Santa Barbara Independent 7/7/22

Page 1

IN MEMORIAM: TOM MURRAY

TENANT PROTECTIONS EXPIRE POODLE ON PLASTICS RUSACK WINERY’S REINVENTIONS ABSTRACT STATES OF MIND AT SBMA

Professor Profit How Mathematician Dr. Eliot Jacobson Turned Beating Casinos into a Career by Tyler Hayden


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Word of Mouth series - Save 20% -

David Gergen

2022-2023 Series Subscriptions on Sale Now!

Hearts Touched with Fire Tue, Oct 11 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

Maria Ressa

How to Stand Up to a Dictator Thu, Jan 19 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Ian Bremmer The Power of Crisis

Thu, Nov 10 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

Nina Totenberg Dinners with Ruth: The Power of Friendships Tue, Feb 7 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

Siddhartha Mukherjee The Song of the Cell

Wed, Mar 8 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

Save up to 25% with a Curated series, or Create Your Own series of 4 or more events and save 10% (Single tickets on sale August 5 at 10 AM)

View the full 2022-2023 lineup at ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 7, 2022

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FREE CONCERT ON FRONT TERRACE

TED NASH: THE SOUND OF ART SUNDAY, JULY 10 | 3 PM In his fourth summer as SBMA artist-inresidence, Grammy Award-winning musician and composer Ted Nash shares insight and experience with a selection of Santa Barbara City College students and fellow musicians culminating in a free concert. This workshop focuses on using improvisation to guide the composition process and is inspired by works from the Museum’s contemporary art collection and the Going Global: Abstract Art at Mid-Century exhibition, which explores the universal language of abstraction. Front Terrace | Santa Barbara Museum of Art | FREE Images left to right: Autumn Light cover. Pico Iyer.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art 1130 State Street www.sbma.net

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JULY 7, 2022

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This program is a partnership between the Santa Barbara Museum of Art + Santa Barbara City College


TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 36, # 860, July 7-14, 2022

Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Rodrigo Hernandez, Koss Klobucher, Emma Spencer, Finnegan Wright Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

25

Name: Jinhee Hwang Title: Graphic Designer

Professor Profit

How Mathematician Dr. Eliot Jacobson Turned Beating Casinos into a Career

by Tyler Hayden

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

COURTESY

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

COLORFUL CREATIVITY

Tell us about yourself. Where’d you grow up? How long have you been in S.B.? My family and I were always on the move. However, I did spend a majority of my life in California and South Korea, so I feel split between which one I call home. Before coming to Santa Barbara three years ago, I worked as an English instructor in South Korea. And once I came here, I built my graphic design experience working for various organizations and companies. Now, I’m so grateful to be a part of the Independent family! How’d you get into graphic design? When I was in school, one of my responsibilities as an intern for the Language Exchange program was to create digital and printed marketing materials. As I had grown up learning studio art, it was exciting for me to return to a visually creative space. I enjoyed learning about how particular colors, shapes, and placement could evoke specific responses from viewers, and so I decided to pursue graphic design professionally. In the design process, I personally love the special effects I can build with the software, such as transparency overlaps, original patterns, and dimensional elements.

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 36

What do you do for fun? I’m no professional, but I like to play guitar and sing. I also draw on the side whenever I’m feeling creative! And finally, I love to spend hours on the beach in my oversized hoodie and wait for the sunset.

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

ON THE COVER: Dr. Eliot Jacobson. Photo by Carl Perry. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Arts Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS

NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS

Summer FESTIVAL OPERA P Y O T R

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FORESTERS ACTION! A HAPPENIN’ HOMESTAND! THURSDAY, JULY 7 AT ARROYO SECO, 6 PM

SATURDAY, JULY 9, 6 pm FRIDAY, JULY 8, 6 pm BMW Santa Barbara SUNDAY, JULY 10, 2 pm Walnut Creek Crawdads Hugs for Cubs Night Lincoln Potters AT PERSHING PARK Walnut Creek Crawdads AT PERSHING PARK AT PERSHING PARK

ALL GAMES ON AM 1290 Complete schedule at www.sbforesters.org Tickets available at the gate!

2023 Housing Element Public Review Draft

Planning Commission Hearing: Thursday July 14, 2022 City Council Hearing: Tuesday July 26, 2022 On July 5, 2022, the City of Santa Barbara 2023 Housing Element Public Review Draft will be available for review and comment for 30 days. Copies of the document will be available for review at the City Clerk’s Office (735 Anacapa Street), Santa Barbara Central Library (40 E. Anapamu Street), and Santa Barbara Eastside Library (1102 East Montecito Street); and online at SantaBarbaraCA.gov/HEU. The public is encouraged to comment on the 2023 Housing Element Public Review Draft and comments can be submitted to HEU@SantaBarbaraCA.gov by August 3, 2022. During the public review period, the Planning Commission will hold a hearing on Thursday July 14th and the City Council will hold a hearing on Tuesday July 26th. Both the Planning Commission and City Council will receive a staff presentation, listen to public comment, hold a discussion, and provide feedback to staff on the draft document. The agenda for the July 14, 2022 Planning Commission hearing will be available on Thursday July 7, 2022 at SantaBarbaraCA.gov/PC. Written public comments to the Planning Commission members may be submitted by email to PCSecretary@SantaBarbaraCA.gov prior to the beginning of the meeting. All public comments submitted via email will be provided to the Commission and will become part of the public record.

AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you need auxiliary aids or services or staff assistance to attend or participate in this meeting, please contact the City Administrator’s Office at (805) 564-5305. If possible, notification at least 48 hours prior to the meeting will usually enable the City to make reasonable arrangements. Specialized services, such as sign language interpretation or documents in Braille, may require additional lead time to arrange. INTERPRETACIÓN EN ESPAÑOL: Si necesita una interpretación del español al inglés, para sus comunicaciones al Consejo, comuníquese con la Oficina del Secretario Municipal al 564-5309, o por correo electrónico a Clerk@ SantaBarbaraCA.gov. Si es posible, la notificación de al menos 48 horas generalmente permitirá a la Ciudad hacer los arreglos. 6

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JULY 7, 2022

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SALSA NIGHT

DANCE, DANCE, DANCE! 7/9 - 9 PM

BIG MOUNTAIN WITH BOMBAFIYA ROOTS REGGAE 7/10 - 1:00 PM

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY FEAT JANIS MANN 7:30 PM

M.O.B. JAZZ QUINTET 7/12 - 7:30 PM

OMAR VELASCO 7/14 - 8:00 PM

(((FOLKYEAH!))) PRESENTS:

THEE SINSEERS W/ CASSOWARY 7/15 - 6:00 PM

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TELEVISION COVERAGE: The meetings will be broadcast live on City TV-Channel 18 and online at www. SantaBarbaraCA.gov/citytv.

7/8 - 10 PM

ME SABOR PRESENTS:

INSTAGRAM

MEETING PARTICIPATION: You may provide verbal public comment in person or remotely. Instructions for joining the meetings electronically and providing remote verbal comments are detailed on the meeting agendas.

A COLLECTION OF SB SONGWRITERS

@sbindependent

The agenda for the July 26, 2022 City Council hearing will be available on Thursday July 21, 2022 at SantaBarbaraCA.gov/CAP. Written public comments to City Council members may be submitted by email to Clerk@SantaBarbaraCA.gov prior to the beginning of the meeting. All public comments submitted via email will be provided to City Council and will become part of the public record.

7/7 - 8:30 PM

RAFA ROSE, JEREMY FERRARA, BAMBLUME, PHILIP ROGERS

STAY CONNECTED

CITY OF SANTA BARBARA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING


JUNE 30-JULY 7, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COMMUNITY

‘A Day of Unity’ Brings Boxing Back to S.B.

BOXING IS BACK: Anthony Vazquez (left) from Five Directions dukes it out against Joel Lazoya from King City Boxing in a crowded Eastside Boys & Girls Club.

M

ore than 300 Santa Barbara residents crowded a dense and humid Eastside Boys and Girls Club on Sunday, July 3, as the basketball court was transformed into a makeshift boxing ring for a U.S.A. Boxing–sanctioned showcase. More than 20 fights were held for the soldout “A Day of Unity” event, which included youth and adult amateur boxers. Challengers from around the state included Compton

Boxing, KnuckleHeadz Boxing (Ventura), ASG Boxing (Moreno Valley), and King’s City Boxing. As recently reported by the Independent, brothers Jairo and Zico Gonzalez have revived the boxing community in Santa Barbara, where nearly a decade has passed since the city’s last organized event. The brothers own and operate Five Directions Community Club and hosted the event to debut the club’s

up-and-coming fighters and put on a show for local boxing fans. Nine boxers from Five Directions participated in the event, with Tomas Arzate, Jaiden Moctezuma, Jonathan Lopez, Vincent Terrazas, and Anthony Vazquez taking home wins for the local club. The Gonzalez brothers said they plan on hosting up to three showcases a year, starting —Rodrigo Hernandez in 2023.

HOUSING

The End of Tenant Protections in S.B. County? Federal Tenant Protections End, Thousands Waiting for Rental Assistance by Jun Starkey ederal protections for renters officially ended on July 1, ending protections for millions of tenants and families in America still struggling to recover financially from the COVID-19 pandemic. Going forward, this means that any rent must be paid in full every month, and landlords are within their rights to evict or sue a tenant for unpaid rent. However, landlords are still prohibited from suing or evicting a tenant for unpaid rent accumulated between March 2020 and September 2021. Additionally, local governing bodies are now permitted to create laws to extend tenant protections. Alex Entrekin, a housing attorney at the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara, said Legal Aid is anticipating an increase of tenants seeking help and an increase of landlords taking tenants to court. “It’s hard to know for sure,” he said. “But we’ve seen spikes, and we anticipate that we’ll be seeing more.”

F

It’s estimated that more than 700,000 California households have rent debt of an average of $4,600 per household. These estimates are based on Census Household Pulse data, collected between April 27 and May 9, 2022. In June 2021, Governor Gavin Newsom signed off on a $5.5 billion rental relief package, vowing to pay off 100 percent of Californians’ unpaid rent to those who applied for rental assistance by the deadline of March 31, 2022. Steve Ortiz, CEO of United Way of Santa Barbara County, said 3,327 households in the county have received more than $25 million in rental assistance, and more than 3,000 applications are still being processed. A massive influx of applications created a delay in distributing funds. Another potential problem is funding. United Way currently has about $11 million in funds, but if all current applicants were approved, Ortiz said it would require more

than $30 million. “It is available, but the county has to request additional funding,” Ortiz said. Currently, it is unclear if Santa Barbara County plans to request these funds. For some landlords, the end of these protections is a relief. Attorney Betty Jeppesen, president of the Santa Barbara Rental Property Association, said she has represented several Santa Barbara property owners who’ve struggled with tenants refusing to apply for rental assistance. “There was a lot of confusion and reluctance with tenants applying [for rental assistance],” she said, explaining that most tenants did not give an explanation for their refusal to apply. The majority of SBRPA members are “mom and pop” landlords, Jeppesen said, only owning a handful of properties. “Some have been without income on properties for over two years now,” she said. “But their insurance, property maintenance, property mann agers, and taxes have only gone up.”

COU RTESY SANTA BAR BAR A SH ER I F F ’S OF F IC E

RODR IG O H ER N AN DEZ

COMMUNITY

The Sheriff’s Office has launched an inmate tattoo removal program at the Northern Branch Jail as part of a larger mission to help incarcerated people reintegrate into the community. Dr. Bernard Weinstock, who performed the first round of tattoo removal treatments at the jail, and Dr. John Baeke attended special training on how to use the Tri-Beam laser tattoo removal machine for the free program, which is offered to inmates who participate in rehabilitation programs, have no current discipline reports, and have a finalized sentence with sufficient confinement time to complete the tattoo removal process.

GOLETA Councilmember Roger Aceves and Goleta Planning Commissioner Sam Ramirez have formalized their run for Goleta City Council’s District 1 and 2, respectively, announcing that they are officially in the races headed for November 2022. This will be the first election in Goleta to choose councilmembers by the fledgling district divisions finalized in March. Also on the ballot will be an ask to Goleta voters to ban the sale of flavored tobacco from city stores and another ask for a one-cent-per-dollar increase in sales tax. Full story at independent.com.

COURTS & CRIME Aharon Zebulun Israel Brown, 23, was arrested for allegedly breaking into pop star Ariana Grande’s Montecito home. Responding to a burglar alarm at the residence, Sheriff’s deputies arrested Brown on 6/26 for stalking, burglary, obstruction, violation of a court order, damaging power lines, and tampering with fire alarm equipment. Last year, Grande was granted a fiveyear restraining order in L.A. County against Brown after he repeatedly appeared at her L.A. residence, occasionally brandishing a knife, and threatened to harm her and her family. Brown is being held on no bail at the Main Jail and pleaded not guilty during his 6/28 arraignment. Five former North County cannabis operators are scheduled for hearings this month in Superior Court in two separate cases. The charges they face include alleged perjury, unlawful cultivation and sale of marijuana, and conspiracy to commit a crime. The two cases — Herbal Angels and Santa Barbara Greenland Deliveries — are among dozens of criminal complaints the DA has filed against cannabis operators since the Board of Supervisors opened the floodgates to the industry in 2018. Herbal Angels’ hearing is 7/6, and Greenland Deliveries’ preliminary hearing is 7/13. Full story at independent.com. CONT’D ON PAGE 8 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 7, 2022

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JUNE 30-JULY 7, 2022

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 7 INFRASTRUCTURE

Locally Owned and Operated

www.santacruzmarkets.com

Gov. Newsom declared a state of emergency in S.B. County on 7/1 to help with the recovery from October’s Alisal Fire, which burned nearly 17,000 acres in the Santa Ynez Mountains and shut down the U.S. 101 for several days. The proclamation allows the state Department of Transportation to request immediate federal assistance for highway repairs or reconstruction. The California Office of Emergency Services will also assist in the recovery process andGOLETA make it easier for anyone unemployed due to the fire to get unemployment benefits. n

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Then last Sunday, after Lomeli had left for the day and was at home enjoying an afternoon barbecue, his son Rene Lomeli said the family received a notification that someone had thrown an object at the storefront window, shattering the glass. “I drove to the store and took pictures but didn’t catch anyone nearby,” Rene Lomeli said. The glass was shattered, but luckily the object did not completely break the window, he added. The store’s camera did not capture the incident or suspect. Carniceria La Nueva had already been through a tough few years, starting with a fire in 2018—when the shop was named Carniceria La Bodeguita—that left the building repairable but cost Lomeli an estimated $50,000 worth of damage and lost equipment. “I lost everything,” Javier Lomeli said. When the Lomeli family rebuilt and reopened the store with a brand-new name, Carniceria la Nueva, it was thrown into a two-year pandemic that made it difficult for any small business to thrive. “It’s not easy in the past couple years,” said Lomeli, who has had to take more time off recently after being diagnosed with cancer. “I’m just tired of this.” A report was filed with the Santa Barbara Police Department, and a police spokesperson said the incident was being investigated. But no details were released as to whether the incidents were related or if they are being pursued as a hate crime. Lomeli says police sent him a photo of the woman in question for identification but that he has not heard about any leads since last —Ryan P. Cruz week.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

What EPA Ruling Means to Central Coast

CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON 104th Concert Season

Experience the wonder of hearing the world’s finest classical music performances live in concert in Santa Barbara.

