Santa Barbara Independent 7/28/22

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WILL THE U.S. BE SANE AGAIN? · MIXED REVIEWS OF MUNGER MOCKUP · REMEMBERING OWEN BAILEY MUSIC IN THE VINEYARDS · FARM TO BAR FORAGING FUN FREE

Santa Barbara

JULY 28- AUG. 4, 2022 VOL. 36 NO. 863

l o o h c s r e af t

s e i t i activ guide! FROM THE ARTS AND SPORTS TO STEM AND MORE: OUR ANNUAL ROUNDUP OF OFFERINGS BY TERRY ORTEGA


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Young at Heart 2022-2023 Series Subscriptions on Sale Now!

series - Save 20% -

Cirque FLIP Fabrique Muse Sun, Feb 5 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre

Step Afrika!

Thu, Feb 16 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

George Hinchliffe’s

Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain

Sat, Apr 22 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Save up to 25% with a Curated series, or Create Your Own series of 4 or more events and save 10% (Single tickets on sale August 5 at 10 AM)

View the full 2022-2023 lineup at ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

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75 YEARS OF MUSIC 1947-2022 GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! MUSICACADEMY.ORG

Summer Festival

STÉPHANE

SPERANZA

DENÈVE

JESSIE

SCAPPUCCI

MONTGOMERY

GRANADA THEATRE SERIES

DAPHNIS AND CHLOE

THE PINES OF ROME

SAT JUL 30, 7:30 PM

SAT AUG 6, 7:30 PM

STÉPHANE DENÈVE CONDUCTOR ACADEMY FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

SPERANZA SCAPPUCCI CONDUCTOR, ALUMNA ACADEMY FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF Symphony No. 3 in A Minor MAURICE RAVEL Daphnis and Chloe, Suite No. 2

GIOACCHINO ROSSINI Overture to William Tell Selections with the LEHRER VOCAL INSTITUTE FELLOWS OTTORINO RESPIGHI The Pines of Rome

NEW! MEET THE CONDUCTOR

Hear from the conductor before the performance. Beverages and bites will be served.

JUL 30, AUG 6 Sullivan Goss – An American Gallery | $20 – LIMITED AVAILABILITY

MOSHER GUEST ARTIST RECITAL AT THE MUSIC ACADEMY’S HAHN HALL

JESSIE MONTGOMERY THU, AUG 4, 7:30 PM Jessie Montgomery composer, violin | Academy Fellows

FINAL PICNIC CONCERT WED, AUG 3, 7:30 PM AT THE MUSIC ACADEMY’S HAHN HALL

Bring your own picnic to the gorgeous Academy gardens, and enjoy performances by our Fellows.

MUSICACADEMY.ORG 4

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JULY 28, 2022

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant

COVER STORY

25

After-School Activities Guide From the Arts and Sports to STEM and More by Terry Ortega

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Rodrigo Hernandez, Koss Klobucher, Melea Maglalang, Emma Spencer, Finnegan Wright Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 43

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

Name: Robyn Wise Title: Contributor Tell us a little about Robyn. What’s your background? My background is in communications and content creation, mainly for cultural clients such as museums, artists, architects, and designers.

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

REPORTING FROM THE VALLEY

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Previews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 ON THE COVER: Wilderness Youth Project courtesy photo. Design by Ava Talehakimi.

What did you write for us this week, and what do you have cookin’ next? For this week’s story, I had the pleasure of digging into the live music offerings at local wineries and discovered some amazing talent right here under our noses. Did you know there’s also a burgeoning hardcore scene in Solvang and Lompoc? I’m watching it closely. Next up, I’ll be sitting down with Valley-based singer-songwriter Jonathan Fiery to pen a story about his latest release. Why is the Santa Ynez Valley a fun and special place to live in and write about? Growing up surrounded by this amazing natural landscape and so many good, original people has given me strength in life. It’s a tight-knit community — you can’t hide! — so you learn to appreciate the interconnectedness of things. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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Society doesn’t have to be this way, or end this way. We can change it. Our numbers, and our wasteful affluence, underlie most of our social and environmental crises. Join our global coalition to bend the curve. www.stableplanetalliance.org

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JULY 21-28, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COMMUNITY

Booker Brown, Football Legend, Dies at 69 DIC K M ARTI N

S

anta Barbara High School’s roster of athletic legends took its second big hit in less than a year when Booker Brown died July 18 after an extended illness. The longtime pastor and founder of a charitable foundation in Mojave was 69. Born in Wesson, Mississippi, Brown moved west with his family as a child, graduating from SBHS in 1970. He went on to become a much-decorated offensive lineman at Santa Barbara City College and USC, where he joined his former SBHS teammate, fullback Sam Cunningham. The Trojans capped their national championship season in 1972 with a resounding Rose Bowl victory over Ohio State. Cunningham died last September 7 at 71, and Brown was among the former Dons and Trojans who attended his memorial at Peabody Stadium in November. Off the field, Brown was an easygoing man described as a “gentle giant” by John Martony, who interviewed him at several SBCC football games. Russ Carter, another SBHS football player who was a reserve lineman at USC, said he and Brown became instant friends in the 7th grade. “We drove

HEALTH

TRANSPORTATION

ALWAYS DONS: Booker Brown (left) was united at USC with former Santa Barbara High football teammates Russ Carter and Sam Cunningham. They were recruited by longtime Trojan assistant Marv Goux (right), himself a former Don.

teachers crazy and had to be split up in the classroom because we couldn’t do anything but have fun together, all the time,” Carter said.

Brown is survived by Jacqueline, his wife of 30 years; seven sons; and 23 grandchildren. Full story at independent.com/booker—John Zant brown.

CITY

Funk Zone Project Draws Public Heat COU RTE SY

155-Residential-Unit SOMOfunk Development Starts Lengthy City Review Process by Ryan P. Cruz he 155-residential-unit mixed-use “SOMOfunk” project began its long journey through the city review process Monday, as the Santa Barbara Architectural Board of Review (ABR) took a first crack at the design, which would create a whole new look for an entire city block in the Funk Zone. The project’s principal architect, Christine Pierron, from Santa Barbara–based Cearnal Collective, presented the project’s latest redesign, which drew from the Funk Zone’s industrial and artistic roots with a collection of buildings that resembled an old-school California industrial district reimagined as a modern urban housing and commercial center. The design itself is a departure from what the Funk Zone has become known for — artist studios, surf shops, and small businesses — but the promise of a large swath of muchneeded housing in a city scrambling to meet housing quotas makes the project especially attractive to city planners. In the weeks leading up to this first public hearing, the development has drawn criticism from locals whose concerns range from the size and scale of the project to its impact on the city’s water usage to the affordability and availability of the units to city residents. During Monday’s meeting, at least 20 community members spoke in opposition to the project,

Ventura County confirmed its first case of monkeypox on 7/22, a day before the World Health Organization declared the monkeypox outbreak a global health emergency. The individual in Ventura is an adult, while another case in an undisclosed county last week was a California toddler. The routes for infection in both cases were under investigation, but each is presumed to be due to close physical contact with another infected individual, their clothing, or their bedding. Full story independent.com/ monkeypox-ventura.

T

The Metropolitan Transit District has announced its annual service changes to local bus routes, which will go into effect 8/15. The following trips will be added to the schedule for August: two Line 12x (Goleta Express) weekday a.m. outbound trips departing the Transit Center at 6:05 a.m. and 6:30 a.m.; one Line 12x weekday a.m. inbound trip departing Hollister & Storke at 7:58 a.m.; and one Line 24x (UCSB Express) weekday a.m. outbound trip departing the Transit Center at 7:25 a.m. The printed version of the schedule guide will be available at the Transit Center and onboard buses at the beginning of August.

ENERGY The 3CE electricity consortium that buys power for much of Santa Barbara County added 16 new wind-energy turbines to its resources on 7/21. Located in Riverside County just outside of Palm Springs and operated by AES Corporation, the Mountain View Wind Repowering Project took out 104 older turbines to replace them with more powerful Vestas turbines. Altogether, the 16 wind turbines generate 257 gigawatt hours of energy per year, which is enough to supply 40,000 households with electricity. Full story at independent.com/wind-power.

COURTS & CRIME

FUNK’S FUTURE? This rendering shows the SOMOfunk project as it would look from the corner of Mason and Santa Barbara streets.

and the board received 164 written letters from the public on the issue. “As more and more of the community learns about this development, we’ll only see these numbers continue to grow,” said Brittany Zajic, a member of the nonprofit group Keep the Funk, Inc., which has already garnered hundreds of supporters. “It’s hard for the ABR to ignore such a response from the impacted community.” Board chair Kevin Moore reiterated that the ABR’s purview was limited during this first concept review but that the board would be able to receive comments on the aesthetics of

the design, materials, and landscaping. Funk Zone residents, regulars, business owners, and employees held back no punches during the lengthy public comment, pleading to the boardmembers to consider the “authenticity” of the neighborhood, which has collected organically over the past decade and more. At one point, a community member produced a portable speaker, using her time to lead the packed David Gebhard public meeting room in a dance party to the tune of Parliament Funkadelic’s “We Want the Funk.” The board itself was generally supportive of the proposal and agreed 5-1 to move the

S.B. Police rescued a 5-year-old child reportedly left abandoned for more than 24 hours within reach of unregulated firearms known as “ghost guns” on 7/23. The child’s mother, Mammoth Lakes resident Lauren Tracy, 46, was reportedly found intoxicated by authorities at a residence more than a mile away and placed under arrest. Tracy was booked in County Jail on multiple felony charges, including child endangerment, possession of undetectable “ghost guns,” possession of a firearm with a prior misdemeanor conviction, unlawful possession of ammunition, child neglect, and criminal storage of a firearm, with bail set at $100,000. The child was placed in the care of Child Protective Services. The 96-year-old woman who died in what investigators called suspicious circumstanceson Park Lane Road in May has been identified as Violet Evelyn Alberts. The Sheriff’s Office is terming her death a homicide. In an autopsy on 6/1, the coroner thought the death did not appear natural and was awaiting a toxicology report to make a final determination. Though the cause of death is in the investigation report, detectives are not releasing further information on the progress of the ongoing case. Tips on the case can be given at (805) 681-4150 or anonymously at (805) 681-4171 or sbsheriff.org.

CONT’D ON PAGE 8  CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 28, 2022

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JULY 21-28, 2022

FUNK ZONE PROJECT CONT’D FROM P. 7 project forward to the city’s Planning Commission, ruling that it “provisionally met” the criteria for the city’s design guidelines. Boardmember Steve Nuhn, who is also an architect at Cearnal Collective, recused himself out of conflict of interest; Dennis Whelan voted against the motion, saying the size was not appropriate for the area and that he “didn’t think it was compatible” with the surrounding neighborhood. The board left plenty of comments for the Planning Commission to work with, suggesting that planners rearrange the proposed 18,000 square feet of commercial space to foster more traffic to the courtyard “paseos” and public spaces inside. The bulk of the project’s height, the board agreed, was packed into the middle of the design, and there was eventually an agreement that public views were not affected because, technically, the city only considers views for “specific gathering” spaces, and the Funk Zone did not have parks or spaces that would be affected. As the design is tweaked and makes its way through the eight-step review process — from application to ABR concept review, city staff review, Planning Commission for recommendations, City Council for approval, back to ABR for a project and final design approval, and finally building permit approval — there

will surely be lengthy discussion on each of the concerns brought up by community members. But with the city in the midst of a housing crisis, the question will be whether the city can afford not to build a project of this size. And if the public outcry is too great, the question becomes whether there exists a large-scale project that the city’s residents would stand behind, and if so, what would that project look like? Neil Dipaola, the developer behind SOMOfunk, and the rest of the ownership team are convinced that this project is exactly what the city needs. The project’s 38 affordable units amount to more than any other privately funded developments over the last 24 years, they say, and it drew support from the notoriously critical Housing Authority. The developers say they also intend to enforce a “locals priority” criteria for the 142 apartments and 13 condominiums in attempt to keep out-of-town applicants from using the units as short-term rentals. “It’s a very, very big project,” said boardmember Leon Olson. “However, to accomplish the housing that is desirable, size matters.” Santa Barbara’s Planning Commission will take the next in-depth look at the project, though a date has not been set. n

COURTS & CRIME

COU RTESY

Gaviota Alliance Wins vs. Hollister Ranch

T

he long, rolling breakers along the coast of Hollister Ranch have led many a surfer to combine funds with fellow surfers to buy a parcel of the ranch. It’s the only way to drive past the gatehouse guards and down to the beach — unless you paddle in from the ocean or walk the shoreline. Over the years, public advocacy groups have been litigating to gain access over land to the property’s beaches. The Hollister Ranch Owners’ Association has always fought it in courts. When Hollister reached a private agreement with the Coastal Commission in 2018, Santa Barbara Superior Court Judge Colleen Sterne noted it had been negotiated without public notice, saying, “My due process bone is twitching” of the backroom deal. The Gaviota Coastal Trail Alliance then joined the case as an intervenor and successfully overturned the settlement. The State of California voided the agreement last week, and the Hollister group argued the Trail Alliance 8

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had accomplished its goals and did not need to participate further. On Monday, July 25, Judge Sterne disagreed, stating that the Alliance and the state were effectively adversaries over the settlement and did not have identical interests in the case. Marc Chytilo, an attorney for the Alliance, greeted the news cheerfully: “In for a penny, in for a pound. We’re there until there’s access.” Hollister attorney Beth Collins of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck indicated her clients were interested in “resolving outstanding issues as expeditiously as possible” and in the meantime would continue their private access program for “persons from underserved communities, tribal members, scientists, and educators.” The next battle in this decades-old struggle is a dispute over details of an easement involving the YMCA. That motion is expected to be heard in September. —Jean Yamamura


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON

Dungan a No-Show in Own Defense

RODR IG O H ER N AN DEZ

104th Concert Season

From left, defendant John Dungan with his attorneys, Ricky Worsfold and Jeremy Lessem, on Friday, July 15

I

n the triple-murder trial of John Dungan, a Santa Barbara man charged with killing a Solvang woman and her two young children on Highway 154 in October 2019, the defense rested its case without calling Dungan to the stand. Before resting, the defense called two witnesses. The first was Dr. Adham Malaty, a private psychiatrist who has been affiliated with Cottage Hospital since 2017 and testified to examining Dungan at the hospital a little more than a week after the collision. Malaty said he was unable to determine if Dungan or his actions were suicidal but that there were “a lot of red flags,” one being the “suicide letter” Dungan left in his mother’s car and another the Sheriff ’s Office call advising the hospital about Dungan’s history of multiple crisis interventions. The next witness was collision reconstructionist Jeffrey Bonsall, a senior forensic engineer at private consulting firm Momentum Engineering. Bonsall provided the court with his opinion on what the events looked like that day, including stills from a simulated video depicting the crash from an overhead point of view.

Bonsall’s investigation and simulation suggested that as a reaction to Dungan’s Camaro being in the opposing lane, the Yukon owned by Nicholas Goddard — a Los Gatos man traveling with his son — collided with the rear of victim Rebecca Vanessa Goss Bley’s Chevy Volt before falling into an embankment to the right. Pointing to photographs from the scene, Bonsall also said that the Camaro’s right front tire was pointed and locked to the right while the car landed on the left side of the bridge, suggesting an evasive maneuver. During the prosecution’s rebuttal, witness Scott Peterson, a retired CHP Officer with 26 years’ experience in collision reconstruction and crash science, refuted Bonsall’s testimony, explaining to the jurors how it was “impossible” for Goddard’s Yukon to hit the Volt and end up on the embankment to the right more than 150 feet away and not be involved with the collision. Closing statements will begin Thursday, July 28, with the jury expected to be in deliberation later that day or Friday. —Rodrigo Hernandez

Gustavo Dudamel

international series

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at the Granada Theatre

SAGE PUBLICATIONS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2022, 7:30PM

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, Music Director Sheku Kanneh-Mason, cello

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2023, 7:30PM

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Riccardo Muti, Music Director

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2023, 7:30PM

FILHARMONIE BRNO (of the Czech Republic) Dennis Russell Davies, Music Director

THURSDAY, MAY 18, 2023, 7:30PM

CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

(CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC/PHILADELPHIA) Osmo Vänskä, conductor Yefim Bronfman, piano

SUNDAY, MAY 28, 2023, 4:00PM Gustavo Dudamel, Music Director Gabriel Cabezas, cello

Ag Revenues Almost Hit $2B

R

Riccardo Muti

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC

COUNTY

evenues derived from agricultural operations in Santa Barbara County are pushing up against the $2 billion mark, having hit $1.918 billion for 2021 — a $98.988 million increase from 2020. Had cannabis revenues been included, it’s all but certain the $2 billion ceiling would have been shattered to smithereens. As usual, strawberries led the pack, generating $849 million in revenues with wine grapes pulling in $105 million and broccoli generating $101 million. The big asterisk in all these figures, released by the County Agricultural Commissioner’s Office, is that they do not include any revenues generated by the county’s cannabis industry. For technical reasons having to do with the politics of regulating crops, cannabis is not legally or officially designated an agricultural crop. (By law, the county is seriously restricted in its ability to regulate the cultivation of farm crops. By not decreeing cannabis as such, greater latitude to regulate was allowed.) In 2021, the county reported collecting $15.7 million in tax revenues off revenues generated by cannabis licensees operat-

Experience the wonder of hearing the world’s finest classical music performances live in concert in Santa Barbara.

ing on 280 acres of land. That’s merely the taxable revenues collected, not the total amount generated. Assuming a 4 percent rate of taxation—the lowest possible number based on the county’s tax codes—that’s around an additional $300 million. In 2021, there were 15,000 acres set aside for broccoli cultivation, 12,500 for cauliflower, and 11,238 for strawberries. Of all wine grapes, pinot is the most land-intensive varietal with 5,000 acres. In terms of raw acreage, ranching and rangeland is by far the most expansive, with 567,595 acres set aside; 2021 saw the raising of 23,599 head of cattle. Out on the deep blue sea, lobster—sold to the lucrative China market — brought in the most money: $5.4 million for 233,860 pounds of catch. Sea urchin was second, with $2.5 million and 766,856 pounds. To put these numbers in perspective, 10 years ago—in 2011—the County Ag Commissioner’s Office reported total revenues of $1.1 billion. Strawberries and broccoli led the pack, with strawberries generating $366 million in revenues and broccoli $126 million. —Nick Welsh

masterseries

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ESPERIA FOUNDATION

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2022, 7:30PM

JUILLIARD STRING QUARTET WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022, 7:30PM

HÉLÈNE GRIMAUD, piano

SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 2023, 7:30PM CAMA in conjunction with the Lobero Theater Foundation present

LOS ROMEROS ⳼ THE ROMERO GUITAR QUARTET “THE ROYAL FAMILY OF THE GUITAR”

in celebration of the Lobero’s 150th Anniversary (2/22/1873–2/22/2023)

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prominent international conservation organization placed the migratory monarch butterfly on its Red List of Endangered Species last week, warning that the iconic butterfly lies on the brink of extinction. The International Union for Conservation of Nature—started by the brother of Aldous Huxley, philosopher, writer, champion of psychedelic drugs, and one-time Santa Barbara resident—made this finding on July 21, elaborating that climate change, insecticides, logging, forest fires, deforestation, and development have disrupted not just the monarch’s habitat but also its famed migratory cycles, in which the butterflies travel 2,500 miles. With temperatures spiking earlier in the year, the monarch’s migratory cycles are now being triggered before the milkweed plants on which they feed can mature. According to another international conservation nonprofit, western monarch populations have been especially hard-hit, reportedly plummeting from a census of GOLETA 293,000 2015 to Ave2,000 in 2020. To date, 5757 in Hollister the U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife has Mahatma 2# not listed the monarch butterfly as a federLONG GRAIN RICE species, though two years ally endangered 99 $ ago, it did acknowledge the species was sufficiently challenged to qualify. Other species,

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he executive director of Clay Studio, Patrick Hall, has taken a sabbatical from his position at the nonprofit ceramic arts studio in Goleta YOU FOR VOTING US after a letter signed by more GOLETA than 15 employees sent out Ave 5757 Hollisterwas expressing their discontent with Hall and threatening to strike if Mahatma 2# he did not step down. ON LEAVE: Clay Studio’s executive director, Patrick Hall (right), MANGOS The letter, signed by 12 is taking a sabbatical to allow an investigation into employee employees and supported by grievances. seven, was sent out Thursday, July 21, and outlined dissatisfaction with relationship with members of the organiea. lb. office conduct, health and safety standards, zation and ability to begin immediately. and the culture of the organization. The let- According to Burba, Hall offered to step 7# ter went on to demand that Hall be relieved aside and approved Burba taking over to PEACHES & NECTARINES of his position as executive director and that allow time for an investigation into accusaClay Studio hire a nonprofit consultant to tions made in the letter. develop “an active board of directors with “Patrick denies the allegations but wants lb. diverse stakeholders,” implement a sexual a very transparent investigation,” Burba harassment policy, and ensure all employ- said. ea. GREEN CABBAGE El Pato 7 oz. ees participate in sexual harassment and Once Burba took over, she said she spoke anti-racism training. with employees, and they agreed to return The letter stated that employees would to work on Friday, July 22. “The Clay Studio strike until their demands were met, and is a community resource and will remain lb. after the letter was sent, the 19 employees open to members and participants concurnamed in the letter did not report to work. rent with an operational assessment,” Burba Folgers 8 oz. Members of Clay Studio’s Board of said. “There is an incredibly hardworking Seedless lb. Directors responded quickly, and pres- staff ensuring this.” WATERMELONS Burba declined to comment on any ident-elect of the board Marsha Bailey approached retired army officer Kathy accusations made in the letter, only statlb. Burba to take over as executive director ing that an independent consultant has hours after the letter was sent. Two oth- been contracted to conduct an assessment, ers were approached before Burba but which will later be brought to a mediator. Springfield 15 oz. JALAPENOS declined, and Burba was chosen due to her —Jun Starkey

ENDANGERED: The International Union for Conservation of Nature has warned that the monarch butterfly lies on the brink of extinction.

however, were deemed more imperiled at the time and of higher priority. In the last year, monarch populations appear to have rebounded somewhat. In Santa Barbara County, monarchs have roosted in such dense profusion among eucalyptus groves that the City of Goleta features a monarch as part of its city logo. In 2011, 70,000 monarchs had roosted in groves located on Ellwood Mesa; by 2022, that number had dropped to 15,000. In an effort to restore monarch populations, many individuals have taken to planting milkweed in their backyards or on median strips as part of an ad hoc grassroots movement. Scientists are now saying that such planting might take monarch butterflies off course during their lengthy annual migrations, doing more harm than good. —Nick Welsh


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D BUSINESS

Carbajal Bemoans Semiconducter Shortage

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epresentative Salud Carbajal met with business owners and members of the Santa Barbara and Santa Maria Chambers of Commerce on Monday, July 25, to discuss several solutions for inflation, including the Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors (CHIPS) for America Act. The CHIPS for America Act is a $52 billion bill geared to incentivize the production of semiconductors in the United States, which is currently experiencing a shortage due to production and supply chain issues brought on by the pandemic. The shortage has played a major role in the slow production of everything from automobiles to video game consoles and has also fueled inflation. The CHIPS for America Act that passed the Senate 64-32 on Tuesday, July 26, would provide more than $52 billion for the production of semiconductor chips, including

subsidiaries and tax incentives for semiconductor manufacturers to move operations to America, and $11 billion for workforce development, such as education programs. According to the United States Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo, the U.S. only makes about 12 percent of semiconductor chips. Proponents of the CHIPS Act include Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, who called this a national security concern due to America’s reliance on other nations to produce a vital technology. Currently, China is the world’s leading semiconductor producer. In the most recent version of the CHIPS Act, the semiconductor industry is projected to need an additional 90,000 workers by the year 2025. The bill will be brought to the House of Representatives on Thursday, July 28, and is likely to pass due to the extensive —Jun Starkey bipartisan support.

HOUSING

La Cumbre Plaza to Get 1,900 Housing Units?

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n Tuesday, City Planner Rosie Dyste presented the first draft of Santa Barbara’s Housing Element — the city’s blueprint for meeting the state-mandated Regional Needs Housing Allocation number of 8,001 units by 2031 — to the City Council for comments. But as the draft Housing Element takes shape, it has become clear that city staff, residents, and leadership at every level agree that Santa Barbara needs a specific plan to tackle a severe lack of affordable housing. “In this document, you have the potential to set us up and set the foundation for decades of affordable housing development,” said City Planning Commission Chair Gabe Escobedo, who spoke during a lengthy public comment session. City residents who spoke at the meeting and councilmembers seemed to agree that the best methods to provide that affordable housing would be by prioritizing the goals that would ensure a “permanent and sustainable” affordable housing fund, and by looking at specific locations where future housing can be built. And while long-term goals are vital, city leaders and tenant advocates say this work needs to start as soon as possible. “The majority of tenants can’t wait until more housing is built; they can’t wait until we get more funding,” said Wendy Santamaria,

community organizer with Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE). “We’re seeing people getting rent increases right now. People are getting displaced right now, and there is no waiting for them.” Councilmember Eric Friedman said that the city could take a more earnest look at the La Cumbre Plaza housing plan, which would redevelop the 31-acre shopping center to create as many as 1,900 units, but requires working with a “very complex” ownership structure. Councilmember Kristen Sneddon, who sits on the city’s Housing Crisis Task Force, suggested that the city take a deeper look at the previous Housing Element cycle to see what worked, what went wrong, and how it could better live up to its stated goals. For La Cumbre Plaza, she said she would be willing to allow for more height and higher density if that meant the city could ask for up to 15 percent affordable housing from any proposed development. The draft Housing Element will undergo revisions after the California Department of Housing and Community Development provides comments, and final draft hearings will be held early next year. The city is asking for public input until August 3. See santabarbaraca.gov/heu. —Ryan P. Cruz INDEPENDENT.COM

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JULY 21-28, 2022

HEALTH

Dr. Ashrafian, I Presume

Gratitude Grows Here.

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

COU RTESY

Neighborhood Clinics Names New CEO

We never stop reaching higher for our patients and for our community. “Creating this fund to support nursing students allows me to continue the legacy of giving so dear to my family.” — George Burtness Cottage Volunteer and Benefactor

Thanks to benefactors like George, Cottage can provide nursing scholarships and education to support the next generation of healthcare professionals like Taylor. Together we can ensure we have the best care right here at home.

