Santa Barbara Independent 7/14/22

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JULY 14-21, 2022 VOL. 36

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Pro Soccer is Back, Baby Midsummer Opera Moment Museum of Contemporary Art Closing

p U e d i S y n n u S dBoy a S r o f e d a h S No Loko’s New Hit by Ryan P. Cruz id bostrom photos by ingr


I G E T YO U R T

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DAPHNIS AND CHLOE SAT JUL 30, 7:30 PM

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THE PINES OF ROME SAT AUG 6, 7:30 PM

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Hear from the conductor before the performance. Beverages and bites will be served.

JUL 30 & AUG 6 | $20 Limited availability Sullivan Goss – An American Gallery

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T C H A I K O V S K Y

FRI JUL 15, 7:30 PM | SUN, JUL 17, 2:30 PM GRANADA THEATRE DANIELA CANDILLARI CONDUCTOR PETER KAZARAS DIRECTOR LEHRER VOCAL INSTITUTE ACADEMY FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA DANIELA

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JULY 14, 2022

$10 COMMUNITY ACCESS TICKETS AVAILABLE NOW! INDEPENDENT.COM


Americana 2022-2023 Series Subscriptions on Sale Now!

series

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Charley Crockett “Crockett is an old-school country music superstar in waiting.” Independent (U.K.)

Sun, Oct 2 / 7 PM Arlington Theatre

Allison Russell Wed, Nov 16 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Watkins Family Hour Tue, Nov 29 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

“Sean and Sara Watkins are akin to royalty in American folk circles.” The Guardian (U.K.)

Save up to 25% with a Curated series, or Create Your Own series of 4 or more events and save 10% (Single tickets on sale August 5 at 10 AM)

“[Russell’s] abstract poetry mixed with a literal mind is just unbelievable…This is one of the best conceptual albums I’ve ever heard.” – Brandi Carlile

View the full 2022-2023 lineup at ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 14, 2022

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Congratulations! FROM SANTA BARBARA MIDDLE SCHOOL

TO THE NINTH GRADE CLASS OF 2022 ON YOUR RITE OF PASSAGE!

Fatima Acosta

Cainan Birchim

Sam Blakely

Leo Bolger

Nick Boller

Hudson Bonsignore

Cole Bucher

Aaron Bush

Mason Coburn

Sophia Cruz

Damian De Voto

Luc Guier

Alec Hamman

Emma Hine

Corinne Hulford

Tove Ibsen

Cameron McNulty

Avalon Nichols

Charlie Palmer

Olivia Peters

Eloise Phillips

Ella Popovich

Leo Powell

Ada Ray We honor your growth into 9th grade leaders and scholars. Thank you for your integrity, compassion, and resilience.

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Micah Sage

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Jack Shapiro

JULY 14, 2022

Sawyer Smythe

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Jessa Sperling

Aislinn Wilson

Carpe Diem!


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Rodrigo Hernandez, Koss Klobucher, Emma Spencer, Finnegan Wright Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

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INTREPID INTERN Name: Rodrigo Hernandez Title: News Intern

COVER STORY Sunny-Side Up

No Shade for SadBoy Loko by Ryan P. Cruz

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2ND FEATURE Summer Reading

Our Annual Foray Into the Joys of the Written Word by Leslie Dinaberg

NEWS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

OBITUARIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

LIVING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

ARTS LIFE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

Arts Previews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

ASTROLOGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

CLASSIFIEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

ON THE COVER: SadBoy Loko. Photo by Ingrid Bostrom. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

In a nutshell, who is Rodrigo Hernandez? I am a first-generation Santa Barbara local proud of my Mexican roots, with my mom being from the small town of Zumpango, Tlaxcala, and my dad hailing from Guadalajara, Jalisco. I recently graduated from City College, where I majored in journalism and was the editor-in-chief at The Channels — the college’s student-run online newspaper. I decided to join the Indy for a summer internship, reuniting with my Channels editor predecessors and current Indy reporters Ryan P. Cruz and Jun Starkey, before heading off to CSU Northridge, where I will continue studying journalism along with photo and video. In my free time, I enjoy reading about multiple subjects, including film and music history, organized crime, fantasy, horror, and science fiction, as well as watching movies, collecting vinyl records, and playing guitar. You’ve mainly been covering the Dungan triple-murder trial. What other topics would you like to write about this summer? I would like to do more stories about the everyday local community in Santa Barbara, specifically representing more of the Eastside and Westside. Although it is exciting to cover high-profile cases, writing about community events such as the recent boxing match at the Eastside Boys and Girls Club or the Summer Nights events at La Cumbre Junior High does more to have a greater impact on the public in terms of feeling seen and heard while staying informed. I admire the cover story on Milpas Street businesses back in April, and I believe that engaging more with underrepresented groups and voices will not only benefit the paper but Santa Barbara as a whole. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

LEARN. SHARE. CONTRIBUTE. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. Become a Docent at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art! If you have a passion for art and are interested in serving the community, the SBMA Docent Program is a rewarding and supportive environment to learn and have fun. Volunteer docents engage with visitors of all ages through guided tours to make works of art accessible to everyone. Diverse applicants with an interest in learning about art, working with students, and facilitating positive Museum experiences for visitors are encouraged to apply.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net

The year-long training course begins September 28, 2022. For more information, contact education@sbma.net or visit www.sbma.net/docent.

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JULY 14, 2022

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COURTESY

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volume 36, # 861, July 14-21, 2022


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JULY 7-14, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COU RTESY

PUBLIC SAFETY COU RTESY SBCSAR

HOUSING

BIG PLANS: A multi-story, mixed-use project proposed for Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone would add 142 apartments and 13 condos to the area.

Four-Story Funk Zone Behemoth Prepares for City Review

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by Ryan P. Cruz

four-story, 155-residential-unit collection of mixed-use buildings spanning an entire city block in the Funk Zone is preparing to make its way through the city review process, after being postponed twice since June. The project has been in the works in some form since 2014, when developer Neil Dipaola announced plans for a “funky” take that he said would fit perfectly in the Funk Zone, which at the time was still in its early freeform stages of becoming the local hotspot that it is now. Back in 2014, Dipaola was one of the hottest new names in local land development; he had led the charge for The Loop in Isla Vista, a modern residential mixed-use apartment building that earned a Governor’s Award for Environmental and Economic Leadership, and later, he teamed up with partners Matthew and Wally Hofmann to install the city’s first Airstream hotel on De la Vina Street, a feat that was achieved without displacing any of the mobile home park’s working-class tenants. Since then, Dipaola has moved on to bigger projects, and the Airstream hotel business, AutoCamp, has expanded to include another park in Sonoma County and a 103suite camp just outside Yosemite National Park. The Funk Zone development, which has been temporarily referred to by planners as

“SoMo” — a play on the New York portmanteau SoHo (south of Houston Street) and Tribeca (triangle below Canal Street), referring to the area “South of Montecito Street” — stretches across the entire city block from Yanonali to Mason streets, between Gray Avenue and Santa Barbara Street. The address 121 East Mason Street has been registered under the company SOMO SB, LLC, since January 2014. When early plans came out in 2020, they included a more whimsical take that featured rentable live-in sailboats on rooftops and a collection of 125 residential apartments and 153 parking spaces spanning the two-acre site. All of the existing structures, with the exception of the 500-square-foot silo, would be demolished for the development. The project came across the Planning Commission and Architectural Board of Review in 2020, with city leaders worrying the project’s size was too big and neighboring business owners concerned about the effect it would have on the area, which was once a dense, somewhat chaotic, but funky hodgepodge of art studios and surf shops that had collected in the area due to affordable rents. Since then, it has become the apple of local developers’ eyes, with wineries and high-end restaurants changing the face of the once industrial Funk Zone. On the other hand, the project is attractive to city planners and developers looking to address a severe lack of housing in the city, as

PAU L WE LL M A N FI LE P HOTO

Developers Plan to Tear Down City Block for 155-Residential-Unit Development Known as ‘SoMo’

Developer Neil Dipaola in 2014

it scrambles to meet its 8,000-unit allocation before the 2023 Housing Element. The project’s latest plans consist of 231 parking spaces, 13 condominiums, and 142 residential units — 38 of which must be “affordable” — spread across nearly 200,000 square feet. Dipaola also has a deft hand, making his projects notoriously easy to approve by exceeding housing density requirements with about 74 units per acre and checking every box when it comes to meeting the city’s longterm development goals. The project was scheduled for a public hearing with the Architectural Board of Review on June 13 and again on July 11, but both hearings were postponed; a future hearing date has been tentatively scheduled for July 25. The development is still far from a final approval, and each governing body will have an opportunity to review the project before approving any building permits. n

County Search and Rescue saved a man and his dog from the cliffs above More Mesa beach on 7/10 after receiving a call right as the group was concluding a training session nearby. The dog, Ranger, had gone over the side, and the owner became stuck himself while attempting to rescue the dog and called 9-1-1. A Search and Rescue member lowered the man down to the beach in a harness once Ranger was secured with a veterinarian rescue member, and Ranger was lowered down right after. Both were evaluated and had no injuries from the incident. County Fire snuffed out an “illegal burn” behind a lumberyard near Aero Camino in Goleta on 7/11 before any nearby structures were damaged. Railroad service was stalled while crews put out the roughly 1/8-acre blaze, but the tracks were reopened and the fire cleared in less than an hour. The cause of the fire is still under investigation, though there were no initial reports of foreign debris near the scene. A brush fire reportedly started by a catalytic converter burned two to three acres on 7/8 off Highway 101 just south of Buellton. A quick coordinated response between County Fire, Cal Fire, and the U.S. Forest Services tackled the fire with dozers, air support, and ground crews. County Fire spokesperson Captain Scott Safechuck said that fire investigators found evidence of “catalytic converter material” that spewed from a vehicle in the right-hand lane onto the dry brush by the side of the highway. A semi-truck trailer reportedly veered off the Northbound 101 near Mariposa Reina on 7/7, crashing into a group of trees and killing the vehicle’s sole occupant, Jesus Tamayo, 41, of Compton. According to a CHP spokesperson, Tamayo reportedly lost control of the vehicle going at least 65 mph and “was ejected from the vehicle, causing major injuries.” Tamayo was reportedly not wearing a seatbelt and succumbed to his injuries at the scene. This incident is still under investigation; anyone with information can contact Officer C. Sanchez at (805) 967-1234. CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 14, 2022

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HEALTH

Cottage Dropping VBAC Ban

COU RTESY

JULY 7-14, 2022

Controversial Policy Was in Place for Nearly 20 Years by Lauren Bray and Tyler Hayden

This article is a joint reporting venture by Edhat and the Santa Barbara Independent and is part of an ongoing series of stories on maternal health in Santa Barbara.

S

anta Barbara Cottage Hospital, the South Coast’s only full-service maternal care facility, announced it is planning to offer the option of VBACs — vaginal birth after Cesarean section — in the fall of this year, following an unofficial ban since 2003. Spokesperson Maria Zate said Cottage is in the process of recruiting obstetric hospitalists to support VBACs. “When the option becomes available, a hospitalist and a dedicated anesthesiologist from our medical staff will be on-site 24/7, with an additional OB/ GYN physician on call,” she said. “The hospital is committed to this level of physician coverage to respond to emergencies. This will ensure the highest level of safety for our patients, following the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) guidelines.” Local advocacy groups and parents have been pressing Cottage on the VBAC issue for years. They’ve cited studies and recommendations from ACOG that support trial of labor after Cesarean (TOLAC) and its successful result, a VBAC, since 2010. The physicians association deems VBACs “a safe and appropriate choice for most women who have had prior Cesarean delivery.” Its literature states most women with one previous Cesarean delivery with a low-transverse incision are candidates for and should be offered a trial of labor. According to ACOG, those with a high risk of uterine rupture would not be good

candidates, a sticking point some local doctors have pointed to in the past as a reason for not providing the service. Uterine rupture is when the Cesarean scar on the uterus breaks open during labor, prompting an emergency C-section surgery, although it occurs in less than one percent of patients. “The scar separates in about one out of every 200 women,” said Dr. Stuart Fischbein, a Southern California board-certified OB/GYN who is an outspoken proponent of midwifery collaboration and allowing women to choose their own style of maternal care. “If you’re doing four VBACs a month, you’re going to have about one uterine rupture every four years. How many crash C-sections has [Cottage] done during those four years for other causes? Like fetal distress or abruption of the placenta or cord prolapse? Tons. And they seem to be able to handle those just fine.” Cottage Hospital is the only Level One Trauma Hospital between San Jose to Los Angeles, meaning it provides the highest level of surgical care and is capable of responding to every aspect of injury, from prevention to rehabilitation. Many surrounding hospitals with equal or lesser levels of care are supportive of VBACs. Marian Regional Medical Center in Santa Maria and two Ventura hospitals offer the service. Larger facilities farther south such as UCLA Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles, and Cedars-Sinai Los Angeles have been supportive of VBACs for years. When asked why the ban was reversed now, what information was used to inform the decision, who actually makes such decisions, and so on, Zate referred to her original statement. “That’s all the info we can provide,” she said.

Protest in support of VBACs outside Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital in 2017

The local chapter of the International Cesarean Awareness Network (ICAN) hosts a maternal healthcare panel every year in Santa Barbara. When asked about their previous interactions with Cottage Hospital on the VBAC issue, ICAN stated the hospital had quoted outdated ACOG articles and would not respond when asked about a specific policy banning the procedure, and the legality of such ban. Dr. Fischbein, who has performed numerous VBACs in home-birth settings, questioned Cottage’s announcement. “Cottage will quote ACOG and their guidelines when it suits them, and they’ll ignore ACOG’s guidelines when it doesn’t,” he said. “This is the classic cognitive dissonance that happens in hospitals. They cherry-pick their data.” There is no law against VBACs, and federal statutes prohibit a hospital from refusing to accept anyone in active labor as a patient, but local doctors have reportedly expressed worry about consequences from Cottage if they went against its policy. Jamie Davin, a local mother of two, sought the opinion of a Santa Barbara OB/GYN regarding a VBAC for her second child and was told she’d be a perfect candidate. “They

very much wanted to support my VBAC but had to decline me as a client because they were not allowed to support VBAC at Cottage and they were afraid of repercussions if they were to do so,” said Davin. “They did not suggest I have a Cesarean but gave me the name of a doctor in Ventura who supports VBAC.” The Santa Barbara Midwifery & Birth Center has been supporting VBACs for the past five years. Director Laurel Phillips applauded Cottage’s recent decision to address the longstanding need and to eliminate an unnecessary source of friction between the hospital and the community. “Santa Barbara should be a destination for maternity care, famous for the best practices and the most choices. We have the resources,” said Phillips. “Pregnant people will no longer have to make the drive to Ventura in labor if they desire a VBAC in the hospital. That was an unacceptable and dangerous situation for the large number of people in our community who have had a past Cesarean birth and do not want another.” Sansum Clinic, which employs six of the eight practicing obstetricians in South Santa Barbara County, declined to comment for this story. n

organizers. It then moved in 1990 to its current location at the Paseo Nuevo Shopping Center. In fact, one of the city’s conditions for approving the mall at the time was that it include a black box theater (Center Stage Theater currently fills that role) and visual arts venue. With MCASB’s imminent departure, Paseo Nuevo must now find a new museum tenant, said Jason Harris, the city’s economic development manager. While other regional venues, including the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and UCSB’s Art, Design, & Architecture Museum, feature contemporary works in their schedules, it often appears peripheral to their main shows. MCASB, meanwhile, was known for bringing big-name contemporary artists from all over the world to Santa Barbara — including John Baldessari, Ed and Nancy Kienholz, and Wayne Thiebaud, among others — and highlighting local talent. “It is a huge loss,” said Nathan Voss, owner of the Sullivan Goss gallery. “Having a Museum of Contemporary Art in Santa

Barbara was a point of pride for everyone involved in the city’s arts ecosystem. Hopefully, this sad news will remind the community how fragile some of our most beloved arts institutions are without more public and private financial support.” MCASB’s revenue took a major hit when, in 2018, it canceled its annual Dream Home Raffle fundraiser amid allegations of impropriety against the event’s contracted operator. The raffle was the museum’s main source of income for many years, generating $1.1 million in 2017 alone. But the consultant, which ran raffles for numerous nonprofits and charities across the country, has since come under fire for rarely awarding the homes it and its clients aggressively advertised. Even with the raffle revenue, however, MCASB was in serious financial trouble, tax records show. In 2017, the organization reported a loss of approximately $504,000. The year before that, it was just more than $712,000. In 2019, the museum lost more than $1.2 million, and in 2020 it dropped another $1.7 million. n

ARTS

MCASB Announces August Closure Venue Had Been Under Financial Strain for Years

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by Tyler Hayden and Joe Woodard

he Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB), which for the better part of five decades has served as the city’s premier contemporary art-focused venue, announced it is closing August 28. The organization had faced financial strain for a number of years now, said Board President Laura Macker Johnston in a statement, and the COVID pandemic was the final nail in the coffin. “Despite our best efforts to expand our donor base within the region, we have been unable to reach the fundraising goals nec8

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JULY 14, 2022

essary to maintain operations, and it is the board’s intention to act responsibly at this time to honor the institution’s legacy,” Johnston said. While MCASB will soon shut its doors, she explained, the museum is in talks with community partners about potentially continuing their popular Emerging Leaders in the Arts and Teen Arts Collective programs. Founded in 1976 as a roving space and originally called the Contemporary Arts Forum (CAF), the museum moved into its first permanent home in 1980 in the historic Balboa Building owned by Bob Klausner, whose wife, Betty, was one of the CAF’s first INDEPENDENT.COM


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON

Triple-Murder Trial Enters Week Four

P

104th Concert Season

RODR IG O H ER N AN DEZ

rosecutors called a certified collision reconstructionist on Monday, July 11, for the ongoing trial of John Dungan, a Santa Barbara man charged with murdering Solvang woman Rebecca Vanessa Goss Bley and her two children, 2-year-old Lucienne Bley Gleason and 4-month-old Desmond Bley Gleason, in a high-speed car wreck on Dungan’s defense attorney Jeremy Lessem (left), talking to Deputy Highway 154 on October 25, District Attorney Stephen Wagner 2019. Retired CHP officer Scott Peterson was mph in four seconds, as well as the accelcalled to the stand to testify about the Event erator pedal being at full position leading Data Recorder (EDR) report retrieved from up to the time of impact and the seatbelt Dungan’s Camaro. Peterson said that the being unbuckled. Camaro’s EDR was the only one salvageFollowing his testimony from June 7, able, since the ones from the Volt driven CHP Officer Shannan Sams returned to by Bley and the Yukon driven by Nicholas the stand on Monday to describe the two Goddard, who was driving down the 154 attempts he had at conversing with Dunfrom Los Gatos with his son and narrowly gan’s parents. Sams said that while asking avoided the collision, were damaged exten- questions to the parents during their secsively from a fire immediately following the ond interaction, in the waiting room of the crash that ignited from the Volt. hospital where Dungan was being treated, Pages from the report reveal Dungan Dungan’s mother, Geraldine, appeared to was traveling at speeds of up to 119 mph be uncooperative with her responses, while toward Bley’s car leading up to the crash. his father, Michael, was communicative Peterson said that “the speed increased as with the officer. Sams said that Geraldine the Camaro got closer to the Volt,” con- would yell her husband’s name and say that firming that Dungan was traveling at 119 he “didn’t have to answer them because it mph when colliding with the Volt. A chart wasn’t in the best interest for their family.” detailing the car’s diagnostics, including The trial will continue Thursday, July 14, speed, ranged from 5 seconds to 0.5 before in Judge Thomas Adams’s courtroom, with the crash. The data showed the Camaro’s the prosecution expected to rest their case accelerometer increasing from 109 to 119 this week. —Rodrigo Hernandez

Experience the wonder of hearing the world’s finest classical music performances live in concert in Santa Barbara.

Riccardo Muti

Gustavo Dudamel

international series

SEASON SPONSOR:

at the Granada Theatre

SAGE PUBLICATIONS

MONDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2022, 7:30PM

CITY OF BIRMINGHAM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Mirga Gražinytė-Tyla, Music Director Sheku Kanneh-Mason, cello

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2023, 7:30PM

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Riccardo Muti, Music Director

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2023, 7:30PM

FILHARMONIE BRNO (of the Czech Republic) Dennis Russell Davies, Music Director

THURSDAY, MAY 18, 2023, 7:30PM

CURTIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

(CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC/PHILADELPHIA) Osmo Vänskä, conductor Yefim Bronfman, piano

SUNDAY, MAY 28, 2023, 4:00PM

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Jail Population Can Be Cut in Half

F

rom 2011 to 2019, the county jail’s population fluctuated between 1,000 and 1,200. By the decade’s end, it was down to 1,000. During the height of the pandemic, jail population plunged to 600, fueling the hope of criminal justice reform advocates and several county supervisors that Santa Barbara could keep its incarceration levels low and save money without compromising public safety. This week, the county supervisors heard from a private consultant — Michael Wilson — that the 600 number, in fact, lay within their grasp. Wilson noted that the jail population — now at 791 — could be expected to hover between 800 and 900 for the foreseeable future if present trends and practices continue. (The jail has a permitted capacity of 1,034 beds.) Wilson examined 50,000 probation records and 500,000 jail booking records as well as county crime rates, booking patterns, and demographic trends. He thought they could free up 254 bed spaces by implementing these policy changes: Eliminate 70 beds by expanding the electronic ankle

bracelet program; eliminate another 64 beds by reducing jail time for those violating an arrest warrant; and eliminate another 63 beds by reducing re-incarceration for those violating probation. People arrested for domestic abuse, driving while intoxicated, or crimes against children would not be eligible for any reduced time. For low-level offenders, Wilson said, sentences longer than one or two days can cause “criminogenic” side effects—like losing one’s job or housing — that lead to greater recidivism. Wilson’s presentation was part of a yearlong examination of the county’s criminal justice bureaucracy. Leading the effort is retired Riverside Judge Sherrill Ellsworth, who said the cheapest and most meaningful reform was to improve access by their lawyers to the accused and to expedite the discovery process. Sheriff Bill Brown cautioned that diverting inmates from the jail would wind up costing more for effective diversionary programs and that for any jail to be safely administered, there needed to be a strategic segregation of inmates otherwise —Nick Welsh at risk of violent behavior.

Gustavo Dudamel, Music Director Gabriel Cabezas, cello

masterseries

SEASON SPONSOR:

at the Lobero Theatre

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2022, 7:30PM

JUILLIARD STRING QUARTET WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2022, 7:30PM

HÉLÈNE GRIMAUD, piano

SATURDAY, MARCH 4, 2023, 7:30PM CAMA in conjunction with the Lobero Theater Foundation present

LOS ROMEROS ⳼ THE ROMERO GUITAR QUARTET “THE ROYAL FAMILY OF THE GUITAR”

in celebration of the Lobero’s 150th Anniversary (2/22/1873–2/22/2023)

MONDAY, APRIL 24, 2023, 7:30PM

AUGUSTIN HADELICH, solo violin SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW (805) 966-4324 ⳼ tickets@camasb.org

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JULY 14, 2022

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JULY 7-14, 2022

ENERGY

Diablo Canyon’s New Lease on Life WI KICOMMON S

Nuclear Power Plant Gets Stay of Execution Ahead of 2025 Shutdown

GOVERNOR’S REPRIEVE: Governor Gavin Newsom signed a budget trailer bill to set aside $75 million in state funding to help keep Diablo Canyon’s two reactors humming. by Nick Welsh ognitive dissonance!” exclaimed David Weisman during a recent interview. Weisman would repeat this more than a few times. And he had reason. For the past 20 years, Weisman — a poet, musician, and train aficionado who just celebrated his 61st birthday—has been waging relentless war in the wonkiest imaginable terms against PG&E’s Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant located in Avila Beach. When PG&E announced six years ago it would not seek a license renewal for California’s last remaining nuclear power plant, Weisman — spokesperson and agitator-in-chief for Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility — thought his job was effectively over. But in recent weeks, Governor Gavin Newsom just signed a budget trailer bill to set aside $75 million in state funding to help keep Diablo Canyon’s two reactors humming. More than that, Newsom assigned responsibility for the future of the nuclear plant to an obscure, though vitally important, statewide water agency. On top of that, President Joe Biden and his Department of Energy just set aside $6 billion in special funds that likewise can be tapped into by PG&E to extend the lifespan of its Diablo Canyon plant that was otherwise slated to shut down in 2025. Also signing onto this plan is California Senator Dianne Feinstein. Congressmember Salud Carbajal, who represents the district in which Diablo Canyon is situated, objected that Newsom had failed to consult with him or people in the district before making so sudden and drastic a pronouncement. “There are key questions

C

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that must be directly addressed,” Carbajal stated regarding the governor’s proposal. Carbajal said his San Luis Obispo County constituents needed to be shown a “road map” for any plan that will expect them to accept additional nuclear waste in their “backyard for more years to come.” Carbajal also expressed serious reservations about the impact an extended Diablo Canyon might have on his dreams of midwifing a major wind energy project off the coast of Morro Bay. The first offshore lease sale for that proposal is scheduled to take place this fall. The wind farm idea relies on using Diablo Canyon’s vast electrical grid to transit power for the wind turbines off the coast. If Diablo Canyon is still operating, that grid will not be available. Giving the 40-year-old reactors a new lease has been a concerted push by a notably bipartisan mix of national energy experts and politicians who contend the loss of Diablo Canyon — which produces 9 percent of California’s energy supply — will inflict even greater energy reliability questions for a state already plagued by rolling brownouts and blackouts. In addition, they’ve noted, Diablo Canyon provides carbon-free energy to no fewer than three million people. Even with a raft of heavy-hitting renewable projects now in the pipeline, state energy experts are projecting a major gap in reliable supply by the year 2025. The size of that gap, not coincidentally, is roughly identical to the amount of energy produced at Diablo Canyon. Given the immediacy of the threat posed by climate change, they argue, the carbon-free energy produced by Diablo Canyon can no longer be discarded. When those INDEPENDENT.COM

renewable energy projects come online, they say, Diablo Canyon can then be shut down. Highlighting just how drastic this change of direction is, Weisman noted, a team of high-ranking administrators from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will be hosting a public hearing next Thursday evening in San Luis Obispo — for the first time in many years — to discuss the adequacy of PG&E’s $175 million plans to decommission the Diablo Canyon facility. “If ever there was a case of cognitive dissonance,” he muttered, “this is it.” Weisman testified two weeks ago in front of Diablo Canyon’s Independent Safety Committee, which is presided over by Robert Budnitz, a former safety expert with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Budnitz shared some of Weisman’s concerns about the abruptness of the change in course and the amount of time needed to execute it safely. “The details are still elusive,” Budnitz opined. “It’s a real safety concern.” Budnitz expressed concern over the large number of safety initiatives underway for the decommissioning process that will be impacted. For the safety committee to stay on top of all this, he said, “It’s going to be tough.” Borrowing a line his mother was fond of using, Budnitz added, “There’s many a slip between the cup and the lip.” Lots of questions remain. Diablo Canyon was built to store nuclear fuel rods used onsite up to the year 2025. But after that, where will those rods be stored? What about all the deferred maintenance that could be safely deferred so long as the plant shut down in 2025? What about all the parts and equip-

ment whose safe life expectancy will expire around 2025 that will now have to be replaced if the plant continues operation? Are there enough spare parts to be bought? And it’s an old plant. One of its two units was shut down in 2020 because unspecified vibrations alerted operators to serious cracks in that unit’s turbine. Plus, the number of staff —suitably skilled and trained to work in a nuclear power plant—will be hard to secure. Budnitz and members of the safety commission were adamant they were neither for nor against the extension plan; their role, they stressed, was strictly reactive. But their charge is to ensure safety issues at the plant are properly addressed. “In my personal view, it’s doable in 2022,” he said. “But it’s not going to be doable in 2024.” Weisman takes a dim view of the proposed changes, expressing offense that the state legislature would throw taxpayer and ratepayer money at a company whose CEO’s compensation package weighs in at just less than $52 million a year. As much as that it is, he suggested, it won’t be nearly enough. In 2009, he said, PG&E was given permission to exact $85 million from ratepayers to cover the cost of license renewal. “And that was in 2010 dollars,” he said. That was also before PG&E opted not to renew. Left unaddressed in Governor Newsom’s push are some major big-ticket improvements Diablo Canyon would have been required to implement had it sought license renewal. Chief among these is the replacement of the plant’s water intake and discharge systems—estimated to cost between $8 billion and $12 billion—required to keep the plant from overheating. The current system has been described by a Coastal Commission member as one of the great predators of coastal aquatic life. The high cost of a new water discharge system was one of the key reasons PG&E opted not to seek license renewal. Those who support keeping the lights on at Diablo Canyon insist it’s a short-term solution, a necessary bridge to allow renewable energy technologies the time needed to catch up while preventing brownouts in the short term. “Diablo was in operation in 2020, and we still had all sorts of rolling brownouts and blackouts,” Weisman cautioned. At the time Californians were experiencing brief but disruptive brownouts that year, Weisman noted, California was selling energy outside the state. The problem was not so much an energy deficit, he said, but speculators who were gaming the energy system. Weisman was openly dubious the extension would be a short-term fix. “You’re going to spend billions and billions of dollars for just a few extra years?” he asked. Then, as if answering his own question, he stated, “Cognitive dissonance.” n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 7

COMMUNITY Fairview Gardens — the 13-acre farm in Goleta that found itself on “the brink of a financial cliff” and took a “pause” to conserve resources in June — announced it’s bringing back former executive director Michael Ableman this fall to help plan the farm’s future. Among Ableman’s plans are reducing energy use at the farm, restoring the farmhouse, and adding a service building for equipment, tools, workshops, kitchens, and meeting space. Ableman’s vision also include children’s programs, such as “a multi-dimensional edible sensory landscape.” The nonprofit intends to raise about $10 million to carry out the new plans. Full story at independent.com/whats-up-at-fairview.