Experts React to Supreme Court’s Decision to Cut Back Agency’s Authority

I

N AN CY RODR IG U EZ

by Ryan P. Cruz n what has been a whirlwind week full of historical Supreme Court decisions, the court’s latest ruling to restrict the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) power to make “generationshifting” regulations may not have an immediate impact on areas with already-progressive environmental policies — like California and Santa Barbara County — but according to CLIMATE CRUSADER: UCSB assistant political science professor Leah local experts, it could have big Stokes speaks at a rally in 2019, advocating for stronger government implications for government policies in response to climate change. agencies making new rules going forward. from burning coal. But the majority opinion “Nothing could be more devastating to leaves just enough “malleable” language, she our efforts to curb climate change policing said, to open the door for any government than this Supreme Court decision. It’s hor- regulation to be called into question. rible,” said 1st District County Supervisor This open-ended interpretation relies Das Williams, one of Santa Barbara’s stron- on the “Major Questions Doctrine,” an idea gest political voices for clean energy and raised in the latest decision by this Supreme environmental justice. Court’s conservative majority. It states that Williams serves as co-chair of the Cen- if a government agency seeks to decide an tral Coast Clean Energy (3CE) policy board, “issue of major national significance,” the which recently recommended the pur- action must be explicitly authorized by chase of an increased amount of geother- Congress, meaning only Congress can take mal energy in an effort to reach 60 percent “major steps” to tackle “major problems.” In Chief Justice John Roberts’s response to renewable energy by 2025, and 100 percent renewable energy by 2030, a goal he says is West Virginia v. EPA, he writes that the agency’s requirement that power plants estab“10 years earlier” than the statewide goal. The Central Coast’s green energy policies lish the “best system of emission reduction” help pave the way for policy making across amounts to the EPA looking for a major, the country, he said, but the Supreme Court’s generation-shifting change away from coal. decision on West Virginia v. EPA could ham- The fact that the EPA’s requirement “raises string states that still rely heavily on coal and an eyebrow,” in Roberts’s opinion, means gas. that it is making a decision that should only “Not all the nation is going to move as fall on Congress. quickly as we are,” he said. “The EPA is vitally The ruling is the latest from what Stokes needed in states that are still burning coal.” called a “radical, illegitimate” Supreme He called the ruling “enormously short- Court, which she said “did backflips to take sighted,” though he remained optimistic up this case.” The concern, she said, is that about the Central Coast reaching 100 per- future regulations may be affected by this cent renewable energy well before the state new precedent, in a Supreme Court where and nationwide timelines. six of the nine members were appointed by Dr. Leah Stokes, assistant professor of presidents from the Republican Party, which political science at UC Santa Barbara, hosted “has long fought any type of climate-changea forum that dove deep into the Supreme related regulations.” Court ruling and what it meant in the conThese justices, she said, “are really doing text of environmental policy. Stokes’s book, what they themselves as individuals want to Short Circuiting Policy, examines how utili- do; they’re not thinking about precedent; ties and interest groups have promoted cli- they’re not thinking about the will of the mate denial and weakened clean energy laws people.” in recent years. While the decision may have cracked the During the forum, which was hosted via door for future political and legal challenges, Twitter by Evergreen Action and Earthjus- Stokes said that the EPA still has the authortice, Stokes explained that the recent deci- ity to regulate greenhouse-gas emissions. “It sion was limited in its scope and interprets a just underlines — if we could bold, italicize, specific section of the Clean Air Act, ruling and underline it any more—how critical it is that the EPA does not have the authority for Congress to act and pass the climate and to adopt “generation-shifting rules” — or clean energy investments,” Stokes said. “The rules that would require power plants to use administration still has a lot of tools in the other methods of producing energy aside toolbox.” n

Riccardo Muti

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Last year on June 11, 2021 we lost a very dear friend and mentor to many, Connie Speight at the age of 95 years young. Many folks knew her as The Elephant Lady, a misnomer, because she was a sprite woman, 5 foot tall, tiny as a mouse with a huge and mighty personality and spirit. At the age of 75, Connie was the founder of the Elephants Umbrella Fund, an organization that raised funds and rescued 19 elephants and supported many sanctuaries in Thailand, Laos and Cambodia. There were many happy Santa Barbara locals who looked forward to her biannual garage and plant sales. All proceeds went to her Ellies as she called them. Many people knew her and E.U.F. From Earth Day where she always had a booth to raise awareness of the plight of Asian elephants. Connie’s heart was large and tender leading her to many philanthropic organisations; Eyes in the Sky, Transition House, Habitat for Humanity and the Otter Pond at the Children’s Estate, which is now the Santa Barbara Zoo, where she has a plaque summing up her philosophy. Every Christmas Connie would host a luncheon at her lovely and humble home for a group of lady friends who would buy gifts for children. The Visiting Nurses Association would give her the names of those children most in need. Connie would give each of her friends, 1 or 2 children’s names, ages, and their wish list. We would buy gifts and get together at her home. Susan, a wonderful craft woman, would make these large Christmas stockings which we would fill with all the wrapped presents. Always a fun time and a win, win, win for all. Connie was an avid traveler and thought nothing of traveling alone to places all around the world. I am personally grateful to have traveled and accompanied her twice to Thailand and Nepal in the later years of her life to see the last remaining elephants in the wild and hangglide with the vultures and hawks (Parahawking) for her 90th birthday. The spirit of Connie lives on in the people and creatures, large and small, who she touched during her adventures on earth. She is missed dearly by her friends and we have no doubt she is impacting the space where ever she is. We thank you dear Connie for your precious heart, mind and spirit which connects all the ones you left behind.

Love from your friends of E.U.F. Donations in Connie’s memory can be made to Santa Barbara Zoo, Elephant Care International (ECI.org) or: Sébastien DUFFILLOT

Founder, Elephant Conservation Center phone: +33 (0)7 82 32 98 49 Web: https://www.elephantconservationcenter.com/ email: sebastien.duffillot@gmail.com

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JUNE 30-JULY 7, 2022

POLICE

SBPD Head Detective Put on Leave

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ergeant Brian Larson, head of the Santa Barbara Police Department’s detectives division and Crimes Against Persons Unit, has been on administrative leave since March 3 pending resolution of a fourmonth-long investigation into allegations he created a hostile work environment for women who worked under his supervision. According to police sources, Larson has been a gifted investigator who could be counted on to handle the toughest of the tough cases. Eight years ago, he won the prestigious H. Thomas Guerry Award. But according to the same sources, Larson could also be hard on people who worked under him. According to some, his critical remarks to the women he supervised were significantly harsher than those meted out to men. At issue was whether Larson’s conduct constituted sexual discrimination or merely bad management. City Hall hired an outside firm to investigate 13 allegations made against Larson; it reportedly determined that 11 were substantiated. Based on these findings, Commander Kenneth Kushner reportedly recommended that Larson be terminated. The matter then went to an internal hearing presided over by Interim Chief Bernard Melekian. Chief Melekian would instead recommend that Larson be suspended for 30 days without pay instead and reassigned to a different division. Larson was sworn into the Santa Barbara Police Department in June 2007 and promoted to sergeant in 2017 by former Chief Lori Luhnow. In 2019, Larson was elevated

COU RTESY SB PD

In Memoriam

Sergeant Brian Larson

to the Detective Bureau. Given Larson’s prominence in the department and the community, the circumstances surrounding his absence has stirred notice, speculation, and not an insubstantial amount of controversy. So, too, did Melekian’s decision to soften the disciplinary recommendation. Although Larson never agreed to the more favorable terms, it was expected he might sign legal papers early this week agreeing to Melekian’s determination. For the time being, however, that deal is off the table. A handful of new witnesses have reportedly come forward in the past week, and their accounts will now be investigated. Larson and Melekian declined to comment on any specifics of what remains a pending personnel action. —Nick Welsh

PUBLIC SAFETY

Neighbors and Rangers Try to Solve Montecito Hot Springs Dangers

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he last time Daryl Hodges hiked up to the hot springs above Montecito, he said people were soaking peacefully. “We’ve heard anecdotally that a couple of bad apples fall from the tree after dusk,” said Hodges, the Santa Barbara District Ranger for Los Padres National Forest. He knew that nearby residents were extremely worried about an event like 2008’s Tea Fire, which erupted after dusk when sundowner winds blew an inadequately extinguished bonfire into life and took out 210 homes before it was done. Hodges noted that campfires are banned in the forest currently and that they’d had to close Los Padres last year because of fire dangers. The issue of fire and evacuation has put the Hot Springs Trailhead in a spotlight recently, as residents have complained about illegal parking, while the county is trying to get landowners to remove their incursions into the public right-ofway that are taking up potential parking spaces. And parking is a hot potato

because of the recent viral popularity of the geothermal pools, which many attribute to the pandemic. Because the springs are in the federal forest, Congressmember Salud Carbajal convened a meeting including neighbors, law enforcement, County Parks officials, and a representative from 1st District Supervisor Das Williams’s office. At the meeting, Lieutenant Michael Wolfe of the California Highway Patrol said about 600 enforcement actions took place at the trailhead between December and May, ranging from verbal warnings about illegal parking to towing about 40 badly parked vehicles. And while most hikers were good stewards of the land, a few people were not and left trash behind. “There may be environmental degradation occurring from the simple fact that people put sunblock on,” Hodges noted. “The solution needs to be a collaborative effort, and we have a good start.” —Jean Yamamura


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

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RODR IG O H ER N AN DEZ

Third Week of Hwy. 154 Triple-Murder Trial Investigators and Defendant’s Mother Called to Stand

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Defendant John Dungan in court on Friday, June 1 by Rodrigo Hernandez uring the third week of the trial against John Dungan — a Santa Barbara man accused of killing a 34-year-old Solvang woman and her two children in a head-on collision on Highway 154 — prosecutors called upon investigators, who brought forward information regarding the severity of the crash, and the defendant’s mother. Michael Carlson approached the stand on Thursday, June 30, detailing his investigation and conclusions from the accident that occurred on October 25, 2019. At the time, Carlson was working as a detective with the Coroner’s Bureau, where his main role was to determine the cause and manner of deaths. Following the investigation, Carlson said that the driver, Rebecca Vanessa Goss Bley; and her children, Lucienne and Desmond Bley Gleason, died immediately upon impact from multiple blunt force traumatic injuries. Homicide was ruled as the manner of death, with agreement from forensic pathologist Dr. Manny Montez. Carlson told the jury about being called to the scene of the crash to find and recover the corpses, revealing graphic and vivid details about what was left of the bodies. Photographs of Bley’s charred body were displayed on the screen as Carlson described her injuries, including third-degree burns on her right shoulder, open fractures on her arm and leg, skull and neck fractures, and a dislocated pelvis. Carlson said that he had difficulty finding the children in the debris, stating that they were “burned beyond recognition” and that one of them was a torso, and the other an abdomen. Carlson said he had carbon monoxide tests conducted to see if the children were breathing during the fire, with results showing that they had no trace of the gas in their bodies. The former coroner’s detective said he had to use the childrens’ spleens in order to conduct the tests. The next day, the defendant’s mother, Geraldine Dungan, was called on Friday to

D

SE HABLA ESPAÑOL testify about her son. Geraldine provided quick and curt responses about her experience leading up to the event, often saying that she couldn’t recall the details. When asked if she and her son communicated regularly, she denied that they did. However, evidence would later show that John “almost exclusively” talked to his parents, with 1,400 messages between him and his mother and father over the course of June to October 2019. During cross examination, she testified to having impaired memory and being evaluated twice by psychologists and neurologists. She also said that her son would “always say things that were up for interpretation” and that he was “always thinking 10 moves ahead, calculating outcomes normal people aren’t paying attention to.” When questioned by the prosecution about whether her son is manipulative, she agreed. When asked about whether he is “mean,” she said she didn’t know. The next witness called was Special Agent of the California Department of Corrections Jeffrey Clements. A California Highway Patrol detective at the time, Clements was assigned as the lead investigator of the case. Clements described the process of obtaining texts from the defendant’s phone, which were also displayed in Judge Thomas Adams’s courtroom. On the day of the crash, Dungan texted his parents at 11:03 a.m., “I hope one day after I’m gone you’ll realize what you did wrong and understand that I loved you.” After attending therapy and visiting his mother later that day, he would text his parents shortly before the incident, at 4:33 p.m., saying, “Even though you may have disappointed me sometimes, I still love you both.” Clements said that Dungan’s court-mandated GPS anklet from a previous charge last registered at 4:44 p.m. on East Camino Cielo and Highway 154, with an alert of the strap being tampered with. The trial will continue on Thursday, July 7. n

Workplace Law and Related Litigation on Behalf of Employees and Employers. Santa Barbara · Ventura · San Luis Obispo. (805) 845-0864 · anticounilaw.com

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JUNE 30-JULY 7, 2022

n Us oiin JJo All Month Long for Indy Hops!

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HEALTH

County’s OD Deaths Accelerate

I

f overdose deaths continue at their current rate, there should be 182 such deaths by year’s end. That’s up from last year’s death count of 133 and the prior year’s overdose deaths of 114. This latest calculation comes courtesy of Sheriff Bill Brown, now leading the charge for any anti-opioid campaign he launched a few months ago dubbed Operation Opioid. According to Brown, there have been 91 overdose deaths during the first six months of this year. Half of those deaths, Brown said, are attributable to fentanyl, a synthetically made opioid said to be 50 times more powerful that morphine and 100 times more powerful than heroin. It’s also considerably more deadly and addicting. Fentanyl is sold in various forms, often in the guise of such prescription pharmaceuticals as Xanax and OxyContin. It is also frequently laced in street drugs like cocaine and methamphetamine. With sufficient quantities of fentanyl,

the body stops breathing and absorbing oxygen. Brown said the new stats underscore the urgency behind a campaign he announced amid his successful reelection effort earlier this year. Aside from a widespread messaging campaign, Brown said it’s his hope to distribute Narcan — a drug used to revive overdose victims — as widely as possible. “When you go into any public building, I want you to see a fire extinguisher, an AEB (machine used in event of heart attacks), and Narcan,” he said. “I want Narcan to become as common as fire extinguishers.” Currently, Pacific Pride is distributing drug test strips so that those using drugs recreationally can determine whether the drugs they’re taking are cut with fentanyl. In addition, Brown envisioned a public media campaign with buses adorned with “billboards” proclaiming, “Fentanyl Is Forever” or “One Pill Can Kill.” —Nick Welsh

ANIMALS

Starvation Caused Pelican Crisis EMM A SPENC ER

Indy ps Ho

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

R&R: To date, 280 ailing pelicans have been taken in by the Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for treatment and rehabilitation.

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he solution of any mystery invariably begets new riddles; such is the case with the mystery of the brown pelicans, in which starvation, it turns out, has been determined to be the culprit that claimed the lives of more than 200 of these acrobatic dive-bombers over the past two months off the coast of Southern California. What makes this more mystifying still is the fact that anchovies — on which brown pelicans feed — have been found in great abundance in coastal waters. This is the official finding of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife that’s spent the better part of two months trying to figure out what’s caused more than 700 of these once-endangered birds to wash up on shore so emaciated that they lack the ability to maintain their capacity for waterproofing, without which they’d die of hypothermia. State biologists determined that domoic acid — associated with red tides — was not to blame, nor was any variant of the avian flu. 12

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“The cause of this stranding event was determined to be starvation,” the department declared in a June 24 press statement. As to why the pelicans failed to avail themselves of the anchovies lying in such obvious abundance off the coastal waters, the department speculated it might be the “prolonged period of unusually strong winds in late April and early May” that interfered with the birds’ ability to forage. Department biologists also speculated that larger-than-average pelican populations this year might have played a role. The department is still investigating. To date, Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network has taken 280 brown pelicans in a state of evident distress. Of those, 40 percent died, 61 were locally released, and seven remain; the rest were transferred to other facilities down the coast. Locally, the survival rate has been about 70 percent. Statewide, it’s estimated that 200 of the 700 pelicans taken in by various rehab centers up and down the coast perished. —Nick Welsh


Tear this sheet out and bring it with you!

Indy s p Ho Join in

July 1 to July 31

A monthlong beer crawl hosted by the Santa Barbara Independent

Here’s How It Works

Over the course of July, visit all participating breweries and order a pint (or two!) When you order, get your Indy Hops Passport stamped Collect all the stamps throughout the month

Bring your completed passport to our Passport Drop Party on Sunday, July 31 from

2-4pm at Night Lizard to be entered to win gift cards from the participating breweries

independent.com/indyhops

Indy Hops PASSPORT

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Indy s p o H Tear this sheet out and bring it with you!

T R O P PASS

Receive a stamp from each brewery by ordering a pint during the month of July

Bring your completed passport to our Passport Drop Party on Sunday, July 31 from 2-4pm at Night Lizard to be entered to win gift cards from the participating breweries. For full Drop Party details visit our website.

Participating Breweries Carpinteria

Santa Barbara

Carpinteria

Goleta

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara

Goleta

Carpinteria

Bonus Tasks!

WEEK ONE: Bring a friend to your favorite participating brewery!

WEEK TWO: Visit a participating brewery that you have never been to before

WEEK THREE: Do a tasting flight

WEEK FOUR: Buy beer to take home

independent.com/indyhops


A

Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Is That a Credit Card Stuck in Your Throat?