Learn more and donate at cottagehealth.org/reachinghigher

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Dr. Charles Fenzi by Nick Welsh aybe Dr. Charles Fenzi can finally get to take that vacation he’s put off for the past 10 years. Last week, Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics (SBNC) announced it had selected Fenzi’s successor as CEO of the safety-net healthcare organization. “We like this guy a lot,” Fenzi said of his replacement, Dr. Mahdi Ashrafian, who since 2016 has served as CFO for the Community Health Systems, which runs six safety-net clinics throughout Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego counties. Fenzi noted that Ashrafian, who will take the helm sometime this August, was selected out of a field of 50 interested applicants who inquired about the post after Fenzi announced his retirement in January. Back in 2012, the then financially beleaguered SBNC was on precariously thin ice, and Fenzi, who had experience as a high-profile community health provider in Roswell, New Mexico, was tapped to stabilize the organization. Under Fenzi’s tenure — both an executive and practicing physician — SBNC not only was stabilized but also greatly expanded its services and increased the number of its patients from 17,000 to around 22,000 today. The clinics Ashrafian comes from have slightly more patients than SBNC — 31,000 — but they serve the same underserved demographic. Most of the patients are low-income, working class, and Latino. Housing-navigation services are provided for those experiencing homelessness. Without Medi-Cal, many would have no insurance. “We are part of the safety net,” Ashrafian said. About 15 percent — mostly those without legal documentation — pay out of pocket. In Ashrafian’s clinics to the south, the sliding-scale fee is $35. At SBNC, it’s $45. And that’s for a visit that costs SBNC $150 to provide. With revenue gaps like that, Fenzi noted, SBNC has always had to rely on Santa Barbara’s philanthropic community. Whoever took over, he added, needed to be comfortable at doing the philanthropic dance. Ashrafian, he said, fit the bill. Fenzi expressed great enthusiasm for Ashrafian’s administrative chops. Both clinics rely on specialized federal funding

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Dr. Mahdi Ashrafian

streams reserved only for health-care providers serving safety-net populations. The network of clinics where Ashrafian worked provides a wide range of specialized care, including mental health, prenatal, pediatric, optical, preventative, chiropractic, and dental. Ashrafian was born in Iran and lived there until he graduated from high school, at which point he moved to Indianapolis to be with his immediate family. The cultural shock was not as jarring as one might expect; he spoke English. It was more the bitter cold of Indiana’s winters that got to him. When the opportunity came to study medicine at UCLA, Ashrafian wasted little time taking it. California, it turns out, suited him. He always gravitated toward the practice of safety-net health care, he said. Ashrafian said that he and his wife have always wanted to move to Santa Barbara since first visiting in 2016. “It still has a small-town feel,” he said. “It still has a sense of community.” Ashrafian and his family already put in a couple of offers on homes here only to come up short against all-cash offers for considerably more. “It’s tough,” he said of the city’s notoriously daunting housing market. But almost as tough, warned Fenzi, are the challenges SBNC now faces in recruiting and keeping staff. Ever since UCLA started setting up clinics in Santa Barbara two years ago, Fenzi said, the competition for medical staff has grown intense. Almost immediately after, Cottage Health launched what would become a string of new urgent care clinics. “UCLA really changed the environment,” Fenzi said. “They just bought another building at the corner of Chapala and Victoria — the one where the Police Activities League meets,” he said. “I don’t think UCLA is interested in our demographics per se; it’s our staff.” That’s expressed in dollars and cents. And when it comes to the dollars and cents, he added, SBNC can’t compete toe-to-toe. Ashrafian had nothing but praise for Fenzi. “He’s done a great job creating a solid foundation for this clinic,” he said. “I’m only one person, but with the board and with the staff and with the clinics’ leadership team, I’m hoping we can take it to the next level n and expand our services.”


Image: Joan Miró, Oiseau perché sur un arbre; Personnage, 1970. Bronze. Fundació Miró Mallorca.

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

CASEY DU R KI N / PEACO C K

Love Island a Nocturnal Nuisance?

RANCH LIFE: Love Island’s Season 4 is currently filming at Dos Pueblos Ranch and its nearby beaches.

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eighbors of Dos Pueblos Ranch have grown concerned over a raunchy reality show currently in production at the storied Gaviota Coast property. But it isn’t the salacious content of Love Island —the original U.K. version of which Vanity Fair called a “sexually humiliating version of dodgeball” — that’s got nearby residents riled; it’s the production’s late shooting hours, which blast light out into the rural area. Love Island’s marketing division describes the show as a “real-time dating competition featuring a group of sexy singles in a luxurious villa who must try to win the $100K prize by coupling up and surviving to the end.” The villa in question for Season 4 is Dos Pueblos Ranch’s Casa Grande, though the show films across 214 acres of what was once a 15,000-acre rancho granted in 1842 to Santa Barbara’s first doctor, Nicholas Den, an Irishman who embraced the Californio lifestyle and raised 11 children there. That should matter to a reality show with “love” in its title. As far as today’s neighbors are concerned, however, the setting is incongruous. For one thing, the ranch is not on an island. For another, the bright production lights are sorely out of place. Concerned neighbors recently contacted the Gaviota Coast Conservancy, whose executive director, Doug Kern, said unusual activity was taking place without notice, like increased vehicle traffic, new tents on the mesa, and bright lights late at night. The

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 7 EDUCATION California State University Channel Islands professor and doctor of nursing practice Charlotte GullapMoore announced 7/26 that she will be running for Santa Barbara City College’s Board of Trustees in the upcoming November election. Gullap-Moore is running for Area 1—representing Montecito, Summerland, and Carpinteria — looking to replace trustee and former board president Peter Haslund, who has been a member of the college’s Board of Trustees since 2010. Haslund has said he plans on retiring after his third term, leaving the field wide open for new candidates.

show’s producers got a county filming permit, but it doesn’t mention lights. “Pretty much anybody who’s familiar with environmental safety and protection of habitat resources at night knows that’s a big no-no,” Kern said of the bright nighttime lights, which likely disturb nocturnal wildlife roaming the ranch. The land in question is currently owned by developer Roger Himovitz. Last year, he announced that his family had bought the property and was establishing an institute for the land, setting out goals for “environmentally responsible uses” like public trails, Chumash cultural preservation, and a retreat center. More recently, he’s been talking with the County Planning department about these plans, including the potential to develop a campground at the ranch. Ranch representatives were not able to speak about the Love Island production due to a nondisclosure agreement. The permit issued for the production indicates there are 305 cast and crew members, whose day runs 6 a.m.-3 a.m. The rules are fairly strict to protect the property, including “no-go” environmentally sensitive habitat areas. The permit requires an onsite biological consultant, as well as qualified cultural monitors for parts of the property important to the Chumash. The shoot is scheduled to end August 28, after which one more month is booked to strike the set. —Jean Yamamura

ART MATTERS LECTURE Joan Miró in Time and Space Charles Palermo Professor of Art History, The College of William and Mary

thursday, august 4, 5:30–6:30pm mary craig auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art

Students and Museum Circle Members: Free SBMA Members: $10

Non-Members: $15

Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desks in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net. For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters

This lecture reviews some works—paintings, objects, sculptures— by the great Catalan artist Joan Miró. Charles Palermo offers readings of works in the hope of showing how Miró implies movement

UCSB earned several top places in the ShanghaiRankings 2022 Global Ranking of Academic Subjects (GRAS), ranking 5th in communication, 9th for electrical and computer engineering, 13th for physics, and 20th for automation and control. Compared with other U.S. universities, UCSB ranked 4th in communication, 6th for metallurgical engineering, 7th for electrical and computer engineering, and 8th for both automation and control and physics. The GRAS 2022 listed more than 1,800 out of 5,000 universities across 96 countries and regions. Performance is measured by the Academic Excellence Survey (AES) conducted by ShanghaiRanking, which surveyed 1,424 professors from top world universities. n

and scale in his works. The result is fictional worlds with their own sense of time and place, which nevertheless stand right before us.

1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday 11 am–5 pm Thursday 11 am–8 pm www.sbma.net

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PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street, Suite 302 Santa Barbara CA. I Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until July 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


NEWS of the WEEK

JULY 21-28, 2022

CONT’D

HOUSING

Mixed Reviews of Munger Hall Mockup CAEL A ER IC KSON PHOTOS

UCSB Students, Faculty, and Staff Share Feedback from Guided Tours

HALL MONITOR: “I felt like a pod person, “ UCSB student Caela Erickson remarked of spending time in the bedroom of the full-scale Munger Hall Mockup. “Some people may be into that, but I’m not.” by Tyler Hayden his summer, UC Santa Barbara began offering guided tours of the Munger Hall Mockup, a full-scale model of one “house” within the proposed dormitory that has generated a considerable amount of commentary and controversy over its unique design. While the 10-story structure conceptualized by billionaire-philanthropist Charles Munger and intended for 4,000 undergraduates would feature spacious common areas and a host of amenities, the majority of its 10-foot-by-7-foot singleoccupancy bedrooms would not include windows. The walkthroughs are currently only available to students, faculty, and staff, said university spokesperson Kiki Reyes, and so far “several hundred individuals” have participated. “We have received beneficial feedback, including helpful constructive criticism from our students,” she said, most of which focused on parking, dining options, and the LED panels planned for the rooms without windows. Not everyone who takes the tour fills out a survey provided at the end, Reyes said, but among those that do, “nearly eight out of 10” leave with a “favorable or neutral impression” of the space. Many students expressed enthusiasm over the privacy the single rooms would offer, Reyes said, as well as a promise from the university that Munger Hall housing costs would remain 20-30 percent below the market rate of nearby Isla Vista. Cole McCarthy, a second-year undergrad, said he kept an open mind going into his tour of the model, which was built more than three years ago inside a warehouse on Los Carneros Way. “I don’t think it’s fair to be holistically negative going into it,” he said. But he left conflicted. “On the one hand, it’s really nice,” said McCarthy, who lived in the “funky” Santa Rosa Residence Hall his freshman year. “It’s indisputable. There are all sorts of features—air conditioning, game rooms, balconies, flat-screen TVs in every suite—that would make it the nicest dorm on campus.” He also appreciated the project’s bike-friendly infrastructure. But on the other hand, McCarthy continued, “I just couldn’t get past the windows.” The LED panels are “pretty good,” McCarthy acknowledged, but just not enough to shake a general sensation of claustrophobia. “I personally would not want to live there,” he said. “I would feel trapped.” All the amenities under the sun can’t replace natural light and a view of the world outside, he concluded. “It’s not the students’ fault that there is a housing shortage,” he said, “so

T

why are they being punished for it?” McCarthy wondered if the billion-plus dollars it would cost to construct Munger Hall might be better spent on expanding and upgrading existing dormitories or perhaps building atop single-story dining commons, as other universities have done. Fellow tour participant Caela Erickson, who transferred from Ventura College to UCSB last year, was less equivocal in her remarks. “I felt like a pod person,” she said of spending time in the mocked-up bedroom. “Some people may be into that, but I’m not.” Erickson also didn’t like the idea of the structure being so self-contained with numerous food and retail spaces, a frequent selling point by administrators, as it would compel residents into UCSB-only “microtransactions” that would pull money from the rest of the community. Erickson said she was especially disappointed that her tour guide from the Campus Housing department was unable to answer many of her questions about the project, including its sustainability elements and the rationale behind its hyper-dense design. “I feel like UCSB should be leveling with us a little more,” Erickson said. “Or at least pretending to be leveling with us.” Many of McCarthy’s and Erickson’s worries were echoed by more than two dozen fellow students during a public forum last month. Luna Moreno called her walkthrough “unconvincing.” The mockup, she said, failed to reflect the sheer size of the proposed 1.7-million-square-foot building with enclosed hallways as long as football fields and interior suites situated far from any outside-facing “Great Room” like the kind displayed in the model. “Any positive reaction to the tour fails to account for the massive scale of the project,” Moreno insisted. Len DeBenedictis, a 1962 graduate and member of the board of trustees for the UCSB Development Fund, said he was “pleasantly surprised” by his experience inside the model. “The overall feel was very comfortable for a more socially oriented person,” he said. “The loner might prefer a different use of space, but you can’t have both large, windowed bedrooms and all the other accommodations without more than doubling the building cost and floor space.” “I don’t believe that it will damage students in any way psychologically as has been suggested by some,” DeBenedictis continued. “I don’t know about you, but I like it dark and quiet when I want to sleep.” Harold Marcuse, a professor of German history, was also “positively impressed” with what

he saw. “Many aspects have been well-thought-out, and economies of scale are being leveraged in many ways,” he said. “I’d have to say, as a student, I’d probably prefer to live in a dorm like this than in a triple room in one of the older dorms, or in a multi-shared room in IV.” Yann Ricard, Graduate Program Coordinator for the Department of Earth Science, said he had real concerns about the windowless bedrooms before his tour. He worried they’d feel “carceral.” But now that he’s experienced one for himself, “I think the whole question is not only overblown, but pretty much of a non-issue,” he said. “In great part, this is because of the considerable ceiling height, which makes the small room still feel airy, and the ingenious placement of the ‘clerestory window,’ which delivers natural-feeling light.” Compared to his son’s dorm in Boston and its view of a brick wall, or his other son’s apartment in Baltimore that faces a neighbor’s rusting AC unit, “I’d choose a Munger room in a heartbeat,” Ricard said. The upside of private rooms also can’t be overstated, Ricard continued. “I don’t imagine I have to explain the value of privacy at an age when people experiment with their sexuality and have to focus on their studies,” he said. Still, Ricard does harbor some trepidation over how well the communal kitchens will be managed. “There will be issues with food storage and not everyone cleaning after themselves,” he said. “I also worry about UCSB running the grocery store, given the disfavorable pricing of food services on campus.” “My parting feeling is that it’s a good project given the requirements of our campus but has been mishandled terribly by abysmal PR and a sad penchant for secrecy at UCSB,” Ricard concluded. “I can’t understand why this mockup was not opened up years ago and why it is still not fully open to the public. I wish UCSB were more transparent.” Jaime Fior, a student affairs assistant for UCSB’s Gevirtz School of Education, said she came away from her walkthrough with “mixed opinions” but ultimately “can’t help but feel like people are entitled Americans when I hear them complain” about the proposal. “People live in much worse conditions all over the world (and here); I’d like to see their outrage about that.” “I think the real issue here is that there wasn’t more forethought and planning by certain powers that be, and now we have almost no options at this point for meeting studenthousing needs with the monies available,” Fior summed up. n “Will anyone be held accountable for that?”

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Opinions

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HOT ENUFF FOR U: Depending on who you

believe, Santa Barbara is either 101 miles away from Avila Beach, 79.1 miles, or 88.5. Either way, it’s a sweet road trip destination for those of us trying to sneak in a pseudo summer vacation. However far away it actually is, it’s still way too close should anything go wrong with the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant that PG&E operates up there on the western zit of the Pacific Coast’s nose. It should be acknowledged that Diablo Canyon has been humming along without major catastrophe, providing carbon-free energy to 3 million homes since PG&E flicked the switch in 1985. That’s not to say, however, that all is hunky-dory. Far from it. I mention this because of the obvious threat now posed by climate change — which has clearly morphed from one of those arthritically slow-moving zombies as seen in older movies to a more contemporary variant capable of sprinting up walls and across ceilings while eating your brains out. Because of this, a new generation of Gen Z eco-warriors — perhaps a little too selfenamored by their own brilliance — has adopted an insufferably patronizing tone extolling the carbon-free virtues of nuclear energy when speaking down to old-school enviros who only spent their entire adult life fighting to keep the nuclear genie firmly in the bottle.

Dog of Frankenstein

For those tuning in late, PG&E announced in 2016 it would turn off the lights at Diablo’s twin reactors in 2024 and 2025 when its licenses with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) expire. Retrofitting the plant to seismic safety standards didn’t pencil out when renewable fuels had grown too competitively low — not to mention the wholesale violence inflicted on the marine environment by dumping 2.5 billion gallons of water every day into the Pacific, water 20 degrees hotter than the ocean. But two weeks ago, Governor Gavin Newsom strong-armed a bill through the legislature allocating $75 million to help PG&E stay open. The feds — under President Biden — set aside another $6 billion to help induce PG&E to seek the necessary license extensions. I get it. The world is burning. In England, subway rails caught fire as the mercury hit 104. In France, Tour de France organizers hosed down roads to prevent them melting as cyclists zoomed over them. In China, 900 million people are living under heat alerts and glaciers are melting, with flash floods and mudslides anticipated. In the United States, 100 million Americans in 28 states are living under extreme heat warnings. And in Spain, for the first time ever, a heatwave was given a human name — Zoe — where, by the way, a wildfire inferno is raging. Don’t even ask about the millions of Ethiopian refugees forced to flee because of drought and starvation.

Newsom is understandably freaked about possible blackouts and brownouts as reservoir levels — from whence hydroelectricity is derived — continue to plummet. Did you know the water mass of the Great Salt Lake has diminished to one-third its normal size? While technically Salt Lake is not such a reservoir, it paints the picture. If California means business about going fossil-free by the year 2045, we’ll have to use 68 percent more electricity to get there. Diablo Canyon provides 15 percent of the state’s carbon-free electricity. If that goes away, supporters say, that’s the equivalent to 300,000 more cars per day on the road. More melting concrete. Here’s the rub. For the past few years, Congressmember Salud Carbajal has been moving heaven and earth to launch the nation’s largest wind power plant in ocean waters about 20 miles off the coast of Morro Bay. Depending on who you ask, this could generate one or two times as much carbonfree energy as Diablo Canyon. Maybe even more, the way that technology is evolving. The first offshore leases go on sale next month. Right now, 24 companies are lined up with checkbooks in hand. For such a wind energy project to work, however, it needs access to the grid system now set up to load electricity produced at Diablo Canyon into the state system. Thus the $64 billion question: Do we forsake a massively promising renewable technol-

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ogy whose time appears ripe in favor of a clean, but inherently risky, technology whose chief virtue is immediate availability? And for all you eyes-wide-shut econukers out there, PG&E has a documented history of flim-flammery concerning the real and present seismic risks at Diablo Canyon. In 1967, PG&E insisted no nearby faults had moved even a squiggle in 100,000 to a million years. Four years later, the company would “discover” the Hosgri Fault — just three miles from the plant — was capable of inflicting a 7.9 earthquake. Surprise. Then, 15 years ago, when PG&E was forced against its will to conduct another test, active faults were found within 650 yards of the plant. Eventually, PG&E conceded, also against its will, that these new faults were longer and capable of inflicting bigger jolts. The company’s response? It used a new formula to calculate how much shaking all this could inflict inside the plant. Guess what? It was 50 percent less. All this history was recounted at a press conference last week by former State Senator Sam Blakeslee, who represented the district in Sacramento. Blakeslee, by the way, is a card-carrying Republican and former Exxon geologist who just happens to have a PhD in earthquake studies. So how far is it to Avila Beach? I don’t know, but I doubt you can get there from here. —Nick Welsh

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OPINIONS CONT’D MURDOCH DUMPS TRUMP BY DAVE GRANLUND

Letters

Cigarette Ad Shock

W

hat is happening to our Santa Barbara Independent? I was shocked to see a full-page ad for Camel Gold cigarettes in the July 21 issue. How can you possibly accept an advertisement for a product known to cause addiction and cancer? Lung cancer makes up 25 percent of cancers in the U.S. and is the leading cause of cancer death in the nation. Cigarette smoking causes other terrible health consequences, including heart and circulation disease and premature age of deaths. We expect more from the Independent, previously trusted as our community news source, and hope this was a temporary oversight that will not be —Dr. Mary Ferris, S.B. repeated.

Editor’s Note: The Independent has adjusted its guidelines and will no longer accept cigarette advertising. We appreciate readers’ feedback on this topic.

Hot Springs Troubles

I

have been hiking with the Sierra Club for more than five years. Recently, we have encountered problems being able to park at the Hot Springs trailhead. Several loop hikes start at this trailhead, and we can no longer do these hikes. The problem seems to be that people have been putting big rocks where the parking used to be. The county has tried nicely to ask the property owners to remove these rocks, but many property owners have refused. As a hiker, I want to support the county’s efforts to restore the parking so we can hike these trails again.

—Guofang Wei, S.B.

U.S. and Climate

R

egarding last week’s letter titled “Supreme Climate Folly,” the Supreme Court’s ruling stated that government agencies like the EPA can only enforce the laws passed by Congress. The United States is a country based on law—that is, not on the expertise of the government technocrats. While the U.S. caused much of the climate change factors, the Washington Post in 2020 said U.S. greenhouse gas emissions were set to drop to the lowest level in three decades. Also, an article in ActiveSustainability.com stated China now emits 2.25 times the greenhouse gases as the United States does, and a Bloomberg News article a few years ago stated that the U.S. had led the world in the reduction of greenhouse gases emissions in 15 of the last 17 years. Many millions of people and organizations are

working diligently to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, but they do not constantly issue press releases so you do not hear about their efforts. But their efforts are having a big cumulative effect which results in our nation leading the world in climate mitigation. —Bill Caloudes, S.B.

Bike Path Needs

T

he county has a unique grant opportunity to complete a missing gap in the popular Coastal Access Route by connecting the Obern Trail from Goleta to the City of Santa Barbara’s newest bike paths on Modoc and Las Positas. This would give much-needed, safe access to schools, beaches, neighborhoods, and UCSB. However, some community members object that doing so would mean the loss of up to 63 trees. Both are right. The trees along Modoc are lovely, and the stately Canary Island palms should be preserved. Options should minimize the loss of trees; in fact, one path under consideration reduces removal to 41 trees and possibly far fewer. Most trees removed would be eucalyptus, a non-native and highly flammable tree. Sixty to 120 oak trees, both native and fire-resistant, could be planted as a mitigation, a better long-term choice given climate change and hotter, windier conditions. Improving our bike infrastructure by linking our most popular multi-use paths is critical for poorer residents, students, young people, pedestrians, the handicapped, and all of us who would like to drive less. Modoc has a relatively high accident rate. In fact, a biker was killed on that stretch of road a few years ago. We desperately need a bike and pedestrian path there, but the county should minimize tree loss and impacts to the Modoc preserve.

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For the Record

¶ The Carpinteria Library news brief on July 14 incorrectly cited cost as a factor in the decision to leave the Santa Barbara library system. The costs were known, and the decision was a matter of autonomy. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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obituaries Shirley J. Sims Hall 5/14/1935 - 7/15/2022

Shirley J. (Sims) Hall, wife of David B. Hall, CPA, died on July 15, 2022, in Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Shirley June Small was born May 14,1935, to L. G. and Ruth Small, and had a younger sister, Mary Lou and brother, Robert, who also predeceased her. She grew up in Takoma Park, Maryland, graduating from Takoma Academy in 1953. She continued her education in California in several different colleges and lived in Santa Barbara while attending the University of California there. Shirley was married in 1958 to a young doctor, Charles Sims. They had five children, Mark, Murray, Heather, Matthew, and Hannah, who died in 2021. Their marriage ended in 1971, and Shirley was largely responsible for her growing children, as well as working in various jobs and continuing with her education. As the children reached maturity, Shirley moved to Massachusetts to obtain a Divinity degree at Boston University, but decided not to go into pastoral work. Shirley Sims worked in various capacities at Massachusetts General Hospital, and from 1998 to 2012 served as the administrative assistant to worldrecognized Cardiologist and researcher, Dr. Robert Levine, assisting him in obtaining research grants and mentoring fellows, many of whom are now in very responsible positions in other countries. Upon receiving the news of Shirley’s death, a number of these cardiologists have sent letters expressing their gratitude for all that Shirley did to help them while studying with Dr. Levine. Shirley attended the 50th anniversary reunion of her Takoma Academy class back in Maryland, and there became re-acquainted with David Hall, a classmate from the 2nd grade through high school. David had gone to Tennessee for college, become a certified public 18

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accountant, and headed a CPA firm in Murfreesboro, TN. They agreed to keep in touch. Years later, after the death of David’s wife, he suggested that Shirley might retire and join him in Tennessee. They were married there in 2012 and have enjoyed nine good years together. Shirley is survived by her husband, David B. Hall, her children, Mark Sims (Priscilla), Murray Sims, Matthew Sims, and Heather Sims (Mel Stewart), nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Shirley’s life will be celebrated at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Murfreesboro on Friday morning, July 22, with visitation from 9:00 to 10:45 and the funeral service at 11:00, followed by burial in Evergreen Cemetery. Woodfin Memorial Chapel, Murfreesboro, TN. (615) 893-5151

Dorothy Louise Chavez (Harmon) 12/14/1954 - 7/8/2022

A vibrant, free spirit, Dorothy was a force of nature, she followed the fun, loved Rock and Roll, motorcycles, and the beach. She enjoyed camping trips at Red Rock, participating in neighborhood and beach clean ups, traveling to visit family in Australia, taking long walks with her Great-granddaughter, and caring for her beloved cat, Pink. She had an impressive collection of frog figurines and sea shells and nurtured many houseplants on your porch. You could often find her sporting her natural wavy locks, always effortlessly cool in denim jeans and lots of silver and turquoise jewelry. She had a laugh that was hardy and infectious, she kept the phrase, “Far out” alive far beyond its mainstream use and her hospitality and giving nature was unending. She lives on in the hearts of all who knew her. She is survived by her daughter, 5 grandchildren, and great granddaughter as well as a large extended family, who will always cherish and celebrate her life.

JULY 28, 2022

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Emily (Dolly) Jane McKernan 7/25/1931 - 7/15/2022

Emily Jane McKernan (Dolly) passed away at Villa Alamar in Santa Barbara, California, on July 15, 2022. Dolly courageously endured a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. Bravery was a way of life for Dolly as she used courage, determination and humor to move on after blindness struck a blow to her active, busy and colorful life at the age of 64. After briefly mourning her loss of sight, she went on to find ways to live life fully again. She began to visit the Braille Institute of Santa Barbara, remarkably becoming a teacher there. She taught classes on cooking and craft making. She was included in one of their advertising campaigns, both video and poster media. She assisted the Institute with the Christmas fundraiser and she and her husband Tom attended many of their activities and events. She wrote a cookbook, Cooking Without Looking. Dolly was also able to continue with hobbies such as bowling, activities with the Model A Club of Santa Barbara and at the Goleta Elks Lodge. She continued traveling with friends and family. Dolly has a lovely way of putting others at ease with her blindness, never making it seem like a disability or handicap. She set up her household and her life in an admirable fashion, inspiring so many unsighted people to have courage with their own difficulties or discouragements. Dolly Crosby was born in Detroit Michigan on July 25, 1931, to Margaret and Gordon Crosby. She married Tom McKernan in 1949 and they started a family there, moving to Goleta in 1962 with Delco Electronics They lived in Goleta for the next 60 years. Dolly worked at McDonalds at the beginning of their hostess program, charming both customers and staff. She was employed there for 9 years. She also cared for her granddaughters, Brie and Nicole when they were little and became a big part of their lives. Family was everything to Dolly. She and Tom helped each of their children

and grandchildren in ways big and small. When Dolly had to be admitted to Villa Alamar, Tom visited her every day until he, too, became ill, and then their oldest son Dan faithfully drove Tom to see Dolly daily for the next several years. Their devotion to each other was a love story of a bygone era and an inspiring model for their children and their families. Dolly is survived by her three sons, Daniel (Lisa), Michael (Janine), and Kenneth (June) as well as granddaughter Brie Milligan (Ryan) and many grandchildren. Remembered with love, smiles and happy times, Dolly McKernan will live on through those who knew her and loved her. A graveside service will be held at the Goleta Cemetery on Friday, July 29 at 10:00 am. Contributions to the Braille Institute of Santa Barbara may be made in Dolly’s memory.

Andre Martin Barclay 9/28/1955 - 7/6/2022

Andre Martin Barclay was born on September 28 1955 in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. He is predeceased by his parents Paul and Liane Barclay. Survived by sisters Ingrid Barclay and Katja Carlton (husband Doug), niece Emily Carlton (husband Rolando) and nephew Caleb Carlton. Also surviving him are half sisters Linda Neely and Judy Mingle as well as his extended family, the Echeverrias of Carpinteria. Andre passed on July 6 2022 after a brave battle with carcinoid tumor syndrome. He was a generous, funny, caring, dry-witted, socially conscious man filled with curiosity, a fascination with technology, science, current events and the environment. He was a well respected general contractor and self taught engineer. He was a devoted friend to all who were blessed to call him friend. We will miss his endearing and colorful stories, his intellectual world views and his tender and huge heart. Onward and upward our one and only Andre! You will be deeply missed and forever cherished. Celebration of life will be announced at a later date.