COUNTY The Board of Supervisors approved $4.4 million in per capita monies for the county’s libraries on 7/12. In other library news, Carpinteria Library opened its doors as a municipal library on 7/1, having left the Santa Barbara system the day before, in part for cost savings but also for the ability to have “more autonomy in the operations, direction, and strategic plans for the future,” said Library Director Jody Thomas. The city’s Measure X added $568,550 to the library’s budget, and the library received a gift of $175,000 from the La Centra–Sumerlin Foundation toward the renovation costs. A reopening celebration for Carpinteria Library will be held 7/16, 1-4 p.m.

Gratitude Grows Here. We never stop reaching higher for our patients and for our community. “Forever grateful for the compassion we experienced at Cottage.” — Andrew, Henry’s father

The Reaching Higher Together campaign provides bold new ways

CITY COU RTESY

A Minotaur II+ rocket exploded approximately 11 seconds after launching on 7/6 from the North Vandenberg Space Force Base. There were no injuries in the explosion, and the debris was contained to the immediate vicinity of the launch pad. The rocket will be used on the future LGM-35A Sentinel intercontinental ballistic missile. The test launch was meant to demonstrate preliminary design concepts and relevant payload technologies in operationally realistic environments, according to Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center officials. An investigative review board has been established to determine the cause of the explosion.

to promote excellence and innovation in patient care, so kids like Henry can live their fullest life. Our generous community ensures we have the best healthcare right here at home.

Learn more and donate at cottagehealth.org/reachinghigher

COURTS & CRIME Joseph Ashley Garcia, 40 — the Lompoc man who allegedly set his father on fire — pleaded not guilty to murder on 7/6. The amended criminal complaint of murder was brought after Garcia Sr. died due to his injuries on 6/21. The charge has several enhancements, including the infliction of torture. A mental competency hearing was scheduled for 7/13, after press time. The county’s Main Jail went into lockdown on 7/5 when 26-year-old inmate Nicholas Erickson — originally booked on 6/18 for five felony charges — escaped the facility, leading to a 90-minute chase that included a County Air Support and K-9 units. After a K-9 unit found Erickson, he reportedly “feigned surrender” before fleeing again. German shepherd Odin gave chase and “tumbled down a hill and fell from an 8-10-foot drop” onto a sidewalk, injuring his leg, before apprehending Erickson, who sustained minor injuries and was re-booked on new charges of escape, obstruction, and harming a police dog. He is being held on $200,000 bail.

S.B. Interim Chief of Police Barney Melekian (pictured) officially retired after a 50-year career in law enforcement this week and will be replaced by Captain Marylinda Arroyo, who will serve as interim-interim until a permanent new chief is chosen. Melekian served far longer than he initially anticipated when he took the post in March 2021, after former chief Lori Luhnow resigned. Melekian combined street cred, having won both the Medal of Valor and Medal of Courage during his years with the Santa Monica Police; administrative chops, as he served as both fire chief and city administrator for the city of Pasadena; and political smarts, having served in the Department of Justice under the Obama Administration as director of the Community Oriented Policing Services Office.

COU RTESY

BUSINESS

Developer Ed St. George’s plans for a new nine-room hotel slated for the perpetually vacant lot at the intersection of Montecito and Castillo Streets came in for a withering critique at the hands of Historic Landmarks Commissioner Ed Lenvik last week. “We expect street facades to be pedestrian-friendly. I find this to be the most pedestrian-unfriendly element of anything we can imagine other than the Bank of America building” on the 800 block of State Street. Lenvik termed the plans “unacceptable.” No vote was taken. St. George and his team of architects will reassess and submit revisions accordingly. n INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 14, 2022

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

READY, AIM, FIRE: Back when I still lived in Wisconsin, I did some reporting on the Posse Comitatus, a right-wing, paramilitary group

of White supremacists, survivalists, religious fanatics, and gun-toting anti-Semites. I stumbled onto this having been inadvertently invited to a Posse wedding by a friend and co-worker — in this case the bride — who would discover only later that she’d married into a group of well-armed extremists. In the moment, I was blissfully clueless. It was a barroom wedding in the middle of nowhere on a moonlit snowy night; all I remember is drinking too much and trying to dance the polka. I did much better at the former. Only later would I discover I’d driven home with a stolen Christmas tree affixed to the roof of my car. Those were simpler times. My Commie friends back then saw the emergence of groups like the Posse Comitatus as yet more proof that the contradictions of global capitalism had achieved critical mass, and that David Rockefeller found himself forced to resort to more overtly fascistic solutions to maintain corporate hegemony. I begged to differ; I merely thought they were kooks. It would turn out we were both wrong. Members of the Posse Comitatus, in fact, were deadly serious. When pulled over by cops and ordered to display their driver’s licenses and proof of insurance, they resisted. Often violently. My friend’s husband was

A Reasonable Dog

especially militant in this regard. In Wisconsin, they don’t like it when you fight with cops, even if you’re White. He went away for a significant stretch. Up ’til then, my friend’s only worry had been about the extent of her betrothed’s creeping mommy issues. Hey, he seemed like a nice guy. But then, I never got the whole Posse thing about driver’s licenses. It seemed such an eccentric hill to die on. But this weekend, I found myself scouring the Constitution for any mention of licenses. And mandatory auto insurance, too. There was no mention of either. The Constitution, it turns out, does guarantee the right to travel. But cars — not having been invented until 100 years ago — escaped the notice of our Founding Fathers, leaving it to our wig-sniffing modern-day Originalists to infer what they will from words never spoken. I mention this in response to the explosion of mass shootings now taking place. How many have there been since Uvalde? 18? 20? Being susceptible to simplistic analogies, I always figured if The Man could force us to obtain licenses and insurance in order to drive, how hard could it be to require gun buyers to do the same? It seemed like an obvious idea. I suggested the insurance idea in the pages of this very column back in November 2015. At the time, 45 shootings had occurred on American college campuses that year. Finally, people are catching on. This week,

Governor Gavin Newsom signed three gun

control bills with a flotilla of others in the pipeline. In January this year, the San Jose City Council passed an ordinance requiring proof of liability insurance for gun owners. As we speak, State Senator Nancy Skinner — yes, a pinko Dem from Berkeley — is pushing a similar statewide measure through the Sacramento legislature. The insurance requirement is screamingly utilitarian and elegant; it avoids any whisper or shadow of government intrusion. Instead, it bestows upon the insurance industry itself — Big Brother personified — all rights to determine how likely we are to shoot someone else or ourselves. Like Santa Claus, the industry knows if you’ve been bad or good and what risk you pose to become a mass shooter. They have the actuarial tables; they’ve run the odds. And maybe if you’re a 21-year-old male incel stewing in all your unrequited juices, they’ll simply deny coverage. I don’t know how the Skinner bill will fare. With 12 gun-control bills chomping at Sacramento’s bit, there’s a lot of competition. By the time the San Jose city clerk recorded the council’s vote this past January, City Hall had been slapped with three lawsuits filed by gun rights advocates. Enforcement has been suspended pending resolution of this litigation. Guns now kill more people — 43,000 a year — than cars. That’s because the auto industry now installs such things as airbags, seat belts, and other safety fixtures that

they initially resisted. They ultimately did so, in part, at the insistence of the insurance industry. I’m not a prude where guns are concerned. I was trained to shoot as a kid as part of the NRA’s Eddie Eagle safety indoctrination programs. One of my gun-nut friends pointed out that the majority of gun deaths are intentionally self-inflicted and that an insurance requirement would do little to change that. Good point. I’d counter by noting that 120,000 people a year are wounded by gunfire. I’m guessing 99.99 percent are not failed suicide attempts. Not having been shot yet, I’d guess that a gunshot wound is not something you just suck up and shake off. A vast pool of liability funds might go a long way to ease the burdens for those forced to suck and shake. Last month, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas vastly expanded the rights of citizens to carry concealed weapons, decreeing nothing in the Constitution empowers local government to require law-abiding citizens to demonstrate they have a “special need” to pack concealed heat. Should Thomas review my proposal to require insurance for guns, he’d no doubt find there’s no mention of cars or car insurance in the Constitution either and rule both to be unconstitutional. And that reminds me. How did that Christmas tree get on top of my car? —Nick Welsh

PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street, Suite 302 Santa Barbara CA. I Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until July 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


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obituaries Dylan Corselius Willson 5/27/1986 - 7/14/2008

You continue to illuminate the world with your beautiful spirit. Your flame will never be extinguished. All my heart, Mom

John Brennand

9/15/1935 - 6/30/2022

John Brennand, renowned Godfather of recreational and competitive running in Santa Barbara, passed away on June 30th at Cottage Hospital after a brief battle with COVID 19, exacerbated by dementia. An influential leader in the Southern California race community, he was also an exceptional engineer and beloved husband, father, and brother. Born in El Paso, TX on September 15th, 1935, John was raised in Santa Fe, NM where he graduated from Santa Fe High School in 1952. He completed his degree in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering at the University of Colorado, Boulder, graduating in 1957. A competitive skier of national class at CU, he also became interested in running. He went East for an MS in Electrical Engineering at M.I.T. where he met and married Carolyn “Cally” Huss and they began their family life together at Vandenberg Air Force base in 1959. Moving soon thereafter to Santa Barbara, John started to work with General Research in 1960. Their first son, Bob was born in 1961, daughter Karen in 1962 and younger son Scott in 1967. John became one of the first computer engineers at General Research, working with state-of-the-art mainframe 14

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machines of that early era. His efforts were instrumental in advancing flight dynamics and advanced electro-propulsion for automotive. John became active in roadrunning and racing, competing all over South California very early in his career. Prior to the running boom of the 1970’s, at a race in Los Angeles, he learned there was an established, but largely inactive running group, the Santa Barbara Athletic Club. John signed up immediately to wear the blue-and-white singlet and blue shorts, and got involved with the organization of club racing and training. He became a driving force of the club and de facto organizer of runners from every corner of the Central coast area. He inspired others to run and many were enthusiastic women who became a large part of the SBAA membership and very successful competitors. Anywhere there was a race, John would fill the family station wagon, a French Citroen, with runners to compete, arriving in the nick of time for the starting gun. He was and remained Secretary-Treasurer of the club, later the S.B. Athletic Association, for almost forty-eight years, stepping down in 2010 as age, injuries and illness slowed him. John was a first-class runner, competing successfully in Southern California and later nationally and internationally. He raced, placing well in several Boston Marathons, raced in in several Olympic Marathon trials, and raced overseas in various locations in World Masters competition. John’s personal best marathon was 2:28.01 at Eugene in 1981, at age 46. He considered the epitome of his running career a 32:35 10K (5:15 per mile) at age 49. His final marathon was in May 2018 at the age of 82, when he ran Mountain to Sea (Ojai) and continued to run Wednesday Nite Moves with family until 2019 John grew a network of local races and established new races in the Santa Barbara area. He was the founding race director for the Santa Barbara Marathon, directed Semana Nautica for many years and assisted the McConnell’s Ice Cream run, still ongoing in its 41 years. In 1984 John was the technical director of the men’s and women’s Olympic mara-

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thons in Los Angeles. In 1987 John was awarded the Russ Hargreaves Memorial award for recreational achievement by the Santa Barbara Roundtable Athletic Association and was inducted into the Hall of Fame for Special Achievement in 1995. His son Scott was also inducted the same year for High School Coach of the Year. John and Cally had a rambling house in the foothills, where they welcomed guests and runners of all ages before or after races, on holidays, and where they raised their three children. In 1983 the family was honored by the County of Santa Barbara as Family of the Year, because of their active role in community leadership beyond running, encompassing serving Salvation Army holiday dinners, and volunteering in Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, 4-H clubs, PTA, Jaycees and numerous charities. John’s passion for sport was passed on to his children, each competitive in running, tennis, golf, swimming and/or water polo. Long summer backpacking trips in the Sierras, spring ski trips and sailing regattas were “embraced” as family vacations. Son Bob and grandson Nate shared John’s fleet of foot and competed as “three generations” in several national championships. A beloved mother and wife, Cally passed away in 1996. John found love again with the Hon. Robin Riblet. They married in 1997 and led a merry life. While John was retired, Robin continued to preside in the bankruptcy court until her retirement in 2014. Nevertheless, they found time for yearly hiking trips throughout Italy, sometimes with a group of friends from Santa Barbara, sometimes with Robin’s brother and sister-in-law and often alone. In 2001 John and Robin bought a mountain retreat in the Canadian Rockies town of Canmore, Alberta, where they, family and friends have spent many wonderful vacations, hiking innumerable mountain trails in the summers and skiing Lake Louise and other resorts in the winters. Robin was a loving and devoted wife to John his last twenty-five years. John is survived by wife Robin, his three children and their spouses: Bob (Sally), Karen (Kent), Scott (Betty)

and six grandchildren, and five brothers: David, Daniel, Paul, Mark and Peter. “I have lived my life; I have run my race”. In lieu of flowers or other remembrances, please consider donations to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Ruthie Connelly

5/22/1933 - 6/7/2022

said made her at least 10 percent happier. She said that visiting with her grandson Daniel Jason Gold made her 100 percent happier. Per her wishes, Ruthie was cremated and her life was celebrated by close family shortly after her death. Ruthie supported the Women’s Fund of Santa Barbara, Doctors Without Borders, and Planned Parenthood. Ruthie is survived by her loving brother Richard Greene.

Ronald Brennen “RB” Brown 11/7/1947 - 5/15/2021 Ruth Mary Connelly (Ruthie) passed away after a brief illness at Cottage Hospital on June 7th, 2022 after fond goodbyes from family. Her daughter was at her side. Born in 1933 in Central Falls, Rhode Island to Julie and Jack Greene, Ruthie was the middle of three children. She grew up climbing trees in Pawtucket, Rhode Island. After high school, Ruthie traveled west and landed in Los Angeles. Her mother and brother followed. Ruthie’s eldest brother, John (Jack) Greene, pre-deceased her. She had one daughter, Calla (Skeetz) Gold, during a brief marriage to Robert F. Skeetz. Ruthie moved to San Francisco in 1963 and embarked on her lifelong dream of dancing and performing. She danced under the name Anya and was well versed in Balinese, modern, and classical ballet. She studied, taught, and performed with the Mark Wilde Ballet Company. She choreographed several performances. Ruthie moved to Santa Barbara in 1971. She made new friends in the Unitarian Church community and was part of a communal group that was formed to live in The Greenhouse, a commune spearheaded by Unitarian members in Goleta. She continued to live the communal lifestyle until she met the love of her life Kevin Connelly, a renowned sail maker. He predeceased her in 2012. She was a wonderful mother, grandmother, and beloved wife. Ruthie was loved by many and a joy to know. Ruthie loved to read and discuss books. She bought and gifted many copies of 10% Happier by Dan Harris, which she

Ron was born in Santa Barbara to RB Brown and Laverne Brown. He was an only child. He graduated from SB High. In the ’60s Ron was one of the best longboard surfers at Rincon. He was a sponsored professional, touring both coasts for surf contests. In the ’70s he was the longtime Channel Islands Surfboards shop Manager, good friends with Al & Terry Merrick. Ron then led an adventurous, eclectic lifestyle spending several years on Oahu’s North Shore managing Wyland Art Galleries and surfing everyday. He travelled the Pacific in large sailboats before returning to SB, where he worked in various ocean oriented businesses including managing West Marine, Boater’s World and hosting a fishing show. Ron is survived by his wife Terese, his two children Julia Brown and Justine Vallee and his granddaughter Koko. A very informal SB style paddleout, will be held August 1 at noon, at the big picnic area of Leadbetter, west end of the parking lot. BYOB and pictures. RIP RB!

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OPINIONS CONT’D

“WAR FATIGUE” BY JEFF KOTERBA

Letters

A Brief AUD History

I

t is being said that the need for higher density in Santa Barbara was driven by the need to make apartments competitive economically with condos and commercial space. That had nothing to do with the Average Unit-size Density (AUD) Priority Housing Overlay. The idea reached an impasse in 2010 that affected a General Plan Update (GPU); some wanted to up densities everywhere, and others didn’t want to up densities anywhere. Since changes to the city’s general plan require five affirmative votes, it appeared as if there might not be a GPU. The development community said that increased density would result in workforce-affordable housing, and, in an effort to reach a compromise, I proposed an experiment: In a very limited part of the city’s commercial and light industrial areas, increase densities for rental projects for the life of the building. Presumably, units would be less expensive by design. Councilmember Dale Francisco added the 250 units or eight-year time limit, at which point the city would examine the results. In July 2011, the development community and housing advocates held design charrettes on building market-rate moderate-income-affordable rental and for-sale units at increased densities. The results showed that for-sale units would not be affordable, but they showed that affordable rental units could be built, with studio rents starting at $1,200/month. I was shocked when the first AUD high density project, The Marc, delivered rents at more than twice that amount. At a subsequent Coastal Housing Coalition Conference, one speaker said there is no such thing as “affordable by design.” Another speaker said that rents will be what the market will bear. That is exactly what the city has seen with the Priority Housing Overlay projects. Our big mistake was to not tie increased density to increased affordability.

—Sheila Lodge, S.B.

Heart of the Matter

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eorgia lawmakers passed a strict law in 2019 outlawing most abortions once fetal cardiac activity is detected, typically around six weeks of pregnancy, a law that is likely to take effect. If fetal cardiac activity defines the unborn fetus as a human with rights, the unborn shall be considered to have

all rights accorded by law. Could this affect organ transplants? The Uniform Determination of Death Act of 1981 declares, “An individual who has sustained either irreversible cessation of circulatory and respiratory functions or irreversible cessation of all functions of the entire brain, including the brain stem, is dead.” In other words, if the brain is dead, even while cardiac activity is present, life ceases. The ramification of this act is profound in the procurement of organs for transplant. To procure healthy organs, the heart must be intact and beating. The heart is the last organ to be taken from the cadaver and will continue to beat outside of the body for hours. The heart is functioning while it is being sewn into the new body. The question I ask is: If the detection of “fetal cardiac activity” at six weeks in utero is by law the determination of life, then how is the legal and medical term “brain dead” applicable in order to harvest human organs when the heart is still beating? Will a heart transplant be put under the same scrutiny as a woman’s fetus? The other organs for transplant are not viable if the heart has stopped beating. More than 100,000 people are waiting for an organ transplant, and a new person is put on the waitlist every nine minutes. At a minimum, 17 people are dying each day while waiting for an organ. If cardiac activity becomes the criteria for life, then there will be no more transplants other than living donor transplants. My husband would not be alive today without a heart transplant of a beating heart.

For the Record

—Peggy Lamb, S.B.

¶ In the “History of Black Santa Barbara” story in the June 23 issue, we misspelled the name of Dr. Frances E. Ford, a noted Black woman podiatrist in the 1920s, and correct it here. In last week’s opioid story, Sheriff Brown’s initiative is called Project Opioid, and AED stands for Automated External Defibrillator. Last, Tom Murray, honored in last week’s In Memoriam, was born in 1954, and his photograph was taken by Kyle London Photography. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

Record of Decision for the Point Mugu Sea Range Final EIS/OEIS Notice of Availability The U.S. Navy, after carefully weighing the strategic, operational, and environmental consequences of the Proposed Action, is announcing its decision to continue military readiness activities and increase research, development, acquisition, testing, evaluation, and training activities as described in Alternative 1, the Navy’s Preferred Alternative, in the Point Mugu Sea Range Final Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental Impact Statement (EIS/OEIS). The Navy made this decision after considering military testing and training objectives; best available science; potential impacts activities may have on human, natural, and cultural environments; and input and expertise from elected officials, government agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and the public on the proposal and environmental analysis. The Navy is committed to being a good steward of the environment and will continue to implement mitigation measures and standard operating procedures to avoid or reduce potential environmental impacts from testing and training. For More Information The Navy is committed to providing the public an accessible version of the Record of Decision. The Record of Decision, Final EIS/OEIS, and supporting documents are available online at www.pmsr-eis.com. Printed copies of the Final EIS/OEIS are also available for viewing at the Camarillo, Carpinteria, E.P. Foster (Ventura), San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, South Oxnard, and Oxnard Downtown Main public libraries. INDEPENDENT.COM

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obituaries Pamela Arneson

7/5/1946 - 6/11/2022

Pamela Bozena Arneson passed away after a lengthy illness on June 11, 2022 at the age of 75. The loss of her vibrant, fun-loving personality will be greatly felt by all who knew her. Pamela was born on July 5, 1946 in Los Angeles, CA. Her parents, Robert and Bozena Rose, raised Pam and her brother Wink in a loving home. A competitive swimmer during her teenage years, Pam was a nationally ranked record holder in the butterfly stroke. She attended Stephens College in Colombia, Missouri for two years, and then graduated with a degree in English at UCSB. Pam first met Eric Arneson as a young girl when she was training at a school for competitive swimmers in Ventura. Later, the two corresponded while Eric was serving in the Vietnam War. Upon his return, they married and moved to Santa Barbara where Eric accepted a job offer with the S.B. Recreation Dept. They had two sons: Corey (deceased) and Chad. Pam and Eric were married for 53 years and were well-known in Santa Barbara as sports and recreation devotees. Pam was an ardent supporter of her family’s athletic pursuits—especially volleyball! She spent hundreds of hours watching her sons Corey and Chad play volleyball for SBHS. She was known to wear her green and gold beads to cheer on the Dons at all the games, and volunteered in the refreshment booth. For over 11 years Pam worked alongside her husband Eric and son Chad at the East Beach volleyball courts as they facilitated the CA Beach Volleyball Association’s adult and youth tournaments. In recent years Pam attended many SBHS volleyball games to watch her son Chad Arneson coach the SBHS team. She was very proud of Chad, and as the “Coach’s Mom” was greeted affectionately by players and spectators alike. Pam Arneson was a people person. Early in her career, she worked as a leader for the UCSB Alumni Vacation Center. Her outgoing friendliness served her well in her role at Westmont College as the Associate Director of Alumni and Parent Relations, a job she held for 15 years. She volunteered for the Santa Barbara community as a member of the S.B. 16

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Rescue Mission Auxiliary and Junior League. Pam lived her life energetically. She loved the ocean. She could be found combing the beaches of Santa Barbara at dawn to collect colorful sea glass that had washed up on shore, which she then fashioned into creative works of art. A music enthusiast, Pam attended concerts and master classes at the Music Academy of the West, which filled her summers with joy. Pam was an avid reader, enthusiastically discussing her favorite reads with anyone who asked her for a book recommendation. She relished watching new movies on Netflix, but insisted on reading the book version of a new series before seeing it on the screen. Pam enjoyed traveling with Eric on beach trips to Hawaii, Fiji, Tahiti, and Costa Rica, and took trips to Italy and other fun locations with friends. A woman of strong faith in Christ, Pam was a member of El Montecito Presbyterian Church for 35 years, where she served as a deacon. She attended various community Bible studies. She firmly believed in the power of prayer, and shared prayer requests with several small prayer groups, one of which was ongoing in her life for over 40 years. Her hope and strength in God never wavered during life’s most difficult moments. Pam is survived by her husband Eric Arneson, her son Chad Arneson, her brother Wink Rose Roberts, a niece Terin Kramer, nephews Declan and Eden Kramer, and a cousin Chris Sinclair and wife Sherry. Other extended family members include: Kristy Wright, Rashad Wright, Nathan and Annadee Wright, Elijah, Isabella, and Isaiah Wright. A service celebrating Pam Arneson’s life will be held on Friday, July 22, 2022 at 2:00 p.m. at El Montecito Presbyterian Church, 1455 E. Valley Rd., Santa Barbara, CA. All who knew and loved Pam are invited. To make it a true celebration, guests are encouraged to wear casual Hawaiian shirts or clothing in the colors of the ocean or sea glass. Gifts to honor Pam may be directed to the S.B. Rescue Mission. Pam was a very bright light in the lives of all who knew her—a dear wife, loving mother, loyal friend, and woman of faith. Although she is sorely missed by so many,

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there is comfort and joy in knowing that Pam is home in the arms of the Lord she loved.

Gloria Orr

1/10/1925 - 6/27/2022

Our Beautiful Mother “Gloria Jean” passed away peacefully at her home in Santa Barbara surrounded by her many children and grandchildren. The house was full of singing, piano playing & conversations when she left this earth and moved to her new home in heaven. We all knew and could feel our Lord and Dad there waiting with open arms to take her home. Gloria is the mother to 11 of her own children: Shaune, Maureen, Dana, Rosemary, Rodric, Stephen, Lorraine, Camille, Jeannie, Diane & Danny and also the Grandma / Great Grandma to 30 more wonderful children. Our parents met at UCSB in the late 1940’s where they both earned their degrees in education. They were married for over 70 years when dad passed away in 2019. Theirs was a very strong & loving marriage and they had a united front that we used to call “Fort Knox” because nothing could separate or divide them. We lived most of our lives on a small ranch in Santa Barbara with animals and adventure all around us so moms to-do list was a never ending task. Somehow mom would always find the time to counsel our friends or anyone who had a hurt that needed mending. Often, she would invite people without families into our home for meals, holidays or a place to hang their hat for the night. She always stretched the meals so everyone was welcome on a very limited budget. Our mother and father were very involved with their church, serving others in a time of need & helping at the Mission shelter where they would sometimes sleep and counsel people thru the night. Our mom loved feeding people and nourishing their souls with kindness. She loved The Lord Jesus and would always try to do the best she could to spread the love of Christ to others through her actions. Mom vol-

unteered anytime or anywhere she could and taught all eleven of us the importance of this service towards others. She would often say, “if you’re ever feeling down or sad, try serving others and you will feel much better”. We called her “Gabby Glo” because she had the gift of “Gab” that could take a short conversation into hours of memories and adventures from her life. We all miss our mom beyond what words can describe but know she will be watching over us until we go home to join her with God in paradise. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Villa Magella in Santa Barbara.

Montie Clayton Aleridge Jr.