LONG, HOT BUMMER: Increasingly, I seek refuge in the idiotic, the stupid, and the irrelevant. Outrage over anything else has become too dangerous. Why does my neighborhood supermarket insist on stocking its vinegar bottles on a totally separate aisle from all its cooking oils and salad dressings? And what genius forgot to add the necessary apostrophes to the words “Mens” and “Womens” painted onto the bathroom doors at some chichi restaurant where I recently ate? We all need aggravations we can safely agitate over without fear of self-immolation. There are way too many we can’t, as with this week’s mass shooter du jour who celebrated the Fourth of July by firing off 79 rounds from his assault-style rifle in a sweet small town just outside Chicago. Police, we have learned, had been called twice to his home in the past, once for threatening suicide, once for threatening to kill others. During those occasions, police would find he had 16 knives, a dagger, and a sword. Despite these warning signs, the shooter was allowed to purchase five firearms — one being the rifle — before turning 21. It was all perfectly legal. His father, a one-time mayoral candidate, served as his sponsor. I can’t go there. Until recently, I felt the same numb, dumb rage over the oceans of unnecessary plastic packaging that inevitably accompany 98.7 percent of all purchases I make. Yes, we live in

an unsafe world, but do we really need to put condoms on absolutely everything? To listen to the petrochemical industry, I guess we do. The results, they say, speak for themselves. Today, there are now 8 billion of us. When I was born, there were only 3 billion. What happened in between? The production of about 8 billion metric tons of plastics. This past week, enviros scored a massive victory for sanity and common sense when Governor Gavin Newsom signed SB 54, which mandates the reduction of such plastic production by 25 percent by the year 2032. This bill also requires all one-time-use plastics be made of recycled materials by that date. It doesn’t outright outlaw Styrofoam, but comes pretty damn close. In addition, the bill will require the plastic industry to pony up $500 million a year for the next 10 years to mitigate the negative impacts of its prior mass plasticization of the environment. The bill got passed — just one vote shy of unanimously — at the 11th hour and 59th minute only because enviro activists had a statewide ballot initiative all dressed up and ready to go for this November’s election. The petrochemical industry agreed not to fight the legislative fix because they didn’t want to risk losing at the ballot box. The legislative route also gave them two extra years to comply. In years past, the enviros — in their effort to win public support — cried convincing tears about the violence being inflicted by vast

ocean-borne swarms of micro-plastics upon marine mammals and otherwise innocent sea creatures. Yes, we felt awful about it. But plastics are so cheap and so damn convenient. And then there was COVID to worry about. But more recently, activists have emphasized a more alarming factoid that requires no connection between empathy and action to be effective. Marine biologists in Australia discovered the average human now ingests five grams of micro-plastics per week. And that, it turns out, is how much an average credit card would yield if ground up into tiny micro-plastic fragments. What happens to our bodies once ingesting these tiny petrochemical breadcrumbs? No one really has a clue. But one credit card’s worth a week? Probably not good. Some within the environmental community argue that the recycling of plastics is a deliberate fraud aggressively perpetrated by petrochemical industries. (Because plastics come in an infinite variety of chemical formulations, this argument goes, they defy all economically viable methods of recycling.) This deception gives the public false comfort that something is being done with the teeming multitudes of plastic water bottles and plastic bags currently drowning the planet. In fact, California Attorney General Rob Bonta launched such an investigation this April, accusing Big Oil of concocting another Big Lie with recyclables the same way it did with climate change. I take refuge in the assurances of Kathi

King with Santa Barbara’s Community Environmental Council, who’s been bird-dogging various forms of plasticide here in Santa Barbara since 2006. King called the bill “a historical breakthrough.” Yes, it’s true that only 5 percent of all plastics are now getting recycled. But it’s also true there are 80 such recycling operations in the United States specializing in re-tooling old water bottles. Given the global enormity of California’s economy and its recycling markets, maybe the state’s new plastics bill — which also requires producers to bear the cradle-to-grave costs of their petrochemical spawn industrial — will improve these numbers. Only time will tell. It’s worth noting that India banned single-use plastic bags one day after Newsom signed the plastic recycling bill. Two weeks prior, Canada banned the manufacture and importation of single-use plastics of any kind. In Santa Barbara, activists are joining Kathi King in lobbying City Hall to ban the sale of plastic water bottles at the City of Santa Barbara’s ever-expanding airport. This should be a no-brainer. Hey, in 2012, we passed a single-use plastic bag ban and the world did not come crashing to a halt. Some inconveniences — however rhetorical they might seem — are necessary to incur. I don’t know if any of this qualifies as cause for hope. But it’s reassuring to discover intelligent life still exists on Planet Earth. —Nick Welsh

PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891

Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until July 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic

“Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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OPINIONS CONT’D JOHN COLE, NCPOLICYWATCH.COM

Letters

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he price for public parking is going up a dollar beginning July 1, according to a sign at the parking lot at the corner of Chapala and Carrillo streets. This seems outrageous, just as the price of gasoline is at an all-time high and it seems that the country is going into a recession. I go to a nearby gym regularly. While the city allows the first hour and 15 minutes free, any time after that will cost $2.50. Also, there are no parking attendants at the stations. This means that if people need to pay with cash or if they lose their ticket, they are out of luck. How much does the city get in parking currently? How much goes into paying the wages for parking attendants? Will this impact downtown businesses? Will S.B. residents skip going downtown, especially during the winter when there are fewer tourists who frequent the downtown businesses? Why was this increase passed when California gas prices are leading the nation? This increase is another Santa Barbara self-inflicted wound on the economy. —Raul Hernandez, S.B.

Mad Kings

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his July 4 marks the 246th year since our declaration of independence from the authoritarian madness of King George III. I am proud to be a part of our great American experiment in political freedom. Today, to paraphrase Lincoln, we are engaged in a great culture war testing whether this nation, or any democratic nation, can long endure. History has cast three individuals into the long shadows of Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln: Vice President Mike Pence, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, and Trump Chief of Staff Mark Meadows. Pence, McConnell, and Meadows knew early on that the 2020 presidential election was not stolen—thanks, January 6 Committee. Prominent Trump Republican officials have testified that months prior to the January 6 coup attempt, the multiple, baseless Trump “Stop the Steal” schemes at the federal, state, and individual level were unconstitutional, likely criminal. Since the failed Trump coup, Pence, McConnell, and Meadows have been virtually silent, MIA! That silence perpetuates the toxic Trump deceit. Their forthright voices could change the course of our present political upheaval. Do Pence, McConnell, and Meadows stand with the mad king? Or with our

American experiment in democracy this July 4?

—Joe White, Lompoc

Carp Pride

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arpinteria, the largest grower of pot in the state? Is that something we’re supposed to be proud of? I, for one, think not. My family reaches back more than 100 years in Carpinteria and Montecito. My grandfather was always happy to come to beautiful Carpinteria from his home in Pasadena and stay at his two-story on the corner of 3rd Street with his three kids, one of whom was my father. Carpinteria was famous for lemons and later avocados, as well as the world’s safest beaches. We had a home on Padaro Lane almost 60 years. The simple question is, wouldn’t you rather be known for the world’s safest and most beautiful beaches? Or the pot capital of California? —William T.Caspers, Oxnard

For the Record

INGRID BOSTROM

Parking Dollars

¶ We clarify the caption for Aliso Elementary School’s former students that ran in the June 23 issue: Virginia Goena (left); Lorenzo Martinez; Josephine Villegas, who is 102, not 103; her son Benito Villegas; Salvador Campos; and Tomas Castelo. Benito Villegas and Castelo were in the school as it integrated, while the four others attended during the segregated days. The correct website for the Latinx Arts Project is latinxartsproject.org. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions. INDEPENDENT.COM

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obituaries Thomas F McBride 8/6/1938 - 6/10/2022

On June 10, 2022, Thomas F McBride closed his eyes, took his last breath, and went into heavenly slumber. Tom was born in Los Angeles on August 6, 1938, to John Harold and Ruth Carolyn (LaFontaine) McBride. Tom was a good-natured man, who could be counted on for a ready smile and a quick, humorous quip. He was caring, honest, sincere, and immensely creative and talented. Tom attended schools in the Los Angeles area, going on to graduate from Santa Monica High, where he was the student body president, head yell leader, and winning sprinter in his class size. He also took the lead in the senior play, Death Takes a Holiday, which he later commented “was a terrible old play.” He attended Santa Monica City College, Cal State Northridge, and Chouinard Art Institute now known as CalArts. Tom was one of Malibu’s regulars, during the Gidget days. He lived on Las Flores Beach in Malibu. He enjoyed the much simpler life of those days, with the “sand and surf as his front yard and 10′ longboards. Nothing better.” His surfing friend, Dutch Vandervoort said, “In the water (Tom) had a smooth, easy style on his board. In 1959, while he was in Hawaii, Tom had the guts to take off deep in the pocket at Makaha, or Sunset Beach… he had the skill and judgment to successfully make these 10’12’- plus waves, though he never bragged about his exploits. Tom was humble and full of joy just to surf those Hawaiian waves.” (For more stories about Tom’s surfing days, visit his website: atomicbride.com.) Tom was previously married to Carmen Dragon, namesake of the famous American Conductor. They had one daughter, Kelly Marie. Tom moved from the LA area to Hawaii, then on to Santa Barbara, finally settling in Carpinteria. On February 2, 2002 at 2:22 pm, in the beautiful Santa Barbara Courthouse sunken gardens, Tom married the love of his life, Janette “Jan” Walsh. Tom and Jan enjoyed life, taking walks on the Carpinteria State Beach and 18

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the Carpinteria Bluffs, attending art galleries and art exhibits, theatre, and musical events, including those sponsored by the Santa Barbara Jazz Society, the board on which Jan has served as its executive secretary. The couple enjoyed traveling, visiting family and friends afar, as well as venturing north as often as possible to their favorite spots, Cambria and Big Sur. Tom has had a varied professional career. Tom worked for the Doheny Estate, which is now a park in Beverly Hills; building superintendent for the American Film Institute in Los Angeles; and an assistant to longtime friends, Bill and Cathy Royer, who owned and operated Imports East in Los Angeles. For the past 30 plus years, Tom has been employed as the property manager of Rancho Granada Mobile Home Park, a senior community, where he resided with his wife, Jan. Tom sat on the rent control board in Carpinteria, saying “it was my way of protecting senior citizens from overzealous property owners.” Ever the artist, Tom was always creating. His abstract paintings and sculptures are owned by several well-known individuals, notwithstanding those owned and revered by family and friends. In addition to Tom’s artistic talents as a painter and sculptor, Tom also had a passion for creating musical compositions. He collaborated with numerous local and outof-town musicians, the list of which includes Dick and Arlene Dunlap, Joseph Woodard, Jim Connelly, Jeff Kaiser, Fred Olivas, and others. In his younger days, Tom had fun playing the saxophone with Alan Goulding and Doug Dragon, brother of Daryl Dragon, aka Captain, as in Captain and Tennille, a musical duo known for many pop songs, including Muskrat Love and Love Will Keep Us Together. Although Tom goes on to explore new frontiers in the heavenly realms of eternity, the void of his absence will never be filled in some of us, most especially within the heart of his loving wife, Jan. Pay attention to those who are present in your life. “Love one another, as I have loved you,” said Jesus. (John 13:34) Remember, Time is always of the essence. After all, death doesn’t always take a holiday. Tom is preceded in death by his parents, Harold and Ruth McBride, his loving sister, Margaret Pickering, and nephew Scott McBride. He leaves behind his devoted and loving wife, Jan McBride and her daughter,

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Angela Archer; his daughter, Kelly Marie McBride; grandsons Sean Arbaut (Shelby), and Dylan Arbaut; his beloved brother, Robert McBride (Lois); nieces Suzanne Solberg (Dr. Dave), children, Patrick and Sandra; Barbara Hurlburt (Mark), son, Paul (Krys); nieces by marriage: Lynn McBride (Craig), sons Brandon and Dalton, and Shaina Riker (Matt), son, Nolan; nephews, Trevor Pickering (Cris), daughter, Nora; Brooks Pickering (Janna), children Sam and Halle, and Brooks’ former spouse, Susan Pickering, and their children, Quinn and Reed; former son-in-law, Charles Arbaut; and Tom’s in-laws, Jerry and Betty Barb, and Carol Clark. Tom also leaves behind numerous friends, especially his longtime friends, Bill Brice, Dick and Arlene Dunlap, Bart Dickens and Gilbert Hall. Thanks go to the following: Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital ER and Tom’s medical team, including Drs. Nguyen, Yim, Vowels, Elder, Golan, Diener and Lash, but most especially Morgana Jacques, RN and case manager, Kim Pointer. Special thanks also go to Daniel Greenwald, M.D., his P.A., Amanda Sweet, and the staff of UCLA Cancer Center. Gratitude to Tom’s longtime treating physician, Alex Koper, M.D., who, like Dr. Greenwald, cares a great deal about his patients, along with his staff at Sansum Clinic. Thank you to Andrew Ross, M.D. and his staff. Thank you goes to the following: the ever kind-hearted David Moorman, and the VNA Loan Closet for providing medical equipment; VNA Hospice nursing and other staff members for helping Jan and the family through the rough last several days as Tom transitioned; Central Coast Home Health, especially Tom’s nurse, Christina Dugre; who always brought a smile; and special thanks to Shaina Riker, who lovingly assisted in the home care of her Uncle Tom. A celebration of life to honor Tom will be held in the near future. Please consider a donation of any size to the American Cancer Society, or a charity of your choice.

Nancy Lee Yox

10/31/1948 - 4/1/2022

Nancy Lee Yox of Santa Barbara, California passed away peacefully on April 1, 2022 at her home, surrounded by loving family after a long illness. She was born on October 31, 1948 in Boston, Massachusetts, the first daughter of Richard and Beverly Jones. Her early years were spent in Los Angeles, Laguna Beach and Fresno, California, moving several times during her father’s medical residencies. Continuing the pattern of multiple moves, Nancy attended four different high schools and studied Studio Art at four different colleges, graduating from Humboldt State University in 1970 with a B.A. in Studio Art. She met her husband Tim in 1975 at the Indonesian clothing and fabric store, Thin Air. They went on to become a wholesale clothing company, Back East. Back East imported a unique clothing line based on Indonesian batik textiles. Nancy helped create the clothing styles along with executing design of many other aspects of the business. During this time Nancy raised their two children, a daughter, Tia Barrett Yox and son, Adam Andrew Yox, in Santa Barbara. Avid world travelers during their marriage, they spent time in Mexico, Indonesia, Europe, Hong Kong, U.S. Virgin Islands and annual trips to a small village in the South of France where they owned a “petit mas” in the countryside. Many summers and winter vacations were spent at their cabin built by Tim in the Sierras in Arnold, California. They were also sailboat owners and loved to sail to the Channel Islands, participating in many Yacht Club excursions to Catalina with their friends through the club. Nancy was an elegant hostess who loved to cook delicious gourmet food and their homes were always beautifully decorated. In later years she delighted in being a grandmother, and designing jewelry. She was devoted to her family and many friends, including lifelong dear friend Julie Benson.

Nancy is survived by her husband Timothy, daughter Tia, son Adam, as well as her brother Richard M. Jones (Claire) of St. George, Utah and her sister Catherine Jones-Aidnik (David) of Santa Barbara, grandson Ascher Yox and granddaughters Olivia Curry-Yox and Sophia Curry-Yox as well as multiple nieces and nephews. She will be forever missed by those who loved her.

Fran M. Dickey

4/1/1927 - 4/2/2022

On April 2, 2022 Fran passed away after a number of years fighting Parkinsons. She passed away just one day after her 95th birthday. Fran was born in Racine, WI. and graduated from Rippin College. She lived in Tulsa, Miami, and then moved to New Jersey, where she got her masters degree at Columbia University in New York. She then decided to move to California and settled in Goleta in 1967. Fran began her teaching career at the Goleta middle school. Her passion was art and she taught for 20 years before retiring. Goleta and Santa Barbara were the perfect setting for her with the ocean and mountains near by. Her legacy will live on through her students and their children. Those who knew her knew she was a warm and kind person. A special thanks to her close friends Trish and Vi for without them life would have been far more difficult toward the end. Another thank you to the folks at Casa Linda where she spent her last seven years. She also had a special place in her heart for her nephew, John Jr. as well as her two nieces Jennifer and Johanna. Until we meet again rest in peace, John Dickey (her brother).. Continued on p.20


In Memoriam

Tom Murray 1964-2022

Guitar Player ROD ROLLE

and recording engineers Mark Anthony, Paul E. Rubin, Elliott at Hidden City Studio and 11 South Studios. The other side of our SPO journey would be the many clubs, restaurants, taprooms, and organizations who believed in Stiff Pickle and whom we thank, in part: Barb and the crew at The Brewhouse, Figueroa Mountain Brewing Taprooms, Pearl Social Santa Barbara, Carr Winery, the M. Special Brewing Company, Longoria Winery & Tasting Room, and our fans, The Pickletts. On September 26, 2010, the Stiff Pickle Orchestra won first place in the Santa Barbara Blues Society “Battle of the Blues Bands” acoustic division. The Blues Society sent us to Memphis for the 27th Annual International Blues Challenge in late January 2011. Tom said over and over again that his proudest musical moments came from the recognitions we received from the Blues Society and the times they asked us to open for several of their big shows. Once again, thank all of you for believing in Tom Murray and the Stiff Pickle Orchestra. -Rod Rolle

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usic and family were Tom Murray’s life. He loved spending time on the beautiful Santa Barbara beaches and in the backcountry. He loved creating things with his hands. Tom grew up in the Santa Barbara foothills in a family that has roots here leading back to the 1860s. He rode his bike through the lemon orchards off Foothill, took his motorcycle out to Caliente Hot Springs, and was a “hotshot” firefighter in Los Padres National Forest — after hearing him play guitar, his boss said, “I think you’re in the wrong profession!” His sister, Colleen Million, remembered, “In his youth, my brother was crazy about learning to play the guitar. I remember him spending consecutive days in his room, never leaving it, just so that he could play Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton licks over and over on his vinyl record player while teaching his fingers to play all the riffs just like the British blues players. Eventually, he moved on to the great American originators of the blues. He was incredibly dedicated! He went on to study music at the Musician’s Institute in Hollywood and graduated in 1985.” Tom met Linda Hughes during Fiesta ’81, and they were married the following September. They went together to Los Angeles, and when they returned to Santa Barbara, where Tom attended Santa Barbara City College, he was named music student of the year and won the Mahlon Balderston Scholarship Award. He then applied to UCSB, where he was awarded a Regents Scholarship and majored in music composition at the College of Creative Studies. Through all this, Tom and Linda had four children while working toward their UCSB degrees, Linda’s in educational psychology. Tom played gigs, dreaming of and then building a house for the family. Linda remembered, “We took our young children everywhere with us to listen to live music and see Tom play the big stage. Live Oak was always a special weekend. We counted them as the next generation of aspiring musicians. Tom focused on ethnomusicology and the blues. And we always had music in our house.” He devoted much of his life, day in and day out, to playing music. The riffs he would play and the rewinding of the tape player were the continuous pattern in the house, Linda said, while the rest of us would tap our feet in the living room and two-step while cooking in the kitchen. Tom’s sliding blues, jubilant melodies, and deep singing voice

are encapsulated in the songs he leaves behind. Not long before he died, Tom shared his belief in music. Perhaps some would call it being “in the zone,” but he explained a moment more than that, one that in some ways transcended all else. Being a master at your craft is in that moment, when you can play it all with ease and with joy. Tom believed that his music was his connection to the Eternal. Fellow musician Cyrus Clarke describes his own experience parting ways musically with Tom. “One day, Tom told me he had to stop playing music with me. At first, I thought maybe my personal hygiene or bad attitude was responsible; this hadn’t ever happened to me before. But in the next sentence, he told me that he just needed to spend all of his time with his own music. I can’t describe how much I respected him for that; it’s a tough decision I’ve had to make for myself as well. I always knew that Tom was the real deal, but that sealed it for me. I was standing in front of a great artist who believed in himself and would do anything to develop that creativity that he held in his soul.” Tom was driven to not only perfect his own skills but to share the gift of music with others. For almost 40 years, Tom taught students music — starting in 1985 at Jensen Music and then later his own spot: Guitarman Studios. He worked in just about every music store in Santa Barbara, collecting and keeping students who followed him to different teaching locations for years until they left for college, many remaining close family friends. Some of his own nephews, struck by inspiration, became musicians in their own right. There was a wide array of generations and ages of students and their families he encouraged to play guitar -Etta Murray and Linda Murray and ukulele.