Theodore (Ted) Gregory Zrelak 11/9/1936

Theodore (Ted) Gregory Zrelak was born November 9, 1936, in East Liverpool, OH, to Rudolph and Kathryn Zrelak. When he was twelve, the family moved to San Bernardino, CA. Ted graduated from High School in San Bernardino and attended college at Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo for two years. He worked part time for the U.S. Forest Service and eventually attended Utah State University in Logan, UT graduating in Forest Management. He worked summers in Southern Utah. After college, Ted’s career took him to California working for the San Bernardino National Forest as Junior Forester, timber management, resource officer and fire management. He was District Ranger on the Los Padres National Forest two different times: Frazier Park on the Mt. Pinos district and King City on the Monterey district. He was then transferred to Riverside as fire coordinator at the South Zone lnteragency Center. In 1979, Ted transferred to Santa Barbara to take the position as Fire Management Officer for the Los Padres NF. In 1984, Ted transferred to Pennsylvania to become Assistant Director of fire and aviation working with 20 Eastern states. In 1990, Ted was transferred to San Dimas, CA working as fire specialist at the Technology and Development Center where he retired in 1992. Ted and his wife, Sharon, moved back to Santa Barbara for their retirement years. After his Forest Service career, he worked for Rezek Emergency Equipment going to forest, state, and county fires setting up lights, kitchen equipment, etc. for the fire crews. Ted was a member of the Society of American Foresters and the Santa Barbara Elks Lodge. He is preceded in death by his parents, a sister and brother. He is survived by his wife Sharon of 63 years, a son, Chad of Paso Robles, daughter, Julie George of Bowie, MD, four grandchildren, and three great grandchildren. Services will be held at St. Raphael Church in Goleta, CA on Thursday, July 28, 2022 at 10:00 AM. Arrangements entrusted to Welch-RyceHaider Funeral Chapels. Continued on p.20


In Memoriam

Owen Bailey 1968-2022

BY D AV I D A N D H U G H B A I L E Y,

T

L AU R I E B A I L E Y, L E E H E L L E R , AND L I N D A K R O P here is an Owen Bailey–sized hole in

LAURIE BAILEY

Passionate Advocate

our community. Owen, the Environmental Defense Center’s executive director for nine years, died June 24 at his home in Goleta after a long battle with cancer. He left behind a community that loved him and a planet he was working desperately to protect. On June 5, 2022, Owen stood before the crowd at EDC’s annual Green & Blue celebration, face alight, voice hoarse but strong. Days before, his breathing had become more labored from years of cancer treatments. But he found the strength to speak with clarity and conviction, offering gratitude for EDC’s work and one last impassioned plea for more. Owen was born into his environmental passion. In his early years in rural Connecticut, he was surrounded by recovering forest — secondgrowth trees and scrub, with all their attendant wildlife, reclaiming what had long been pastureland. He attended the University of Connecticut, where he met his wife, Laurie. The two spent their early twenties embracing art, travel, and adventure in New York City, followed by a year for Owen in London immersing himself in English history and Shakespeare. The two finally settled in Los Angeles, where Owen A PASSION FOR ACTION: Executive director of the Environmental realized he most wanted to make a difference Defense Center for nine years, Owen Bailey had an exceptional abilthrough advocacy. He started as a volunteer ity to deliver a message and rally people to a cause. with the Sierra Club, but — quickly recognized for his exceptional ability to deliver a message and rally people to a cause — was brought on staff, privileged to inhabit his joyful and wacky world. They finishing his tenure there as Southwest Advancement were gleeful participants to what Laurie described as a never-ending sketch comedy routine: with Owen at a Director. Owen moved to Santa Barbara to become EDC’s Christmas tree farm, for instance, suddenly announcexecutive director in 2013, recruited due to his work ing in a menacing growl that he was inspecting the to protect Oceano Dunes and Hearst Ranch, and to trees for termites. Owen was devoted to his family, defeat a proposed liquid natural gas project off-shore especially Ben and Nicola. When Ben was small, he Oxnard. He brought the same passion and skill to was obsessed with buses, so Owen would spend SatEDC. urdays riding the Orange line back and forth, just When Owen spoke, you believed; he knew how for Ben. Later, when Nicola was in 2nd grade, Owen to tell EDC’s story to inspire action. When he acted, introduced her to The West Wing and a mutual paschange happened. He fought to stop dangerous oil sion was born — the two watched the entire series, trains and to prevent construction of a new fossil-fuel- Owen schooling young Nicola along the way about powered plant in coastal Oxnard. When the Refugio the nuances of modern-day politics — undoubtedly pipeline ruptured, Owen was one of the first on the setting the stage for her future as an activist. Owen was diagnosed with cancer in 2017, learning scene to document the failed response by Plains All American Pipeline. Owen soon became a trusted that it was metastatic in 2019. Characteristically open leader across a range of issues — if you wanted a smart, about his condition, he channeled his energy into strategic approach, Owen was The Guy. It didn’t hurt poetry and other writings to help educate on cancer, that he had also worked for Senator Barbara Boxer to provide an outlet for himself and support for fellow on her 2008 campaign. Owen “got” politics: He was a cancer patients and their families. savvy analyst, a brilliant strategic thinker, and a probEver upbeat after the most discouraging news, he was, in the end, accepting. “I have had a wonderlem solver. Owen’s integrity was unassailable. Whether it was ful life,” he wrote, little more than three months ago. community leaders; EDC Board, staff, and donors; “I am so privileged to live under one roof with the or activists at large, everyone knew that Owen would three people I love most in the world. My children are tell you the truth — as kindly as he could, because he young adults, and they are kind, creative, intelligent, was also hugely compassionate. If you knew Owen, and loving human beings. I have spent 30 years lovyou trusted him. ing and living with my very best friend in the world, Even better: Owen did all of this while being end- and she has consistently made me better, happier, and lessly funny. No pun went unsaid. No pop culture ref- inspired me to want to do more.” erence was unmade. No argument about who actually In addition to Laurie, Benjamin, and Nicola, Owen wrote Shakespeare’s plays was overlooked. To work is survived by his brothers, Martin, Hugh, and David; with Owen was to be committed to serious change and his parents, Patricia Palmer and David O. Bailey. while having serious fun. Memorial ceremonies for Owen will be held Wife Laurie, son Ben, and daughter Nicola were August 7 at 2 p.m. at Godric Grove at Elings Park. n INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 28, 2022

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obituaries istrators of Casa San Miguel and the two weekday regular caregivers, Lana and Nora who became very special to Barbara during these past two years. Family and friends acknowledge that Barbara lived a full and meaningful life, right up to her final days. A private memorial will be held in August in Santa Barbara. Arrangements entrusted to McDermott-Crockett Mortuary

Barbara A. Bertram 9/19/1924 - 7/8/2022

Barbara Anne Bertram, a devoted school teacher for over 30 years, passed peacefully from this life on July 8, 2022 at Casa San Miguel, her home for the past nearly two years. Alert and conversant right up to her final days, Barbara was proud to state that she was 97 and a half years old! Barbara traveled extensively throughout Europe and loved to reminisce about her love of art which she enjoyed and collected throughout her travels. The joy of this past year was highlighted by her trip to the Santa Barbara Art Museum to take in the wonders of the Vincent Van Gogh exhibit. As a lover of art and supporter of the local Art Museum, Barbara was thrilled to have had that opportunity and recently commented – “my paintings (originals) seem so drab compared to the work of Van Gogh!” Barbara loved art and reading. She read book after book in her retirement years and donated many books to the Santa Barbara Public Library. For many years, she enjoyed being in a book club where she shared insights and stories with other book club members. Born in Glendale, California, Barbara was the second of three children of Edward and Eva Haller Bertram. Her siblings, Wallace and her younger sister Sally, preceded her in death many years earlier. A graduate of UCLA, Barbara’s life was centered on teaching, which was conducted entirely in the San Francisco Elementary School system. Barbara so often fondly spoke about her dear and long-time San Francisco friend, Julia O’Meara, a few years her senior (age 99), whom she still communicated with until very recently. Barbara leaves behind Joyce Bertram, wife of her brother Wallace and their three daughters – Lisa Severy, Sally Yoshida and Susan Bertram – and her maternal cousin, Robert Haller and great nieces and nephews of whom she was very proud. Many thanks are extended to a wide variety of caregivers who assisted Barbara in her later years. Special mention goes out to Katerina and Anton, Admin20

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Glenda Claire Gabrielson

1/28/1946.- 6/27/2022

On June 27, 2022, Glenda Claire Gabrielson died peacefully in her sleep. She was 76 years old. She was born in Mankato, Minnesota, on January 28, 1946, to Roy and Marjorie Snyder and had one brother. In 1951, the family moved to Santa Barbara, where they owned and managed motels, including the De Anza Motel in Montecito. After graduating from Bishop Diego Garcia High School in 1963, Glenda earned a B. A. in Sociology from San Jose State University. In 1982, she married Mike Gabrielson, and the couple eventually settled in Monterey, California. That same year, they started Semaphore Corporation, a software company supporting the shipping industry. For the last thirty years, Glenda suffered from Chronic Fatigue Immune Dysfunction Syndrome (CFIDS), and, for the last four years, she battled cancer. She met these extraordinary challenges with deep reserves of optimism and faith and with the unshakable support and devotion of her husband, as well as love and support from her wider family and religious community. Survived by her husband, Mike Gabrielson; brother, David Snyder and wife Joanna Snyder; sister-in-law Linda Gabrielson, husband Hans-Martin Maurer, and daughter Madeleine Maurer; niece Pamela Snyder and husband Warren Leggett; nephew Matthew Snyder and wife Karla Galdamez; and niece Carey Snyder, husband Mark Barsamian, and son Zachary Barsamian. All who knew her will dearly miss her, but will take heart in the memory of her boundless love, kindness, and resiliency.

JULY 28, 2022

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Charles Emilio Depaola

Cecilia Murphy

Charles Emilio Depaola, devoted husband, father, brother, son, uncle, and friend, passed away on Friday, July 15th, 2022 at the age of 53. Charles is survived by his mother, Joan Depaola; his wife, Veronica Depaola; his children, Clara, Sofia, and Charles Depaola; his siblings, Michael and Maria Depaola, and many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Charles was born on December 3rd, 1968, in Arlington, MA, to Emilio and Joan Depaola. At the age of 12, Charles and his family moved to Santa Barbara, CA. Charles went on to graduate from Santa Barbara High School in 1986. In 2004, he married Veronica in Santa Barbara, CA. In 2004 and 2009, respectively, Charles and Veronica welcomed their two beautiful children, Sofia and Charles. Charles embraced every moment to the fullest through simple pleasures. He opened a pizzeria in New York with his cousin Mark and went on to work as a stock broker. He proudly served in the US Army National Guard and was deployed on active duty to support Enduring Freedom in 2007. Upon his return home from Iraq, Charles dedicated himself working in construction and raising his children and spending time with family and friends, as his greatest honor was being a family man. You could find Charles joyfully showing his kids his boxing and martial arts moves, two sports he loved, or enjoying a beach sunset walk with his family. His infectious laugh and warm personality would immediately bring a smile to anyone’s face. Charles’ family has organized a memorial fund to help with the costs of funeral services and supporting his wife and children during this difficult time. Please consider donating using the following link: Fundraiser by Veronica Depaola : Charles Depaola memorial fund (gofundme.com)“

Many people think they had the best mom, but that honor is ours. Ceci Murphy (Songer, sometimes) was an absolute delight; kind, with a ready smile, twinkling eye, and a quietly wicked sense of humor. She graduated from Bishop Diego High School, class of 1965, then attended SBCC and USF, earning a teaching certificate that she never used. Raised by a single mother, Ceci longed for a large family – ideally nine boys to comprise a baseball team – and settled happily for three daughters: Katey, Renee, and Sarah. Ceci was an artist by trade (graphic) and by nature. She spent many years at Bernie’s Friday Night Adult Education ceramics class, could render a lovely watercolor or charming sketch seemingly without effort, and inadvertently gave at least two of her daughters a minor complex of art inferiority. After divesting herself of a marriage, Ceci blossomed. She switched careers and became an escrow officer at Lawyer’s Title; bought her own home and painted the exterior herself; fulfilled a lifelong dream to travel to Europe, especially Paris; trained for a marathon at 55; completed a triathlon in her 60s; yet continued to be on call for friend, mom, and grandma duties at all times. Ceci left Santa Barbara in 2007 and lived in Maryland, Hawaii, and San Francisco to be close to family. Dementia flirted with her for years, but despite hitting her in earnest in 2017, Ceci never lost her cheerful disposition, her roll-with-it attitude, and willingness to try just about anything. Ceci is survived by her three daughters Katey Edwards, Renee Songer, and Sarah Songer; grandchildren Claire, Lily, and Owen Edwards; son-in-law Jeremy Edwards; best friend Mau-

12/3/1968 - 7/15/2022

6/15/1947 - 7/11/2022

reen Loster; and many others. In lieu of flowers, please visit someone with dementia, give a caregiver a break, or check in on an old friend. It might not be easy but your kindness will be appreciated. There will be an outdoor memorial for Ceci on Sunday, July 31 from 2-5pm at 3003 Serena Road, Santa Barbara. Friends of the family are welcome to come reminisce and mourn with joy. Masks optional but encouraged.

Sally McEwen

8/12/1936 - 6/25/2022

On June 25th, 2022, after a long season of illness, Sally McEwen, our mom, went home to be with the Lord she truly loved. We can only imagine the joy in reuniting with our dad, Bob McEwen, and so many other family members and friends. Mom’s love for Jesus was the foundation of her life. Bob and Sally have been a part of the Santa Barbara community since 2007 when they moved here to be close to their grandkids, attending their games, recitals, and special events as “Super Fans”! Sally is survived by her daughter, Jody (husband Greg), grandchildren Levi and Bree (husband Chad), great-grandchildren Arlo, Scout, and Colt; daughter, Jill (husband Ewoud), grandchildren Kees and Kole; daughter, Jamie (husband Scott), grandchildren Tyler (wife Brittany), Reed and Braeden. A Celebration of Life service will be held at Free Methodist Church, Saturday, August 6th at 11:00AM – 1435 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, CA.


obituaries Jay David Gaines, MD 3/5/1941 - 6/12/2022

Jason passed away peacefully at Serenity House in Santa Barbara on June 12, 2022 at the age of 81. He is survived by his wife of 47 years, Priscilla; his son Sam and daughter-inlaw Molly; his grandchildren, Theodore, Lois and Beatrice; and his brothers, Joli Kansil and Jed Gaines. He valiantly battled acute myeloid leukemia, which was diagnosed in December 2021. Born in New York City in 1941, to Sam and Sondra Gaines whose families came from Ukraine, Jason spent his adolescence in Deal, NJ before attending Colgate University at age 16. After graduating from Stanford University School of Medicine, he spent two years of required military service in the Public Health Service which sent him to Ethiopia. He then returned to Stanford Medical School for a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in infectious disease. This training allowed Jason to return to Africa, where he practiced in Ghana, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. Most of his time was spent in Liberia with the Peace Corps developing health care projects in rural areas and teaching volunteers to train Liberians to provide basic health care and preventative medicine. He also developed a program for internal medicine at A. M. Dogliotti College of Medicine at the University of Liberia. In 1975, he married Priscilla, whom he had met on a ski slope in Snowbird, Utah. They moved to Connecticut, where he enjoyed a long and distinguished career as a physician in the greater New Haven area. In addition to founding a family practice, he was on the faculty at the Yale School of Medicine. After retiring in 2009, Jason and Priscilla moved fulltime to Santa Barbara where they enjoyed time with friends, golf, and the beautiful beaches of Montecito. He always looked forward to his book club, his men’s discussion group, golf-

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

ing groups and extensive world travel with Priscilla. The family would like to thank his doctors, Christopher Thrash and Daniel Greenwald, and the staff on the Compton floor of Cottage Hospital for their support and dedicated care. Donations in memory of Jason can be made to an organization of your choice. A celebration of his life will be held in November.

Mark Anthony Rodriguez

1/24/1960 - 7/14/2022

On July 14, 2022, the world lost a kind, loving, caring man that would give the shirt off his back for others in need. Mark was born to Rita Provencio and Arturo Elias Rodriguez at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. Raised in his early years in SB, he attended Franklin Elementary School. When he was 11 years old, Mark’s mother and brother were involved in a fatal automobile accident. Mark then moved to Santa Ynez, Simi Valley, and finally San Diego, CA where he was raised by his older siblings. He attended Monte Vista HS in Spring Valley and also roamed the streets of National City. In 1980, Mark returned to his hometown, first working for the City Public Works Department, ensuring City roads were paved and gutters clear on rainy days. Then, he moved his way up from sales at a local paint store to running his own painting business after acquiring his contractors license. For 30 years, Mark painted various commercial and residential properties throughout SB. During this time, he also raised 3 children, and a step child, with the mother of his children, Rachel De Luna. Mark adored his family. His favorite pastimes included fishing, camping, and BBQing with his loved ones. He loved line dancing and riding his motorcycle. He volunteered as a Chaplain in the local jail, as a chain crew member for HS football games, and as a helping hand for friends in need. Mark is survived by 5 siblings, Emma (Sal) Hernandez, Dolores (Carlos

Sr.) Barragan, Ernie (Annette) Greenwald, Francisco (Lety) Unzueta, and Simonette (Jaime) Guevara; his 3 children Leah (Isacc) Cervantes, Elias Rodriguez, and Andrew Rodriguez; 1 step child Angelina (Kelly) De Luna; his 2 granddaughters; and many cousins, nieces, nephews and chosen fam. A service will be held for Mark at the Veterans’ Memorial Building on Monday, August 15, 2022 at 11am. In lieu of flowers, please contact MARmemorial7@gmail.com for donation inquiries.

Eileen Marie Tobe 6/17/1939 - 7/15/2022

daughter Olivia Zuniga. Her ashes will be buried under a shade tree on the Santa Barbara, CA ranch where she lived for the last 28 years. She will be missed and not forgotten.

Mary Guadalupe Jacinto Failla 7/19/22

Mary Guadalupe Jacinto Failla passed away on Tuesday, July 19, 2022 at the age of 88 in her home surrounded by her loving family. A Rosary will be held on Monday, August 1, 2022 at 6:30 pm at Welch-RyceHaider in Santa Barbara. Mass and funeral services will be at St. Raphael’s Church on Tuesday, August 2, 2022 at 10 am.

Mike Dale

2/5/1951 - 6/19/2022

Born and raised in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, PA, Eileen moved in 1959 to Chicago to attend Moody Bible Institute for three years. In the mid-60’s she moved to Los Angeles to work at Gulf Oil, where she eventually made her home and established deep and lifelong friendships. Her interest in psychology led her to become involved with The Glendon Association, where she worked as an invaluable volunteer for many decades. In 1978 Eileen met Frank Tobe, who would later become her husband of 42 years. Together, Eileen and Frank traveled the world as close companions, alongside their treasured friends. Each day was an opportunity for shared adventures, large and small. On the 9th of July, after a date night with her husband, Eileen experienced a ruptured brain aneurysm, which led to her death six days later in the hospice ward of Cedars Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. Eileen leaves behind her beloved son, Douglas, as well as Tamara Zuniga, Warren Firestone and Jenny Cagan, whom she loved and cared for as her own, and her honorary grand-

Michael Allan Dale, 71, of Carpinteria passed away peacefully at Serenity House surrounded by loving family on June 19, 2022. Mike was born February 5, 1951 to James and Nancy Dale in Flushing, NY. Over the years his family moved steadily west, settling in Pasadena where Mike graduated along with several life long friends from La Salle High School. He then moved to Santa Barbara to attend UCSB, graduating with a BA in English and a teaching certificate. After graduation Mike lived in several different places in the area, but Carpin- teria was always his favorite- which he aptly dubbed “The Best Little Town in America.” Mike had a varied early career, eventually settling into Facilities Management and Real Estate Procurement for the last 25 years of his work life. He retired as Director of Facilities from Sansum Clinic in 2017. INDEPENDENT.COM

Outside of work, music and literature were his passions. Mike could always be found with a guitar or a book in his hands. He began playing the guitar as a teen, and progressed to playing many other string instruments- the mandolin and fiddle were his favorites. Over time he acquired quite the col- lection of instruments. For the past 32 years he was a member of Glendessary Jam, a group of like minded musicians playing ‘old time’ music. Although not intended to impress, his vocabulary was impressive, making him a worthy opponent at Scrabble and other word games. He was a talented songwriter and poet when the mood struck him, and his Irish proclivities occasionally led to some serious ‘Irish blarney.’ When Mike met his wife Susan, they quickly discovered that they both suffered from “abibliophobia” (the fear of running out of good reading material) and reading together became one of their favorite pastimes. After retirement Mike also spent many happy and frus- trating hours tinkering with his 1978 VW bus, “The Brown Bomber.” Camping trips in the bus were always an adventure! Mike is survived by his wife Susan Dale (Smitke, Schmid), sons Andrew Dale and Patrick Dale (Jessica), step daughter Chelsea Schmid, sister Dorothy Dale (Steve), brother Stephen Dale (Sandy), 21 first cousins (all on his father’s side), former spouse Jane Sprague -mother of Andrew, Patrick, and her son Ben Kluver. Family services to be held at the family homestead, “The Big House,” in Tannersville NY, followed by burial in St. Francis de Sales Cemetery in Elka Park NY. Mike journeyed through 3 years of cancer treatment with incredible strength and grace. The family thanks Ridley Tree Cancer Center, Cottage Hospital, VNA and Serenity House for their compassionate care. Please consider a donation to any one of these community treasures in his memory.

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Opinions

voices

CONT’D

I’m Outta Here The Creeping Coup Is Creeping Closer

SAVE THE DATE!! AUGUST 2, 2022

NACHO AVERAGE HR! Corporate Connections

COME JOIN US FOR AN IN PERSON FIESTA MIXER AT THE HILTON GARDEN INN GOLETA FROM 5:30-7:30PM. Register at sbhra.org under Events Calendar!

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guy. I’ve lived too long to honestly say one persuasion is better or worse than another. I practice conviction and avoid a myopic world view, for my own health, if nothing else. I think there are merits and shortcomings in almost all big decisions we make, and I have a big decision to make that I want to be thoughtful about. It’s been difficult because it involves the “unimaginable.” I have had an uneasy feeling the past year or so about this “unimaginable.” I’ve wondered what the Ukrainians were thinking before they were invaded by Russia. Even though seemingly unimaginable, there was a looming threat and advance knowledge of the invasion. Yet we saw them sipping craft cocktails in upscale bars, schoolteachers and schoolchildren scurrying to their routines, contractors and engineers leaving their comfortable homes in the mornings to start their missions in life. I wondered what they thought when the unimaginable happened to them. Weeks after the Russians invaded, the morgues were full and they were digging trenches in the streets for dead bodies. What about the Jews in Nazi-ridden Germany? How did some people have the prescience to leave, and others succumbed to the unimaginable? What did some know, and others did not? Were resources or social status a factor? It was unimaginable that in a 48-hour period, my country and the world would be in lockdown from a rogue virus with a strange name and the number 19 after it. Less unimaginable but pretty surprising was that an aggrieved trust-fund queen with a string of failed businesses had been elected leader of the free world. After COVID and four embarrassing, drama-filled years, it seemed like the country just needed a break, time to breathe, maybe find some light at the end of the tunnel. But we are learning from bipartisan hearings that the domestic terrorists who invaded our capitol on January 6 had not a small number of the allies: members of Congress or people affiliated with the last executive branch of government — unimaginable! These folks have been quietly installing their own attorneys general and electoral vote counters in the ever-important swing states — so the next time they will be sure to succeed where they failed before. If the domestic terrorists take over the legislative branch of government next Novem-

ber, as they seem poised to do, for me that is the beginning of the end. Remember, the legislative branch of our government makes laws. Whadaya gonna do? I’ve interviewed foreign consulates and expats in three different countries and explored real estate for the past 10 months. I’ve chosen my “Wait until the JOEP BERTRAMS, THE NETHERLANDS

I

BY MIKE STOLTZ ’m not really a politically partisan

U.S. is sane again” city based on (1) the political stability of their institutions, (2) health care for my 85-year-old mother, (3) financial security of my assets, and (4) quality of life. While I started this process with a little trepidation because leaving my country for fear of it descending into chaos, violence, and a pseudo-autocracy was almost unimaginable — but 10 months in, with every passing week, I feel more strongly than ever. If I were to write a bumper sticker to my driving motivation, I’d say something like: “History has held autocracies all over the world, but never have there been so many guns in the hands of so many aggrieved.” Think about it. On January 7 this year, 102 million voters did not believe Joe Biden was the duly elected president. No matter what the outcome of the next midterm or presidential elections, I feel there is going to be a rough period in this country for which I did not sign up. I ask myself if I want to listen to the sounds of gunshots and chaos in the streets and see bloodshed on the nightly news. My friends and family nod in agreement and shake their heads, yet eventually retreat to “Whadaya gonna do” and “Are you free for tennis on Saturday?” Could the unimaginable happen here? I hope I’m as wrong as I’ve ever been, but I don’t have to and I’m not going to take the chance. Are you? Mike Stoltz is a serial entrepreneur, a guest speaker at universities, and a mentor in Long Beach State’s Entrepreneur program. He was raised in Santa Barbara.


Opinions

CONT’D

voices

County of Santa Barbara Planning and Development

The Voice of the Heartland Thoughts About Woody Guthrie on His 110th Birthday

NOTICE OF PREPARATION of an Environmental Impact Report for the County of Santa Barbara 2023-2031 Housing Element Update Release Date: Thursday, July 21, 2022 Notice is hereby given that the County of Santa Barbara (County) Planning and Development Department (P&D) will be the lead agency preparing an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) for the County of Santa Barbara 2023-2031 Housing Element Update in compliance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code ������ et seq.). The purpose of the Notice of Preparation (NOP) is to solicit agency comments on the scope and content of the environmental information which is germane to an agency’s statutory responsibilities in connection with the proposed project. P&D will also accept written comments from interested persons and organizations. The EIR will consider the potential environmental effects of the proposed project based (in part) on the comments received in response to the NOP. The proposed project includes the following components to adequately plan for and address housing needs in the unincorporated area: • • • •

W

BY DICK FLACKS

oody Guthrie’s birthday — July 14 — has become an

annual moment for remembering and celebrating his legendary life and legacy. In his native Oklahoma every year, there’s a big Woody Birthday music festival; many smaller Woody songfests seem regularly to convene on what used to be Bastille Day. I myself have been doing Woody birthday radio bashes for most of the 40 years my KCSB show Culture of Protest has been on the air. This year, fellow KCSB programmer, musician, and ethnomusicologist Hunter Gettelfinger, invited me to talk about Woody at a birthday party he was organizing down at Jim Connolly’s Piano Kitchen. It was for me a timely invitation, because I’ve been thinking a lot about the meaning of Woody in the time of Trump. Woody was the voice of those he called “Dust Bowl refugees” — the hundreds of thousands forced out of their farms and homes by the fierce dust storms that swept Oklahoma and Texas, where Woody joined the masses of migrants headed for California. He sang in the voice of rambling workers looking for a home. At the time of the migration, in the late ’30s, he certainly shared their economic struggle. But Woody was born into a decidedly propertied family. Charley Guthrie, his father, was a real estate speculator, an oil developer, under-sheriff of Okemah. He was an active conservative Democrat who devoted much energy to opposing the rising socialist movement. Woody was born a few days after Woodrow Wilson won the Democratic nomination for president — which prompted Charley to name the new baby Woodrow Wilson. That fall, Gene Debs got 16 percent of the Oklahoma vote running against Wilson. The year before Woody’s birth, Okemah was the site of a horrific lynching. L.D. Nelson, an African-American farmer, had gotten into a gunfight with a local deputy sheriff. He and his mother were arrested for the murder of the cop, taken from jail by a mob of 40 (possibly including Charley Guthrie), and both were hung from the town bridge. Picture postcards of this event can still be found. Donald Trump was elected by a minority of the popular vote, but he did win a majority of white voters. I pondered this in 2016, coming to realize that there are millions of Americans with ancestors who might have been among the smiling participants in the lynching postcards — ancestors who had a part in the enforcement of white supremacy. Trump’s own father was a lot like Charley Guthrie. Unlike Donald, Woody thoroughly rejected his father’s ways. Instead, he deliberately spent his brief artistic life giving voice and inspiration to the other side. His life story as the renegade troubadour who inscribed on his guitar “THIS MACHINE KILLS FASCISTS”; who rudely refused to obey segregationist custom; who wrote hundreds of songs telling the stories of labor martyrs and heroes, of Harriet Tubman and Pretty Boy Floyd; and who lost radio network contracts because he wouldn’t sing commercials, enables us to see that Trumpism need not define the direction for heartland America. Listen to Woody. He’s offering antidotes to n despair, even when his songs tell us of grim history.