1/12/1942 - 6/7/2022

It is with great sadness that the family of Montie Clayton Aleridge Jr. announces his passing on June 7th, 2022, at Cottage Hospital Santa Barbara, California. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends. Clayton was born on January 12, 1942, in Orange, CA to Montie Clayton Aleridge Sr. and Bernice Aleridge. Following in his father and grandfather’s footsteps, Clayton became a golf professional at the age of 19. He worked at several golf clubs throughout California before moving to Santa Barbara in 1962 where he worked as assistant golf pro to the late Sam Randolph at the La Cumbre Country Club. Clayton married Nancy Robinson in 1962 and had two children, Deborah and Montie Clayton Aleridge III. In 1966 Clayton and Nancy moved out to Goleta where he opened a new 9-hole golf course: the University Village Golf Course now known as Ocean Meadows. In 1970 after his previous marriage Clayton met and married his late wife, Beverly

Kubecka, she had a 5- year-old daughter Lori Cole. Together they raised two daughters and a son. Clayton and Beverly enjoyed thirty-eight blessed years of marriage. Together, they traveled to Lahaina, Maui, Hawaii for vacation where they made some friends and fell in love with the islands. They moved to Maui in 1978 where they played golf and enjoyed the beaches before moving back to Santa Barbara in 1983. They spent the next few years as small business owners, purchasing San Roque Patio Florist, Goleta Floral and Flowers, Carpinteria Florist, and opening several different corner flower stands. During this time, they cruised and travel the world. After Beverley’s passing in 2008, Clayton met Betty Ogg, his late wife in 2009. They spent their time together enjoying season tickets to UCSB Men’s and Women’s Basketball games, cruising, and taking cross country road trips. Together they raised their beloved pup Daisy who became Clayton’s best friend till his passing. Clayton continued his love of golf at the La Cumbre Country Club 2-3 days a week. After Betty’s passing, Clayton met his beloved friend and traveling companion, Marylin Glenn, whom he spent his final couple of years traveling and enjoying life with. Clayton loved to barbecue with his family and friends. He will always be remembered as a beloved mentor, full of laughter and positivity in life to those that loved and knew him. He never ceased to follow his passions and recently tied for 1st place in his golf club group with the Elk Lodge of Santa Barbara. Clayton is survived by his sister Marnette Stewart, three children, ten grandchildren, and seventeen great-grandchildren. We will be holding a celebration of life to honor our beloved Dad on Saturday, August 13, 2022. For friends who would like to attend, please contact Lori at lori@lorismobilenotary. com or 805-895-1591 for information on location and time.


obituaries Donald Austin Stivers 5/10/1924 - 6/28/2022

Donald Austin Stivers grew up in the beautiful Finger Lakes region of New York State. During WWII, he served in the 256th Armored Field Artillery Battalion, which landed in Normandy (Utah Beach), and fought through France, Belgium, Holland, and finally into Germany. After the war, Donald attended Hobart College, and then Seabury-Western Theological Seminary. He was ordained as an Episcopal priest on St. Thomas’s Day, December 21, 1951. Soon thereafter, he met the love of his life, Florence Hume Tryon, a nurse working at Rochester General Hospital. For nearly 25 years, he served as the parish priest of All Saints Episcopal Church in Irondequoit, New York. While there, Donald and Florence raised two children and dedicated themselves to both family and church life. In 1979, Donald was called to a new ministry – first to Boulder City, Nevada, where he served at St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church, and then in 1982 to Christ The King Episcopal Church in Santa Barbara, California. After he retired from active ministry in 1991, he continued to serve at All Saints By-The-Sea in Montecito, and at the Mount Calvary Retreat House & Monastery. In Santa Barbara, Donald loved to swim at the Cathedral Oaks Athletic Club. He and Florence also enjoyed hiking and birdwatching with the Santa Barbara Audubon Society. During retirement, Donald joined a creative writing group in Santa Monica, writing short stories and reminiscences. Donald was a wonderful son, brother, uncle, father, grandfather, pastor, counselor, and friend for so many people. Donald is predeceased by his parents, Laura G. and Clinton F. Stivers, by his wife Florence T. Stivers, by his brother Rev.

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Alton H. Stivers and sister-inlaw Susan M. Stivers, brotherin-law Richard Webb, and his grandson John R. Stivers. He is survived by his sister Jean Webb, his brother Kenneth Stivers, his daughter Margaret G. Stivers and son-in-law Hartley Folstad, by his son Michael H. Stivers and daughter-in-law Dr. Michelle P. Stivers, by his grandson Alexander H. Stivers, and his granddaughter Louise M. Stivers. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church in Santa Barbara on Saturday, July 16th at 2pm.

Barbara, CA, and Lucas of Fergus Falls; grandchildren: Marcus, Genevieve, Theodore, and James; siblings: Karen (Michael) Johnson of Yankton, SD, and Bruce (Sandra) of Centerville, SD; and many nieces and nephews. Lauren was preceded in death by his parents, Lowell and Priscilla, and his mother-in-law, Arlene Wiese.

Grappino Andre Angelo Ceccato

3/30/1940 - 6/14/2022

Mike Dale

Lauren C. Voog

2/5/1951 - 6/19/2022

5/27/1952 - 6/27/2022

Lauren C. Voog 70, of Belgrade died Monday, June 27, 2022, at Carris Health Rice Memorial Hospital in Willmar. A private family service will be held. Lauren Craig Voog was born on May 27, 1952, in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the son of Lowell and Priscilla (Andersen) Voog. He grew up in rural Centerville, SD where he attended Rose Cottage Country School and graduated from Centerville High School in 1970. After high school, Lauren went on to South Dakota State University. After college Lauren began working for the BNSF Railroad. He went on to become an engineer. On August 9, 1975 Lauren married Kathleen Wiese at Eastside Lutheran Church in Sioux Falls. This union was blessed with two sons. The family made their home in Brookings. In 1978 Lauren was transferred to Willmar and the family moved to their home in rural New London. Lauren was an avid outdoorsman and loved spending time outside. Above all else, Lauren loved his family and spending time with them especially his grandchildren. Lauren is survived by his wife of 46 years, Kathy; sons, Justin (Jennifer) of Santa

dearly after her death in 2020. He also specialized in being a father and grandfather. He is survived by his son, Craig (Leslie Cass) Eldridge, his daughter, Debra (James Jervik) Ceccato Faricy, and his 4 grandchildren, Alec and Griffin Eldridge, and Stella and Frederick Faricy. He will remain in our hearts always and forever. Please join us for a celebration of Pino’s life at the Santa Barbara Cabrillo Pavilion (bath house), 1118 E Cabrillo Blvd on Thursday, July 21, 2022 from 4-8:00 pm.

Grappino “Pino” Andre Angelo Ceccato passed away on June 14, 2022 at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. Pino (P.C.) was born and raised in Santa Barbara, CA to Italian immigrants. He grew up on Mason St and attended Franklin Elementary School. He did not speak a word of English on his first day of class, but learned quickly. He is a graduate of SB High School, and attended SB City College with a major in electrical engineering. His true passion, however, turned out to be cars. Fast fast cars! He held the land speed record in his division at the Bonneville Salt Flats for 20+ years. Pino started his own automotive business, PC Automotive, in 1972 and soon built his own shop on Nopal St in 1978. For those who were blessed to know Pino, it is obvious how much he cherished the simplest pleasures in life, including Santa Barbara, his family, his friends and his work. He was strong, committed, kind, honest, and, most notably, predictable. From cycling to work each morning, to Thursday “garlic runs”, to Sunday truck washing, to nightly jacuzzi soaks or to daily VO & waters, his routine never changed. You could set your watch to his schedule. Pino was a loving and gentle husband to Mary Ann, his wife of 56 years. He missed her

Michael Allan Dale, 71, of Carpinteria passed away peacefully at Serenity House surrounded by loving family on June 19, 2022. Mike was born February 5, 1951 to James and Nancy Dale in Flushing, NY. Over the years his family moved steadily west, settling in Pasadena where Mike graduated along with several life long friends from La Salle High School. He then moved to Santa Barbara to attend UCSB, graduating with a BA in English and a teaching certificate. After graduation Mike lived in several different places in the area, but Carpinteria was always his favoritewhich he aptly dubbed “The Best Little Town in America.” Mike had a varied early career, eventually settling into Facilities Management and Real Estate Procurement for the last 25 years of his work life. He retired as Director of Facilities from Sansum Clinic in 2017. Outside of work, music and literature were his passions. Mike could always be found with a guitar or a book in his hands. He began playing the guitar as a teen, and progressed to playing many other string instruments- the mandolin and fiddle were his favorites. Over INDEPENDENT.COM

time he acquired quite the collection of instruments. For the past 32 years he was a member of Glendessary Jam, a group of like minded musicians playing ‘old time’ music. Although not intended to impress, his vocabulary was impressive, making him a worthy opponent at Scrabble and other word games. He was a talented songwriter and poet when the mood struck him, and his Irish proclivities occasionally led to some serious ‘Irish blarney.’ When Mike met his wife Susan, they quickly discovered that they both suffered from “abibliophobia” (the fear of running out of good reading material) and reading together became one of their favorite pastimes. After retirement Mike also spent many happy and frustrating hours tinkering with his 1978 VW bus, “The Brown Bomber.” Camping trips in the bus were always an adventure! Mike is survived by his wife Susan Dale (Smitke, Schmid), sons Andrew Dale and Patrick Dale (Jessica), step daughter Chelsea Schmid, sister Dorothy Dale (Steve), brother Stephen Dale (Sandy), 21 first cousins (all on his father’s side), former spouse Jane Sprague -mother of Andrew, Patrick, and her son Ben Kluver. Family services to be held at the family homestead, “The Big House,” in Tannersville NY, followed by burial in St. Francis de Sales Cemetery in Elka Park NY. Mike journeyed through 3 years of cancer treatment with incredible strength and grace. The family thanks Ridley Tree Cancer Center, Cottage Hospital, VNA and Serenity House for their compassionate care. Please consider a donation to any one of these community treasures in his memory.

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obituaries the Sunset Home, a nonprofit senior retirement home for women in Venice CA under the umbrella of Trinity Baptist Church in Santa Monica for many years. A memorial will be held on July 19th at 2:00 pm at Veronica Springs Church in Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens.

James Richard Downing

1/17/1929 - 6/28/2022

Jim was a devoted husband, father, educator, camper, world traveler, naturalist, volunteer, and real estate developer. He lived the first ten years of his life in Bakersfield California. Jim’s family moved several times during his young life including Kansas City, Missouri and South Lynwood, California. His interest in learning and inspiration from his teachers motivated him to study and to attend college. He graduated from Compton High School and Compton Junior College before transferring to the University of California, Santa Barbara. While studying for his BA at UCSB, he met Marguerite Noel, the love of his life for over seventy years. They married on September 9, 1951. After serving as an officer in the Army during the Korean War, he obtained an MA in Education from UCLA. He taught science and social studies during his teaching career of over 30 years. He taught briefly in Torrance, California before teaching at Lincoln Junior High School in Santa Monica until he retired in 1984. Jim and Marguerite had three children (Janis Holt, Kenneth Downing, and Pamela Noel Hughes). Additionally, Jim had seven grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Jim and his family spent many summers camping all over the United States, Canada and Hawaii. They also made numerous trips to Europe, Asia, and South America. Throughout his entire life he was involved in numerous community service organizations including the YMCA, Western Youth Baseball, Santa Barbara Botanical Gardens, Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History and the Goleta Library. Most notably after he retired from teaching, he ran 18

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Frederick Carl Heidner II 2/7/1929 - 7/2/2022

A life well-lived leaves a lasting and positive impact on those who shared in that life, and Dr. Frederick (Fred) Carl Heidner II certainly lived his life well. Fred Heidner passed from this life on July 2, 2022 at the age of 93 from natural causes. Fred’s final residence was at the Valle Verde retirement community in Santa Barbara, California, where he was an enthusiastic and active resident for the past 13 years. Fred Heidner was born to Dr. Frederick and Esther Heidner in Milwaukee, WI on February 7, 1929 and lived a joyful and carefree youth with his brother and best friend, John N. Heidner. Fred completed his college education and medical school studies at the University of WisconsinMadison. Fred completed his medical resident training in the United States Navy, and in 1961 began his career as a urologist at Sansum Clinic in Santa Barbara, California. Fred practiced medicine with skill and compassion during what he considered to be the golden age of medicine, until his retirement in 1990. While in medical school, Fred met the love of his life, Patricia Jean Watzke, whom he married in 1954. Fred and Patricia raised a daughter, Greta, and three sons: Frederick (Fritz), Hans and Kurt. Fred also experienced the joy of being a grandfather to two granddaughters, Anja and

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Nicola, and three grandsons, Ryan, Niels, and Eric, all of whom respected and loved him dearly. Fred was also blessed by a special relationship with two individuals brought into his life following the death of his son Fritz. To the day of his passing, Fred considered Matthew Grul and Jeannie Moore to be members of his family. Others dear to his heart include his son-in-law, Russell Greene and his daughters-in-law, Faith Heidner (Hans) and Suzi Heidner (Kurt). Fred Heidner lived a full and impactful life, and the days that remain for his family and friends will be all the more joyful and meaningful for having shared in that life. Their joy will come from having shared life with a man who radiated positivity and optimism, had a smile for all, and displayed unconditional love and support for his family and friends. They will remember Fred’s keen intellect, his quick wit, and his playful and gentle sense of humor. They will remember a man who modeled the qualities of honesty, integrity, generosity, love and kindness, but rarely spoke of them. They will remember a man who lifted the spirits of others with his cheerful view of life and his welcoming personality. They will remember a man who was confident and humble, and a man who had no interest in measuring himself against others. And they will fondly remember the joy he received from cheering for his beloved Green Bay Packers football team. While we are sad at his passing, we are tremendously grateful for the time we had together, for his example, for the many things he taught us, and for a lifetime of happy memories. Fred left the world knowing that Patricia, his wife of 67 years, is surrounded by love and will be well-cared-for by the members of her family. Fred will be memorialized at a private gathering of family. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that individuals who desire to honor Fred’s life with a donation, to please support a cause that aligns with his values. As a guide, Fred loved the natural world and was concerned about the state of the environment. He loved animals, he valued education, and

he recognized the importance of the arts. Fred and Patricia were devotees of the Music Academy of the West, and for many years attended concerts and Master classes almost daily during the summer. Fred was well-aware that he lived a privileged life compared to so many others, and he would have been pleased to know that his friends chose to honor him by supporting an organization with the broad mission of improving people’s lives.

Ryan Harrison Leone 8/3/1985 - 7/2/2022

Ryan Harrison Leone passed away suddenly at Pacifica Hospital in Sun Valley, CA on July 2,2022. Ryan was born in Framingham, Massachusetts on August 3, 1985, the only child of Diane and Frank Leone. He spent his first four years in neighboring Sudbury. Ryan moved with his family to Santa Barbara in 1989. He attended Monte Vista Elementary School, Marymount Middle school (now the Riviera Ridge School), and Santa Barbara High School. Ryan had an idyllic childhood. He loved books of all types and was a movie devotee from the age of three. Even at three he could recite long passages from his then favorite movie Ghostbusters. He began writing as a hobby and at the age of nine won first prize in a youth writing contest sponsored by Barnes and Noble. Ryan loved to travel and traveled extensively throughout the United States and beyond during his youth. At the age of 15 he even travelled to Taipei and Beijing. He was a devoted animal lover, especially dogs. He had two labs, Bogie (aka Humphrey Bogart Leone) and Brava, and, currently, a nine-monthold German Shepard named Cubby. The last 22 years of Ryan’s life were compromised by drug addiction. Although he fought

his addiction gamely, long periods of sobriety were intertwined with periods of use. Between the ages of 15 and 34, Ryan spent a cumulative eight years incarcerated, all for nonviolent drug related violations. During one such prison term Ryan wrote a novel entitled “Wasting Talent.” Selfpublished, the book has sold approximately 400,000 copies and provided Ryan with considerable international renown. In recent years Ryan turned his experiences as a user and inmate into a large YouTube and Patreon presence, attracting tens of thousands of subscribers. Many subscribers have credited Ryan with helping them manage their own addictions, which was Ryan’s primary objective. Ryan established several non-profits dedicated to providing more widespread availability of Narcan, used to treat opioid overuse and to address prison reform issues. At the time of his passing, Ryan had numerous projects near or at completion. His second novel, “Anti-Heroes” is complete and in the editing phase, a documentary of Ryan’s life, “Idiot Savant: the Tortured Life of Ryan Leone,” is ready for release, and his screenplay, “Florida,” co-written by actor Nick Stahl, is in negotiation for sale. Those who knew Ryan valued his incredible creativity, storytelling ability, commitment to social justice, sense of humor, loyalty, sensitivity to those less fortunate, and inherent kindness. He was devoted to his domestic partner, Karina Franco, and as father of their two lovely children. Ryan is survived by his parents Frank H. Leone and Diane M. Leone of Santa Barbara, his partner Karina Franco, and two sons, Nikko Gatsby Leone, age 4, and Weiland Sparrow Leone, age 11 months, all of Northridge. A memorial celebration of Ryan’s life is scheduled for Saturday, July 16, at the Unity Church, 227 East Arrellaga, in Santa Barbara at 2:00 pm. followed by a reception. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Ryan’s foundation, Paul’s Project at 114 Magnolia Court, Mountain Home, Arkansas 72653.


obituaries William J. Jones

5/7/1933 - 6/30/2022

William (Bill) Joseph Jones, a longtime resident of Montecito who enjoyed his family, fishing and sailing, passed away peacefully in his sleep at age 89. Bill is remembered for his wide warm smile, strong core values, sense of humor, and passion for helping others. Anyone who dealt with him knew that his handshake was a contract. Bill was born in Altadena, CA, to Helen Rund Jones, of Illinois, and William Ellis Jones, of Wales. Bill played football at St. Francis High School in La Canada Flintridge and earned Eagle Scout honors. When he was 19, Bill met Elizabeth Mary Henry of Glendale, CA. They fell in love and married. Bill started working in 1959 at Excel-Mineral Company in Vernon, CA, which produced and marketed industrial absorbents (Quik-Sorb) as well as cat litter (Jonny Cat). As sales grew, he was named sales manager, then Vice President, then Senior Vice President of Sales. Bill served on the Excel board of directors and as president of the Sorbitive Minerals Institute as well as the Sanitary Supply Association of Southern California, both trade organizations, for many years. When he wasn’t working, Bill was with his wife and six children, often taking camping trips that included fishing. After moving to Montecito in 1974, the family became involved in the Santa Barbara Sea Shell Association and the Santa Barbara Sailing Club. Bill is survived by his wife, Beth, and their children: Douglas Jones and John McGuinness; Kathy Jones and Mark Norum; Brian Jones; Sharon Jones and Stephen Simpson; Marie Jones Rembert and Alex Rembert; and Diane

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Jones. He is also survived by his brothers, Jack and David Jones, and six grandchildren: Davis and Cailey Rembert, Zia and Lucca Simpson, and Carter and Marisa Jones. A funeral mass is planned for noon on Saturday, July 16 at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Church in Montecito. A visitation is planned from 3 to 5 p.m. Friday July 15 at Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapel in Santa Barbara. Hawaiian shirts are encouraged. The family thanks Monsignor Stephen Downes of Our Lady Mt. Carmel for his spiritual support. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests a donation to Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, 1300 East Valley Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, or VNA Serenity House (go to VNA Health’s donation page and direct a gift to go to Serenity House). https://interland3.donorperfect.net/weblink/weblink. aspx?name=E9655&id=116 Interment at Calvary cemetery at a later date.

Rita Elfriede Heidner 6/8/1935 - 6/29/2022

The world has lost a beautiful and wonderful light that had shone so brightly for so many. Rita Elfriede Heidner passed away peacefully in her sleep in the early morning of June 29, 2022, after a prolonged hospital stay due to complications from a fall in April. Rita (originally Elfriede Woellmann) was born in the small town of Tostedt, Germany on June 8th, 1935, the youngest of five siblings. She grew up in the family farmhouse, which was thankfully spared from attacks by Allied forces during World War II. Her father, Rudolf, was a very talented musician, playing violin, flute, and several other instru-ments, including trumpet in the Tostedt Posaunen-

chor (town band), which is still in existence today. At age 16, Rita made the bold choice of leaving warravaged Germany and moving to Canada with her older sister Selma, who was recently engaged to a German-Canadian. While that engagement was ultimately called off, Selma and Rita stayed in Canada (first in Calgary and then later in Vancouver). Selma met another German-Canadian, William Rauch, whom she married. William, Selma, and Rita then moved to Santa Barbara, California, once they were granted residence by the U.S. government. Rita moved into her own apartment on Arrellaga St., and took on several demanding but impressive jobs, including working in the womens’ fashion department at Robinson’s (now Macy’s), as well as the hostess and manager positions at Kerry’s Restaurant and the Blue Ox restaurant. She also helped Selma and William raise their children, William Jr. and Thomas. In 1970, Rita married Philip Heidner, who she met through William’s work, and they bought a house in Goleta. In 1972, they welcomed their only child, Eric. However, the marriage did not last, so Rita raised Eric on her own, with only a part-time job as a cafeteria employee at Dos Pueblos High School to cover the bills and her son’s college tuition. But despite the lack of money on hand, Rita gave Eric incredible support, encouragement, and love that helped him land a successful career as a music educator. Rita absolutely loved attending all of her son’s concerts– both at Santa Barbara High School, and then later at Santa Barbara City College. She continued to do so until the day of her fall in April of this year. Rita is survived by her son, Eric, her two nephews, William Jr. and Thomas, and by Thomas and his wife Jill’s two children, Ehren and Daniel, as well as by Ehren’s son, Lukas. A graveside service at Goleta Cemetery will be limited to family members and a small list of close friends.

Walter ‘Walt’ Dalton Clapp 10/4/1938 - 6/27/2022

The Clapp Family wishes to honor the life of their beloved Walt Clapp. He was endlessly generous with his love of others and shared it freely. He especially loved his wife of 60 years Wendy, his son Doug and daughter Jill, daughter and son-in-law Christina and Rafic, grandsons Antoine, Alex, Andre, Jarin, and Calen, and last (but certainly not least) his kitty Ruby Begonia. His quiet creativity, his magic in the garden, and his zest for life were just some of the unique traits that made him special. He was unfailingly loyal to any group or organization he participated in and had the wonderful ability to instantly recall peoples’ and their stories…even many years after meeting! He looked at life with positivity, a sense of humor, and a twinkle in his sparkling blue eyes. Everyone who knew Walt loved him. Walt was born at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara to Ralph and Helen Clapp, and a graduate of Humpty Dumpty pre-school and Santa Barbara High. He earned a BA from Claremont Mens College and then completed Naval Officers Candidate School. Walt was so proud to serve his country. Following his Naval career, he spent 40 years working in sales, marketing, and management for Container Corporation of America. Throughout his career he introduced his family to many people, places, and experiences along the East coast and the Midwest. Walt was most proud of his connections with people and the care he put into every professional and personal relationship. After returning to Santa Barbara in 2004, he became a diligent volunteer at PATH in Santa Barbara serving lunches to homeless residents. Walt was a proud INDEPENDENT.COM

member of Channel City Club, Clampers, Westerners, and All Saints by the Sea Episcopal Church. He loved holidays and decorating with lights, music, golf, the beach, picnics, and traveling, especially to Hawaii which was a place he visited with his mother and father as a boy, and on his honeymoon. It was an extremely special place to him. We will be celebrating Walt’s life July 23rd at All Saints by the Sea Episcopal Church at 3pm. In remembrance of Walt’s spirit, colorful clothing or Hawaiian shirts are invited. In Walt’s honor donations can be made to PATH at www.epath. org or by mailing to PATH, 816 Cacique St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Attention: John Bowlin.

Matthew Justin Dyet 05/02/1991- 04/28/2022

It is with heavy heart that we share the sad news of the sudden passing of our beloved son and brother Matthew Justin Dyet on April 28, 2022. Matthew was born on May 2, 1991, at University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona. Matthew spent his early years discovering the Sonoran desert through hiking and camping with his parents and brother. These experiences led Matthew to a profound respect for all wildlife and the outdoors. Matthew was introduced to music at an early age and began playing the guitar and eventually performing on stage as a preteenager. This eventually led him to become an accomplished string instrument musician. Matthew than decided to pursue a musical career by attending Santa Barbara City College. After two years at City College Matthew transferred to UCSB where he primarily studied ethnomusicology. Matthew also had the privileged to be part of the Middle Eastern ensemble while at UCSB which he thoroughly enjoyed. Matthew left his family and friends too soon. He will be forever missed by those that were close to him and shared so many fond memories both locally and abroad.

JULY 14, 2022

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COVER STORY

Sunny-Side Up

No Shade for SadBoy Loko’s New Hit

Humbled by his “jail vacation,” SadBoy Loko is optimistic about the future and grateful for the good things in life.

by Ryan P. Cruz photos by ingrid bostrom

S

adBoy Loko has been through a lot in the

past few years—spending most of 2018 through 2020 behind bars, and then coming home in the middle of a worldwide pandemic — but with a new album dropping on July 29, and a summertime anthem “Palm Trees” garnering hundreds of thousands of views on YouTube, the Santa Barbara–bornand-bred rapper is making, as he says, a “major comeback from a minor setback.” His newest single, “Palm Trees,” featuring Kap G and YBE, and its accompanying music video, are a look into SadBoy’s latest artistic and musical evolution, and a celebration of his newfound outlook on life. The vibe is reminiscent of the 2005 anthem “Summer Nights” by Lil Rob, with backyard cookouts; classic, chromed-out lowriders; palm trees; and a chorus that lends itself perfectly to cruising around town with the top down. It’s a departure from some of the darker-themed gangsta rap of his earlier work, and for good reason. SadBoy’s stint in jail gave him time to reflect and be grateful for the little things in life. “Jail vacation did me good; it humbled me,” he said. “When you spend two birthdays inside, you learn to appreciate things. Someone else out there in the world is going through worse.” In 2015, SadBoy made waves when he was signed to multi-platinum artist YG’s label, 4Hunnid Records. He was 20

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JULY 14, 2022

discovered after making the rounds in Japan, where Chicanoinfluenced car culture and lowrider aesthetics were popular among the locals, who would emulate the black-and-gray ink and “cholo” looks of Southern California gang culture in the mid-’90s. “Put it this way: Japan is more infiltrated with our culture than Los Angeles,” SadBoy said. During this time, SadBoy released hit songs like “Gang Signs,” which amassed more than 67 million views, and “Bruisin’” with YG and Slim 400 (who was fatally shot in December 2021), which reached 36 million views. He went from living in a motel to touring alongside one of the biggest artists in the game, and as he got bigger, he started to evolve and become more socially conscious. Featured on the YG song “Blacks and Browns,” SadBoy addresses the struggles faced by people of color in America, directly criticizing the Trump-era border policies and “Make America Great Again” slogan. Then, with his career on the rise, shortly after his 2018 release My Evil Ways, SadBoy’s future became tied into a case that would leave him in Santa Barbara County Jail for nearly two years. At the time, he was implicated in an incident that left him facing charges of attempted murder, robbery, and assault likely to produce great bodily harm—all of the charges with an additional gang enhancement. Eventually, through a plea deal and additional evidence that showed SadBoy was likely not at the scene of the crime,

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’When you spend two birthdays inside, you learn to appreciate things. Someone else out there in the world is going through worse.‘ —Sadboy Sadboy loko

C O N T I N U E D >>>


COVER STORY he was able to avoid the charges of attempted murder and robbery, and he was sentenced to three years in prison. SadBoy says he used the time behind bars to work on his craft and to think about how he can use his platform to help youth avoid the same cycle of violence and incarceration. He remembers picking up U.S.A. Today each morning and reading about the chaotic world beyond those walls. “Every day, you hear about kids in cages,” he said. In March 2020, he began to hear whispers of a deadly virus quickly spreading across the world. From inside, the pandemic took an even more unsettling role. Many jails and prisons were overcrowded, leading several local governments to encourage early release for those SadBoy feels at home at Art’s Market on Cacique Street. who qualified. He worked there, off and on, from the ages of 14-16. On July 17, 2020, SadBoy came home. Although COVID-19 was still wreaking havoc on the the children of Mexican parents often disworld, he was able to face the challenges tanced themselves from their musical tradifrom the comfort of his hometown. Natu- tions. “Now look at it; it’s the trend.” rally, he got right back to work, releasing I’m His newest single, “Palm Trees,” is his Still Here 2 in April 2021. third release of the year, following “Pit Nowadays, SadBoy has grown beyond Lock” — which has nearly 1.5 million views the hard-edged anger of his youth and on YouTube — and “El Llamado de las moved into a role he feels even more com- Calles,” which features San Diego’s Spanishfortable in — as a father and mentor. He rapping Dyablo and Mexican artist Jessie says he knows that words have power, and Morales El Original de la Sierra. he makes it a point to direct his words to the The song features Kap G — whose 2016 next generation to help them “find strength hit “Girlfriend” peaked at #3 on Billboard’s through music to overcome their struggles.” Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart — and He understands his reputation, and the Mexican rapper YBE, whose Ski Mask popularity he built through his heavily Mafia movement “encourages people to gang-influenced work, but he hopes that listen to the music, not judging the face he can become a role model for his success behind it.” and not just because of his street cred. SadBoy said that once Kap G provided “Don’t look at me because I’m from the hook, the rest of the song’s summer vibe the Eastside,” he said. “Look at me for came naturally. “It just brought me back.” motivation.” On his front porch in Santa Barbara, talkUnder his new label, Prajin Records, ing about his new direction and upcoming he has found room to explore himself album, the usually stone-faced and heavily beyond gang life, reaching deep into his tattooed rapper is beaming, a pearly smile Mexican roots for inspiration. Along with that he says has gotten him out of a lot of multi-platinum producer Cricket, he has sticky situations. “I may look mean, but I expanded into some reggaeton and cor- got this smile,” he says. rido tracks featuring a range of new artists He has big plans too. After touring across like Lupillo Rivera, Jorge Gamboa, Mexi- most of America during his early career, he can rapper Alemán, and “Chicano king of hopes to play more shows on the other side of the border and here at home in Santa Auto-Tune” MC Magic. The tracks will make up his newest Barbara. release, Sin Fronteras, or “Without Bor“I want to do a show here, for all the kids ders,” which is scheduled to come out this in Santa Barbara,” he said, adding that he summer. With the title, he hopes to con- will make the show free under one condinect with the Latino community that has tion: You have to show your report card become a force in popular music with the with good grades for a ticket. likes of artists Bad Bunny and Rosalía in He laughs and takes a moment to think recent years. about how far he’s come, before leaving one “We’re breaking barriers, and there’s no last piece of advice he learned the hard way. borders,” he said. It’s a change from what “Follow your dreams; don’t follow the next he experienced growing up, he said, when man’s dream.” n

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7/5/22 1:03 PM


F E A T U R E

SUMMER READING

Our Annual Foray Into the Joys of the Written Word by Leslie Dinaberg

E

THE INDEPENDENT

LOCAL PICKS FOR GREAT SUMMER READS by Leslie Dinaberg

BARBARA CRONIN HERSHBERG “I’ve been in the same book group for about 30 years now, so it keeps me reading,” says Barbara Cronin Hersh-berg. A former elementary school teacher in Goleta, Hershberg now volunteers as president of Friends of Santa Barbara Public Library. Her summer read recommendations include: Teenager by Bud Smith, The Maid by Nita Prose, French Braid by Anne Tyler, Listening Still by Anne Griffin, The Paris Library by Janet Charles, and Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks. “I’m currently reading Ruth Ozeki’s The Book of Form and Emptiness.”