I

was a member of the Stiff Pickle Orchestra with Tom. I knew him as a devoted husband, father, grandfather, music teacher, mentor, entrepreneur, an exceptional singer/songwriter/slide-guitar-player with a musical passion, and a longtime friend. His was a friendship that always encouraged creativity on our musical journey. On behalf of Tom Murray, I would like to thank all who helped develop the Stiff Pickle Orchestra (SPO) “juke joint” blues sound: Alex Marshal (a k a Frank Frank), Mark Anthony, Barney Drake, Art Larsen, Dennis Berger, Jill Avery, Ej’e Lynn-Jacobs, SPO soundman Richard Johnson,

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inally, in Tom’s words: “I’m The One Who’s Your Friend.”

I heard your singing angels Crying last night Saying meeting your maker It’s gonna be alright Cause I’ll be at the station to meet you When your train pulls in And they’ll be no mistakin’ me Cause I’m the one who’s your friend Now that we’re near the end So fasten your seatbelt And jump right in It’s up around the corner Just around the bend And I’ll be at the station to meet you When your train pulls in And they’ll be no mistakin’ me Cause I’m the one who’s your friend Now that we’re near the end No need to pack a bag Cause there’s nothing you need You came here all alone Your treasure you leave And I’ll be at the station to meet you When your train pulls in And there’ll be no mistakin’ me Because I’m the one Who’s your friend Now that we’re near the end

After a two-year battle with stage IV prostate cancer, Tom passed away on May 16, 2022. He is survived by his wife, Linda; children, Katie, Etta, Oliver, and Iris; granddaughter, Lilith; mother, Marilyn Murray; and sisters, Pam Bateman, Colleen Million, and Kim Sheetz.

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

James D. Cook

Ecco Sorenson Ochoa

James Daniel Cook, died May 6, 2022 from complications from surgery. He was born in Detroit, Michigan in 1961. His parents are Robert E. Cook and Iris M. Cook. His brother pre-deceased him in 1995 and his father in 2016. He enjoyed a long career working in wealth management for Santa Barbara Bank & Trust and Wells Fargo. He was a wonderful human being and was so competent, capable, hardworking and most of all Kind. He always helped others in need. Jim was very active volunteering in the community. He was a passionate volunteer helping many non-profits with their auctions. In addition, he served on many boards: Santa Barbara Jaycees, Arthritis Foundation, Santa Barbara Firefighters Alliance, Profant Foundation, Emmaus of Santa Barbara and Jodi House. He is dearly missed by his mother, his African Grey Parrot, Cisco, and many friends. In lieu of flowers please make a donation to VNA Health of Santa Barbara. A Celebration of Life Open House is scheduled at VNA Health Community Room on Saturday, July 16th from 1-4 PM located at 509 E Montecito Street, Santa Barbara.

Ecco S. Ochoa ventured on into the next life on June 22, 2022, in Santa Barbara, California. She passed at the home of her son, Retired Superior Court Judge Frank J. Ochoa Jr. She was given extraordinary end-of-life care by her daughters-in-law, Paula Lopez Ochoa and Rosario Vidales-Ochoa. Ecco Sorenson was born in Driggs, Idaho. Her father, Jesse Frank Sorenson, served in the 91st “Wild West Division” in World War I and fought in the Battle of Meuse-Argonne. Her mother, Ada Majora Bigelow was from Wallsburg, Utah. Her grandmother’s family were Mormon Handcart pioneers. Her Bigelow ancestors included an Officer in the First Continental Army who served directly under General George Washington and an Army of the Potomac Artillery Officer who served at the Battle of Gettysburg. Ada and Jesse eloped and were married in Idaho Falls, Idaho on January 2, 1920. Ecco was the first of their four children. Wanda, Frank, and Dale followed. The boys were both veterans of World War II. They moved to Long Beach when Ecco was 5 years old. She lived there until moving to Santa Barbara in 2000. Ecco earned an A.A. degree from Long Beach City College in1940 and started working the same year at Douglas Aircraft Company in Long Beach. During World War II, Douglas built war aircraft for the U.S. military, and she worked as a “rate” girl in the employment department and as a clerk for the plant manager. She also worked for a time in Philadelphia in an aircraft factory as a spot welder building Conestoga aircraft because she wanted to serve her country in any way needed. She returned to Douglas in winter 1944. She then met the love of her life, Frank Joseph Ochoa, who was also working at Douglas, and they married on November 2, 1945 in Lakewood, California. Ecco and Frank settled in Long Beach and their first child was born in 1948. Over the next

1961 - 2022

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7/11/1920 - 6/22/2022

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four years, three more sons were born. Ecco’s main job in those years was raising her 4 sons John, Frank Jr., Dana, and Victor, who were born within 4 years of each other. Later, she worked in clerical capacities in business and law offices. Despite her extraordinary memory for past events when it came to questions about raising her four sons, her response was “I don’t remember. It was all a blur.” She is survived by three of her children (Dana pre-deceased her), seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She was a lifelong avid reader. She read and explained materials to her children on a nightly basis, creating strong foundations for their educational attainments. She passed that “love of reading” quality on to her sons and other descendants. She considered the First Congregational Church of Santa Barbara her second home. She was active in the church’s Dorcas Circle, spending countless hours knitting blankets and sewing quilts for homeless, disabled and other underprivileged children. She was a member of the League of Women Voters for decades and was very proud when she received her 50 years membership recognition many years ago. Aware that she was born in the year that women achieved the right to vote, she made sure to never miss voting in any election in her entire life. Ecco was a perpetual giver. She gave to UNESCO children’s funds, literacy programs, and other charitable endeavors. As their Christmas gifts, she gave her grandchildren gift cards showing that they had given a gift to organizations such as “Heifer International”. This organization provides agricultural supplies and other food sources to end poverty and hunger around the world. She gave such gifts in their names to teach them the ethic of giving. Excited utterances among the kids around the Yule Tree would be: “I gave a goat to people in need!” The response: “Well I gave three chickens!” She was a staunch advocate for civil rights, peace, and equality of treatment for persons of all races, ethnicities, nationalities, and genders. She and her husband proudly displayed in the window of their home in Long Beach a sticker that read “My neighbor may be of any race, religion, or nationality.” Throughout the Vietnam War she wore a necklace pendant which read, “War is Not Healthy for Children and Other

Living Things.” When asked what message she would want to impart to her descendants, she said, “I would just tell them to care about other people. Caring about the world, and the people in it, makes a life worth living.” A Celebration of Life for Ecco S. Ochoa will occur on Friday, July 8, 2022, at 10 am at the First Congregational Church, 2101 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105.

Richard “Rick” Hamilton

4/14/1944 - 6/27/2022

CELEBRATION OF LIFE FOR RICHARD “RICK” HAMILTON. PLEASE JOIN US TO CELEBRATE THE LIFE OF RICK. THIS WILL BE HELD ON 07/17/2022 AT MANNING PARK AREA 9 IN MONTECITO. THE LOCATION IS AT THE LOWER SECTION OF THE PARK, TAKE SANTA YSIDRO ROAD, THEN TURN ONTO SANTA ROSA LANE. THIS WILL BE A POT LUCK STYLE EVENT, PLEASE BRING A DISH. THE RECEPTION WILL TAKE PLACE BETWEEN 12:00 PM– 5:00PM. PLEASE HELP SPREAD THE WORD. WE WOULD LOVE TO SEE YOU THERE! In lieu of flowers, we would ask you to please donate to ASAP Cats in Rick’s name.

Grant Edward Burrows 5/3/1968 - 5/17/2022

Grant Edward Burrows was born to Sue and Donald Burrows and grew up in Santa Barbara, California. As a child he loved playing in the creek and going on adventures with his friends and cousins. He attended Santa Barbara High School and participated in student government, track, and cross-country. Following high school he backpacked through Europe before entering college. Grant studied philosophy at UCLA, UC Irvine, and USC. After graduating, Grant worked with his father at Anarad, Inc. in Santa Barbara, where he taught himself software programming. Grant continued his career as a programmer and engineer for nearly 30 years working at Rockwell Collins and Panasonic Avionics. Grant was gifted with a love of foreign languages and cultures. He never missed a opportunity to visit a new country, try new foods, or meet new people and learn about their lives. Grant loved to travel and he settled in Vietnam at various times of his life, making Hoi An his home for many years. Grant was a devoted father to his daughters Christina and Emma. He often took his daughters on road trips around North America and on trips to Asia, South America and Europe. Grant strived to make his daughters adventurous, hard workers, independent, and open to new ideas. Grant is survived by his daughter Emma Burrows and her mother Van Ho, his daughter Christina Burrows and grandsons Alexander and Adam, his brother Wyeth Burrows, his sisters Heather Burrows and Dawn Anderson, and his aunts and uncles Billie Maunz, Chuck Maunz, Carolyn Novick, and Peter Novick. Grant was preceded in death by his parents Donald and Sue Burrows. A celebration of his life will be held later this year.


obituaries Jeffrey Martin Kustal 3/2/1941 - 6/14/2022

“By rising gently you might learn, The days come once and don’t return, And you should be there when they do, There is but one life given you.” (from the poem “The Days in a Life”) Poet, devoted husband and father, friend, and world traveler, our beloved Jeffrey Martin Kustal peacefully ended his long battle with Parkinson’s on June 14th, passing at the age of 81. Jeff was husband to Lyn, and father to sons Robert and Eric. He eventually found lasting happiness in the small town of Ojai, California, thousands of miles from where his journey through life began, on March 2nd, 1941, when he was born to Robert and Susan in the bustling neighborhood of Brooklyn’s Sheepshead Bay. After graduating from Brooklyn’s James Madison High School and New York’s Pratt Institute, Jeff received his graduate degree from Northwestern’s Kellogg School. He then shaped what would be a highly successful business managing properties across the United States. He based his company first in Santa Barbara, where he re-located in 1974 with first wife Carol, and later in Ojai, where he moved in 1993. But Jeff ’s true love and passion was always writing poetry, and he may have been most fulfilled through his involvement in his later years with the Ojai Senior Writer’s group, where he made lasting relationships. Jeff will also be remembered for his amazing health and stamina, the byproduct of what started as long-distance running in his late 20’s and evolved into grueling sessions on the exercise bike and treadmill in his later years (maintaining the pace of some half his age), and, finally, walking the equivalent of coast-to-coast even as a dreaded disease enveloped him. 90He’ll also be remembered for his quick wit (with the slight propensity to veer into Dad-jokery), his deep generosity, his heartfelt

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com concern for others – and, last but certainly not least – his beloved garden, which grew into a personal backyard-oasis from years of diligent work (and, lest we forget, his vast accumulation of mileage points). Jeff is survived by his brother Glenn (Marion,) his sister Cathy, his wife Lyn of Ojai, Lyn’s daughters Dana and Amy (Thompson) of Simi Valley, son Robert and wife Emi of Walnut Creek, son Eric of San Francisco, and grandsons William and Nico. A Celebration of Life will be held July 16th in the area surrounding his beloved garden. In lieu of flowers please make a donation to The Parkinson’s Foundation or The Michel J. Fox Foundation.

John Robert DeLoreto 3/30/1959 - 6/17/2022

John R. DeLoreto, born in Santa Barbara, CA, on March 30th, 1959, the son of James and Frances Neilson DeLoreto, passed away peacefully on June 17th, 2022 at his home in AZ surrounded by loved ones after battling cancer. John is survived by family members: daughter Caroline (Adam Taft); son Robert James (RJ) & granddaughters Liliana & Myloh DeLoreto; ex-wife Camilla La Mer (aka Victoria); brothers Edward S. & James Jr. (Sally), niece Megan (Matt), nephews Chris & Greg DeLoreto; extended family Silvia Biedermann, Monique Franco, Alicia Lopez & Ferman Kelly III; & his God family Hilary Ruston and godchildren Kate and Max Ruston. As a child John loved cuddling with his parents and adored his older brothers who played, read to him & taught him a lot. They gave him a lot of attention since he was the baby of the family. He had a photographic memory and was a natural entrepreneur. Neighbors remember buying hot dogs at Johnny’s Treehouse Café or seeing a film at his basement theater. He attended Roosevelt & Laguna Blanca where he met his lifelong best friends Lanny Ebenstein, Theodore Gekis, Hilary Ruston & Danielle Greene. He attended Cate HS & SBHS. John’s passions included: government

& justice, debating with Lanny starting at age five about presidential elections; standing up for other students, as Hilary remembers; participating in theater & film; writing for school newspapers; & pushing the limits. He studied Comparative Literature at Berkeley & met & fell deeply in love with his wife Victoria. Each night they would watch Julia Child, cooking her meals & laughing. They moved to SB & got married. Caroline was born while John attended SB Law School. RJ was born prematurely a year later as John sat his CA State Bar Exam. A month of driving to Ventura’s Neonatal Unit inspired John & Victoria to be the first to fundraise for a Cottage Hospital Neonatal Unit which was built soon after. One of John’s greatest joys was raising his kids & grandkids: Telling his famous & magical “Rosie Bomb” stories, golfing with RJ, attending plays with Caroline, & going on many adventures. One of John’s purposes in life was to give a voice to those in need, to stand up for what was right & speak up against injustice. He had a huge heart. Sometimes his outspokenness could stir the waters but brought needed changes. In the 90’s he was on the Goleta Waterboard during the drought helping bring state water to SB, won cases against police injustices including harassment against gay business owners in SB, & was on the board of Access Theater. John had many gifts and talents. He had a unique view of life from his colorful personality & quick mind, sometimes bringing challenges, but also seeing many possibilities where others could not. He was inventive, creative, imaginative, & brilliant as a lawyer. John would bring a smile during difficult times & a good laugh at life. He was a firecracker & bright ball of energy, taking this life & everyone who met him by storm. John was loved by many & will be greatly missed. Service will be held at SB Mission at 11:00am July 29th. For information on service and more go to website: www.celebratingjohndeloreto.com

Leslie Steinmetz

Ben Hull

Leslie Rogers Ackerman Steinmetz, age 98, passed away on June 29th, 2022, at her home due to complications from COVID 19. She was born in New York City on March 22, 1924, raised in Larchmont, New York, and graduated from Vassar College in the class of 1945-4. Her two former husbands, Lee Ackerman and Fred Steinmetz, and her beloved Companion, Jerry Shore, predeceased her. She lived in Phoenix, Arizona, and Malibu, California, before moving to Santa Barbara, California, in 1984. Leslie worked in the Los Angeles Unified School District for 20 years as an elementary school teacher and a reading specialist. Active in many organizations she was especially proud of her work in UTLA (the teachers’ union), her engagement in anti-Vietnam war activities as well as her work as president of the Santa Barbara Peace Resource Center, and the board of the Santa Barbara ACLU. Leslie was active in Santa Barbara politics supporting progressive candidates. She was a feminist inspiration to her family and beyond. She was an avid reader with her women’s book club and circle of friends. The garden at her house was one of her masterpieces looking out over the ocean. She loved travel, music, art and treasured playing the piano each day. Her great delight and joy were her family. She is survived by her four children: MaryLee Ackerman (Tom Hunt), Byron Ackerman (Kathy Dervin), Carl Ackerman (Lyn Kajiwara) and Elizabeth “Tootie” Hicks (d. Joe Hicks), as well as her seven grandchildren: Ben Hunt, Jess and Megan Dervin-Ackerman, Laura and Jennifer Ackerman, and Katarina and Natasha Hicks. The family would like to thank Leslie’s incredible team of caregivers, Amy Yanez, LeeAnn Harris, Viviana Wink, and Frances Blythe, for providing the most loving and peaceful care for Leslie over the past year. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting that donations be made to either the National Network of Abortion Funds or Vassar College’s Memorial Scholarship fund.