• •

A detailed analysis of the County’s demographic, economic, and housing characteristics; An assessment of community housing needs; An analysis of the barriers or constraints to producing and preserving housing; A review of the County’s progress in implementing current housing policies and programs; An identification of goals, objectives, and policies, in addition to a full list of programs and strategies that would implement the plan; and A list of sites (i.e., Suitable Sites Inventory) that could accommodate new housing, demonstrating the County’s ability to meet its Regional Housing Needs Allocation.

A project description, location map, and potential environmental issues to be addressed in the Draft EIR will be detailed in the Environmental Scoping Document – County of Santa Barbara 2023-2031 Housing Element Update which will be available along with the NOP on the proposed project’s webpage: https://www.countyofsb.org/3177/Housing-Element-Update Additional information regarding the proposed project and virtual scoping meeting will be posted to this website as it becomes available. All comments on the NOP must be received by 5:00 p.m. Friday August 18, 2022 The purpose of the NOP is to receive comments on the scope and content of the environmental issues to be addressed in the EIR. Please send comments on the NOP to: Jessi Steele, Planner Planning and Development Department 123 East Anapamu Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 E-mail: jsteele@countyofsb.org

We are here for you!

Need support? 805.964.5245 info@dvsolutions.org dvsolutions.org

You are not alone! INDEPENDENT.COM

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AH a! TM

Healthy Attitudes, Emotional Harmony, and Lifelong Achievement for Teens

Fall 2022 Programs Apply at ahasb.org/online-application

AHA! Out-Of-School Programs

AHA! Peace Builders

The AHA! Peace Builder program is offered once per week throughout the school year at SBJH, La Colina JH, La Cumbre JH, GVJH, Carpinteria Middle School, Carpinteria HS, and DPHS. Participants: •

Build skills for more self-awareness, better relationships, leadership, and public speaking

Learn and practice Connection Circle leadership

Learn to peacefully and powerfully intervene or speak out where needed

Become active agents in creating a positive, welcoming campus climate

Help build the world they want to live in through the language they use and the choices they make

Tuesday

Ally Group: Guides and inspires youth to build social and emotional intelligence and allyship and to meaningfully serve their community. Open to youth in grades 9-12.

Wednesday

AHA! Juniors: The new AHA! Juniors group provides a safe, brave space for junior high students to connect and play; to learn social-emotional skills; and to have fun and form positive, supportive friendships. Open to youth in grades 6-8.

Wednesday

Creative Group: Invites youth to dive into multiple modes of creative expression in an environment of support and joy. Open to youth in grades 9-12.

Thursday

Girls’ Group: Female-identified teens are guided to claim their inner and outer beauty, make empowered choices in relationship, and embrace authenticity and assertiveness. Open to youth in grades 9-12.

Friday

EQ Vibes! Music Group: Participants tackle important social-emotional themes through music and learn basics of composition and collaboration. No music experience required. In partnership with the Turner Foundation. Open to youth in grades 9-12.

Saturday

AHA!’s Littlest Little Farm: Teens aged 13-19 lovingly maintain a smallscale regenerative farm under the supervision of AHA! facilitators and farm educator. Participants take home fresh organic produce. AHA! | 1209 De La Vina Street, Suite A | Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 770-7200 Ext. 3 | ahasb.org | @aha_sb | Questions: perla.ahasb@gmail.com

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Lights Up! Theatre Company

l o o h c s af ter 2022

s e i t i activ guide!

AHA!

BY TERRY ORTEGA

O

kay, students, not to put pressure on you, but it’s time to gear up and learn so you can create a better world! Just to be clear, you can do this during the school day, but it’s after school where you can really have some fun. A great way to express yourself is through the arts with acting, dancing, playing an instrument, creating art, and cooking. Sports will get you moving on the pitch, in the ocean, or on the court. Kids can also connect with nature, and teens can build community, practice self-awareness, and express themselves through music and collaboration. STEM-based activities such as math can ignite your passion, and if you want extra academic help with homework and planning, there are programs just for you. Let the S.B. Independent’s After-School Activities Guide assist you in finding the perfect way to end the day, meet new friends, have fun, and become the innovators that will change the world for the better … no pressure! Happy back-to-school! If you want to be listed in next year’s guide, send your listing to afterschool@independent.com June 5-9, 2023. Listings are not automatically rolled over from the previous year without verification.

COURTESY PHOTOS

S.B. Dance Arts

Wilderness Youth Project

Santa Barbara Museum of Art

turn the page for listings!

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of Greater Santa Barbara

PYC PROGRAMS Blenders Winter Basketball League

Dates: December - March Ages: Kindergarten - 8th Grade Registration starts Aug. 10 - Nov. 1, Scholarship entry deadline Oct. 10

Blenders Basketball Clinic

Dates: Aug. 30 - Sept. 22 & Oct. 4 - 27 (Tuesdays/Thursdays) Ages: 1st - 8th grade / Coed

Beginner Ballers

Dates: Sept. 10 - Oct. 1 (Saturdays) Ages: 4 - 5 year olds

PYC Free Basketball Clinic with UCSB Men’s Basketball Date: October 1 Ages: Kindergarten - 8th Grade

PYC Free Basketball Clinic with UCSB Women’s Basketball Date: October 29 Ages: Kindergarten - 8th Grade

REGISTER NOW! 26

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(805) 967-8778 programs@pageyouthcenter.org www.pageyouthcenter.org


af ter-school ! e d i u g s e i t i v i t c a

The Adderley School

ARTS The Adderley School Musical Theater Workshops Workshops will instill confidence in each student and help them discover and develop their unique talents! Ages 4-18. Oct. 3-. $540-$700/ session. The Adderley School, 955 La Paz Rd. Email santabarbara@theadderleyschool.com.

theadderleyschool.org

Apples to Zucchini Cooking Classes Teaching kids to cook delicious, nutritious, affordable meals with real food. Eat what you cook and have fun! Grades K-6. Mid-Sep.–mid-Dec. $260/13 weeks. Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. Call (805) 886-1206 or email christie@atozcookingschool.org. atozcookingschool.org

JAZZ BALLET TAP

Artstudio 4 Kids The Art Studio 4 Kids After-School art program offers weekly sessions in person

HIP HOP

in an outdoor setting. Grades 1-8. Sep.-May 2023. Prices vary. Artstudio 4 Kids, 815 Puente Dr. Call (805) 689-8993 or email geraldineotte@gmail.com. artstudio4kids.com

CONTEMPORARY TODDLERS

Callaghan School of Irish Dance Classes are full of hops, skips, and jumps with high-energy

ACRO/TRICKS

steps mixed with lively music. Ages 5-10. Sep. 5-Oct. 24. $30/class. 11 E. Carrillo St. Call (805) 856-8373 or email irishdance805@gmail.com. irishdance805.com

DISNEY DANCE ENCANTO ADVENTURE

Clay Studio After-School Clay Camp Highly trained instructors will lead students through

PERFORMANCE COMPANY

ceramic projects exploring color, line, shape, form, texture, space, and value. Grades 1-12. Sep. 12-Dec. 16. $280-$400/six-week session. Clay Studio, 1351 Holiday Hill Rd., Goleta. Call (805) 5652529 or email allison@claystudiosb.org. claystudiosb.org/childrensprogramming

PROUD TO CELEBRATE 25 YEARS OF BELONGING, JOY, AND SELF-EXPRESSION

COMPETITION TEAM AND MORE!

CLASSES FOR 12 MOS TO ADULT

2021

bestof

Santa barbara

®

Winner

COME FOR CLASS. STAY FOR COMMUNITY.

REGISTER TODAY! CLASSES BEGIN AUGUST 22

Santa Barbara

The Dance Network

AMPSB.ORG - SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE INDEPENDENT.COM

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af ter-school ! e d i u g s e i t i v i t ac The Dance Network Join for dance and fitness classes at S.B.’s familyfriendly studio. Learn tap, hip hop, ballet, contemporary, break dance, and more! Ages 2-adult. Aug.-June 2023. Starting at $46/month. 5130 Hollister Ave. Call (805) 225-6078 or email thedancenetwork.sb@gmail.com.

thedancenetworksb.com

Dance Unlimited Quality dance classes in ballet, tap, jazz, hip hop, contemporary, and combo classes. Ages 4+. Sep. 6-Jun. 17, 2023. $75$135/month. Dance Unlimited, 5370 Hollister Ave., #1. Call (805) 708-1900 or email sbdanceunltd@gmail.com. sbdanceunlimited.com

Goleta School of Ballet This

S.B. Dance Arts

classical ballet school is dedicated to teaching at all levels with a genuine fondness for music and dance. Ages 3-18. Sep. 6-May 26, 2023. Starting at $54-$66/class. 303 Magnolia Ave., Goleta. Call (805) 328-3823 or email info@goletaschoolofballet.com.

goletaschoolofballet.com

InterAct Theatre School Performing arts with singing, dancing, and acting. Quality musical theater training with performances and weekly classes. Ages 4-16. All year. $279-$558. Unity of S.B., 227 E. Arrellaga St. Call (805) 869-2348 or email info@interacttheatreschool.com.

South Coast Youth Band Beginners welcome!

InterActTheatreSchool.com

Kindermusik with Kathy & Friends Music instruction, play instruments, singing and movement classes indoors and outdoors. Learn keyboard/piano, music theory, and explore various instruments in a creative and fun way! Ages 3-8. All year. $75-$105/month. Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St., and Carpinteria Community Church, 1111 Vallecito Rd., Carpinteria. Call (805) 7290698 or email kindermusikathy@gmail.com.

kindermusikwithkathy.com

Lights Up! Theatre Company S.B.’s exciting teen theatre conservatory offers professional, nurturing training with performances at the Marjorie Luke Theatre. Choose among musicals, actor’s workshops, and more! Ages 12-19. Sep.-May. Prices vary. The S.B. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. Email info@lightsupsb.com. lightsupsb.com

southcoastyouthband.com 4th, 5th and 6th graders Program supported by the Santa Barbara Education Foundation

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Goleta School of Ballet

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af ter-school activities guide! 2022-23 Season Contact us at sbstrings@gmail.com for more info.

Audition Dates Aug 28 or Sep 4, 2022

Santa Barbara Strings is welcoming violin, viola, cello and double bass players from the Santa Barbara County area. Beginner, intermediate and advanced students aged 4-19 are enthusiastically invited to audition for one of our three orchestras and/or chamber ensembles. No experience? We can help you navigate the process and introduce your child to the rewarding world of classical string music. Orchestral rehearsals are in person on Sunday afternoons from September 2022 - May 2023. Chamber ensemble rehearsal days may vary. Scholarships for eligible students are available for program participation and instruments.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art

S.B. Dance Arts Find joy and community at S.B.’s BEST dance studio. Indoor and outdoor classes! Ages one-teen. Aug. 22-May 24. $150+/17 weeks (scholarships available). S.B. Dance Arts Performing Arts Ctr., 531 E. Cota St. Call (805) 966-5299 or email info@sbdancearts.com.

sbdancearts.com

For more information, including videos of our recent Winter and Spring concerts, visit our website: www.santabarbarastrings.org www.facebook.com/sbstrings

@santabarbarastrings

S.B. Strings Youth Orchestra Welcoming enthusiastic beginning, intermediate, and advanced string players. Visit the website for information about ensemble auditions on August 29 or September 4. Ages 4-19. Sundays, Sep. 2022-May 2023. Prices vary. Inquire about location. Email sbstrings@gmail.com. santabarbarastrings.org

S.B. Museum of Art Fall After-School Classes Construct, collage, and mix materials to create new narratives from the everyday, inspired by architecture and imagined worlds. Ages 5-12. Sept. 20-Oct. 18. Members: $150/five weeks; non-members: $200/five weeks. Ridley Tree Education Ctr. at McCormick House, 1600 Santa Barbara St. Email communityprograms@sbma.net. sbma.net/kidsfamilies

South Coast Youth Band A 31-week after-school music program providing fun band experiences and quality instruction for elementary school students. Beginners are welcome! Grades 4-6. Sep. 19-May 17, 2023. $100/year. Scholarships available. Email scyband@gmail.com. southcoastyouthband.com

State Street Ballet

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af ter-school ! e d i u g s e i t i v i t ac

AHA!

State Street Ballet Academy Fun dance classes for all ages in a supportive and inclusive environment with annual performances at Lobero and Granada theaters. Ages 1-18. Aug. 22-May 21, 2023. $12-$20/class. 2285 Las Positas Rd. Call (805) 563-3262 or email info@ssb-academy.com.

ssb-academy.com

Young Singers Club Weekly confidence and skill-building classes include solo and group singing courses, voice lessons, choreography, acting, microphone technique, performance preparation, with recital opportunities at SOhO Restaurant & Music Club and more. Ages 5-12. Sep. 12-Nov. 18. $325/course. 4713 Chandler St. Call (805) 280-9802 or email youngsingersclub@gmail.com. youngsingersclub.com

Young Singers Club Sing! Dance! Grow!

Young Singers Club Children’s Caroling Choirs Weekly practices include professional vocal training, harmonizing, and performance preparation for costumed caroling at various events such as the Annual Downtown S.B. Holiday Parade and Stow House. Ages 7-17. Sep. 13-Dec. 16. $425/quarter. 4713 Chandler St. Call (805) 280-9802 or youngsingersclub@gmail.com. youngsingersclub.com

GENERAL AHA! Ally Group Engaging group discussions, fun and interactive activities, and connecting different perspectives. Community building through the development of healthy, supportive relationships. Grades 9-12. Oct. 4-Dec. 13. Donation-based. Unitarian Society of S.B., 1535 Santa Barbara St. Call (805) 380-8115 or email perla.ahasb@gmail.com. ahasb.org AHA! Creative Group Practice self-awareness, connection, and creative expression through differ-

Lessons Classes Choirs Youngsingersclub.com

ent art media, including writing, painting, music, and theater. Find your artistic voice. Grades 9-12. Oct. 5-Dec. 14. Donation-based. Jefferson Hall, Unitarian Society of S.B., 1535 Santa Barbara St. Call (805) 380-8115 or email perla .ahasb@gmail.com. ahasb.org

AHA! Girls’ Group Guides young women toward knowing themselves and others and being authentic, assertive, and healthy in relationships. Grades 9-12. Oct. 6-Dec. 15. Donation-based. AHA!, 1207 De la Vina St., Ste. A. Call (805) 380-8115 or email perla .ahasb@gmail.com. ahasb.org

ASSESSMENT-BASED TUTORING GRADES 2-12 Afternoons from 2 pm to 6 pm

Reading Intensive Math Intensive Sliding Scale Available A Nonprofit Learning Center Serving Students Since 2009 30

THE INDEPENDENT

JULY 28, 2022

Wilderness Youth Project

805.895.1153 www.gatewayeducationalservices.org e: info@gatewayeducationalservices.org INDEPENDENT.COM

AHA! Juniors Group AHA! Juniors Group will provide a safe, brave space for junior high students to connect and play, learn social-emotional skills, and to have fun and form positive, supportive friendships. Grades 6-8. Oct. 5-Dec. 14. Donation-based. AHA!, 1209 De la Vina St., Ste. A. Call (805) 380-8115 or email perla.ahasb@gmail.com. ahasb.org


af ter-school ! e d i u g s e i t i v i t c a AHA!’s EQ Vibes Music Group Teens will learn to express themselves through music composition and collaboration. No music experience required. Grades 9-12. Oct. 7-Dec. 16. Donation-based. Rose Garden Village Foundation, 525 W. Canon Perdido St. Call (805) 380-8115 or email perla.ahasb@gmail.com. ahasb.org

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM TEAM RIDER : RONIN CASTORINO PHOTO : HAYDEN GARFIELD

AHA!’s Littlest Little Farm Teens will learn regenerative farming skills in a fun, supportive, caring community. Ages 13-18. Aug. 13-Sept. 3. No fee (see stipulations). Address given at orientation. Call (805) 380-8115 or email perla.ahasb@ gmail.com. ahasb.org

BEGINNING TO ADVANCED PROGRAMS RUNNING M-F, LIMITED AVAILABILITY.

Girls Inc. of Greater S.B. AfterSchool Program After-school enrichment in a pro-girl environment: leadership, social and emotional learning, movement, healthy living, life skills, STEM, and homework assistance. Grades transitional K-6. Aug. 29-June 2023. $115/ week. Girls Inc. Goleta Valley Center, 4973 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Call (805) 963-4757 or email info@girlsincsb.org.

Wilderness Youth Project

WWW.SURFHAPPENS.COM

805.966.3613

girlsincsb.org/programs/after-school

Wilderness Youth Project Kids will participate in adventure, learning, play, and joy, and will connect to nature in small groups guided by mentors. Ages 2.5-18. Aug.-May. $300-$550/season (scholarships available). Various locations in Goleta, S.B., and Carpinteria. Call (805) 964-8096 or email info@wyp.org. wyp.org

EDUCATION/STEM California Learning Center Tutoring, college advising, test prep, and educational consulting. Academic support from review to enrichment for most subjects. Ages 6-60. All year. Prices vary. California Learning Ctr., 3324 State St., Ste. L. Call (805) 563-1579 or email info@clcsb.com.

clcsb.com

Girls Inc. of Greater S.B. After-School Program After-school enrichment in a pro-girl environment: leadership, social and emotional learning, movement, healthy living, life skills, STEM, and homework assistance. Grades transitional K-6. Aug. 29-June 2023. $115/week. Girls Inc. Goleta Valley Center, 4973 Hollister Ave,, Goleta. Call (805) 963-4757 or email info@girlsincsb.org.

girlsincsb.org/programs/after-school

NOW ACCEPTING ENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS FOR 2022-2023 SANTA BARBARA

Learning Center Director: Jennifer Cloud TuitionTK-12

Online A-G

Free

Public

Independent

School

Study

Program

Curriculum

Approved

College

Prep

Coursework Credit

Recovery

One-on-One Credentialed Academic Support

and

for

Courses

Appointments

with

a

Teacher Social-Emotional

Enhanced

Student

Success

S.B. Math Ellipse

Main Office: 805-623-1111 Learning Center: 805-695-5231 OLIVEGROVECHARTER.ORG INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 28, 2022

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31


fall After-School Classes

construct

a n d c o l l ag e tuesdays september 20 – october 18 3:30 – 5:30 pm | AGES 5 – 12 Construct, collage, and mix materials to create new narratives from the everyday, inspired by architecture and imagined worlds. $150 SBMA Members/$200 Non-Members Location: Ridley-Tree Education Center at McCormick House, 1600 Santa Barbara Street

REGISTER AT SBMA.NET/KIDSFAMILIES Follow us on

of Greater Santa Barbara 32

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JULY 28, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


ARTSTUDIO 4 KIDS

af ter-school activities guide!

Where An outdoor studio 815 Puente Drive, Santa Barbara When 3:30 – 5:00 PM After School September - May Ages: Grades 1-8 Small groups up to 12 students

For Kids Who Love Art

These 1.5-hour classes blend fine art techniques with your child’s own creative expression. We discuss aspects of art history (the masters), contemporary artists, and the elements of art (line, space, color, balance, etc.), while letting them run with their own imagination. We mix and balance age-appropriate projects with creative ideas for the young artist. We paint, we draw, we use fine art materials like liquid watercolors, tempera + acrylic paints, and paint on canvas provided in class.

S.B. Math Ellipse Challenging, after-school and/or weekend math enrichment groups for kids who love math and some math contests. In-person and virtual groups. Grades 2-12. $24/hr. Call (805) 680-9950 or email skona@ sbfamilyschool.com.

santabarbaramathellipse.org

For more information, visit: www.artstudio4kids.com or call 805-689-8993

ARE YOU HIRING?

Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com Contact advertising@independent.com for more details and in-print rates

Surf Happens

SPORTS Players Academy Clinics Curriculum-based recreational clinics lead by accredited coaches that aim to develop soccer skills for all ability levels. Birth years 2018-2010. Sep.7-Nov. 14. $175/10 sessions; $300/20 sessions. Girsh Park, 7050 Phelps Rd., Goleta. Call (805) 452-0083 or email bianca@santabarbarasc.org.

STAY CONNECTED

santabarbarasc.org/recreational programs/clinics Surf Happens After School Program The longest-running surf school in S.B. that offers beginning-advanced weekly surf classes. Ages 6-15. Aug. 29-May 2023. $50-$100/session. East side of Santa Claus Ln. Beach, Carpinteria. Call (805) 966-3613 or email info@surfhappens.com. surfhappens.com/after-school-program

Youth Evolution Basketball Youth Evolution Basketball serves the community with one goal: to bring alive the sport of basketball to our youth. Ages 3-11. Aug. 31-Oct. 5. $113-$124/session. Carrillo Gym, 102 E. Carrillo St. Call (805) 564-5422 or email sports@santabarbaraca.gov.

sbparksandrec.org

Youth Evolution Soccer Youth Evolution Soccer serves the community with one goal: to bring alive the sport of soccer to our youth. Ages 2.5-11. Aug. 27-Oct. 8. $113-$124/session. Cabrillo Park, 800 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Call (805) n 564-5422 or email sports@santabarbaraca.gov. sbparksandrec.org

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THIS JULY WEEKEND! SAT

30

SANTA BARBARA HALF MARATHON

Leo Kottke

The two-time GRAMMY® nominee and master of the guitar is known for syncopated, polyphonic melodies and a fingerpicking style that draws on blues, jazz, and folk music.

THURS

AUG

11

Hot Tuna Acoustic

Lifetime Achievement Award-winners Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady perform with a well-honed and solid power, with GRAMMY® Award-winner Justin Guip providing the perfect drumming to electrify their trademark sound.

AUG 12

EMPORIUM PRESENTS

PAUL MITCHELL SYSTEMS PRESENTS

The Kingston Trio

Jesse Cook AUG 24

VISIT LOBERO.ORG OR 805.963.0761 LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT

FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

34

THE INDEPENDENT

JULY 28, 2022

John C. Mithun

Foundation

INDEPENDENT.COM

@loberotheatre


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

JULY AUG.

28

T HE

3

by

TERRY & VICTORIA ORTEGA SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

THURSDAY 7/28 7/28: Concerts in the Park: Pepe Marquez Band Pack a picnic and bring a chair or blanket to S.B.’s beautiful waterfront and listen to the Latin, R&B, and soul sounds of the Pepe Marquez Band. No alcohol or pets. 6-7:30pm. Great Meadow Chase Palm Park, 323 E Cabrillo Blvd. Free.

tinyurl.com/SBConcertsInThePark

COURTESY

FRIDAY 7/29

hit TV show Long Island Medium and host of Hey Spirit! with Theresa Caputo podcast Theresa Caputo will connect some guests with the other world. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $79$129. Ages 21+. chumashcasino.com/

entertainment

7/29-7/31, 8/2: Makers and Wares Market Shop from local S.B. artisans, makers, bakers, and more in a beautiful downtown courtyard. Fri.,Tue.: 1-6; Sat.Sun.: 11am-6pm. Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free.

paseonuevoshopping.com/events

7/29: Music on the Water Sunset Cruise Gather friends and family of all ages on a 50-foot cruising catamaran to experience the sunset on the water listening to the various music styles from Ben Betts. 6:30pm. S.B. Sailing Ctr., 302 W. Cabrillo Blvd. $85. Call (805) 962-2826. sbsail.com

7/29: Boxtales Theatre Company presents: Gilgamesh Boxtales Summer

7/29:

UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Hot Fun in the Summertime: The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert Bring breathable blankets, low chairs, and a picnic to watch 1994’s The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (rated R) about three drag performers who travel across the Australian desert performing for enthusiastic crowds and less-enthusiastic locals. 8:30pm. Sunken Gardens, S.B. County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa St. Free. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

7/29: Asian American Film Series: Waterman This 2021 documentary explores the journey and legacy of legendary five-time Olympic medalist and Native Hawaiian Duke Paoa Kahanamoku. A Q&A with producer David Ulich and director Isaac Halasima will follow. 6pm. Alhecama Theatre, 215-A E. Canon Perdido St. Free. sbthp.org/aafs

Teen Theatre Camp will perform the oldest known written story that tells the tale of mythical king Gilgamesh, his friend Enkidu, and the pursuit of immortality. 11am-noon. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. Free.

luketheatre.org/events

7/29: Webinar: How to Grow Your Business on a Budget Learn top-producing, cost-effective marketing methods to build brand awareness, increase repeat business, and how to generate quality leads with information on free resources to help stretch your marketing budget. 10-11am. Free.

THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

WEDNESDAY

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

and even your leashed dog to listen to an evening of love songs both happy and sad from the Channel Island Chamber Orchestra. 5:30-7:30pm. S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. $10-$25. Call (805) 682-4726 or email info@sbbotanicgarden.org.

sbbotanicgarden.org

SATURDAY 7/30 7/30 Lobero Live Presents Leo Kotke With more than 30 albums that showcase his barnstorming fretwork and quirky songwriting, acoustic guitarist Leo Kottke will bring his

No Simple Highway, JG Mystery Band, East San Roque Deadfolk, 6-10pm. Donations accepted for Rex Fund Foundation. Tue.: Taimane, 8pm. $25-$28. Wed.: An Evening with Greg Koch & Koch Marshall Trio, 7:30pm. $15-$20. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

cfsb.info/sat fingerpicking style that draws on blues, jazz, and folk to S.B. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido. GA: $40-$50; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

Taimane

7/29-7/30: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Do No Harm, 6-9pm. Sat.: Larry Williams and the Groove, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

7/30: Tina Schlieske & The Graceland Exiles with Sister Laura Tina Schlieske’s

coldspringtavern.com

S.B.-based band The Graceland Exiles, which includes her sister Tina and B-Side member Laura Schlieske, will perform original material as well as old R&B, rock, and soul. 8:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $10. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776.

7/30: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar Rusty Pool. 9pm. $18.54. 500 Anacapa St. Call (805) Lindsey, 6-9pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126. 564-2410. eoslounge.com

7/29: Eos Lounge Rodriquez Jr., Audio

arrowsmithwine.com/events

7/29-7/30: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Spurts, Dry Goods. Sat.:

7/31: Zaca Mesa Winery Brad Welker, Cuddle Fish, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, noon-3pm. 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 688-9339. Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

sohosb.com/events

7/29: S.B. Botanic Garden Summer Serenade Concert Bring blankets, picnics,

Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

7/28-8/3: SOhO Restaurant & Music uptownlounge805.com/events Club Thu.: Sookie Sookie, The Disappoint7/30: Andrew Murray Vineyards ments, Duende, 8:30pm. $10. Ages 21+. Fri.: Jams Benefit Concert, 7pm. $25. Ages Keith Cox, noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 686-9604. 21+. Sat.: Tina Schlieske & The Graceland andrewmurrayvineyards.com/Visit/ Exiles with Sister Laura, 8:30pm. $10. Ages 21+. Sun.: Sandy Cummings & Jazz du Jour, Events 12:30-3pm. $10. Mon.: Jerry Day Celebration:

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

tinyurl.com/GrowBusinessWebinar

7/29: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free.

