fires begin but are quickly extinguished, as manpower and air power are poured onto each of them. But parts of Los Padres National Forest — which borders thousands of homes across Carpinteria, Montecito, Santa Barbara, and Goleta — haven’t burned in 90 years, forest officials say. In particular, forested lands at higher altitudes and some interior areas of chaparral would benefit from some controlled return of fire, they explained during a scoping session on Monday night for the new Ecological Restoration Project being prepped for an Environmental Assessment. The history of fire suppression in Los Padres goes back to the 1920s. What used to be open stands of healthy trees have become overcrowded groups of pines, firs, and some oak woodlands over the past century. The “Forest Health” part of the Eco plan will thin 60 stands across 48,000 acres using mechanical and hand-cutting of trees up to 24 inches in diameter, and mowing, masticating, or chipping surface and ladder fuels. The cut trees and brush would be pile-burned, and prescribed understory burns would take place at intervals. In a meeting Monday night, the U.S. Forest Service speakers described the need to clear overcrowded stands to let in sunlight and give fewer trees a chance at the available water. A fire in such a stand tended to burn at a high intensity, causing fires higher up in the tree canopy, killing larger trees and leading to a zone of no cones or seeds to start the next generation. Though thinning would take out trees large and small, the idea was to leave enough trees of a variety of ages to grow the stand over the years. Monday night’s meeting was duplicated in a virtual meeting on Wednesday after press time, as the Forest Service considers public questions in the 235,000-acre project, which is estimated to remain in place for 25-35

I

years. Much of the biological and cultural survey work is ongoing; once the Environmental Assessment is in a draft form, it will undergo 30 days of public comment, and the final Eco plan would have a 45-day comment period. The second set of plans is for “Fuel Breaks and Defense Zones,” according to a 17-page document that describes the work in general terms. Along roads and up to structures and property lines, fuel breaks as wide as 1,500 feet are planned in 418 stands of about 446 acres apiece. The total acreage is 186,000 out of the two million acres that make up Los Padres National Forest. The reduction of fuel loads is to slow the spread of fire under most conditions, and methods are just about identical to the Forest Health work, though the size of trees to be taken is not specified and weed whipping and grazing are included. Chaparral makes up 78 percent of Los Padres, and forest officials said the chaparral has been subject to toofrequent wildfires. When fire returned two or three times in a span of six years, the composition of the plant community changed to one of weeds. Los Padres will nonetheless use fire to clear chaparral from fuel breaks, as some areas hadn’t burned in 30-50 years, and planting with less flammable natives could follow.

PRAISE AND DISCORDANCE The plan has earned praise from the Coalition of Labor and Agriculture (COLAB), whose director Andy Caldwell call it a “major opportunity to end neverending forest fires” by thinning trees that are 10 times the optimal level for a healthy forest ecosystem. The crowded conditions affect sunshine, nutrients, and water for the trees, which “become weakened and susceptible to pests and diseases. They end up dying and becoming fuel for ravaging forest fires,” Caldwell wrote in an email. The pest in question is by and large some variety of bark beetle, a scourge that has been getting under the skin of drought-starved pines that are unable to muster the sap to drive them out. But whether the pest is a detriment or actually beneficial to forest health is a question being raised by Los Padres ForestWatch. “The beetles are thinning the trees for free,” asserted Bryant Baker, an environmental scientist with ForestWatch for the past six years. The bugs were native to

Southern California and long-established in the Sierra Nevada. While the native ips and other beetles thrive in trees under stress from drought, the Forest Service’s plans to thin the stands of conifers will ultimately kill and remove more trees than the beetles would, said Bryant. A set of studies that made their way into Mother Jones in 2015 included one from a Forest Service ecologist who had compared survival rates in beetle-infested limber pines. She found that those that lived had grown during periods of less moisture; the dead pines had grown during periods of good snow and rain. The beetle infestation had led to a natural selection for more drought-tolerant pines, which then survived subsequent infestations. What’s more, said Baker, the snags or dead trees became homes for woodpeckers and a whole new ecosystem developed around them. Sundowner blazes are a minority of all the fires in Santa Barbara County, but they can produce a conflagration that the proposed fuel breaks are too small or too distant for firefighter safety or to prevent wind-blown embers from starting spot fires. “If you think about the last few fires, the vast majority of damage was from sundowner fires, like the Thomas Fire,” Baker said. Fuel breaks, even if 1,500 feet wide, would not stop embers that blow a mile away. The Eco restoration plan area stretches across four ranger districts from Monterey’s redwood forests to the Ventura County’s dry alpine heights. An Environmental Assessment is a middle-level review, said Baker, less than an Environmental Impact Statement but better than a Categorical Exclusion. For a plan that includes the Santa Ynez River’s riparian corridor, he advocated for a higher level of review.

HOMES AND STRUCTURES After fire health and restoring fire frequency intervals, the Eco plan addresses the risk to homes and communities. A growing chorus of voices, including ForestWatch, is arguing that the way to protect the zones where the forest and homes meet is home hardening. Carla D’Antonio, an ecosystem specialist at UC Santa Barbara, was between meetings in Mauna Kea and Montreal but took a minute to observe that chaparral was an underappreciated diverse and beautiful ecosystem. “Home hardening is critical,” she said. “Fire is inevitable and wind-driven fire is impossible to control even with big fuel breaks.” Steve Windhager, a fire ecologist and director of the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, called home hardening “the single greatest thing that can be done to reduce home loss in the WUI as a result of wildfire.” He noted the ecological damage done by creating fuel breaks and roads to them, as they became “vectors for spread of invasive species into primarily native habitat.” Home hardening avoided those adverse effects to wildlands: “It makes sense that this should be our first choice for how to make our communities safer.” The Forest Service does not disagree. “Fire-resistant homes is a good step homeowners can take,” said Kyle Kinports, a vegetation manager at Los Padres. But it wouldn’t protect the forest from frequent or high-severity wildfire, which had consequences like flooding, erosion, and campground closures, as well as negative effects on endangered species like the California condor and steelhead trout. The scoping documents and maps of the treatment areas by ranger district can be found at tinyurl.com/ecoproject. The current comment period ends August 28.

INDEPENDENT.COM

n

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

13


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Barking Dogs Gather No Moss

SHOOTING THE BREEZE: Is that a diabetes syringe in your pocket, or are you just

happy to see me? That question was very much on my mind this Sunday as I was trying to celebrate the passage of the Inflation Reduction Act — okay, I admit the name’s a stretch — perhaps one of the most historic and sweeping pieces of legislation passed by the Senate this side of the Pleistocene era. Instead of focusing on all the things the bill did accomplish — $370 billion in tax credits for clean energy projects, minimum tax rate of 15 percent established for big corporations worth a billion or more, and a maximum cap of $2,000 a year for 10 prescription drugs — I found myself fixating on what it didn’t include. Mr. Buzzkill, meet Mr. Party Pooper. What didn’t make it across the finish line was the desperately needed price-tag relief for the 8 million insulin junkies who must take a drug invented 100 years ago every day of their lives if they wish to continue eating and breathing. While I have been spared this lethal challenge where my blood sugar levels are concerned, about 6.7 million people die from complications of diabetes each year. If passed, the measure would have limited monthly insulin payments to people with private insurance as well as people on Medicare to no more than $35 a month. What didn’t pass was relief for people on

private insurance. The cap for Medicare recipients, however, did. In the United States, the insulin market is controlled — dominated is a more precise word — by three major pharmaceutical companies. A vial of insulin that cost $21 in 1999 cost $323 in 2019. For many diabetics, a single vial is not sufficient to get them through the month. Only three companies and prices triple? I’m sure there’s a reasonable explanation. Until I hear it, the word “collusion” flutters unbidden to mind. Insulin is a treatment, not a cure. Many moons ago, I shared the sunrise shift for hyperbaric therapy at the Santa Barbara Wound Center — perhaps the least euphemistically named health-care facility in town — with a fit-looking young dude whose feet weren’t getting the oxygen they needed. That’s one of the things diabetes does. The hope was that 40 sessions in the oxygen tank — delivered at pressures more typically found 30 feet under the sea — might magically jumpstart his body’s ability to distribute the oxygen his lungs were breathing in and get it to his extremities. In his case, that didn’t happen. I was in the room when a guy in a white lab coat gave him the news. They were off discreetly in a corner. I didn’t hear a word. I didn’t have to. The next stop was amputation. They don’t make get-well cards for something like that. To be fair, the Senate vote was encour-

FLOWER FRIDAY FEATURING

14

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

agingly close. To include the price cap for insulin, 10 Republicans had to vote for an arcane but critical procedural waiver. The vote was three short. But seven Republicans did vote for the waiver that would secure insulin for those with insurance policies at no more than $2,000 a year. Among these seven were some of the most right-wing, shoot-first-aim-later throat-punchers the GOP has swimming in its moat. People like shameless election deniers Josh Hawley from Missouri and Louisiana’s Bill Cassidy and John Kennedy. A lot of diabetes happens to southern Republicans. Like diabetics everywhere, many of these voters are forced to shortchange their own lives or those of their children by rationing their insulin. Come election season, I wouldn’t want to have to explain to these voters why I could have helped them but didn’t. They don’t make get-well cards for that either. Just to be clear, the Senate did pass a watered-down version of an insulin price cap. People on Medicare will benefit; people on private insurance will not. But this legislation is coming back in another package. I am fixating on insulin because it — and diabetes — put Santa Barbara on the map. If it weren’t for diabetes, it’s highly doubtful Santa Barbara would look the way it does. A little more than a century ago, one of the world’s leading diabetes researchers — Dr.

William David Sansum — got off the train

in Santa Barbara to fill the shoes left by the world’s foremost authority on the subject, Dr. Nathaniel Potter, who had recently died. In 1922, Sansum would be the first Ameri-

can doctor to create and administer insulin

for a sick patient. That patient lived to be 90. Word got out, and every diabetic in the country with enough money to pay the train fare headed to Santa Barbara. To accommodate this onslaught, historian Walker Tompkins claims, all of Santa Barbara’s best hotels — El Encanto, the Upham, and the Samarkand — came into existence. Among these visitors was an upright New Englander named Bernhard Hoffmann, whose daughter had diabetes, then a death sentence. More than anyone, Hoffmann is responsible for Santa Barbara’s architectural fixation with all things red-tiled and Moorish. He bought Casa de la Guerra and transformed it into the Spanish fandango of El Paseo. He rebuilt the Lobero Theatre. And to make sure others followed suit, Hoffmann created the Architectural Board of Review (ABR). For this, he and the ABR would soon be reviled as “communistic” in the local press. Hoffman got the picture and left town. But by then, insulin could be produced at commercial scale; his daughter was safe. With the next vote on insulin, everyone else will be too. —Nick Welsh


OPINIONS CONT’D

“FLIGHT C ANCELLATIONS” BY JEFF KOTERBA

Letters

Stand Against Hate

W

e were shocked and disappointed when the Pride flag was ripped down from St. Mark’s Church in Los Olivos. We were saddened for all people but most especially the congregants of St. Mark’s and the LGBTQ+ community. St. Mark’s is open to all people of all faiths, including the Jewish community. As Jews, our history is ripe with acts of violence, and today Jews around the world are regularly beaten, synagogues burned, and more. But this is our little community where we hoped some of the ugliness in the world would not affect us; we were wrong. Because there is no “them,” only us, we stand up against all forms of hate. An attack on any one of us is an attack on all of us. To the St. Mark’s congregation, Father Randall, and the LGBTQ+ community, we proudly stand with you.

—Susie Margolis Pierson, President, and the Santa Ynez Valley Jewish Community Board of Directors

Carrillo and Chapala Mess

T

faults, say in the Midwest? As a side note, I saw this questionable assertion slide by: “Retrofitting the plant to seismic safety standards didn’t pencil out when renewable fuels had grown too competitively low … ” Using the word “competitive” makes it sound as if this is about market competition. But the only reason wind and solar are “competitive” is that the California Legislature has declared them so. Were it not for legislative subsidies and decrees, no rational utility operator anywhere would be using wind or solar. I suspect that what really bothers Nick is the nuclear waste problem. That problem is solvable too; we could do as the French do and reprocess our “spent” fuel into new fuel rods. The reason that what we currently define as nuclear waste is such a problem is that most of the “waste” is actually usable fuel. We’ll know environmentalists are serious about reducing CO2 emissions when they embrace nuclear as the cleanest, safest way of generating electrical power.

***

—Dale Francisco, S.B.

he former Greyhound Bus Depot is an eyesore! After attempting to push the city to remove the graffiti, I picketed at the corner of 32-36 West Carrillo Street through Fiesta, urging cleanup. So many people gave me a thumbs-up! The previous graffiti cleanup — made at my urging — resulted in a smear of gray paint across even the mosaics on the wall. The Beverly Hills owner doesn’t care. He leased it. The two names on the signs don’t care. We should all care! If we care enough to pay an outside firm almost a million dollars to make suggestions to fix our downtown, we might want to care enough to clean up one obvious place with the authority we have. —Candace C. Corbani, S.B.

Kudos to Nick Welsh for enumerating the arguments against continuing operation of Diablo Canyon, as opposed to institution of a wind power plant utilizing the same grid system. However, contrary to the Angry Poodle’s assertions, nuclear energy is not “carbon-free” and “clean.” Large amounts of fossil fuel are required for the mining, milling, and enrichment of uranium fuel and the storage of nuclear waste (and massive amounts are needed for the construction of new nuclear power plants). Nuclear power plants generate massive amounts of radioactive waste dangerous for thousands of years, without guaranteed existing or probable safe —Steve Daniels, S.B. storage reservoirs.

Nukes!

Thank You

I

n a canine column two weeks ago (“Zombie Power: Governor Newsom Brings Diablo Canyon Back from the Dead”), Nick Welsh made a big deal of the proximity of earthquake faults to Diablo. That’s a fair argument. He also grants that nuclear power is “carbon free” (though he doesn’t mention that it’s our only such source of industrial-strength electricity). So, the question: Would he be in favor of nuclear power in places where there aren’t major earthquake

2.50

%

5-MONTH CD

For a limited time, earn a guaranteed interest rate with a CD (certificate of deposit). A $10,000 minimum balance is required. To get started, contact the Preferred Banking Office nearest you or scan the QR code to learn more.

W

e are fortunate in Santa Barbara to have so many excellent medical professionals. The Eastside Dental Clinic on Milpas Street has a staff of the most caring, friendly, helpful, and generous people you will ever find. I have been with them about four years and have received excellent care. (Costs are determined using a sliding scale.) To whichever organization is supporting these neighborhood clinics — thank you.

—James Collins, S.B.

APY1

firstrepublic.com/CD

Santa Barbara, 1200 State Street, (805) 560-6883

1 Offer is subject to change without notice and applies for one term only. Annual percentage yield (APY) is effective as of publication date. Penalty will be imposed for early withdrawal. $10,000 minimum balance required. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

15


obituaries Heinrich Richard (Dick) Falk 5/3/1939 - 7/27/2022

FALK, Heinrich Richard (Dick) Professor Emeritus of Theatre, scholar of 18th-century Spanish theatre and long time Santa Barbara resident, Heinrich Richard Falk died on 07/27/2022 . He was born on 3 May 1939 in Frankfurt/ Main, Gemany, to Janet Elizabeth Prentice and Reverend Heinrich Wilhelm Karl Falk; he was the grandson of George Gordon Prentice and Janet Eleanor (Stirling) Prentice of New Haven, Connecticut, and San Diego, California. In 1947 the Falk family left Germany and moved to San Diego where Dick attended elementary and junior high school. In 1952 the family moved to Caracas, Venezuela where he completed high school in 1955 at the Colegio Americano. He received his undergraduate degree in Humanities and German from Wittenberg University (Ohio), and his Ph.D. in Theatre History and Classics from the University of Southern California in 1970. He was also a post-doctoral scholar in Comparative Literature at the University of California, Los Angeles. He met his future wife, Evelyn Joyce Duncan, while they were both graduate students at USC and they were married in Los Angeles in 1965. They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary at their home in Santa Barbara in 2015. Dick taught for 40 years in the Theatre Department of California State University, Northridge. He served as Acting Department Chair on two occasions and was the Director of Graduate Theatre Studies for over 25 years. He was Coordinator of the CSUN International Programs, served as the university representative to the statewide CSU Academic Council on International Programs for many years, and in 1986-87 served as the Resident Director for the CSU International Programs in Madrid and Granada, Spain. He also served as the Coordinator of the university Humanities Interdisciplinary Program and taught courses in 16

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Humanities for many years. In 1993 Dick was a Visiting Professor at the Shanghai Theatre Academy, where he lectured on Latin American theatre and directed graduate students in the production of several Latin American plays. This led in 1999 to his organizing the first CSUN theatre production to travel to China and initiated a continuing series of theatrical exchanges with the Shanghai Theatre Academy. An invitation in 2004 from a former student to direct the inaugural production at the new Punchi Theatre in Colombo, Sri Lanka, was followed by a subsequent appointment as a Fulbright Scholar to teach and direct in the English Department of the University of Sri Jaywardenepura in Sri Lanka. An appointment as a Fulbright Senior Specialist in 2011 took him to Korea, at the Seoul Institute of the Arts, where he served as an advisor and consultant to their international programs. Fellowships and grants over the years from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Del Amo Foundation (Los Angeles), Asian Cultural Council, American Council of Learned Societies, and CSUN supported research in the area of 18th-century Spanish teatro breve that resulted in the publication of several articles re-evaluating the role of popular theatre during the Spanish Enlightenment. Another area of interest that Dick pursued, through archival and oral history research in Spanish villages, was the role of touring theatre, particularly the Teatro del Pueblo during Spain’s Second Republic. Dick is survived by his wife, Evelyn Joyce Duncan Falk of Santa Barbara, California; brother, George (Ethel) of San Diego, CA; sister, Hanna Crim of St. Petersburg, FL; sister-in-law Julia Falk of Auburn, VA; and their families.

Alfonso L. Valdez

5/26/1943 - 7/27/2022

Born the third of nine siblings in Calvillo Aguascalientes, Mexico. He had only the chance to get through fourth grade. He left school and had to begin working to help the family. At nine

AUGUST 11, 2022

years old he hustled and bustled through his formative years and always made sure to protect his siblings and help provide for his younger brothers and sisters. He decided at the ripe age of 21 to make a leap of faith and go to the U.S. He came to find a “better” life and send money back to his mom and dad in Guadalajara from where he ultimately settled for over 55 years in Santa Barbara. It was during that time that he found and worked his way into the heart of the love of his life that would become his wife of 49 years, Maria Luisa Valdez. With hard work, love, and determination they laid a beautifully strong foundation for their children Alfonso, Jaime and Annel. A life formed and centered around love, devotion, and joy that continues to this day. Innumerable reunions with family and friends were the hallmark of his life well lived. Hard work was always a signature of the family. Thirty plus years in construction work provided a different opportunity generated through the Laborers 591, introduced by his cousin and longtime supporter, Aurelio Torres. Beyond the work, came a love of the game of golf that connected him to countless people from all walks of life and cemented a bond with his sons that can never be replaced. His love for his wife precluded all serious conversations because he recognized the importance of her partnership even until his last days, he unselfishly gave credit to the principal role she played in their success and the upbringing of their children and generations to follow. His soft spot was a unique relationship with his daughter, a.k.a. La Negra or as he would say his baby. Among all things important to him, his grandchildren in many ways brought him his greatest joy. He leaves behind a legacy of friends, family, and ability. Those who were fortunate to know him, felt not only special but loved. He will be sorely missed by many but will equally be remembered as the person that made them feel special. His wife Maria Luisa, sons Alfonso and Jaime, daughter Annel, daughter-in-law’s Grace and Kelli, and grandchildren Diego, Mia, Valeria, Eliana, Amiya, and Vida were physically present at his passing along with prayers and genuine sentiment from direct and indirect family and will forever be grateful for the life lived and the example he provided of what a life well-lived truly means. As he said on more than one occasion, he won in this game called life. Yes, Alfonso, that you did. Viewing/Rosary Tuesday, August 2nd at St. Raphael’s Church starting at 6pm. Funeral Mass Wednesday, August 3rd at St. Raphael’s Church 10am.

INDEPENDENT.COM

Richard A. Bonacorsi 8/23/1949 - 5/26/2022

Cemetery, 55 Hideaway Lane, Methuen, MA. The setbacks he suffered from his car accident were monumental, but Richard always pushed to overcome obstacles. He was a fighter to the end and kept us laughing while he did it.