On June 18, 2022, Ben Hull, husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather and friend died as a result of Alzheimer’s disease at the age of 86. Ben was born in 1935, the third of four children, in St. Louis, Missouri to parents Ben and Dorothy (Rosenthal) Hull. He met his future wife, Joyce Coleman, on a blind date in March of 1955 and they were married a short 6 months later, a marriage that lasted almost 67 years. Looking for an adventure and a better place to live, in 1959 they and two other families (the Bryants and the Coopers) packed up the kids, the cars and caravanned westward on Route 66. This was one of the best decisions they ever made, landing in Santa Barbara – a great place and time to raise a family. Ben was not afraid of hard work. In fact, he enjoyed it. He took great pride in his work and always made a good job of it. He could design, build and repair anything and he was happy to pass these skills on to anyone who wanted to learn. Ben worked both for others (Applied Magnetics, Dispensers, Honeywell, HeyerSchulte, PS Medical, Medtronic) and for himself (Southern Deep Well Drilling Company). Ben and Joyce enjoyed traveling with friends and explored Mexico, Alaska, the northeastern United States, Hawaii, Tahiti, Italy and Greece. They liked water skiing, snow skiing, scuba diving and dearly loved to play golf. Ben is survived by his wife, Joyce; his daughter, Karen Thompson and her husband, Steve; his grandson Andrew Hull and his wife Darcy, greatgrandchildren Ruby and Llewyn; his grandson Oliver Thompson and his wife, Daniela; and his daughter-in-law, Pam Bohn. He is pre-deceased by his son, Bryan Hull. A private graveside service will be held for Ben. We would like to thank the staff of Villa Alamar Memory Care for the loving care and attention they gave to Ben. Ben was generous, friendly, fun-loving, knowledgeable and wise. He was a good-hearted man who loved his family and treasured his friends. He will live on in our memories.

3/22/1924 - 6/29/2022

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$2 10am: SUMMER KIDS MOVIES Tickets! Fiesta 5: Tuesday & Wednesday Camino Real: Thursday *Kids Series Only Happening Now! *

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7/12, 13, 14: METRO SUMMER KIDS MOVIES

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7/14: PAWS OF FURY

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FA I R V I E W

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Minions: Rise of Gru* (PG): Fri: 12:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00, 9:00. Sat: 11:00, 12:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00, 9:00. Sun: 11:00, 12:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 12:00, 1:15, 2:15, 3:30, 4:30, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00. The Black Phone (r): Fri-Wed: 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:10. Thur: 12:30. Paws of Fury* (PG): Thur: 3:00, 5:30, 8:10.

Thor: Love and Thunder* (PG13): Fri-Thu: 12:15, 1:15, 3:00, 4:00, 5:45, 6:45, 8:30, 9:40. Top Gun Maverick (PG13): Fri-Thur: 12:30, 2:00, 3:30, 5:00, 6:30, 8:00, 9:30.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Minions: The Rise of Gru* (PG): Fri: 12:00, 12:45, 1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 3:45, 4:30, 5:15 (3D), 6:00, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15, 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE 9:00. Sat: 11:15, 12:00, 12:45,1:30, 2:15, GOLETA 3:00, 3:45,4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15, 805-688-4140 9:00. Sun: 11:15, 12:00, 12:45,1:30, 2:15, Thor: Love and Thunder* (PG13): Fri: 11:00, 12:00, 12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:30, 3:00, 3:45,4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15. 4:30, 5:30, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:00, 10:00. Mon: 12:00, 12:45,1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 3:45, Sat/Sun: 10:00, 11:00, 12:00, 12:45, 1:45, 4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15. Tue/Wed: 2:45, 3:30. 4:30, 5:30, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 11:15, 12:00,12:45, 1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 3:45, 4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15. Thur: 2:00, 9:00, 10:00. Mon-Wed:11:00, 12:00, 12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:30. 4:30, 5:30, 6:15, 12:45, 1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 3:45, 4:30, 5:15 (3D), 7:15, 8:15, 9:00. Thur: 0:00, 11:00, 12:00, 6:00, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15, 9:00. Sat: 11:15, 12:00, 12:45, 1:45, 2:45, 3:30. 4:30, 5:30, 6:15, 12:45,1:30, 2:15, 3:00, 3:45,4:30, 5:15, 6:00, 6:45, 7:30, 8:15 7:15, 8:15, 9:00, Lightyear (PG): Fri-Wed: 12:15, 2:45, Elvis* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 11:30, 3:00, 6:30, 9:55. Mon-Thur: 12:30, 4:00, 7:30. 5:20, 7:50. Thur: 12:15. Everything Everywhere All At Once (R): Jurassic World Dominion (PG13): Fri-Wed: 4:45, 8:00. Thur: 4:45/ Fri, Mon-Thur: 1:30, 4:40, 8:00. Private Rentals: Fri, Mon: 2:00. Sat/Sun: 10:20, 1:30, 4:40, 8:00. Tues/Wed, Sat/Sun: 11:45, Thur: 2:00. Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Paws of Fury* (PG): Thur: 3:15, 5:45, 8:10. Fri, Mon-Wed: 1:55. 4:50, 7:45. Sat/Sun, Wed: 10:50, 1:55, 4:50, 7:45. Marcel the Shell with Shoes On (PG): Thur: 8:00. Wallace & Gromit ($2) (PG): Kung Fu Panda ($2) (PG): Tue/Wed: 10:00. Thur: 10:00.

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Mr. Malcom’s List (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:35, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:25, 4:35, 7:30. Thur: 4:35. Elvis (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:05, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 1:10, 4:05, 7:15. Thur: 4:05. Mrs. Harris Goes to Paris (PG): Thur: 7:15. Gabby Giffords Won’t Back Down (PG13): Thur: 7:30.

The Black Phone (R): Fri-Thur: 12: 45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15. Jurassic World Dominion (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:30, 4:45, 8:00. Thur: 1:30. The Forgiven (NR): Fri-Thur: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. Elvis* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 12:30, 4:00, 7:30. Where the Crawdads Sing* (PG13): Thur: 4:45, 8:00.

ARLINGTON

Thor: Love and Thunder* (PG13):

1317 STATE STREET Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. SANTA BARBARA Sat/Sun:11:30, 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. 805-963-9580

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R

BY DAVID OBST AND D R . D AV I D B E R M A N

epublicans may well try and take away millions of Americans’ right to vote in the next presidential election by enforcing a federal law called the Controlled Substance Act (CSA), a law enacted by President Nixon in 1970. This law was the brainchild of John Ehrlichman, Nixon’s domestic affairs advisor; and John Dean, Nixon’s general counsel. I was Dean’s literary agent for Blind Ambition, a best-selling book about his White House years. While working with Dean on the book, he told me about how the act came about. He and Ehrlichman came up with the idea to drastically reduce the number of Black and young people being able to vote in Nixon’s upcoming presidential election. Their new law would make smoking or possessing marijuana a felony. If an American citizen is convicted of a felony, they lose their right to vote. Dean told me what the “war on drugs” was really about was taking the vote away from Black people and the anti-war left. The new law resulted in the creation of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), which then divided all the drugs Americans used into five categories. The DEA sorted these drugs into a schedule. Those at the top of the schedule were deemed to be the most dangerous. They included heroin, LSD, and marijuana. DEA agents were ordered to prosecute those who used or sold such drugs. Ehrlichman and Nixon’s plan was that by getting the public to associate hippies and African Americans with marijuana, they would make them into criminals. Ehrlichman said, “We could then arrest their leaders and raid their homes. We’d be able to vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about drugs? Of course we did.” That was 50 years ago. Today, more than 100 million Americans have smoked marijuana. It is legal in 33 states. Cannabis has also widely been accepted for its medical uses. Much of the world has, by now, decriminalized it. Smoking pot is even legal in North Korea. Smoking or even possessing pot is still illegal in the United States and can still be prosecuted under federal law. The fact that the last few administrations have not widely enforced the law doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. One would hope that the many states that have legalized pot would protect its citizens from felony convictions; however, under the Supremacy Clause of the United States Constitution, federal law preempts conflicting state and local laws. There is no protection for a citizen because state laws are always subservient to federal laws. When a conflict between the two occurs, federal laws always prevail. So, what does all this mean? According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Uniform Crime Report, there have been more than 12 million cannabis arrests in the United States since 1996. Just a decade ago,

LEGALIZACIÓN BY NERILICON, EL ECONOMISTA, MEXICO

voices

The Plot to Criminalize Marijuana and Voters

The Arlington Theatre

CONT’D

almost a million persons were arrested for marijuana violations. According to the American Civil Liberties, there were 8.2 million marijuana arrests from 2001 to 2010, and 88 percent of those arrests were for marijuana possession alone. Finally, even though it has been shown that Black and White people use marijuana at about the same rate, there is a 3.6 times greater chance for Black people being arrested for marijuana usage. So, if a newly elected Republican executive branch of government starts enforcing the law, they can significantly reduce the number of Black people who get to vote. Al Gore would have won Florida if convicted marijuana felons’ votes had been counted. We can’t let this happen again. These same people who are taking away a woman’s legal right to abortion will now have the right and power to use the DEA to start arresting Black people, young Americans, and anyone else they feel would not vote for their agenda simply because they possess and smoke marijuana. The only thing that can stop them is for to for the law to be amended so that marijuana is no longer considered the most dangerous drug in the Controlled Substance Act. This must be done as soon as possible. Plato said that “just” or “right” means nothing but what is in the interest of the strongest party. We must change this act before Republicans use it to try and n steal the presidency.


Opinions

voices

CONT’D

Rent Stabilization Is Necessary Market Cannot Provide amid Today’s Housing Trends

I

BYALICE O’CONNOR AND

RICHARD APPELBAUM

t’s an old story: Housing costs in our region are

among the highest in the country. It’s a story we share with other desirable coastal communities. Demand is inevitably going to be high, and supply is inevitably constrained by limitations in natural resources like water, and by the need to protect the beauty — and the appeal — of this place. We’re experiencing an unprecedented crisis of housing affordability, however. The real estate market is unprecedentedly “hot” — single-family homes selling above the asking price; rental prices surging. Well-paid remote workers want to have a place here. Affluent retirees as well. Groups of students share the rent costs; apartments are offered for vacation rentals. At the same time, corporate investors seeking profit maximization are a major part of the landlord population. These trends, in the context of zero vacancy, mean that the private market cannot provide adequate housing at prices the local workforce can afford. Decades in the making, Santa Barbara’s housing affordability crisis has been significantly exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, which sent home prices soaring from already out-of-reach highs. The median home sale price in the City of Santa Barbara rose 30 percent in 2020-21 and 34 percent in 2021-22 to reach $2.2 million. Sky-high rents continued to rise, averaging $2,400 per month and far outpacing household income. Following decades of stagnation, incomes for middle and lower-wage workers only recently began to rise.

Out-of Reach Prices

Tenants feel the impact of these out-of-reach prices most acutely, for housing costs absorb a growing proportion of monthly income. Recent Census data shows Santa Barbara to be one of the most rentburdened — and least affordable — metro areas in the nation. A large proportion of households pay more than 30 percent of monthly income to rent, and considerable numbers pay more than 50 percent. And communities of color disproportionately experience higher rates of overcrowding, eviction, and substandard conditions compared to their white counterparts. The future of our community requires a largescale, multi-faceted program to increase the supply of affordable housing — a reality recognized in the state-mandated Regional Housing Needs Assessment (RHNA) goals. Implementing a program for meeting affordable housing supply needs will take many years — and the financial and policy framework for such a program doesn’t yet exist. Forging that framework is a very important priority. But some immediate measures to protect affordability and stability are possible. Rent stabilization — along with other tenant protections — are viable and necessary tools for alleviating the current crisis. Reciting the mantra that “rent controls have never succeeded” prevents rational discussion of policy choices. That mantra is based in part on models of rent control that are no longer relevant. In

California, state laws put legal limits on how communities can protect tenants and regulate rents. Importantly, the Costa-Hawkins Rental Housing Act of 1995 provides that rental housing built within the previous 15 years is exempt from rent regulation. This permits landlords to return legally vacated, rent-controlled apartments to market rates. Moreover, rent stabilization measures typically provide that landlords are entitled to a fair rate of return and set up means for landlords to seek rent increases to pay for needed capital improvements or maintenance.

Smart Rent Regulation Works In comprehensive and authoritative surveys of rent regulation in California and across the U.S., researchers from the University of Southern California, the University of Minnesota Center for Urban and Regional Affairs, and the Washington, D.C.–based Urban Institute offer careful assessments of what well-designed and implemented rent stabilization measures can accomplish. Far from “never succeeding,” these and other studies report that rent stabilization helps to promote residential stability, keep rental housing costs in check, and reduce vulnerability to unjust eviction. A comprehensive report done at the University of Minnesota’s Center for Urban and Regional Affairs concludes that: The empirical research indicates that rent regulations have been effective at achieving two of its primary goals: (1) maintaining below-market rent levels, and (2) moderating price appreciation. Generally, places with stronger rent control programs have had more success preventing large price appreciation than weaker programs. There is widespread agreement in the empirical literature that rent regulation increases housing stability for tenants who live in regulated units.

Rent stabilization is not in itself a solution to the crisis of affordability — but smart rent regulation can help people who work here to live here. And it provides a framework for enabling tenants to protect the habitability as well as affordability of their homes. Rent regulation need not be financed out of existing budgets. Most cities with rent control pay for the program by assessing a small annual registration fee for every rental unit. Concern about the administrative cost of rent regulation is not in itself a warrant for refusing to undertake it. In short, a smart program to promote rent stabilization is a necessary and feasible tool in the longterm effort to serve the housing needs of the local workforce, and all who contribute to the health, vitality, and stability of our community. Professor Alice O’Connor is director of the Blum Center on Poverty, Inequality, and Democracy at UC Santa Barbara. Distinguished Professor Emeritus Richard P. Appelbaum was MacArthur Foundation Chair in Global and International Studies and Sociology at UCSB.

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WATER

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COVER STORY

PROFESSOR PROFIT

How Mathematician Dr. Eliot Jacobson Turned Beating Casinos into a Career by Tyler Hayden

F

or a bigtime troublemaker, Eliot Jacobson is

jarringly pleasant. He volunteers at a wildlife rescue center and helps out at the Planned Parenthood book sale. Every Sunday afternoon, he and friends gather under the big tree at Alice Keck Park to play traditional Irish music. He talks lovingly of his family and he always asks you about yours. But Jacobson certainly knows how to make enemies. In the late 1990s, the former professor began parlaying his PhD in mathematics into a part-time career of counting cards and cracking casino games.

Then, when Jacobson started publishing all of his research and strategies to his free online blog, he induced the wrath of game creators and distributors who watched their stocks tank. “I was born and raised on the academic paradigm that knowledge serves the greatest good in the public domain,” Jacobson, 64, explained over coffee last month. Wearing a baseball cap and lightweight fleece, he looked like all the other regular Joes at the Daily Grind that morning. “I want information in people’s hands, then let the best man win. Let the person who is willing to study and learn and educate themselves be the one who succeeds.” Even if it means knowing tons of people want to wring his neck? “Oh yeah, absolutely,” he shrugged. “That’s my life.” Jacobson recently made his latest book, Advanced Advantage Play—a 475-page tome that teaches readers how to beat blackjack and baccarat; proprietary games like Mississippi Stud, High Card Flush, and Three-Card Poker; and all manner of casino side bets and promotions—available for $12.95, the cheapest Amazon would allow him to sell it. He’d give it away if he could, and he often does. One of the few other advantage play books out there—very rare and very exclusive—can cost upward of $1,000, if you’re even able to find a copy. For all the animosity against Jacobson in the gambling world, there is also deep respect. Over the last two decades, he’s made the industry much smarter. “Eliot brought science to the game,” said Willy Allison, who runs the annual World Game Protection Conference,

Every game can be beaten, Jacobson insists. The puzzle is just figuring out how. Pit bosses learned to hate him. He’s been banned from an impressive list of Las Vegas properties—the Horseshoe, the Flamingo, Circus Circus, and Mandalay Bay, among others — as well as his hometown Chumash Casino. During one particularly bad night, he was muscled into a Vegas backroom and threatened with violence. Then Jacobson switched sides and became an independent consultant for the casino industry, teaching managers how to protect their games and spot “advantage players” like himself. He burned bridges with many of his compatriots. They called him a snitch and a sellout.

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which this year bestowed its Lifetime Achievement Award on Jacobson. “And he was a blackjack player himself, so he’s got street cred.” Among the speakers at February’s conference were professional gamblers, surveillance experts, “helpful hackers,” and a former mob boss. Before Jacobson came onto the scene, Allison explained, most casino operators knew how to run their games but didn’t understand the underlying math that made them so rich. Even now, when a new proprietary game comes on the market—essentially, anything outside the regular casino offerings of craps, roulette, blackjack, and so on—big brains like Jacobson’s are needed to determine if and how they work, as their mathematics are intellectual property closely guarded by their makers. There are currently more than 700 such games in Nevada alone. But what continues to make Jacobson unique even among his peers is a willingness to openly share his hard-earned knowledge, something Allison greatly admires. “In AP (advantage play), you hang onto your secrets,” he said. “But not Eliot. He doesn’t give a shit. He takes the punches and doesn’t cry.”