DAVID STARKEY “I’ve been really looking forward to reading Emily St. John Mandel’s novel Sea of Tranquility. I love the way she writes such vivid, almost simple scenes, but they’re always in service to a larger, more complex plot,” says former Santa Barbara Poet Laureate and SBCC English Pr0fessor Emeritus David Starkey. “As far as summer reading goes, I don’t think of it as a time to read ‘lesser’ or ‘lighter’ books—it’s just an opportunity to read more good books!” he says.

EMMA TRELLES

scaping into the pages of a good book is one of life’s purest pleasures, especially during the summertime, when the days are longer and we have a little more time to linger over the joys of a really good read. Whether you’re traveling this summer or enjoying the many charms Santa Barbara has to offer, here’s some literary inspiration to let your imagination run wild through the written word. For additional summer reading recommendations and book banter, visit independent.com/summer-reading2022.

22

Great Reading Recs

JULY 14, 2022

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“I read incessantly, day and night, on my phone, laptop, and my favorite way—in print. I prefer the latter because there’s something intimate about holding another human’s words and imagination in your hands and allowing them to enter your own consciousness, even if just for a brief while,” says Santa Barbara Poet Laureate Emma Trelles. “Right now, and ironically, I’m in the thoughtful heart of Wintering: The Power of Rest and Retreat in Difficult Times, by Katherine May, which pins the season to when things go awry in our lives and how we might use that slower time to heal. I’m also reading Calypso, by David Sedaris … he is really at his peak with this textured collection of essays that makes me feel his losses and fumbling (and by default, my own) and also makes me laugh out loud, sometimes all in one paragraph.”

On deck next for Trelles: “The great Audre Lorde’s A Burst of Light and Other Essays (because while I’ve read some of her work, I want to sit down and dwell in her brilliance for a sustained period of time); In the Dream House, by Carmen Maria Machado; and Willa Cather’s My Antonia, a novel I’ve been meaning to read forever and that I picked up last year at Planned Parenthood’s annual book sale at Earl Warren.” For poetry, “I’m under the spell of Central Coast poet Marsha de la O’s Every Ravening Thing. She’s such a gifted poet in how she combines a rich fabric of images with personal inquiry.”

LAUREN TRUJILLO Some personal favorite recommendations from Santa Barbara Public Library Foundation Director Lauren Trujillo include Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid and The Personal Librarian by Heather Terrell. Tru Trureadjillo is currently read ing Unbound by Tarana Burke, Atlas of the Heart by Brene Brown and Do Better Work by Max Yoder. Also soon to be on Trujillo’s stack is The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin, a sci-fi fantasy novel that was recently announced as the 2022 Santa Barbara Reads book.

SANDY STARKEY “I am reading Amy Bloom’s memoir In Love right now,” says SBCC English Professor Emeritus Sandy Starkey. “It’s about her husband, who has early onset Alzheimer’s, and her efforts to do what he’s asked of her: find a way to end his life with dignity. … It’s very, very sad, and not what I would normally call summer reading, but it’s good.” For lighter fare, she recommends Barbara Pym. “Her novels are funny and engaging …with wonderful characters, all flawed but still mostly kind. She’s kind of a modern-day Jane Austen.”

EMILY COSENTINO LEE Always a smitten bookworm, Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee share some summer reading faves in the most recent Santa Barbara Independent All Booked newsletter (register at independent .com/newsletters): There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job by Kikuko Tsumura, My Life in France by Julia Child, and One True Loves by Taylor Jenkins Reid are currently tops on her n list.


Book Banter D.J. PALLADINO AND JOE MEDJUCK SOUND OFF ON THEIR FAVORITE READS COURTESY

O

by Leslie Dinaberg

h the joy of being a fly on the wall

when two bibliophiles banter about books! Longtime friends D.J. Palladino (writer, teacher, bookstore owner) and Joe Medjuck (movie producer and former college professor who reads and hangs out at bookstores whenever possible) recently let me into the inner sanctum of their favorite hangout to talk about some of their favorite books and authors.

Working at Mesa Bookstore (themesa bookstore.com) — D.J. and his wife, Diane Arnold, are the owners, and Joe happily “helps out” when they need him to, and he’s not producing films like Ghostbusters, Old School, Kindergarten Cop, and Up in the Air—you get to recommend a lot of books to people. What are some of your favorites? Joe Medjuck: I like to recommend things that are not as well known. City of Thieves by David Benioff, who later became the showrunner on Game of Thrones, is really good. A guy in a bookstore recommended it to me. I think it was the poet Noah benShea. Interestingly, City of Thieves’ structure bears similarity to Michael Chabon’s last novel Moonglow, which I also really like. They’re both about the authors using their real names and life writing a story about, I believe, their fictional grandfathers. Coincidentally, in City of Thieves is a book within the book called The Courtyard Hound, which inspired the name of a side project band for some of the members of the (Dixie) Chicks, called The Courtyard Hounds. I always think it’s interesting when musicians take the names of books for their group. For example, The Swell Season band from the movie Once is based on a book of short stories by my friend Josef Škvorecký. Another book that was recommended to me by a guy who works for Kirkus Reviews (they have a Favorite Book spot listed on their business cards) is Body and Soul by Frank Conroy. D.J. has a belief that you just need to read the first line of a book to know if you want to keep reading. I think you might need the first paragraph. D.J. Palladino: [reading from Body and Soul] “His first view of the outside was through the small, fanshaped window of the basement apartment.” JM: That one’s okay. The first line of City of Thieves is great. “My grandfather, the knife fighter, killed two Germans before he was eighteen.” DJP: It has become one of the most recommended books in the store. What are the others? JM: I think Marathon Man by William Goldman is probably the best thriller ever written. And of course, The Princess Bride is the Great American Novel. DJP: I always recommend Ender’s Game for science fiction. We both always recommend Raymond Chan-

Joe Medjuck (left) and D.J. Palladino

dler books to people and are willing to argue that The Big Sleep is actually the greatest American novel. … I love to recommend Pride and Prejudice. I would recommend Sally Rooney books. I know Joe isn’t crazy about them. But I just think they’re transformative. They’re so compelling, and they’re so smart and sexy. She does sex in a way that I’ve never seen anybody else do it. It’s not corny. It’s not euphemistic, and it has something to do with the plot.

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What about young adult fiction? DJP: I love The Hunger Games but we have a problem with YA books in that they’re very trendy. It’s hard to keep them in a used-book store. I like to go classic. It’s surprising how few young adult readers have read The Golden Compass. I like to go with those and Tolkien. I love Harry Potter. I’m really thrilled when some kid comes in and says, “My father was reading it to me, and now I’m reading it.” Any other favorite authors you would recommend? JM: I read everything by Michael Ondaatje; I read everything by Alice Monroe—they’re my Canadian writers. A classic book I would recommend is Fifth Business by Robertson Davies. What are the most popular books in the store? DJP: Dune. Way before the movie, Dune was something we couldn’t keep enough copies of; we have to buy new ones because there aren’t enough used. Also The Four Agreements. A Gentleman from Moscow is really popular. Kristin Hannah books are really popular. JM: Of course we both like Ross MacDonald. DJP: We have all of his books. And I like Ross MacDonald’s spouse, Margaret Millar, more than I like Ross MacDonald, but I can’t convince anybody. And is there anything you would recommend especially for summer? DJP: When I think about summer reading, I think about when I was a kid and I read Tom Sawyer and To Kill a Mockingbird, and I couldn’t put it down—and I didn’t have to. Those were great. I was like out of my body. Making this happen is the best, and that’s somen thing you can really do in the summer.

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23


Little Free Libraries

MER S U M I NG READ

FIND YOUR NEXT GREAT READ RIGHT IN YOUR OWN NEIGHBORHOOD

W

Photos and text by Ellie Bouwer hat better way to dig into sum-

mer reading than with free books? There are 150,000 Little Free Libraries around the world, sharing more than 70 million books each year — including at least 70 registered libraries in the greater Santa Barbara area. These little libraries operate on an honor system, giving free access to books for all. They’re also a great way for neighbors to share books and connect with each other about literature. Here are some of the best Little Free Libraries in the Santa Barbara area. For more information and to download a free app that includes a map, visit littlefreelibrary.org. To see even more Little Free Libraries, visit Independent.com.

SHADY OAK LIBRARY 3308 Calle Fresno, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Charter # 103447 In a beautiful shady clearing off the road in San Roque, Shady Oak LFL is easily the largest library on this list. There are books of all genres, and this library is a vibrant spot for the community — be prepared to run into other book lovers during your visit. There’s plenty of parking nearby, and Stevens Park is only a short walk away for those who enjoy reading in nature.

PUEBLO STREET LIBRARY

MINISTRY OF MAGIC LFL

LITTLE BIRD LIBRARY 23 East Pueblo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Charter # 104506 This is a gorgeous little oasis in Upper East Santa Barbara. The library is overhung by lovely greenery, and there is a seat in the shade for sitting and reading. The library is large and very full, boasting a vast array of different genres. There is truly something for everyone — toddler books in both Spanish and English, YA fiction novels, magazines, comics, etc. There is also a neighborhood comment book where community members may request books or leave feedback, and lots of parking on the street nearby.

PLANTERBOX ON TOP

570 Carlo Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 Charter # 136078 The Little Bird Library is cute, functional, and accessible. It’s designed after a classic birdhouse, with a little red canary on top and solar-powered fairy lights strung around the box. The books are primarily mysteries and spiritual wellness books, as well as a few kids’ books in Spanish and English. It is also only a short walk to Stow Canyon Open Space, a small park with shade and seating where one can bring their new books for outdoor reading.

MRS. MARZAK’S SUNFLOWER LFL 439 Valdez Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117 Charter # 124906 Perfect for children of all ages, this library sits on a gravel pathway with a comfortable bench and a tree providing shade. The library itself, painted with sunflowers on the sides, is separated into four different sections by age — there are books for everyone from toddlers to young adults in both Spanish and English. There is hand sanitizer inside the library free to use, the neighborhood is quiet, and there is plenty of parking on the street nearby.

24

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JULY 14, 2022

1813 Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Charter # 117624 This LFL on Castillo Street is a well-decorated, asymmetrical box with a planter box and an owl figurine on top. It’s easily accessible from the street, although it does not offer seating or shade. The books inside are clean and organized, mostly consisting of lifestyle, comedy, and mystery novels. The neighborhood is lively, and there is plenty of parking available on the street. 302 Santa Anita Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Charter # 31064 The Ministry of Magic LFL has a creative Harry Potter – themed design. There is plenty of shade on the sidewalk next to the library, as well as a free produce box nearby offering fresh fruit and veggies. The neighborhood is gorgeous and peaceful but does not offer much street parking nearby. The books inside are a well-organized mix of thriller, mystery, and fantasy novels.

NANNY’S KIDS LIBRARY 2010 Chino Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Charter # 135590 The Nanny’s Kids LFL provides a bright and colorful little library for local children. The neighborhood has parking available on the street. The library holds a small collection of children’s books in both Spanish and English, but it is in need of donations. Unfortunately, the library is too high for very young children to reach by themselves but is otherwise easily accessible.

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VERA CRUZ 521 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This Little Free Library is located in front of the Vera Cruz house, which was designed by architect Jeff Shelton. The library’s design is creative and unique, modeled after a vintage Ford buggy, and there is a bench nearby on the sidewalk under a shady tree to sit and read. There is a small pond underneath and greenery surrounding the library, and parking is available on the street nearby. Unfortunately, the library could use some repairs and book donations.

CASA COTA’S BOOK NOOK 1127 E. Cota Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 Charter # 116486 Casa Cota’s Book Nook is well-organized and clean. The books inside are mostly YA fiction. It’s accessible from the sidewalk, and parking is sparsely available. The design is unique and eye-catching, with a two-tier main compartment, an asymmetrical roof, and a shelf on the side n to hold your things while you browse.


Celeb Bookfluencers FAMOUS PEOPLE LIKE GOOD BOOKS TOO

I

by Leslie Dinaberg t all started with

Oprah. Not that people weren’t reading before the sometime Montecito resident made it her mission to bring a love of reading to the masses by starting the Oprah’s Book Club segment of her talk show in September of 1996 with the selection of the then recently published novel The Deep End of the Ocean by Jacquelyn Mitchard. The rest, as they say, is history. Many obscure titles became breakout hits thanks to the much lauded “Oprah bump,” and in total, the club recommended 70 books during its 15 years. When the show ended, Oprah’s “bookfluence” morphed into many forms and moved in and out of fashion for a few more years, mostly recently at Apple TV. The trend of celebrity book influencers has continued to grow — with Jenna Bush, Jimmy Fallon, Netflix, Good Morning America, and Stephen Curry getting into the game — perhaps most notably with sometime Ojai resident Reese Witherspoon’s book club, which has not only sold bajillions of books but also paid it forward with a nonprofit component called The Readership, which is “on a mission to advance diverse voices, promote literacy, and make book joy available to all.” Ever the multi-tasker, Reese’s Book Club has a good eye (and impressive track record) for books that will perform well on screen, championing titles like Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid, Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens, and Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng — all of which have made, or will be making, their way to a screen n near you.

My personal Oprah recommendations: House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III, Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, An American Marriage by Tayari Jones, and Open House (and everything else) by Elizabeth Berg. My personal Reese recommendations: The Last Thing He Told Me by Laura Dave, The Chicken Sisters by K.J. Dell’Antonia, Group by Christine Tate, The Guest List by Lucy Foley, Such a Fun Age by Kiley Reid, The Alice Network by Kate Quinn, and Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman.

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25


2022 Historical Fiesta Parade

Explore the underwater world of the Santa Barbara Channel in our updated upstairs exhibit. Encounter a Two-spot

Friday, August 5 at noon

Octopus, Moon Jellies, Giant Pacific Seahorses, a California Moray, and more. Learn about the channel’s unique habitats from rocky reefs to kelp forests and

The 2022 Historical Fiesta Parade will travel Cabrillo Boulevard from Castillo Steet to the Rainbow Arch. Enjoy covered Fiesta Parade Seating at the best spot to watch the parade!

see the animals that live there.

Reserved Parking $20 Reserved Seating $30 Deluxe Reserved Seating $50 (includes poster)

Fiesta Needs Parade Volunteers! Be A Part of the Fiesta Family!

211 Stearns Wharf Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805-962-2526 sbnature.org/seacenter

Tickets: www.sbfiesta.org

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JULY 14-20

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE

by

TERRY VICTORIA ORTEGA & SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events independent.com/events.. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit independent.com/eventsubmit..

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

THURSDAY 7/14

FRIDAY

7/14: Concerts in the Park: Blue Breeze Band Pack a picnic and bring a chair or blanket to S.B.’s beautiful waterfront and enjoy the best songs of Motown, R&B, funk, and blues. No alcohol or pets. 6-7:30pm. Great Meadow, Chase Palm Park, 323 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Free. tinyurl.com/SBConcertsInThePark

7/14-7/17 The Theatre Group at SBCC Presents Something Rotten! Follow

7/14-7/16: Backstage Kitchen & Bar Thu.-Sat.: Dueling Pianos, 7pm. 409 State St. Free. Call (805) 957-4111. tinyurl.com/BackstageK-B

TUESDAY

7/14: Eos Lounge Bynx, 9pm. Free.

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

cfsb.info/sat 7/15: Plastic Pollution Solutions Climate Action Webinar Did you

7/15-7/17:

The Ojai Art Center Theater Presents Meredith Willson’s The Music Man Travel to the

COURTESY

fictional town of River City, where the residents meet the fast-talking salesman/ conman Harold Hill, who falls in love with the feisty Marian the librarian, with songs like “Seventy-Six Trombones,”“Till There Was You,” and more. The musical shows through July 24. Fri.-Sat.: 7:30-10pm; Sun.: 2-4:30pm. The Ojai ACT, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $25-$30. Call (805) 640-8797. ojaiact.org

7/15-7/16: California Wine Festival Start the weekend off on Friday with a Sunset Rare & Reserve Tasting followed by the beachside festival the next day with hundreds of wines from all of California, local craft brews, and a variety of foods to sample, including artisanal cheeses, breads, salads, desserts, and more with a live band to provide the beat. Fri: 6:30-9pm. Chase Palm Park Carousel House. $110-$140; Sat.: 1-4pm. Chase Palm Park Field: Oceanside, 236 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $75-$85. Ages 21+.

californiawinefestival.com

7/15: Curtain Call: State Street Ballet Summer Intensive Students from throughout the United States will present a diverse program from classical to contemporary with new works by well-known choreographers such as Royce Zachery, Megan Philipp, and Aaron Smyth. 3 and 6pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $13-$25. Call (805) 9630408 or email cstheater@sbcoxmail.com.

centerstagetheater.org

know that, according to the Department of Energy, only 5 percent of our nation’s plastic waste was recycled in 2021? Learn about plastics — recycling, reduction, and policy with a focus on local and state efforts to reduce waste. Register online to attend or have the presentation and recording sent to you. Noon-1pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/PollutionSolution Webinar

7/15: AFSB Gallery Opening Reception: Malka’s Place The Archi-

7/15:

Free Summer Cinema—Hot Fun in the Summertime: Dirty Dancing

Bring breathable blankets, low chairs, a picnic, and friends and family to travel back to1963’s Catskills to follow the story of an innocent teen who crushes on the hotel’s slick and handsome dance instructor in this 1987 movie (rated PG-13) starring Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze. 8:30pm. Sunken Gardens, S.B. County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa St. Free. Call (805) 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

500 Anacapa St. Call (805) 564-2410.

eoslounge.com

WEDNESDAY

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

COURTESY

FRIDAY 7/15

SUNDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

brothers Nick and Nigel Bottom in the 1590s as they write the world’s very first musical in the shadow of that Renaissance rock star known as “The Bard” as they realize that reaching the top means being true to thine own self … and all that jazz. The musical will show through July 23. Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 721 Cliff Dr. $10-$26. Call (805) 965-5935 or email sbcctg@sbcc.edu. theatregroupsbcc.com

Shows on Tap

tectural Foundation of S.B. presents this exhibition of photographic montages by Joyce Wilson. Meet artist Joyce Wilson and Malka Belzberg, the inspiration for this exhibition that will show through August 27. afsb.org/news-events

SATURDAY 7/16 7/16: 26th Annual Mental Health Arts Festival This festival will showcase the artwork of more than 50 artists that includes painting, drawing, jewelry, poetry, sculpture, and arts and crafts with this year’s featured artist Kristine Kelly’s fused-glass work. Funds raised go directly to the artists. 11am-3pm. 8 E. De la Guerra St. Free. Read more on p. 37.

mentalwellnesscenter.org

1-5pm; Flannel 101, 9pm-midnight. Sun.: Sam Mitchell, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/ event-calendar/

7/15-7/16: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Ransome Note. 6-8pm. Sat.: Ace GonzaCOURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

lez & Surfrider Sound, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

7/15: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Ben Betts. 7-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805)

Bynx 7/14-7/15, 7/17, 7/20: Lost Chord Guitar Thu: The Contenders (Jay Nash and Josh Day), 7:30-9:30pm. $20. Fri.: California Guitar Trio, Travis Larson, 8-11:30pm. $25. Sun.: Matt McCarrin & Ms. Finch, 8-10:30pm. $10. Wed.: Mike Hellman, Ruben Lee Dalton, Anna May, 7:30-9:30pm. $5. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 331-4363.

lostchordguitars.com

7/14-7/19: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Thee Sinseers, Cassowary, 8pm. $20. Ages 21+. Fri.: S.B. Voice Academy with S.B. All Star Band, 6pm, free-$8. Area 51, 8:30pm, $10, ages 21+. Sat.: Madz, Versatility, Heart & Soul, 8pm. $25. Ages 21+. Sun.: Dr. Wu, 7:30pm. $25. Ages 21+. Mon: Nate Birkey Quintet, 7:30pm. $15. Tue: Kimberly Ford, 7:30pm. $10. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com 7/15: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

7/15: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800. uptownlounge805

.com/events

7/16-7/17: S.B. Bowl Concerts Sat.: Rise Against, The Used, Senses Fail, 6pm. $35-$65. Sun.: Slightly Stoopid, Fortunate Youth, Pepper, Common Kings, 5pm. $41-$58. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411.

sbbowl.com

7/18: The Red Piano Church on

7/15-7/17: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Elementos Project, 6-9pm. Sat.: Salt Martians, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: The Reserve, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free.

Monday: Lightnin’ Willie and the Poorboys, 7:30pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439.

theredpiano.com/schedule

coldspringtavern.com

Call (805) 967-0066.

7/20: Solvang Music in the Park Live music. 5-8pm. Solvang

7/15-7/16: Maverick Saloon Fri.:

Free. visitsyv.com/events

Park, corner of Mission Dr. and First St.

The Molly Ringwald Project. 9pmmidnight. $10. Sat.: The Rondales,

7/16: Air Love n’ Love This romantic comedy written by Claudia Hoag McGarry follows Peter, an abstract painter of 50; and his intellectual 26 year-old daughter, who both run an Airbnb that drastically changes the lives of everyone associated with it, romantically and otherwise. The play shows again on July 23. 6-7:30pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. $20. Read more on p. 37. tinyurl.com/AirLoveNLove 7/16: Solvang Theaterfest Presents Mat Kearney Join this grand reopening of the new theater with a concert featuring the return of Nashville-based Mat Kearney, who is out with his new studio album with a rootsy quality with acoustic guitar and burnished synths, January Flower. 7pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $77-$127. Call (805) 6861789 or email info@solvangtheaterfest.org. Read more on p. 36. solvangtheaterfest.org/

calendar

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

JULY 14, 2022

Fundraiser

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27


T HE 7/17: Steely Dan Tribute Band: Doctor Wu This 11-piece band

BALL AEROSPACE

presents

will bring Steely Dan’s groove-laden, blockbuster hits with a few deep cuts for the die-hard enthusiasts. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $25. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/

events

MONDAY 7/18

Directed by Katie Laris

7/18: Connect & Stretch Follow Luca Cupery for stretching the legs, arms, and torso using a combination of yoga asana and fluid movements that will leave you feeling more balanced and integrated. 5:15-6:15pm. Yoga Soup, 28 Parker Wy. $25. Call (805) 965-8811. union.fit/users/

Musical Direction by David Potter Choreography by Christina McCarthy

7/16:

TUESDAY 7/19

Live Webcast: James Webb Space Telescope Expert Panel / Transmisión en directo: Panel de expertos del telescopio espacial James Webb Learn about the first astronomi-

Lesser Goldfinch

cal images to be released in mid-July from the James Webb Space Telescope from a NASA-led expert panel via live webcast. Aprenda sobre las primeras imágenes astronómicas que se publicarán a mediados de julio desde el Telescopio Espacial James Webb de un panel de expertos de la NASA a través de una retransmisión en directo a las 11 de la mañana. 12:30-1:30pm. Farrand Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$18. Call (805) 682-4711. sbnature.org/visit/calendar

Book by Karey Kirkpatrick and John O'Farrell Music and Lyrics by Wayne Kirkpatrick and Karey Kirkpatrick

COURTESY

7/16:

luca-cupery

James Webb Space Telescope

Conceived by Karey Kirkpatrick and Wayne Kirkpatrick

JULY 8-23, 2022

G AR VI N T H E AT RE

www.theatregroupsbcc.com 805.965.5935 PREVIEWS: JULY 6 & 7

Thank you to our season sponsor:

LIVE CAPTIONING

Sun. 7/10 matinee

INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

7/14 - 8:00 PM

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7/16: Bart’s Books Author Night: Shana Nys Dambrot Delve into a dream world with Shana Nys Dambrot, art critic, curator, educator, and author of Zen Psychosis, a work of experimental fiction and an attempt to construct a personal memoir collected from dreams and accompanied with fantastical pinhole photographs by Osceola Refetoff. 6-7pm. Bart’s Books, 302 W. Matilija St., Ojai. Free. Call (805) 646-3755.

bartsbooksojai.com/comingevents

7/16: DIY Lavender Wreath Walk through the lavender field and harvest fresh stems to create your very own lavender wreath. A continental breakfast and all materials will be included. 9:30am-noon. Santa Rita Hills Lavender Farm, 1900 Tularosa Rd., Lompoc. $100. tinyurl.com/LavendarWreath

COURTESY

7/15 - 6:00 PM

SBVA SINGER SHOWCASE

W/SB ALL STAR BAND 8:30 PM

FUNK IT UP WITH AREA 51!

7/20: The Victor Job Fair The Victor Restaurant and Bar at the

MADZ & VERSATILITY WITH HEART & SOUL 7/17 - 7:30 PM

DOCTOR WU PLAYING THE MUSIC OF STEELY DAN!

Santa Ynez Inn is looking for hosts, servers, cooks, dishwashers, and more to join the team at this new signature restaurant. 11am-4pm. The Santa Ynez Inn, 3627 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Email jorge .ledezma@santaynezinn.com. santaynezinn.com/thevictorjobfair

We are here for you!

7/20: Virtual Lunch and Learn: Land to Sea Conservation

7/18 - 7:30 PM

NATE BIRKEY QUINTET FINE NYC JAZZ 7/19 - 7:30 PM

JAZZ JAM WITH KIMBERLY FORD

Need support?