Rafaela Frausto

11/25/1949 - 7/26/2022

Salem – Richard A. Bonacorsi passed away peacefully in his home on May 26, 2022 in Salem, NH, after a brief battle with cancer. He was 72 years old. Richard was born on August 23, 1949 to Joseph and Rose (Cubelli) Bonacorsi and grew up in Methuen, MA. In his mid-teens he was seriously injured in a car accident which would change the course of his life. After many months in the hospital and over a year in recovery, he worked for Grieco Brothers in Lawrence, MA and earned his GED, and eventually attended Northern Essex Community College. He never had trouble finding work and did everything from sales to landscaping to cabinetry, until finally becoming an installer, field technician, and technical troubleshooter with Cox Cable in Santa Barbara, CA. As his vision failed him, he transitioned from technical work to customer service, from which he retired. During retirement he volunteered for the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, spent time with his mother and his close friends at his home, talked everyday to his closest friend, Paulie, and enjoyed countless hours caring for his grandchildren. In 2014 he returned to New Hampshire and shared a home with his brother, Joseph Bonacorsi, until his passing in 2020. Richard is survived by his nephews, Joseph (Melanie) Bonacorsi of Chichester, NH, Jason Bonacorsi of Boscawen, NH, and Matt (Kristen) Bonacorsi of New Boston, NH, and his stepdaughter, Andria (Brian) Bargiel, of Santa Barbara, CA and his grandchildren, Oliver and Ruby. He is also survived by his loving significant other, Rebecca Dorman of Salem, NH, who cared for him throughout his illness. He will be remembered as the loving and funny Uncle Cheech of Jessica, Jordin, Cassandra, Alexandra and Nathan. He loved to play tricks on them and make them laugh. He was predeceased by his only sibling, Joseph Bonacorsi in May of 2020 with whom he was laid to rest at a graveside service on July 1, 2022 at 12:30 p.m. at St Mary-Immaculate Conception

RAFAELA (“Yaya”) FRAUSTO, mother, grandmother, sister and aunt, left us on July 26th, 2022 to join her beloved mother and father, Rafaela and Ricardo V. Frausto, brother, Richard Frausto Jr. and nephew, Emmanuel Frausto. She is survived by her children, Raquel Frausto, Veronica Frausto-Frishman, and Nathan Frishman, her granddaughters, Zia Pilar Frausto and Farrah Beardon, her siblings, Maria Rafaela Williams, Bernardo Frausto, Norma Baer, Alma Consuelo Smith, Armando Frausto, Angela Lynn Nieto, Sylvia Brown and many, many nieces, nephews and cousins. She was a lifelong advocate for women, children and the most marginalized in her community. She was an artist, activist, and had a deep love for her Puerto Rican/Mexican cultures. She was always dancing, quick to laugh, with a tremendous strength and beauty that was reflected in everything she did and touched. She was in her third year of retirement with her final role as Director of the Pleasant Valley Neighborhood for Learning/First 5. She volunteered and worked tirelessly for non-profits and served on many Boards and Committees in Santa Barbara City and County, Nevada County and Ventura County. Her volunteerism included: Advisory Committee on Diversity, California First 5 Commission; Affirmative Action Committee, Santa Barbara School District; Citizen’s Task Force on Community Development, City of Santa Barbara; Legal Defense Center Board of Directors, Santa Barbara; President of El Concilio de la Raza, Santa Barbara; California Child Care Resource and Referral Network Board of Directors; President Nevada County Business & Professional Woman; Family Preservation & Support Advisory Committee, Nevada County. She has left a lasting impression on all who have had the privilege to know her. Continued on p.18


In Memoriam

Ryan Leone

IT’S GOING TO BE HISTORIC... APPLY FOR GOLETA’S INAUGURAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION

1985-2022

BY F R A N K L E O N E

t is not so much how long you live as

The City of Goleta is excited to announce that it is seeking applicants for the City’s brand-new Historic Preservation Commission. This is an important next step in the implementation of the Historic Preservation and Cultural Resources Ordinance enacted by the City Council in April 2022. The goal of the Historic Preservation Ordinance is to preserve and protect resources that, once lost, cannot be replaced or replicated. The Commission will be comprised of five members appointed by the Mayor and will term out in varying years (June 2024, 2025, and 2026). After that, terms will be for four years, with no limit on the number of terms to which members may be appointed. A majority of the members must be residents of the City. Meetings are tentatively scheduled for the 3rd Monday of every other month, subject to the agenda calendar. Don’t miss this historic opportunity! Apply for the City’s first Historic Preservation Commission at www.CityofGoleta.org/BoardsCommissions. Applications due by September 9, 2022, at 5:00 p.m. For questions contact cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent August 11, 2022

8/11 - 8:30 PM

PAT CURREN WITH PETMEDZ SB SURF ROCK 8/12 - 9:00 PM

THE MOLLY RINGWALD PROJECT 80’S DANCE 8/13 - 9:00 PM

BUDUNKAFUNK SB BOWL FUNKY AFTER-PARTY 8/14 - 1:00 PM

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY FEAT. JEFF ELLIOTT TRIO 7:30 PM

FOLLOW US ON

INSTAGRAM

@sbindependent

and prisoner rights, Ryan reached his audience by entertaining them, telling stories, carefully weaving encouragement and hope into his narrative. Ryan developed a YouTube following numbering in the tens of thousands and had a significant presence on Patreon and other social media platforms. Ryan was involved with numerous projects when he died: a documentary titled Idiot Savant: the Savage Life of Ryan Leone; his second novel, Anti Heroes, which is in the editing phase; and a screenplay titled Florida, co-written by actor and close friend Nick Stahl, which is now being reviewed by potential investors. Ryan Leone was special. He had a huge and humble heart, unmitigated love for many, and was devoted to his domestic partner, Karena Franco, and their young sons, Nikko and Weiland. Ryan left an indelible legacy. His scores of YouTube videos continue to influence many throughout the world. And a veritable army of friends and followers are poised to move forward to help Ryan’s two causes: a more humane approach to addiction and his quest to improve our criminal justice system. Perhaps Ryan’s most enduring legacy will be the foundation he established during his final months: The Ryan Leone Foundation: Paul’s Project. The shortterm objective of the foundation is to provide large amounts of Narcan, used to counter opioid overdoses, in high-risk areas. Those of us who loved Ryan miss him dearly. But we find comfort in knowing how much he did to champion the cause of those most in need and how the shape of his legacy will allow his influence to endure for decades to come.

STAY CONNECTED

what you do with the years you are here. We all possess some type of genius, and Ryan Leone’s genius was his love of stories, particularly those portrayed in books or film. That love helped him turn his life around after his lifetime flirtation with drugs landed him in federal prison. During his four years of incarceration, he spent numerous stints in solitary confinement, arguably a counterproductive form of torture that has no place in our country’s penal system. He nonetheless wrote Wasting Talent, which sold approximately 400,000 copies after publication in 2012. During his final year in prison, Ryan turned to a positive addiction, physical fitness, and coupled with exceptional nutrition became uncommonly healthy and strong. He resolved to address the outrages he experienced by working hard to change the world. His passions were twofold: to help addicts manage and not be shamed by their addiction and to call attention to the myriad injustices of our criminal justice system. Ryan Harrison Leone was born August 3, 1985, in Framingham, Massachusetts, the only child of Diane and Frank Leone. The family moved to Santa Barbara in 1989. Ryan passed away on July 2, 2022. Ryan was an exceptionally happy, active, and inquisitive youth. At the age of 3 he could quote long passages from his then-favorite movie, Ghostbusters, as well as passages from the multitude of children’s books that he reveled in nightly. Ever creative, Ryan put together amazing costumes from common household goods. Later, as a youth baseball player, he became a catcher because, well, catcher’s uniforms were just so cool. Ryan attended Monte Vista, Marymount Middle School, and Santa Barbara High. During those years, he made friends easily and was universally viewed as a fun guy, loyal friend, great storyteller, and someone with an extraordinary sense of humor. He was a showman. An only child, Ryan was close to his parents and loved his Labrador retrievers, Bogie and Brava. Ryan traveled a great deal, both domestically and internationally, with stops on foreign soil in eastern Canada, Mexico, Taiwan, Japan, and China. At the age of 15, Ryan began using drugs. He spent a cumulative eight years incarcerated for nonviolent drug offences. As a sweet, gentle person raised in a loving household, one can only imagine the horror of what Ryan saw and experienced during those years. As a dear family friend said shortly after his passing, “Ryan was an extremely good person with an extremely bad disease.” Ryan handled his disease with dignity. He owned his space and did not run or hide from it. He steadfastly refused to blame anyone or anything. Ryan was released from federal prison in 2013 and returned to Santa Barbara. He quickly became somewhat of a celebrity. In one short stretch, he was featured in Penthouse magazine, the Huffington Post, Malibu magazine, and the Santa Barbara Independent. Ryan instinctively knew how to connect with his target audiences, largely the marginalized and dispossessed who were dealing with the pain and humiliation of addiction and/or long-term incarceration. Rather than preach a generic gospel of sobriety

COURTESY

I

A Life Cut Short

PEPPINO D’AGOSTINO ACOUSTIC GUITAR 8/16 - 7:30 PM

JAZZ JAM WITH KIMBERLY FORD 8/17 - 8:00 PM

PETTY, SET, GO WITH BRANDI ROSE & THE FUNKY BUNCH TOM PETTY TRIBUTE 8/18 - 8:30 PM

KARL DENSON’S TINY UNIVERSE FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

Donations to The Ryan Leone Foundation: Paul’s Project may be sent to Brooke Houk, 114 Magnolia Court Mountain Home, AR 72653.

SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

17


obituaries The Rev. Canon Samuel Mortimer Ward, IV 9/29/1937 - 7/28/2022

The Rev. Canon S. Mortimer Ward, IV passed from this life on Thursday, July 28, 2022. He was born in New York City in 1937 on the feast of St. Michael and All Angels. He graduated from Windsor Mountain School and received his Bachelor’s degree from Heidelberg University with a major in psychology and Master of Divinity degree from the Church Divinity School of the Pacific. He married Diane Korosy in 1960, and they had two children, Christopher and Samantha. A Benedictine Confrater, Canon Ward served nineteen congregations as Vicar, Rector or Interim Pastor as well as numerous others as Diocesan Transition Specialist. Among other church positions he served on Diocesan Council, was a diocesan Fresh Start facilitator, ETS Claremont faculty member, Secretary of Province Eight Commission on Indian Work, Chair of Music and Liturgy Commissions for both San Diego and Los Angeles Dioceses and was Coordinator of Worship for two General Conventions of the Episcopal Church. As a Professional Transition Specialist in the Interim Ministry Network he served as a member of the faculty, Accreditation Committee, Transition Consultant Peer Review Committee, Professional Development Committee, Board of Directors and was a contributor to two IMN textbooks. A retired volunteer firefighter, he served the American Red Cross as an instructor, member of the Disaster Action Team, Emergency Medical Technician, Board Certified Crisis Chaplain, Disaster Mental Health Lead, Spiritual Care Advisor to the Central California Region, Services to the Armed Forces chapter lead and received the Clara Barton Award for meritorious volunteer leadership. In 2013 he was appointed to the board of directors of the Institute for Congregational Trauma and Growth. Mort is survived by his wife of 41 years, Alessandra Ward, children Christopher, Samantha, Taylor and Alexander and seven grandchildren. 18

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com He will be remembered not only for his ministries, but for his epic eyebrows, his hearty laugh and a tremendous sense of humor that came alive especially with family and friends. Canon Mort loved learning, teaching, all kinds of animals, good liturgy and music. His favorite hymn was “Christ the Fair Glory” which he had congregations sing because it encapsulated his theology of prayer while causing people to stretch their vocal range a bit. The date for a memorial service will be announced in the future.

mates, 13 grandchildren and mates, and 8 great grandchildren, as well as by his many friends and colleagues. Bob will be interred at Belmont Memorial Park in Fresno, California at a future date.

Bobbi (Roberta) Pearson

12/29/1940 - 8/2/2022

Robert Franklin Blecker 10/25/1942 - 7/13/2022

Robert Franklin Blecker, 79, died on July 13, 2022, at Westminster Village, in Scottsdale, Arizona, where he and his wife of 41 years, Kenlyn Meaney Blecker, have lived for the past 10 years. Bob was born in Fresno, Ca. on October 25, 1942, to parents Dr. Ralph and Mae (Froude) Blecker, who already had a three-yearold daughter, Betty Ann. Bob’s father died at age 42, shortly after being seriously ill while serving in World War II. Bob’s sister also died at a young age of 11 from aplastic anemia, Bob was raised as a single child by his widowed Mother and loving Aunts and Uncles. Bob loved to play and work on an uncle’s farm in Clovis, Ca. This led to his love of the outdoors and to earning his Bachelor of Science degree in 1967 from Cal State Fresno, followed by his MS degree in Hydrology at the University of Arizona in Tucson in 1969. Bob spent his entire career as a Hydrologist with the U.S. Forest Service, beginning in 1969 at the Cleveland National Forest, and then moving to the Los Padres National Forest in 1972 until his retirement in 1997. Bob and Anne Booher married in 1967 and have three daughters, Patricia (Blecker), Marcia (Twomey), and Leslie (Gardiner). The couple divorced in 1974. On April 11, 1981 Bob Blecker married Kenlyn Meaney, the mother of Dan, Michelle, Marcia, Douglas, Shawn and Bridget. Bob will be greatly missed by his wife, their nine children and

AUGUST 11, 2022

Bobbi (Roberta) Pearson passed away unexpectedly on August 2nd in Montrose, Colorado. She was 81 years young. She spent her final days in a state of pure elation in the splendor of the San Juan Mountains, surrounded by her beloved family and friends, who were gathered together for a music and nature-filled family celebration. Born in Chicago to Mort and Sylvia Natker, she was the eldest, followed by Nadine and Andy. Her father owned a popular Chicago coffee and sandwich shop, where he worked long hours, seven days a week. Bobbi often helped out and inherited her father’s work ethic. She was also an honor student throughout her education in high school and at the University of Illinois and Northwestern University. She was a leader too— president of her high school class and sorority. Bobbi was always very popular. Her little brother Andy remembers all the boys she dated. At the University of Illinois she met her husband, Larry. When he called Bobbi to propose, Andy, who was 10 at the time, forgot to pass that message along. Eventually, she got the message, married Larry and proceeded to have three beautiful children, Scott, Todd and Jill, in quick succession. Bobbi was an excellent pianist. Growing up, she played every evening with her mother, and later for the Chicago Symphony; she also played the guitar and clarinet and wrote songs, which she performed in high school, in college, and in their backyard in Glencoe, Illinois, where Todd would charge an entrance fee. Bobbi loved to dance as well; she danced like no one was watching, and no amount of her children’s embarrassment could stop her. In 1972 the family left the extreme weather of Chicago and headed

INDEPENDENT.COM

west to Montecito in Santa Barbara where the sun is almost always shining. With her creative skills, Bobbi made a new, warm and nature-filled home. There was a cornucopia of fruit trees and vegetables in the yard and their gardens were even featured in Better Homes & Gardens Magazine. She quickly made lifelong friends with like-minded, independent women, while still finding time to work as an editor and typist for UCSB graduate students. Bobbi’s love for the outdoors spanned her lifetime. She grew up going on annual visits to the beach for summers in Union Pier, Michigan. She was a great swimmer her entire life. For the past 35 years, Bobbi would spend part of every year in Baja California, Mexico, surfing, body boarding, and riding her bike with her devoted partner Mike, whom she met in Santa Barbara in 1984. Together, they loved and cared for their own spot of Pacific Ocean beach eight hours’ drive off road from the nearest town. They built from local stones a beautiful beach house, surrounded by rock and flower gardens. Bobbi and Mike lived off the fish they caught, exploring the wild coast, and befriending local fishermen, seasonal birds, and adventuresome surfers, for whom “Punta Blanca” and “Bobbi and Mike” became surfer legend. Bobbi moved to Columbia, California to live with Mike in 1985. Ten years later they created a small and still thriving business, Columbia Pinecones, collecting and selling specimen botanicals for florists worldwide. She lived there until her passing. Through their company, Bobbi found one way to share a small piece of her appreciation and passion for nature with the world. Bobbi’s love was the glue that kept her family connected. She traveled widely to see the people she loved and sent cards to everyone for almost every occasion; she had regular, long conversations with an extraordinary range of people – even from Baja where her satellite phone dropped the call every five minutes. She was always the first to text or find a reason to reach out. Bobbi loved looking at photographs of her family and there was never a wrong time to pull-up an old black-and-white picture. Bobbi’s love and care for her family and friends touched many others as well. She had such a deep interest in the lives of those she loved and also cared about their friends. That love, combined with

her total lack of malice or guile gave her license to ask anyone just about anything, and to believe unquestioningly any response she was given. Bobbi loved animals and spent countless hours observing the wildlife around her homes in California and Mexico. When a sad looking dog appeared chained up and apparently neglected on a neighbor’s porch, without hesitation, Bobbi marched into the neighbor’s land to do what was right. The ‘dog’ turned out to be a statue. She was a political activist, especially during the anti-Vietnam War movement and volunteered to support the Chicago 7 during their conspiracy trial. She continued to be sensitive to injustices throughout her life. Although Bobbi rarely attended synagogue, she felt a connection to her Judaism. She found her spirituality in nature, in the California mountains and the Punta Blanca beaches of Baja, where Bobbi found “tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.” She lived an exceptionally happy, active and full life to the end. She loved and excelled at being a mother and grandmother; she was never as proud as when she was talking about her children and grandchildren. She was pure of heart, genuine, and a bright light that always shone with joy, curiosity, enthusiasm, and loving acceptance. Bobbi is survived by her partner, Mike Ebert; her children, Scott, Todd, and Jill Pearson; her siblings Nadine Grobstein and Andy Natker; her daughters-inlaw Diana Farrell, Adrienne, and Kirstin Pearson; her brotherin-law Mike Grobstein, and sister-in-law Roslyn Natker; her grandchildren Sam, Sonia, Grace, and Jasper Pearson; her nephews and nieces, Greg Grobstein, Shawn Kimber, Blake, David and Josh Natker, and their spouses, Lisa Grobstein, Kim Spurlock, Elana and Shannon Natker; and the Farrell and Ebert families; also by her former-husband, Laurence Pearson. And by her cat, Larry. FUNERAL: 10 am Friday 12th August 2022 at Santa Barbara Cemetery, 901 Channel Drive, Montecito, California 93108 MEMORIAL: will take place directly following the funeral from approximately 12pm at the Rosewood Miramar Beach, 1759 South Jameson Lane, Montecito. In lieu of flowers, you may make a tribute donation to the Humane Society of Tuolumne County.


obituaries Timmoxena Jackson 2/9/1929 - 7/14/2022

Timmoxena was born February 9, 1927, to the late Jessie Mae and Charles H. Byrd in Sommerville, Texas. She passed away peacefully at home on Thursday, July 14, 2022. Timmoxena, known to most as “Timm,” was raised in Waco, Texas. She attended the Second Baptist Church there and accepted Christ at an early age. After graduating from high school, she traveled to California with her mother and sister in 1944. In 1946 they moved to Santa Barbara, California and she joined the Second Baptist Church in there. In 1947 Timm met and married the love of her life, Silas Jackson Sr. in Santa Barbara, California. To this union were born three sons, Silas Jackson, Jr., Gregory Jackson, and Anthony (Tony) Jackson. Upon arriving in Santa Barbara Timm was a domestic worker until she joined the Santa Barbara City Housing Authority from which she retired after 14 years of service. Timm was a loving wife and mother, and she doted on her family. Her family was everything to her, and she was enormously proud of all of them. She was the matriarch of this family, and she was given the respect that was due a Queen. She raised her sons with a firm but loving hand. She loved celebrating each birthday and made sure each card was read aloud. The holidays were always celebrated with the house bursting at the seams as the family grew and grew, but she never complained because she loved having her family around her! Next to God and her family was church. Timm loved everything there was about church. She held numerous church positions. Blessed with a beautiful voice, her favorite church activity was as a member of the choir, serving for many years as the choir president. She also served for years as the church secretary. She was a faithful, and hardworking member of the church attending every Sunday, while her health allowed. As her health declined, she could be found in her den looking through her hymnal song book softly singing. Timm was preceded in death by her parents Jessie Mae Jones and Charles Byrd, sister Charles Etta Jackson and loving husband Silas Jackson Sr. She leaves to cherish her memory her loving sons, Silas Jr. (Diana), Gregory

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

(Oksu), and Tony; Grandchildren, Shawn, Cassandra, Vanessa, Jafari, Alya, Kwamé, and Kofi; GreatGrandchildren Taylor, Tamara, Daniel, Jalen, Emica, Avery, Tuli, Sadie, Silas, Kayman and Kruz. Also, a host of nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. Timm was a wonderful wife, mother, grandmother, aunt, and friend! She will be missed and forever be in our hearts. We know that she is in a better place, and we will see her again. Services for Timm will be held on Saturday August 20, 2022, at 11:00 a.am. at the Welch-Ryce Haider Funeral Chapel, 450 Ward Drive, Santa Barbara, California 93111. We ask that everyone please wear masks. In lieu of flowers the family asks donations to be made in her memory to Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church, 430 E. Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara, California 93101.