McCarrin & Ms. Finch, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Lost Chord Guitars, 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. 7/29-7/30: S.B. Bowl Fri.: The Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com Chicks, 6:30pm. $95-$195. Sat.: Josh Groban, 7pm. $51-$205. 634 State St.. 1122 7/28, 7/30: M.Special Brewing Co. N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com (S.B.) Thu.: Kelp, The Nebulas, 7-10pm. Sat.: Fabulous Stuoubadoors, 6-8pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. 7/29: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm; Missbehavin’, 7:30-10:30pm. 3126 mspecialbrewco.com State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800.

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

7/28, 7/30-7/31, 8/3: Lost Chord Guitars Thu.: Surfer Joe, 7:30-9:30pm. Sat.: Cristina Vane, 8-11:30pm. Sun.: Matt McCarrin Jazz, 8-10:30pm. Wed.: Matt

DUSTIN THOMAS

7/29-7/30: Theresa Caputo: The Experience Live! Star of the TLC network’s

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

mspecialbrewco.com

zacamesa.com/upcoming-events/

7/29-7/30: Maverick Saloon Fri.:

8/3: Fox Wine Co. Hooveri, Mohama-

Jukebox the Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Col Angus, 9pm-midnight. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

saz, 7-10pm. 120 Santa Barbara St. $10. Call (805) 699-6329.

tinyurl.com/HooveriShow

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

SUNDAY 7/31

ReGina Christine Sabens

7/30:

Ako Ito/This Is Me Join this

celebration of community and the cultural fabric of the Filipinx/a/o community and diaspora in S.B. County. There will be opening announcements, a panel discussion, food, music, vendors, art, and storytelling. Register online. 5-8pm. Museum of Contemporary Art S.B., 653 Paseo Nuevo. Free. tinyurl

7/31:

COURTESY

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

S.B. Arts & Crafts Show

Stroll the waterfront and take in fine and contemporary art and crafts from nearly 150 artists and artisans. 10am-6pm. Cabrillo Blvd. from Stearns Wharf to Calle Cesar Chavez. Free.

tinyurl.com/WaterfrontArt Show

.com/AkoItoCelebration

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

JULY 28, 2022

Fundraiser

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35


T HE 7/31: Wildcat Lounge Presents Glitter Brunch Vivian Storm and Angel D’Mon invite you to a fabulous brunch experience every Sunday with a show at 12:30pm. Visit the website to make a reservation and view the menu, which includes Kitty Chilaquiles, French toast, burgers, and more. 11am-3pm. Wildcat Lounge, 15 W. Ortega St. $5. glitterbrunch.com

FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

THURSDAY NIGHTS FROM 6–7:30PM FREEPALM SUMMER CONCERT CHASE PARK GREATSERIES MEADOW FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES STAGE FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

THURSDAY NIGHTS FROM 6–7:30PM FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES 2022 SCHEUDLE THURSDAY NIGHTS FROM 6–7:30PM THURSDAY NIGHTS FROM 6–7:30PM CHASE PALM PARK GREAT MEADOW STAGE THURSDAY NIGHTS 6–7:30PM CHASE PALM PARK GREATFROM MEADOW STAGE CHASECHASE PALMPALM PARK GREAT STAGE PARK GREAT MEADOW MEADOW STAGE SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts

THURSDAY NIGHTS IN JULY FROM 6–7:30PM

(805) 564-5418 ParksAndRec@SantaBarbaraCA.gov CHASE PALM PARK GREAT MEADOW STAGE

THU

JULY 14

8/1: Sunset Rooftop Yoga Flow S.B. Beach Yoga invites

THE MOLLY RINGWALD PROJECT you to this all-levels class that will offer invigorating Vinyasa flow 80’s Tribute Band

that will build strength, confidence, and balance followed by restorative poses. 6:30pm. East Beach Cabrillo Pavilion Bathhouse Rooftop, 1118 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $20.

THE BLUE BREEZE BANDtinyurl.com/SunsetFlow The Best of Motown/R&B

TUESDAY 8/2

THE BLUE BREEZE BAND CARDIAC

SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts CAPTAIN THU

50s and 60s Rock n’ Roll Best of Motown/R&B LATIN R&B / SOUL THE MOLLY RINGWALD PROJECT CONCE R T S I NTHU T H80’s E P A R K Band I S M A D E MARQUEZ POSSIBLE BY JULY CCOONNCC EERRTTS7SI N TTHHEETribute PPAARRKKPEPE I SI SMMAADDEEPPOOSSSSI B I N I BLLEEBBYY THESE GENEROUS SPONSORS JULY 28 Latin THESE CONCER T S I NGENEROUS THE PAR KSPONSORS I SR&B/Soul MADE POSSIBLE

THESE GENEROUS SPONSORS THE BLUE BREEZE BAND

THU

COURTESY

THURSDAY NIGHTS IN JULY FROM 6–7:30PM THE BLUE THURSDAY (805) 564-5418 Best of Motown/R&B ParksAndRec@SantaBarbaraCA.gov PEPE MARQUEZ AN D BREEZE TH E STAGE CO RO NBAND ARI ES CHASE PALM PARK GREAT MEADOW THURSDAY THE BLUE BREEZE BAND JULY 21 Best of Motown/R&B

JULY28 28 JULY THU

FIESTA 2022

MONDAY 8/1

FRITZ OLENBERGER

THU

JULY 7

OLD SPANISH DAYS

BY

JULYTHESE 14 The Best of Motown/R&BSPONSORS GENEROUS CO N CERTS IN T H E PA RK IS M A D E P OSS I B LE BY THESE GEN ER O US SPO N S O RS THU

CAPTAIN CARDIAC

THU

PEPE MARQUEZ

JULY 21 JULY 28

AN D THE COR ON AR IES 50s and 60s Rock n’ Roll

8/2:

Latin R&B/Soul

Music at the Ranch: Tony Ybarra

7/31:

Bring your lawn chairs and enjoy this SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts summer evening with the rich flamenco and Latin sounds ParksAndRec@SantaBarbaraCA.gov (805) 546-5418 of the guitar from Tony Ybarra. 5:30-7:30pm. Rancho La Patera & Stow House, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd. Goleta. SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts ParksAndRec@santabarbaraCA.gov SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts ParksAndRec@santabarbaraCA.gov Free. Email info@goletahistory.org. goletahistory.org/ SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts ParksAndRec@santabarbaraCA.gov CO N C E RTS I N T HE PA RK IS M A D E PO SS IBL E BY THESE GENER OUS SPONSORS

Join La Presidente Maria Cabrera, her family, and the Old Spanish Days board of directors to celebrate the history and excitement of Fiesta 2022 with dinner, performances by the 2022 Spirit and Junior Spirit of Fiesta, and dancing to the band Heart and Soul. 5-9:30pm. S.B. Carriage and Western Art Museum,129 Castillo St. $115.

music-at-the-ranch

SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts

The Two Truths

SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts ParksAndRec@SantaBarbaraCA.gov Parks(805) And546-5418 Rec@santabarbaraCA.go8/2: v Candlelight Yoga with Aubry All levels are invited

Realizing the Meaning of Relative & Absolute Truth with resident teacher Dawa Tarchin Phillips

B U D D H I S T

C E N T E R

Information/Reservations www.freewalkingtoursb.com 36

THE INDEPENDENT

JULY 28, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

paseonuevoshopping.com/events/viva-la-fiesta

8/3: Crafternoons Kids of all ages are invited to join every

8/2-8/3: Old Spanish Days: Fiesta La Cumbre Plaza

Wednesday to work on a project they bring or participate in an art station for inspiration using workshop materials and assistance from an art coordinator. Artists six years and younger must be accompanied by an adult. 3:30-5pm. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. $8. exploreecology.org/event/crafternoons

Celebrate Fiesta with a lineup of dance performances in front of Macy’s through August 5. Tue.: noon-5pm; Wed.: noon5:30pm. La Cumbre Plaza, 121 S. Hope Ave. Free.

shoplacumbre.com/Events

8/3: El Mercado de la Guerra Stroll through a colorful Mexican market (across from City Hall) to feast on Spanish and Mexican-American foods, shop for crafts and souvenirs, and enjoy live entertainment all day and into the early evening. The Mercado goes through Saturday, August 6. 11am-10pm. De la Guerra Plaza, first block of E. De la Guerra St. Free.

sbfiesta.org/events-calendar

8/3: El Mercado del Norte This family-friendly event will feature a full carnival with rides and games, food and merchant vendors, live music, dancing, and the Crazy Horse Cantina! The purchase of a wristband will get you unlimited rides. The Mercado goes through Saturday August 6. 11am-10pm. Mackenzie Park, State St. and Las Positas Rd. Admission: free; wristband: $30. sbfiesta.org/events-calendar

8/3:

(It's not what you think!")

Center Court is the place to get into the Fiesta spirit with dancing and music performances daily through August 6. Noon7pm. Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free.

WEDNESDAY 8/3

free Historical Walking Tours

A

8/2: Flamenco Dance and Live Music Paseo Nuevo

tinyurl.com/CandlelightYogaAug2

In-Person & Online www.bodhipath.org/sb/

Waterfront Funk Zone ow Old Town nd n

sbfiesta.org/events-calendar

to join for a relaxing and slow Hatha Yoga practice, along with stretching and mindful breathwork surrounded by soft calming candlelight vibrations. 5:30pm. Carpinteria Woman’s Club, 1059 Vallecito Rd., Carpinteria. $15.

COURTESY

August 4 & 11 7:00 – 9:00pm

La Recepción del Presidente

Solvang Music in the Park Gather

the family together and meet your friends at the gazebo for live music. 5-8pm. Solvang Park, 1630 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free.

tinyurl.com/ParkMusicAug3

8/3: La Fiesta Pequeña “Little Fiesta” is a historical and colorful program that celebrates Old Spanish Days with performances of traditional song and dance. 8-10pm. Old Mission S.B., 2201 Laguna St. Free. sbfiesta.org/events-calendar


JULY AUG.

28

3

FOODBANK PICNIC IN THE PARK 2022 The Foodbank offers free, nutritious meals, activities, and enrichment opportunities to all children ages 1-18 in our county, Monday-Friday, June 6-August 12, unless otherwise stated. Visit the website for North County locations. Call (805) 967-5741, text “SUMMERFOOD” to 304-304, or download the CA Meals for Kids App.

FOODBANK PICNIC EN EL PARQUE 2022

May 28–September 5 Walk through a beautiful garden while nearly 1,000 live butterflies flutter freely around you. The exhibit features a dazzling variety of butterflies, from local favorites to exotic tropical species. Learn about the life cycle and behavior of these spectacular invertebrates while observing them up close.

El Foodbank ofrece comidas nutritivas gratuitas, actividades, y oportunidades de enriquecimiento para todos los niños de 1 a 18 años en nuestro condado, del 6 de junio al 12 de agosto, de lunes a viernes si no se indique lo contrario. Visite el sitio web por las ubicaciones de North County. Llame al (805) 967-5741, envíe un mensaje de texto que dice “SUMMERFOOD” al 877 877, o descargue la App de CA Meals for Kids. tinyurl.com/FoodbankSummerFood

tinyurl.com/PicnicInThePark2021

S.B. UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT FREE MEALS Free breakfast and lunch for all youth 18 years and younger. For more information, call (805) 963-4338 x6385, text “food” to 304-304,or download the CA Meals for Kids App.

DISTRITO ESCOLAR UNFICADO DE S.B. COMIDAS GRATIS Desayuno y almuerzo gratuitos para todos los jóvenes de 18 años o menos. Para más información llame al (805) 963-4338 x6385, envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra “food” al 304-304, o descargue la App CA Meals for Kids. sbunified.org/support/foodservices

ALISO ELEMENTARY (JUNE 13-AUG. 12)

PARQUE DE LOS NIÑOS (JUNE 6-AUG.12)

Carpinteria: 4545 Carpinteria Ave. 11am-noon

Santa Barbara: 520 Wentworth Ave, noon-1pm

CARPINTERIA HIGH SCHOOL (JUNE 13-JULY 8)

S.B. CENTRAL LIBRARY (JUNE 6-AUG.12)

Carpinteria: 4810 Foothill Rd. 11:1512:15pm

GOLETA VALLEY COMMUNITY CTR. (JUNE 6-AUG.12) Goleta: 5679 Hollister Ave. 11am-noon

Santa Barbara: 40 E. Anapamu St. Tue.-Fri., noon-1pm

2559 Puesta del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105 805-682-4711 • sbnature.org MEDIA SPONSORS: SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NOOZHAWK

SBWPC'S Young Feminists in Collaboration with The Resource Presents:

Empowerment For Young People Post Roe THIS SATURDAY JULY 30 5:00 - 6:00 PM SB PUBLIC LIBRARY, FAULKNER GALLERY*

OUR PANELISTS: Julia Teymouri,

DIRECTOR OF UCSB STUDENTS FOR REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE

Erica Reyes,

40 E Anapamu St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

DISTRICT DIRECTOR, 24TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT OFFICE

OR WATCH LIVE ON FB:

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PLANNED PARENTHOOD, VICE PRESIDENT OF COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

*The Santa Barbara Library does not advocate or endorse the viewpoints of this meeting.

DISTRICT DIRECTOR, SENATE DISTRICT 19

Jackie Gardena,

Luz Reyes-Martín,

Vianey Lopez,

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JULY 28, 2022

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37


Health The Arlington Theatre

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$2 10am: SUMMER KIDS MOVIES Tickets! Fiesta 5: Tuesday & Wednesday Camino Real: Thursday *Kids Series Only Happening Now! *

7/29: 7/29: 7/29: DC LEAGUE OF RESURRECTION VENGEANCE SUPER-PETS

Fiesta • Fairview

Hitchcock

8/2, 3, 4: METRO SUMMER KIDS MOVIES

Fiesta 5 • Camino

Fiesta 5

8/4: BULLET TRAIN

Arlington • Metro 4 • Camino

8/4: EASTER SUNDAY

Fiesta 5 • Camino

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for July 29-Aug 4, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

DC League of Super-Pets* (PG): Fri-Sun: 12:10, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55. Mon-Thur: 2:05, 4:45, 7:25. Where the Crawdads Sing* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:55, 4:50, 7:45. Minions: Rise of Gru (PG): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 3:45, 6:00, 8:15.

Thor: Love and Thunder (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Jurassic World Dominion (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:15, 4:15. The Black Phone (R): Fri-Wed: 5:45, 8:15. Lightyear (PG): Fri-Wed: 1:30, 7:30. Thur: 1:30. Bullet Train* (R): Thur: 3:15, 5:45, 6;45, 9:00, 10:00.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Nope (R): Fri: 1:20, 2:45, 4:20, 5:45, 7:20, 8:45, 10:20. Sat: 11:45, 1:20, 2:45, 4:20, 5:45, 7:20, 8:45, 10:20. Sun: 11:45, 1:20, 2:45, 4:20, 5:45, 7:20, 8:45. Mon-Wed: 1:20, 2:45, 4:20, 5:45, 7:20, 8:45. Thur: 11:45, 1:20, 2:45, 5:45, 8:45. Marcel the Shell with Shoes On (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 2:10. Sat/Sun: 11:50, 2:10. Thor: Love and Thunder* (PG13): Fri: 2:30, 5:20, 8:15, 9:40. Sat: 11:30, 2:30, 5:20, 8:15, 9:40. Sun: 11:30, 2:30, 5:20, 8:15.Mon-Wed: 2:30, 5:20, 8:15. Paws of Fury (PG): Fri-Mon: 4:30, 8:00. Elvis (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:10, 7:40. Sat: 12:40, 4:10, 7:40. Thur: 12:40. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Sat/Sun, Thur: 11:00, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Goosebumps ($2) (PG): Thur: 10:00. Bullet Train* (R): Thur: 3:00, 4:30, 6:05, 7:40, 9:15. Easter Sunday* (PG13): Thur: 5:10, 7:50.

HITCHCOCK

DC League of Super-Pets* (PG): Fri: 1:25, 2:40, 4:00, 5:15, 6:35, 7:50, 9:10.Sat: 12:05, 1:25, 2:40, 4:00, 5:15, 6:35, 7:50, 9:10. Sun, Tue/Wed: 12:05, 1:25, 2:40, 4:00, 5:15, 6:35, 7:50. Mon, Thur: 1:25, 2:40, 4:00, 5:15, 6:35, 7:50 Vengeance* (R): Fri, Mon, Thur: 2:30, 5:25, 8:05. Sat/Sun, Tue/Wed: 11:50, 2:30, 5:25, 8:05. Marcel the Shell with Shoes On (PG): Fri-Wed: 7:30. Paws of Fury (PG): Fri-Wed: 2:25, 5:00. Thur: 2:25. Minions: The Rise of Gru (PG): Fri: 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9:00. Sat: 11:55, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9:00. Sun, Tue/Wed: 11:55, 2:15, 4:30, 7:00. Mon: 2:15, 4:30, 7:00. How to Train Your Dragon ($2) (PG): Tue/Wed: 10:00. Private Rentals: Sat/Sun: 11:45. Easter Sunday* (PG13): Thur: 5:00, 7:30.

PA S E O N U E V O Nope (R): Fri/Sat: 12:45, 2:45, 3:45, 5;45, 6:45, 8:45, 9:45. Sun-Thur: 12:45, 2:45, 3:45, 5;45, 6:45, 8:45. Where the Crawdads Sing (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 4:45, 8:00. Elvis (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 4:45, 8:00.

Resurrection (NR): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:15, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 5:15, 7:45. Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 4:30, 7:20.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

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38

F I E S TA 5

Nope* (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:45, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Bullet Train* (R): Thur: 4:45, 8:00.

JULY 28, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

“T

A Call to Action

he pills were malarone, not misoprostol.” My obstetrician colleague in Tanzania, East Africa, made a chilling discovery about medication I had purchased in a local pharmacy to use for terminating a patient’s pregnancy. Malarone is a powerful antimalarial agent that could have killed someone in the prescribed quantity for misoprostol, one of the drugs utilized in medical abortions. During the four years I worked as a surgeon in Tanzania—where abortion is legal only to save the life of a mother—treating patients safely was challenging. As was my experience with a pharmacy dispensing incorrect medication, the barriers to care were often nuanced and dangerous to navigate. In the weeks since the SCOTUS decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, I have been struggling to process its impact on my professional and personal life. Having lived abroad in several countries where violence against women is widespread, it is devastating to consider that protection within our American borders is disintegrating. But we can’t condone this—it’s not acceptable for us, or our future generations. I want my son to grow up in a world where the life of a woman is as valuable as his own. I want him to understand that dignity, bodily autonomy, and access to health care are fundamental human rights. I want him to bear witness to the sacred physician-patient relationship and respect my ability to protect those who entrust their lives to me.

Santa Barbara’s Medical Establishments Must Begin to Prioritize All Aspects of Women’s Health by Dr. Katrina Mitchell I stand with the American College of Surgeons, American Medical Association, American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, American Academy of Pediatrics, and all other organizations that have spoken out against this assault on medical practice and patient safety. Just as SCOTUS does not have the authority to dictate receipt of vasectomy or vaccination, it should not play a role in requiring a woman to accept the physical and mental health risks of pregnancy and childbirth. Making abortion illegal doesn’t stop abortions—it stops safe abortions. Our country already carries the highest maternal mortality rate of any western nation, and we can’t afford to lose more women. At best, pregnancy and childbirth changes the mind and body of a woman forever. At worst, it ends in death. Our leaders are unaware of—or choose to ignore—these facts. If they could join surgeons in a day of work, they would experience a harsh awakening. I would invite them to watch as we perform an emergency hysterectomy on a woman hemorrhaging in labor. Sit with us as we deliver the news to her family that their beloved wife, sister, or daughter did not survive. Listen to us declare a depressed pregnant woman brain dead from a self-inflected gunshot wound. See us place breathing and feeding tubes in a patient paralyzed from eclampsia and hemorrhagic stroke. Smell the stench of leaking urine and feces from a rectovaginal fistula in an adolescent victim of incest. Hear our testimony in a child abuse case when a young mother, alone and overwhelmed, shakes her baby to death.

INGRID BOSTROM

living

Dr. Katrina Mitchell

Our cultural idealization of motherhood leads to a complex reality for many women. During pregnancy and the postpartum period, women are at their highest lifetime risk for development of a mood or anxiety disorder. I have cared for tens of thousands of patients who are struggling in a healthcare system and culture that lacks safeguards to protect their physical, emotional, and economic wellbeing. Women who are suffering need access to obtain treatment, as maternal health directly affects fetal and childhood development. Restricting abortion further reduces the ability of women to conquer the multi-layered challenges they already face. At this moment in time, we must raise our voices louder than ever and demand expansion of the support we can offer to our communities in need. This is a crisis. Our state will be receiving an influx of patients traveling from elsewhere to obtain reproductive health services. Planned Parenthood is the only organization in Santa Barbara that provides elective abortions, and this is not enough. Our medical establishments must accept this call to action and begin to prioritize women’s health—all aspects of it. Change is uncomfortable, but silence is complicity. Women of all ages, races, ethnicities, gender identities, sexual orientations, and socioeconomic statuses deserve locally available comprehensive care for concerns unique to them at critical junctures in their reproductive life cycle—from puberty to menopause. Beyond abortion services, I propose the creation of a Santa Barbara women’s healthcare task force, composed of community leaders, healthcare providers, and stakeholders. This task force can identify what we currently do well, and create a plan to address the gaps—including those that impact underserved and high-risk patient populations. As illustrated in Aftershock, the powerful new documentary exposing the epidemic of Black maternal mortality in the United States, birthing centers and midwifery care for low-risk patients is a standard worldwide. Method of delivery is significantly correlated with successful breastfeeding, and I see the effect of highintervention birth in my lactation practice each day. We need to understand this association and ask how we can promote outcomes that influence a lifetime of health for mothers and children. Safe birth exists both in and outside of hospitals, and we should help patients explore all options based on their individual circumstances.


Health continued This task force can facilitate research into the everevolving physical and mental health needs of women in our county. It can fundraise to help build a facility that utilizes the latest technology and models standards of care for all facets of women’s health. Patients can receive their pap smear, mammogram, bone density test, menopause management, and female surgical services alongside obstetrics, reproductive mental health, lactation, and physical therapy. And this list is just a start. Many individuals throughout Santa Barbara have the vision, knowledge, and skills to build something great, but the system to support them must exist. This system

must be intentional and proactive, not short-sighted and reactive. When I graduated from medical school, I committed myself to a life of service to others. The work ahead requires more dedication than ever, but I am ready. My son is, too. Will you join us?

Dr. Katrina Mitchell is a breast surgeon, lactation consultant, and perinatal mental health provider. She is passionate about community education and advocacy for women’s health. This article reflects her personal views and does not represent that of the organizations with which she is affiliated.

JULY 29 - AUGUST 4 "SMART, SOULFUL" The Hollywood Reporter

Outdoors

DEREK GLAS

Getting Back to the Garden

A

hummingbird is hovering above the fuchsia trumpet of a penstemon, shade and sunlight dapple the ground beneath a winding willow maze, and clumps of columbine and yarrow adorn trails that lead to secret places. This is the Santa Ynez Valley Botanic Garden, a hidden gem and labor of love located — unexpectedly — in Buellton. I cannot believe I’ve missed it until now.

A Hidden Gem in Buellton by Cynthia Carbone Ward “There’s not a day that I come here and don’t find a little miracle,” muses landscape designer Eva Powers, who is on the board of trustees for the S.Y.V. Botanic Garden Foundation, and one of the dedicated volunteers, along with Puck Erickson Lohnas, Steve Schulz, and others, who envisioned this place 15 years ago and worked to make it real. When the adjacent River View Park was developed, a requirement was put in place to set aside 2.5 acres as habitat for the endangered western willow flycatcher, and so it was, but more exuberant ideas took root in the collective imagination of the locals. What had once been a wasteland of cement, construction debris, and gravel was gradually transformed into a living replica of the natural landscapes of the valley. Eva leads me along hand-cut trails through the plant zones of Figueroa Mountain, the Gaviota Coast, the Channel Islands, and a Santa Ynez River rain garden. There are healthy stands of sycamore, alder, pine, and oak trees in once-barren places. Native grassland thrives, butterflies flutter, and slopes are soft with buckwheat.

There are human-made surprises also: Chumashinspired stone carvings by artist Lon Etzel, colorful mosaic animal images by visiting schoolkids, and a dome-shaped Chumash hut constructed of bundled tule reeds attached to a willow branch framework — a project led by volunteer Julio Carrillo III. Nearby, the branches of a wishing tree are hung with poignant messages handwritten on brown paper slips that will eventually be mulched, true to the cyclical nature of things, to help fertilize the wishing tree: I wish my grandpa would get better. I wish for a sleepover for my birthday. I wish COVID will go away. “The pandemic has actually led more people to the garden,” Eva tells me. “It’s an outdoor place to go, a refuge. People can help with activities and maintenance, or just quietly be here and reconnect with nature. Maybe sometimes we forget how important that is.” Indeed, the garden provides a kind of sustenance, and I feel replenished just knowing it is here, a sanctuary for plants, wildlife, and humans. Behind the gas stations, stores, and Highway 246, nature is trying to continue, mountains loom like munificent elders, and wonders abound. The miracle within the miracle, however, is the dedicated community that birthed and tends it. “Good people find each other and make good things happen,” observes Kyle Abello, the City Liaison to the Garden. “This is a beautiful example of a public-private partnership and the collaborative effort of neighbors.” The Foundation is grateful for a recent grant from the City of Buellton, but local contributions of materials, building supplies, and expertise have been crucial, and it continues to run primarily on donations and the hard work of volunteers. This has allowed it to be a relatively unstructured, welcoming, admission-free destination, and a creative venue for environmental education, native plant propagation, arts and crafts, and peaceful reflection. It’s organic, as it should be, a work still in process. I stand still for a moment before traversing the wooden bridge that leads back to the park and playground area. As I walk to my car, I hear the distant shouts of children playing in the distance, an elderly couple in wide-brimmed hats strolls along hand-inhand, and a trellis of wisteria casts a crisscross of shade upon a picnic table. I feel giddy, and I don’t know why, until it dawns on me that I have just glimpsed the very things that I believe will save us: community collaboration, and the precious natural world. The enchanted garden remains a hidden gem until directional signs are installed, but the physical address is 151 Sycamore Drive in Buellton, at the west end of River View Park, just two turns off Highway 246. Come. Be inspired, learn, reflect and feel hopeful. Donate if you wish. n

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Sports

2022 Fiesta Los Mercados COURTESY PHOTOS

Boys of Summer Rejoice

Justin Campbell

Jace Jung

T

he 2022 MLB Draft was a dream realized for many baseball prospects with Santa Barbara ties. In addition to the six Gauchos drafted this week, 16 former Santa Barbara Foresters were selected, including five in the first two rounds. The 2020 Foresters team was the main source of the draftees, which started with the Detroit Tigers selecting Jace Jung of Texas Tech, who followed his brother Josh, also a former Foresters infielder, as a first-round pick. Spencer Jones of Vanderbilt, who spent the summer of 2019 and 2020 with the Foresters, was also selected in the first round.

MLB Drafts Six Gauchos, 16 Former Foresters by Victor Bryant Foresters head coach Bill Pintard is a part of the Yankees organization, so he was especially elated by Jones’s landing spot. “It’s really special because Spencer Jones played here for two years,” Pintard said. “He played as a high school guy and then he played on the COVID team. For him to go No. 1 to the Yankees was really a thrill.” Pintard said all 16 of his former players called him with the news. “I told them I am proud to have contributed to their journey.” Right-handed pitcher Justin Campbell out of Oklahoma State, who played with the Foresters in 2020, was selected with a supplemental pick immediately after round one by the Cleveland Guardians. In the second round, former Foresters Peyton Graham and Peyton Pallete were picked up by the Detroit Tigers and the Chicago White Sox, respectively. In later rounds, San Marcos and SBCC product Ian Churchill went to the Toronto Blue Jays; Dos Pueblos graduate Isaac Coffey heads to the Red Sox; and Santa Barbara alum Derek True is going to the Oakland Athletics. True spent three years at Cal Poly, where he developed as a relief pitcher. Westmont catcher Simon Reid was drafted in the 10th round at pick number 315 overall. Reid is the second-highest drafted player in Westmont history

Spencer Jones

and the only player who spent all four years at an NAIA school to be drafted this year.