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Advantage Play (AP), as Jacobson describes it in his book, “is the act of legally exploiting procedural or structural weaknesses in some aspect of casino games or operations in a way that generates an edge over a casino.” Every game can be beaten, he insists. The puzzle is just figuring out how. Jacobson’s focus has always been on what is considered “legal” and not the mushier concept of what is “ethical.” Whatever people think about the morality of a particular tactic to win against the house, he writes, “advantage players are only concerned with staying on the right side of the law. They take great pride in the distinction between what they do and cheating.” Jacobson is quick to acknowledge, however, that if the casino catches you employing AP, either by tracking your betting patterns or catching some telltale physical sign, you can’t be arrested, but you may be asked not to play a certain game. Or you might be kicked out altogether, perhaps temporarily, perhaps permanently. Casinos reserve the same rights as bars and restaurants to deny service to anyone. But you’ll never see a sign that says, “Thou shalt not use thy

brain,” Jacobson said. Card-counting is the best-known example of AP. That’s where a player keeps track of what cards have been dealt and uses quick mental math to predict which ones are most likely to come next. Basic blackjack card-counting first gained popularity in the ’60s and became even more prominent after MIT’s famous team made a killing in the ’90s, but Jacobson sees it as old hat, “roughly equivalent to shag carpeting and bell-bottom pants,” he says. So he figured out how to apply it to baccarat and the dozens of blackjack spinoff games that now exist. Then there’s hole-carding, or sneaking a peak at a game’s face-down cards either because a dealer is being sloppy, they’re using a poorly designed automatic shuffler (there are specific brands and models to look out for), or the room’s layout offers fortunate lines of sight between tables. The method is technically legal, according to a 1983 ruling by Nevada’s Supreme Court, as long as the player doesn’t use a camera or other artificial device to glean the information. The goal is to pick a mark, swoop in, “slaughter a game, and get the hell out of there,” Jacobson said. It may sound simple in concept but is exceedingly difficult to pull off. Also, determining the edge from hole-carding often requires a huge amount of computational effort, Jacobson warned. Nevertheless, he said, “There’s no doubt that hole-carding is the number-one method advantage players use to beat games.” Edge-sorting is a strategy players use to spot natural irregularities in the machine-cut patterns on the backs of cards—full diamond shapes on the right side and half-diamonds on the left, for example—that lets them know when to fold and when to bet big. Players aren’t allowed to mark cards by scratching or bending them, but they are legally permitted to use a deck’s existing physical flaws to gain the upper hand. Jacobson served as an expert witness in a 2012 case involving an ultra-high-stakes baccarat player, Phil Ivey, who used edge-sorting to win more than $10 million in London. A judge ultimately allowed the casino to withhold Ivey’s earnings, ruling he came by the sum “dishonestly.” The precedent-setting decision left Jacobson and many others scratching their heads, as the magistrate essentially stated that what Ivey did wasn’t cheating but wasn’t fair either, thus creating a third and very gray legal statute. “To me,


C O V E R S T O RCOVER Y STORY if you don’t like the laws, then create a law,” Jacobson said. “But don’t manufacture one after the fact.” The final most common form of AP is collusion, or secretly using teamwork at a table. Players flash signals to teammates about their hands, and everyone bets accordingly. “The needle always moves toward the player’s side when information can be used to improve a strategic decision,” Jacobson said. In fact, advantage players often work together. It allows them to cover more ground and flattens the curve of a game’s natural volatility. “Team play is really where it’s at,” he said. But when done right, AP is not a sexy pursuit, Jacobson warned. It’s a grind. Players spend days on their feet scouting vulnerable games, only to spend more days sitting in rooms filled with smoke and crowds. The rewards can be big, but most of the time, they’re modest and squeaked out over long periods of time. Only a handful of people on the planet have the bankroll and the stomach needed for the really huge scores.

KID CASINO The pathway to green felt and flashing lights for Jacobson began when he was 13 years old on a family vacation to Lake Tahoe. They’d stopped at a casino in Reno, and he asked his mother, a high school English teacher who was reading The Waste Land when she went into labor with him and named him after the poet T.S. Eliot, to play a nickel slot machine. She did, and they lost, but she noticed the sparkle in her son’s eye. That Christmas, Jacobson found a toy slot machine, roulette wheel, and blackjack mat under the tree. Jacobson set up a casino in the garage of their San Fernando Valley home and invited the neighborhood kids to play. He must have already had a good sense of odds and how to flip them in his favor, because a sign he nailed to the wall announced the house’s roulette payout for hitting a single number was 10-1. Normally, it’s 35-1. Before long, Jacobson had pocketed all his friends’ allowances and the casino had no more customers, but his father, an electrical engineer who invented the modern answering machine, kept the sign up for another 20 years until they moved. Fast-forward and Jacobson had received his PhD in mathematics and settled down as a tenured professor at Ohio University. “But I really hated it,” he said. “I was in a little town on the edge of Appalachia and looking for a way out.” As fortune would have it, Jacobson was invited to speak at a math conference in Las Vegas. “I thought, ‘This is my chance,’ ” he said. He studied up on blackjack and learned basic card counting, and he used an early version of a computer program to train. He uses the same program today to run simulations across hundreds of millions of hypothetical hands. When he finally made it to Vegas, “the worst possible thing happened,” Jacobson said with a wolfish grin. “I won.” That flipped the switch. Soon he was taking trips all over the country — Atlantic City, St. Louis, Biloxi — and learned that as an advantage player, “you can have lots of good times and some very bad times.” By the time he made it to California, his marriage was coming to an end, and he landed in Santa Barbara, which was close to family and an old friend. He essentially walked on to UCSB’s computer science department and secured a full-time teaching job. He also remarried. Jacobson was near enough to Las Vegas that he started making regular pilgrimages. He was also driving the 45 minutes to the Chumash Casino as often as he could. After years of steady winning, Chumash managers finally got hip to his card-counting. That was strike one. They told

CONTINUED»

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2022 Historical Fiesta Parade

Friday, August 5 at noon The 2022 Historical Fiesta Parade will travel Cabrillo Boulevard from Castillo Steet to the Rainbow Arch. Enjoy covered Fiesta Parade Seating at the best spot to watch the parade!

Reserved Seating $30 Deluxe Reserved Seating $50 (includes poster) Grandstand $70 (reserved parking, grandstand seating with shade cover, poster, pin, and water)

Fiesta Needs Parade Volunteers! Be A Part of the Fiesta Family!

Tickets: www.sbfiesta.org

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Jacobson he could still play, but he wasn’t allowed to help other players. When a pretty woman sidled up to him at the table a few months later and asked for advice — Jacobson suspects she was a plant — he forgot himself and gave a few friendly tips. That was strike two. Jacobson sustained his third and final strike — a lifetime ban — when he busted the casino’s shuffle, meaning he studied and dissected the dealers’ shuffling procedure so accurately that he could pick the aces out of the deck before they hit the table. That still didn’t close the book on the Chumash, however. Jacobson personally stayed away but told a couple of his advantage-player students about weak dealers who would accidentally expose their holecards during three-card poker games. They made their move the next weekend and walked away with more than $30,000. “They just beat the crap out of them,” he said. But by far Jacobson’s closest call with physical harm as a result of his advantage play came at the hands of security officers at an undisclosed casino on an undisclosed date. Jacobson can’t say much about the incident, because he later settled a lawsuit with the casino in his favor that also came with a nondisclosure agreement. But what he can say is that at around 2 a.m. in a Nevada facility, he was holecarding a game — he was up about $400 — when he was approached by four men, two in uniforms and two in plain clothes.

they did. “I didn’t pee my pants, but almost,” he said. After insisting Jacobson provide them his name, Social Security number, place of birth, and other private information — Jacobson said one of the men was quivering with anger and seemingly about to lose control — the guards escorted him off the property onto a busy road with no sidewalks. When Jacobson got back to his hotel room, he called an attorney and had a lawsuit for kidnapping and false imprisonment drawn up by the next day. The settlement, he said, was substantial. “They lost a lot of money,” he said. Much more than $400.

CASHING OUT? It wasn’t the brush with a serious butt-whooping that pushed Jacobson toward what advantage players call “the dark side” — casino surveillance and security. It was the slow but steady realization he didn’t have the nerve or the bank account to ever become a truly high-level player. “These guys who are out there, they’re betting $2,000, $5,000 a hand,” he explained. “I was nervous to bet $200. My life, earning a minimum income as a professor, made it very challenging for me to put out a month’s pay.” So Jacobson ultimately decided he was better suited as a theorist and began offering his services to the industry. He hooked up with fellow mathematician and casino analyst Mike Shackleford, better known as the Wizard of Odds, who sent a few clients his way, and before he knew it, Jacobson was crunching numbers for some of the biggest names around. Jacobson audited online casinos, designed slot machines, performed market research, and put on seminars. “The casino industry is the only industry whose product is math,” he said. “Whether it represents itself as craps or slots or pai gow, it’s math,” he said. He also developed games and promotions for other businesses and organizations, including a bingo game for NASCAR and a scratcher for McDonald’s. Jacobson claims to have retired in 2017, but his recent activity suggests otherwise. During the COVID shutdown, he started making how-to gam-

‘I was born and raised on the academic paradigm that knowledge serves the greatest good in the public domain.’ —Eliot Jacobson The group told Jacobson he was under arrest and placed him in handcuffs. Jacobson protested but was quickly led away. As they exited the casino floor, one of the plain-clothed men leaned in and told him they were headed to the loading dock where there were no cameras and where he would be taught a lesson. Jacobson yelled for help, but the man told him he was a cheat and scum and no one would come to his aid. They refused to let him make any calls. Eventually, it became apparent the men were bluffing and only meant to scare Jacobson, which


COVER STORY

C ARL PERRY

bling videos and created a free spreadsheet that helps casinos determine if they’re being fleeced through their baccarat games. In keeping with his selfdiagnosed “serial compulsive personality,” Jacobson also recently published a book of poetry as well — Totally Disconnected: The Poetic Ramblings of a Socially Awkward Mathematician, available at Chaucer’s. Casino games, however, occupy absolutely none of his free time. “I don’t like any of them,” he said. “And the reason I don’t like them is because I can run a mathematical analysis and figure out exactly what’s going to happen.” There’s zero rush in the supposed unpredictability, he explained, because every game is predictable in the long run. “I don’t need to watch the thing play out in slow motion,” he said. Where Jacobson still gets his kicks is chess, a game he learned when he was 5 years old and the only one he’s ever truly enjoyed. Interestingly, unlike gambling, it’s a full-information contest, meaning both players are privy to everything that’s happening in front of them. But the mental jousting of attacks, traps, defense, and feints make outcomes much harder to anticipate. Jacobson usually plays online because the Santa Barbara Chess Club meetups begin at 7 p.m. and end at 10. He’s in bed by 8. Next winter, Jacobson will head back to the World Game Protection Conference to teach a three-hour class on safeguarding against advantage play. He’s booked for future dates, too, in an unofficial conference faculty role. The lifetime achievement award meant a lot to him, as it confirmed the abiding respect of his peers over all the previous hostility thrown his way. “For me, it’s always just been about knowledge and the excitement of knowledge, and discovering things,” Jacobson said. There’s a deep-rooted good guy/bad guy mentality in the casino industry, he continued. “And I just don’t buy into that. I love people on both sides of the table.” There’s a reason one of his direct competitors, Bill Zender, wrote the forward to Advanced Advantage Play. “Eliot is a good friend, and it is a privilege to be given the opportunity to contribute to his outstanding work,” Zender stated. In the meantime, Jacobson is stirring the pot with a new pursuit. He can’t help himself. His new blog on calculating the rate of climate change — not denying its reality but sounding new alarms on the speed at which Earth is circling the drain — is drawing a good amount of attention but also some serious pushback. But you’ll also still find him on Sundays at the park, plucking a mandolin, banjo, or guitar. He used to play a mean flute, but a shoulder injury put a stop to that. He’s also tried the fiddle. Anything to keep him busy. Because every morning, Jacobson said, he asks his wife: “What am I going to do n today to avoid getting in trouble?”

May 28–September 5 Walk through a beautiful garden while nearly 1,000 live butterflies flutter freely around you. The exhibit features a dazzling variety of butterflies, from local favorites to exotic tropical species. Learn about the life cycle and behavior of these spectacular invertebrates while observing them up close.

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SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

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JULY 7-13

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE

by

TERRY VICTORIA ORTEGA & SNIDER

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events independent.com/events.. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit independent.com/eventsubmit..

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

THURSDAY COURTESY

7 THURSDAY 7/

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

7/7: Concert in the Park Molly Ring-

SUNDAY

wald Project. 6-7:30pm. Chase Palm Park Great Meadow, 323 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Free.

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

sbparksandrec.santabarbaraca .gov/concerts

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

7/7-7/10, 7/13: Lost Chord Guitars Thu.: Terry Lawless, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Fri.: Loc Dawgs, 8-10:30pm. $10. Sat.:

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Thea the Band & Katie Leigh, 8-11:30pm. $10. Sun.: American Classics with Matt McCarrin & Ms. Finch, 7:30-10:30pm. $5. Wed.: Brandi Rose Lentini, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Lost Chord Guitars, 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Call (805) 331-4363.

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

lostchordguitars.com/shows

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

7/7-7/10, 7/12: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Rafa Rose,

FISHERMAN’S MARKET Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

S.B. Artworks Opening Reception: The Harbor Show Featured artist Brian MacLaren will be showcasing 20 new watercolor paintings with a Central Coast theme. Other area artists’ work will be on exhibit along with live acoustic classical guitar by Tessa Ogella. The exhibit will show through August 4. 5-8pm. S.B. Artworks, 28 E. Victoria St. Free. sbartworks.org/

cfsb.info/sat

7/7: Chaucer’s Book Talk: Ron Shelton S.B. local, author, and wellknown filmmaker of Bull Durham, White Men Can’t Jump, and Tin Cup Ron Shelton, will talk about and sign copies of his wry and humorous book The Church of Baseball, which tells the story behind the film Bull Durham. 6-7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787.

chaucersbooks.com/event

7/7-7/10: The Theatre Group at SBCC Presents Something Rotten!

Lavender U-Pick Harvest Explore the walking trail, shop the nursery, and then help yourself to a bounty of fresh, organic, and sustainably grown lavender. Pay for what you pick starting at $4 per bundle. Scissors and baskets will be provided. 8am-2pm. Foxen Canyon Farms, 3151 Foxen Canyon Rd., Solvang. Free. Call (805) 5548960. tinyurl.com/FoxenLavender

7/7: Concerts in the Park: The Molly Ringwald Project Pack a picnic

7/7: S.B. Museum of Art Family 1st Thursday Participate in teaching artist-led

theatregroupsbcc.com

and bring a chair or blanket to enjoy the ‘80s sound with The Molly Ringwald Project on S.B.’s beautiful waterfront. No alcohol or pets. 6-7:30pm. Great Meadow Chase Palm Park, 323 E Cabrillo Blvd. Free. tinyurl.com/SBConcerts

InThePark

activities and experiment with composition, color, and texture by creating a collage of boldly hued and patterned squares on black paper and then enjoy the gallery through 8pm. 5:30pm-7:30pm. Family Resource Ctr., S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free.

sbma.net/events

7/7-7/8, 7/10-7/11, 7/13: Wylde Works Thu.: Spencer the Gardener, 5-6pm; Sour Fin, 8-10pm. Fri.: Anthony Kouigaz Band, 8-10pm. Sun.: Isla View, 8-10pm. Mon., Wed.: Meghan Downing Band. 8-10pm. 609 State St. Free. wyldeworks.com/products/julyevents-calendar 7/8: Carhartt Family Wines Live music, 5-8pm. 2939 Grand Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 693-5100. carhartt

7/7-7/13:

Follow brothers Nick and Nigel Bottom in the 1590s as they write the world’s very first musical in the shadow of that Renaissance rockstar known as “The Bard” as they realize that reaching the top means being true to thine own self ... and all that jazz. The musical previews July 7 and will show through July 23. Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 721 Cliff Dr. $10-$26. Call (805) 965-5935 or email sbcctg@sbcc.edu.

familywines.com/events-calendar

7/8:

Free Summer Cinema — Hot Fun in the Summertime: American Graffiti Bring breathable blankets, low chairs, a picnic, and friends and family to travel back to the last day of summer vacation in 1962 with 1973’s American Graffiti (rated PG), directed by George Lucas. See vintage cars from the film’s period on Anapamu Street between Anacapa and Santa Barbara sts. before the movie. Car show: 5-8pm; movie: 8:30pm. Sunken Gardens, S.B. County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa St. Free. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

7/8: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

7/8-7/9: S.B. Bowl Fri.: Caamp, 7pm. $45-$65. Sat.: Fleet Foxes, 7pm. $41-$66. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411.

sbbowl.com/concerts

.com/events

FRIDAY 7/8 COURTESY

BARAA JALEAHEJ

special-events

7/8-7/9: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: Goodlanders, 7-9pm. Sat.: Art of Funk, 7-9pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

Jeremy Ferrara, Bamblume, Philip Rogers, 8:30pm. $15. Ages 21+.Fri.: Orquesta Sangre Nueva, class: 9pm; show: 10pm. $18-$25. Ages 21+. Orquesta Sangre Nueva Sat.: Big Mountain with Bombafiya, 9pm. $25-$30. Ages 21+. Sun.: S.B. Jazz Society and Janis Mann, 1-4pm, 7/8: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm.; $10-$35; M.O.B. Jazz Quintet, 7:30pm, $15. Heart & Soul, 8-11pm. 3126 State St. Free. Tue.: Omar Velasco, 7:30pm. $18-$20. 1221 Call (805) 845-8800. State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb uptownlounge805.com/events

SATURDAY

7/7:

Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

7/8-7/10: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Pam & The Fisher Men, 6-9pm. Sat.: Porch Critter, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Kelly’s Lot, 1:304:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com 7/8: Eos Lounge Torren Foot, 9pm. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Free. Call (805) 564-2410. eoslounge.com 7/8-7/10: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Paradise Kings, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Brian Black, 1-5pm; Pull the Trigger, 8:30-11:30pm Sun.: Cadillac Angels, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon

.com/event-calendar/

7/8: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Colonel Angus. 6-8pm. 6860

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

7/9: Andrew Murray Vineyards Live music, noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 686-9604.

visitsyv.com/events

7/9-7/10: Hook’d Bar & Grill Sat.: Tikibomb, 4pm. Sun.: Jeff Pine, noon. 116 Lakeview Dr. Free. Call (805) 350-8351. hookdbarandgrill.com/music-onthe-water 7/10: Buttonwood Farm & Winery Shawn Jones, 12:30-4pm. 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd, Solvang. Free. Call (805) 6883032. buttonwoodwinery.com

7/10: Seven Bar & Kitchen Lenny Kerley, 6-9pm. 224 Helena Ave. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 845-0377.

sevensb.com/live-music

7/11: The Red Piano Shawn Jones, 7:30pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439. theredpiano.com/ schedule 7/13: Nite Moves The Mustangs. 7pm. 801 Shoreline Dr. Free. runsantabarbara.com/nite-moves 7/13: Solvang Music in the Park Live music. 5-8pm. Solvang Park, corner of Mission Dr. and First St. Free.

visitsyv.com/events Volunteer Opportunity

JULY 7, 2022

Fundraiser

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31


T HE

Musical Direction by David Potter Choreography by Christina McCarthy

7/8-7/10: The Ojai Art Center Theater Presents Meredith Willson’s The Music Man Travel to the fictional town of River City, where the residents meet the fast-talking salesman/ conman Harold Hill, who falls in love with the feisty Marian the librarian, with songs like “Seventy-Six Trombones,”“Till There Was You,” and more. The musical shows through July 24. Fri.-Sat.: 7:30-10pm; Sun.: 2-4:30pm. The Ojai ACT, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $30. Call (805) 640-8797.

ojaiact.org

Book by Karey Kirkpatrick and John O'Farrell Music and Lyrics by Wayne Kirkpatrick and Karey Kirkpatrick Conceived by Karey Kirkpatrick and Wayne Kirkpatrick

G AR VI N T H E AT RE

www.theatregroupsbcc.com 805.965.5935 Thank you to our season sponsor:

PREVIEWS: JULY 6 & 7

LIVE CAPTIONING

Sun. 7/10 matinee

INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

The Lightning Thief Mini Concert Kids ages

K-12 are invited to see Out of the Box Theater perform pieces from the musical The Lightning Thief and then enjoy a craft in the spirit of heroes and Greek gods! 2-5pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 962-7653 or email youthservices@santabarbaraca.gov.

7/9: Big Mountain, Bombafiya Take in the American roots reggae sound from San Diego’s band Big Mountain with Ventura’s Bombafiya to open the show. 9pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 221 State St. $25-$30. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

SUNDAY 7/10

7/8-7/9: S.B. Improv Presents Unquested: The Improvised Epic Enjoy a fabulous tale of improvised fantasy adventure such as The NeverEnding Story, The Princess Bride, and Labyrinth created from audience suggestions and performed by 11 community players. See shows through July 29. 8pm. Unitarian Parish Hall, 1234 Santa Barbara St. Free-$14. Call (805) 680-0455 or email info@sbimprov. com. tinyurl.com/UnquestedImprov

“ARTFULLY SEDUCTIVE, STEALTHILY HILARIOUS SATIRE” Santa Barbara Independent

and Anna-Katharina Preidl in making Wienerschnitzel along with breaded veal cutlet (eggplant for vegetarians) and the traditional accompaniments then dine al fresco in the garden. Classes (with different menus) go through July 24. 6-8:30pm. Apples to Zucchini Cooking School, 2300 Garden St, $90. tinyurl.com/AtoZ

Sommerfest

SATURDAY 7/9 7/9: Star Party at the Museum of Natural History The Palmer Observatory will open its doors and its roof to share a remarkable view of the wonders of the night sky through its state-of-theart 20-inch telescope. 8:30-10pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free. Call (805) 682-4711.

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

FRI: 5:00pm & 7:30pm SAT: 2:30pm & 5:00pm & 7:30pm SUN: 2:30pm & 5:00pm MON - THURS: 5:00pm & 7:30pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM 32

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JULY 7, 2022

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LompocMovies

BeehiveGifts

7/11:

Science Pub: Beauty, Value, and

Art in Nature The Museum’s Rare Earth summer exhibit features fine minerals and crystals from the worldrenowned Arkenstone Collection of Robert Lavinsky, PhD. Join Dr. Lavinsky in a fun and friendly conversation about the value of these treasures in the realm of science, beauty, and value as precious objects. 6-8pm. Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 x172 or jrolle@sbnature2.org.

TUESDAY 7/12

7/10:

Chaucer’s Book Signing: Rachel

Ignotofsky Rachel Ignotofsky will

entertain, educate, and sign copies of her nonfiction picture book What’s Inside A Flower?: And Other Questions About Science & Nature, a stunning introduction to flowers from seeds to roots to bloom that will inspire budding young scientists. 2pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787.

7/12: Curative Culinary Alliance Presents Chefs Collaboration Join chef collaborators Weston Richards, Sally Ruhl, and Justin West for a multicourse sit-down dinner under the stars that will feature more than a dozen different items with profits going toward the S.B. Rescue Mission. 6-9pm. Handlebar Coffee Roasters, 2720 De la Vina St. $85.

tinyurl.com/CollabChefs

WEDNESDAY 7/13

chaucersbooks.com/event

7/10: Ted Nash: The Sound of Art SBMA artist-in-residence and Grammy Award–winning musician and composer Ted Nash will share insight and experience with a selection of SBCC students and fellow musicians that will culminate in a concert. 3-4:30pm. Front Terrace, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. sbma.net/events

7/9: Lompoc Movies in the Park: Spider-Man: No Way Home Follow the 7/10: Retreat: The Art of Inspired Living story of the newly unmasked Peter Parker, who asks Dr. Strange for help to navigate his normal life from that of a superhero. Bring low-back chairs, blankets, and snacks (some snacks will be available for purchase). 8-10pm. Ryon Memorial Park, 800 W. Ocean Ave., Lompoc. Free. Rated PG. Call (805) 875-8100. tinyurl.com/

Finnigan Shields of Mother Madre Bees for a talk on the different medicinal gifts that are found in the beehive and created by the honeybee. 6-7pm. Free. tinyurl.com/

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

7/8: Apples to Zucchini Cooking School Sommerfest Series: Wienerschnitzel Join Nancy Martz

JULY 8 - 14

7/11: CA Herbal Medics and Artemisia Academy of Herbal Arts & Healing Virtual Talk: Gifts from the Beehive Join area herbalist and beekeeper

tinyurl.com/LightningThiefMini

COU RTE SY

JULY 8-23, 2022

7/9:

MONDAY 7/11

COURTESY

Directed by Katie Laris

is known to many as the Model T of the airplane world. Walk among the antique aircraft, observe flying events, and interact with the pilots at this fun family-friendly event. The proficiency contest will be Saturday at 2pm. Visit the website for the full schedule that includes food for purchase such as tri-tip BBQ dinner, hamburger and hot dog lunch, and pancake breakfast. Fri.-Sat.: 10am-9pm; Sun: 9am-noon. Lompoc City Airport-LPC, 1801 N. H St., Lompoc. Free. westcoastcubflyin.com

COURTESY

7/8-7/10: 38th Annual Lompoc West Coast Cub Fly-In The Piper Cub

COURTESY

presents

People of all faiths or no faith are invited to learn what it means to live an inspired life and how to better express the fullness of who you are with Rev. Karen who will lead conversation, insights, prayer, and meditation. 11:30am-1:30pm. Ojai Retreat and Inn, 160 Besant Rd., Ojai. Suggested donation: $20. Email karen@karenswylie.com.

karenswylie.com/category/events

7/13:

Lobero Live Presents Corinne Bailey Rae, Jensen McRae Enjoy

an evening from two-time Grammy Award winner and British soul singer and songwriter Corinne Bailey Rae, who came onto the scene in 2006 with her self-titled debut album featuring “Put Your Records On,” with alt/indie American singer-songwriter Jensen McRae to open the show. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido. GA: $59-$75; VIP: $121. Call (805) 9630761. lobero.org/whats-on


Premier Sponsor:

FREE Summer Cinema

FOODBANK PICNIC IN THE PARK 2022

Supporting Sponsor:

Fridays at 8:30 PM at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden

Fri, July 8

The Foodbank offers free, nutritious meals, activities, and enrichment opportunities to all children ages 1-18 in our county, Monday-Friday, June 6-August 12, unless otherwise stated. Visit the website for North County locations. Call (805) 967-5741, text “SUMMERFOOD” to 304-304, or download the CA Meals for Kids App.

FOODBANK PICNIC EN EL PARQUE 2022 El Foodbank ofrece comidas nutritivas gratuitas, actividades, y oportunidades de enriquecimiento para todos los niños de 1 a 18 años en nuestro condado, del 6 de junio al 12 de agosto, de lunes a viernes si no se indique lo contrario. Visite el sitio web por las ubicaciones de North County. Llame al (805) 967-5741, envíe un mensaje de texto que dice “SUMMERFOOD” al 877 877, o descargue la App de CA Meals for Kids. tinyurl.com/FoodbankSummerFood

Fri, July 15

tinyurl.com/PicnicInThePark2021

S.B. UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT FREE MEALS Free breakfast and lunch for all youth 18 years and younger. For more information, call (805) 963-4338 x6385, text “food” to 304-304,or download the CA Meals for Kids App.

DISTRITO ESCOLAR UNFICADO DE S.B. COMIDAS GRATIS Desayuno y almuerzo gratuitos para todos los jóvenes de 18 años o menos. Para más información llame al (805) 963-4338 x6385, envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra “food” al 304-304, o descargue la App CA Meals for Kids. sbunified.org/support/foodservices

Films presented by:

Special thanks to Santa Barbara County Parks, the Community Services Department of Santa Barbara County and Big Green Cleaning Company Media Sponsors:

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History

living

Community

COURTESY

EMMA SPENCER

Spenser Jaimes Shares Chumash Heritage Through Film

p. 35

S

itting in the sand at Santa Barbara’s West Beach, on what was originally the Chumash village Syuxtun, 19-year-old filmmaker Spenser Jaimes looks out onto the ocean toward the islands —which he also refers to by their original names: Tuqan (San Miguel), Wi’ma (Santa Rosa), Limuw (Santa Cruz), and ‘Anyapakh (Anacapa)—telling of his family’s roots and the deeply beautiful culture that has existed along the coast for thousands of years. Jaimes, whose Šmuwič-Chumash heritage can be traced back to Syuxtun and the island of Limuw, made a splash at the 2022 Santa Barbara International Film Festival with his first-ever short documentary, Connected By Water, which documented the traditional crossing of the channel by relatives of the Coastal Band of the Chumash, Tongva, and Acjachemen tribal nations in redwood-plank tomols. He has since started Limuw Productions and is currently researching his next project, which will focus on the 1824 Mission Revolt, which he says is often told through a Spanish or American historical lens.

Local Filmmaker Is Researching His Second Documentary Project on the 1824 Mission Revolt by Ryan P. Cruz “Modern ways of storytelling, through books and media, are never done by our own people because we do not have access or the funds to do it ourselves,’’ he said. “Our people have our own accounts that haven’t been told yet.” He hopes his work can reframe the narrative of the revolt as “childish” and “unorganized,” and instead tell the story of a highly organized response to an act of violence against a young boy. Growing up with a family that was embedded in local Chumash culture, Jaimes was exposed to a broader historical telling of the Central Coast’s long and complicated history, which changed the entire landscape from a bustling community of villages to a Europeanized settlement in a matter of a few generations. He first remembers becoming aware of the discrepancy between historical records and tribal accounts as an elementary school student, when, on a field trip to the Museum of Natural History, he heard tour guides repeatedly refer to the Chumash as a thing of the past. “Hearing them say Chumash is extinct was rough,” he said, “I came home and told my aunt: ‘They were talking about it in past tense.’ ” Later, when the class was assigned its 4th-grade Mission project—which at one time was a staple of public school curriculum in California—Jaimes refused to participate in what he considered a one-sided narrative. As he grew through high school, he said he had trouble reconciling the fact that he grew up on his own ancestral lands, but much of the City’s historical traditions seemed to reflect only the things that happened after the Spaniards arrived. The easily recognizable white stucco and red-tile roofs that define the “Santa Barbara aesthetic” ignore the fact that natives were forced to work and live in what became a Spanish-occupied area. It’s even more evident, he said, in local celebrations like the

week of Fiesta that paint a pearly white picture of “Old Spanish Days.” “People need to know the history,” he said. “Celebrating that here is cultural erasure. Ask yourself what you are celebrating. What did they do, and why did they do it?” Jaimes says he considers himself lucky to have grown up with a family connection to the land, and with aunts and uncles who taught him the traditional songs, practices, and stories. Some people are often separated from their culture, and some may not become involved or aware until much later in their lives. “My generation, we’ve been lucky enough to be born in a culture,” he said. Along with his relatives, and other Indigenous youth throughout the coast, Jaimes has become part of a new generation that is not only socially aware but also politically active. This includes a recent initiative to change the names of the Channel Islands back to their native designations. One of his newest passion projects is the push for more coastal access for Chumash in Santa Barbara. Since 2001, the local bands of Chumash have revived the thousands-of-years-old tomol crossing from Syuxtun to Limuw, and the community regularly launches for weekend trips off the coast. The City charges up to $20 a day for parking, and an additional trailer fee that can add up to over $7,000 per year for the group. “As the original stewards of our homelands, the Chumash people should not have to pay any amount of money to access our ocean,” he said. “The ocean is where we gather, pray, sing, paddle, and dance together, and where we gather foods and medicines to sustain ourselves.” He also hopes to have a larger storage space—currently, only one tomol can be stored at West Beach at a time—and imagines a day where the channel is once again packed with the native watercraft. “Access to our ocean shouldn’t just mean free parking. For thousands upon thousands of years, our people could fish and travel inside our tomols freely,” he said. “Although on West Beach, having space to house at least one tomol is a step in the right direction, we need an environmentally friendly non-permanent structure to house our tomols—not just one, but dozens—for any and every Chumash tribe, clan, band, and family.” With easier accessibility to their traditions, he says, Chumash descendants can more easily heal from the traumas brought on by the Spanish missionaries and Mexican and American occupations—“some of which are occurring in real time.” He is almost at his funding goal of $10,000 for his upcoming project and is looking to complete the documentary before the 200th anniversary of the revolt in 2024. n

County Veterans’ Service Officer Rhonda Murphy (center) received high praise from her boss, Harry Hagen (left), and Supervisor Joan Hartmann (right).

An Unsung Hero for Veterans R

honda Murphy, the County of Santa Barbara’s unsung veterans’ service officer for the past 25 years, got her song sung long and loud by the supervisors this week. Typically, such public accolades are dished out only upon retirement, but Murphy — who herself served time in the U.S. Navy — isn’t going anywhere. Even so, Supervisor Steve Lavagnino — who recounted what it was like working across the hallway from her — exclaimed, “It feels like she’s ready to retire, but she isn’t.” Murphy has amassed the second-longest tenure in the post of all veterans’ service officers throughout the state. But she was also just appointed president of the statewide association of veteran service officers, making her the first woman to hold the title. That’s what gave rise to Tuesday’s accolade fest.