THE LIFE STORY OF JENEY McCOY (Jennifer Reiko Watanabe Young McCoy)

March 18, 1934 – July 21, 2022

We are sorry to report the loss of Jeney McCoy at age 88, a Santa Barbara inspiration who besides helping her late husband Jim McCoy grow McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams into the storied local brand that it is, was active in civic causes, and influenced three generations with her infectious spirit and energy. Jeney was quite the character, truly a one-of-a-kind personality, full of boundless good energy, generous to a fault, fun to be around, a dedicated friend, and an even more dedicated wife, mother, grandmother, and great grandmother. There were four great chapters in her long storied life. CHAPTER ONE – THE FARM Jennifer was born in Great Neck, Long Island, New York in 1934. Her mother Eleanor Blanchard was born in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, and grew up in Melbourne. Eleanor was one of five Blanchard sisters born to a ship captain with English roots; Jennifer’s great grandfather helped settle Christchurch, New Zealand. Jennifer’s father was Hideo Watanabe, a half-Japanese merchant who imported silk and was interned in a U.S. concentration camp in New York during WWII. Hideo had a Japanese father and British mother, unusual for the late 1800’s. Jennifer’s earliest memories were of living on “The Farm” in Doylestown

Pennsylvania, a bucolic pastoral estate that belonged to her Aunt Dorothy and “Uncle Oscar”, the lyricist and Broadway legend Oscar Hammerstein II. Jennifer attended boarding schools in the area (Baldwin Elementary and George School) where she grew into a beautiful, long-limbed and tan young woman who competed on the tennis and swim teams, as well as acted in school productions. At age 19, after her father tragically passed away, Jennifer began to travel around western Europe both with her mother and on her own, igniting a love for travel that was never extinguished. When Jennifer finally returned to the U.S., she enrolled at Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio. She never did early mornings very well, and so it was no surprise that during an early morning religion class, Jennifer would slowly nod off during the lecture. Her bobbing beautiful head was noticed by a smitten handsome young man in a crew cut who had just returned from the Marines, Richard Young. Jennifer left behind a surprise treasure trove of old love letters that Richard wrote to her during this time, around 1954. CHAPTER TWO – RAISING 4 BOYS IN LOS ANGELES Richard and Jennifer fell in love, married and had the first of their four sons, Kevin, in 1957. After getting his PhD from Columbia University, Richard asked Jennifer which coast she wanted to live on. Jennifer chose the West coast, and so Richard took a job at the UCLA Medical School, starting as an assistant professor. During Richard’s post-doctoral fellowship in Europe, which included stops in Italy, France, and Sweden, and which of course Jennifer was more than happy to encourage, son Mike was born (in Bari Italy). Upon their return to Los Angeles, sons Jimmy and Andy quickly followed. Those 15 years in Los Angeles were when Jennifer really fulfilled her stated childhood dream of “being a mommy,” raising four strong-willed successful rowdy boys. It was 19601975 and Jennifer was aged 25-40. During that time, Jennifer made over 7,000 lunches, plus countless breakfasts and dinners, laundry, dishes, cleaning, and then of course the driving … driving to kid sporting events (she was the mom in the stands whose screaming encouragement she made sure could be heard in deep right field), driving to lessons, and perhaps most excitingly to movie sets. Jennifer would drive her boys all over Los Angeles to make some extra money in commercials, television shows, and movies. No surprise, Jennifer’s energy was equal to the task – and more! She had a laissez faire, trusting style of parenting that gave her four boys self-confidence and a sense of adventure. During these years, Jennifer also refused to be bored, and was known to be a contestant on TV game shows where she won furniture, appliances, and thousands of dol-

lars. She also worked at the ticket counter at the Santa Monica ice skating rink so her boys could get free entry and cheap lessons. But as those who knew her know only too well, Jennifer also loved to sell. Besides the assortment of multilevel marketing items (including bras), Jennifer also sold gourmet imported foods that led her to attend numerous food conventions. CHAPTER THREE – SANTA BARBARA In the mid-1970’s, Jennifer changed her name to Jeney for “numerology reasons,” believing it would change her destiny. Perhaps she was right because shortly thereafter, thanks to a rather fortuitous trade show booth placement, Jeney met the second great love in her life, gregarious James O. McCoy from Santa Barbara. Big Jim was the purveyor of McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams of Santa Barbara, a local legend. Soon a new, 40-year, second life started for Jeney and Jim in Santa Barbara, melding Jim’s family of daughter Monika and son Robert with Jeney and her four sons. Somehow, they made it work. Joking she “had to change models to get the girl,” Jeney, then 43 years old, and Jim welcomed in little Jeni Reiko McCoy in 1977. The combined family moved into a Spanish style house with a pool on the upper east side of Santa Barbara which not surprisingly hosted many parties, some of which Jim and Jeney even knew about. It was an open, friendly household where all of the kids could, and did bring their friends (and their friend’s friends) to swim or simply hang out. The decade that followed was a high energy frenzy that Jeney not only coveted but in part created by infusing every day with her own sense of controlled chaos. The home became a social magnet for family and friends, a place where Jeney and Jim could host Super Bowl, French speaking, and Thanksgiving parties. When her boys moved away, Jeney filled her house with Swiss or French au-pairs, local and international guests, and friends spanning a lifetime of active living. Jeney and Jim were not surprisingly also active around town, spending quality time at the University Club, the Montecito Country Club and the Yacht Club. Jeney was captain of the Montecito Country Club women’s tennis team that competed against the other club teams – which, win or lose, always seemed to end with a celebratory lunch. Civically, both Jim and Jeney volunteered with the Fiesta planning, with Jim serving as El Presidente in 1993, and Jeney the Fiesta Primera Donna. Both Jim and Jeney were so very generous and well known in town thanks to their support of local charities, and their gifts of ‘wooden nickels’ (good for a free scoop at McConnell’s) were forever being passed around town. For many years, Jeney and Jim organized the annual Elegant Evening bash at the Montecito Country Club that attracted hundreds of fellow dancing aficionados each year.

INDEPENDENT.COM

CHAPTER FOUR – THE FINAL CHAPTER Jeney’s flamboyant life and radiant personality brought smiles and joy to all who were privileged to know her. But she was not without her own personal tragedies. Jeney’s stepson Robert McCoy died in 1980 at age 20. Daughter Jeni Reiko McCoy died in 2012 at age 34. And shortly after selling McConnell’s Ice Cream, Jeney’s love, Big Jim McCoy died in 2013. Following Jim’s death, Jeney was able to do some traveling with her children, and to visit relatives in the South Pacific, but as her health declined, so did the breadth of her world. The onset of Covid, with its restrictions on travel and visitation, was not a welcome addition to Jeney’s final years. Nonetheless, the final few months of Jeney’s life were truly a blessing, both to her and to those who loved her. Jeney was able to spend quality time with all of her children, grandchildren, and even great-grandchildren. She was able to go through old love letters, old photographs, and old movies of her life and the lives of her family, reminding herself of the positive impact she had on so many others and the love she was able to share and receive from so many people. Jeney died peacefully in her sleep the night of July 21. She was in her bed, in her home, surrounded by her adoring cats, with family nearby, and without hospice or other medical intrusions. Characteristically, she died with a smile on her face, likely dreaming of her days on The Farm. In Jeney’s wake are her four sons, Kevin (wife Berni), Mike (wife Debbie), Jimmy (wife Tracy), and Andy (wife Kate), her step-daughter Monika (husband Russell), eight grandchildren (Kimberly, Amber, Christopher, Scott, Jackson, Grayson, Bridget, and Lindsey), two great grandsons (Samuel and Max), and cousins Katy and Paul Jacobson, Kiaora Fox, and Osiris, Isaiah and Ajala. A bright light went out with Jeney, and those she left behind will mourn the loss for quite some time. But Jeney wouldn’t want it this way. If she could have this one last wish, it would be that all those whom she had the privilege of touching in some fashion or other should not mourn, but instead should turn on some strobe lighting, and dance … preferably to CCR’s Green River.

Forever Dancing In Our Hearts Jenna Elizabeth Hall

AUGUST 11, 2022

1991- 2020

Forever missed… Forever loved…

THE INDEPENDENT

19


Deep Blue Sea Arts & Gifts Gifts that speak to your heart for every occasion

Come by to see our selection of gifts and art from local Santa Barbara artists and artisans Open 7 days, 10 am to sunset 805-962-0715 • www.deepblueseaart.com 219 Stearns Wharf C, Santa Barbara

TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE A DIFF

ERENCE

Deep Blue Sea Art & Gifts located on the historical Stearns Wharf invites you to visit us this summ er for your FREE

“II HELP HEAL THE OCEAN” N BRACEL For every ad redeemed, Deep Blue Sea Art & Gifts will donate $5 to Heal The Ocean, a local Santa Barbara nonprofit for the preservation of our ocea ns

ET!

Located behind Mother Stearns Candy Co.

PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

20

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until August 31, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


COVER STORY

Angela Perko poses in front of Sullivan Goss, where her newest body of work is currently on view and continues to weave mytho-historical themes and iconography together with brilliant color and intricate design.

The Fertile Images of Angela Perko Late-Blooming Artist Finds Fruitful Inspiration in The Place of Hidden Things by Roger Durling Photos by Ingrid Bostrom

A

rt’s responsibility has always been to inter-

pret experiences during trying times; it’s a worthy vessel for our collective remembrances, as well as our trauma. Could there be a more prescient and urgent display of artistic expression in Santa Barbara than Angela Perko’s current show at Sullivan Goss Gallery, The Place of Hidden Things? I doubt it. Perko’s exemplary, focused, and cohesive collection of paintings speak loudly about pressing issues like the environment, and, most vividly, the challenges to women’s reproductive rights. Her visual and very sensitive handling of these subjects is portrayed in an enduring and classical manner recalling ancient art. “I’ve always painted in a timeless fashion, but these works make contemporary statements,” the painter tells me. It is a staggering body of work by an artist at her most mature, disciplined, and visionary. “There’s a lot of culture in her work,” says Susan Bush, curator at Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery. “In each of her paintings, there is such an influx of information from different cultures, from literature, and from myths. Angela has so much that she has to say; that she found an outlet for

the things that she wants to say at a later stage in her life is brilliant.” I’ve been a fan of Angela Perko’s work since the early 2000s, and I eagerly look forward to her exhibits; her work grows more complex and captivating with each show. Her paintings clamor for attention and exploration. There’s a lot of information in them, and they have a robust narrative that demands deciphering, but it also sweeps you up — you get lost in it. The first thing that strikes you is her bold and confident use of color. She combines landscapes with still life — universal imagery with mythology and history — submerging the viewer into a vernacular of Perko’s own creation. She intermingles all these different ideas at once in syncopated fashion — playfully mixing flat planes with foreground, mid-ground, and background. She coalesces observation and imagination in inimitable ways, frequently inserting emblems and unexpected elements and recontextualizing them within new or altered compositions that retain rigor and necessity. This results in paintings that are as physically palpable and ocularly layered as our complicated lives. Not only are our minds engaged, but our hearts are moved as well. Perko’s work requires the viewer to balance at least two contending ideas — the subject being

displayed and the medium creating it. “I want to get away from too much narrative,” she explains. “I want the images to be accessible — universal. We’re part of the idea. Not necessarily telling the story but using universal imagery that could connect with the viewers.” The other arresting aspect of Perko’s work is her introspection; this peek into her interior life seems to have deepened even further with her latest work. “I’m coming to terms with life,” she says. “I’m 64 years old. You start to reflect on your life. There’s fear. There’s a lot of loss in the world. I have grandchildren and worry about the future. This is part of working it out.” Talking with Perko is inspiring, and I was fortunate to be welcomed into her home for three conversations. She is warm and thoughtful and a great storyteller, who often digresses yet always comes back full circle to the topic she started with. She often texted me after I left with further reflections and clarifications. Since 1995, Perko and her husband, Jerry Jacobs, have lived in a spacious home on upper State Street, where a rundown old shed has been transformed into an art studio and the California native plant garden continues to evolve.

INDEPENDENT.COM

CONTINUED> AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

21


COVER STORY

Join us in reading August’s book of the month! AUGUST’S THEME:

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

Discussion: Wednesday, August 31 at 6pm on Zoom BOOK O F THE M O N TH :

When No One is

Watching by Alyssa Cole

Register at independent.com/ indybookclub

Currently on view at Sullivan Goss, The Place of Hidden Things is Angela Perko’s ninth solo exhibition at the gallery.

Born in Hollywood, Florida, after her parents’ divorce, she went to live with her father in the countryside in Orange Springs, Florida. “It made an impact,” she admits. “I went to a rural school. One class for each grade.” A teacher asked her class to do an art project on the Norwegian fjords. Only 8 years old, Perko relished the opportunity. She recalls taking an art class in high school but being more interested in philosophy. Her studies took her to Lake Forest College in Illinois and on to Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, where she took philosophy classes but was disillusioned with the fact that everyone else was asleep in them. After college, she worked in a restaurant, met Jerry, and got married. “Our connection was that we both loved reading,” she says. “Both Jerry and I had nice libraries for people our age.” They knew people in the book business in San Diego and went with them on a road trip to Santa Barbara, their first glimpse of our town. Eventually, they decided to open their own bookstore and considered doing it in Florida but opted for California in 1981. “There were so many bookstores in S.B. at the time. This was a real book center,” says Perko.

Pictured behind Angela Perko is her gallery of what she calls “the pretty ladies,” with each of the 17 paintings representing a fertility figure from different antiquity cultures.

22

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Steven Acronico offered Jerry a job at Hammer Books — a rare bookstore — and Angela worked at the Charlotte Bakery in De la Guerra Plaza. They opened Lost Horizon bookstore in 1983, which was first located downtown and then moved to the Upper Village in Montecito in 2019, where they share the space with the Stewart Fine Art Gallery, which mixes nicely with the books. “We always loved the book and the movie,” says Perko of the store name. “It stands as a place that preserved all Western culture and ideas, plus Ronald Coleman [star of the film] lived in Santa Barbara.” They did well from the beginning. “The bookstore is an interesting thing, for you never know what’s going to come your way,” she says. “We have a great collection of art books at the store. Jerry was always a collector. Booksellers have an enthusiasm for collecting.” “I always say I’m a book-learned painter,” says Perko. She considers her stint at the bookstore as essential to her artistic career. It was there she became acquainted with the Canadian “Group of Seven,” artists (once known as the Algonquin School) who were at their peak in the 1920s-1930s and strongly


C OV E R S T O R Y Angela Perko in her garden with “The Wall,” which touches on themes of female immigrants

Premier Sponsor:

FREE Summer Cinema

Supporting Sponsor:

Fridays at 8:30 PM at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden

Fri, August 12

Fri, August 19

influenced by post-Impressionism, creating bold, vividly colored canvases. Perko, who is mostly self-taught, also learned a tremendous amount from studying the works of Kandinsky, Picasso, and many other artists from the early part of the 20th century. But it is the literary connections that make her paintings stand out, and they owe a lot to her immersion in the book world. “I am very moved by visual writers, like Virginia Woolf,” she says. “The Waves and To the Lighthouse are two novels that I feel have greatly added to my visual vocabulary. Federico García Lorca, Jorge Luis Borges, and Pablo Neruda provide a visual feast. And scenes from Gabriel García Márquez’s works rattle around my head. Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz is my go-to for a feminine gaze, and, of course, Jane Austen. The very visual and sensitive handling of classical subject matter by David Malouf reinforces the idea of timelessness that I often attempt to achieve. Graham Greene is a favorite. I admire his questioning of his faith, and his sense of irony puts him high on my list of influences, along with Iris Murdoch and José Saramago.” Perko didn’t start painting until 1988, when she took landscape lessons with Michael Drury. “The children were grown up,” she says. (Angela and Jerry have two daughters: Sara, who teaches art in the international school system in Istanbul and is soon moving to Argentina, and Tessa, who lives in Germany and has a doctorate degree in cultural studies.) “The bookstore was Jerry’s baby,” Perko says. “It’s his identity. Painting for me was just sort of like picking up the brush and finding out this is who I am. This is what I do.” It was also at the Lost Horizon bookstore where Perko hung her first works, and where she was noticed by art gallery owner Maureen Murphy, who represented esteemed landscape painters like Ralph Waterhouse, Meredith Brooks Abbott, and Rick Garcia. “My paintings stuck out like a cold sore,” Perko says self-deprecatingly. Murphy advised her, “Your stuff sells, but I can’t put them on the wall. You should look for somebody else to represent you.” Frank Goss, who founded Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery, and has since retired, saw Perko’s work at the bookstore and offered her representation. Her first show there was in 2005 — it was a success.

Films presented by: Special thanks to Santa Barbara County Parks, the Community Services Department of Santa Barbara County and Big Green Cleaning Company Media Sponsors:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Volunteer With Us!

(805) 692-2226 zoe@sbhabitat.org sbhabitat.org/volunteer

August

Saturday 13 & Sunday 14 — 9am to 5pm

WILD & CRAZY SALE — No Early Birds —

Something for Everyone

Dresses, Gowns, Capes, Costumes, Bistro Tables, Chairs, Posters, Ice Ceam Machine, Cabinets, Desk, Mannequins, Lamps, Vintage Construction Items...

And so much more!

Bar Opens at Noon • Free Popcorn! Cash or Cedit Cards Only

CONTINUED>

30 Los Patos Way, Montecito, CA 93109 INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

23


le b a l i Ava ow! N

Dancing onWaves

COVER STORY

TRUE STORY OF FINDING LOVE & REDEMPTION IN THE OCEAN By Hillary Hauser “Dancing on Waves pu lls like an undertow, a tho you in ug provoking page-tur ne htr the reader can’t put down .” – REV. CAROL H. BE

Founder Inner Wellne

HAR,

ss Center, Santa Barbar a

“This book is an amazing journey, a tender and compelling story of one woman’s quest to find herself with the help of the ocean. It is about loss and triumph, an inspiring tale that made me fall in love with the Ocean all over again.” – RANDI RABIN, M.A., LMFT

“Don’t be su yourself no rprised if you find but bondin t only reading about of characterg with an assortmen t s that inclu de abalone and urch musicians, in divers, classical su Jean-Michelrfers, scuba divers, schipperkes Cousteau, three , water quali doctors, regional ty officers an control health d sc UC Santa B ientists at arbara.” – MIROIR S

CULTURAL CA, CALIFORNIA’S MUSIC JO URNAL

“The eloquent words in Hillary Hauser’s book inspire me. The depths of her excitement and commitment to cleaner oceans keep pushing me – and many others – to achieve more.” – ANNE DOUBILET, Fellow, The Explorers Club;

k HHE k Hillary Hauser Enterprises

Member Women Divers Hall of Fame

Available at Chaucer’s, Tecolote, BookBaby Bookshop, & other outlets

Angela Perko and her husband, Jerry Jacobs, own Lost Horizon bookstore in Montecito, and first bonded over the mutual love of books.