7/21 - 8:30 PM

POCKET FOX / GLENN ANNIE / KATIE SKENE FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

805.964.5245 info@dvsolutions.org dvsolutions.org

SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 THE INDEPENDENT

Morning Bird Walk Join birding expert Rebecca Coulter as she leads a group walk through the garden for a morning of watching and listening for a variety of birds like the dark-eyed junco, black phoebe, song sparrow, and spotted towhee, as well as migrant species. 8:3010am. S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. $20-$30. Call (805) 682-4726. sbbotanicgarden.org/calendar

WEDNESDAY 7/20

7/16 - 8:00 PM

28

7/19:

SUNDAY 7/17

JULY 14, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

7/17:

Zermeño Dance Academy’s “Fiesta in the Grove” Take in an evening of

food, drinks and entertainment, featuring renowned artists Yiyi Orozco, Jose Tanaka, Diego Alvarez Muñoz, the 2022 Spirit and Jr. Spirit of Fiesta Tara Mata and Layla Gocong, and dancers from the Zermeño Dance Academy. 4-7pm. Godric Grove, Elings Park, 1298 Las Positas Rd. $50$75. tinyurl.com/ZermenoFiestaInTheGrove

Join the Land Trust for a Zoom conversation with S.B. Channelkeeper’s Science and Policy Associate, Molly Troup, on the intersection between land and ocean conservation and how clean creeks, healthy watersheds, and oceans are impacted by what happens on land. Reservations are required. 12:30-1:30pm. Free. Call (805) 966-4520 or email events@ sblandtrust.org. sblandtrust.org/event

7/20: Composer Molly Joyce and Academy Fellows This live showcase will feature composer-in-residence Molly Joyce in a program of her own works, complete with a world premiere performed by Academy fellows. 7:30pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy, 1070 Fairway Rd. Free-$40. Call (805) 969-4726. musicacademy.org


JULY 14-20

FOODBANK PICNIC IN THE PARK 2022

Premier Sponsor:

FREE Summer Cinema

Supporting Sponsor:

Fridays at 8:30 PM at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden

Fri, July 15

The Foodbank offers free, nutritious meals, activities, and enrichment opportunities to all children ages 1-18 in our county, Monday-Friday, June 6-August 12, unless otherwise stated. Visit the website for North County locations. Call (805) 967-5741, text “SUMMERFOOD” to 304-304, or download the CA Meals for Kids App.

FOODBANK PICNIC EN EL PARQUE 2022

Fri, July 22

El Foodbank ofrece comidas nutritivas gratuitas, actividades, y oportunidades de enriquecimiento para todos los niños de 1 a 18 años en nuestro condado, del 6 de junio al 12 de agosto, de lunes a viernes si no se indique lo contrario. Visite el sitio web por las ubicaciones de North County. Llame al (805) 967-5741, envíe un mensaje de texto que dice “SUMMERFOOD” al 877 877, o descargue la App de CA Meals for Kids. tinyurl.com/FoodbankSummerFood

tinyurl.com/PicnicInThePark2021

S.B. UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT FREE MEALS Free breakfast and lunch for all youth 18 years and younger. For more information, call (805) 963-4338 x6385, text “food” to 304-304,or download the CA Meals for Kids App.

DISTRITO ESCOLAR UNFICADO DE S.B. COMIDAS GRATIS Desayuno y almuerzo gratuitos para todos los jóvenes de 18 años o menos. Para más información llame al (805) 963-4338 x6385, envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra “food” al 304-304, o descargue la App CA Meals for Kids. sbunified.org/support/foodservices

Films presented by:

Special thanks to Santa Barbara County Parks, the Community Services Department of Santa Barbara County and Big Green Cleaning Company Media Sponsors:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

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living

p. 31

Sports

Pro Soccer Is Back, Baby

Santa Barbara Sky Football Club Launching in 2024 by John Zant The club’s name, Santa Barbara Sky FC, is revealing in itself. “We will be a Football Club,” Moore said. “We think everybody understands football in the global sense now.” The timing of his venture is vastly superior to conditions in 1977 and 1990, when previous attempts to establish pro soccer in town fizzled out. Besides, the word “failure” does not appear to be in Moore’s vocabulary. A native of Liverpool, England, the 67-year-old Moore built an impressive résumé as an executive at Reebok, Sega, Microsoft, and Electronic Arts. In 2017, he returned to his hometown to become CEO of Liverpool Football Club, one of the world’s foremost sides. During his tenure, Liverpool won the UEFA Champions League, the FIFA Club World Cup, and the Premier League. After concluding his contract with Liverpool, Moore and his wife, Debbie, settled in a home in Montecito in December 2020. He recalled that his first visit to Santa Barbara had come early in his business career. “I was coaching soccer and getting a master’s at Long Beach State,” he said. “I got a job with a company called Patrick, which made great football boots at the time. I roll into town, go to a phone box, find the yellow pages, go to sporting goods, and there’s Copeland Sports on State Street. They placed a small order, and it all went. Then I got UCSB to wear Patrick gear.” Upon his return to Santa Barbara decades later, Moore landed another job as a high-tech executive with Unity Technologies. He became acquainted with several local soccer aficionados and was prompted to investigate the possibility of landing an expansion club in the USL. He attended the league’s winter meetings and became convinced it was building a solid multi-level organization like the divisions of English football layered below the Premier League — Major League Soccer being the U.S. equivalent of the Premier League. The USL’s clubs also include women’s teams. Moore decided to become a founding investor and applied his organizational skills to make Santa Barbara Sky FC a reality. “We are not a fly-by-night organization

in any sense,” he said. “I’m used to building multi-billiondollar businesses. We’ve gone from zero to a fully fledged club in seven months.” He was ready to unveil the club’s crest (featuring an image of Saint Barbara and a color scheme of midnight blue and terra cotta) and merchandise this week. He has plans to form a Sky FC charitable foundation, much like his own foundation in Liverpool, which supports a food bank and cancer hospital. When the Sky FC takes to the pitch at SBCC’s La Playa Stadium in March 2024, it will be the first “true West Coast team” in the USL’s League One, which currently has 11 clubs spread from Fresno to Madison, Wisconsin, and Statesboro, Georgia. Moore expects League One to comprise 30 teams in 2024 as the USL, founded in Peter Moore 2010, continues to grow. “The moment the World Cup ends in Qatar this winter, everything moves to North America [site of the 2026 World Cup],” Moore said, “and the game is going to explode in this country.” Previous attempts to bring pro soccer to Santa Barbara did not go so well. In 1977, the erstwhile American Soccer League — whose president was basketball icon Bob Cousy – tried to expand west with the Santa Barbara Condors. The club imported half a dozen English players, including former Liverpool captain Ron Yeats, and opened the season with much fanfare at the San Marcos High stadium. But the Condors were grossly underfinanced. After going weeks without paychecks, the players were fed up, and the team disbanded halfway through the season. Moore himself had played for the ASL’s Cleveland Cobras and recalled, “It was very much an immigrant game.” Real Santa Barbara was a club started in 1989 with a homegrown roster and a coach from Moldavia. In 1990, it was among 24 inaugural members of the American Professional Soccer League, which was trying to establish itself as the nation’s premier soccer league. But the Santa Barbara market proved too small to meet the league’s ambitions, and Real became a noble failure. Tim Vom Steeg played for Real. “It paid for my graduate school,” said Vom Steeg, the longtime coach of the UCSB men’s soccer team. Vom Steeg agrees with Moore that the growth of the sport in this country creates a positive outlook for Sky FC. Pointing to crowds of 10,000 or more who have attended UCSB’s games against the likes of Stanford and UCLA, he said, “It’s not just about soccer; it’s the entertainment of going to a cool event. We play in the fall at UCSB. [Sky FC] will provide entertainment options for families in the spring and summer.” INGRID BOSTROM

D

espite the clouded history of professional sports in Santa Barbara, Peter Moore sees nothing but bright skies for the United Soccer League club he is launching, to begin play in 2024. “I’ve lived [in the U.S.] 40 years, and soccer is on fire now in a way I’ve never seen,” Moore said in an interview before the public unveiling of his plans this week. “Whether it’s the Premier League on Saturdays, freaking Ted Lasso, everything else that has brought the game into focus … I’ve never seen anything more potent, more powerful, and more right for it finally becoming something that every American kid wants to play.”

Here are some other pro sports that have come and gone in Santa Barbara: BASKETBALL: The Santa Barbara Islanders were Western Division champions of the Continental Basketball League in 1990, but that was their only season. Financial troubles forced them to wind up playing in Ventura; their rental payments at SBCC were in default. Taking dubious turns as the club’s owners were the late Howard Schneider, who was jailed for fraud in another matter, and Craig Case, currently charged with various improprieties. VOLLEYBALL: The Santa Barbara Spikers were a founding team in the International Volleyball Association and won the league’s championship in 1978. But the entire IVA fell apart after five seasons in 1980. BASEBALL: The Santa Barbara Rancheros (1962-63), a New York Mets farm club, gave way to the Santa Barbara Dodgers, who lasted through 1967 but suffered low attendance and were moved to Bakersfield. They played in Laguna Park, which was demolished in 1970. The Santa Barbara Foresters, now playing their 42nd consecutive season of pre-professional summer baseball, have been a smashing success by comparison. They have survived because of community involvement —including host families that provide room and board for players—and the passion of longtime manager Bill Pintard. In memory of his son Eric, who lost his life to cancer, Pintard’s Foresters have made hospital visits and provided activities for children with cancer. Peter Moore is astute in recognizing that the Santa Barbara Sky FC’s prospects for success will rely on that sort of wholesome engagement with the community. n

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JULY 14, 2022

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BOOKS

FOOD &DRINK

p. 32

STEVE MCCRANK PHOTOS

Rancho Sisquoc Celebrates 75 Years

RANCH HEAVEN: Wet winters bring green and flowing waters to Rancho Sisquoc.

New Book Covers Legacy of Santa Maria Valley Ranch and Vineyard BY JUDITH FLOOD WILBUR AND CHASE REYNOLDS EWALD

L

ocated far up the Santa Maria Valley, Rancho Sisquoc is one of Santa Barbara County’s most tremendous properties. It’s massive, at 58 square miles, being the largest private property left in the county; it’s old, as one of the last Mexican land grants before Americans took over in the 1840s, not counting the millennia of Chumash occupation; and it’s significant in all sorts of agricultural ways, from ranching to row crops to vineyards. To celebrate the 70th year of ownership by the Flood family, and the 50th year of commercial vineyards being planted back in 1972, the family is releasing a book called Rancho Sisquoc: Enduring Legacy of an Historic Land Grant Ranch. Written by Judith Flood Wilbur and Chase Reynolds, with extensive photography that’s both historic from family albums and more modern by Steve McCrank, who also works in the winery, the book beautifully captures the landscape and lore. None other than former Governor Jerry Brown and Steve Hearst added forewords to the tome, as did local legend and ranch owner Eric Hvolboll.

—Matt Kettmann

32

THE INDEPENDENT

JULY 14, 2022

Here is an edited excerpt from Rancho Sisquoc: Enduring Legacy of an Historic Land Grant Ranch.

B

oth James and Betty Flood were larger-than-life char-

acters. Despite not living full-time on the ranch, they were fully present in all decisions and present in actuality as much as possible. James Flood loved working with large machinery; when not needed in the office, corrals, fields, or vineyards, he could usually be found on a grader or tractor. One time he was grading a steep part of the road called the 101 between the Dam Corral and Crazy Springs. When he stood up to answer the call of nature, the tractor tilted, slipped, and started slowly sliding down the steep incline. James rode the tractor all the way to the bottom, emerging with lots of bruises but no broken bones. After that, that stretch of road was called the “1-Uh-Oh.” Betty was equally charismatic, whether creating memo-

rable Thanksgiving gatherings around the kitchen table in the original farmhouse, gathering watercress along the river, or helping gather cattle. Even in her nineties, Betty still insisted on driving wine club guests to the vineyards in the old 1956 Land Rover. “It was considered the highlight of the day for wine club members to drive out to the vineyard in the Land Rover with Mrs. Flood,” says Judy Flood. “They loved it, but we were terrified she’d go off the cliff. She was 93, driving a 1956 Land Rover with no brakes. I told her it was not really prudent. She wrote, ‘Join me at your own risk!’ on a piece of paper and posted it on the windshield. She was so mad at me, she made seven trips that day.” Eventually, family members took to removing the spark plugs from the vehicle so Betty couldn’t start it. To celebrate Betty’s 80th birthday, Judy and her children organized a three-day campout for 32 family members at the Tunnell House. Tents were erected and meals cooked on-site each day by a caterer who drove up from town. Days

STILL SPREAD: Rancho Sisquoc’s main ranch area includes a winery, tasting room, row crops, cattle corrals, and much more at the eastern end of the Santa Maria Valley.

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COWBOY LIFE: Ranching goes back generations at Rancho Sisquoc and continues today.

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were filled with games, skits, treasure hunts, hikes, horseback rides, and fun. Evenings were spent sitting around the campfire sharing memories under the night sky. It is fitting that the family members would mark their mother’s later years in such an adventurous, logistically complicated, and memorable way. The four Flood children — Jim, Judy, Elizabeth, and John — spent much of their childhoods traveling back and forth to the ranch, sometimes by train from San Jose to San Luis Obispo, where they’d eat club sandwiches in the dining car. “When our family dogs grew to six, we started driving,” recalls Elizabeth. “My mother collected dogs; we had so many strays.” It was an unusual way to grow up, but for the Floods, it was just what they did. They would spend a month or more on the ranch every summer, Judy recalls. “The big highlights of summer were getting up at 5 a.m. and having breakfast with the cowboys and Mrs. Moreno. She’d ring the bell on the main house. There would be five or six cowboys. In those days, they ran cattle way up above Tunnell House. It was a 10- or 12-mile ride to Tunnell House; we’d camp there and look for cattle, then go from there into Abel Canyon, Manzana, and other areas. We’d bring them back to Tunnell House, where there were corrals, a water trough, the river, and a spring. We’d also round up in Media Portrero, a big area north of there. We spent a lot of time riding with the cowboys.” Elizabeth has similar memories. “A typical summer day began with breakfast in the original cookhouse with the employees,” she says. “It consisted of gooey eggs, raw bacon, lots of coffee, and cigarette smoke. Conversation was limited to ‘yep’ and ‘dunno.’ Then we would catch the horses, saddle up, and head out to gather cattle. Pete, my favorite horse, had the SQ brand on his left cheek. My parents loved this activity, as did my younger brother, John. He and I would follow Doaney, an entertaining fellow who would show us his beer stash hidden in the creek. Often after riding on hot summer days, we headed to Bee Rock on the Sisquoc River. We kids fished, played in the swimming hole, and built forts. My father insisted that we eat the fish we caught, even though they tasted like river moss.” Wildlife was ubiquitous on the ranch: Wild turkeys, wild boars, beavers, and rattlesnakes were frequently sighted. Skunks lived under the house. Bears were known to come to the MacMurray Vineyard to feast on the Merlot. When Betty wasn’t moving cattle or building rock walls, she did the cooking and laundry. James spent his days outside in the vineyards, on horseback, and working alongside the men. He’d take guests and his children on hours-long Jeep rides explaining every aspect of the land, the cattle, his newly graded road, and the vineyards “What I saw,” says Elizabeth, “was them working together. I was 4 when they got the place. It was just a dirt pile. It was a working ranch. They didn’t concentrate on lawns and trees, but they spent a lot of time cleaning it up and fixing it up…. Their goal was to have it be a ranch, not to turn it into a showplace. My parents didn’t want to change anything. They kept it a ranch, and it still is a ranch. It’s still authentic, and that’s what makes it different from other places.” In the 1960s, James and Betty Flood were featured on the cover of Fortune Magazine. In the photo, they stand on the cliffs above ranch headquarters, thoroughly in their element, the Santa Maria Valley falling away behind them as the river makes its way to the ocean. From the same spot looking east, the ranch feels limitless, with layers of hills and mountains receding in the distance as one’s eye extends toward the wilderness in the Los Padres National Forest. The couple did their best to honor the land, instill respect for it in their children and grandchildren, and maintain its history and legacy while still making it viable in the 21st century. The next generation has every intention of doing the same. n

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26th Annual Mental Health Arts Festival

The Arlington Theatre

Paintings

Crafts

­

Jewelry

$2 10am: SUMMER KIDS MOVIES Tickets! Fiesta 5: Tuesday & Wednesday Camino Real: Thursday *Kids Series Only Happening Now! *

Drawings Poetry

7/15: WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING

7/15: PAWS OF FURY

Paseo Nuevo • Fairview

Fiesta 5 • Fairveiw

7/15: 7/19, 20, 21: METRO SUMMER GABBY GIFFORDS KIDS MOVIES WON’T BACK DOWN

7/15: THE GRAY MAN

Sculpture Fiesta 5 • Camino

Hitchcock

Fiesta 5

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for July 15-21, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

FA I R V I E W

Artwork by Kristine Kelly

Saturday, July 16, 2022 11am-3pm De La Guerra Plaza, Downtown Santa Barbara Sponsored by: Sponsored by: mentalwellnesscenter.org

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Paws of Fury* (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 11:30, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20. Where the Crawdads Sing* (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 11:05, 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Minions: Rise of Gru* (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 1:30, 3:45, 6:00, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 3:45, 6:00, 8:15.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Volunteer With Us!

(805) 692-2226 zoe@sbhabitat.org sbhabitat.org/volunteer

Thor: Love and Thunder* (PG13): Fri: 12:40, 1:40, 2:40, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:20, 7:20, 8:20, 9:10, 10:10.Sat: 10:45, 11:50, 12:40, 1:40, 2:40, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:20, 7:20, 8:20, 9:10, 10:10. Sun: 10:45, 11:50, 12:40, 1:40, 2:40, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:20, 7:20, 8:20, 9:10. Mon-Wed: 12:40, 1:40, 2:40, 3:30, 4:30, 5:30, 6:20, 7:20, 8:20, 9:10.Thur: 10:45, 11:50, 12:40, 1:40, 2:40, 4:30, 5:30, 7:20, 8:20. Elvis* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 12:30, 4:00, 7:30. Jurassic World Dominion (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:20, 4:40, 8:00. Thur: 1:20. Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Sat/Sun, Thur: 10:40, 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Home ($2) (PG): Thur: 10:00. Nope* (R): Thur: 4:00, 5:45, 7:00, 8:45, 10:00.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris* (PG): Fri-Thur: 4:30, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 4:30, 7:15. Gabby Giffords Won’t Back Down (PG13): Fri-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 5:00, 7:30.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Thor: Love and Thunder* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. 34

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JULY 14, 2022

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METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Thor: Love and Thunder* (PG13): Fri: 1:15, 3:00, 4:00, 5:45, 6:45, 8:30, 9:40. Sat: 12:15, 1:15, 3:00, 4:00, 5:45, 6:45, 8:30, 9:40. Sun: 12:15, 1:15, 3:00, 4:00, 5:45, 6:45, 8:30. Mon-Thur: 1:15, 3:00, 4:00, 5:45, 6:45, 8:30. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri: 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30. Sat: 12:30, 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30. Sun: 12:30, 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Paws of Fury* (PG): Fri, Mon, Thur: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun, Tue/Wed: 11:55, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. The Gray Man (PG13): Fri, Mon, Thur: 2:40, 5:30, 8:20. Sat/Sun, Tue/Wed: 11:50, 2:40, 5:30, 8:20. Minions: The Rise of Gru* (PG): Fri: 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00, 9:00. Sat: 12:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00, 9:00. Sun, Tue/Wed: 12:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00. Mon, Thur: 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00. Everything Everywhere All At Once (R): Fri-Thur: 7:50. Lightyear (PG): Fri, Mon, Thur: 2:35, 5:15. Sat/Sun, Tue/Wed: 11:45, 2:35, 5:15. Trolls World Tour ($2) (PG): Tue/Wed: 10:00.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Where the Crawdads Sing* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Elvis (PG13): Fri-Thur: 12:30, 4:00, 7:30. Jurassic World Dominion (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:20, 4:30, 8:00. Thur: 12:40, 4:30. The Black Phone (R): Fri-Wed: 5:40, 8:15. Thur: 8:15. The Forgiven (NR): Fri-Wed: 12:15, 2:55. Thur: 1:30. Nope* (R): Thur: 4:00, 7:00, 10:00.


JULY 15 - 21 “AN INCENDIARY DRAMA. AS VOLATILE AND UNTAMED AS AN INFERNO.” – INDIEWIRE

JOHN DICKSON

Sweetie’s Opens on the Mesa

SWEET DREAMS: Sweetie’s Ice Cream Shop has opened next to the Cliff Room on the Mesa.

Shop, serving McConnell’s Ice Cream, has opened on the Mesa at 1826A Cliff Drive next to the Cliff Room. Sweetie’s, which is not owned by McConnell’s, is brought to you by entrepreneur Chris Chiarappa, who is involved with Mesa Burger, Lighthouse Coffee, and many other local culinary adventures. Sweetie’s is open Sunday-Thursday from 1-9 p.m. and Friday-Saturday from 1-10 p.m. Chiarappa recently announced that he is opening a taproom named The Landing at 5690 Calle Real in Goleta, formerly Outback Steakhouse. RARE SOCIETY OPENS: Rare Society has opened in the

Funk Zone at 214 State Street, the former home of Corazon Cocina, American Ale, Yankee Noodle, Rebar Coffee, Tri Tip Company, Union Ale Brewing Company, and Couchez. The third location of the San Diego–born concept, Rare Society is the brainchild of Chef Brad Wise, who is paying homage to the infamous retro steakhouses that once laid claim to the Las Vegas Strip. Chef Wise’s menu places proteins and seafood in the spotlight, with cuts of dry-aged ribeyes, American Wagyu, and classic filet mignon complementing steakhouse specialties such as oyster Rockefeller, snow crab legs, and Caesar salad. ANACAPA SEAFOOD: Real estate agent Caitlin Hensel

has announced that a new restaurant is coming to downtown Santa Barbara at 703 Anacapa Street, across from La Paloma Café. “We are very excited to announce that our clients have just completed a long-term lease on the iconic Los Arcos building,” says Hensel. “The to-be-named venture, from the restauranteurs behind @picnicrestaurant in Barcelona, will bring international farm-to-table dishes with a focus on local seafood, serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner to Anacapa Street. They will also have a large outdoor patio open all day with coffee, juices, great wine, and a full cocktail list. Look out for them to open in this beautiful space later this year!”

PIZZA MY HEART TO DEPART: Reader Don sent me an Isla

Vista update that I confirmed is true: “Hi John, I love how you pay attention to IV. Pizza My Heart is closing. I ignored the place for years but it’s been so convenient to get a slice and a pint to enjoy on their patio. August 14 is their last day, according to my pal who shared this news. Somebody is going to get lucky if they hire their afternoon manager—that guy is friendly and efficient and he really seems to care for the team members.” BARBAREÑO ADDS MONDAYS: Owner Julian Martinez

sent me an update about his restaurant at 205 West Canon Perdido Street: “Hi John, I hope all is well! We wanted to let you know that our restaurant, Barbareño, has expanded our days of operation. We are now open on Mondays. Moving forward, we will be open every day except Tuesdays, starting at 5 p.m. Thank you!” LEBANESE FEAST: A cooking class/dinner at Apples to Zucchini Cooking School to benefit the school’s partnership programs will be held on July 15 in their teaching kitchen at 2300 Garden Street. Chef Sally Ruhl’s class menu includes Casitas Valley Pastures lamb, tabbouli, farro pilaf, and some surprises. Dinner, accompanied by paired wines, will be served in the school’s garden. Chef Ruhl will provide all students with her recipes. Proceeds from the cooking class will benefit Apples to Zucchini’s partnership programs, which include Girls Inc., Noah’s Anchorage, Safe House, and Santa Barbara School of Squash. Visit tinyurl.com/a2zbenefit.

FOOD & DRINK

R

eader Tim tells me that Sweetie’s Ice Cream

FRI: 7:30pm SAT: 2:30pm & 7:30pm SUN: 5:00pm MON, WED: 5:00pm TUES, THURS: 7:30pm

“SHARP REFLECTIONS DELICIOUSLY WRAPPED IN ENTERTAINING ANTICS” – THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

VER! O D HEL

BREWCO FOR SALE: Reader Josh let me know that a

listing of a restaurant for sale has appeared online at tinyurl.com/brewco4sale and that the description and photos match Hollister Brewing Company at 6980 Marketplace Drive in Goleta. The ad reads, “Price reduced to $795,000 for this 6,000 sq ft Brewery, Bar & Restaurant and large Patio with ABC type 23 distribution license with additional ABC type 47 hard liquor license in an extremely sought-after corner location with seating for 140+ indoors and a further 80 outdoors.”

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

FRI, SAT: 5:00pm SUN: 2:30pm MON, WED: 7:30pm TUES, THURS: 5:00pm

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

L I F E PAGE 36

SURF’S UP, ART’S UP COURTESY

SANTA BARBARA HISTORICAL MUSEUM PHOTOS

TAKE A HIKE, SAVE THE WORLD

“Carpinteria Coast” by Henry Chapman Ford

“Santa Ynez Mountains” by Edward Willis

S

“Evening at Surfrider” by Brian Lotti

“The Ocean from the Riviera” by Lumina Welch

paintings from the museum’s collection, the exhibition includes a 1943 painting of the Santa Ynez Valley by Francis M. Sedgwick, who donated a 6,000-acre portion of one of his ranches to become the Sedgwick Preserve. A watercolor by Ellen Cooper Baxley depicts a scene on her family’s Ellwood Cooper Ranch. Once spanning 2,000 acres, portions of the former ranch are now preserved as the Sperling Preserve on the Ellwood Mesa and the Coronado Butter-

fly Grove. Also featured is the Oak Group founder Ray Strong’s 1982 painting “Beyond Camino Cielo.” The Oak Group is still an active artist-environmentalist group today, using members’ work to promote preservation of open space. —Leslie Dinaberg

Admission to Santa Barbara Historical Museum is free, with current hours Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays from noon-5 p.m. and Thursdays from noon-7 p.m. See sbhistorical.org.

SOLVANG FESTIVAL THEATER IS BACK IN ACTION The Solvang Festival Theater is back in action after a 10-month, $5.3 million renovation project with a grand reopening show on July 16 starring multiplatinum songwriter and producer Mat Kearney. A pop artist known for fusing acoustic music with spoken word and rapped vocals, and hits such as “Trainwreck,” “Wanted Man,” and “Nothing Left to Lose,” Kearney has released five studio LPs, claimed the #1 spot on iTunes, topped multiple Billboard charts, made four entries into the Hot 100, and amassed more than 2.5 billion global streams. He has an impressive touring history too, sharing the road with everyone from John Mayer to NEEDTOBREATHE, and has performed live on the Today Show, Ellen, The Tonight Show, The Late Show with David Letterman, and Jimmy Kimmel Live! Later this summer, PCPA will bring two plays to the stage: Stephen Sondheim’s Into the Woods, August 11-September 4; and Native Gardens by Karen Zacarias,

September 9-17. Additional Solvang Festival Theater shows include the Amanda Castro Band on July 23, Sitara Son on July 31, Just Dave Band on August 7, Blue Breeze Band on August 21, Modern Cocktail Society on August 28, The Molly Ringwald Project on September 4, Mambo Soul Band on September 11, comedian Brian Regan on September 21, and the Robert Cray Band on October 14. —LD

See solvangtheaterfest.org.

Mat Kearney opens the renovated Solvang Festival Theater with a concert on July 16.