The Road to Wichita The Foresters finished in first place in the California Collegiate League south and will now focus on defending its National Baseball Congress World Series title following a 2-1 victory over the San Luis Obispo Blues on Sunday, July 24. The NBC World Series will be played July 28 – August 6, with Wichita, Kansas, hosting the last six days of the event. The first four days will be played in Hutchinson, Kansas, at Hobart-Detter Field. Four pools of four teams each will compete over a six-day period, with the top two teams from each pool advancing to a single elimination bracket to determine a national champion. The Foresters finished the regular season with four victories in the final five games. It is yet to be seen if that momentum can lead to a third consecutive NBC World Series title. The Foresters will play their first game against the Haysville Aviators on July 29 at 6:30 p.m.

August 3 - August 6, 2022

Live Music & Dancing Schedule

De La Guerra

De La Guerra Plaza

Del Norte

Mackenzie Park

(De La Guerra & State Sts.)

(State St. & Las Positas Rd.)

Wednesday, August 3 11:15 AM-12:00 PM — Cruz Dance & Entertainment 12:10-12:45 PM — Alma de Mexico 12:45-1:15 PM — Grupo Danza de Quetzalcoatl 1:20-2:20 PM — Maria Bermudez Flamenco Performing Arts 2:25-3:15 PM — Garcia Dance Studio 3:15-4:15 PM — Flamenco Santa Barbara 6:30-8 PM — False Puppet 8:30-10 PM — Doublewide Kings

Wednesday, August 3 11:00 AM-12:00 PM — Garcia Dance Studio 12:05-1:00 PM — Puro Flamenco 1:15-1:45 PM — Boscutti Ballet Theatre 2:00-2:45 PM — Cruz Dance & Entertainment 3:00-3:15 PM — 2022 Spirits 3:30-4:30 PM — Zermeño Dance Academy 5 PM — Luis Medrano 6:15 PM — TBA 7:30 PM — Buena Onda 9 PM — Time Travelers Band

Thursday, August 4 11:00-11:30 AM — Boscutti Ballet Theatre 11:35 AM-12:05 PM — Garcia Dance Studio 12:10-12:40 PM — Alma de Mexico 12:45-1:30 PM — Cruz Dance & Entertainment 1:35-2:00 PM — Grupo Danza de Quetzalcoatl 2:00-2:30 PM — Puro Flamenco 2:35-3:10 PM — Maria Bermudez Flamenco Performing Arts 3:15-4:30 PM — Zermeño Dance Academy 5-6:15 PM — Tony Ybarra 6:45-8 PM — Los Anclas 8:30-10 PM — Mezcal Martini Friday, August 5 11:00-11:30 AM — Alma de Mexico 12:05-12:35 PM — Baile de California 12:40-1:15 PM — Garcia Dance Studio 1:20-1:50 PM — Puro Flamenco 1:55-2:25 PM — Maria Bermudez Flamenco Performing Arts 2:30 PM-3:15 PM — Cruz Dance & Entertainment 3:20-3:40 PM — Grupo Folklórico de West L.A. 3:45-4:30 PM — Zermeño Dance Academy 5-6:15 PM — Jackson Gillies Band 6:45-8 PM — Flannel 101 8:30-10 PM — Molly Ringwald Project Saturday, August 6 11:15 AM-12:00 PM — Cruz Dance & Entertainment 12:00-1:00 PM — Maria Bermudez Flamenco Performing Arts 1:05-1:35 PM — Puro Flamenco 1:40-2:00 PM — Boscutti Ballet Theatre 2:05-3:00 PM — Zermeño Dance Academy 3:05-3:25 PM — Alma de Mexico 3:30-4:30 PM — Garcia Dance Studio 6:45-8 PM — The Roosters 8:30-10 PM — Spencer the Gardener Wednesday & Saturday Featuring DJ Darla Bea and La Boheme Dancers

Thursday, August 4 11:00-11:30 AM — Puro Flamenco 11:45 AM-12:30 PM — Zermeño Dance Academy 12:35-12:50 PM — 2022 Spirits 1:00-1:30 PM — Grupo Folklórico de West L.A. 1:40-2:10 PM — Boscutti Ballet Theatre 2:15-3:00 PM — Cruz Dance & Entertainment 3:10-3:40 PM — Alma de Mexico 3:45-4:30 PM — Garcia Dance Studio 5 PM – Dusty Jugs/The Rincons 6:15 PM — Art of Funk 7:30 PM — Soul Kool 9 PM — Los Anclas Friday, August 5 11:00-11:45 AM — Cruz Dance & Entertainment 12:00-12:30 PM — Boscutti Ballet Theatre 12:45-1:15 PM — Alma de Mexico 1:30-2:30 PM — Grupo Danza de Quetzalcoatl 2:45-3:00 PM — 2022 Spirits 3:10-4:15 PM — Zermeño Dance Academy 4:45 PM — Chill Point 6 PM — Vibe Setters 7:30 PM — 805 Cali Tejanos 9 PM — Heart and Soul Saturday, August 6 1:00-1:30 PM — Alma de Mexico 1:45-2:15 PM — Baile de California 2:45-3:00 PM — Grupo Folklórico Huitzillin 3:15-3:30 PM — Ballet Folklórico Aztlán de CSUN 3:35-4:00 PM — Boscutti Ballet Theatre 4:30 PM — Grooveshine 6:15 PM — House Arrest 7:30 PM — Mestizo 9:15 PM — Agua Santa

Get more information at www.sbfiesta.org

UCSB Roster Coming into Focus The 2022 MLB draft was heavy on college players and short on high school prospects in comparison to years past. For UCSB, that means they will very likely lose all six of their draftees, but it could also mean that all of the high school prospects currently committed will make it to campus rather than begin their professional career. The lone UCSB commit drafted was 6'6" shortstop Austin Charles, who was selected in round 20 by Kansas City. The draft was older this year than usual as more than 75 percent of the players drafted in the first 10 rounds were coming from college. “I think part of that is the reduction in minor leagues and no short season A-ball,” said UCSB coach Andrew Checketts. “I think there are more high school kids that are going to go to school, and the pros are going to let us develop them or filter them, whichever view you have, of what happens in college.” n INDEPENDENT.COM

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Passport

Drop Party Sunday July 31 2 - 4pm Night Lizard 607 State St, Santa Barbara

Have a pint and hang out with fellow Indy Hoppers as we celebrate the end of the crawl Bring your completed Indy Hops Passport to our Indy Hops Passport Drop Party for a chance to win gift cards from the participating breweries!

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FOOD &DRINK

p. 43

Jessica Gasca Writes the Story of Soil MACDUFF EVERTON

Santa Barbara County Winemaker Tells the Tale of Each Vineyard

portive about me doing my own wine,” explained Gasca, who had started her own brand in 2012 with one ton of pinot noir and two tons of syrah. “They hired me knowing my wine would eventually become my purpose and my focus. Any time harvest came around, or when I had to bottle, they let me do my own thing. I don’t know how many other wineries would have been so gracious.” In May 2017, Gasca and her husband, Brady Fiechter, opened the Story of Soil tasting room in Los Olivos. By April 2018, she’d left Dragonette with a big slap on the back and was finally on her own. Story of Soil’s lineup includes a dozen different smallbatch wines, rarely more than 200 cases each, including syrah, pinot noir, gamay noir, sauvignon blanc, and grüner veltliner, grown across an assortment of 11 different vineyards. In line with her philosophy, Gasca is meticulous about sourcing, aiming for “top-tier, highest-quality” vineyards. “There are seven biodynamic certified vineyards in Santa Barbara County — I work with five of them,” she said. “There is something magical to me about these vineyards, where the owners are walking the vines constantly. And if you work with great grapes, there is very little I have to do in the cellar, to be quite honest.” Gasca is also becoming an important part of the wine industry’s charitable efforts as part of the Santa Barbara Vintners Foundation, where she became president of the board in 2019. She was integral in shifting the biannual Santa Barbara Wine Auction to benefit the ComVINE LOVE: Jessica Gasca is committed to making wines from vineyards that are truly farmed sustainably, explaining, “There is something magical munity Health Centers of the Central Coast, while still to me about these vineyards, where the owners are walking the vines constantly.” supporting Direct Relief, the international aid organization based in Goleta that the auction was founded to What follows is an edited excerpt from Vines & Vision: buying habits. “I thought I was a wine drinker, drinking foster in 2000. “I had never heard of the CHC before, so I went The Winemakers of Santa Barbara County, published in $12 bottles of J. Lohr cab or Estancia or Coppola that I and found a mobile unit in Los Alamos, knocked on 2020 by Matt Kettmann and Macduff Everton. bought at Safeway,” she says. “I thought it was fancy.” She did have a direct connection to hand-crafted the door, and talked to the doctor on site that day,” he wine is not about me,” says Jessica Gasca of wine, though. Her uncle through marriage is Gary Burk, she explained. “They have the capability to drive their her brand, Story of Soil. “That’s why I don’t the founder of Costa de Oro Winery. “I called him up mobile health units from vineyard to vineyard and give put my name on the bottle. It’s about the place and said I would love to make wine,” explained Gasca, our workers health care, which is amazing.” where it’s grown. It’s my job to tell you that who quickly took the offer of an unpaid The 2020 gala was the first to benefit both orgastory: the vintage, the microclimate, the place. That’s harvest job in 2009. nizations, and it also connected Direct Relief more what I’m trying to do, to let you know as a consumer Cellar life was immediately directly to the CHC. “The cherry on the top is intoxicating, especially since she that we’re checking the box for vintners who where it’s from and what it’s about.” want to give back locally, we’re still supporting Gasca’s story begins among the pines of Lake Arrow- was surrounded by the legendary head, where she was born, but begins to blossom in New winemakers who then worked at Direct Relief, and they are partnering with York City, where she moved in 2003 after getting a psy- Central Coast Wine Services. “The the CHC to provide medicines, vaccines, and all the things they need,” says Gasca. “The chology degree from Cal State L.A. While pursuing big culture back then at CCWS was a three of us have come together to do even city dreams, Gasca helped open a restaurant, where the good ol’ boys club,” she remembered. N TTMAN E “It was really fabulous. All the winebigger and better things locally. It’s really resident sommelier taught wine classes every Tuesday. K T T BY M A “That sparked my interest,” she explained. “The makers would get together at lunch time, exciting.” She further cemented that relationship by raising more money during the Vintner Foundation’s amount of knowledge he had about a simple beverage cook together, eat and drink, and then go back to harvest. That was a really fun intro- duction to recent golf tournament at Sandpiper. just blew me away.” On the wine front, she never wants Story of Soil The New York experiment fizzled fast — “it was way wine culture for me.” too hot” she recalled, “and then way too cold” — so Her first real wine job was working in the cellar and to eclipse 2,500 annual cases. That’s despite the wines Gasca went back to restaurant work in Los Angeles on sales and marketing for Matthias Pippig of Sanguis, already selling out at a brisk pace, which means a waitlist while considering a graduate degree. “Ironically, I was who’d been hired to open Grassini Family Vineyards. “It will soon be required. “Brady and I don’t own any land, and I don’t know going to get my degree in counseling for drug and alco- was a perfect fit for me, because I had a lot of experience hol abuse,” she said. “But I decided, screw it, I want to in hospitality and I had opened new businesses before,” if we will ever be able to afford land,” explained Gasca, leaving that door open just enough. “But I never said Gasca, who stayed with Pippig until 2013. be happy.” After New York, Gasca realized that she was more After a brief harvest stint at Fess Parker Winery, dreamed that we would be this far along so quickly.” curious about wine than her friends. “I was interested in Gasca found an ideal gig at Dragonette Cellars. “The the whys and the whats when we would go tasting,” said reason I took the job at Dragonette is, well, they are 2928 San Marcos Ave., Los Olivos; (805) 686-1302; storyofsoil Gasca, though she can’t help but laugh about her former incredible humans, but they were also extremely sup- wine.com

“T

ES BOTTLARRELS &B

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Farm-to-Bar Fun at the Wildcat

COURTESY PHOTOS

s cocktail

Strawberries from the Tuesday farmers’ market

Barbara’s best spots to find yourself on the dance floor, but there is another notable happening to explore at the only LGBTQIA-friendly nightclub with a dedicated weekly queer night. This year marks the 11th anniversary of Farm to Bar, a weekly Tuesday cocktail hour using both foraged and farmers’-market-sourced ingredients, showcasing the imaginative creations of Shaun Belway. A bartender at Wildcat and manager at the Bobcat Room (the sister property next door), Belway joined

Shaun Belway Still Loves Foraging for Cocktail Inspiration by Vanessa Vin

the team back in 2011, soon after Farm to Bar founder Patrick Reynolds created the event as part of the communitywide fundraiser in support of Paralympian Andre Barbieri, who had lost a limb during a snowboarding accident. Reynolds and Belway worked together at the (now closed) Hungry Cat in S.B., and they were eager to find ways to innovate fresh cocktails. Both had also spent a good amount of time in restaurant kitchens, so the idea of bringing together hyper-local seasonal ingredients from around Santa Barbara appealed to both of them. Belway, who grew up in the lower Eastside Milpas area, has since brought some of his childhood influences to the menu by using community-sourced produce or ingredients found foraging in nature. “I forage for a lot of what we use for the cocktails at Bobcat,” he

says, chatting while on his weekly Tuesday-afternoon stroll at the farmers’ market. “Some things, like fennel, grow all over the place. I’ve been foraging this since I was a kid. When I grew up on the Eastside of Santa Barbara, it was my job to take care of the fennel that would grow near the creek in our backyard. Except we didn’t even call it fennel; we called it a licorice plant back then.” Today, Belway uses fennel for his seasonal Farm to Bar version of a whiskey sour. It’s blended fresh with A fresh Farm to Bar cocktail

CAMILA URIEGAS

T

he Wildcat is often referred to as one of Santa

FOOD & DRINK

Shaun Belway on his weekly farmers’ market stroll

apples at Bobcat. “Most of the flavor of fennel comes from the bulb. And since it grows underground, it takes a lot of work to clean and prep. To save time, I come to the farmers’ market and pick up whatever is at peak season for my Farm to Bar cocktails.” He hands me a ripe, squishy berry that looks like it just fell off of the vine: white mulberry. This drought-tolerant fruit is at its peak for harvesting, and it is not bothered by pests or susceptible to disease. “It’s a very unique berry; looks pretty weird; they grow on trees; the fruit grows super quick, but the harvest season is very short! So you need to know when to pick it up — otherwise it’s gone!” Walking with Belway feels like a stroll through a Farmers’ Almanac. Topics like moon cycles, harvest dates, and Santa Barbara history are discussed over a little taste of date, fresh spearmint, and fenugreek sprouts. For him, these weekly farmers’ market visits are not just for ingredient sourcing; they are also an opportunity to connect with the community and dream up his cocktails, which sometimes sound more like healthy elixirs than alcoholic libations. That said, while the general clientele order drinks containing alcohol, he has noticed an increasing trend toward alcohol-free mocktails. It makes perfect sense considering the fresh originality that comes in his creations, many of which are made almost entirely from scratch. “There are certain things we just make in-house, like ginger beer, for example. I love ginger; we juice 10 to 20 pounds per week for the cocktails. We’ve never used ‘bottled’ ginger beer at Bobcat — it’s a lot more work — but I prefer the taste.” Tuesday’s happy hour is casual, usually a mix of locals and post-farmers’-market patrons. Light bites are often included, and there’s always a feeling of community and sharing. Just keep in mind that there is an etiquette to ordering on Farm to Bar nights; forget about the vodka tonics or Jack and Cokes — just name your spirit of choice and let the Farm to Bar team take care of the rest. Tuesdays are their day to be creative and experiment with whatever is fresh. My drink on a late spring day? Gingerinfused gin, crunchy sugar snap pea, chamomile flowers, and the last green grapes of the season. Delicious!

4-1-1 Tuesdays, 4-8 p.m., farmers’ market fresh cocktails featuring sustainably sourced ingredients layered with homemade shrubs, syrups, and infusions. Wildcat Lounge, 15 W. Ortega Street, wildcatlounge.com.

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1st THURSDAY AUG 4, 5-8 PM Join us for an evening of art and culture in downtown Santa Barbara! Activities include art openings, live music, artists’ receptions, wine tastings, and hands-on activities. ALL FREE!

Please join us for

La Fiesta Pequeña!

PARTICIPATING VENUES 1

SBIFF’S SB FILMMAKER SCREENING SERIES, SBIFF Education Center, 1330 State Street

2

THE SHOPS AT ARLINGTON PLAZA, 1324 State Street

3

ENGEL & VÖLKERS, 1323 State Street, 805-342-0227

4

SANTA BARBARA FINE ART, 1321 State Street, 805-845-4270

5

MAUNE CONTEMPORARY, 1309 State Street, 805-869-2524

6

DOMECÍL, 1221 State Street, Suite 7, 805-324-4971

7

10 WEST GALLERY, 10 West Anapamu Street, 805-770-7711

8

SULLIVAN GOSS – AN AMERICAN GALLERY, 11 East Anapamu Street, 805-730-1460

9

CHANNING PEAKE GALLERY, 105 East Anapamu Street, 1st Floor, 805-568-3990

10 SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART, 1130 State Street, 805-963-4364 11 GALLERY 113, 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #8, 805-965-6611 12 WATERHOUSE GALLERY, 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #9, 805-962-8885 13 TAMSEN GALLERY, 911.5 State Street, 805-705-2208 14 FREQUENCY WINE COMPANY, 804 Anacapa Street, 805-770-3069 15 SANTA BARBARA HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 136 East de la Guerra Street, 805-966-1601 16 AIREDANSE

FITNESS & ARTS, De La Guerra Place, 801 State Street

17 BLISSFUL BOUTIQUES SUMMER STORE, 621 Paseo Nuevo 18 LA PALOMA CAFÉ, 702 Anacapa Street, 805-966-7029 19 HELENA MASON ART GALLERY, 48 Helena Avenue, 805-341-0419

LEARN MORE THE ART CRAWL & Also Enjoy: STATE ST PROMENADE MARKET

As the August sun slowly sets behind the “Queen of the Missions”, experience the Franciscans hospitality as they welcome all to enjoy the official opening of Old Spanish Days Fiesta at this beautiful setting as they have since 1927. La Fiesta Pequeña, “Little Fiesta”, is a colorful, historical program which includes traditional songs and dance from Californios Spirits.

Wednesday, Aug. 3•7:30-9:30 pm Old Mission Santa Barbara FREE to the public

Blankets, chairs or other items left to reserve a seating location will not be allowed until Wednesday at 6 am. Street closures occur at 6:30 pm.

MARIACHI LAS OLAS Entertainment by:

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Also broadcast live on KEYT Channel 3

For more information:

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On Sale Friday, July 29 at 10 AM

S.B. Food Connection Coming to Milpas

Charley Crockett COURTESY

Sun, Oct 2 / 7 PM / Arlington Theatre

PASSING THE TORCH: Dave’s Dogs on Milpas will become a brick-and-mortar outlet for popular local catering company Santa Barbara Food Connection.

R

eader Eric says that Dave’s Dogs on Milpas has closed (the Turn-

pike location is open for business as usual) and that Santa Barbara Food Connection, which has operated a truck locally for several years, will replace it. The website santabarbara foodconnection.com describes the eatery as “a local breakfast, lunch, and late-night catering service specializing in fast, delicious food.” CELEBRITY CHEFS OPEN I.V. EATERY: Korean restaurant Vons Chicken,

which closed at 955 Embarcadero del Mar in Isla Vista last April, has reopened under new ownership. Sources tell me that it is run by L.A.-area celebrity chefs “Jared and Chris.” I located a pair in Orange County and another duo in Santa Monica that go by that name. XO EXITS: This just in from Acme Hospitality: “I wanted to let you

ISLAND ANNIVERSARY: Island Brewing Company celebrated its 21st

anniversary on July 23 with a party and a new beer release, “Return to Paradise,” a strong pale ale. “It’s amazing that we’re still doing what we love in the community we love,” says owner and founder Paul Wright. “We’re above all grateful for our staff and supporters and hope to have a day of connecting with friends and those that have made it all possible. Here’s to the next 21.” RESTAURANT OPENINGS: At least 50 local eateries opened, or reopened, in

the last year, which is more than in any 12-month stretch since 2018.

• July 2022: Rare Society, 214 State St.; Sweetie’s Ice Cream Shop, 1826 Cliff Dr., Ste. A • June 2022: Lighthouse Coffee, 401 E. Haley St.; Taza Mediterranean Street Kitchen, 413 State St; Vons Chicken, 955 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista • May 2022: Carp Moon Café, 4991 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria; Finch & Fork (reopened), 31 W. Carrillo St.; Hummus Republic, 6546 Pardall Rd., Isla Vista; Mangione’s Italian Ice, 1222 State St.; Mariscos Santa Barbara, 5892 Hollister Ave., Goleta; Rodeo Room Whiskey Lounge, 231 W. Montecito St. • April 2022: Casa Comal, 505 State St.; Hook & Press Donuts, 15 E. Figueroa St.; Lighthouse Coffee, 199 S. Turnpike Rd., Ste. 101; Local, 1187 Coast Village Rd., Montecito; Montecito Deli (reopened), 1150 Coast Village Rd., Montecito; Saint Bibiana Pizzeria, 17 W. Ortega St.; Sazon Latino, 1417 San Andres St.; Zocalo, 901 Embarcadero del Mar, Ste. 101, Isla Vista • March 2022: Beans BBQ, 1230 State St.; Goodland BBQ, 5725 Hollister Ave., Goleta; Hibachi Steakhouse and Sushi Bar (reopened), 500 State St.; Shalhoob’s at the Market, 38 W. Victoria St.; Wingman Rodeo, 235 West Montecito St. • February 2022: Bedda Mia, 1218 State St.; Little Heart Cafecito, 38 W. Victoria St.; Soul Bites, 423 State St.; Starbucks, 3052 De la Vina St. • January 2022: Broad Street Oyster Company, 418 State St.; El Patio Evening, 3007 De la Vina St.; Texas Tacos, 910 Embarcadero del Norte, Isla Vista

FOOD & DRINK

know that on behalf of Acme Hospitality, the XO Santa Barbara pop-up has concluded. Stay tuned for more exciting things to come in this space!” The restaurant at 121 East Yanonali Street had a grand opening ribbon-cutting ceremony on May 12, 2022, which is unusual for a “pop-up.”

“Drawing from traditional hillbilly mountain music, vintage soul and R&B, Crockett’s old-school country music twang – as well as his exceedingly dapper dress sense – harks back to another era.” Independent, (U.K.)

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

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John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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FREE Summer Cinema Fridays at 8:30 PM at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden

Supporting Sponsor:

7/28 - 8:30 PM

SOOKIE SOOKIE / THE DISAPPOINTMENTS / DUENDE PUNK ROCK NIGHT

Fri, July 29

7/29 - 7:00 PM

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A snapshot view of the best of local culture and fun happenings in the worlds of music, theater, visual art, film, dance, books, lectures, and more from Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

COURTESY PHOTOS

POETRY AND PICTURE BOOKS NEW WORK BY LOCAL AUTHORS

L I F E PAGE 49

COURTESY

ARTFUL HAPPENINGS ON AND OFF THE WALLS

“Nurture Our Mother” mural by Adriana Arriaga and Claudia Borfiga Diana Raab

Janet Lucy

T

he moving tale of a little green sea turtle’s quest for identity and purpose — and a life-threatening encounter with a plastic bag he mistakes for a jellyfish — comes to life in Santa Barbara writer Janet Lucy’s new children’s book, Makana Is a Gift/Makana es un Regalo. With colorful watercolor illustrations by Alexis Cantu, this undersea tale connects young children to the ocean world and educates them about the perils of plastic pollution. Available in both English and a bilingual Spanish/English version, local nonprofit publisher Seven Seas Press partnered with the Goleta Valley Library to raise funds to give 400 books to the children participating in their Summer Reading Program, themed “Oceans of Possibilities.”

“Themes of identity and belonging are important for young children,” says Lucy, who earlier in July received the 2022 Book of the Year Award from Creative Child Magazine in the category of Kids’ Storybooks on Nature & Conservation. “Through Makana’s story, they can recognize challenges they experience. Makana Is a Gift offers children and families timely themes to explore together. May we all play a part in protecting these magnificent, magical creatures.”(sevenseaspress .org)

Ann Lewin-Benham

An illustrated story poem by Ann Lewin-Benham, Parsley: A Love Story of a Child for Puppy and Plants, is the new children’s book from this local author, who is widely known for her six classic textbooks on how brain science looks in practice in the classroom. Illustrated by Karen Busch Holman, this story of a child, a dog, and a plant combines simple rhyming stanzas with a message of hope — and a surprise ending. Lewin-Benham will read and talk about Parsley at Chaucer’s Books on Sunday, July 31 at 2 p.m. (annlewin-benham .com) Santa Ynez Valley author Dan Gerber has a new book of poetry, The End of Michelangelo, coming out this fall. A longpracticing Zen Buddhist, Gerber is the

Dan Gerber

award-winning author of more than a dozen books of poetry, fiction, essays, and memoir, and has had his work included in The Best Ameri-can Poetry and American Life in Poetry, among other collections. Often dark, and always thought-provoking—for example, talking about words on the page from his poem “On Dyslexia” is the line “You see them as they are; I see them as they are becoming”—Gerber’s poems acknowledge both the fragility of the times we live in and how very much alive we still are. (copper canyonpress.org) Written in response to lines by the great Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, local memoirist, poet, essayist, blogger, and speaker Diana Raab’s new poetry chapbook, An Imaginary Affair, is an intimate collection that celebrates the joys, and pains inherent to the heart, while honoring the wisdoms and moods of Neruda’s poetry. Santa Barbara Poet Laureate Emma Trelles’s take: “These poems remind us that to be alive is to try and balance joy and lament, and how through this effort we more deeply inhabit the world and ourselves.” (dianaraab.com) —Leslie Dinaberg

School may not be in session yet, but the Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art has some influential work on view through August 6. In the main gallery is Finding Beauty in Structure: Works of Ken Jewesson, featuring more than 30 pieces of art from Jewesson’s long career as a ceramic designer, printmaker, painter, draftsman, collage artist, and jewelry maker. Among a group of avant-garde artists to introduce modernism to Santa Barbara, according to Museum Director Judy L. Larson, “His colorful works represent an intersection of science and art and express his heartfelt sense that art connects us to the divine.” Also on view is Two New Acquisitions: Irma Cavat and Ciel Bergman, celebrating two pioneering women artists in Santa Barbara and the first women to teach in the UC Santa Barbara Art Department. The museum is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays. (westmont.edu/museum) The Latinx Arts Project/Carpinteria—Proyecto de Artes Latinx/ Carpinteria is holding a special event on Saturday, July 30, from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Alcazar Theatre. Billed as a Latinx Mural Art Forum, the event includes a big-screen showing of the documentary short Voces de Old Town Carpinteria with an introduction from director Brent Winebrenner. Followed by a panel discussion on muralism, moderated by Independent reporter Ryan P. Cruz and featuring artists Adriana Arriaga, Ralph D’Oliveira, Ruth Ellen Hoag, and Lisa Kelly. The grassroots Latinx Arts Project/Carpinteria founders Suzanne Requejo and Leslie Westbrook will also share their plans for creating “Past, Present, Future” murals celebrating Latinx culture and history in Carpinteria and officially announce the open call for entries and prize money offerings for Ventura and Santa Barbara County artists to participate in the Carpinteria mural project. Suggested donation is $10. (llatinxartsproject.org) An opportunity to truly make your artwork sing is in the offing, with applications now open (through August 15) for Pianos on State. This fabulously fun annual interactive public art and music experience will be back downtown for the 13th year. From Tuesday, October 4, through Sunday, October 23, each creatively painted piano becomes a one-of-akind original interactive piece of art, envisioned and painted by Santa Barbara artists. The pianos are displayed on designated pads along State Street for the public to play and enjoy. A collaboration between Santa Barbara Arts Collaborative, Santa Barbara County Office of Arts and Culture, the City of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Education Foundation, Downtown Santa Barbara, and the Children’s Creative Project, each artist or artist team will be given a $350 stipend to purchase materials of their choice for a designated piano. Pianos and transportation are also provided. The Community Arts Workshop (CAW) is where the magic happens during piano painting weekend, September 30-October 2, where artists of all styles and stripes rub shoulders, trade tips and information, and make art together. For more information and application details, visit pianosonstate.com/apply. —LD

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Join us in reading July’s book of the month! J U LY ’S T H E M E :

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

J ULY ’S READ:

The Test by Sylvain Neuvel independent.com/indybookclub

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Josh Groban Returns to the Bowl by Josef Woodard

J

osh Groban, of the dramatic yet friendly voice and presence, is a fact of cultural life by now. His work as a proudly mainstream pop singer and actor of stage — musical theater division — and small screen has garnered nominations from the Emmy, Grammy, and Tony camps. His singing partnerships include Celine Dion and Sarah McLachlan, and his philanthropic impulses led him to create the Find Your Light Foundation, supporting arts education for youths. In a strong mid-career stride at age 41, he performs at the Santa Barbara Bowl on July 30, on tour to present music from his pandemic-era-spawned album Harmony. With him on stage (and on the album) are esteemed Preservation Hall Jazz Band, violinist/singer Lucia Micarelli, and singer-songwriter Eleri Ward, along with his longtime guitarist/music director, Santa Barbara–born and semi-based Tariqh Akoni. Can you tell me about your overall concept for the Harmony tour? This album had so many hurdles we needed to get around to make beautiful noise together. People were recording all over the world, and in their living rooms, always isolated, with nobody in the same space. And with the technology afforded to us now, we were able to make this album sound so great. But I always knew if I had the opportunity to tour with songs from the Harmony album, it would be a cathartic,

EIGHT WINERIES TO VISIT FOR LIVE MUSIC Music and Wine Are a Great Pairing by Robyn Wise

Looking to sample tunes with your wine? Live music is back, perhaps more appreciated than ever, at these melodious wineries in the Santa Ynez Valley.