“The average person walking in the gallery is going to have to take some time to figure out her paintings,” says Bush, who started as a curator at Sullivan Goss just days before Perko’s first show opened. “They require scrutiny,” Bush continues. “They’re not easy retail paintings. They have a museum quality. We believe in her paintings.” Bush also shares that Perko’s pieces have a big following. “She has a few dedicated collectors,” she exclaims. “She’s garnered a following among writers and musicians. Her paintings are very rhythmic.” In the midst of our conversations, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade. Perko and I had a planned follow-up meeting the day after, but we decided to reschedule since we were both so distraught. I got a text from her: “There’s been an unsettling increase in hostility toward women for a while now. I often wonder if that has been part of why I am compelled to tell my stories from a more feminine point of view. I want to highlight the absolutely essential but un-heroic part women play in a playful, serious way. One can’t help but ask, why is there such fear and anger, animosity, and, frankly, cruelty directed at women? … It’s an age-old question made more poignant with today’s ruling.” At the heart of Perko’s collection are a group of 17 small paintings (10" x 10"), which

24

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

she endearingly calls “the pretty ladies,” with each representing a fertility figure from different antiquity cultures (Greek, Egyptian, Japanese, and Mexican, among others.) She is thinking about women throughout the ages and how important they are in the fabric of life. She’s also showcasing them — giving them their own space and their due. “What attracted me to them is that they’re diminutive women,” she says. “They’re so essentially feminine. Fertility is important in keeping life going. These figures are important to these cultures. It’s still so essential to the nature of women. They come alive when you examine them. So many expressions that you see in women today; they still speak in their own quiet voices.” Each fertility figure is positioned against a contrasting and elaborate pattern in the background — both beautiful and kinetic. The backgrounds battle with the small-scale figures about who gets the most attention. The visual push and pull is dynamic. My interpretation is that Perko wants to illustrate that women are the ones who ultimately claim the spotlight in the portrait and not the pressures of society, history, and Supreme Court rulings. Perko has also painted three large-scale pieces measuring 60" x 60" — again depicting fertility figures. One is called “Lady of the Shells,” and the others are “The Two-Faced Woman From


Tlatilco,” and “Lady of the Labyrinth.” They are gasp-inducing, defiant, and gorgeous. In this entire series, Perko is elevating an ordinary everyday effigy to the place they belong — a place of grace, beauty, and dignity, a place of art. “What was striking about these fertility figures is that people believed in them,” she explains. “They’re magical. We don’t believe in them the same way anymore. They were used by women on an everyday basis. They were essential to women.” “I don’t think my talent is exceptional in a technical sense or conceptual sense,” she humbly says. “I developed this skill to be able to tell my stories, to illustrate what goes through my head in a visual way. They’re visual expressions of a literary nature. I think of myself as a poet or a short-story writer.” Six other canvases in the show are rich in imagery and magical realism storytelling about subjects such as the environment, justice, and fate — and recalling medieval illuminated manuscripts. She includes a checkered pattern around the border of the compositions that serves as an organizing

component, giving structure and continuity to the series. The black-and-white patterns create a frame-within-a-frame motif. It provides a visual transition between the painting’s interior and its exterior subjects — or is it the other way around? “The frame defines an interior space, but I wanted nature to infringe upon it,” she elucidates. “It’s hopeful. We’re dependent on nature. It’s a play of inside/outside and trying to blur the lines.” After I had left her house the last time, I received one of her texts: “I can only hope that my paintings give the viewer a moment of thought, or pleasure, or amusement, and perhaps that same viewer might discern something of themselves that they would not have otherwise seen.”

The Place of Hidden Things is on view at Sullivan Goss (11 E. Anapamu St.) through September 26. The gallery will host a free artist discussion with Angela Perko and Roger Durling on Saturday, September 10, at 4 p.m. Expect a lively, interesting conversation, and refreshments will also be provided. For more information, visit sullivangoss.com.

JUST ANNOUNCED!

EARL MINNIS PRESENTS &

PRESENT

The Immediate Family

Guitarists Danny Kortchmar and Waddy Wachtel, drummer Russ Kunkel, and bassist Leland Sklar have come together, with guitarist Steve Postell, to perform their own songs as supergroup The Immediate Family.

SUN

NOV

20 FRI

SEPT

2

Tab Benoit with special guest JD Simo

“Benoit is one of the most impressive guitarists to emerge from Southern Louisiana and his guitar tone and style is easily recognized – as is his soulful voice. He wasn’t awarded B.B. King Entertainer of the Year (Blues Music Awards) for nothing.” – Rock and Blues Muse

AUG 12

EMPORIUM PRESENTS

PAUL MITCHELL SYSTEMS PRESENTS

The Kingston Trio The bold use of color is one of the hallmarks of Angela Perko’s work, as well as in her home.

Jesse Cook AUG 24

VISIT LOBERO.ORG OR 805.963.0761 LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT

FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

INDEPENDENT.COM

John C. Mithun

@loberotheatre

Foundation

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

25


“Lunchtime” – Ink & Watercolor, Jim Felland

NORTH SHORE

The Goleta Valley Art Association presents an

35th Anniversary

ART SHOW & SALE featuring

Music by Greg LeRoy 1- 4 P.M.

MOVIE SCREENING • CONTESTS • PRIZES W/SPECIAL GUESTS, JOHN PHILBIN (TURTLE), MATT ADLER (RICK KANE), NIA PEEPLES (KIANI) & MORE!

Benefiting the Hui O He'e Nalu

at Camino Real Marketplace

AUGUST 25TH 6-9PM

Saturday, August 13th Art Show Hours: 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.

GVAA will donate 10% of proceeds to Direct Relief International.

Presented by:

SANTA BARBARA ARLINGTON THEATRE

Benefiting:

The Peak... The Dream... The Ultimate Celebration! THEARLINGTONTHEATRE.COM / TICKETS; ARLINGTON BOX OFFICE; OR AXS.COM WWW.LISTENTOTURTLE.COM

@LISTEN2Turtle

You’re invited to ETC’s 44th Season!

Get fresh news from

INDEPENDENT.COM

in your inbox, every morning.

Sign up for

INDY

TODAY! Independent.com/

newsletters Visit www.etcsb.org or call 805-965-5400 to subscribe today!

2022/23 SEASON GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY DANA WHITE

26

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


AUG. 11-17

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE

by

TERRY & VICTORIA ORTEGA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

11

THURSDAY COURTESY

THURSDAY 8/

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

SUNDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

FRIDAY

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

8/11-8/13, 8/17: Lost Chord Guitars Thu: Téka & The New Bossa, 7:30-9:30pm. $20. Fri.: The String Revolution, 8-11:30pm. $15. Sat.: Soul Cats Band, 8-11:30pm. $10. Wed.: American Classics with Matt

McCarrin & Ms. Finch, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 3314363. lostchordguitars.com

8/11-8/12, 8/14, 8/16-8/17: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Pat

WEDNESDAY

FISHERMAN’S MARKET Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

music for the last 50 years, Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady, the founders of Hot Tuna, started the band as a side project during their Jefferson Airplane days along with three-time Grammy Award winner Justin Guip on the drums. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 W. Canon Perdido. GA: $50-$60; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on

Join in to learn some new swing moves at this monthly gathering. 7:30-9:30pm. Old Town Coffee, 5877 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Free. Call (805) 845-1550 or email info@ otcoffeeshop.com. otcoffeeshop.com/

FRIDAY 8/12

events

sbmm.org/santa-barbara-events

8/11-8/14, 8/17: PCPA Presents Into The Woods “Be careful what you wish for” is the theme of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine’s Brothers Grimm–inspired musical that follows the Baker and his wife on a journey through the woods to break the Witch’s spell that has left them childless. They cross paths with Cinderella and Rapunzel and their Princes, Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf, Jack and the Giant, and so many more. Recommended for ages 8 and up. The show runs through September 4. 8pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $43.50-$55. Call (805) 922-8313.

pcpa.org/shows

years of music, this iconic folk group will play their best-loved songs like “Tom Dooley,” which sold more than three million copies as a single, “Greenback Dollar,”“The Tijuana Jail,” and more. 7pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $46-$66. (805) 963-0761.

lobero.org/whats-on

8/11-8/16: Opening Exhibit: The Peaceful Sea: Paintings by Kevin A. Short More than 30 contemporary seascapes, depicted in vivid color and exuberant brushwork, will offer a personal, meditative take on the beauty of the California coast. Thu.-Tue.: 10am-5pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free-$8. Call (805) 962-8404. Read more on p. 37.

8/11-8/13, 8/15: Wylde Works Thu.: David Segall Band, 8-10pm. Fri.: Ben Betts, 4-6pm; Nicole Sofia Band, 8pm. Sat.: Anthony Cougiaz, 8pm. Mon.: Traditional Irish Music Jam, 6pm. 609 State St. Free. wyldeworks.com

cfsb.info/sat 8/12: Kingston Trio: Keep the Music Playing Tour In celebration of nearly 65 COURTESY

8/11: Swing Dance on the Patio!

sohosb.com/events

SATURDAY

Lobero LIVE Presents Hot Tuna Acoustic Leading American

8/12: UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Hot Fun in the Summertime: Moonrise Kingdom Gather at the Courthouse

8/12-8/14:

Gem Faire Peruse precious and semiprecious gemstones, beads, crystals, gold and silver, pearls, fossils, and more with jewelry repair and cleaning while you shop. Fri.: noon-6pm; Sat.: 10am6pm; Sun.: 10am-5pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Admission: $7. Call (503) 252-8300 or email info@gemfaire.com. gemfaire.com

8/12: Rodney Carrington at Chumash Casino Resort Take in a night with comedian, actor, and country music singer Rodney Carrington. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $39-$59. Ages 21+.

chumashcasino.com/entertainment

Sunken Gardens to watch 2012’s Moonrise Kingdom (rated PG-13), directed by Wes Anderson. The film follows a young boy and girl on an island off the coast of 1960s New England who fall in love and run away, which turns the town upside down. Bring breathable blankets, low chairs, and a picnic! 8:30pm. Sunken Gardens, S.B. County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa St. Free. Call (805) 893-3535. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

8/12: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar Wryn, 6-9pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free.

otcoffeeshop.com/events 8/12: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free.

Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

8/13: Summer Potluck & Global Healing Meditation Gather as a conscious community for a family-friendly and heartfelt afternoon. Bring a delicious dish to share. There will be music, community, a play area for the kids, and the opportunity to send light to the world in prayer for the beautiful earth. RSVP to receive location information. 2-5pm. La Ladera Sanctuary, Montecito. Free.

Peppino D’Agostino 8/12-8/13: Uptown Lounge Fri.: The Trio, 5-7pm; DJ Ian, 10pm-1am. Sat.: Brandon Kinalele, 6:30-9:30pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800.

uptownlounge805.com/events

8/13: Andrew Murray Vineyards Loren Radis, noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 686-9604. andrewmurrayvineyards

.com/Visit/Events

Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126.

arrowsmithwine.com/events

8/12-8/14: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Kelly’s Lot, 6-9pm. Sat.: Salt Martians, 1:304:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com 8/12-8/13: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Skunk Puppy, 7-9pm. Sat.: Blown Over, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

8/12-8/14: Maverick Saloon Fri.:

33 Thunder, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Cadillac Angels, 1-5pm; Pull the Trigger, 8:3011:30pm. Sun.: Sam Mitchell, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

SATURDAY 8/13

tinyurl.com/Potluck-Healing

(805) 845-1550.

Curren with Petmedz, 8:30pm. $15. Ages 21+. Fri.: The Molly Ringwald Project, 9pm. $15. Ages 21+. Sun.: Santa Barbara Jazz Society featuring Jeff Elliott Trio, 1pm. $10-$35; Peppino D’Agostino, 7:30pm. $20. Tue.: Jazz Jam with Kimberly Ford, 7:30pm. $10. Wed.: Petty, Set, Go with Brandi Rose & The Funky Bunch, 8pm. $10. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

8/11:

8/12: Old Town Coffee exPorter, 6pm-9pm. 5877 Hollister Ave. Free. Call

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

8/13: Eos Lounge Moscoman, 4pm. $12.36. 500 Anacapa St. Call (805) 5642410. eoslounge.com

8/13: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Marika & The Ohms, 7-9pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

8/13, 8/16-8/17: S.B. Bowl Concert Sat.: Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, 6pm. $35-$101. Tue.: My Morning Jacket, 6:30pm. $47-$76. Wed.: Robert Plant & Alison Krauss, 7pm. $65-$185. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

8/14: Hitching Post Wines Jacob Cole, 2-4pm. 420 E. Highway 246, Buellton. Free. Call (805) 688-0676.

hpwines.com

8/13: Mosaic Market at the Courtyard Join on the courtyard behind Mosaic Locale and shop local from more than 20 bakers, crafters, artists, and makers that include Little Gorgeous things, Plumage Jewelry, Sol Vintage y Mas, Chou’s Bakery, and more. 11am-4pm. Mosaic Locale, 1131 State St. Free. tinyurl.com/MosaicMarket 8/13: Afterparty at Camp MOXI Calling all adults to participate in DIY bandana screen-printing, knot-tying, rowing races with UCSB Rowing, to make friendship bracelets, and more. Enjoy s’mores, food, drinks, and a rooftop dance party and deejay set by Dante Elephante. 7-10pm. MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, 125 State St. $35. Ages 21+. Call (805) 770-5000. tinyurl.com/CampMoxi

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

AUGUST 11, 2022

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

27


ALWAYS

AMAZING.

The Arlington Theatre

­

NE VER

­

8/12: BODIES BODIES BODIES

ROUTINE.

­

Advance Previews: 8/18

8/12: MACK & RITA

8/12: FALL

8/12: SUMMERING

8/12: EMILY THE CRIMINAL

BEAST Metro 4 • Camino

HOME FREE SEPTEMBER 16 | FRIDAY | 8PM

Metro 4 • Camino

Paseo Nuevo • Fairveiw

Fiesta 5 • Camino

Hitchcock

DRAGON BALL SUPER Fiesta 5 • Camino

Paseo Nuevo

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Aug 12-18, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

PESADO SEPTEMBER 23 | FRIDAY | 8PM

Mack & Rita* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:10, 4:35, 7:00. Easter Sunday (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:45, 5:15, 7:40. DC League of Super-Pets (PG): Fri-Thur: 2:20, 4:55, 7:30.

CHRISTOPHER CROSS SEPTEMBER 24 | SATURDAY | 8PM

QUEEN NATION OCTOBER 1 | SATURDAY | 8PM

Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER.

CAMINO REAL

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Bodies Bodies Bodies* (R): Fri-Sun: 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40. Mon-Thur: 1:05, 3:30, 5:55, 8:25. Bodies Bodies Bodies* (R): Fri-Thur: Bullet Train* (R): Fri-Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30. Mon-Thur: 2:15, 5:15, 8:15. 1:00, 3:30, 5:55, 8:30. Fall* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:45, 4:45, 7:40. Thor: Love and Thunder (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:45, 5:00, 8:00. Thur: 1:45, 5:00. Nope (R): Fri-Wed: 2:15, 5:15, Top Gun Maverick (PG13): 8:15. Thur: 2:15, 5:15. Bullet Train (R): Fri-Thur: 2:05, 5:50, Fri-Thur: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45. Beast* (R): Thur: 8:00. 8:00. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): F I E S TA 5 Fri-Thur: 1:10, 4:20, 7:30. 916 STATE STREET Thor: Love and Thunder (PG13): SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455 Fri-Wed: 1:55, 4:55, 7:50. Thur: 1:55, 4:55. Fall* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:05, 4:40, 7:30. Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero* (PG13): Easter Sunday (PG13): Fri-Wed: 2:30, Thur: 7:50. 4:55, 7:20. Thur: 2:30, 4:55. Beast* (R): Thur: 8:15. Where the Crawdads Sing (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:55, 4:50, 7:45. HITCHCOCK DC League of Super-Pets (PG): 371 South Hitchcock Way Fri-Thur: 1:45, 4:30, 7:05. SANTA BARBARA Minions: The Rise of Gru (PG): 805-682-6512 Summering (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: Fri-Wed: 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8:00. 5:15, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:15, 7:30. Dragon Ball Super: Super Hero* (PG13): Thur: 7:20. Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 4:30, 7:20.

1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Welcome to Freedom

METRO 4

7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

ARLINGTON

28

TOP GUN: MAVERICK Fan Appreciation 8/12-14 Bonus Content Collector’s Print (while supplies last)

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Bullet Train* (R): Fri: 5:00, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 4:00, 7:00.

PA S E O N U E V O

8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Mack & Rita* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:30, 4:55, 7:30. Nope (R): Fri-Thur: 2:05, 5:05, 8:05. Where the Crawdads Sing (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:55, 4:50, 7:45. Elvis (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:45, 4:30, 7:05.


COURTESY

COURTESY

T HE

8/14:

9th Annual Carpinteria Surf ‘n’ Suds Beer Festival 2022 On Saturday, those ages 21 and over can taste from more than 75 craft breweries, ciders, seltzers, kombucha, and wineries on site and enjoy food trucks and street faire vendors with live music. On Sunday, all ages are invited to be a part of the inaugural Surf ‘n’ Suds Music Festival that will feature Reggae’s Pato Banton, Arise Roots, Cornerstone Reggae, and DJ Hecktik. Food and drink will be available for purchase. Sat.: VIP: 11:30am; GA: 12:30-6pm; Sun.: 12:30-6pm. Carpinteria State Beach, Carpinteria. $10-$75; Shuttle: $20. tinyurl.com/BeerMusicFest

8/13: SBMM Summer Sea Glass Pop-Up The S.B. Maritime Museum and the Sea Glass and Ocean Arts Festival invite you to this pop-up that will feature handmade, ocean-themed art an authentic sea glass jewelry created by dozens of talented artists with a portion of the proceeds to benefit SBMM. 10am-5pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free. Call (805) 962-8404.

sbmm.org/santa-barbara-events

8/13: Star Party at the Museum The Palmer Observatory will open its doors and its roof to share a remarkable view of the wonders of the night sky through its state-ofthe-art 20-inch telescope. Masks are required. 8-10pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free.

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

8/13-8/14: Magic Castle Cabaret’s Wild & Crazy Sale Shop for Halloween costumes, decorations, formal gowns, velvet capes, bistro table and chair sets, lamps, posters, bar glasses, plates, and more. The bar opens at noon. Cash and credit cards accepted. 9am-5pm. Magic Castle Cabaret, 30 Los Patos Wy. Free. tinyurl.com/

including a drop-in rock painting with teaching artist Kathy Badrak. Explore the current exhibitions and the Portals & Pathways installation. Kids can get a visit with a fairy and get an eco-glitter tattoo from 1-3pm. 11am-4pm. The Wildling Museum of Nature & Art, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call (805) 688-1082 or email info@ wildlingmuseum.org. tinyurl.com/SummerFamDay

8/14: Explore Ecology Beach Cleanup Bring your own supplies or use the buckets, plastic bags, and reusable gloves provided for your self-guided cleanup. Sign in at the Watershed Resource Center. Masks required for ages 2+. 10am-noon. Arroyo Burro Beach, 2981 Cliff Dr. Free. Call (805) 884-0459 or email jill@explore ecology.org. tinyurl.com/ExploreEcology

"UNIQUE ANDVariety GRATIFYING "

naturetrack.org

8/14: Peppino D’Agostino Master of the fingerstyle acoustic guitar, Peppino D’Agostino will put you in a trance as he plays his melodic and emotionally intense blend of folk, jazz, Latin, and flamenco. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $20-$25. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

MONDAY 8/15 8/15: Monday Morning Rooftop Yoga Flow S.B. Beach Yoga invites you to this all-levels class offering invigorating Vinyasa flow that will build strength, confidence, and balance followed by restorative poses. Dress in layers and bring a mat and towel. 9-10am. East Beach Cabrillo Pavilion Bathhouse Rooftop, 1118 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $20. tinyurl.com/MonMornRoof

FRI: 2:45pm / SAT: 5:00pm / SUN: 2:45pm MON: 2:45pm / TUES: 5:00pm WED: 7:30pm / THURS: 5:00pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

TUESDAY 8/16 8/16: My Morning Jacket, Joy Oladokun Get down to the rock and country sounds from My Morning Jacket, the American rock band formed in Louisville, with singer-songwriter Joy Oladokun opening the show with her folk, soulful songs. 6:30pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $47-$76. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

At the Lobero Theater THIS Friday, August 12

WEDNESDAY 8/17

8/17:

Free Senior Day at Santa Barbara Botanic Garden Seniors can enjoy S.B.’s beautiful Botanic Garden for free thanks to sponsor Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapels. 10am-5pm. S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Free. Call 805-682-4726 x103.