COURTESY

anta Barbara’s spectacular natural beauty takes the spotlight with Take a Hike, Save the World, an exhibition at Santa Barbara Historical Museum inspired by and designed to galvanize visitors to enjoy Santa Barbara County’s trails and public lands and join in the important work needed to help protect them. A visual journey through historic photographic and fine art, as seen by artists and photographers beginning in 1875, the show runs through November 13. “Our goal is to inspire our visitors to explore, enjoy, and above all preserve the natural beauty that surrounds us,” said Museum Director Dacia Harwood. “The exhibition is a reminder of the fragility of these landscapes, which are under threat, not just by development, but from the toll taken by effects of climate change, wildfires, mudslides, and extreme drought.” Designed to encourage visitors to discover how Santa Barbara’s most scenic trails have been traveled over the centuries and how to ensure they are preserved for generations to come, the exhibition is part of the countywide museum initiative “Impact: Climate Change & the Urgency of Now.” Featuring late 19th- to late 20th-century

The surf’s up and so is the art. My Pet Ram presents the surf-themed pop-up Double Up at (where else?), the former Funk Zone site of the Surfing Museum. Named for the surf term “double up,” which refers to when two swells merge together to form a single unpredictable wave, the exhibition — done in two parts, or “waves,” of painting, sculpture, and photography being switched up after a month-long show — is curated by Marcello Ricci, former executive director of the Arts Fund. Ricci, who grew up in Santa Barbara, has spent the last four and a half years in New York City, opening My Pet Ram art gallery on the Lower East Side (mypetram .com) and featuring artists such as Robert Otto Epstein, Meg Atkinson, Skye Gwilliam, and Inga Guzyte. Those last two names — Gwilliam and Guzyte — will be familiar to locals, as both artists have ties to Santa Barbara as well as internationally. “I always hoped to eventually do shows in Santa Barbara, and this summer, I will have the chance to do some programming in the space that used to house Jim O’Mahoney’s Surf Museum,” said Ricci. “I have been working on a show that honors that surf history and also references the geometric designs found throughout the space.” He continued, “The domain of surfing possesses many potential streams of comparison for abstraction.” For example, in Nick Irzyk’s paintings, wavy cells of gritty color blanket a shallow three-dimensional space with skin reminiscent of the surface tension of the ocean. And the appendages in Zuriel Waters’s “Fever Bloom” evoke a metamorphosing surfer’s balancing limbs. In addition to Waters and Irzyk, the two-part show’s “First Wave” (on view through July 31) features work by Merrick Adams, Sean Anderson, Bradley Biancardi, Jes Cannon, Nicholas Cueva, Matthew F. Fisher, Matthew Fischer, Damien Hoar de Galvan, Dan Levenson, Brian Lotti, Giordanne Salley, Jake Sheiner, Sarah Schlesinger, Gillian Theobald, Todd Weaver, and Aaron Wrinkle. The “Second Wave,” with a second set of work on view, breaks on August 5, with an opening reception on August 12 from 6-9 p.m. —LD

Double Up by My Pet Ram (16 Helena Ave.) is open Wednesday-Sunday from noon-7 p.m. all summer.

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 36

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JULY 14, 2022

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Executive Summary:

The State of the Nonprofit Sector in Santa Barbara County, 2021 Nonprofit sector shows resilience during the pandemic and hope for the future. By Julia Nguyen

The Santa Barbara Foundation believes in investing in our community to create a lasting impact for everyone in our region and beyond. We mobilize collective resources to improve outcomes for constituents and funders alike. Our 2021 State of the Nonprofit Report, created in partnership with the University of San Diego Nonprofit Research Institute and Datalake, LLC., includes vital information from Santa Barbara County nonprofits and provides input on the state of the nonprofit sector, also known as the social sector. Among other topics, the report highlights data about how the pandemic affected the nonprofit sector, and underscores where they most need support. The report gathered data from 187 nonprofit leaders who provided information about their organization’s operation during the pandemic. They provided information on their demand for service, financial outlook, organizational capacity, and sector trends. The graphs in this Executive Summary are results from the answers collected.

The State of the Nonprofit Sector in Santa Barbara County

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Importance of the Nonprofit Sector Nonprofits provide many essential and supplemental services within our community, while also employing a significant percentage of the workforce in Santa Barbara County. The successes and failures of these organizations therefore can have a drastic effect on the economy. The State of the Nonprofit Sector report has vital information about Santa Barbara County nonprofits, including insights from many nonprofit leaders and professionals who provided input on their own experiences and their organization’s practices. This Executive Summary breaks down the major points from the report including how the nonprofit sector was affected by the pandemic, how the nonprofit sector weathered the crisis, and what donors, funders, and supporters can do to sustain the nonprofit sector.

Sector Overview As of 2021, there were 2,029 registered nonprofit organizations, 279 foundations, and 482 other tax-exempt organizations in Santa Barbara County. In recent years, Santa Barbara County nonprofits saw year over year growth prior to the pandemic, and that growth declined becoming lower than the overall growth in California and in the U.S. This trend suggests we may see a decrease in the number of registered nonprofits moving forward. According to the California Employment Department, 600 nonprofits in Santa Barbara County had employees in 2020, with employment totals higher than previous years.

Pandemic Impacts During the pandemic, many community members relied on nonprofits, leading to an increase in demand within the social sector. Throughout changing safety restrictions and expectations, our nonprofit sector skillfully adapted to continue to serve the community. Many organizations rearranged their working model, including moving employees to remote work, providing increased personal protective equipment to ensure essential workers were able to follow California Department of Public Health protocols, and modifying their community programs to continue reaching their stakeholders. Nonprofits’ determination and ingenuity led to one-third increasing their services to meet community needs. With their fast thinking and ability to pivot during difficult times, the nonprofit sector showed resilience during the worst of times, which inspires hope for the future. It wasn’t all good news though. Unfortunately, due to a limited workforce, diminished volunteer participation, decreased earned income, and COVID-19 restrictions, many nonprofits struggled to meet the increased community need.

Disparity During the Pandemic The report looked at Santa Barbara County as a whole, while also highlighting differences between North, Mid, and South County. The data shows a significant disparity between the regions. The ratio of population per nonprofit increases considerably as one moves from South to Mid to North County, and yet the assets per capita do not follow the same trend. Some of this disparity can be accounted for by nonprofits who are serving the entire county and whose major assets are tied to their South County headquarters, however the differential is significant enough for this to be highlighted.

1000

$30K

500

$15K

0 North County

2

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Executive Summary

Mid County

South County

$0

Assets Per Capita

People per Nonprofit

Figure 9: People per Nonprofit and Nonprofit Assets per Capita Nonprofit Assets per Capita People per Nonprofit


Further evidence of the inequity between regions within the county comes from outcomes during the pandemic. According to the latest report from Santa Barbara County Public Health COVID-19 update, North county residents saw higher COVID rates throughout the pandemic. The City of Santa Maria suffered the highest case total and highest death toll in Santa Barbara County. Many nonprofits worked to mitigate this disparity and improve the health and outcomes of North County residents. The health of the county depends on the well-being of all its community members. If a large population is not being supported due to a lack of resources, this can be detrimental to the county’s overall success. To support the social sector and our most vulnerable community members, and to confront inequity, we must address this asset imbalance. Report data suggests some South County nonprofits are working to open offices in the Mid-to-North County area to expand their services in the coming year. This could help mitigate the imbalance and better serve all community members across Santa Barbara County. It will be imperative for these organizations to thoughtfully engage the communities they seek to enter as they plan services and programming.

Pandemic Revenue Loss The report elucidates how nonprofits faced revenue loss when a major revenue source, specifically program fees, was reduced or waived when in-person activity was limited or ceased entirely. The organizations most impacted by these revenue changes came from the fields of Arts and Culture, Education, International Aid, and Public and Societal Benefit. As a result, many of these organizations reduced their capacity to ride out the pandemic. Table 19: Subsector Differences in Financial Impacts of COVID-19 Subsector

Loss of Fee for Service

Decline in Donations

Decline in Foundation Grants

Arts and Culture (n=27)

93%

56%

58%

Environment (n=14)

79%

43%

36%

Education (n=27)

70%

60%

44%

Health, other than hospitals (n=18)

56%

61%

78%

Human Services (n=68)

62%

50%

40%

Public and Societal Benefit (n=15)

60%

67%

43%

The decrease in earned income and income from large events forced most nonprofits to change their revenue model, especially by increasing the amount of their income coming from government grants and individual donors. The State of the Nonprofit Sector in Santa Barbara County

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Table 43: Ability to Deliver Programs by Level of Donor Support Description

N

Decreased

Consistent

Increased

Total

Delivering programs to a greater extent than usual

29

31%

17.2%

51.7%

100%

Delivering programs to the same extent as usual

12

33.3%

41.7%

25%

100%

Delivering programs in a moderately reduced capacity

27

33.3%

25.9%

40.7%

100%

Delivering programs in a severely reduced capacity

16

31.3%

31.3%

37.5%

100%

Not delivering programs at all

4

25%

75%

0%

100%

Overall, responses showed that donors supported nonprofits during a critical time. Donor funding allowed many nonprofits to continue to provide programs to their most vulnerable populations while also keeping most or all workers employed. Revenue changes varied greatly based on the size of nonprofits. Organizations with budgets of $5 million or higher were most likely to see an increase in donor support, while organizations with smaller budgets were likely to see a decrease in their donor base. Unfortunately, some nonprofits that did not receive donor support went into debt to continue their mission. Table 20: Budget Size Differences in Financial Impacts of COVID-19 Budget Size

Decline in Donations

$50,000 or less

93%

$50,001- $250,000

62%

$250,001- $1 million

58%

$1- $5 million

40%

More than $5 million

33%

Income streams also depended on service type for many organizations. Nonprofits providing COVID-19 response found greater success in gaining financial commitments from foundations, many of whom realigned their priorities to focus on pandemic support throughout the crisis.

“We have received many more individual donations targeted towards COVID emergency programs. We also received a number of unsolicited foundation donations to help with our COVID response,” shared a Human Services Youth Development study participant.

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The shift in foundation priorities left some nonprofits struggling to access funding, and in turn led to tough decisions to keep their doors open.

A study participant from an Education nonprofit shared that “many foundations have pivoted their focus to COVID-19 relief, or other priorities that don’t include us. So the relationship may be strong but the circumstances have changed.”

A positive change in foundation funding came in the form of increased support for general operating funds. It is critical for the continued health of the sector that funders maintain this flexible funding approach, specifically unrestricted gifts, multi-year, and general operating support grants. This type of funding helps nonprofits not only regain their financial footing, but also adapt to unexpected shifts in operations.

Nonprofit Sector Workforce Challenges Nonprofit employees make up a large percentage of the workforce in Santa Barbara County. Many nonprofit employees were furloughed, had reduced hours, or faced reduced pay during the pandemic due to decreased operation and loss of revenue. Many volunteer-based nonprofits also lost their workforce due to shelter-at-home precautions in the early pandemic, and people’s reduced capacity throughout the crisis.

“80% of our operating revenue normally comes from program fees. Since we have had no programs since the pandemic, we have lost 80% of our revenue,” a study participant in Human Services shared. “We have cut staff, cut expenses, and reduced our rent. We continue to operate using savings and general donations.”

Thankfully, heading out of the pandemic, nonprofit leaders reported they were able to rehire most, if not all, of their furloughed employees. Unfortunately, a new issue has arisen wherein many nonprofits face difficulty in retaining current or hiring additional workforce. Currently, employee retention and recruitment are a significant challenge organizations experience sector-wide. Leaders and employees explain that burn out from high demand during the pandemic, behavioral health concerns, and wages/cost of living imbalance are fueling some of the exodus.

“I’ve watched staff members be impacted by the anxiety and stress of COVID. Multiple staff members have had mental and physical impacts, leading to accommodations and resignations,” said a study participant from Human Services.

The State of the Nonprofit Sector in Santa Barbara County

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The pandemic placed an unprecedented amount of stress on people across sectors, with many re-evaluating their livelihood. Another possible reason workers are leaving the social sector could be the expectation to return to in-person work. During the pandemic, many nonprofits were able to continue their services by shifting to remote work. This provided workers more flexibility and less travel, which in turn gave caregivers the opportunity to provide child or elder care and provided a way to save money during the pandemic. As companies require workers to return to the office, workers who feel more comfortable with their at-home work setting or require a more flexible environment may move on to permanent remote positions at other companies.

“[We need] benefits that extend beyond medical and retirement, such as loan repayment, child-care, remote work, and other flexibility,” shared a study participant.

Santa Barbara County nonprofit employment numbers increased, though not as much as needed to help meet increased demand. Organizations are finding they must be proactive in workforce recruitment and retention by offering competitive wages and benefits for their employees. According to current social sector employees, solutions like hybrid work schedules can help retain the existing workforce by increasing flexibility. Nonprofit leaders can also maintain or cultivate a positive work culture to continue to incentivize workers to carry on the organization’s mission.

Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Access in the Nonprofit Sector The stress of the pandemic highlighted long standing inequities and further exacerbated ongoing racial tensions across the country, which were further fueled by acute events, such as the murder of George Floyd. This, in turn, ignited conversation about diversity and equity. As our community continues on the path of awareness and betterment, we must address Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Access (DEIA) in the nonprofit sector. Data from the report reveals that most sector leaders are white, with only a small percentage of Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) leaders. It is important for the health of the social sector for nonprofit staff and leadership to represent the communities they serve. Also of concern is that BIPOC nonprofit leaders reported receiving less support from donors. As a result, their organizations were more likely to report debt compared to organizations with white leaders. Table 49: Diversity of Leadership by Level of Donor Support Description

N

Average Pct of Leadership Team identified as BIPOC

Decreased Donor Support

22

36.4%

Consistent Donor Support

20

30.7%

Increased Donor Support

27

28.3%

When asked about DEIA efforts, many leaders reported high awareness of DEIA issues in their organizations as well as goals of DEIA education and action planned in the current or coming year. Many nonprofits stated that they were working on increasing staff and board diversity. While these efforts are underway, many reported a lack of diversity in their current board composition, along with a need for board training in DEIA. Many organizations are also working on developing measurable DEIA goals. 6

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Executive Summary


Figure 37: Actions Taken to Promote DEIA 25%

Provide specialized training for board members on diversity, equity, inclusion, and access

34% 27%

Develop measurable goals around diversity, equity, inclusion, and access

32% 48%

Provide specialized training for staff on diversity, equity, inclusion, and access

23% 50%

Actually increase the diversity of your board members

31% 58%

Implement practices to increase the diversity of board members

27% 59%

Actually increase the diversity of your staff

18% 58%

Implement practices to increase the diversity of job candidates

23% 0%

10%

20%

30%

Yes

Plan to in the next 12 months

40%

50%

60%

DEIA education is crucial to the health and success of the social sector. The Central Coast Regional Equity Study suggests that if racial gaps in income were eliminated, the estimated equity dividend for Santa Barbara County would be $7.5 billion. If all sectors— government, nonprofit and for profit— invested more into DEIA, we can recruit talent and foster sustainable collaboration to continue building our economy here in Santa Barbara County. To create a more empathetic community, we must codify DEIA principles in all organizations. According to findings from the study, this can be accomplished for nonprofits with a focus on organizational readiness, governing practices, internal culture, and programs. This critical work will require deep reflection with a focus on trust, patience, and proactive and intentional practice.

The State of the Nonprofit Sector in Santa Barbara County

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Conclusion This Executive Summary provides key points on the successes and challenges the nonprofit sector faced throughout the pandemic. As we emerge from the current crisis, we need to continue to support nonprofits to maintain a thriving social sector in Santa Barbara County. At the Santa Barbara Foundation, we encourage donors and funders to invest in an organization’s overall support, whether it be general operating support, access to professional development opportunities for the staff/board, or in-kind expertise that will advance the organization’s development. In addition to financial support, the sector needs investments in capacity building, including expertise in board development, communications/marketing, and assistance in convening around issues affecting each subsector or the sector as a whole. Nonprofits, with the support of funders, should continue to develop business models and scenario planning, business continuity/crisis planning, and alternative capacities to deliver programs. This will be especially important for the mid-size organizations that scaled to meet additional needs during the pandemic. We believe these recommendations will help bolster the social sector to ensure it can continue to thrive and grow to best serve our community. The Santa Barbara nonprofit community has proven its resilience and fortitude during the most difficult of times, and we are optimistic about its ability to continue to adapt and evolve.

How You Can Help If you have any questions about this report, please contact Gary Clark, Director of the Collaboration for Social Impact, at gclark@SBFoundation.org. If you are interested in contributing to the Santa Barbara Foundation to help bolster the capacity of the social sector, we welcome your partnership and appreciate your support. To contribute, please visit: bit.ly/SBF-givenow To read more about our 2021 State of the Nonprofit Sector Report, visit bit.ly/sbf-2021nonprofitreport

South County 1111 Chapala Street, Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 963-1873 North County 2625 South Miller Street, Suite 101 Santa Maria, CA 93455 (805) 346-6123 info@SBFoundation.org SBFoundation.org 8

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Executive Summary


AIR LOVE N’ LOVE PREMIERES AT THE LUKE

MENTAL HEALTH ARTS FESTIVAL IS BACK COURTESY

L

ocal playwright Claudia McGarry runs an Airbnb property with her son, which inspired the concept for her new play, Air Love n’ Love, presented at the Marjorie Luke Theater this month. This romantic dramedy follows a father/daughter Airbnb host team who each has their own relationship concerns. There’s also the ex-wife and the intriguing new renter in the mix, among others. “I love the idea of romances being born out of total abandon, passion, and dreams,” says McGarry. “I wanted to play around with that concept, using different couples of different ethnicities and different ages to show that ‘love is love,’ no matter what.” McGarry is also directing the piece—her first foray into directing. The show weaves music throughout the narrative, including original songs and live performance. Beyond romance, Air Love n’ Love also tackles issues of immigrants starting new

THEATER

COURTESY

a&e | PREVIEWS

Fused glass art by featured artist Kristine Kelly

T lives in America and how people handle deep loss. “After watching the politics over the last several years, and once the pandemic began, I sensed people need comic relief,” says McGarry. “They need comedy, love stories, and, yes, they need stories that show empathy.” —Maggie Yates Air Love n’ Love runs July 16 and 23 at the Marjorie Luke Theatre. See luketheatre.org/event/air-love-nlove.

he enduring connection between art and mental health has served as inspiration for some of our most treasured artists (Vincent van Gogh, Edvard Munch, Louis Wain) and the artistic gifts of local creators with mental health disorders will once again be on display at the Mental Wellness Center’s (MWC) 26th annual Mental Health Arts Festival. Celebrating a return to in-person events after a two-year hiatus, the event will follow a similar format to past years, displaying the work of local artists in an array of different mediums, including paintings, drawings, jewelry, poetry, sculpture, and arts and crafts. While the majority of the artists have been exhibiting for years, there will also be work on display made by members of the Mental Wellness Center’s Fellowship Club, who create their work in the MWC’s art room. This festival gives them the opportunity to showcase their artwork. This year’s featured artist is Kristine Kelly.

ART

Her depiction of an underwater scene is reproduced on the festival poster. Kelly creates fusedglass artwork, often focusing on nature scenes, and was recently awarded first place in the National Glass Expo for a depiction of Yosemite. The purpose of the Art Festival is “for artists to display their work and showcase their talent to the community in a way that is positive, productive, and meaningful for them,” explains Darcy Keep, MWC board member and Administrative Director of Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine at Cottage Health. Keep began her career advocating for people impacted by mental health disorders before joining the MWC board more than 20 years ago, and she saw the Arts Festival as a way to continue that goal. “It’s hard to express how much I love and admire the MWC clients …. While others may see their differences or limitations, we at MWC see their artistic gifts, their strengths, and their resilience,” she says. —Ellie Bouwer

4·1·1

The 26th annual Mental Health Arts Festival takes place Saturday, July 16, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., at De la Guerra Plaza. See mentalwellnesscenter.org.

OPERA

O

ne of the surefire high cultural highlights of Santa Barbara summers arrives in the form of the Music Academy’s opera weekend. Casual attire may be welcome in the house, but these fully staged productions are anything but casual. They serve as showcasing opportunities for the Academy’s lofty voice program, long run by legendary mezzosoprano Marilyn Horne, along with other aspects of what goes into putting on an opera. This year’s model, Friday night (July 15) and Sunday afternoon (July 17) at The Granada Theatre, brings a fresh approach to Tchaikovsky’s classic Eugene Onegin (note to the dollarwise among us: many $10 tickets are available). Apart from the fledgling and already career-bound talents of the singers involved, director Peter Kazaras has a solid reputation and is currently head of Opera UCLA. A rapidly ascending reputation precedes Slovenian-born conductor Daniela Candillari, whose career shot upward this season after working with the important Metropolitan Opera productions of Terence Blanchard’s much-buzzed-about season-opening Fire Shut Up in My Bones (notably the Met’s first performance of an opera by a Black composer — in 2021) and Matthew Aucoin’s Eurydice. Candillari took time out of her busy Academy schedule for an interview. She noted, “This is the first time in three years that we are back making opera, and everyone is really excited to be once again collaborating and being in the rehearsal process.” Commenting on Eugene Onegin, she said, “Tchaikovsky was such a master of writing beautiful and memorable melodies, supported by an incredibly colorful orchestration and a very unique harmonic language. One needs only to look at Nutcracker, for instance, and the impact that piece has on everyone. In my opinion, the effect of Onegin is very similar. It is a story that deals with love, hope, loss, betrayal — all the

COURTESY

EUGENE ONEGIN MIDSUMMER OPERA MOMENT

emotions that all of us have probably experienced at some point.” Fittingly for the Music Academy’s 75th anniversary season, “for this production, we are paying homage to 1947 and the founding of the Music Academy. There are two time frames that we see in the opera: The first one is 1947, as mentioned, and the second one goes back further into the history.” A Music Academy connection is present in her work with Aucoin at the Met, after Aucoin spent some time on the Music Academy faculty. “This was the second time I worked with Matthew Aucoin, and Daniela Candillari I am a big fan of his music,” Candillari said. “He has a really unique way of connecting different musical languages. In his music, I find elements of minimalism and 12-tone technique that are incredibly poetic and colorful. His use of orchestra colors is equally special and during both of our collaborations I have found myself being incredibly moved by his writing.” Although she is a composer as well as conductor, the success of the latter role has limited her personally creative options. “Finding time to compose has been really challenging this past season,” she said. “Earlier on in my career, I could always carve out a week or two to sit still and compose, but recently that has not been the case, unfortunately. When I’m learning and interpreting music of other composers, I find it really difficult to separate myself from a current project, because the preparation requires all of the attention.” Her involvement in jazz studies helped guide her into the jazz-flavored palette of the Blanchard opera, a stylistic

understanding that “was really helpful when working with the jazz combo, which functions almost like a continuo element throughout the opera. Additionally, I was always thinking about the sound of the orchestra from the perspective of jazz bands from the past and their sounds, and how that can get translated into a modern-day opera orchestra.” Meanwhile, referring back to her current work in the 805, Candillari said, “This is my third summer at Music Academy, and every year has been special. I’m always impressed with the fellows’ dedication to each project, and their responsiveness and openness to ideas and interpretations. It is really wonderful to have a chance to work with fellows who are the future of music.” —Josef Woodard See musicacademy.org. For a longer version of this interview, visit independent.com/eugene-onegin2022.

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Indy s p o H Tear this sheet out and bring it with you!

T R O P PASS

Receive a stamp from each brewery by ordering a pint during the month of July

Bring your completed passport to our Passport Drop Party on Sunday, July 31 from 2-4pm at Night Lizard to be entered to win gift cards from the participating breweries. For full Drop Party details visit our website.

Participating Breweries Carpinteria

Santa Barbara

Carpinteria

Goleta

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Goleta

Carpinteria

Bonus Tasks!

WEEK ONE: Bring a friend to your favorite participating brewery!

WEEK TWO: Visit a participating brewery that you have never been to before

WEEK THREE: Do a tasting flight

WEEK FOUR: Buy beer to take home

independent.com/indyhops 38

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JULY 14, 2022

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF JULY 14

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): With a fanciful flourish, Aries poet Seamus Heaney wrote, “I ate the day / Deliberately, that its tang / Might quicken me all into verb, pure verb.” I’d love for you to be a pure verb for a while, Aries. Doing so would put you in robust rapport with astrological rhythms. As a pure verb, you’ll never be static. Flowing and transformation will be your specialties. A steady stream of fresh inspiration and new meanings will come your way. You already have an abundance of raw potential for living like a verb—more than all the other signs of the zodiac. And in the coming weeks, your aptitude for that fluidic state will be even stronger than usual.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): According to Arthurian myth, the Holy Grail is a cup that confers magical powers. Among them are eternal youth, miraculous healing, the restoration of hope, the resurrection of the dead, and an unending supply of healthy and delicious food and drink. Did the Grail ever exist as a material object? Some believe so. After 34 years of research, historian David Adkins thinks he’s close to finding it. He says it’s buried beneath an old house in Burton-on-Trent, a town in central England. I propose we make this tantalizing prospect your metaphor of power during the coming weeks. Why? I suspect there’s a chance you will discover a treasure or precious source of vitality. It may be partially hidden in plain sight or barely disguised in a mundane setting.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): I’m pleased to authorize you to be extra vast and extensive in the coming weeks. Like Gemini poet Walt Whitman, you should never apologize and always be proud of the fact that you contain multitudes. Your multivalent, wide-ranging outlook will be an asset, not a liability. We should all thank you for being a grand compendium of different selves. Your versatility and elasticity will enhance the well-being of all of us whose lives you touch.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Your memory is SUBSTANTIAL. Your sensitivity is MONUMENTAL. Your urge to nurture is DEEP. Your complexity is EPIC. Your feelings are BOTTOMLESS. Your imagination is PRODIGIOUS. Because of all these aptitudes and capacities, you are TOO MUCH for some people. Not everyone can handle your intricate and sometimes puzzling BEAUTY. But there are enough folks out there who do appreciate and thrive on your gifts. In the coming weeks and months, make it your quest to focus your urge to merge on them.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): I love these lines by Leo poet Conrad Aiken: “Remember (when time comes) how chaos died to shape the shining leaf.” I hope this lyrical thought will help you understand the transformation you’re going through. The time has come for some of your chaos to expire—and in doing so, generate your personal equivalent of shining leaves. Can you imagine what the process would look and feel like? How might it unfold? Your homework is to ponder these wonders.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A British woman named Andie Holman calls herself the Scar Queen. She says, “Tight scar tissue creates pain, impacts mobility, affects your posture, and usually looks bad.” Her specialty is to diminish the limiting effects of scars, restoring flexibility and decreasing aches. Of course, she works with actual physical wounds, not the psychological kind. I wish I could refer you to healers who would help you with the latter, Virgo. Do you know any? If not, seek one out. The good news is that you now have more personal power than usual to recover from your old traumas and diminish your scars. I urge you to make such work a priority in the coming weeks.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Ancient Roman philosopher Seneca wrote, “Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.” But a Spanish proverb suggests a different element may be necessary: “Good luck comes by elbowing.”

(Elbowing refers to the gesture you use as you push your way through a crowd, nudging people away from the path you want to take.) A Danish proverb says that preparation and elbowing aren’t enough: “Luck will carry someone across the brook if they are not too lazy to leap.” Modern author Wendy Walker has the last word: “Fortune adores audacity.” I hope I’ve inspired you to be alert to the possibility that extra luck is now available to you. And I hope I’ve convinced you to be audacious, energetic, well-prepared, and willing to engage in elbowing. Take maximum advantage of this opportunity.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Many Scorpios imagine sex to be a magnificent devotion, a quintessential mode of worship, an unparalleled celebration of sacred earthiness. I endorse and admire this perspective. If our culture had more of it, the art and entertainment industries would offer far less of the demeaning, superficial versions of sexuality that are so rampant. Here’s another thing I love about Scorpios: So many of you grasp the value of sublimating lust into other fun and constructive accomplishments. You’re skilled at channeling your high-powered libido into practical actions that may have no apparent erotic element. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to do a lot of that.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A Sagittarius reader named Jenny-Sue asked, “What are actions I could take to make my life more magical?” I’m glad she asked. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to raise your delight and enchantment levels, to bask in the blessed glories of alluring mysteries and uncanny synchronicities. Here are a few tips: (1) Learn the moon’s phases and keep track of them. (2) Acquire a new sacred treasure and keep it under your pillow or in your bed. (3) Before sleep, ask your deep mind to provide you with dreams that help generate creative answers to a specific question. (4) Go on walks at night or at dawn. (5) Compose a wild or funny prayer and shout it aloud it as you run through a field. (6) Sing a soulful song to yourself as you gaze into a mirror.

Join us in reading July’s book of the month! J U LY ’S T H E M E :

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

J ULY ’S READ:

The Test by Sylvain Neuvel independent.com/indybookclub

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Being able to receive love doesn’t come easy for some Capricorns. You may also not be adept at making yourself fully available for gifts and blessings. But you can learn these things. You can practice. With enough mindful attention, you might eventually become skilled at the art of getting a lot of what you need and knowing what to do with it. And I believe the coming weeks will be a marvelous time to increase your mastery.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “If I don’t practice one day, I know it; two days, the critics know it; three days, the public knows it.” This quote is variously attributed to violinist Jascha Heifetz, trumpeter Louis Armstrong, and violinist Isaac Stern. It’s a fundamental principle for everyone who wants to get skilled at any task, not just for musicians. To become a master of what you love to do, you must work on it with extreme regularity. This is always true, of course. But according to my astrological analysis, it will be even more intensely true and desirable for you during the coming months. Life is inviting you to raise your expertise to a higher level. I hope you’ll respond!