A

jug of wine, a loaf of bread and … how about banging dance hits from the ’80s, a jazz guitar concert, or a fourpiece country band? For many wineries in the Santa Ynez Valley, the long days of summer usher in a jam-packed roster of live music. This year, especially as wine and music fans try to make up for the last two years of shuttered tasting rooms and canceled shows, there’s no shortage of excellent live acts to catch in this famed wine appellation while enjoying a bottle (or two!) of your favorite varietal. To kick-start your planning, here are just a few destinations to enjoy wine and song together — from ticketed, singleconcert affairs to more casual, weekly jams geared toward BYO picnics. So, grab a friend and a glass, and get ready to groove! This is just a small slice of the winery music offerings, so check local listings for more venues. And don’t forget to call ahead for reservation requirements, ticketing information, and guidelines regarding children, pets, and outside food, as each venue has its own setup and rules.

Brander Vineyard & Winery Highlights of Brander’s longstanding summer music series include an intimate performance by blues/rock artist Shawn Jones, who has shared bills with big names like Robert Cray,

Josh Groban performs at the Santa Barbara Bowl on July 30.

You have really established your own sound and stylistic identity now. Who were your major influences in your formative days? It’s interesting now to look back at the process of making those first albums. It was a really surreal time because, on the one hand, I was selling super well, but on the other hand, I wasn’t really considered “in” with the music business. I was an enigma certainly to most music writers and things like the Grammys. It felt really isolating to not be part of the club, but I realize now that I was actually given a better opportunity to pave my own path and write my own playbook. It also kept me from the trappings of hype. Not being invited to the party means you don’t ever get distracted by it. I grew up listening to singers with unique voices. Pavarotti, Bjork, Annie Lennox, Bill Withers … anyone who had a distinct sound. I also loved artists like Paul Simon and Peter Gabriel who introduced me to music from countries I’d never otherwise have heard. All that helped shape my influences, for sure. You have ventured into acting and other modes of artistic expression. Do you see these as separate aspects of what you do as an artist, or are they connected? Sometimes I’ll take on a non-musical project and view it as separate or a “side project,” but in the overriding arc of my career, I’ll realize in hindsight that it was very connected. Doing a musical theater album, for instance, led to my Broadway debut. One didn’t cause the other, but the universe decided that it was time, and I rode the wave. So much of creativity is chasing waves of energy and

saying yes to them. It’s always important to stay a student of those experiences, and I always want to choose an endeavor that I can give all of myself to, but I can also take great lessons from. At the end of the day, whatever the endeavor, it’s about telling stories and reaching people.

For a longer version of this interview, see independent.com.

Bonnie Raitt, Willie Nelson, and Waylon Jennings (Aug. 6) and appearances by acoustic duo Teddy Jack & Jonathan McEuen (Aug. 13, Sept. 24). See brander.com.

ANDY WADELL

RECONNECTING WITH HARMONY

eclectic celebration of the togetherness we missed during the album making process. This show is pure love and gratitude for making music for fans and friends we’ve missed. I wanted the show to have that reunion feeling.

ANDREW ECCLES

a&e | PREVIEWS

Brick Barn Wine Estate Brick Barn’s “Wine Down Wednesdays” are popular with locals and tourists alike, with 50 percent off wines by the glass during happy hour and live music from local musicians such as Victor Valencia (Aug. 3), Terry Lawless (Aug. 17), and the Alan Satchwell Jazz Trio (Aug 24). Other special dates on the calendar include Ghost\Monster (Sept. 4) and the hard-driving country/rock/blues of Cadillac Angels (Oct. 8). See brickbarnwineestate.

Buttonwood Farm & Winery Sunday afternoons at this low-key, friendly winery — among the oldest in the area — buzz every weekend through Labor Day with food trucks and a rotating schedule of local singer/songwriters such as Los Angeles–based Americana songstress Erinn Alissa Selkis (Aug. 7), Adrian Galysh (Aug. 14) and Brian McKee (Aug. 2 ). See buttonwoodwinery.com.

Fess Parker Celebrating the venerable winery’s weekend “SummerFess,” The Drive-in Romeos will rock the terrace at Fess Parker on August 20, with modern R&B hits and 1950s-inspired rock. Ticket sales benefit the Santa Barbara County Food Bank. See fessparker.com.

Firestone Vineyards The T-Bone Ramblers, LiveWire, and Dusty Jugz are just a few of the excellent local country, blues, and classic-rock bands lined up for Firestone’s Friday night concert series (through Oct. 28). Reserve a table in advance and enjoy complimentary food and a personal space heater during the show. Visitors can also catch pop-up performances by singer/songwriters like Lindsey Suarez and Richard & Tony on select Sundays afternoons through September 25. See firestonewine.com.

Wine in the vines at Kessler-Haak

Kessler-Haak Jazz lovers will want to venture to Lompoc to check out two remaining appearances by the acclaimed Nick Schaadt Quartet, performing the music of Herbie Hancock as part of Kessler-Haak winery’s “Jazz in the Vines” concert series, on August 13 and September 24. See kesslerhaakwine.com.

Lincourt Head to this OG winery, established long before the region became a wine destination, on Friday afternoons to hear musicians like singer/songwriter and trumpet master Alan Satchwell (Aug. 5) and San Luis Obispo native Nataly Lola (Aug.19), known for her song styling on the guitar and ukulele. See lincourtwines.com.

Presqu’ile This beautiful winery near Santa Maria is plugging the amps and mics back in with a raucous set by local ’80s cover band The Molly Ringwald Project (Aug. 6), followed by a benefit performance on September 24 by the winery’s house band, the Tepusquet Tornadoes, which specializes in classic rock, n soul, and R&B. See presquilewine.com.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF JULY 28

ON the Beat

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Fiction writer John Banville tells us, “There are moments when the past has a force so strong it seems one might be annihilated by it.” I suspect that’s sometimes true for many of us. But it won’t apply to you Aries anytime soon. In fact, just the opposite situation will be in effect during the coming months: You will have more power to render the past irrelevant than maybe you’ve ever had. You will wield an almost indomitable capacity to launch new trends without having to answer to history. Take full advantage, please!”

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Researchers have proved that lullabies enhance the health of premature babies being cared for in hospitals. The soft, emotionally rich songs also promote the well-being of the babies’ families. I bring this to your attention because I believe you should call on lullaby therapy yourself in the coming weeks. Listening to and singing those tunes will soothe and heal your inner child. And that, in my astrological opinion, is one of your top needs right now. For extra boosts, read fairy tales, eat food with your hands, make mud pies, and play on swings, seesaws, and merry-go-rounds.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Dancer and singer-songwriter FKA Twigs has taken dance lessons since she was a child. In 2017, she added a new form of physical training, the Chinese martial art of wushu. Doing so made her realize a key truth about herself: She loves to learn and practice new skills. Of all life’s activities, they give her the most pleasure and activate her most vibrant energy. She feels at home in the world when she does them. I suspect you may have similar inclinations in the coming months. Your appetite for mastering new skills will be at an all-time high. You will find it natural and even exhilarating to undertake disciplined practice. Gathering knowledge will be even more exciting than it usually is.

CANCER

ON the Beat spotlights all things music and music-adjacent in this newsletter/column by music and arts journalist-critic Josef Woodard

Sign up at independent.com/ newsletters

(June 21-July 22): Cancerian author Laurie Sheck writes, “So much of life is invisible, inscrutable: layers of thoughts, feelings, and outward events entwined with secrecies, ambiguities, ambivalences, obscurities, darknesses.” While that’s an experience we all have, especially you Cancerians, it will be far less pressing for you in the coming weeks. I foresee you embarking on a phase when clarity will be the rule, not the exception. Hidden parts of the world will reveal themselves to you. The mood will be brighter and lighter than usual. The chronic fuzziness of life will give way to a delightful acuity. I suspect you will see things that you have never or rarely seen.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): It’s always advisable for you Leos to carry on a close personal relationship with mirrors. I’m speaking both literally and metaphorically. For the sake of your mental health, you need to be knowledgeable about your image and monitor its ever-shifting nuances. And according to my analysis of the astrological omens, you are now authorized to deepen your intimate connection with mirrors. I believe you will thrive by undertaking an intense phase of introspective explorations and creative self-inquiry. Please keep it all tender and kind, though. You’re not allowed to bad-mouth yourself. Put a special emphasis on identifying aspects of your beauty that have been obscured or neglected. By the way, Leo, I also recommend you seek compassionate feedback from people you trust. Now is an excellent time to get reflections about your quest to become an even more amazing human.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): At your best, you are a flexible purist, an adaptable stickler for detail, and a disciplined yet supple thinker. Maybe more than any other sign of the zodiac, you can be focused and resilient, intense and agile, attentive and graceful. And all of us nonVirgos will greatly appreciate it if you provide these

talents in abundance during the coming weeks. We need you to be our humble, understated leader. Please be a role model who demonstrates the finely crafted, well-balanced approach to being healthy.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): There is a distinction between being nice and being kind. Being nice is often motivated by mechanical politeness, by a habit-bound drive to appear pleasant. It may be rooted more in a desire to be liked than in an authentic urge to bestow blessings. On the other hand, being kind is a sincere expression of care and concern for another. It fosters genuine intimacy. I bring these thoughts to your attention because I think that one of Libra’s life-long tasks is to master the art of being kind rather than merely nice. And right now is an especially favorable phase for you to refine your practice.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Author Clive James loved the Latin term gazofilacium, meaning “treasure chamber.” He said that the related Italian word, gazofilacio, referred to the stash of beloved poems that he memorized and kept in a special place in his mind. In accordance with astrological omens, Scorpio, now would be an excellent time to begin creating your own personal gazofilacium: a storehouse of wonderful images and thoughts and memories that will serve as a beacon of joy and vitality for the rest of your long life. Here’s your homework: Identify 10 items you will store in your gazofilacium..

SAGITTARIUS

Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Tips to get the most out of the next three weeks: (1) Keep your interesting options open. Let your mediocre options shrivel and expire. (2) Have no regrets and make no apologies about doing what you love. (3) Keep in mind that every action you perform reverberates far beyond your immediate sphere. (4) Give your fears ridiculous names like “Gaffe” and “Wheezy” and “Lumpy.” (5) Be honest to the point of frankness but not to the point of rudeness. (6) Don’t just run. Gallop.

CAPRICORN

Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet Richard Hugo wrote, “It doesn’t bother me that the word ‘stone’ appears more than 30 times in my third book, or that ‘wind’ and ‘gray’ appear over and over in my poems to the disdain of some reviewers.” Hugo celebrated his obsessions. He treated them as riches because focusing on them enabled him to identify his deepest feelings and discover who he really was. In accordance with astrological omens, I recommend a similar approach to you in the coming weeks. Cultivate and honor and love the specific fascinations at the core of your destiny.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Author Violet Trefusis (1894-1972) and author Vita Sackville-West (1892-1962) loved each other. In one letter, Violet told Vita, “I want you hungrily, frenziedly, passionately. I am starving for you. Not only the physical you, but your fellowship, your sympathy, the innumerable points of view we share. I can’t exist without you; you are my affinity.” In the coming weeks, dear Aquarius, I invite you to use florid language like that in addressing your beloved allies. I also invite you to request such messages. According to my reading of the planetary omens, you are due for eruptions of articulate passion.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): I’d like to honor and pay homage to a past disappointment that helped transform you into a beautiful soul. I know it didn’t feel good for you when it happened, but it has generated results that have blessed you and the people whose lives you’ve touched. Would you consider performing a ritual of gratitude for all it taught you? Now is an excellent time to express your appreciation because doing so will lead to even further redemption.

Homework: When it’s impossible to do the totally right thing, you can do the half-right thing. Example? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 52

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EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION

SANTA BARBARA Charter School needs two or three K‑6 instructional aides for the 2022‑23 school year. Approximate Schedule: 8:30‑1:30, M‑F (25 hours weekly, some flexibility) Job begins on Monday, August 15, 2022 Instructional Aides assist a certificated teacher and other staff with various instructional and recreational activities. The position requires sensitivity, discretion, intuition, and competence. Starting hourly rate Instructional Aide (DOE): $15.39 Training provided. Send resume and cover letter to Laura Donner ldonner@sbunified.org www.sbcharter.org

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE ALOE CARE Health, medical alert system. The most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice‑activated! No wi‑fi needed! Special offer call and mention offer code CARE20 to get $20 off Mobile Companion. Call today 1‑844‑ 790‑1673. (SCAN)

Small, peaceful and nurturing residential home for disabled adults in Carpinteria is hiring direct care staff. Full and Part Time Positions. Join our family and enjoy a rewarding career caring for others. www.cornerstonehouse.org or 310‑699‑2762.

Chemistry, Biochemistry or related field at time of application. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/12/22. https://apptrkr.com/3282121. Posting will remain open until filled.

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS ASSISTANT

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Supports Academic Programs and provides administrative support to Bren faculty, visitors, and students to ensure smooth and successful instruction. Helps faculty and visiting instructors with room and equipment scheduling, GauchoSpace access, textbooks and readers, entering grades, and course evaluations; tracks upcoming academic activities and notifies faculty and students; alerts students to upcoming deadlines for registration, Master’s Projects and other program requirements; posts and updates the schedule of classes and electronic calendars for courses, events, and resources; maintains accurate and engaging content on Academic Programs webpages; participates in promotional and recruitment activities on behalf of the Bren School. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related area and/or equivalent experience/training.1‑3 years of experience working with students. Strong communication, active listening, and interpersonal skills. Ability to work with diverse populations, and multicultural competencies. Good organization skills. Strong analytical and critical thinking skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39184

PROFESSIONAL

ANIMAL TECHNICIAN ACADEMIC COORDINATOR

Undergraduate Instructional Support Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Main duties will include implementing laboratory course material directives and to accurately prepare experiments for all teaching labs. Req; B.S. in

VIVARIUM Under the supervision of the Animal Resource Center (ARC) Manager, the Animal Technician is responsible for the care and maintenance of laboratory animals and equipment in the Biology and BioEngineering facilities. Animals are maintained according to University Policy, the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources (ILAR) Guide for the Care

and Use of Laboratory Animals in Research, and USDA regulations. All duties will be performed according to established standard operating procedures (SOP’s) of the ARC. Reqs: High school diploma required. One year of previous animal experience preferred. It is essential to have above average communication skills and be flexible to change. Notes: The technician will rotate working weekends and UC holidays and will be compensated with time off and not additional pay.Satisfactory conviction history background check. $25.20/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39284

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER

ATHLETICS DEPARTMENT Senior resource person for all department travel. Responsible for managing, projecting, planning, coordinating, analyzing, securing and monitoring the travel needs for 20 sports, approx. 40 coaches, 20 administrators, 400 + student‑athletes, 200 + recruits, involving 29 accounts with a travel budget of over $1,685,000. Responsible for ensuring all travel is in accordance with NCAA and Big West Conference travel policies and regulations, as well all University and campus policies. Responsible for travel arrangements, solicitation of pricing and verification of budget information for all team, administrative, individual travel for recruiting visits, conferences and conventions travel. Arrange airfare, hotel accommodations, and transportation as needed. Coordinate booster/radio talent travel arrangements and billings. Reqs: Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite, email and calendaring software. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively with diverse groups at all levels, both verbally and in writing. Exceptional skills in customer service and the ability to work with a variety of constituents and in a diverse environment. Excellent analytical and problem solving skills. Ability to use sound judgment and discretion in responding to issues and concerns and maintain confidentiality. Ability to work independently and be flexible while performing a wide range of tasks concurrently and effectively. Ability to interpret local and system‑wide policies and procedures. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Mandated Child Abuse Reporter. Campus Security Authority. Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. May be required to work nights or weekends to assist with travel related emergencies. $26.32/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard

to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 8/5/22, thereafter open until filled. Job # 39390

AUTOMATED PARKING SERVICES TECHNICIAN

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES Reporting to the Operations Manager, applies acquired job skills, policies, and procedures to complete substantive assignments/projects/tasks of moderate scope and complexity; exercising judgment within defined guidelines and practices to determine the appropriate action in support of hardware, automated parking systems, and network. Analyzes automated parking systems user requirements and programs system configurations. Works directly with system vendors and manufacturer representatives on warranties and parts exchanges. Maintains all security access and departmental key issuance. Works with Facilities Management Small Projects unit, Communication Services and outside vendors in completing various parking‑related projects. Ensures security and inventory of equipment. Applies professional business/technical support concepts to resolve hardware, software, and networking issues as they relate to the automated parking systems. Reqs: 5 years of experience working with hardware and software systems as well as secure data and revenue systems or equivalent education. Ability to perform technical tasks associated with installation, maintenance and repair of field based hardware (and related software packages) parking pay stations, EMV and contactless credit card readers and communication systems both wired and wireless. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $26.86/hr ‑ 34.86/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38967

and related fields with the goal of placing students in graduate programs and jobs, cultivates partnerships with corporations, NGOs, and governmental agencies to hire and/or fund pairs of graduate and undergraduate student interns, and fosters an inclusive community to promote diverse perspectives essential to understanding and solving environmental problems. The Coordinator plans and hosts professional training for students, guest speakers, and events to further

the Initiative’s and the Bren School’s goals. The position will be 50% time (10 hours per week): Manage Leadership Programs between Bren School & UCSB Undergraduate Departments and 50% time (10 hours per week): Coordinate Partnership Development for paired Graduate/ Undergraduate Internships. Minimum Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree and 1‑3 years of experience working with community building and communication. Preferred Qualifications:

Master’s or PhD degree in a relevant field, Experience working with graduate students in community building, communication, or a related field, Experience working with undergraduate students in outreach or career development, Experience with community building related to diversity, equity, and inclusion, Training or work experience in environmental science and management, experience working with students, Excellent

Continued on p. 54

NOW HIRING

WEB CONTENT MANAGER The Santa Barbara Independent has an opportunity in our Digital Department. This full-time position will publish all editorial content on independent.com as part of a team of two web content managers. Looking for motivated individuals, who have great attention to detail and are ready to collaborate. Web content managers handle all digital formats including website, newsletters, and social media. HTML/CSS knowledge a plus. Will train the right candidate. Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance; Section 125 cafeteria plan; 401(k); and vacation program. This position is currently authorized to work from home, but weekly inperson meetings in Downtown Santa Barbara are required. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

Please send résumé along with cover letter to

hr@independent.com

BREN SCHOOL

Community Coordinator(50% time) UCSB’s Bren School seeks a 50%‑time Community Coordinator to manage a new initiative to support graduate/ undergraduate scholars from diverse backgrounds and perspectives on their path to developing careers as environmental leaders. The Coordinator works with relevant UCSB departments to select and mentor underrepresented undergraduate students in environmental studies

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EMPLOYMENT organizational, and oral and written communication, skills, Ability to manage a diverse portfolio of responsibilities simultaneously, Ability to work well independently and as a part of a team, Ability to work with a diverse group of people, Experience building and maintaining professional relationships. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. As a condition of employment, you will be required to comply with the University of California SARS‑CoV‑2 (COVID‑19) Vaccination Program Policy https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/5000695/SARS‑CoV‑2_Covid‑19. All Covered Individuals under the policy must provide proof of Full Vaccination or, if applicable, submit a request for Exception (based on Medical Exemption, Disability, and/or Religious Objection) or Deferral (based on pregnancy) no later than the applicable deadline. New University of California employees must (a) provide proof of receiving at least one dose of a COVID‑19 Vaccine no later than 14 calendar days after their first date of employment and provide proof of Full Vaccination no later than eight weeks after their first date of employment; or (b) if applicable, submit a request for Exception or Deferral no later than 14 calendar days after their first date of employment. (Capitalized terms in this paragraph are defined in the policy.) Federal, state, or local public health directives may impose additional requirements. For more information and to apply, please visit: https://apptrkr.com/3273177

BUSINESS MANAGER

DEPARTMENT OF FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES Responsible for the full range of management functions of the Film and Media Studies Department, and the Carsey‑Wolf Center. Management responsibilities encompass budgeting, academic and student support services, technical support services, contract, grant, and gift/donation administration, purchasing and financial management, payroll, staff and academic personnel, facilities maintenance and renovation, space management, safety program, as well as long‑term planning in the areas of financial management and instructional resources. Develops and implements operating policies and procedures as they relate to overall departmental and center goals and objectives. Interprets policies and procedures for the Chair, departmental committee members, the Director, and independently solves problems requiring interpretation of a wide variety of policies. Requires considerable initiative, independence, judgment, and problem‑solving abilities as well as effective management and supervisory experience, and a strong knowledge of university and departmental policies and procedures. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. $75,800‑$94,750/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/1/22. For more information and to apply, visit https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 39233.

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BUSINESS SERVICES MANAGER

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Directs and coordinates key core campus business processes and operations through subordinate managers, business units, programs, and systems that are accountable for accomplishing UC and UCSB operational goals. Has significant responsibility for formulating and administering UCSB’s strategies for UC Procurement, AP Payables, Equipment, and Sustainability activities, systems, programs, and policies. Position functions with a very high degree of autonomy, accountability, and stewardship of significant campus resources. The Business Services Manager is responsible for establishing objectives, directing programs, developing strategies and policies, managing human, financial, and physical resources, and functions with a high degree of autonomy. Proactively assesses risk to establish systems and procedures to protect organizational assets. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree Bachelor’s degree in a related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Management skills required to lead the department, including management of staff performance and development, team building and communications, resolution of issues and conflicts, review and approval of work, and hiring and training employees. Demonstrated effective interpersonal skills required in interacting with both internal and external resources. Demonstrated effective written and verbal communication skills. Notes: Form 700 Statement of Economic Interests Filer, Satisfactory conviction history background check. $91,300 ‑ $116,400/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38333

CATERING CHEF

Campus Dining Under the general direction of the Executive Catering and Concessions Chef, the Campus Catering Chef manages the culinary operation of Campus Catering, Conference Catering and Departmental Catering areas ($2 million annually), assisting with establishing production standards, cooking processes and procedures for day to day operations. Responsible for training production personnel in food preparation, display design, equipment usage, proper food handling, recipe testing, and creative menu planning and innovations. Implements budget plans and cost control techniques. Supervises service and staff for special high‑profile campus related events. Ensures high quality food and presentation for all catering events on campus and off campus. Helps create and maintain an effective team that takes pride in their product and services. Ensures that food quality and safety guidelines are established and consistently maintained. Direct supervision of 2 Senior Cooks and on‑site supervision of up to 20 full‑time cooks, and up to 30 student cooks throughout the year. Reqs: Extensive previous catering experience with a strong command of fundamentals. Demonstrated ability to organize and manage a high‑volume kitchen as well as produce specially requested menu items. Ability to take on last minute events and prioritize workload. Extremely organized and detail oriented, specialized in utilizing the freshest of ingredients and producing items from scratch with an artistic and innovative

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presentation. Experience in plated service, baking, appetizers, and hot/ cold food buffets. Demonstrated ability to develop and implement a wide variety of menus incorporating varied ethnic cuisines and current trends. Working knowledge of excel and word programs. Knowledge of state and federal safety and sanitation regulations regarding proper handling, storing, cooking and holding temperatures and proper use and cleaning of kitchen equipment. Ability to train others in these areas. Notes: Valid driver’s license and clean driving record. CCC certification with the American Culinary Federation or equivalent. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Days/ Hours: Tues‑Sat, 6:30am‑3:00pm. $51,800.00‑$67,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/3/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39370

CO‑COORDINATOR FOR MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS, & ENGINEERING

CAMPUS LEARNING ASSISTANCE SERVICES Responsible for the co‑management of Campus Learning Assistance Services (CLAS) Math‑Physics‑Engineering Tutorial Program’s financial resources, program administration, personnel actions, program design, marketing and scheduling. Participates in department management team to address departmental strategic planning and identify financial, technical and departmental priorities. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related field/s or equivalent combination of education and experience. 3‑5 years of experience working in an Academic Resource Center. Demonstrated commitment to diversity and cultural issues. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. May work occasional evenings and weekends. $68,700 ‑ $75,000/Year. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 8/5/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38682

submission, and managing deadlines. Responsible for overseeing the completion of post‑award activities of research awards totaling more than $12M annually. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/ or experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $65,415 ‑ $68,530/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/1/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39465

COOK‑ ORTEGA DINING

CAMPUS DINING Performs culinary duties such as preparing soups and casseroles, grilling, roasting or barbequing foods, working a sauté station, and preparing and assembling made‑to‑order entrées serving up to 1,500 meals per shift. Ensures that assigned responsibilities are accomplished and that high standards of food quality, service, sanitation and safety are met at all times. Assists with student training, food production and sanitation. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent combination of education and experience, and minimum of one‑year culinary experience in a high‑volume culinary environment; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Knowledge of and experience with culinary techniques, including but not inclusive of sautéing, grilling, frying, steaming, preparing sauces and stocks. Working knowledge in food service and sanitation regulations. Knowledge of and experience with advanced culinary techniques, including but not limited to sautéing, grilling, frying, steaming, preparing sauces and stocks. Ability to work in a high volume cooking environment and to work within a team. Ability to multi‑task and manage deadlines so as to ensure timely output of meals. Skills in verbal and written communication. Active listening, flexibility with change, critical thinking, multi‑tasking and time management. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $18.41‑ $20.32/hr. Days/Hours: Monday‑ Friday, 11:30am ‑ 8pm, May vary. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35020

CONTRACT AND GRANTS MANAGER

COMPUTER SCIENCE Provides immediate supervision to the Contracts and Grants Unit for the Department of Computer Science. A portion of the time will be spent performing Contracts and Grants and Financial Unit tasks; however, the largest portion of time will be dedicated to C&G Unit staff supervision. Supervises unit operations to ensure compliance with departmental and organization policies, procedures, and defined internal controls. Ensures accountability and stewardship of department resources in compliance with departmental standards and procedures. Responsible for overseeing the submission of approximately 35 proposals annually totaling $54M to roughly a dozen funding agencies. Duties include but are not limited to reviewing detailed budgets and all required University and agency forms for new, continuing, supplemental awards, and renewed contracts, overseeing proposal

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to multi‑task and manage deadlines so as to ensure timely output of meals. Skills in verbal and written communication. Active listening, flexibility with change, critical thinking, multi‑tasking and time management. Notes: Ability to lift up to 50 pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per day. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $18.41/hr ‑ $20.32/hr. Monday‑ Friday, 6:30am ‑ 3pm, will vary. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #35025

DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATOR

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT Provides administrative oversight of all departmental operations, and supervision of department staff and student assistants. The Education department houses approximately 35 Academic Senate Faculty and Lecturers and offers a masters and doctoral program in Education. In addition to providing high‑level support to the Chair for managing faculty support (faculty meetings,recruitment visits, coordinating department events), serves as the primary administrative point of contact for the department. Maintains the department budget, gathers and analyzes financial and other resource data; prepares reports for analyses of operational activities, evaluates current and proposed services. Independently develops appropriate business procedures and practices with procurement, financial and personnel processes according to University policies and department procedures. Audits and oversees payment processing and general ledger reconciliation. Maintains historical background of the department to provide analytical evaluation and institute procedural changes as needed. Researches complex financial discrepancies and works with staff contacts in the Dean’s office as needed to resolve issues related to functions such as student services, budget, human resources, payroll, space, and school‑wide communications. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.00 ‑ $32.47/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/5/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39330.