8/13: Full Moon Sound Bath with Cristy Candler

SUNDAY 8/14

FRI: 5:15pm & 7:30pm SAT: 2:45pm & 7:30pm / SUN: 12:30pm & 5:15pm MON: 5:15pm & 7:30pm / TUES: 2:45pm & 7:30pm WED: 3:00pm & 5:15pm / THURS: 2:45pm & 7:30pm

use wheelchairs to get up close to the water’s edge and navigate the beach under your own control. There will be eight Freedom Trax devices to use on a first come, first serve basis. Please RSVP. Noon-4pm. Gaviota State Park Beach, 17620 Gaviota Beach Rd., Gaviota. Free. Call (805) 886-2047.

WildCrazySale

Join this meditative and relaxing sound bath experience with harmonic tones of crystal singing bowls along with essential oil aromatherapy and guided meditation from Cristy Candler. The ceremony will also include a deck card ritual, focusing on the theme of this full moon in Aquarius, called the Full Sturgeon Super. Bring a sweater/jacket, blanket, yoga mat, and pillow. 4-5pm. Clay Studio, 1351 Holiday Hill Rd., Goleta. $25. Call (805) 565-CLAY or email info@ClayStudioSB.org. claystudiosb.org/events

“THE GREATEST LAVA-FUELED LOVE STORY EVER TOLD” Rolling Stonge

8/14: Wheelchair Users Experience Freedom Trax at Gaviota Beach NatureTrack will be at Gaviota State Park to introduce those who

COURTESY

8/13-8/14:

2nd Annual Summer Family Day at the Wildling Museum Enjoy activities for all ages,

AUGUST 12 - 18

sbbg.org/classes-events

8/17: Braille Institute Virtual Workshop: Introduction to JAWS Learn basic navigation to JAWS, Job Access with Speech, a popular screen reader, developed for computer users whose vision loss prevents them from seeing screen content or navigating with a mouse. 2-3pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/BrailleJAWS

8/17: Death Café Santa Barbara You are invited to bring a beverage (and your own cup) to come together in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss death. Death Café S.B. is in conjunction with The Center for Successful Aging with Liz Bauer, Lynn Holzman, and Peggy Levine. 3:30-5pm. Hill-Carillo Adobe, 11 E. Carrillo St. Free. Call (805) 729-6172. email cominghomesb@ gmail.com. tinyurl.com/DeathCafeAug17

Fans of legendary folk icons The Kingston Trio can re-discover their timeless music all over again. In celebration of nearly 65 years of music, the iconic folk group performs such timeless classics as “Where Have All The Flowers Gone?” and “Tom Dooley”. GET YOUR TICKETS AT www.lobero.org - 805.963.0761 or www.kingstontrio.com INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

29


Thank You

To Our Many Sponsors For Bringing Our Festival Back To Our Community! The Board of Directors of Old Spanish Days would like to thank our amazing sponsors, volunteers, and our collaborative non-profit partners. Fiesta could not happen without their generous support! Special gratitude to the entire Santa Barbara community for once again coming out to celebrate this time-honored tradition. Special thanks to the City and County of Santa Barbara and Old Mission Santa Barbara for their generous support of Old Spanish Days Fiesta since 1924. Also, a thank you to our Collaborative partners: Goleta Valley Historical Society, the Santa Barbara Zoo, and to Santa Barbara Historical Museum for Project Fiesta! To the many non-profit vendors who contributed to the two Mercados and to the many restaurants, wineries, breweries, distilleries, organizations, and companies that donated to the many events this Fiesta season—Thank you! Old Spanish Days would like to give special recognition to Los Niños de las Flores, Las Señoritas, Bienvenidos, Parade Announcers, Parade Marshals, and all the parade volunteers. Our heartfelt gratitude goes out to the 2022 Spirit of Fiesta Tara Mata and 2022 Jr. Spirit Layla Gocong, as well as the entire dance community.

Thank-You! ¡Gracias!

——————— DIAMOND ($50,000) ———————

————————— GOLD ($12,500) —————————

——————— PLATINUM ($25,000) ———————

————————— SILVER ($5,500) ————————— Wood-Clayssens Foundation W W W Foundation ——————— TITANIUM ($17,500) ——————— Florabundance Oshay Family Foundation TourSpain ———————— BRONZE ($2,500) ———————— Bank of America Robin Cedarlof Chaucers Books Flamenco Arts Santa Cruz Markets 30

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


living

p. 31

Sports

So Long, Vin Scully another series, arrived on my desk. Inside was a handwritten letter from Vin Scully. A reader had sent him a partial copy of my column, and he wrote to me that he was “most appreciative of your kind words.” I immediately sent him the missing “jump” of the column, and he replied with another note of gratitude. Those missives are among my most treasured mementoes. It was as if Rembrandt had personally thanked me for admiring his painting. I thank you, Vin Scully, and may you rest in peace.

Vin Scully

V

in Scully’s death last week prompted a remarkable outpouring of sentimental remembrances from legions of people who took pleasure in listening to his evocative play-by-play broadcasts over 67 years from Brooklyn to Los Angeles. His career encompassed more than 10,000 games, and in each of them he vividly expressed his love of baseball. My family welcomed Scully’s friendly voice into our home when the Dodgers moved to L.A. in 1958. I was 11 years old and, of course, had the transistor radio under the covers at bedtime.

Plus, Remembering Santa Barbara Sports Legends, Living and Lost by John Zant Something about the way he spoke told you that Scully was a kind and gracious human being. Everybody who had a personal interaction with him will tell you that was so. I have written proof of his magnanimity. Scully’s 50th year as the Dodgers’ announcer began with their season opener at home in 1999. I decided to write a review of his broadcast. The game went 11 innings, the Dodgers defeating the Arizona Diamondbacks 8-6, and Scully made it entertaining throughout. He was not one to discuss world problems, but when the “doves of peace” took flight during a pregame ceremony, Scully remarked, “Unfortunately, they haven’t been very effective.” That said, he dove into the game. He was fascinated with Arizona pitcher Randy Johnson, who threw a sharp breaking curve that “darts in like a rattlesnake’s head.” He tapped into cinematic culture when he said, “Every time I see Randy Johnson with that long hair I think of Deliverance—remember that movie? Well, right now, he’s trying to deliver.” Such gems poured out of Scully all afternoon, and when I pieced together my column for the News-Press, I realized that he was its co-author. A week later, an envelope postmarked from Arizona, where the Dodgers were playing the Diamondbacks in

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON-IN-LAW: On Monday, August 8, Bill Bertka celebrated his 95th birthday in good health, indicative of good genes and an active lifestyle. The longtime Santa Barbara resident will begin his 43rd consecutive season in the employ of the Los Angeles Lakers next month. It will be his 54th year as a scout, coach or executive in the NBA—a tenure that pales only next to Vin Scully’s. His current title is “special assistant to the general manager and consultant.” Bertka has played a part in 11 NBA championship seasons with the Lakers. He most values the seven rings he earned as an assistant coach alongside Bill Sharman, Pat Riley, and Phil Jackson. Bill Pintard, who is married to Bertka’s daughter Kris, is closing in on his father-in-law’s record. Pintard is manager of the Santa Barbara Foresters, and last Saturday, they claimed their 10th National Baseball Congress World Series championship, defeating the Hays Larks by a 12-1 score at Wichita, Kansas. It was the collegiate baseball club’s third consecutive title, adding to their lore as the winningest team in the history of a tournament that began in 1935. “It’s amazing what Bill has accomplished for this city,” Bertka said.

was the architect of the Dallas Cowboys’ offense when they won the Super Bowl in 1995. The Pro Football Hall of Fame decided to honor “behindthe-scenes” contributors—assistant coaches, trainers, equipment managers—with Awards of Excellence that are put on display in the museum at Canton, Ohio. Zampese was among five assistant coaches named to the award this year. He lives in San Diego and was unable to attend last weekend’s Hall of Fame festivities in Canton. Zampese was a football star at Santa Barbara High. In 1953, when he ran and passed for 33 touchdowns, he was named Southern California CIF Player of the Year. He went on to play at USC for two seasons. His college career was cut short when the Pacific Coast Conference barred him for taking a part-time job in violation of NCAA rules. Zampese revealed that the job was sweeping leaves for $1.50 an hour. In this era of NIL (name, image, and likeness) benefits, players will legally be banking millions of dollars during the upcoming college football season. FINISH LINE: John Brennand and Jim Klein are two men who created legacies in recreational and college athletics. Brennand ran his first marathon when it wasn’t cool and later organized popular marathons and road runs for the masses in Santa Barbara. The Independent named him a Local Hero in 2011. He died on June 30. As a decathlete, Jim Klein finished fourth behind Rafer Johnson at the 1960 U.S. Olympic Trials. That year, Westmont College hired him as its cross-country and track-and-field coach. Klein built the Warriors into a small-college power and later coached at Boise State. Westmont’s team in 1971-72 included Jean-Louis Ravelomanantsoa, a sprinter from Madagascar who was an Olympic finalist in 1968 and world-ranked in 1972. Klein and I traveled to the Munich Olympics in a VW van that he commandeered from a Westmont satellite office. It was a fabulous road trip through France, Switzerland, and southern Germany. At a country inn, we dined with a bottle of the greatest wine I’ve ever tasted—1959 Chateau Mouton Rothschild. It cost 30 francs, about $7. I shared that memory with Jim shortly before he died from cancer here on July 24. He made it to 90. Repose en paix. n

SPEAKING OF WINNERS: Bill Russell could not beat his own mortality, but he won everything else. He led the Boston Celtics to 11 NBA crowns in 13 years, frustrating the Lakers seven times in the finals. “I watched him in high school, college [two NCAA championships at USF], and the pros,” Bertka said. “His attitude toward competing was extraordinary. He affected the game by doing what other people didn’t want to do.” Bertka also respected Russell’s outspoken commitment to social justice. “He believed in what was right for people, even though he drew a lot of criticism. He was serious about life. At the same time, he was a fun guy to be around. He liked to laugh.” ZAMPESE HONORED: Like Bertka, Ernie Zampese was a longtime assistant coach. He did his work as an offensive coordinator in the NFL, including a spectacular stint with the San Diego Chargers during their “Air Coryell” years. Zampese INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

31


County of Santa Barbara Planning and Development

Santa Barbara

SECOND NOTICE OF PREPARATION – REVISED PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD for the Environmental Impact Report for the County of Santa Barbara 2023-2031 Housing Element Update Release Date: Thursday, August 11, 2022 Notice is hereby given that the County of Santa Barbara (County) Planning and Development Department (P&D) will be the lead agency preparing an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the County of Santa Barbara 2023-2031 Housing Element Update in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code ������ et seq.). The purpose of the Notice of Preparation (NOP) is to solicit agency comments on the scope and content of the environmental information that is germane to an agency’s statutory responsibilities in connection with the proposed project. P&D will also accept written comments from interested persons and organizations. The EIR will consider the potential environmental effects of the proposed project based (in part) on the comments received in response to the NOP. The proposed project includes the following components to adequately plan for and address housing needs in the unincorporated area: • • • •

An assessment of community housing needs; An analysis of the barriers or constraints to producing and preserving housing; Goals, objectives, policies, and programs that would implement the plan; and A list of sites (i.e., Suitable Sites Inventory) that would accommodate new housing and the County’s Regional Housing Needs Allocation, including sites the County may rezone for high density residential development.

A project description, location map, and potential environmental issues to be addressed in the Draft EIR will be detailed in the Environmental Scoping Document – County of Santa Barbara 2023-2031 Housing Element Update which will be available along with the NOP on the proposed project’s webpage: https://www.countyofsb.org/3177/Housing-Element-Update Additional information regarding the proposed project and virtual scoping meeting will be posted to this website as it becomes available. All comments on the NOP must be received by 5:00 p.m., Friday, September 9, 2022 Please send comments on the NOP to Jessi Steele, Planner, Planning and Development Department, 123 East Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 or by email to jsteele@countyofsb.org Virtual Public Environmental Scoping Meeting: A scoping meeting will be held virtually on Thursday, August 25, 2022, at 5:30 p.m. Please register in advance for this Zoom webinar at: https://countyofsb.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZGcyewiDTV-na_OT0prGCQ.

@ink.paper.crafts @ inkpapercrafts.com ink.paper.crafts | inkpapercrafts.com

Tue-Sat 10a-6p 32

THE INDEPENDENT

3554 State St. AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm 1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) • (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael MA Michael H H Kreitsek, Kreitsek, MA

We are here for you!

Need support?

o School tto k c a B o h S at

EATS & DRINKS

805.964.5245 info@dvsolutions.org dvsolutions.org

You are not alone!

Michael HCounseling Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286

Winter Gardening & Cooking Classes POSITIONS AVAILABLE!

• Chef Educators (paid) • Administrative Assistant (paid) • Volunteers atozcookingschool.org

Follow us @atozcookingschool


living

Self-Defense

Santa Barbara Krav Maga Preps for Real-World Dangers I

RYAN P. CRUZ

n today’s world, it helps to be prepared for anything. What would you do if an assailant were to burst into your workplace, or a grocery store, or your home? Would you trust yourself to be able to fight them off? Dating back to 1930s Bratislava — in what was then known as Czechoslovakia — a technique, Krav Maga, was developed to arm normal everyday Jewish citizens with the confidence and skills necessary to defend themselves during the brutal early Nazi occupation in the ghettos of Eastern Europe. Its founder, Imi Lichtenfeld, the son of a detective and chief instructor for police, combined his training in boxing, judo, wrestling, swimming, and gymnastics to create a “self-defense survival system” that could be used by undersized and oppressed communities to fight back against their oppressors, or as he put it, “so that one may walk in peace.”

‘Survival’ Self-Defense System Teaches How to Avoid Conflict and Defend Against Attackers by Ryan P. Cruz Today, this form of self-defense has proved so effective and practical that it is widely used in the Israeli military and special forces training as the premier form of preparation for hand-to-hand-combat. Here in town, Pedro Sanchez of the Santa Barbara Krav Maga Family Self-Defense Center in Old Town Goleta has been training and passing on his knowledge to locals for the last 12 years, teaching the reality-based self-defense techniques to everybody from college students to parents looking to feel safe in any situation. Sanchez first got his start in capoeira and jiu-jitsu before discovering Krav Maga in 2003. After studying under his master, Beau Durocher, Sanchez began instructing at Beach Cities Krav Maga in Orange County, before opening another location in Yorba Linda. In 2011, Sanchez

‘I think the best thing you can learn is that you’re not made of glass; that you know you can fight if you absolutely had to.’ —Krav Maga instructor Pedro Sanchez

Santa Barbara Krav Maga Family Self-Defense Center lead trainer Pedro Sanchez (right) and student instructor David Ashamalla show how to create space when defending against an attacker from the ground.

branched out to open his own center in Santa Barbara. One of the core tenets of Krav Maga’s training philosophy, he says, is to avoid conflict at all costs. “The biggest thing we always say is to never be a hero. Never do that,” he said. “Always comply; always do the best you can. Your job is to go home safe.” During a weekday session, the sweaty gym is alive with activity. A group of mostly women, ranging in age from their late teens to early sixties, warms up while Sanchez and student instructor David Ashamalla prepare the day’s training: ground work, and how to create space against an attacker who has the better position and may be stronger. He splinters the group off into pairs, with one as the attacker and another on the ground. Recent high school graduate Kelly Bowdle and bank worker Sarah Duncan are among the women in today’s class. Both joined to learn how to defend themselves in scary situations; Bowdle hopes to travel abroad, and Duncan wants to be able to feel safe when jogging alone at night. “I think a lot of it is like when you’re alone, just being aware of what’s around you,” Duncan said. Much of Krav Maga’s training revolves around recreating familiar and realistic scenarios, the types of conflicts people actually find themselves in most often. “We talk a lot about that. The reality of like, ‘Hey, what is a real attack?’ ” Sanchez said. In real-life scenarios, he says, even the most effective martial arts training typically goes out the window. Krav Maga prepares people for the worst situations, when the chips are down and the only goal is survival. It’s in these situations where people really grow and find confidence in themselves. “I think the best thing you can learn is that you’re not made of glass; that you know you can fight if you absolutely

had to; that you know that there’s no quit in you,” he said. Part of that is using intuitive movements as defensive maneuvers, like the instinct to protect your neck when an attacker attempts a choke or stranglehold. In Krav Maga, you go with that instinct, bringing your hands up to displace the attackers’ hands and create an opportunity to breathe. Even though these real-life scenarios can be scary, Sanchez said it’s important to recreate both the movements and the intensity of a real conflict in order to trust that you would respond. “If this is a confrontation, that’s a very scary place to be. God forbid somebody was to attack you,” he said. “But if you don’t practice that, if you don’t go, ‘Where am I with that?’, then what are you going to do if this ever happens?” That includes going full speed and pushing beyond the point people normally would quit to show them they always can fight harder. “You either want to cry, throw up, or leave, but you just keep fighting, and eventually it all comes together and you get through it.” And while Krav Maga instructors will tell you to use any means necessary to create space and get away from an attacker — biting, scratching, clawing, kicking, or palm strikes to the eyes, nose, mouth, or groin — the main survival tactic will always be situational awareness to avoid unnecessary conflict. “That situational awareness is the best thing, being aware of your surroundings,” he said. “If you feel like that hair on the back of your neck is going off, it is. You should feel that and you should leave. You should just get out of there for now. It’s better to be safe than sorry.”

S.B. Krav Maga Family Self-Defense Center offers unlimited monthly training ranging from $99 to $150 a month; the first dropin class is free. For more info, see sbkravmaga.com.

INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

33


FOOD &DRINK

mos los ala

GEORGE YATCHISIN

Norman Baits Diners with Summer Menu in Los Alamos Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

ently An indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! hop since ently ASn indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! Shop since Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

FOOD & DRINK

Featuring

Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

805.569.2323

iven I’m all ears when I hear an establishment

is featuring lots of corn on its new summer menu, I hightailed it up to Los Alamos to check out Norman. Housed in the Skyview Motel perched above the 101 — and if you park in the restaurant parking by their very own vineyard at the hill bottom, you will feel every foot of that elevation (but at least get very hungry) — Norman is a mid-century-modern gem offering California comfort food with exciting twists. As Chef Dustin Badenell, who among other places previously worked at the brilliant and missed Bear and Star, puts it, “I source products at the peak of their best to create dishes that you might not think pair properly but in fact do if used correctly.” Start with the corn ribs at dinner, for just one

Corn ribs and compressed watermelon salad COURTESY COURTESY

G

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

GEORGE GEORGE YATCHISIN YATCHISIN

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Chef Dustin Badenell Serves Creative Food Inside Skyview Motel by George Yatchisin

(Regular $25 Exam & X-Ray value of 218) limited time offer

expiration date - 6/5/22

34

805 560 0123

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

example. Not just a TikTok craze, and much safer to have out so you don’t lose any fingers doing the prep at home, they are a gorgeous take on Mexican street corn, curled up on the plate like vegetarian shrimp. Almost too much seems to be going on — there’s chili oil, honey chipotle cream, green romesco, a cilantro lime vinaigrette, and queso fresco — but all the flavors harmonize into one sweet and savory delicious song in your mouth. Corn is back as part of the dinner menu’s veggie option Corn and Carrots, a vivid hash of those two stars plus some unbilled tiny-chopped potatoes, umami-bomb sundried tomatoes, crumbled pistachio, basil walnut pesto, and a blistered pepper vinaigrette. Again, the dish could seem overzealously sauced, but portions are precise and unite for a greater whole. There’s even some corn, this time worked into a zippy jalapeño corn puree, under the perfectly cooked, generous filet of Skuna Bay salmon painted with unagi reduction. A scattering of well-blistered shishitos, not enough (because they are so yummy) Mighty Cap mushroom bites,

A selection of summer cocktails: the Coconut Colada, the Poolside, and the Paloma

and some microgreens and you have a light and lithe delight. Even the drinks speak to summer, from the gin-and-cucumber-forward Poolside — which makes sense because if you dine outside, that’s where you’ll be — to the Frosé that features the rosé from the property’s own vines and summer’s best strawberries in one icy concoction. Just don’t get too freaked out if you use the restrooms, where the eye-covered wallpaper is a clever shout-out to Psycho’s voyeuristic madman.

9150 U.S. 101, Los Alamos; (805) 344-0104; skyviewlosalamos.com


Indy Hops

STEVE H.

Fresco Café Opening Downtown

Thank you for

participating in Indy Hops!

FRESCO FLEES FIVE POINTS: Popular Fresco Café says that a rent increase forced them to move to a more affordable space downtown.