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): In May 2021, Jessica and Ben Laws got married on their dairy farm. The ceremony unfolded smoothly, but an unforeseen event interrupted the reception party. A friend who had been monitoring their herd came to tell the happy couple that their pregnant cow had gone into labor and was experiencing difficulties. Jessica ran to the barn and plunged into active assistance, still clad in her lovely floor-length bridal gown and silver tiara. The dress got muddy and trashed, but the birth was successful. The new bride had no regrets. I propose making her your role model for now. Put practicality over idealism. Opt for raw and gritty necessities instead of neat formalities. Serve what’s soulful, even if it’s messy.

Homework: Ask a friend or loved one to tell you a good secret. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 14, 2022

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Reaching 68,000 Readers Each Week

EMPLOYMENT COMPUTER/TECH SENSATA TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. seeks Program Manager in Carpinteria, CA to develop new programs for different automotive OEMs. Bach. or foreign eqv. in Eng’­ g & 4 yrs. in Prgm. Mgmt. Less than 10% travel. EOE. Must have permanent work authorization in the U.S. Apply at sensata.com/careers referencing Job ID 5604999. SR. DATA ENGINEERS sought by AppFolio, Inc. in Goleta, CA. Telecom prmtd during office clsrs/othr rstrctd stff prsnc as dtrmnd by emplyr. Apply at jobpostingtoday.com #73530.

DOMESTIC COOK AND/OR HOUSEHOLD helper for senior gal in La Cumbre area...call 563­7313 or email bglushyn@aol.com for details.

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1­888­508­6305. (Cal­SCAN)

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE ALOE CARE Health, medical alert system. The most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice­activated! No wi­fi needed! Special offer call and mention offer code CARE20 to get $20 off Mobile Companion. Call today 1­844­ 790­1673. (SCAN)

PROFESSIONAL

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT AND SCHOLARSHIPS

UC EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM (UCEAP) Manages and implements an integrated and prioritized strategy for UCEAP scholarship programs and determines the audience and goals to be achieved by these programs. Collaborates with Director to develop policies and procedures for the administration of all UCEAP scholarship programs and organizes the efforts of those faculty and staff in the system­wide and campus offices who will be involved in the encouragement and selection of scholarship recipients. Collaborates and assists with supervisor in the identification, cultivation, solicitation and stewardship of prospects and donors for scholarships. Supports the long­term and immediate strategies for the engagement and stewardship of UCEAP alumni and donors. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of education, training, and experience in a related field. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. This position is eligible to request a remote or hybrid work arrangement. The UCEAP Systemwide Office is located off­campus in Goleta, CA (near UCSB). Per UC policy, travel for non­mandatory training or professional development purposes is calculated and reimbursed (up to) the costs for travel to and from the

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UCEAP Systemwide Office location, regardless of the actual remote work location elected by employee. Requires periodic travel within California (to/near the UC campuses/ UCOP). May involve occasional national travel and international travel to UC sites abroad. $62,300 ­$72,480/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/22/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 38700

ASSOCIATE BUSINESS MANAGER

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Responsible for complex financial and payroll analysis and processing for the Intercollegiate Athletics Department. Assists the Associate Athletics Director for Business Operations in the overall operation of the department’s $21M budget. Acts as the Associate Athletic Director in his/her absence and has signature authority over all department accounts. Under the direction of the Associate Athletic Director, prepares required documentation for NCAA audits and other annual reports. Responsible for management of department expenditure and revenue accounts, including review and reporting. Serve as liaison between staff, coaches, the department, and other campus departments by resolving various inquiries and requests. Represents the department and Associate Athletic Director at meetings periodically with the campus administrators, coaches, staff, and other university departments. Reqs: Sound judgment and decision­making skills. Excellent written and verbal communicator at all levels. Ability to multi­task. Advanced MS Excel knowledge. Ability to quickly assess and annotate financial data. Advanced knowledge of the organization’s operational and financial transactions and systems. Ability to understand internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Mandated Child Abuse Reporter. Campus Security Authority under the Clery Act. Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in DMV Pull­Notice Program. $66,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/17/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 38397

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AUTO TECHNICIAN ‑GROUNDS

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Responsible for maintenance and repair of all motorized equipment in HDAE. Establishes and maintains a preventative maintenance program. Documents and maintains repair records, and training records, as required by HDAE, EH&S & OSHA. Will comply with department safety and illness program as implemented by supervisor and /or co­workers. Professional Expectation/Attitude Standard/Customer Service: Promotes customer service programs in the Grounds unit to residents/clients. Assists with the development and maintenance of a work environment that is conductive to meeting the mission of the organization. Completes job duties in a manner that demonstrates support for Housing & Residential Services. Reqs: Minimum of 2 years of experience working on small engines, ride­on mowers, electric carts, and tractors in an institution and/or commercial setting. Ex. College Residence Hall, Hotel, resort, school. Basic computer experience. Experience in a customer service environment. Ability to install outdoor equipment Ex. BBQ grills, trash receptacles, bike racks, benches. Ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing. Ability to communicate and work effectively with diverse clientele such as, employees from other departments, students, parents, etc.Maintain safe and organized work area. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull­Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $25.15 ­ $28.33/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37760

AUTOMATED PARKING SERVICES TECHNICIAN

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES Reporting to the Operations Manager, applies acquired job skills, policies, and procedures to complete substantive assignments/ projects/tasks of moderate scope and complexity; exercising judgment within defined guidelines and practices to determine the appropriate action in support of hardware, automated parking systems, and network. Analyzes automated parking systems user requirements and programs system configurations. Works directly with system vendors and manufacturer representatives on warranties and parts exchanges. Maintains all security access and departmental key issuance. Works with Facilities Management Small Projects unit,

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Communication Services and outside vendors in completing various parking­related projects. Ensures security and inventory of equipment. Applies professional business/ technical support concepts to resolve hardware, software, and networking issues as they relate to the automated parking systems. Reqs: 5 years of experience working with hardware and software systems as well as secure data and revenue systems or equivalent education. Ability to perform technical tasks associated with installation, maintenance and repair of field based hardware (and related software packages) parking pay stations, EMV and contactless credit card readers and communication systems both wired and wireless. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull­Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $26.86/hr ­ 34.86/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/25/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38967

CLUB CHEF

THE CLUB & GUEST HOUSE The Club Chef will report to the Kitchen Manager as the co­designer of all menus, including daily luncheon and event menus. Supervise and train all back of the house kitchen staff, manage the purchasing and inventory of all food and kitchen items, and be responsible for cleanliness and organization of the entire kitchen area. Provide meal service for member lunches Monday through Friday, and evenings and weekends as needed for Club events and private parties. Reqs: 1­3 years Restaurant experience Required Thorough knowledge of food and production. Thorough verbal and written communication in the English language, active listening, dynamic flexibility, critical thinking, and ability to multi­task and ensure effective time management. Thorough decision making and reasoning skills, and ability to develop original ideas to solve problems including operations analysis and quality control analysis. Intermediate computer application skills. Thorough and effective interpersonal and work leadership skills to provide guidance to all levels of personnel. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Valid driver’s license and clean driving record. CCC certification with the American Culinary Federation or equivalent. $51,800 ­ $67,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/18/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38518

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS ANALYST

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for developing and submitting research proposals, awards and/or transactions related to contract and grant management and maintains contract and grant records in compliance with institutional and research sponsor policies. Works on proposals of moderate scope such as single investigator NSF proposals where analysis of financial information or reports require review of a variety of factors (e.g. budgets, salaries, expenses, etc.) Receives assignments and analyzes problems, gathers data

and information, and recommends solutions. Completes transactions for signature by manager or authorized institutional official. Maintains effective working relationships and coordinates closely with the Principal Investigator, department staff, Office of Research, other campus central and academic departments. Is independently responsible for gift processing and projecting salary, benefits, tuition, and fees in GUS. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or/and equivalent work experience. Ability to establish and maintain priorities, multi­task and meet deadlines while balancing a high volume workload. Analytical and problem­solving skills. Excellent attention to detail and communication skills. Ability to exercise independent judgment. Ability to perform financial analysis and customized reporting. Proficiency

with Microsoft programs such as Excel, Word, Powerpoint, etc. Proficiency with Google software programs such as Sheets, Docs, Gmail, chat. Must be comfortable explaining guidelines and policies. Notes: This position is funded through June 30, 2024 pending further funding. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $27.68­$30.45/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/20/2022. Apply online at

Continued on p. 42

NOW HIRING

Production Designer The Santa Barbara Independent is seeking a part-time, inhouse production designer to join its creative team. Candidates must have knowledge and experience with Adobe Creative Cloud on a Mac platform. Experience with layout design, font management, print publishing and file handling, preferred. The candidate will possess strong and professional communication skills, and be able to work well under pressure. This position works alongside multiple departments and under strict deadlines. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

Please send résumé along with cover letter to hr@independent.com


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Our cat, Pebble, has been missing since June 30th. She was last seen at 124 San Rafael on the Mesa. She is medium‑sized and has dark brown fur, white and tan chest with white paws, blue eyes, and no collar. She’s been an indoor cat for 7 years, if you see her she’ll be skittish and hard to approach so please call 805‑451‑5937. Thank you!

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Sunrise 5:59 Sunset 8:10

Low

High

Thu 14

5:12 am -1.5

11:58 am 3.9

4:13 pm 2.4

10:39 pm 7.0

Fri 15

5:57 am -1.3

12:43 pm 4.1

5:10 pm 2.4

11:29 pm 6.6

Sat 16

6:42 am -0.9

1:29 pm 4.2

6:12 pm 2.4

12:21 am 5.9

7:26 am -0.4

2:16 pm 4.4

7:23 pm 2.4

Mon 18

1:16 am 5.1

8:09 am 0.2

3:05 pm 4.6

8:46 pm 2.3

Tue 19

2:21 am 4.3

8:53 am 0.9

3:56 pm 4.8

10:25 pm 2.1

Wed 20

3:48 am 3.6

9:41 am 1.6

4:47 pm 5.0

11:59 pm 1.6

Thu 21

5:40 am 3.2

10:34 am 2.1

5:37 pm 5.2

Sun 17

20

28 D

5H

11 D source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Are You Cereal?” -- it’s right there on the box.

Across

1. “Call of Duty: Black ___” 4. “The Ten Commandments” figure 9. Irritate 14. On a pension, briefly 15. Blazing 16. Risky GPS suggestion 17. Tried a little tender... loin 18. One-liner expert 19. Word in the name of many dental offices 20. Cereal featuring a wide receiver on the box? 23. “___ Scared Stupid” (1991 film) 24. 86.4 trillion nanoseconds 25. Run up a bill 28. “Spotlight” actor Schreiber 29. “Confessions” R&B singer 32. The ___ (mysterious “Top Gear” driver) 33. Film composer Morricone 35. Acid in proteins 36. Cereal featuring a Grammywinning singer-songwriter on the box? 41. Per ___ (salary phrase) 42. “Turning Red” studio 43. Off-duty 44. Turn down an offer 46. White who voiced Muriel on “Courage the Cowardly Dog” 50. Brett’s role on “Ted Lasso” 51. Put two and two together 52. Monkey for whom a blood factor is named 54. Cereal featuring a “Muppets Take Manhattan” and “Man of La Mancha” actor on the box?

36. Clear-skies forecast 37. Proto-___-European (early language) 38. Barely 39. “In the Heights” creator ___-Manuel Miranda 40. Drive out, in a way 44. Storm of the Fantastic Four 45. Beer brand from Holland 47. It’s heard twice in “Have you heard?” 48. Well-suited name (and a notable National Spelling 1. Treatment for sore gums Bee final word shout-spelled 2. Czar known as “The Great” by the winner) 3. “Tristram Shandy” author 49. Ledger column (and 23-Across anagram) 4. Thanksgiving parade sponsor 51. T-shirt size 53. Putdown for Bob and Doug 5. “Carmina Burana” McKenzie showstopper 55. Et ___ (and others) 6. ___ Valley (Thousand Oaks 56. Model/actress Delevingne neighbor) 57. About a B-minus, if I’m being 7. “Domino Masters” host generous Stonestreet 58. “Sit, ___, sit. Good dog” 8. Form a splinter group (“Family Ties” vanity card) 9. Like annoying telemarketers 59. Moving vehicle 10. “I relate,” online ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. 11. Foolishly impractical Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1091 12. Website address 13. Benz tag? 21. Income LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 22. Monopoly game piece 26. Subtle (or not-so-subtle) gesture 27. Vanity centers 30. Bit of a beverage 31. Like most IPAs 32. Like Yogi, compared to other bears 34. ___ pla (fish sauce) 35. “How to Get Away with Murder” actress ___ Naomi King 58. Soft palate dangler 60. Rolled chip brand with “Fuego” and “Nitro” varieties 61. One in Orleans 62. Pesto ingredient 63. Take out 64. Shortz employer, for short 65. To the point that 66. Coat or shirt, maybe 67. Slide into your ___

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JULY JULY 14, 14, 2022 2022

THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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EMPLOYMENT https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38663

CUTTER/DRAPER (SENIOR WARDROBE TECHNICIAN)

DEPARTMENT OF THEATER AND DANCE Cutter/Draper provides support for the department’s seasonal theater and dance productions as well as numerous student/classroom projects. Primary duties include pattern‑making, measurements, fitting, alterations, construction, and stitching. May also supervise student employees, crews, and lab courses. Additional duties include dyeing, craft work, maintenance and organization of shop and stock inventory. Reqs: Demonstrated competence in costume construction, organization/maintenance/safety of shop environment, supervision of personnel, and participation in the collaborative design process. Additional skills: Ability to work individually as well as in group settings, quickly and precisely. Ability to calculate yardage and other needs for projects in a timely manner, and able to lift heavy loads and maneuver stairs. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. This is a 100% partial‑year position (10 month, on furlough for 2 months during summer) with full benefits. The work schedule may vary according to the production schedule. $25.16/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/20/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38651

FINANCIAL AND ACADEMIC PERSONNEL ANALYST

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for financial matters and academic personnel processes for the departments and programs that the PASC serves. Manages payroll reconciliation and audits general ledgers. Projects and monitors expenditures across all funding sources. Advises faculty on policies regarding budgets. Serves as primary UCPath initiator for all staff and selected academic appointments including requesting position control numbers and initiating the funding entry. Ensures proper employee and supervisor set‑up in Kronos on‑line timekeeping system. Is responsible for the visa aspects for visiting scholars. From preliminary analysis, extensive communication with applicants and OISS, to submission of documents, ensuring accurate tracking of status and follow‑through. Coordinates annual summer research additional compensation. Provides administrative back‑up and possesses the ability to work under pressure of deadlines. Serves as back‑up for academic personnel actions for permanent faculty and continuing lecturers including faculty retentions, merits and promotions, lecturer reviews, leave requests, and retirements. Maintains a broad knowledge and functional understanding of all academic personnel policies and procedures. Provides consultation and advice to the department Chair and faculty regarding academic personnel policies. Collaborates on financial matters and academic recruitment cases, meeting Affirmative Action guidelines, and ensuring that overall general procedures are

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followed. Serves as back‑up to the Financial and Academic Personnel Manager. Responsible for overseeing department events. Reqs: BA/BS degree in related area or equivalent training and/or experience. Note: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. $24.62 ‑ $27.96/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 32120

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING Under the general supervision of the Financial Manager, the Financial Assistant is responsible for coordinating a majority of Residential & Community Living financial matters and accounting systems. Prepares all paperwork to effect financial transactions. Compiles and enters data for financial reporting. Works closely with the Financial Manager & Administrative Manager to identify fiscal patterns. Monitors and reconciles financial reporting systems, ensuring accuracy, correcting discrepancies and ensuring liens are cleared. Processes all accounts payable, travel & entertainment documents, and other special projects. Coordinates hiring & departure payroll processes for new and existing staff & student employees. Reqs: 1‑3 years general office administration experience. Financial analysis skills and detail‑oriented. Good verbal and written communication skills and ability to multi‑task. Excellent customer service skills. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $29.58/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38203

FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGER

THE CLUB & GUEST HOUSE The Food & Beverage Manager is responsible for the overall foodservice of The Club & Guest house, a 150 seat dining facility with an event space, located within a hotel setting. The Food & Beverage Manager reports to the General Manager and will oversee all food and beverage service functions of The Club & Guest House. This role is crucial to ensuring The Club & Guest House is represented to both the campus and the surrounding community as an organization that provides the highest degree of customer satisfaction and standards of excellence in all aspects of guest services. The Food & beverage Manager will be responsible for the day‑to‑day food & beverage operations, event services planning and execution. Reqs: 4‑6 years of progressive experience in collegiate or high volume food service operations and/or hotel/ restaurant management. Thorough Knowledge in food service operations and sanitation regulations. A high degree of flexibility, energy, initiative, problem solving and resourcefulness. Demonstrated leadership abilities,

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customer service and communication skills, interpersonal savvy, strategic and organization agility, managing vision and purpose, innovation management and business acumen. Highly developed organizational skills, including attention to detail, accuracy, and ability to manage multiple and often conflicting priorities, meet deadlines and delegate with accountability. Financial and analytical skills to manage food cost, labor and controllable targets. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $67,500 ‑ $85,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/18/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38488

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians, as well as scheduling appointments. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required at time of hire is required and non‑negotiable. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Pay Rate/Range: Starting at $23.97/hour. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 37796

as assigned. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. Work experience in a customer service environment. Excellent written and oral communication skills, effective interpersonal skills and the ability to exercise independent judgment. Demonstrated attention to detail with frequent interruptions. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. $21.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37555

PHYSICIAN, LIMITED

STUDENT HEALTH Provides professional care for college‑age outpatients requiring medical care and consultation, including diagnosis and treatment. Provides consultation services on a per case basis as required for all members of the professional staff in assisting them with diagnosis and treatment for their patients. Reqs: Must have a valid CA medical license and DEA license at all times during employment. Board eligible or certified in Family or Internal Medicine with experience in working with college‑age patients. Notes: Must successfully complete and pass a background check and credentialing process before date of hire. Credentials are renewed periodically. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and of Dependent Adult Abuse. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of COVID‑19 vaccination and annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a limited position (no more than 20 hours per week). Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 31222

PHYSICIAN PATIENT SERVICES ASSOCIATE

STUDENT HEALTH Using a computerized scheduling system and a virtual calling system to schedule medical appointments both by telephone and in person. Accurately determines patient’s medical needs with regards to urgency and appropriateness of patient’s appointment request. Assists patients by providing information on general Student Health services and programs. Utilizes substantial customer service experience and demonstrated abilities to clearly explain appointment procedures and uses sound judgment to handle non‑routine appointment requests. Performs a variety of clerical tasks

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STUDENT HEALTH Provides direct clinical services in Primary Care Family Medicine OR Primary Care Internal Medicine and Immediate Care for all eligible patients at UCSB Student Health. Also provides consultation on a per case basis if needed, for all members of the professional staff to assist them with diagnosis and treatment of their patients. Provides supervision for the Physician Assistants when the Primary Supervisor is unavailable as assigned by the UCSB SHS Executive Director and/or Medical Director. Reqs: Doctor of Medicine (MD) Degree, Doctor of Osteopathy (DO) Degree or recognized equivalent is required. Must be Board Certified by the American Board of Medical Specialties. Current CA Medical license and DEA license required at all times during employment. Notes:

Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must complete and pass the background and credentialing process before date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season.Must have a current CA Medical licenses and DEA at all times during employment. Must be Board Certified. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month at 100% position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #37977

PRINCIPAL ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES UCSB’s Departmental Information Technology is looking for a Principal Electronics Technician to support major campus growth initiatives. The technician will share responsibility for the installation,maintenance and troubleshooting of the outside copper and fiber cable plant. Additional duties include coordinating with cable maintenance and installation crews on locating cable, cable tray, conduits, access panels, and manholes for the construction, adding and/or maintaining the cable plant, reviewing and verifying all completed work orders for accuracy of cable assignments, and recording all changes to both outside and inside cable plant. Experience with design and installation of high pair count copper cables, splicing fiber and troubleshooting, knowledge of theories and techniques involved in the implementation and maintenance of private and public telecommunications networks and telecommunications equipment operation and use is essential. Reqs: High School Diploma. Fiber Optic, research, troubleshooting, electronic circuitry construction experience ‑ minimum of 1‑3 years. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $35.83 to $40.29/hr., commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 30409

navigate university life, including (but not limited to) advising around academics, access to disability accommodations, safe housing options and other basic needs, as well as ongoing recovery support. The Assistant Manager will conduct individual and group meetings with students. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Social Work, Counseling, Health Education or other related field, or equivalent experience. Knowledge of co‑occurring mental health and substance use. Ability to provide counseling support (under supervision as required by licensing status) and case management. Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a 50% position, working M‑F 2:00pm – 6:00pm (or weekends/evenings as needed). Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #37623

SR. PARKING REPRESENTATIVE

TRANSPORTATION & PARKING SERVICES Enforces University parking regulations by issuing citations and courtesy warnings to vehicles illegally parked. Identifies vehicles to be “booted” and process them according to California Vehicle Code. Keeps current of campus events and their locations. Directs traffic and escort vehicles including semi‑trucks and buses. Provides parking instructions and give directions. Reqs: Demonstrated exceptional customer service by providing and delivering professional, helpful, high quality service and assistance. Ability to work as part of a team, maintain a positive attitude and work together to achieve a common goal of providing world class customer service. Excellent interpersonal skills, including the ability to collaborate with students, staff, faculty and the general public. Ability to grasp new concepts. Ability to maintain professionalism and composure under high customer demand and challenging customer interactions. Excellent written and verbal communication. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability to work nights and weekends. $22.17/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/15/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38491

RECOVERY PROGRAM ASSISTANT MANAGER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides wrap‑around care and case management to residents of the UCSB recovery‑supportive housing program, as well as non‑resident students in the Gauchos for Recovery Program. The Assistant Manager will be available to provide support after hours and where students live. They will help students to

STUDENT LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING The Student Leadership Program Manager is responsible for the

development of the Resident Hall Association (RHA). Also provides leadership development for the Residence Hall staff (RD/ARD) in regards to hall government. The SLPM represents Residential & Community Living (as well as Housing & Residential Services) on campus wide committees with focus on Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD), Spring Insight, Convocation, weekend programming, voter registration and other university‑wide student programs as well as programs to promote academic recognition and support. This position collaborates with Office of Student Life, Business Services, and Risk Management so that residence hall programs meet the policies and mandates of the campus for safety, security and contract requirements. Advises all Residential & Community Living staff on the campus regulations and requirements Residential & Community Living programs produce a residential experience that insures the quality of life, well‑being, and personal development for more than 5,700+ diverse students residing in eight residence hall communities operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Reqs: 1‑3 years Related experience in student leadership programs. Bachelor’s Degree. Interpersonal skills including verbal and written communication, active listening, critical thinking, persuasiveness, advising, and counseling to effectively motivate others. Strong service orientation with the ability to effectively manage multiple priorities. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, and clean DMV record. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $69,750 ‑ $81,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/12/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38134

SUPERINTENDENT‑ PM CREW

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Responsible for Facilities Management Preventative Maintenance Area. Supervises crew comprised of HVAC Mechanics, Skilled Trades Mechanics and Sr. Building Maintenance Workers. May supervise other Skilled Trades workers, such as Electricians, Plumbers, Carpenters, Painters and Locksmiths, as necessary to complete the assigned tasks of the PM Crew. Carries out inspections of work assignments and communicates work requests to trades staff. Works to train staff in correct technical practices, safety, efficiency and professionalism. Responsible for correct execution of campus maintenance projects. Has full management responsibility for achievement of operational, personnel, and customer satisfaction objectives. Reqs: Solid knowledge and skills in the specialty craft supervised. Solid supervisory skills to include organization, scheduling, assigning work and ensuring quality standards are met. Solid financial skills to accurately project costs of potential jobs and to consistently complete work within established budgetary and time constraints. Skills to actively promote and maintain safety standards. Solid skills to effectively select and evaluate staff, and to appropriately handle disciplinary issues. High School Diploma. Notes: Certification in a specialty skilled trade. Journeyman Level in HVAC, Electrical or Plumbing. Criminal history check (U02): Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Driver’s License (U08): Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history


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EMPLOYMENT background check. $75,800.00 ‑ $106,000.00/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/20/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38586

SUSTAINABILITY PROGRAM ASSISTANT

MATHEMATICS Provides academic advising to over 1200 majors, pre‑majors, transfer students, prospective, and enrolled

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RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 1‑818‑248‑0000. Broker‑principal DRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑ SCAN)

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BULK SALE AUCTION – Tuesday, July 19, 2022 10:00 a.m.; 316 E. Haley Street, Santa Barbara 93101; Held by: LJ Severance Contact: LJSeverance@msn.com This is a legal sale of abandoned personal property, to be sold in one or more lots to the highest bidder, for cash only, plus sales tax (7.75%), paid at time of sale. All items are sold as is, where is, and must be removed at the time of sale, or within 24 hours by arrangement. Note: all business/ personal sensitive information documents, etc., are not included in the sale and must be left behind. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Items include, but are not limited to: Art; and art supplies: Multiple original paintings/drawings of various sizes on mounted and unmounted canvasses; 1 framed painting. Misc. new and used art supplies – pens, pencils, markers, acrylic paints. Art drawing technique books; (8) frames for art – various sizes; 1 bag of shredded paintings; Household items: misc. kitchen supplies, microwave, juicer, utensils, bedding, dry goods, small electronics, bath supplies and linen, misc. household tools, costume jewelry, glass pipes, desk supplies, case of CDs, 2 lamps, tattoo kit. Multiple boxes, storage bins, totes, storage trunks, small locked safe, contents unknown; 2 lamps, tattoo kit, hair shearers, trimmer; Clothing, shoes: 2 wardrobe boxes with hanging clothes, women’s medium; 6 bags/boxes of clothes, shirts, sweaters, jackets tops; misc. shoes; leather gloves; Furniture: Bed/ mattress, small couch, chests, small tables, round table w/ chairs, stool, standing work table, 2 mirrors, stackable shelves.

NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: TRI‑COUNTY INSULATION at 1900 F. Commercial Way, Santa Cruz, CA 95065; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 02/01/2013 in the County of Santa Cruz. Original file no. 2013‑0000249. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: TRI‑COUNTY INSULATION, Statewide Insulation, Inc., 1900 F. Commercial Way, Santa Cruz, CA 95065. AL#1499563 State: CA This statement was filed in the office of Tricia Webber, Santa Cruz County on June 21, 2002 by Lorena Bibriesca‑Camacho, Deputy County Clerk. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as MOTEL 6‑SANTA MARIA at 2040 Preisker Lane, Santa Maria, CA 93454; Dutt Hospitality LLC, 3455 E La Palma Ave, Ste 101, Anaheim, CA 92806 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by HIMANSHU SARVAIYA, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001506. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PRIVATE EQUITY GROUP, 252 Coronado Drive, Goleta, CA 93117, Joel M. Silverman (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed by JOEL SILVERMAN, SELF. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 1, 2022.