COOK

CAMPUS CATERING Under the supervision of the Catering Chef, assists in the preparation of food for catering events. Performs culinary duties, quality assurance on all menu items, with attention to detail on presentation. Assists the Catering Chef with food production and supervision of the part time student culinary team. Under the direction of the Catering Chef, assists in the production of food for Campus Catering. Tasks include food preparation and the production of hot and cold foods. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent combination of education and experience, and minimum of one‑year culinary experience in a high‑volume culinary environment; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Ability to work in a high‑volume cooking environment and to work within a team. Ability

FINANCIAL & PERSONNEL ASSISTANT

GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT Supports the Sustainability department in the Enrollment Services Cluster in the areas of administration, financial and travel processing, and personnel/ payroll support. The Financial Assistants in the Enrollment Services Administrative Unit are primarily responsible for financial processing, but are also cross‑trained on all administrative and financial functions and duties. The functions of this position require strong organizational skills, excellent verbal and written communication skills, exceptional interpersonal skills working in team

situations, ability to pay attention to detail and an ability to work within a multicultural environment. Must be able to work under the pressure of deadlines and a fast‑paced, high‑pressure environment. Reqs: Highschool Diploma. 1‑3 years of administrative or payroll experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 37437

GRADUATE PROGRAM ASSISTANT

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Assists in managing all graduate programs and services in the Departments of French & Italian; Germanic & Slavic Studies; Spanish & Portuguese; and the Programs of Comparative Literature and Latin American & Iberian Studies. Works closely with Faculty Graduate Advisors in advising students and faculty on most aspects of graduate matters. Assists in advising prospective applicants on degree programs and in coordinating the admissions process. Acts as departmental liaison with all relevant campus agencies. Assists in coordinating graduate students’ block grants, fellowships and teaching assistantships. Prepares payroll for graduate student services and processes accounting and reimbursement transactions as needed. Assists in designing and maintaining departmental databases as needed. Assists in coordinating, designing, composing and editing departmental publications and announcements. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent. 1‑3 years of administrative work experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36331.

HOUSING ANALYST/ MORTGAGE ORIGINATION PROGRAM (MOP) COORDINATOR

SANTA BARBARA HOUSING AUTHORITY, UC SANTA BARBARA Serves as the liaison to the UC Office of the President (UCOP), Office of Loan Programs (OLP). The Housing Analyst will administer system‑wide mortgage assistant programs developed by UCOP for UCSB employees. Collaborates with Associate Vice Chancellor and Director, Academic Personnel on matters relating to the relocation, recruitment, and retention of UC Santa Barbara faculty. Processes and underwrites UC Santa Barbara’s $41+ million mortgage loan allocation from application through close of escrow in the University‑wide loan program. Provides financial counseling and loan prequalification to eligible applicants, and offers support to resolving issues relating to the UCSB Housing Program and its participants. Provides mortgage

loan analysis and comparisons of available loan products. Analyzes governing documents and negotiates to resolution of all issues and complaints. Reqs: Demonstrated skills in working with budgets, financial systems, and administrative practices and procedures. Excellent judgment and keen problem‑solving skills. Excellent organization skills, with close attention to detail, and sufficient to establish and maintain program practices, procedures, and records; proven ability to set priorities, maintain schedules, and meet deadlines. Demonstrated ability to read, interpret, apply and convey complex policies and procedures. Demonstrated ability to work with real estate brokers, title companies, underwriters, appraisers, and inspectors of real property. Demonstrated ability to communicate with professionalism, patience, and diplomacy when working with faculty, staff, and others from a variety of cultural, financial, and ethnic backgrounds. Note: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license; clean DMV record. Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. $75,000 ‑ $89,900/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/1/22/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38598

INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE SPECIALIST

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Industrial Hygiene Specialist is responsible for developing, implementing, managing and identifying needs for a diverse set of campus programs in the area of Industrial Hygiene including; confined space, hearing conservation and hazard communication under direction of the Industrial Hygiene Program Manager. Carries out industrial hygiene tasks and surveys related to indoor air IAQ issues and situations involving chemical, physical and biological hazards. Reqs: 2‑5 Years comprehensive industrial hygiene experience. BA Degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Experience in the industrial hygiene field conducting air monitoring, which includes background, ambient, and clearance sampling. Possess experience conducting indoor air quality assessments, mold surveys, and sampling for various chemicals, solvents, and microbiological contaminants. Experience with collecting samples using direct read instruments and sampling equipment using various types of media. Familiarity with OSHA, EPA, federal regulations, and industry standards pertaining to industrial hygiene, environmental, hazardous materials and indoor air quality assessment. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $61,200‑$95,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38151

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Sunrise 6:08 Sunset 8:01

High

Thu 28

4:50 am -0.3

11:39 am 3.7

3:44 pm 2.7

10:05 pm 6.0

Fri 29

5:19 am -0.3

12:05 pm 3.9

4:20 pm 2.7

10:37 pm 5.10

Sat 30

5:48 am -0.1

12:32 pm 3.10

4:58 pm 2.7

11:10 pm 5.8

Sun 31

6:16 am 0.0

12:59 pm 4.0

5:41 pm 2.6

11:45 pm 5.4

Mon 1

6:45 am -0.3

1:28 pm 4.2

6:32 pm 2.6

Tue 2

12:24 am 4.10

7:14 am 0.7

2:00 pm 4.4

7:34 pm 2.4

Wed 3

1:13 am 4.3

7:45 am 1.1

2:37 pm 4.7

8:52 pm 2.2

Thu 4

2:19 am 3.8

8:19 am 1.7

3:22 pm 4.1

10:23 pm 1.9

28 D

5H

11 D

18 source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

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“Outside Help” -- in with the assist.

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59. “It’s ___-win situation” 60. Best Picture winner of 2022 62. Offer that may bring you 1. Goes with the flow? a lot 5. Swing your arms around like 65. Weather report stats Kermit 66. Fade out, like a light 10. Has no presence 67. Picture, in old product 14. Snack that turned 110 in names March 15. Grounation Day participant 68. Quickly, on memos 69. Throw barbs (at) 16. Philistine 17. Altered, before Photoshop, 70. Chest contents maybe 19. “Knights of Cydonia” band 20. 2000 TV show with a 2021 1. Recent Canadian “Jeopardy!” super-champ sequel Mattea 21. Suffix for Quebec 2. Come up 22. Barrett of Pink Floyd 24. Greek goddess of night 3. Thin ice, say 25. Former German chancellor 4. Show sorrow Kohl 5. Round item in a bag lunch 27. “The Handmaid’s Tale” 6. Aberdeen teen actress Ann 7. Retired tennis star Barty 29. Vitamin C, alternately 8. Suffix meaning “residents” 35. Specialty of Lenny Bruce or 9. “Candle in the Wind 1997” Jimmy Carr dedicatee, familiarly 38. Compete like gold medalists 10. “Big Blue” company Momiji Nishiya and Keegan 11. Computer audio installation Palmer 12. Overly curious 39. Name in machine-made 13. “Jurassic Park” dinosaur, frozen drinks for short 40. Uruguayan currency 18. The “R” of NASCAR’s RFK 42. Commedia dell’___ Racing 43. Gal on screen 45. Switches around the kids’ 23. Physicians, informally 26. Steal, with “with” room? 47. Advice to those not wishing 28. Place referenced in the “Black Panther” sequel’s to win completely title 49. “How foolish ___!” 30. Signs of the future 50. M&M variety 31. Perez who did a guest voice 54. It holds a lot of coffee on “Dora the Explorer” 56. Scam Tracker agcy. 32. Bucking horse 58. Div. of a fiscal year

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INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

33. Put ___ the test 34. “Disco Duck” DJ Rick 35. “___ Little Deeper” (song from “The Princess and the Frog”) 36. “Superfruit” berry 37. Home of Microsoft’s corporate HQ 41. Freeze, in a sci-fi story 44. Archaeological find 46. Febrero preceder 48. Packs again at the checkout 51. Home planet of Queen Amidala 52. Solidarity 53. Commotions 54. Pac-12 team 55. Joeys and other jumpers 57. “___ giorno!” (Italian for “good morning!”) 58. Swab on a stick 61. Snake that bit Cleopatra 63. One-fifth of MMV 64. Part of a Bored Ape collection, e.g. ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1093

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

JULY JULY 28, 28, 2022 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT LEAD ADVISOR‑ ADVISING SYSTEMS & SPECIAL ENROLLMENTS

COLLEGE OF LETTERS AND SCIENCE, ACADEMIC ADVISING Provides leadership on behalf of the Division of Student Academic Affairs, College of Letters and Science as a senior academic advisor in the Division of Student Academic Affairs. Advises students to help them meet their academic and personal goals. Analyzes and acts independently on petitions for exceptions to college and university policy. Acts as Dean’s representative to assigned academic departments. Contributes to design, implementation and evaluation of revisions in university or college policy or procedure. Is expert in current university and college degree requirements and in college policy, procedures and precedents related to undergraduate matters Serves as the liaison to the Office of the Registrar regarding the Degree Audit Report System and Special Enrollment Programs. Collaborates with Letters & Sciences Information Technology in developing and implementing a replacement advising workflow system and will be responsible for training college and department advisors on the new system. Provides leadership in absence of the assistant deans. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $62,300 – 65,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/5/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39769

LEAVE OF ABSENCE SPECIALIST 3

HUMAN RESOURCES Manages, plans and administers the leave processes for staff. Participates in the ongoing development of centralized leave services within Human Resources. Utilizes a case management system to counsel employees and supervisors/ managers on a wide range of leave entitlements, including but not limited to, medical and pregnancy leaves, and the available options to continue health and welfare benefits. Meets and collaborates with other HR representatives and campus representatives to manage moderate to complex disability cases. Assists with designing and conducting workshops for employees and supervisors/ managers on leave policies and processes including applicable state and federal laws, such as Family Medical Leave (FML) and California Family Rights Act (CFRA), pregnancy disability and union contracts. Creates and maintains web based educational material. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/or equivalent combination of education and experience. 2‑5 years experience working with FMLA, CFRA, PFL, PDL. Ability to handle difficult and complicated issues with professionalism and sound judgment. Ability to build relationships, collaborate and problem solve across all levels of the organization. Excellent written and verbal communication skills. Excellent analytical and problem‑solving skills. Proficient in Microsoft Office Suite, Google Suite. Demonstrated ability to successfully work with diverse populations. Notes: Satisfactory

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conviction history background check. $62,300 ‑ $67,138/yr. University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/1/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39112

LINUX SITE RELIABILITY ENGINEER

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES ‑ INFRASTRUCTURE The Enterprise Technology Services Infrastructure group is looking for a self‑motivated team player with at least 3 years of Linux system administration experience including advanced networking. Our team is responsible for enhancing the operational performance, security, and scalability of various services in Enterprise Technology Services and supported units. This is accomplished through the development, deployment, and maintenance of various tools including automation, log analysis, service and application heath/performance monitoring, and version control. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Information Technology or equivalent training and/or experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $96,060 ‑ $126,300/yr.; commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 8/4/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39414.

LOCKSMITH

MAINTENANCE‑ RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The locksmith performs journey level locksmithing tasks and related repairs/installations for the buildings maintained by Residential Operations. In compliance with H&RS goals and objectives, affirms, and implements the department Educational Equity Plan. Reqs: Fiveyears’ experience working at a journeyman level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. Notes: Five (5) years’ experience working at a journeyman level as a locksmith. Experience with Best Inter‑changeable core system and Schlage institutional lock hardware and cylinders. Experience installing and servicing door hardware including exit devices (Von Duprin) and door closers (LCN). Understanding of safety practices and Environmental Health and Safety policies and procedures. Ability to work effectively in a team environment. $39.71/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected

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JULY 28, 2022

veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/2/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39424

PAYROLL MANAGER

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Responsible for all aspects of employment in the Chemistry and Biochemistry department which encompasses direct and indirect oversight for management of all non‑faculty payroll functions. Manages, administers, and analyzes the payroll activities for the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, a large multifaceted academic department. Responsible for coordinating, analyzing, monitoring, and processing complex payroll issues for academic, technical, student, visitor, lab assistant, and other staff positions on approximately 366 active projects (as of Fiscal Year 2016‑17) totaling ~ $40 million. Responsible for hiring processes and for the oversight and processing of all payroll actions using UCPath and Time Keeping system. Payroll actions also include visa updates, tracking benefits, processing or overseeing the processing of tuition and fee payments when connected to GSR appointments. Works closely with other academic departments on complex inter‑ and multi‑campus appointments. Executes and maintains knowledge of UC policies regarding recruiting, salaries, benefits, retirement, work study regulations, merit and promotions for research titles, leaves of absence, workers comp and employment separations. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree In related area or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.00‑31.68/ hr. commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/8/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39803

PRIMARY CARE OFFICE MANAGER

STUDENT HEALTH Under the general supervision of the Nursing Director and Medical Director, acts with a high level of independent judgment and works in coordination with Nursing Director/ Medical Director on management goals and objectives to increase standardization and efficiencies in Student Health primary care and nursing care delivery. Project management will involve responding to requests or situations that are sensitive and confidential in nature and need to be addressed timely with utmost discretion and following UC and departmental policies and procedures. Stays abreast of all issues facing the Nursing Director/ Medical Director. Draws upon a thorough understanding of UC and departmental policies and procedures as well as the Student Health mission to serve the students and the community. Provides agenda development, record and tracks action items for various committee needs of the Nursing Director. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent experience. Must have excellent oral and written communication skills. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. To comply

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with Santa Barbara Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must successfully complete and pass the background check before employment and date of hire. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. $24.61hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/1/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #39399

PRINCIPAL ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES UCSB’s Departmental Information Technology is looking for a Principal Electronics Technician to support major campus growth initiatives. The technician will share responsibility for the installation,maintenance and troubleshooting of the outside copper and fiber cable plant. Additional duties include coordinating with cable maintenance and installation crews on locating cable, cable tray, conduits, access panels, and manholes for the construction, adding and/or maintaining the cable plant, reviewing and verifying all completed work orders for accuracy of cable assignments, and recording all changes to both outside and inside cable plant. Experience with design and installation of high pair count copper cables, splicing fiber and troubleshooting, knowledge of theories and techniques involved in the implementation and maintenance of private and public telecommunications networks and telecommunications equipment operation and use is essential. Reqs: High School Diploma. Fiber Optic, research, troubleshooting, electronic circuitry construction experience ‑ minimum of 1‑3 years. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $35.83 to $40.29/hr., commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 30409

SCITREK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PROGRAM COORDINATOR

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY The SciTrek Coordinator works with the elementary school portion of the program in 2nd‑6th grade classrooms and assists with the administrative aspects of the program. This includes but is not limited to: coordinating and setting up schedules, organizing events, packing and putting away materials, updating the website, driving volunteers to schools, assisting with proof‑reading SciTrek materials (knowledge of science is helpful for this), helping with fundraising,

recruitment, and data entry. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent training and/or experience. 1‑3 years general administrative/clerical experience. 1‑3 years data collection, analysis and reporting experience using spreadsheets and charts. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Position funding beyond the first two years is dependent on continuation of SciTrek Program funding. $21.28‑$23.18/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/5/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39765

STUDENT AFFAIRS COORDINATOR

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Provides academic and instructional support for all undergraduate, graduate and doctoral emphasis program services within the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. Provides administrative support, including, but not limited to: planning department events, graduate recruitment, and other outreach activities; quarterly course coordination, course evaluation coordinating and processing, process BARC course fees; manages department articulation process, and ordering program and instructor supplies. Assists the undergraduate and graduate advisers with advising enrolled and prospective students on all aspects of their academic experience. Solely responsible for the administration of the departmental Disabled Students Program, which requires substantive knowledge of University, College, and departmental policies and procedures and the ability to interpret from various academic and administrative offices. Assists with preparation of digital and print materials, uses social media platforms to connect with students, alumni and community members to promote the department and its programs, and department website maintenance. Works collaboratively and in coordination with the Undergraduate and Graduate Advisers, Student Affairs Manager, Department Chair and Business Officer in a team environment to complete administrative tasks related to graduate and undergraduate matters in the department. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area or equivalent experience and/ or training. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. CANRA (U13): Mandated Child Abuse Reporter. Some evening and or weekend hours will be required for special annual events. $24.81‑$26.50/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/1/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 39378

TEMPORARY LECTURER

in Chemistry and Biochemistry Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Main duties will include teaching

courses in general chemistry and biochemistry, with the possibility of occasional upper‑division teaching opportunities. Req; MA in Chemistry, Biochemistry or related field at time of application. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 8/1/22. https://apptrkr. com/3252328. Posting will remain open until filled.

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RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT STUDIOS $1440, Studios with patio $1500, 1BDs $1560, 1BDs with patio $1620, in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 805‑967‑6614

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LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: TRI‑COUNTY INSULATION at 1900 F. Commercial Way, Santa Cruz, CA 95065; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 02/01/2013 in the County of Santa Cruz. Original file no. 2013‑0000249. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: TRI‑COUNTY INSULATION, Statewide Insulation, Inc., 1900 F. Commercial Way, Santa Cruz, CA 95065. AL#1499563 State: CA This statement was filed in the office of Tricia Webber, Santa Cruz County on June 21, 2002 by Lorena Bibriesca‑Camacho, Deputy County Clerk. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SMALL BUSINESS LOAN FUND 333 S. Salinas St., Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Women’s Economic Ventures (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 08/15//07/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2017‑0002303. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: The business was conducted as a corporation, signed by KATHY ODELL, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 7/08/22. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001734. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: TRI‑COUNTY INSULATION at 910 George Street, Santa Clara, CA 95054; Statewide Insulation Inc. (same address). The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 7/15/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. FBN2019‑0001695. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Statewide Insulation Inc. (same address) This businesss is conducted by a corporation. This statement is SIGNED BY MARK A GIESEKE, PRESIDENT. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 14, 2022. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) FBN2022‑0001789. Published: Jul 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CENTRAL COAST RBS, 5671 Ekwill St, Unit 103, Goleta, CA 93117; Darin Biamonte (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 11/4//2020 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 20‑0002735. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: The business was conducted as an Individual. SIGNED BY DARIN L. BIAMONTE, OWNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 7/08/22. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001740. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 20022. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS


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NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: FLUENTESL at 802 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Danny Chun‑Fu Tsai (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 04/19/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. FBN2019‑0000960. The business was conducted by an individual and SIGNED BY Danny Chun‑Fu Tsai, Founder. This FBN 2022‑0001718, E47 statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) , Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: IN HOPE COUNSELING, 5662 Calle Real, #149, Goleta, CA 93117; Sheena Escobedo, 7382 Davenport RD Apt B, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed by SHEENA ESCOBEDO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001670. Published: July 7, 14, 21, 28, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOHEMIAN WAFFLES, 432 E Cota, Santa barbara, CA 93101; Bohemian Breakfast,112 Los Aguajes Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by ANGELA ONEILIN, OFFICER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001658. Published: July 7, 14, 21. 28, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA LEGAL DOCUMENT SERVICES, 4509A Auhay Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93110‑1705; Alexis C Henderson, (same address)This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY ALEXIS HENDERSON. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001705. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: OAK PARK, 1532 Acorn Way, Solvang, CA 93463; Flt Oak Park Flte, LLC, 2082 Michelson Drive, 4th Fl (same address) .This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Corporation. SIGNED BY MICHAEL B. EARL, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 7/6/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001715. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GIOVANNI’S PIZZA OF GOLETA, 5711 Calle Real, Goleta, CA 93117; Noormand & Sons Incorporated (same address). This business is conducted by A Corporation. SIGNED BY MCLEOD NOORMAND, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001783. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s)

is/are doing business as: LA FLORA DIVINA SANTA BARBARA, 4721 Amarosa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Jacqueline Clarke, 249 Verano Dr. #5, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY JAQUELINE CLARKE, FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001722. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SKYPIG PRODUCTIONS, 1127 E Cota St, Santa Barbara, CA, 93103; Santiago P Bailey‑Musacchio (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SANTIAGO BAILEY‑MUSACCHIO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0001720. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SCO HOLDINGS, 121 Gray Avenue, Suite 302, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Iterative Ascent (same address). This business is conducted by Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY JOSHUA CALEB COLLINS, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001853. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARADISE HOOKAH HUT, 432 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Paradise Hookah Hut, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY DANNY TSAI, CO‑OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0001717. Published: July 28, August 4, 18 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ECHOLOGIC DESIGN, 5061 7th Street, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Echologic Design LLC (same address)This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY EVAN WALBRIDGE, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30.FBN Number: 2022‑0001602. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SECOND ARROW COUNSELING, 301 E. Carrillo St, Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Daniel M Cohen, 2415 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105‑3561. This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY DANIEL COHEN, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001728. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RIVIERA BEE CO., 1560 N Ontare RD, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tracey L Goss (same address) This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY TRACEY L GOSS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 13, 2022. This statement

expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001778. Published: July 21, 28, August 4, 11 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOS LAURELES CO, 1128 Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Los Laureles Co LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. SIGNED BY NANCY GONZALEZ, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001860. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AYURVEDA SANA, 48 Mallard Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117; Daniela Caballero (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY DANIELA CABALLERO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001675. Published: July 28, August 4, 11, 18, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CEILO DRONE SERVICES, 571 Hill St, Los Alamos, CA 93440; Gary Gordon, (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY GARY GORDON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001716. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MOVE SANTA BARBARA, 506 E. Haley Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition, Santa Barbara, CA (same address). Move SB County; Cycling Without Age; Coast; Coalition for Sustainable Transportation. This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY GREG JANEE, SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 23, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001621. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MERRILL GARDENS AT SANTA MARIA, 120 Suey Rd, Santa Maria, CA 93454; Shi‑IV Merrill GP, LLC, General Partner of MG at Santa Maria, LP, 1938 Fairview Ave E Ste 300, Seattle, WA 98102. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed by DOUGLAS D. SPEAR, VICE PRESIDENT OF GENERAL PARTNER OF MG AT SANTA MARIA, LP. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001552. Published: July 14, 21. 28, August 4, 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: MELISSA ANN HENSIEK, CASE NUMBER: 22CV02517 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: MELISSA ANN HENSIEK TO MELISSA ANN SOUZA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear

before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING SEPTEMBER 1, 2022, 8:30 AM, DEPT SM4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: July 14, 2022, Jed Beebe, Judge of the Superior Court, Published July 21, 28, August 4, 11, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SABRINA BATES BELL, CASE NUMBER: 22CV01328 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SABRINA BATES BELL TO: SABRINA BATES BELL‑BONADEO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING AUGUST 10, 2022, 10:30 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 6/15/2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022.

STATEMENT OF DAMAGES STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, an individual seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages c. Loss of earnings (to date), $5,000.000.00; d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00 e.Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other (specify) Lost income, incidental, and consequential damages of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust,

seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000.000.00. e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i.Other (specify) Lost Income, incidental, and consequential damages of (specify) $10,000.000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you; 3. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. Plaintiff: Elinor Fisher, an individual seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000.000.00. e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other (specify) Lost Income, incidental, and consequential damages, $5,000.000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed agains you. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (PERSONAL INJURY OR WRONGFUL DEATH) CASE NUMBER: 20CV00235. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. Plaintiff: Judith Dannett, an individual seeks damages in the aboveentitled action, as follows: 1. General Damages, b. Emotional distgress $5,000,000.00; 2. Special damages, c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00, d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000.000.00. e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00, i. Other (specify) Lost Income, incidental, and consequential damages, $5,000.000.00; 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed agains you. Dated: April, 2021, Stephen A. Jamieson.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) CASE NUMBER: (NUMERO DEL CASO): 20CV00235 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): CAMILLA MELDAHL AKA CAMILLA MEHDAHL, an individual; ED ST. GEORGE, an individual; JAMES GELB, an individual; JAMES M. GELB, as Trustee of the 2010 James M. Gelb Revocable Trust, MARIO MELENDEZ, an individual; MELENDEZ CONSTRUCTION, an Unknown business entity; MATTHEW CROTTY, an individual; FRANCES CROTTY, an individual; BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, A NATIONAL BANKING ASSOCIATION, as Trustee under that certain Pooling and Service Agreement dated as of October 1, 1992 for RTC Commercial Pass‑ Through Certificates, Series 1992 CHF; ROBERT L. LOVGREN, an individual; DOREEN J. LOVGREN, an individual, 6651 L.P., a California limited partnership; HARVEY H. WIPF, an individual; HARVEY H. WIPF, as Trustee of the Wipf Family Trust; BERNICE A. WIPF, an individual; BERNICE A. WIPF, as Trustee for the Wipf Family Trust; ERNEST G. GULSRUD, an individual; ERNEST G. GULSRUD as Trustee of the Gulsrud Family Trust; MURIEL GENEVIEVE GULSRUD, an individual; MURIEL G. GULSRUD, as Trustee for the Gulsrud

Family Trust; CURTIS R. JAHNKE, an Individual; and DOES 1 through 100, inclusive. YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): MARSHALL R. BERNES, an individual; MARSHALL R. BERNES, as Trustee of the Marshall R. Bernes Family Trust; JUDITH DANNETT, an individual; AND, ELINOR FISHER, an individual NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Sue respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no pueda pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia,org), en el Centro

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de Ayuda de las Cortes del California , (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuer o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y direccion de la corte es); Santa Barbara Superior Court, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Stephen Jamieson, SOLOMON SALTSMAN & JAMIESON; 426 Culver Blvd; Playa Del Rey, CA 90293 Ph: (310) 822‑9848 DATE: (FECHA) 1/13/2020 Clerk, by (Secretario) /s/ Sara Sisto, Deputy (Adjunto)

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