L

ast June, I announced that Fresco Café

SEVEN BAR & KITCHEN TO CLOSE: Here is an

announcement from Seven Bar & Kitchen at 224 Helena Avenue in the Funk Zone saying that they will be closing this month: “Hello friends, well, we’ve got some tough news for you … we will be closing our doors after 10 long years August 28. This was not our decision; we love you guys, and the business was doing well! Our landlord has decided to go in a different direction with new tenants … we were heartbroken to hear the news, and we know a lot of you will be too. We love you; thank you for loving us. Come celebrate what we’ve created on August 14, 4-10 p.m. with a deejay set, False Puppet, and Mony’s food.” Rumor has it that a sushi place will be the next tenant. UP OR DOWN FOR IN-N-OUT: The Buellton

Planning Commission is studying a proposal for the development of an In-N-Out Burger at 515 McMurray Road, the home of the closed Parks Plaza Theatre. The project is scheduled for a public hearing before the planning commission on September 1. If all goes well, the project will either be approved or denied at that meeting. BRASS BEAR OPENING UPTOWN: Reader Terry

passed the word that the Funk Zone’s popular Brass Bear Brewing Company is

opening a second location at 3302 McCaw Avenue, the former home of Café Stella. KAI SUSHI CLOSES: Reader Marlowe says that Kai Sushi at 738 State Street has updated the hours posted on their window to indicate that they are now closed on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. Unless Lennon and McCartney were right about there being “Eight Days a Week,” I suspect Kai Sushi has closed or gone on vacation. NEW UPTOWN SUSHI: Reader Matt says that a

new restaurant named Kaz ToGo Japanese Food has opened at 3613 State Street, the former home of Vegan GreenGO. BLACK SHEEP TO CLOSE, NEW EATERY COMING:

Reader Annie tells me that Black Sheep restaurant at 26 East Ortega Street is closing in early September and that a new eatery is in the works to take its place. Black Sheep opened in May 2014. “It’s official, Black Sheep is closing on September 4,” said owners Ruben Perez and family. “I am so grateful for everyone we have met, the friendships we have created, and the family we now have. It has been our honor to share with all of you our love of food and service. Thank you for being a part of us. We will miss you. If you need to get your Black Sheep fix before we are gone, we would love to see and feed you.” Annie says that both the restaurant and building may have been sold. I am told that the new owner of the space has ties to the community and is involved in Lotusland. The chef at the upcoming dining destination is reportedly coming from Los Angeles.

We are always looking to improve our events for our readers.

FOOD & DRINK

is leaving their longtime home in Five Points Shopping Center for a new place, and now reader Primetime says that the eatery has landed next to the Lobero Theatre at 23 East Canon Perdido Street, the former home of Sevtap Winery. The popular eatery is closing August 31 at Five Points and is scheduled to reopen downtown in September. Sources tell me that Fresco’s rent at Five Points was hiked to more than $20,000 per month and that the new place will be about half that. I am told that Sevtap put in nearly seven figures in renovations before departing, so it is practically turn-key for Fresco. Offering catering to neighbor Lobero Theatre is being discussed.

Please fill out this survey to share your feedback on this year's Indy Hops.

independent.com/ indyhopssurvey Thank you to all our participating breweries

KYLE’S CHICKEN HOUSE CLOSES: This just in

from reader Brendan: “Kyle’s Chicken House in Isla Vista has apparently closed. The space is cleared out and vacant with leasing signs all around.” Kyle’s Chicken House opened at 900 Embarcadero Del Mar in November 2021 replacing Kyle’s Kitchen, which itself replaced Silvergreens. All three were under the same ownership.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

35


CHAMPS SAY THANKS! The Santa Barbara Foresters are proud to represent our community as 10-time National Champions. We couldn’t do it without you! Thanks to sponsors, volunteers, summer staff, host families, board of directors, coaches, city and SBCC staff . . . and you, Our Amazing Fans!

’STER IT UP! To sponsor the team or be a volunteer, contact us at info@sbforesters.org

All Booked

A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters

36

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

THE HEAD AND THE HEART IS BACK AT THE BOWL WITH EVERY SHADE OF BLUE

L I F E SHERVIN LAINEZ

JONATHAN RUSSELL TALKS ABOUT BAND LIFE IN A ‘POST’-PANDEMIC WORLD

The Head And The Heart band members Charity Rose Thielen, Chris Zasche, Kenny Hensley, Tyler Williams, Jonathan Russell (yellow cap), and Matt Gervais

T

he Head And The Heart’s hauntingly heartfelt earworms have been burrowing their way into audiences’ brains for more than a decade. We caught up with (mostly) lead vocalist/guitarist Jonathan Russell on a short break from touring with their new album, Every Shade of Blue. What’s it like to be back on the road touring again? I feel a lot more stable and grounded. My sense of purpose has returned from a personal perspective, musically and community-wise, and it feels amazing. I guess I wanted to see the silver lining. For musicians and everyone else in the world, we got perspective. Time away and returning after that, you see things differently. We’ve never had such a long gap. Families have been formed in that time. A lot of us are in our mid-thirties. So there was something about the timing of it all; it’s almost like we came out adults in this time off. It’s quite a perspective shift getting back on the road … I think, like many people, there’s been a lot of dammed-up emotion, excitement. So we have a lot to say. You were kids when you started out. How have your dynamics changed as you’ve gotten both older and more successful? I was 24 and I thought I knew everything. I thought I was at my prime, which is just hilarious. There comes a time when the honeymoon of “We’re actually doing this” begins to wear

off. You continue to love what you’re doing, but I think we’ve become more intentional. We’ve almost out of necessity started realizing that this [being in a band] is going to be a long-term marriage, essentially. And in order for it to really remain fulfilling for both parties, or in our case, all six parties, you have to work on it … I guess we started finally treating it like a real relationship within ourselves. Some songs on the new album are credited with the band and some with other collaborators. How did that happen? In the last five years, I’ve started hanging out with other songwriters. Through that, inevitably, you start writing songs together. That’s one lane, and there’s a lane where I’ll write with Mattie [Gervais] and Charity [Rose Thielen], or I’ll write on my own. And then we all—regardless of where it begins, The Head And The Heart is pretty unusual — I’m sure every band has its own unique style of approaching music—with us, with any song, no matter how finished it is, we kind of disassemble it, and everyone touches all of the parts, and then we rebuild it together. What about the album and title track, Every Shade of Blue? I heard this recently, where marriage is like a novel with many chapters in the story. There were a lot of new chapters these past couple of years, and they weren’t necessarily as easy or as bright or

PAGE 37

THE PEACEFUL SEA: PAINTINGS BY KEVIN A. SHORT

“Gold Diggers” by Kevin A. Short

light as what was before it. So I was trying to capture that tone. You can look at that one color, and there’s so many different shades. When you are in your touring and performing chapter, does that mean you’re not in your songwriting chapter? It kind of depends. I’m typically thinking about or at least trying to prepare for what could happen on the road… There’s creativity involved, but it’s less like creation from nonexistence. It’s more like, how do you take something you wrote 12 years ago and make it feel like it should be matched with something that was written three months ago? What works live, what works in the studio, what works on radio—those are all very different energies. I guess my brain goes to that during the tour.… Right now, this record has not been out very long … I feel like the ocean is out to sea right now and I’m just kind of dry. And I don’t really want to attach myself as being a songwriter because there’s nothing for me to say anymore. And I don’t want that to feel like, “Oh, I lost it.” It’s just a part of the cycle where I don’t have ideas. So, I kind of like to forget that I’m a songwriter in this episode. I like to be a performer now. It’s fun. —Leslie Dinaberg

The Head And The Heart performs at the Santa Barbara Bowl Thursday, August 18, 6:30 p.m. Joining them is the acclaimed Los Angeles–based band Dawes. See sbbowl.com.

An affinity for the ocean obviously runs deep in Kevin A. Short, a renowned artist whose water-themed landscapes are the subject of a solo exhibition at the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum. On view from August 11 through the end of the year, The Peaceful Sea: Paintings by Kevin A. Short features more than 30 paintings by Short, who grew up in Santa Barbara County. “I am truly bursting with joy to be showing in the Maritime Museum,” said the artist. “It was here, growing up, that I fell in love with the ocean. My treasured formational memories are here. The harbor, the wharf, the beaches—I learned to surf, swim, fish, and sail here. My brother and I, running, jumping, throwing seaweed and kelp at each other. Hearing people on the docks yell, ‘Hey, kids, slow down,’or‘Don’t throw that in the water’—that’s here.” SBMM Curator Emily Falke described Short’s paintings as “imbued with narrative and emotion.”“Emily and her staff are wonderfully capturing those thoughts and feelings in how they are putting this exhibit together,” said Short, who is internationally recognized for his contemporary landscapes of the Pacific Coast, with previous shows at the Pasadena Museum of California Art, the Irvine Museum, the Carnegie Art Museum, and the California Surf Museum, among others. “Seeing the glare on the water from the mountains, the hills, and the Mission is with me to this very day, in each of my paintings,”he said.“I am also powerfully moved that I am showing in the very place my father loved so much. His recent passing has amplified the wonders and joys of this place. This exhibit is a homecoming in a deeply personal way, superseding all sorrow or any melancholy. I am thrilled, just thrilled, to be here.” —LD See sbmm.org.

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

37


Santa Barbara

best of Santa barbara 2022

®

READERS’ POLL

YOU NOMINATED THEM,

NOW

VOTE FOR THEM! now through August 31

INDEPENDENT.COM/BESTOF2022 38

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF AUGUST 11

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Tips to get the most out of the coming weeks: (1) Exercise your willpower at random moments just to keep it limber. (2) Be adept at fulfilling your own hype. (3) Argue for fun. Be playful and frisky as you banter. Disagree for the sport of it, without feeling attached to being right or needing the last word. (4) Be unable to understand how anyone can resist you or not find you alluring. (5) Declare yourself President of Everything, then stage a coup d’état. (6) Smile often when you have no reason to. (7) If you come upon a “square peg, round hole” situation, change the shape of the hole.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): If I had to choose a mythic deity to be your symbolic helper, I would pick Venus. The planet Venus is ruler of your sign, and the goddess Venus is the maven of beauty and love, which are key to your happiness. But I would also assign Hephaestus to you Tauruses. He was the Greek god of the metalworking forge. He created Zeus’s thunderbolts, Hermes’s winged helmet, Aphrodite’s magic bra, Achilles’s armor, Eros’s bow and arrows, and the thrones for all the deities in Olympus. The things he made were elegant and useful. I nominate him to be your spirit guide during the next 10 months. May he inspire you to be a generous source of practical beauty.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): To be a true Gemini, you must yearn for knowledge—whether it’s about coral reefs, ancient maps of Sumer, sex among jellyfish, mini-black holes, your friends’ secrets, or celebrity gossip. You need to be an eternal student who craves education. Are some things more important to learn than others? Of course, but that gauge is not always apparent in the present. A seemingly minor clue or trick you glean today may become unexpectedly helpful a month from now. With that perspective in mind, I encourage you to be promiscuous in your lust for new information and teachings in the coming weeks.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Cancerian drummer Ringo Starr is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Though he has received less acclaim than his fellow Beatles, many critics recognize him as a skillful and original drummer. How did he get started? At age 13, he contracted tuberculosis and lived in a sanatorium for two years. The medical staff encouraged him to join the hospital band, hoping it would stimulate his motor skills and alleviate boredom. Ringo used a makeshift mallet to bang the cabinet near his bed. Good practice! That’s how his misfortune led to his joy and success. Is there an equivalent story in your life, Cancerian? The coming months will be a good time to take that story to its next level.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): One of the inspiring experiments I hope you will attempt in the coming months is to work on loving another person as wildly and deeply and smartly as you love yourself. In urging you to try this exercise, I don’t mean to imply that I have a problem with you loving yourself wildly and deeply and smartly. I endorse your efforts to keep increasing the intensity and ingenuity with which you adore and care for yourself. But here’s a secret: Learning to summon a monumental passion for another soul may have the magic power of enhancing your love for yourself.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Musician Viv Albertine has recorded four albums and played guitar for the Slits, a famous punk band. She has also written two books and worked as a TV director for 20 years. Her accomplishments are impressive. Yet she also acknowledges that she has spent a lot of time in bed for many reasons: needing to rest, seeking refuge to think and meditate, recovering from illness, feeling overwhelmed or lonely or sad. She admiringly cites other creative people who, like her, have worked in their beds: Emily Dickinson, Patti Smith, Edith Sitwell, and Frida Kahlo. I mention this, Virgo, because the coming days will be an excellent time for you to seek sanctuary and healing and creativity in bed.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran author Katherine Mansfield wrote, “The mind I love must have wild places, a tangled orchard where dark damsons drop in the heavy grass, an overgrown little wood, the chance of a snake or two, and a pool that nobody’s fathomed the depth of.” Be inspired by her in the coming weeks, Libra. I suspect you will flourish if you give yourself the luxury of exploring your untamed side. The time is ripe to wander in nature and commune with exciting influences outside your comfort zone. What uncharted frontier would you enjoy visiting?

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When you are functioning at your best, you Scorpios crave only the finest, top-quality highs. You embrace joys and pleasures that generate epiphanies and vitalizing transformations. Mediocre varieties of fun don’t interest you. You avoid debilitating indulgences that provide brief excitement but spawn long-term problems. In the coming weeks, dear Scorpio, I hope you will embody these descriptions. It’s crucial that you seek gratifications and delectations that uplift you, ennoble you, and bless your future.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Wish on everything,” advises Sagittarian author Francesca Lia Block. “Pink cars are good, especially old ones. And first stars and shooting stars. Planes will do if they are the first light in the sky and look like stars. Wish in tunnels, holding your breath and lifting your feet off the ground. Birthday candles. Baby teeth.” Your homework during the next two weeks, Sagittarius, is to build a list of further marvels that you will wish on. It’s the Magic Wish season of the year for you: a time when you’re more likely than usual to encounter and generate miracles. Be proactive! Oh, and very important: What are your three top wishes?

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19):Author Aldous Huxley wrote, “That people do not learn much from the lessons of history is the most important lesson that history has to teach.” While his observation is true much of the time, I don’t think it will be so for you in the coming weeks. I suspect you will triumph over past patterns that have repeated and repeated themselves. You will study your life story and figure out what you must do to graduate from lessons you have finally, completely learned.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the film I Origins, a scientist says this to a lover: “When the Big Bang happened, all the atoms in the universe were smashed together into one little dot that exploded outward. So my atoms and your atoms were together then . . . my atoms have always known your atoms.” Although this sounds poetic, it’s true in a literal sense: The atoms that compose you and me and everyone else were originally all squeezed together in a tiny space. We knew each other intimately! The coming days will be an excellent time to celebrate your fundamental link with the rest of the universe. You’ll be extra receptive to feeling connection. You’ll be especially adept at fitting your energy together with others’. You’ll love the sensation of being united, merged, blended.

A snapshot view of the best of local culture and fun happenings in the worlds of music, theater, visual art, film, dance, books, lectures, and more from Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): My Piscean friend Luna sent me a message that sums up how I feel about you these days. I’ll repeat it here in the hope it will inspire you to be perfectly yourself. Luna said, “Every time I meet someone who was born within like two weeks of my birthday, I end up with the impression that they are the loopiest and wisest person I’ve met in a long time. They are totally ridiculous and worthy of profound respect. They are unhinged and brilliantly focused. They are fuzzy-headed dreamers who couldn’t possibly ever get anything practical accomplished and they are lyrical thinkers who charm me with their attunement to the world’s beauty and impress me with their understanding of how the world works. Hahahahaha. Luckily for me, I know the fool is sacred.”

Sign up at independent.com/ newsletters

Homework: Imagine what you will be doing exactly one year from today. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 11, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

39


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

CLASSIFIEDS S A N T A

B A R B A R A

I N D E P E N D E N T

Reaching 68,000 Readers Each Week

EMPLOYMENT COMPUTER/TECH TECH PROJECT Mgr – Automotive Solutions, oversee customer deployment of security software solutions with 75% work from home & 25% travel to client sites within the U.S. INTEGRITY Security Services in Santa Barbara. Resume and cover letter to iss.careers@ghsiss.com

EDUCATION

SANTA BARBARA Charter School needs two or three K‑6 instructional aides for the 2022‑23 school year. Approximate Schedule: 8:30‑1:30, M‑F (25 hours weekly, some flexibility) Job begins on Monday, August 15, 2022 Instructional Aides assist a certificated teacher and other staff with various instructional and recreational activities. The position requires sensitivity, discretion, intuition, and competence. Starting hourly rate Instructional Aide (DOE): $15.39 Training provided. Send resume and cover letter to Laura Donner ldonner@sbunified. org www.sbcharter.org

ENGINEERING

OXFORD INSTRUMENTS is looking to hire multiple positions in your area. The openings include Manufacturing Engineer, Associate Test Engineer, and HR Manager. Please apply online at careers.oxinst.com

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

HOSPITALITY/ RESTAURANT

Bogies Assistant Manager/ Westlake Village Inn Join our team: Bogies is looking for an Assistant Manager that has great energy, strong organizational skills, and enjoys working in a team environment. The assistant manager will be responsible for supervising the work of employees in the Nightclub while ensuring guest satisfaction. Number of Employees Supervised: Approximately 20

40

Hours: Weekends required Holidays required Night shift 8‑10 hour shift General Responsibilities:

code CARE20 to get $20 off Mobile Companion. Call today 1‑844‑ 790‑1673. (SCAN)

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

Train, evaluate, lead, motivate, coach and discipline all employees of the Nightclub to ensure that standards are met for outlet operation. Be visible in the operation, promote good public relations, handle complaints, concerns or special requests for guests, clients, and group contacts. Provide excellent knowledge and ensure the quality of all food and beverage items offered through the nightclub while following and maintaining all local, state and federal laws relating to alcohol service and consumption. Control labor and operating expenses through effective scheduling, inventory and cash control. Observe the physical condition of facilities and equipment on a daily basis in the outlet and make recommendations for corrections and improvements as needed. Work harmoniously and professionally with co‑workers and supervisors. Non‑Essential Functions: Assist with the service and preparation of beverage and food to guests Assist with the cleaning of operational areas Physical Demands: The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully perform the essential functions so this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential functions. Able to sit and stand, walk, hear and talk for long periods of time Must be manually dexterous able to use hands, fingers, and arms for extensive periods of time Able to lift can carry up to 25 pounds Desired Skills and Experiences: 2‑3 Years in a supervisory or assistant manager position in Food & Beverage operations Passion for delivering an excellent service standard Knowledge of food & beverage service, cost control, labor control, maintenance, and accounting Ability to effectively manage a subordinate staff Requires reading, writing and oral proficiency in the English language Bartender: 1 year (Preferred) Management: 2 years (Preferred) Nightclub management: 1 year (Preferred) Job Type: Full‑time Please send resumes to HR@wvinn. com or apply online https://www.westlakevillageinn. com/career‑opportunities/

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE ALOE CARE Health, medical alert system. The most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice‑activated! No wi‑fi needed! Special offer call and mention offer

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 11, 2022

characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40104.

Small, peaceful and nurturing residential home for disabled adults in Carpinteria is hiring direct care staff. Full and Part Time Positions. Join our family and enjoy a rewarding career caring for others. www.cornerstonehouse.org or 310‑699‑2762.

PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT The Academic Advisor serves as initial source of academic advising for undergraduate students in the Environmental Studies Program and is responsible for providing specific types of academic advice, which include but are not limited to reviewing & approving petitions, degree completion analysis, major/ minor requirements, educational resources, experiential opportunities such as internships and study abroad, and other student advising services. Serves as liaison to the College of Letters & Science Academic Advising Office, other campus agencies, other colleges and universities, as well as students, faculty and the departmental curriculum committee. Assists the Student Academic Services Manager in implementing systems to track student data. Assists in managing multiple databases including current student and alumni information. Monitors academic progress of declared ES majors, interprets and applies UC systemwide and campus policies and develops procedures and practices for student advising. Maintains a supportive climate by identifying student related problems and refers students to campus resources. Coordinates publicity for the undergraduate program, courses and faculty research. Conducts informational sessions and helps manage social media accounts to provide advice to large student audiences. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.81 ‑ $26.35/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40015

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SOUTH HALL ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Administers all academic personnel activities for the English for Multi‑Lingual Students Program and the Writing Program. Responsible for all academic merit and promotions cases, faculty recruitment and appointment cases, recruiting and hiring temporary lecturers, and UCPath payroll. Responsibilities include working with the Office of International Student and Scholars on visa requests, assisting visiting scholars, facilitating leave requests in a timely manner, attending trainings, and maintaining a working knowledge of the Academic Personnel Manual and campus Red Binder. Reqs: High school diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative experience. Working knowledge and familiarity with computers and the ability to learn and utilize new systems, software, and programs. Must possess excellent written and verbal communication skills and the ability to analyze an issue, research the procedures and policies, and use good judgment to implement policy. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/16/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40100

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING The Academic Personnel Coordinator is responsible for providing advanced administrative support and assisting the Academic Affairs Analyst in coordinating the department faculty merit and promotion cases. Responsible for managing the department’s faculty recruitment activities. Incumbent must possess a high level of confidentiality and attention to detail. This position is also responsible for the shared daily administrative activities of the Central Administrative Office. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative experience. Must possess excellent communication, organizational, and computer skills including Microsoft and Google applications. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other

APPLICATION PROGRAMMER

CAMPUS LEARNING ASSISTANCE SERVICES Hybrid position with excellent university benefits! We assist students in their mastery of UCSB course material through course‑specific tutoring and academic skills development. If you join our team, you will lead and participate hands‑on in the development and migration to new technologies of information systems and functionality, identifying strategies and opportunities for innovation and automation including cross‑organization mission critical projects! You will perform software application design, development/implementation planning, programming and analysis, maintenance, support and training. Reqs: BS in Computer Science, related field, or equivalent combination of education and experience. At least 3 years programming experience using .NET framework, Visual Studio, and Microsoft SQL Server. The position requires a full‑stack developer in .NET ‑ backend development using the .NET Server‑Side Framework and frontend development including HTML, CSS, and JS. Demonstrated experience developing for cloud‑based platforms including Microsoft Azure. Experience using best practices version control methodologies, continuous integration and deployment tools. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check.

$82,000‑$90,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38932

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF RETAIL

CAMPUS DINING Under the general direction of the Director of Retail Operations & Business Management, the Assistant Director of Retail oversees the daily operations of three café’s, two coffee programs and two c‑stores/ markets. Responsibilities include Staff Development and Training of three (3) career managers, twelve student managers and 250 ‑ 275 part time student staff. Financial

responsibilities include managing a budget in excess of $4.0M, writing annual budgets for each location. Responsible for the Marketing and Merchandising of all units. Utilizes planograms to increase store sales. Participates in the bid process for grocery, coffee, snack and candy vending, and the campus Pouring Rights contract. Reqs: Hospitality/ Culinary or Bachelor’s Degree or Equivalent combination of education and experience 6 years of progressive experience in collegiate or high volume food foodservice operations or, retail/ convenience store, or the equivalent combination of education and experience. Advanced supervisory and communication skills. Strong experience in providing leadership to a management team in a high volume foodservice environment. Responsible for creating menus following industry trends. A high degree of flexibility, energy, initiative, problem solving and resourcefulness is required. Demonstrated leadership abilities, customer service and communication skills, interpersonal savvy, strategic and organization agility, managing vision and purpose, innovation management and

Continued on p. 42

STAY CONNECTED @sbindependent

@sbindependent

@sbindynews


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS !!OLD GUITARS WANTED!! GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN, Etc. 1930’s to 1980’s. TOP DOLLAR PAID. CALL TOLL FREE 1‑866‑433‑8277 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) ALOE CARE Health medical alert system. Most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice‑activated! No wi‑fi needed! Special offer w/code CARE20 for $20 off Mobile Companion. 1‑855‑521‑5138 AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/ mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855‑761‑1725 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 1‑877‑649‑5043 (AAN CAN) BECOME A published author. We want to read your book! Dorrance Publishing trusted since 1920. Consultation, production, promotion & distribution. Call for free author’s guide 833‑719‑3029 or visit dorranceinfo.com/acp BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920. Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN)

Watch your favorite live sports, news & entertainment anywhere. First 3 months of HBOMax, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and Epix included! Directv is #1 in Customer Satisfaction (JD Power & Assoc.) Some restrictions apply. Call 1‑888‑641‑5762. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV SATELLITE TV Service Starting at $74.99/month! Free Installation! 160+ channels available. Call Now to Get the Most Sports & Entertainment on TV! 877‑310‑2472 DISCOUNT AIR travel. Call Flight Services for best pricing on domestic & international flights inside & from the US. Serving United, Delta, American & Southwest & many more. Free quote! Have travel dates ready! 844‑951‑2014 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23 1‑866‑566‑1815 (AAN CAN) DO YOU owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 877‑414‑2089. (Hours: Mon‑Fri 7am‑5pm PST) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Help Find Missing Kids! Call 1‑888‑491‑1453. (CalSCAN) HUGHESNET ‑ Finally, super‑fast internet no matter where you live. 25 Mbps just $59.99/mo! Unlimited Data is Here. Stream Video. Bundle TV & Internet. Free Installation. Call 866‑499‑0141 LONG DISTANCE MOVING: Call today for a FREE QUOTE from America’s Most Trusted Interstate Movers. Let us take the stress out of moving! Speak to a Relocation Specialist, call 844‑857‑1737 (Cal‑SCAN) NEVER CLEAN your gutters again! Affordable, professionally installed gutter guards protect your gutters and home from debris and leaves forever! For a FREE Quote call: 844‑499‑0277

CREDIT CARD Debt Relief! Reduce payment by up to 50%! Get one LOW affordable payment/month. Reduce interest. Stop calls. FREE no‑obligation consultation Call 1‑855‑761‑1456 (AAN CAN)

NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 1‑855‑667‑0380 (Cal‑SCAN)

DIRECTV FOR $79.99/mo for 12 months with CHOICE Package.

PAYING TOP CA$H FOR MEN’S SPORT WATCHES! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer,

Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 888‑320‑1052

multi‑market solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com

PAYING TOP cash for men’s sportwatches! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 833‑603‑3236

THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. Mark Twain said, “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising”. So why spend your hardearned dollars on social media where you already have an audience? For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com

PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator. $0 Money Down + Low Monthly Payment Options. Request a FREE Quote ‑Call now before the next power outage: 1‑844‑439‑5645 (SCAN) PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator $0 Down + Low Monthly Pmt Request a free Quote. Call before the next power outage: 1‑844‑334‑8353 PROTECT YOUR home from pests safely and affordably. Pest, rodent, termite and mosquito control. Call for a quote or inspection today 844‑394‑9278

THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing an election is how campaign dollars are spent. Get the best ROI by using our deep relationships in every community in California. Our on‑the‑ground knowledge is indispensable to campaigns that want results. For more info on multi‑market ethnic and non‑ethnic solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@ cnpa.com

PUT ON your TV Ears & hear TV w/ unmatched clarity. TV Ears Original ‑ originally $129.95 ‑ now w/ this special offer only $59.95 w/code MCB59! 1‑833‑530‑1955

THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1‑877‑539‑0299

SAFE STEP. North America’s #1 Walk‑in tub. Comprehensive lifetime warranty. Top‑of‑the‑line installation and service. Now featuring our free shower package & $1600 off ‑ limited time! Financing available. 1‑855‑417‑1306

TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920‑1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877‑589‑0747 (AAN CAN)

SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/ year! Call 1‑844‑410‑9609! (M‑F 8am‑8pm Central) (Cal‑SCAN)

TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 866‑243‑5931. (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET). Computer with internet is required.

SPECTRUM INTERNET as low as $29.99, call to see if you qualify for ACP and free internet. No Credit Check. Call Now! 833‑955‑0905 THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. CNPA’s Advertising Services’ power to connect to nearly 13 million of the state’s readers who are an engaged audience, makes our services an indispensable marketing solution. For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Sunrise 6:19 Sunset 7:44

High

Thu 11

4:08 am -1.2

10:46 am 4.2

3:22 pm 2.1

9:44 pm 7.0

Fri 12

4:49 am 1.1

11:23 am 4.4

4:14 pm 1.1

10:32 pm 6.8

Sat 13

5:28 am -0.9

11:59 am 4.6

5:07 pm 1.9

11:20 pm 6.2

Sun 14

6:06 am -0.3

12:36 pm 4.8

6:03 pm 1.8

Mon 15

12:08 am 5.6

6:42 am 0.4

1:14 pm 4.1

7:03 pm 1.8

Tue 16

1:00 am 4.8

7:17 am 1.0

1:54 pm 4.1

8:13 pm 1.9

Wed 17

2:04 am 3.1

7:52 am 1.8

2:39 pm 4.1

9:39 pm 1.8

Thu 18

3:38 am 3.3

8:30 am 2.4

3:33 pm 4.1

11:20 pm 1.5

11 D

18

27 D

3H source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Study Time’s Over” -- we’re missing some conclusions.

VIVINT SMART security. Professionally installed. 1 connected system for total peace of mind. Free professional installation! 4 free months of monitoring! Call to customize your system. 1‑833‑841‑0737 WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833‑664‑1530 (AAN CAN)

THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. We deliver the largest consortium of trusted news publishers in California and beyond. For more info on

54. Mathematician/ philosopher Pascal 1. Oscar follower? 56. Explanations 5. Nutini with the upcoming 57. Soft shoe, informally album “Last Night in the 58. Bldg.’s rental units Bittersweet” 59. Option to take during 10. Perform terribly “Choose Your Own 14. Dutch cheese variety Oration”? 15. Actor Elgort of “The 62. Fence around a racetrack Goldfinch” 63. Discussion group 16. Peace Nobelist Wiesel 64. “Heads up” abbr. 17. Offices of a N.Y. 65. “Auld Lang ___” conglomerate (as opposed 66. Night, in Napoli to their online services)? 67. R&B artist who got his 19. Tip slightly nickname from a producer 20. Kind of squad or rally who made comparisons to 21. Title fish in a Pixar movie “The Matrix” 22. He’s (spoiler alert) “The Monster at the End of This Book” 1. Sneeze inducer 24. “Chains of Love” duo 2. Stick 26. DÌa de Martin Luther King 3. Venmo’s parent company Jr. month 4. Wake-up times 27. Moves, in real estate jargon 5. 1970s AMC car 28. Prefix meaning billion 6. “What’s in ___?” 31. Bran muffin bit 7. World capital on a fjord 32. Bad thing to say at a driving 8. Table part test when asked to put it in 9. Couturier Cassini neutral? 10. Back with money 36. What tempeh might replace 39. What a time zone might be 11. Popeye’s paramour 12. Gym class challenge, named after maybe 40. Pub potables 13. Promises to wed 41. Underwater version of a 18. Occupied Britney Spears hit? 23. Realize, as profits 44. Shag, e.g. 25. Not quite 45. Inkling 28. Time’s 2019 Person of the 46. Carpal tunnel locale Year Thunberg 50. Aluminum foil alternative 52. It’s full of -ologies 29. Aoki of the PGA

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

30. Post-punk fan’s group, maybe 33. Nothingness 34. “Behold!” to Caesar 35. “___ bleu!” 36. Confections first made in the 1930s 37. Part of a 2022 U.S. women’s soccer negotiation 38. One way to prepare potatoes 42. Altoids purchases 43. “In my dreams!” 47. Time doer 48. “Star Trek” engineer 49. Synthpop kin 51. Passage in a plane 52. Bedding layer 53. Washing machine stage 55. “30 for 30” airer 56. Took off 60. Kung ___ shrimp 61. Pizza option ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1095

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

AUGUST AUGUST 11, 11, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

41 41


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT business acumen. Highly developed organizational skills, including attention to detail, accuracy, and ability to manage multiple and often conflicting priorities, meet deadlines and delegate with accountability. Financial and analytical skills to manage food cost, labor and controllable targets. Individuals must be self‑motivated and have the ability to work in a collaborative team environment. Intermediate computer applications skills; must be proficient with desktop and mobile productivity tools. Notes: Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Must work occasional evenings and weekends. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $75,800 ‑ $91,800/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #40503

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

CARSEY‑WOLF CENTER This position includes four major job functions: publicity, public event curation and coordination, program administration, and theater operations. Responsibilities include: Development of publicity materials for public‑facing academic events, including website content, social media, email marketing, print advertising, and writing press releases. Serving as a member of the Center’s programming team to create and present events at the Pollock Theater. Assisting the Director and Associate Director in administrative tasks supporting the Center’s academic programs, including its undergraduate and graduate programs, its research awards, and its publishing initiatives. Assisting the Pollock Theater Director in coordination of daily theater operations. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in media‑related field or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years event coordination and/or conference organization experience. 1‑3 years supervisory experience. 1‑3 years social media and publicity experience. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be available to work nights and weekends. $62,300 to $76,100/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/16/22. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40222

ASSOCIATE PROJECT MANAGER

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION SERVICES The Associate Project Manager is responsible for all aspects of the administration and oversight of Capital Improvement projects under $1 million including building renovations, deferred maintenance and infrastructure upgrades. Provides support to Project Managers on projects over $1 million. Supports and completes work under the campus expert for asbestos and lead containing building materials and the campus Asbestos & Lead programs. On assigned projects, executes strategies for achieving

42

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

campus objectives for compliance and performs inspections and surveys in campus buildings and project sites. Independently interprets contracts, negotiates changes in the work, hires and manages professional consultants, oversees development of plans and specifications, creates budgets and manages expenses, serves as liaison with all campus departments, and obtains project approvals and permits. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area/and/or equivalent combination of training/experience. Working knowledge of legal standards regarding hazardous building materials and compliance with applicable federal, state and local regulations. Working knowledge of design, construction, construction contract administration and California Building Codes, including full understanding of industry practices. Project management skills, including skill to manage complex projects. Skills in problem recognition / avoidance / resolution. Thorough organizational and analytical skills including skill to provide high quality control. Detail oriented to accurately proof contracts and other documents. Written, verbal and interpersonal communications skills. Proven ability to manage contractors and maintain compliance to the agreed‑upon scope of work and budget. Notes: AHERA Asbestos Contractor/Supervisor and AHERA Asbestos Inspector certificates. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/19/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40290

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS ANALYST

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for developing and submitting research proposals, awards and/or transactions related to contract and grant management and maintains contract and grant records in compliance with institutional and research sponsor policies. Responsible for the post‑award administration, financial management, and analysis of the Contracts and Grants for the Computer Science Department. Responsible for the completion of post‑award activities of research awards totaling more than $12M annually. Duties include setting up new awards and analyzing award terms and conditions, advising faculty, staff, and students. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check $27.68 ‑ $30.45/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/19/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40582

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS ANALYST

THE INDEPENDENT

|

AUGUST 11, 2022

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for developing and submitting research proposals, awards and/or transactions related to contract and grant management and maintains contract and grant records in compliance with institutional and research sponsor policies. Responsible for the post‑award administration, financial management, and analysis of the Contracts and Grants for the Computer Science Department. Responsible for the completion of post‑award activities of research awards totaling more than $12M annually. Duties include setting up new awards and analyzing award terms and conditions, advising faculty, staff, and students. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check $27.68 ‑ $30.45/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/19/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40582

of compliance/legal experience; or an equivalent combination of education, training, and experience (e.g., paralegal certification and 5 years of relevant experience). Note: Satisfactory completion of a conviction history background check. The UCEAP Systemwide Office is located in Goleta, CA. Position is eligible for remote or hybrid work arrangements. Work schedule to align with business hours, Pacific Time. Per UC policy, travel costs for non‑mandatory training and professional development will be reimbursed (up to) the expenses for travel to and from the UCEAP systemwide office regardless of the elected remote work location. $91,300 ‑ $116,400/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39897

FINANCIAL ANALYST DATA PRIVACY AND COMPLIANCE OFFICER

UC EDUCATION ABROAD SYSTEMWIDE OFFICE Responsible for collaborating across the organization in designing, developing, implementing, monitoring, and communicating the data privacy and compliance program for the systemwide UC Education Abroad Program (UCEAP). This position is charged with ensuring UCEAP’s operational, regulatory, legal, and policy alignment with and adherence to a wide range of applicable international and U.S. federal/ state laws, rules, and regulations. Formally serves as UCEAP’s designated Privacy Officer and Policy Coordinator. Regularly leads and/or collaborates on projects of critical importance to the organization that carry substantial consequences of success or failure. Functions as a resource and technical leader with a high degree of knowledge in all areas of compliance relevant to the organization. Conducts complex research and analysis and develops solutions for a wide range of policy and compliance issues without prior precedent and unique to international operations. Works closely as a core liaison with the UC Office of the General Counsel and relevant subject matter experts to coordinate organization‑wide initiatives. Involves understanding and application of a range of international and U.S. federal/state laws and regulations to a wide variety of activities, including academic and non‑academic‑related activities that have implications for UCEAP operations and academic programs. Provides interpretation and guidance to UCEAP unit Directors and subject matter experts regarding complex issues ranging from foreign liability risks to global data privacy. Acts as liaison with internal clients, UC Legal, international counsel, and external organizations as applicable. Serves as the organization’s formal Privacy Officer responsible for the development, oversight, maintenance, and adherence to UCEAP’s global privacy compliance program encompassing U.S. federal and state privacy laws as well as the EU General Data Protection Regulation and other international privacy laws applicable to UCEAP activities. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in a related field and three or more years of compliance/legal experience or equivalent training and/or experience. Three or more years

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT The Financial Analyst is responsible for the full spectrum of financial administration including but not limited to reconciling the general ledger and payroll expense reports; analyzing expenditures and spending patterns; pre‑award and post‑award administration, proposal preparation and budgets; preparing monthly financial reports for review by PIs, and the Business Officer. Maintains knowledge of University accounting policies, contract/grant policies, funding agencies, including related policies and procedures for payroll, travel, and purchasing. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related area or equivalent experience and/ or training. Working knowledge of financial processes, policies and procedures. Proficiency in the use of spreadsheet and database software. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.39 ‑ $33.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40103

LINUX SITE RELIABILITY ENGINEER

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES ‑ INFRASTRUCTURE The Enterprise Technology Services Infrastructure group is looking for a self‑motivated team player with at least 3 years of Linux system administration experience including advanced networking. Our team is responsible for enhancing the operational performance, security, and scalability of various services in Enterprise Technology Services and supported units. This is accomplished through the development, deployment, and maintenance of various tools including automation, log analysis, service and application heath/ performance monitoring, and version control. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Information Technology or equivalent training and/or experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $96,060 ‑ $126,300/yr.;

commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39414.

LOCKSMITH

MAINTENANCE‑ RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The locksmith performs journey level locksmithing tasks and related repairs/installations for the buildings maintained by Residential Operations. In compliance with H&RS goals and objectives, affirms, and implements the department Educational Equity Plan. Reqs: Fiveyears’ experience working at a journeyman level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. Notes: Five (5) years’ experience working at a journeyman level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. $39.71/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39424

integrate with and complement university curricula and create community connections. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and / or training. 4‑6 years’ experience in marketing project management and oversight. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Occasional nights and weekends required. This is a 100% time limited appointment working less than 1,000 hours, for up to 6 months. $6,925 ‑ $7,917/ mo. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/18/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40434

Education Outreach Coordinator

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Responsibilities include coordinating science inquiry‑based activities in secondary schools: setting up schedules, organizing events, updating the website, fundraising, overseeing joint Master’s program, grant reporting, arranging meetings with all partner institutions https:// scitrek.chem.ucsb.edu. Req: BA in Chemistry, Biochemistry or a related field at time of application. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Applications will be reviewed beginning 8/16/22. Apply online at https://apptrkr. com/3308475. The posting will remain open until filled.