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This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001436. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Z & Z INVESTIGATIVE AND PROTECTION SERVICES, 7127 Hollister Avenue 25A‑217, Goleta, CA 93117; Christopher Lee Zbinden (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by CHRISTOPERH LEE ZBINDEN, OWNER, QUALIFIED MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0001590. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RUI’S CREATIONS, 4141 State St Suite E1, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Flourish Local (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by STACY REBICH HESPANHA, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 06, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001469. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOHEMIAN WAFFLES, 432 E Cota, Santa barbara, CA 93101; Bohemian Breakfast,112 Los Aguajes Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by ANGELA ONEILIN, OFFICER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from

Isla Vista Recreation & Park District announces request for proposals (RFP) for Children’s Park and Pardall Gardens Renovation Projects. Proposals due 8/2/2022 by 5pm in electronic and paper copy. For ques-tions, please email ivrpd@ivparks. org, dial (805) 968-2017, or visit www.ivparks.org.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS

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ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING Responsible for security, maintenance, installation, purchase and improvements of all hardware, software, and network related systems that support the UCSB Nanofabrication Facility. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Experience with Linux, Mac OS, and various versions of Windows OS. Experience/training in computer network management and related network hardware. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $31.13 ‑ $39.75/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 31680

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WANTED HSSB ADMIN SUPPORT CENTER The Religious Studies Undergraduate P ro g r a m Coordinator is responsible for independently overseeing all aspects of the Religious Studies Undergraduate Program. Provides academic advising for majors, minors, and potential new students. Collaborates with colleagues within HASC, as well as other campus offices such as the College of Letters and Science, EAP, DSP, and the Office of the Registrar to provide holistic and accurate guidance to all students. Coordinates undergraduate services including preparing and managing the quarterly schedule of classes, updating annual copy for the general catalog, and submitting and managing master course approvals. Maintains departmental statistical reports and completes IRAL and Instructor Workload reports. Works closely with the Department Chair and Faculty Undergraduate Advisor. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience in a higher education setting. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 38365

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students in the Department of Mathematics. Duties include advising, consulting, assisting with and coordinating articulation, testing, outreach, recruitment, registration, orientation, degree certification, Mathematics Achievement, internship programs; and supervising the departmental peer program. Serves as liaison to UCSB Offices, community college, students, faculty, and department undergraduate committee. Is also responsible for maintaining student records, on‑going assessment of student progress, course and student data management, maintaining all student files and records, assisting with curriculum planning, course scheduling, and works collaboratively with faculty and campus agencies on all issues relating to Mathematics curriculum, articulation, academic policies, and procedures. Responds to queries by phone, electronically and in person from prospective students about department programs. Provides backup and support to Student Affairs Manager in his/her absence. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in a related area and / or equivalent experience / training.Proficient in the use of MS Office Suite and familiarity with online systems.Possesses a strong professional orientation, excellent verbal and written communication skills, and the ability to work effectively with all levels of the University community. Ability to multi‑task. $55,100 ‑ $60,000/yr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 37934

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CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Responsible for the administrative functions for the Mellichamp Sustainability Cluster. The Cluster consists of four faculty members from various UCSB departments. The Sustainability Program Assistant assists these faculty with various tasks as needed. This position is responsible for coordinating and managing various workshops, seminars, summits and conferences. Is responsible for managing the cluster’s operating budget, assistance in contract & grant submissions and content management of the cluster website. Reqs: Thorough knowledge in administrative procedures and processes including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. Good verbal and written communication skills, active listening, critical thinking, multi‑tasking and time management skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 – $25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35946

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom) July 19, 2022 at 5:30 PM ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing for the levy and collection of taxes for the Goleta Library Special Tax for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2022, and ending June 30, 2023. An Administration Report consisting of, among other things, the assessed parcels, is filed in the Office of the City Clerk for public review. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, July 19, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, July 14, 2022, on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 961-7505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish: July 7, 2022 and July 14, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001658. Published: July 7, 14, 21. 28, 2022.

the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001670. Published: July 7, 14, 21, 28, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: IN HOPE COUNSELING, 5662 Calle Real, #149, Goleta, CA 93117; Sheena Escobedo, 7382 Davenport RD Apt B, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed by SHEENA ESCOBEDO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA LEGAL DOCUMENT SERVICES, 4509A Auhay Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93110‑1705; Alexis C Henderson, (same address)‑ This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY ALEXIS HENDERSON. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 5, 2022. This statement expires

five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001705. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HOTEL HYGGE, 550 Avenue of the Flags, Buellton, CA 93427; FLT Hygge, LLC, 2082 Michelson Drive, 4th FL, Irvine, CA 92612. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by MICHAEL B. EARL, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara

County on June 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001558. Published: June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PROLOGISTIX, 25 W. Anapamu0 ST Suite C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Real Time Staffing Services, LLC, 1040 Crown Pointe Parkway Suite 1040, Atlanta, GA 30338; Select Staffing; Resource MFG. This business is conducted by a Limited

Liability Company. Signed by DAVID D KRUPCZAK, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 02, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001446. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PELICAN

SHORE PROPERTIES, 4874 8th Street, Unit B, Carpinteria, CA 93013, William R Loomis, (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. Signed by ELIZABETH LOOMIS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 1, 2022, This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E35. FBN Number: 2022‑0001435. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BETH

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING Hybrid Public Meeting - Held in Person and via Zoom Monday, July 25, 2022, at 6:00 P.M. Conditional Use Permit and Design Review for Ellwood RV/Boat/Contractor Outdoor Storage Use at 35 Ellwood Station Road; APN 079-210-066; Case No. 20-0003-CUP

KIMBERLY LLC, 313 Sycamore Dr, Buellton, CA 93427; Beth Kimberly LLC, (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by KIM HARRIES. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001595. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUNKISSED PANTRY, 31 E Canon Perdido,

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NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a hybrid public hearing to consider the 170 space Recreational Vehicle and Boat storage and 13 space contractor storage yard Conditional Use Permit proposed by Ellwood Station, LLC at 35 S. Ellwood Station Road, Goleta. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org) at least 72 hours prior to the meeting. The date, time, and location of the Planning Commission public hearing is as follows: HEARING DATE/TIME: Monday, July 25, 2022, at 6:00 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda). PROJECT LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION: The site is located at 35 Ellwood Station Road (APN 079-210-066) in the Inland Area of the City of Goleta. The site has a General Commercial (CG) General Plan Land Use and Zoning Designation.

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The applicant has requested the approval of the following project components under the CUP application: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10. 11.

Conversion of an existing 190 sf storage and restroom building into a restroom building. The restroom is proposed to be connected to the existing Goleta West Sanitary District sewer system in Ellwood Station Road and the Goleta Water District water supply on-site. Provision of 170 uncovered storage spaces for boats and RVs, totaling 60,341 square feet (1.39 acres) of the site. Provision of 13 uncovered contractor storage areas for materials and equipment, totaling 18,423 square feet (0.42 acres) of the site. These spaces are proposed at the westerly portion of the site. The existing septic system serving existing single-room restroom is proposed to be abandoned in-place. Provision of 3-visitor parking spaces, inclusive of one accessible space, adjacent to the rehabilitated restroom building. Two existing underground pit structures formerly used to convey materials in the prior use of the site are proposed to be curbed to protect from traffic and covered with waterproof concrete roof to prevent ponding. The two structures will also be fenced for safety. A 20-feet wide by 1,210 feet long landscaped bioswale is proposed along the southern property line to capture and partially treat storm water. Other proposed improvements include 8-foot-high security fencing with landscape screening, decorative landscaping at the property entrance, an entrance gate, driveway, and a stepped concrete stem wall of approximately 8-feet in height. The site will be accessed by monitored keypad with time lock to prevent use outside of business hours from 7AM to 6PM. Further, the site will have security cameras every 200 feet around the perimeter, which will be monitored 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Security lighting will be on motion sensors to discourage unwanted visitors. Frontage improvements are proposed such as sidewalk, curb, and gutter, and drainage improvements for storm water to connect to existing drainage improvements along Ellwood Station and pursuant to the City’s standards. The outdoor storage areas will not include any individual utilities (e.g., water, electricity) and no storage of hazardous materials above the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standard quantities would be allowed. No new habitable structures are proposed as a part of the project and the project does not include any fulltime employees. The site will be unstaffed. The site will be visited weekly by maintenance personnel who will conduct landscape maintenance, inspection of rental stalls and any debris cleanup required.

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: A Notice of Exemption (NOE) has been prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et seq., CEQA), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 California Code of Regulations, §§ 15000, et seq., CEQA Guidelines), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency. The NOE is appropriate pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15332 due to the project being within the City of Goleta limits on a 4.9-acre site and is substantially surrounded by existing urbanized uses. The existing parcel is and/or will be served by all required utilities and public services. The new development conforms to the policies of the City of Goleta General Plan, and the regulations of Title 17, the Goleta Zoning Ordinance, within the City of Goleta Municipal Code. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control TSC in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the Planning Commission meeting agenda. All letters/comments should be sent to kdominguez@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the Planning Commission hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Brian Hiefield, Associate Planner, at (805) 961-7559 or bhiefield@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent July 14, 2022 44 44

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 3:00 P.M. ATTENTION: The Virtual Meeting is held pursuant to Assembly Bill (AB) 361. The meeting will be Virtual because meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees. The public may only view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings and not in Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following projects: Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review Karma Indian Grocery Signage 557 Asilomar Way Unit 101 (APN 071-450-006) Case No. 21-0011-ZC/22-0005-DRB Storke Fuel Depot Carwash 370 Storke Road (APNs 073-100-008) Case No. 22-0014-LUP Pacifica Suites alterations 5490 Hollister Avenue (APN 071-330-014) Case No. 22-013-DRB Caston Residential Addition 213 Old Ranch Road (APN 079-570-053) Case No. 22-0026-LUP IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice include new and continued items from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, July 14, 2022


LEGAL NOTICE

If you were affected by the 2015 Santa Barbara Oil Spill, you may be entitled to a payment from a class action settlement A Federal Court authorized this Notice. Para una notificación en español, visite: www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com Để nhận thông báo tiếng Việt, vui lòng truy cập: www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com 如需中文通知,请访问:www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com A Settlement has been reached in the class action lawsuit called Andrews et al. v. Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. et al., No. 2:15-cv-04113 (PSG:JEM) (C.D. Cal.).

What is this about? The lawsuit claims that Plains All American Pipeline L.P. and Plains Pipeline L.P. (“Plains” or “Defendants”) caused an underground pipeline to rupture, resulting in an oil spill along the coast in Santa Barbara County on May 19, 2015. The Settlement is on behalf of members of the Fisher Class and Property Class previously certified by this Court. Plaintiffs for the Fisher Class allege the spill caused long term harm to commercial fishing in the affected class blocks, including significant financial losses. Plaintiffs for the Property Class allege that owners and lessees were unable to use and enjoy their properties as a result of the spill because oil washed up onto their properties and onto beaches adjacent to their properties. Plains denies any claims of wrongdoing and disputes all claims. The Settlement, if approved by the Court, will resolve all remaining claims in the class action litigation pending in the United States District Court for the Central District of California. The Fisher Class Settlement is $184 million, and the Property Class Settlement is $46 million, inclusive of attorneys’ fees and costs. The Court has not decided whether Plaintiffs or Defendants should win this Litigation. The Settling Parties do not agree on whether Plaintiffs would have prevailed on any of their claims against Plains, or the amount of damages, if any, that would be recoverable if the Class prevailed on the claims alleged. Instead, both sides agreed to the Settlement after years of contested litigation, including at the motion to dismiss, class certification, and summary judgment stages. The Parties had also completed substantial discovery and were preparing for trial to commence on June 2, 2022.

Who is affected? You are a Fisher Class Member if you are a person or business who owned or worked on a vessel that was in operation as of May 19, 2015 and that: (1) landed any commercial seafood in California Department of Fish & Wildlife (“CDFW”) fishing blocks 654, 655, or 656; or (2) landed any commercial seafood, except groundfish or highly migratory species (as defined by the CDFW and the Pacific Fishery Management Council), in CDFW fishing blocks 651-656, 664-670, 678-686, 701-707, 718-726, 739-746, 760-765, or 806-809; from May 19, 2010 to May 19, 2015, inclusive; or if you are a person or business in operation as of May 19, 2015 who purchased such commercial seafood directly from the Commercial Fishers and re-sold it at the retail or wholesale level. You can find out if you are a Fisher Class Member by going to www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com.

You are a Property Class Member if you owned or leased residential beachfront property or property with a private easement to a beach where oil from the 2015 Santa Barbara oil spill washed up and the oiling was categorized as heavy, moderate, or light. You can find out if your property is included by going to www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com, where a list of properties Plaintiffs claim were impacted is posted.

Plains Oil Spill Settlement c/o JND Legal Administration P.O. Box 91450 Seattle, WA 98111 Email: info@PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com Telephone: 1‐844-202-9486

If you are a Class Member you may object or tell the Court what you do not like about the Settlement. You will still be bound by the Settlement, and The Settlement, if approved, will result in the creation you may still file a claim. Objections must be of two cash settlement funds of $184,000,000 (the served/filed no later than August 19, 2022. Go to “Fisher Class Settlement Amount”) and $46,000,000 www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com for details on how (“the Property Class Settlement Amount”), together to object to the Settlement. If you are a Class Member with any interest earned thereon, the “Fisher Class and you did not previously opt out of the Class or Common Fund” and “Property Class Common enter a separate settlement with Plains for which Fund,” respectively. Each of the common funds less you signed a full release, you are a member of the (a) any Taxes and Tax Expenses; (b) any Notice and Class and you will be bound by the release of claims Administration Expenses; and (c) any attorneys’ as part of the Settlement. The Fisher Class was first fees and costs and any service awards to Class certified on February 28, 2017, and later amended on Representatives in connection with their representation November 22, 2019. The Property Class was certified of the Class, awarded by the Court (the “Net Settlement on April 17, 2018. You previously had an opportunity Funds”), will be distributed to eligible Class Members exclude yourself from the Fisher Class and the Property pursuant to a proposed plan of distribution (“Plan Class. If you did not exclude yourself then, you may of Distribution”). If you are entitled to relief under not exclude yourself now. the Settlement, the Settlement Administrator will determine your portion of the Net Settlement Fund What happens next? payable to you pursuant to the Court-approved Plan The Court will hold a Final Approval Hearing on of Distribution. September 16, 2022, at 1:30 p.m. Pacific, before the

What does the Settlement provide?

Who represents the Class?

The Court has appointed Lieff Cabraser Heimann Bernstein LLP, Keller Rohrback L.L.P., Cappello & Noel LLP, and Audet & Partners, LLP (“Class Counsel”) to be the attorneys representing the Class. You will not be charged for these lawyers. Class Counsel will apply to the Court for an award of attorneys’ fees in an amount not to exceed 33% of the total Settlement Amount (no more than $60,720,000 from the Fisher Class Settlement Amount and $15,180,000 from the Property Class Settlement Amount). In addition, Class Counsel will apply to the Court for reimbursement of their litigation expenses (in an amount not to exceed $5.2 million from the Fisher Class Settlement Amount and $1.3 million from the Property Class Settlement Amount). If you want to be represented by your own lawyer, you may hire one at your own expense.

What do I need to do to? If you are a Class Member and you wish to get money from the Settlement, you are required to submit a Claim Form available at www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com, or by calling the toll-free number 1‐844-202-9486 to request that a hard copy Claim Form be mailed to you. Your Claim Form and, if necessary, any required supporting documentation as set forth therein must be postmarked (if mailed) or submitted online to the address below on or before October 31, 2022.

Honorable Phillip S. Gutierrez at the United States District Court for the Central District of California, First Street Courthouse, 350 West 1st Street, Courtroom 6A, 6th Floor, Los Angeles, California 90012-4565. At the hearing the Court will determine whether: (1) the Settlement of $184,000,000 for the Fisher Class and $46,000,000 for the Property Class should be approved by the Court as fair, reasonable and adequate; (2) the Judgment as provided under the Settlement Agreement should be entered; (3) to award Class Counsel attorneys’ fees and expenses out of the Fisher and Property Class Common Funds and, if so, in what amount; (4) to award Plaintiffs’ service awards (Class Counsel is requesting $15,000 for each of the 14 Class Representatives) in connection with their representation of the Classes out of the Fisher and Property Class Common Funds and, if so, in what amount; and (5) the Plans of Distribution should be approved by the Court.

How do I get more information? For more details and to print the Settlement Agreement, go to www.PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com. You may also write with questions or notify the Settlement Administrator regarding address changes to Plains Oil Spill Settlement c/o JND Legal Administration, P.O. Box 91450, Seattle, WA 98111, email at info@PlainsOilSpillSettlement.com or call the Settlement Administrator at 1‐844-202-9486.

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Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kiersten L Ozhelevskiy, 2226 Ermine Ave, Ventura, CA 93003. This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by KIERSTEN OZHELEVSKIY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001614. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as CROCKER REFRIGERATION HEATING & AIR at 5531 Ekwill St, Santa Barbara,

CA 93111; Crocker Group Corp. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by LUCILLE CROCKER, CFO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001518. Published June 30, July 7, July 14, 21, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MOVE SANTA BARBARA, 506 E. Haley Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition,

Santa Barbara, CA (same address). Move SB County; Cycling Without Age; Coast; Coalition for Sustainable Transportation. This business is conducted by a Corporation. SIGNED BY GREG JANEE, SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 23, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001621. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MERRILL GARDENS AT SANTA MARIA, 120

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING Hybrid Public Meeting – Held in Person and via Zoom Monday, July 25, 2022 at 6 pm Goleta Gardens LLC (SyWest) Development Agreement Amendment 907 S Kellogg Avenue; APN 071-190-035 City of Goleta Case No. 22-0003-ORD ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:/// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a hybrid public hearing on a Development Agreement Amendment between Goleta Gardens LLC (SyWest) and the City of Goleta. The date and time of the Planning Commission meeting is: DATE/TIME: Monday, July 25, 2022, at 6:00 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda). PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND DESCRIPTION: The subject property (APNs 071190-035) is an 11.71 -acre parcel located at the south terminus of Kellogg Avenue at 907 S. Kellogg Avenue, within the California Coastal Zone. The site is currently operating as the Westwind Drive-In Theater and Public Market. The property is zoned Service Industrial (I-S) and the land use designation is Service Industrial (IS). The applicant proposes to amend a Development Agreement that grants a license to the City of Goleta to use a private access road to the San Jose Creek Channel in exchange for an extension of the deadline to use the City’s former zoning ordinance (Article 35 Coastal Zoning Ordinance) to December 31, 2023 for review of applicant’s pending development proposal (Case No 17-121-DP-DRB). The proposed amendment, as directed by the California Coastal Commission, will change the extension timing to use the City’s former zoning ordinance to either the adoption date of the City’s Local Coastal Plan or December 31, 2023 whichever occurs first.

Suey Rd, Santa Maria, CA 93454; Shi‑IV Merrill GP, LLC, General Partner of MG at Santa Maria, LP, 1938 Fairview Ave E Ste 300, Seattle, WA 98102. This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership. Signed by DOUGLAS D. SPEAR, VICE PRESIDENT OF GENERAL PARTNER OF MG AT SANTA MARIA, LP. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001552. Published: July 14, 21. 28, August 4, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CEILO DRONE SERVICES, 571 Hill St, Los Alamos, CA 93440; Gary Gordon, (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY GARY GORDON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001716. Published: July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022.

NAME CHANGE

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ROBERT DANIEL LANE BURNS, CASE NUMBER: 22CV01910 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: ROBERT DANIEL LANE BURNS TO: BOB DANIEL LANE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JULY 25, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara

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Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 5/26/2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ANITA SUSAN KAPLAN, 3091 Calle Rosales, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; NUMBER: 22CV02141 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: ANITA SUSAN KAPLAN TO: ANITA HARRIS KAPLAN. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is

timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing August 8, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated June 16, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: A. NICHOLAS TOROK, CASE NUMBER: 22CV02089 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: A. NICHOLAS TOROK TO: NICHOLAS TOROK THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name

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The project was filed by Robert Atkinson of SyWest Development on behalf of Goleta Gardens, LLC. The Planning Commission will review and make a recommendation to the City Council on the Development Agreement Amendment request. The City Council is the decision maker for the Development Agreement Amendment. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: A Notice of Exemption (NOE) has been prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et seq., CEQA), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 California Code of Regulations, §§ 15000, et seq., CEQA Guidelines), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency. The NOE is appropriate pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15061.b.3 because the act of approving a Development Agreement Amendment will not cause development of the project site itself, but will change the extension timing to use the City’s former zoning ordinance to either the adoption date of the City’s Local Coastal Plan or December 31, 2023 whichever occurs first. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control TSC in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/comments should be sent to kdominguez@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports and related materials for the Planning Commission hearing will also be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Kathy Allen, Supervising Senior Planner at 805-961-7545 or Kallen@cityofgoleta. org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this Project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to the City on or before the date of the public hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b) [2]). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent on July 14, 2022 46 46

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CITY OF GOLETA PUBLIC NOTICE The following list of disbursements are unclaimed by the listed payees and held by the City of Goleta. If you have a claim against these funds, please contact the City of Goleta City Treasurer, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117, phone (805) 961-7500. Proper proof of claim and current identification must be provided before funds will be released. A claim form will need to be obtained from the Finance Department and submitted by the date below. Funds not claimed by August 29th, 2022, become the property of the City of Goleta. This notice and its contents are in accordance with California Government Code Section 50050. Per Resolution No. 17-45 Adopting the City of Goleta Escheatment Policy. Check Date

Check Number

08/25/2016

80796

Amount $21.24

City Fund General

Payee Miriana Muzar Hall

09/23/2016

81013

$50.00

General

Advanced Laminates & Design

09/29/2016

81069

$48.00

General

Chilas Catering

01/25/2018

84772

$150.00

General

Orbital ATK

03/07/2019

88027

$120.00

General

Cal Green Medical Center

04/25/2019

88444

$21.60

General

Courtyard Marriott

07/18/2019

90160

$1,674.75

General

David Burton III

07/18/2019

90165

$1,656.00

General

Frontier CA Inc Agua Azul Pool Service

07/25/2019

90219

$9.00

General

08/08/2019

90391

$93.57

General

URS Corp

08/29/2019

90509

$150.00

General

Carl Givens

09/05/2019

90577

$105.00

General

League of California Cities

City Treasurer

Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent July 7, 2022, and July 14, 2022


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

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PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING AUGUST 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A

copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 6/16/2022, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court, Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: SABRINA BATES BELL, CASE NUMBER: 22CV01328

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SABRINA BATES BELL TO: SABRINA BATES BELL‑BONADEO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom) July 19, 2022 at 5:30 PM ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing for the levy and collection of assessments within the Goleta Street Lights Assessment District for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2022, and ending June 30, 2023. A draft Engineer’s Report consisting of, among other things, the assessed parcels, will be filed in the Office of the City Clerk for public review. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta. org). HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, July 19, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, July 14, 2022, on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 961-7505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish: July 7, 2022 and July 14, 2022

NOTICE OF ELECTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a General Municipal Election will be held in the City of Goleta, on Tuesday, the 8th November 2022, for the following Officers and Measures: For Councilmember District 1 (Vote for one) (Full term of four Years) For Councilmember District 2 (Vote for one) (Full term of four Years) “Shall Ordinance No. 21-09, An Ordinance of the City of Goleta, California, banning the sale of flavored tobacco products within the City’s limits, be adopted?” “To support Goleta’s 9-1-1 response/crime prevention; clean-up trash in creeks to maintain coastal waters; address homelessness, fire risks from illegal encampments; maintain public safety, clean/ maintain public areas; repair streets/potholes; increase recycled water use for parks; retain local businesses/jobs; maintain open spaces/natural areas and for general government use; shall a measure be adopted establishing a 1¢ sales tax providing approximately $10,600,000 annually until ended by voters, requiring public spending disclosure?”

Yes No

Yes

No

above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING AUGUST 10, 2022, 10:30 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 6/15/2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published July 14, 21, 28, August 4, 2022.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS FROM THE court clerk. from the SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ANACAPA DIVISION In re the William Safina Revocable Trust dated 4‑13‑1995, amended and restated 4‑13‑2015 by William Safina, Decedent. Case No. 22PR00057 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Prob. C. §§I9040(b), 19052) Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above‑named decedent, that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver pursuant to Section 1215 of the California Probate Code a copy to LAWRENCE T. SORENSEN, as trustee of the WILLIAM SAFINA REVOCABLE

TRUST dated 3‑7‑1995, amended and restated 4‑13‑2015, of which the Decedent was the settlor, at the office of the Trustee’s attorneys located at 1900 Sate STreet, Suite M, Santa Barbara, California, 93101, within the later of four (4) months after 6/23/2002, (the dated of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in California Probate Code section 19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Dated June 14, 2022. By: Margaret V. Barnes, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 attorney for Lawrence T. Sorensen Independent Temporary Trustee. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. July 28, 2022 at 3:30 PM. Richard Schroeder Personal Items Jahseh Ahlem Business equipment The Auction will be listed and advertised on WWW.STORAGETREASURES. COM. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transation. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

PUBLIC NOTICE FOR COMMENT Public Housing Agency Annual Plan FY2023 Capital Fund Program CA 16-P021-501-23 Annual Statement/5-Year Action Plan The Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara (HASBARCO) is inviting all interested parties to comment on the Public Housing Agency Plan for 2023, and the proposed Capital Fund Program CA16-P021-501-23 Annual Statement/5-Year Action Plan in accordance with Section 903.17 and 905.300 of Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This public notice is hereby posted a minimum of 45 calendar days prior to the public hearing scheduled on August 18, 2022. The draft PHA plan and draft Capital Fund Program CA16-P021-501-23 Annual Statement/5-Year Action Plan are now available for review on HASBARCO’s website www.hasbarco.org. Written comments may be sent to the Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara at P.O. Box 397, Lompoc, CA 93438-0397or by email to arthurfloyd@hasbarco.org The deadline for submitting written comments is August 18, 2022. A public hearing on the draft plan will be held on August 18, 2022, at 5:00 PM. Join Zoom Meeting https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84165861754?pwd=VC80USs3N3hSUzFVYm1EYWtQK1liUT09 Meeting ID: 841 6586 1754 Passcode: 044039 Or by Phone +1669 900-6833 In compliance with the American with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in the public hearing, please contact the Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara at (805) 736-3423 Ext. 4002. Notification at least 24 hours prior to the meeting will enable the Housing Authority to make reasonable arrangements.

AVISO PÚBLICO PARA COMENTARIOS Plan Anual de la Agencia de Vivienda Pública para el Año Fiscal2023 Programa del Fondo de Capital CA 16-P021-501-23 Declaración Anual/Plan de Acción 5-Año La Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Santa Bárbara (HASBARCO) está invitando a todas las partes interesadas a comentar sobre el Plan de la Agencia de Vivienda Pública para 2023 y el Programa de Fondos de Capital propuesto CA16-P021-501-23 Declaración Anual / Plan de Acción de 5 años de acuerdo con la Sección 903.17 y 905.300 del Título 24 del Código de Regulaciones Federales. Este aviso público se publica un mínimo de 45 días calendario antes de la audiencia pública programada para el 18 de agosto de 2022. El borrador del plan PHA y el borrador del Programa del Fondo de Capital CA16-p021-501-23 Declaración Anual / Plan de Acción Quinquenal ya están disponibles para su revisión en el sitio web de HASBARCO www.hasbarco.org.

The nomination period for these offices begins on July 18, 2022, and closes on August 12, 2022 at 5:00 p.m.. If nomination papers for an incumbent officer of the city are not filed by August 12, 2022 the nomination period is extended to August 17, 2020, at 5:00 p.m.

Los comentarios por escrito pueden enviarse a la Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Santa Bárbara en P.O. Box 397, Lompoc, CA 93438-0397 o por correo electrónico a arthurfloyd@hasbarco.org La fecha límite para enviar comentarios por escrito es el 18 de agosto de 2022.

If no one or only one person is nominated for an elective office, appointment to the elective office may be made as prescribed by Section 10229, Elections Code of the State of California.

Una audiencia pública sobre el borrador del plan se llevará a cabo el 18 de agosto de 2022, a las 5:00 PM. Únase a la reunión de Zoom https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84165861754?pwd=VC80USs3N3hSUzFVYm1EYWtQK1liUT09 ID de reunión: 841 6586 1754 Código de acceso: 044039 O por teléfono +1669 900-6833

Eligible candidates must be a registered voter residing within the boundaries of District 1 or District 2 of the City of Goleta. Nomination papers may be obtained from the Office of the City Clerk located at: City of Goleta, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA 93117, an appointment is mandatory to ensure safety and accessibility during the COVID-19 pandemic. The City Clerk can be reached at 805-961-7505 or via email at dlopez@cityofgoleta.org. The polls (vote centers) will be open between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk Dated this 28th day of June 2022. Publish: Thursday July 14, 2022

De conformidad con la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades, si necesita asistencia especial para participar en la audiencia pública, comuníquese con la Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Santa Bárbara al (805) 736-3423 Ext. 4002. La notificación al menos 24 horas antes de la reunión permitirá a la Autoridad de Vivienda hacer arreglos razonables. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 14, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

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