SENATE ANALYST MARKETING MANAGER (LIMITED APPOINTMENT)

ARTS & LECTURES The UCSB Arts & Lectures Marketing Manager is responsible for implementing innovative multi‑channel marketing strategies for the Arts & Lectures program as a whole and for its individual performances, films, lectures and special events. Temporarily manages the day‑to‑day operations of the Marketing department, supervising and coordinating staff to execute strategic communications and collateral. Implements comprehensive marketing strategies; scheduling and project management of publications, campaigns and promotions. Ensures brand identity and visibility across highly‑specialized evolving digital technologies and platforms. A&L is a large, robust, complex, primarily self‑supporting, non‑academic unit that supports the academic mission of the university. A&L is the largest presenting organization between Los Angeles and San Francisco, and is one of the most visible, public‑facing departments at UCSB. A&L partners with faculty and academic departments, community organizations and leaders, university administrators, philanthropists and funders to create opportunities that

ACADEMIC SENATE Serves as Analyst for Undergraduate Education. Provides Analyst support to the Undergraduate Council (UgC), Committee on Admissions, Enrollment and Relations with Schools (CAERS), and Committee on Courses and General Education (CCGE). Provides direction, oversight, and institutional memory; interprets and ensures compliance with University, campus, and Senate policy and procedures. Manages all administrative aspects of UgC, CAERS, and CCGE. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree and three years working in a related area or equivalent training. Advanced analytical/problem solving skills. Strong policy analysis techniques. Ability to accurately prepare documents, reports, and correspondence. Notes: Occasional travel to other campuses or Office of President. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $75,800/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39742

PRIMARY CARE OFFICE MANAGER

STUDENT HEALTH Under the general supervision of the Nursing Director and Medical Director, acts with a high level of independent judgment and works in coordination with Nursing Director/Medical Director on management goals and objectives to increase standardization and efficiencies in Student Health primary care and nursing care delivery. Project management will involve responding to requests or situations that are sensitive and confidential in nature and need to be addressed timely with utmost discretion and following UC and departmental policies and procedures. Stays abreast of all issues facing the Nursing Director/ Medical Director. Draws upon a thorough understanding of UC and departmental policies and procedures as well as the Student Health mission to serve the students and the community. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent experience. Must have excellent oral and written communication skills. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. To comply with Santa Barbara Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must successfully complete and pass the background check before employment and date of hire. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. $24.61/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #39399

PRINCIPAL ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES UCSB’s Departmental Information Technology is looking for a Principal Electronics Technician to support major campus growth initiatives. The technician will share responsibility for the installation,maintenance and troubleshooting of the outside copper and fiber cable plant. Additional duties include coordinating with cable maintenance and installation crews on locating cable, cable tray, conduits, access panels, and manholes for the construction, adding and/or maintaining the cable plant, reviewing and verifying all completed work orders for accuracy of cable assignments, and recording all changes to both outside and inside cable plant. Experience with design and installation of high pair count copper cables, splicing fiber and troubleshooting, knowledge of theories and techniques involved in the implementation and maintenance of private and public telecommunications networks and telecommunications equipment operation and use is essential. Reqs: High School Diploma. Fiber Optic, research, troubleshooting, electronic circuitry construction experience ‑ minimum of 1‑3 years. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $35.83‑$40.29/hr.,


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT (CONT.)

commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 30409

PROGRAM ASSISTANT

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Provides the full range of administrative functions and services for the Departments of History, Classics, Religious Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, and several research centers and initiatives. HASC provides administrative support for over 110 faculty, 784 majors and minors, and 225 graduate students. Provides high level support to the areas of operations, student services, finance, and academic personnel. Develops and implements procedures and manages day‑to‑day and long‑term general office operations by anticipating, evaluating and resolving potential conflict or problems independently. Manages DSP exams and course evaluations for HASC’s student services area, purchasing for four academic departments and HASC, and oversees daily facility needs. Reqs: Prior experience working in a front office. Requires strong organizational skills and the ability to handle multiple tasks with frequent interruptions. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/18/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 40424

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

SENIOR PLANNER ‑ HYBRID

CAMPUS PLANNING & DESIGN The University is seeking a Senior Planner to implement the Regents’ certified campus Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) to approve, permit, and gain entitlements for all campus capital development projects. Qualified candidates must possess knowledge of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the California Coastal Act, and have experience with other regulatory agencies such as the Army Corps of Engineers, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Regional Water Quality Control Board, to successfully process environmental documents and permits. In collaboration with the Director of Campus Planning and Design, serve as a University representative and liaison with the California Coastal Commission and its staff and other environmental regulatory agencies. Prepare Notices of Impending Development (NOID) and LRDP Amendments to submit to the California Coastal Commission. Reqs: Working knowledge/ skill in city and environmental planning, architecture, or other planning‑related fields. Strong analytical skills. Strong written, verbal, organization, and interpersonal communication skills. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $90,000 ‑ $112,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38791

SERVICE

DIRECTORY HOME SERVICES DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23. 1‑866‑479‑1516 ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule free LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490

MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION VIAGRA users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Call Today 1‑877‑707‑5517 (AAN CAN) DENTAL INSURANCE ‑ Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance ‑ not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1‑888‑623‑3036 www.dental50plus.com/58 #6258 VIAGRA AND CIALIS USERS! 50 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00. 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 Hablamos Español

MONEY TO LOAN RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 1‑818‑248‑0000. Broker‑principal DRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑ SCAN)

RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT STUDIOS $1440, Studios with patio $1500, 1BDs $1560, 1BDs with patio $1620, in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 805‑967‑6614

CLASSIC CARS

WANTED Running or not. We are local to S.B. Foreign/Domestic. Porsche, Mercedes, Ford, Chevy etc. We come to you.

805-699-0684

AUTO AUTO PARTS CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast ‑ FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1‑800‑245‑0398

CAR CARE/REPAIR DONATE YOUR CAR OR TRUCK TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

FOREIGN CARS

2019 MINI COOPER S Clubman. Moonwalk Grey metallic exterior and carbon black leatherette interior. Low mileage (16,275) vehicle in immaculate condition. This vehicle has a clean title and has tinted rear windows, all black trim (no chrome) with red accents and JWC leather steering wheel. Rear view camera, storage package, Mini connected and rear park distance control, plus new front tires. No dings or dents. All service records from current owner available. $30,000. John: (805) 452‑9807.

LUXURY CARS WANTED! OLD Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE 1‑707‑339‑5994. Email: porscherestoration@yahoo.com (Cal‑SCAN)

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICES‑ TO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MARIA WASSERMAN CASE NO. 22PR00365 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MARIA WASSERMAN. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: ALMOND WASSERMAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. The Petition for Probate requests that: ALMOND WASSERMAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION will be held in this court as follows: 09/08/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102‑1107, Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the LATER of either (1) FOUR MONTHS from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 DAYS from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 07/19/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy Clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: April M. Lavigne, Law Offices of April M. Lavigne, 7 W. Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. (805) 881‑1230. Published August 11, 18, 25, 2022. PROOF OF SERVICE BY MAIL 1. I am over the age of 18 and not a party to this cause. I am a resident or employed of or in the county where the mailing occured. 2. My residence or business address is Law Offices of April M. Lavigne, 7 W. Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 3. I served the foregoing Notice of Petititon of Administer Estate on each person named below by enclosing a copy in an envelope addressed as shown below AND a. DEPOSITING the sealed envelope with the United States Postal Service

on the date and at the place shown in item 4, with the postage fully prepaid. Place mailed: Buellton, California. April M. Lavigne. NAME AND ADDRESS OF EACH PERSON TO WHOM NOTICE WAS MAILED 1. Almond Wasserman 601 E. Anapamu Street, #304, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 2. Zachary S. Wasserman PO Box 454 Santa Ynez, CA 93460 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHELE FITZPATRICK CASE NO.: 22PR00316 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MICHELE FITZPATRICK AKA MICHELE A. FITZPATRICK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: KATHLEEN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that: Kathleen Carlson be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decendent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 09/15/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE THE FILE KEPT BY THE COURT. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 6/15/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy Clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Susan H. McCollum, Hollister & Brace, 200 East Carrillo Street, Suite 100, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. (805) 963‑6711. Published August 11, 18, 25, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LINDSLEY FALLON WESSBERG CASE NO.: 22PR00289 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: LINDSLEY FALLON & LINDSLEY

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

FALLON WESSBERG A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: RICHARD MICHAEL ROSENWALD in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. The Petition for Probate requests that: RICHARD MICHAEL ROSENWALD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 09/15/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 07/29/2022 By: Jessica Vega, Deputy Clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Richard Michael Rosenwald, PO Box 40307, Santa Barbara, CA 93140. 805‑455‑6979 Published August 11, 18, 25, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: GARY N. BOZENICH, CASE NO.: 22PR00387. To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of GARY N. BOZENICH. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Nathaniel D. Carey in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: Nathaniel D. Carey be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative

will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 9/08/2022 AT 9:00 A.M. DEPT: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James M. Sweeney, Esq. #205333, Allen & Kimbell, LLP, 317 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, (805) 963‑8611. Published August 11,18, 25, 2022. Electronically filed. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer, 8/2/2022 10:37 AM by April Garcia, Deputy.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SMALL BUSINESS LOAN FUND 333 S. Salinas St., Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Women’s Economic Ventures (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 08/15//07/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2017‑0002303. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: The business was conducted as a corporation, signed by KATHY ODELL, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 7/08/22. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001734. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: TRI‑COUNTY INSULATION at 910 George Street, Santa Clara, CA 95054; Statewide Insulation Inc. (same address). The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 7/15/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. FBN2019‑0001695. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Statewide Insulation Inc. (same address) This businesss is conducted by a corporation. This statement is SIGNED BY MARK A GIESEKE, PRESIDENT. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 14, 2022. I hereby certify that

AUGUST AUGUST 11, 11, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

43 43


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

STAY CONNECTED

this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) FBN2022‑0001789. Published: Jul 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CENTRAL COAST RBS, 5671 Ekwill St, Unit 103, Goleta, CA 93117; Darin Biamonte (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 11/4//2020 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 20‑0002735. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: The business was conducted as an Individual. SIGNED BY DARIN L. BIAMONTE, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 7/08/22. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001740. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 20022.

FOLLOW US ON

FACEBOOK

@sbindependent

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: FLUENTESL at 802 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Danny Chun‑Fu Tsai (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 04/19/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. FBN2019‑0000960. The business was conducted by an individual and SIGNED BY Danny Chun‑Fu Tsai, Founder. This FBN 2022‑0001718, E47 statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) , Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GIOVANNI’S PIZZA OF GOLETA, 5711 Calle Real, Goleta, CA 93117; Noormand & Sons Incorporated (same address). This business is conducted by A Corporation. SIGNED BY MCLEOD NOORMAND, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001783. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LA FLORA DIVINA SANTA BARBARA, 4721 Amarosa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Jacqueline Clarke, 249 Verano Dr. #5, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JAQUELINE CLARKE, FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001722. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: OAK PARK, 1532 Acorn Way, Solvang, CA 93463; Flt Oak Park Flte, LLC, 2082 Michelson Drive, 4th Fl (same address) .This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Corporation. SIGNED BY MICHAEL B. EARL, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 7/6/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001715. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SCO

HOLDINGS, 121 Gray Avenue, Suite 302, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Iterative Ascent (same address). This business is conducted by Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY JOSHUA CALEB COLLINS, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001853. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARADISE HOOKAH HUT, 432 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Paradise Hookah Hut, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY DANNY TSAI, CO‑OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0001717. Published: July 28, August 4, 18 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SKYPIG PRODUCTIONS, 1127 E Cota St, Santa Barbara, CA, 93103; Santiago P Bailey‑Musacchio (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SANTIAGO BAILEY‑MUSACCHIO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0001720. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA NATURE CONNECTION WALKS, 101 S. Salinas Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Tamara A Murray (same address). This business is

FOLLOW US ON

INSTAGRAM

@sbindependent

Go behind the scenes

FOLLOW US ON

TWITTER

@sbindynews 44

|

THE INDEPENDENT

of this week’s Independent with The Indy, a podcast, and hear straight from our journalists about the cover story and more.

Listen at

independent.com/theindy or wherever you listen to podcasts!

AUGUST 11, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY TAMARA MURRAY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001892. Published: August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FREEDOM SIGNS, 816 Reddick Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Elizabeth K Harris, 333 Old Mill Road, #9, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY ELIZABETH K. HARRIS, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001854. Published: August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA FREE SCHOOL, 1330 State Street, Suite 101, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Free School, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY MADELINE KIMLIN, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001898. Published: August 4, 11, 18, 25, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GORJESS BOUTIQUE, 1121 N. Poppy St, Lompoc, CA 93436; Jessica I Escalante (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JESSICA I ESCALANTE, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 5, 2022 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001963 Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAGNETIC MOON APOTHECARY,3937 Foot Hill RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Dion R Lyman, (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY DION LYMAN, FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001889. Published: August 11, 18, 25, & September 1 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as MJB ENGINEERING/CONSTRUCTION at 965 W Mountain Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Bruce T Hayashi (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED: BRUCE T HAYASHI, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). E29 FBN Number: 2022‑0001955. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SAINT BARBARA, 814 W. Figueroa St, #B, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Stacy Baptista (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY STACY BAPTISTA. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 2, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland,

County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001944. Published: August 11, 18, 25, & September 1 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KUMON SANTA BARBARA, 3230 State St., Suite B, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; KM Discovery SBA (same address)‑ This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY YO RI, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001920. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SECOND ARROW COUNSELING, 301 E. Carrillo St, Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Daniel M Cohen, 2415 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105‑3561. This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY DANIEL COHEN, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001728. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RIVIERA BEE CO., 1560 N Ontare RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tracey L Goss (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY TRACEY L GOSS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001778. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ECHOLOGIC DESIGN, 5061 7th Street, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Echologic Design LLC (same address)‑ This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY EVAN WALBRIDGE, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30.FBN Number: 2022‑0001602. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AYURVEDA SANA, 48 Mallard Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117; Daniela Caballero (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY DANIELA CABALLERO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001675. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOS LAURELES CO, 1128 Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Los Laureles Co LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY NANCY GONZALEZ, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001860. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WOMEN’S ATHLETIC CLUB/FIT GAL at 4141 State St., Suite D1.2, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Women’s Athletic Club (same address). This business is

conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY ALICE S. HUANG, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001894. Published: August 4, 11,18, 25, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 60’S & BEYOND, 6190 Manzanillo Drive, Goleta CA 93117; Richard D Emerson (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED: RICHARD D EMERSON. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001959. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LEGACY PHILANTHROPY WORKS, 102 Hixon RD, Santa Barbara CA 93108; Legacy Philanthropy Works (same address) This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY CARL PALMER, BOARD MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on August 4, 2022 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001951 Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SQUARE COLORED JEWELRY at 1730 Mission Ridge RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Alicia B Holm (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED: ALICIA HOLM, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 22, 2002. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0001864. Published: August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RAMIRO PALLEJA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01691 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RAMIRO PALLEJA TO: RAYMOND PALLEJA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING SEPTEMBER 9, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated July 26, 2022 by, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

FOR CHANGE OF NAME: MELISSA ANN HENSIEK, CASE NUMBER: 22CV02517 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: MELISSA ANN HENSIEK TO MELISSA ANN SOUZA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING SEPTEMBER 1, 2022, 8:30 AM, DEPT SM4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: July 14, 2022, Jed Beebe, Judge of the Superior Court, Published July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF VANESSA MALLMANN BARREIRO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV02580 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VANESSA MALLMANN BARREIRO TO: VANESSA BARREIRO BERGA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing: September 14, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 7/26/22 Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published August 11, 18, 25, September 1, 2022. FILED Superior Court County of Santa Barbara 08/01/2022. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer. BY Chavez, Terri, Deputy Clerk

PUBLIC NOTICES DISH WIRELESS LLC is proposing to install new wireless telecommunications antennas on an existing building located at 1190 E. Clark Avenue, Santa Maria, Santa Barbara County, CA 93455. The new facility will consist of the collocation of antennas at a top height of 40ft above ground level on the 49ft 10in bell tower (measured to top of cross) of the 43ft 10in tall church building. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 6122006938 ‑ WM EBI

Consulting, 6876 Susquehanna Trail South, York, PA 17403, or at (985) 630‑2375. EXTRA SPACE Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discover Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. August 25, 2022 at 3:30 PM Kevin Battle Rugby Gear Dameon Cooper Personal Guy Berfield Boxes, furniture etc Matt Ruiz Dresser, full size sofa, love seat, TV, Boxes Mishelle Cooper Household Isabella Doub Clothes The auction will be listed and advertised on WWW. STORAGETREASURES.COM. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. .

STATEMENT OF DAMAGES STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust, seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000.000.00. e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i.Other (specify) Lost Income, incidental, and consequential damages of (specify) $10,000.000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you; 3. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. Plaintiff: Elinor Fisher, an individual seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000.000.00. e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other (specify) Lost Income, incidental, and consequential damages, $5,000.000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed agains you. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, an individual seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages c. Loss of earnings (to date), $5,000.000.00; d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00 e.Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other

(specify) Lost income, incidental, and consequential damages of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. Plaintiff: Judith Dannett, an individual seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distgress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000.000.00. e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i. Other (specify) Lost Income, incidental, and consequential damages, $5,000.000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed agains you. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CAMILLA MELDAHL AKA CAMILLA MEHDAHL, an individual; ED ST. GEORGE, an individual; JAMES GELB, an individual; JAMES M. GELB, as Trustee of the 2010 James M. Gelb Revocable Trust, MARIO MELENDEZ, an individual; MELENDEZ CONSTRUCTION, an Unknown business entity; MATTHEW CROTTY, an individual; FRANCES CROTTY, an individual; BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION, as Trustee under thatcertain Pooling and Service Agreement dated as of October 1, 1992 for RTC Commercial Pass‑Through Certificates, Series 1992 CHF; ROBERT L. LOVGREN, an individual; DOREEN J. LOVGREN, an individual, 6651 L.P., a California limited partnership; HARVEY H. WIPF, an individual; HARVEY H. WIPF, as Trustee of the Wipf Family Trust; BERNICE A. WIPF, an individual; BERNICE A. WIPF, as Trustee for the Wipf Family Trust; ERNEST G. GULSRUD, an individual; ERNEST G. GULSRUD as Trustee of the Gulsrud Family Trust; MURIEL GENEVIEVE GULSRUD, an individual; MURIEL G. GULSRUD, as Trustee for the Gulsrud Family Trust; CURTIS R. JAHNKE, an Individual; and DOES 1 through 100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING BY PLAINTIFF: (LO DEMANDANDO DEMANDANTE):

SUED ESTA EL

MARSHALL R. BERNES, an individual; MARSHALL R. BERNES, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust; JUDITH DANNETT, an individual; AND, ELINOR FISHER, an individual NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca. gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the

court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso.

Benoit, an Individual, Doing Business As Benoit Construction, and Does 1‑5 ELECTRONICALLY FILED Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer 11/10/2021; 11:53 am BY: Narzralli Baksh, Deputy YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): Oliveira’s Fashion Floors, Inc. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the

court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NUMBER: 21CV04486 The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); Santa Barbara Superior Court, 1100 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del

demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Dennis Neil Jones (SBN 112515) Myers, Widders, Gibson, Jones & Feingold, LLP 5425 Everglades St. (805) 644‑7188, Ventura, CA 93003 DATE: (FECHA) 11/10/2021 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/ Narzralli Baksh, Deputy (Adjunto) ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION PURSUANT TO CRC 2.259 THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN ELECTRONICALLY FILED BY THE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, ON 7/20/2022 DENNIS NEIL JONES, SBN 112515 MYERS, WIDDERS, GIBSON, JONES FEINGOLD, LLP 5425 Everglades Street Ventura, CA 93003 Telephone: (805) 644‑7188 Facsimile: (805) 644‑7390 E‑mail: djones@mwgjlaw.com Attorney’s for Plaintiff, Oliveira’s Fashion Floors, Inc. SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA Plaintiff: OLIVEIRA’S FASHION FLOORS, INC. vs Defendants: JACQUES ANDRE BENOIT, AN INDIVIDUAL, DOING BUSINESS AS BENOIT CONSTRUCTION, AND DOES 1‑5. CASE NO. 21CV04486 EX PARTE APPLICATION FOR ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS GOOD CAUSE APPEARING THEREFORE, IT IS HEREBY ORDERED that Plaintiff Oliveira’s Fashion Floors, Inc. may serve the summons in this action upon defendant Jacques Andre Benoit by publication of the summons in this action upon defendent Jacques Andre Benoit by publication of the summns in the Santa Barbara Independent. Dated: July 22, 2022 By: Thomas P. Anderle for Hon. Donna Geck SUPERIOR COURT JUDGE THOMAS P. ANDERLE

All Booked

The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); Santa Barbara Superior Court, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Stephen Jamieson, SOLOMON SALTSMAN & JAMIESON; 426 Culver Blvd; Playa Del Rey, CA 90293 Ph: (310) 822‑9848 DATE: (FECHA) 1/13/2020 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/ Sarah Sisto, Deputy (Adjunto)

A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters

SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 21CVO4486 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Jacques Andre

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST AUGUST 11, 11, 2022 2022 THE INDEPENDENT

45