Rhonda Murphy Helped 20,000 Vets Secure $10 Million in Benefits by Nick Welsh Santa Barbara County currently has 20,000 veterans living within its borders, and the rules and regulations governing the dispensation of their benefits are labyrinthine. Lavagnino recounted the exasperation he sensed among the veterans he saw working with Murphy. “They were frustrated in the extreme,” he said. She exhibited rare skill cutting through the red tape, he stated. But she also knew how to tell them harsh truths they probably didn’t want to hear. Last year, Murphy helped veterans in Santa Barbara secure $10 million in benefits. Translated into simple math, that’s $7,300 per veteran. And that, according to Murphy’s boss, Harry Hagen — county tax collector and public administrator — is double the statewide average. The size of her department, by contrast, has been only onethird as large as it should be, given the number of veterans living in Santa Barbara County. Every dollar Murphy helped secure, Hagen said, has a seven-fold multiplier impact on the local economy. “That’s the equivalent of $70 million,” he said. During COVID and all its social-distancing complications, Murphy managed to figure out how to conduct 3,000 in-person visits and 30,000 electronic communications. During county budget deliberations earlier this year, Hagen went to the mat for Murphy, demanding — with uncharacteristic impatience and urgency — that she be given two additional staff to help her do her job. The supervisors, led by Supervisor Joan Hartmann, complied. Hartmann, who was behind Tuesday’s recognition, stated, “I’m thrilled as a woman you reached the height of your field.” n INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 7, 2022

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FOOD &DRINK

p.36

Improvements and Inventions at Rusack Winery

T

MATT KETTMANN

TASTING ROOM REMODEL AND GRAPE DEVELOPMENT IN BALLARD CANYON here’s something for wine fans of all types to dig

to larger purchases and longer wine club relationships. into at Rusack Winery right now. For those simply Consumers, meanwhile, are seeking situations that are looking to enjoy good company in a great setting more refined and private, yet less overtly educational over excellent sips, the winery just redeveloped its or dogmatic in structure. tasting experience to fully embrace the bucolic scenes “When someone says, ‘I’m not a big fan of chardonof Ballard Canyon, offering oak-shaded views of vines, nay,’ we won’t say, ‘Here’s three chardonnays to taste,’ rolling hills, grazing livestock, and roaming wildlife. or hand them sauvignon blanc when they say they For those ready to geek out on winemaking techniques, like chardonnay,” explained second-generation vintner viticultural experiments, and even the promise of brand- Austin Rusack of this choose-your-own-adventure new grape varieties, Rusack is ripe for a return as well. reality. His team is taking some leads from brewery Let’s start at the beginning, which these days involves experiences, where each taste comes with a couple of confirming your reservation at the gate, pulling into comments about the beer and that’s it. a welcome glass of rosé, and settling into your private “If I need to know more, I’ll ask,” said Gerbac. table on the terrace or deck. This is a stark change from “Instead, I talk about the oak trees and why they look what the visitor experience had become over the 27 the way they do. I talk about the goats across years since Geoff and Alison Rusack founded the street, the last ones from Catalina Island.” the brand. Like many Santa Ynez Valley Of course, with more than two decades of wineries that came of age during the 1990s, winemaking under his belt, Gerbac could the tasting room had morphed into more of certainly talk forever about the wines, from S a tavern-like experience, with folks standing the famed estate syrah to those ever-imperE L TT three deep at the bar, angling for their next sip. BO ARRELS iled Catalina vines that seem to face a new B “This deck is the coolest deck in Ballard & KETTMANN malady each vintage to the experimental T BY MAT Canyon, and let’s make it feel that way for everynursery that he’s developed on a ranch just to body,” explains winemaker Steve Gerbac, who’s the north of the tasting room. Called Rancho Colina, been with the Rusacks since 2003 and guided the rede- this was the home to those early shoots of zinfandel sign. “Let’s connect people to the vineyard. That’s why that Geoff Rusack pulled from Santa Cruz Island years ago for the Catalina Island project. Gerbac is steadily we’re here.” Once seated, you choose from a number of flights, expanding the plantings, now with mission grape, aliexploring the estate wines, or the ones grown on Cata- cante bouschet, varying rootstocks, and some stilllina Island, or the Burgundian varieties they source from unknown vines in the ground. around the country. Or create your very own flight, A few years ago, when a nursery order didn’t come choosing two-ounce pours (or glasses or bottles) from in as expected, Gerbac decided to plant 1,000 of those Rusack’s more than two dozen wines, including $100- island zinfandel grape seeds in the ground to see what happened. Like for many crops, grape seeds don’t grow plus bottlings and select older vintages. “You can choose from just about every wine we make, into the same grape as the parent, and most simply fail, as many as you want,” said Gerbac. “We’re not afraid to at least from commercial standards. “I had grapevines with white leaves,” confirmed open anything. No one’s gonna get in trouble.” This new style of a seated, more intimate, and less Gerbac, who culled the weird and weak ones while formulaic tasting experience is sweeping the industry in saving the stronger vines. One was a white grape, even our post-COVID era. Wineries see them as a way to bet- though it came from red zinfandel, so he had that ter connect meaningfully with customers, which leads tested by UC-Davis, which confirmed that he’d raised

a brand-new grape unknown to science. “It took me a couple years to figure out what I’d done,” admitted Gerbac, who said the variety’s acidity is perfectly in line with its sugar levels at harvest. He and the Rusacks are now seeking to commercialize the grape, which is still unnamed. “Colina blanc” was my suggestion and “chardonnel” was also under consideration, but “white zinfandel” is certainly out. That sort of jabber can keep wine geeks going for hours, but we’re not a high percentage of any tastingroom crowd. Gerbac knows that better than anyone. While plotting the tasting room redo even prior to COVID, he’d sit anonymously on the patio and eavesdrop. Very few people were focused on the wine itself — it was all about the place, the vibe, the company, the moment. “I wish everyone couldn’t stop talking about the wines I make, but this is why people are out here,” said Gerbac of the scene he’s cultivated. “We don’t need 200 people in here every day like we used to have. But if we could get 50 that actually remember us, that feels like the right way to go.”

1819 Ballard Canyon Rd., Solvang; (805) 688-1278; rusack.com

RUSACK WINES TO TRY Icon Sauvignon Blanc & Syrah: This top-

tier line, which started in 2016, features wines with more age, oak, and concentration. The top two barrels of musque clone sauv blanc are fermented in new oak and then kept there for an extra six months to soften out the edges. “There’s something about the musque clone and oak — it lifts those aromatics,” said Gerbac. “This is what the grapes taste like when I pick them.” The $125 syrah amplifies the acclaim that Ballard Canyon gets for the grape, but you can get a taste here for $20. 36

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JULY 7, 2022

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Catalina Island Chardonnay: “There’s so

much acidity,” said Gerbac of these island wines, which they planted in precarious conditions 15 years ago. Even the 2015 is still loaded with zip that cuts through the nutty core. Anacapa: The 2018 blend of Vogelzang

Vineyard cabernet with the estate’s petite verdot and merlot is full of tobacco and dried pepper notes. “This is the style of cab we like,” said Gerbac. “It’s not sweet.” Added Rusack, “I love that hint of green in there.”

FOOD & DRINK

COURTESY

EXPERIENCES AND EXPERIMENTS: Winemaker Steve Gerbac directed the redesign of Rusack Winery’s tasting experience while also developing a brand-new grape variety in Ballard Canyon.

R


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF JULY 7

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): My readers and I have collaborated to provide insights and inspirations about the topic “How to Be an Aries.” Below is an amalgam of my thoughts and theirs—advice that will especially apply to your life in the coming days. (1) If it’s easy, it’s boring. —Beth Prouty. (2) If it isn’t challenging, do something else. —Jennifer Blackmon Guevara. (3) Be confident of your ability to gather the energy to get unstuck, to instigate, to rouse—for others as well as yourself. (4) You are a great initiator of ideas, and you are also willing to let go of them in their pure and perfect forms so as to help them come to fruition. (5) When people don’t get things done fast enough for you, be ready and able to DO IT YOURSELF.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): I know three people who have told me, “I don’t like needing anyone for anything.” They fancy themselves to be rugged individualists with impeccable self-sufficiency. They imagine they can live without the help or support of other humans. I don’t argue with them; it’s impossible to dissuade anyone with such a high level of delusion. The fact is, we are all needy beings who depend on a vast array of benefactors. Who built our houses, grew our food, sewed our clothes, built the roads, and create the art and entertainment we love? I bring this up, Taurus, because now is an excellent time for you to celebrate your own neediness. Be wildly grateful for all the things you need and all the people who provide them. Regard your vigorous interdependence as a strength, not a weakness..

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Bounce up and down when you walk. Express 11 different kinds of laughs. Be impossible to pin down or figure out. Relish the openings that your restlessness spawns. Keep changing the way you change. Be easily swayed and sway others easily. Let the words flowing out of your mouth reveal to you what you think. Live a dangerous life in your daydreams but not in real life. Don’t be everyone’s messenger, but be the messenger for as many people as is fun for you. If you have turned out to be the kind of Gemini who is both saintly and satanic, remember that God made you that way—so let God worry about it.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): As a child, Cancerian author June Jordan said, “I used to laugh all the time. I used to laugh so much and so hard in church, in school, at the kitchen table, on the subway! I used to laugh so much my nose would run and my eyes would tear and I just couldn’t stop.” That’s an ideal I invite you to aspire to in the coming days. You probably can’t match Jordan’s plenitude, but do your best. Why? The astrological omens suggest three reasons: (1) The world will seem funnier to you than it has in a long time. (2) Laughing freely and easily is the most healing action you can take right now. (3) It’s in the interests of everyone you know to have routines interrupted and disrupted by amusement, delight, and hilarity.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): In accordance with the astrological omens, here’s your assignment for the next three weeks: Love yourself more and more each day. Unleash your imagination to come up with new reasons to adore and revere your unique genius. Have fun doing it. Laugh about how easy and how hard it is to love yourself so well. Make it into a game that brings you an endless stream of amusement. P.S.: Yes, you really are a genius—by which I mean you are an intriguing blend of talents and specialties that is unprecedented in the history of the human race.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Novelist Lydia Peelle writes, “The trouble was, I knew exactly what I wasn’t. I just didn’t know who I was.” We all go through similar phases, in which we are highly aware of what we don’t want, don’t like, and don’t seek to become. They are like negative grace periods that provide us with valuable knowledge. But it’s crucial for us to also enjoy periods of intensive self-revelation about what we do want, what we do like, and what we do seek

to become. In my astrological estimation, you Virgos are finished learning who you’re not, at least for now. You’re ready to begin an era of finding out much, much more about who you are.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You need the following experiences at least once every other day during the next 15 days: a rapturous burst of unexpected grace; a gentle eruption of your strong willpower; an encounter with inspiration that propels you to make some practical improvement in your life; a brave adjustment in your understanding of how the world works; a sacrifice of an OK thing that gives you more time and energy to cultivate a really good thing.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): This might sound like an unusual assignment, but I swear it’s based on two unimpeachable sources: research by scientists and my many years of analyzing astrological data. Here’s my recommendation, Scorpio: In the coming weeks, spend extra time watching and listening to wild birds. Place yourself in locations where many birds fly and perch. Read stories about birds and talk about birds. Use your imagination to conjure up fantasies in which you soar alongside birds. Now read this story about how birds are linked to happiness levels: tinyurl.com/BirdBliss.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In accordance with current astrological omens, I have four related suggestions for you. (1) Begin three new projects that are seemingly beyond your capacity and impossible to achieve with your current levels of intelligence, skill, and experience—and then, in the coming months, accomplish them anyway. (2) Embrace optimism for both its beauty and its tactical advantages. (3) Keep uppermost in mind that you are a teacher who loves to teach and you are a student who loves to learn. (4) Be amazingly wise, be surprisingly brave, be expansively visionary—and always forgive yourself for not remembering where you left your house keys.

Join us in reading July’s book of the month! J U LY ’S T H E M E :

CRIME, THRILLER, SUSPENSE

J ULY ’S READ:

The Test by Sylvain Neuvel independent.com/indybookclub

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If you ever wanted to use the Urdu language to advance your agendas for love and romance, here’s a list of endearments you could use: (1) jaan-e-man (heart’s beloved); (2) humraaz (secret-sharer; confidante); (3) pritam (beloved); (4) sona (golden one); (5) bulbul (nightingale); (6) yaar (friend/lover); (7) natkhat (mischievous one). Even if you’re not inclined to experiment with Urdu terms, I urge you to try innovations in the way you use language with your beloved allies. It’s a favorable time to be more imaginative in how you communicate your affections.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Author John Berger described birch trees as “pliant” and “slender.” He said that “if they promise a kind of permanence, it has nothing to do with solidity or longevity—as with an oak or a linden—but only with the fact that they seed and spread quickly. They are ephemeral and recurring—like a conversation between earth and sky.” I propose we regard the birch tree as your personal power symbol in the coming months. When you are in closest alignment with cosmic rhythms, you will express its spirit. You will be adaptable, flexible, resourceful, and highly communicative. You will serve as an intermediary, a broker, and a go-between.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): People who don’t know much about astrology sometimes say that Pisceans are wishy-washy. That’s a lie. The truth is, Pisceans are not habitually lukewarm about chaotic jumbles of possibilities. They are routinely in love with the world and its interwoven mysteries. On a regular basis, they feel tender fervor and poignant awe. They see and feel how all life’s apparent fragments knit together into a luminous bundle of amazement. I bring these thoughts to your attention because the coming weeks will be an excellent time to relish these superpowers of yours—and express them to the max.

Homework: Take a specific action to diminish the sadness you feel about your number-one regret. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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ABSTRACT STATES OF MIND AT SBMA

Ernst Wilhelm Nay, “Chromatik stark und zart,” 1956

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onsider it a logical paradox. Going Global: Abstraction at Mid-Century, the new main exhibition at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, is an inherently nostalgia-waxing survey about a sweeping, once-radical force in 20th-century art. Abstraction has lost its sting and its sense of mission, and the show, drawn from the museum’s permanent collection, serves as a reminder that yesterday’s revolution can transform, in some ways, into today’s comforting relic. Progressive energies turn reflective in hindsight. Abstraction, which overturned prevailing art-world truths when Kandinsky and others kick-started the notion in the early 20th century and through successive reinventions via Abstract Expressionism and other movements by mid-century, is by now an accepted part of the cultural landscape. It appears as innocent eye candy on bank and corporate walls and domains where decorative imperatives prevail. Of course, its potent aesthetic imprint is still vital and infuses contemporary art notions, both “traditional” and hybridized into new forms and elaborations. But what would Kandinsky, Gorky, Pollock, and other abstracting titans think of the fate of the abstract impulse in art? A modest proposal with an educational overview, Going Global addresses the many side routes and offshoots of the abstract mothership, not to mention contributions from the “global” community (aka beyond America and Europe). For an immediate indication of the sharp contrasts under the abstract art umbrella, we enter the McCormick Gallery and are amiably confronted by the op-art eyeball buzz cut of Richard Anuszkiewicz’s 1979 “Centered Green.” Turn right and we take in the gestural, seeping color fandango of Ernst Wilhelm Nay’s “Chromatik stark und zart” (“Strong and tender colors”). (Biographical note: Nay, deemed by the Nazis as a “degenerate artist,” was drafted into the German army, where he befriended Kandinsky.)

In Elizabethan England, it’s hard to get noticed in theater when all anyone can talk about is“The Bard,”and Nick and Nigel Bottom, two no-name theater practitioners, feel lost in the shuffle. The Bard, of course, is powerhouse talent William Shakespeare, and in SBCC’s upcoming rendition of Broadway hit Something Rotten!, director Katie Laris calls him a “rock-star, Mick Jagger–like figure.” Meanwhile, the Bottoms hear it on good authority (a local soothsayer) that the next big movement in theater is called a “musical,” where performers dance and sing in addition to acting. Reaching for renown, the Bottom brothers launch themselves into creating the very first musical. Theater about making theater is interesting because it gives audiences a peek at the “backstage” process. Something Rotten! has fun, referential humor that theatergoers will love, but it’s also a story full of heart that will charm even those who are green in the seats. “It appeals to people with a working knowledge of Hamlet and a working knowledge of the American musical,”says Laris,“but even if you’ve never heard of Hamlet

or never been to a musical, there’s still plenty for you to enjoy.” Christina McCarthy choreographs—so expect large production numbers that require all the pizazz of Broadway—and David Potter directs music. Laris says the music has “a campy, anachronistic vibe”and moves from an Elizabethaninspired sound to contemporary rock. Something Rotten! was nominated for 10 Tony Awards. It’s a robust comedic musical that reminds audiences of those fateful words from Hamlet: “To thine own self be true.” Something Rotten! runs July 6-23 at the Garvin Theatre at SBCC. See theatregroupsbcc.com. —Maggie Yates

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SOMETHING ROTTEN!

Daniel Sabraw (left) and Rod Lathim

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BEHIND THE MUSIC OF THE INDY PODCAST

Molly McAnany wears many hats as the creator of our podcast, The Indy. Not only is she the host and editor, but she’s also parlayed her background as a classically trained pianist into crafting theme music for the audio streamer. We asked her some questions about it below. This interview has been edited for clarity.

Did you play all the instruments on the opening theme? I really only played piano because I don’t play horns … I have a MIDI keyboard that just hooks up to my software, which is Logic. And I am a classically trained pianist. So I do a lot of stuff on the piano, like horns, strings, synth — all of that stuff just happened to be on the piano. It’s probably a six multitrack instrumental; it is the simplest thing ever. But sometimes simple is better. I took a lot of inspiration from Serial, which is literally one note.

Are there any other themes across podcasts that stand out to you? So I took a lot of inspiration from the kind of newsy themes that you hear on CBS [or] ABC. I took that, but then I kind of combined it with Pushkin theme songs. I love NPR’s Invisibilia soundtracks. I love how they use music to kind of push the story forward. And that’s what I kind of have been working on doing with the podcast. Music should be something that brings the listener back in. You should have something different happen every two to three minutes in the show so that people don’t just wander off in their mind and then go somewhere else. Having that music to be like, “Oh, something’s speeding up here.”Like in Serial when they’re about to announce like who the murderer is. You feel that suspense through the music.

Do you use that music sensibility to gauge the rhythm of your speakers? Yeah, so I have four different sounds that I’ve written. One of them is the theme song. And then I have three melodies. So there’s this one really quiet piano one that’s for more serious, sadder topics. It’s very calm, and it could be used for even a book talk. The one that I use most often is the more newsy one. It’s kind of the same thing they did for Serial. It’s like the“dun, dun, dun, dun.”And there’s a bassline, and really quick drums. —Caitlin Kelley

Listen to The Indy podcast at independent.com/ the-indy.

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 38

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Thicker, darker, and more palpable ges-tures mark the painting “10 Mai 1961,” by French painter Pierre Soulages, one of the better-known art-world figures rep-resented in the show. Inspired by the cavernous light and atavistic aura of Lascaux and Altamira, Soulages created something mystical in paint here. A side gallery is devoted to the assigned category of “Signs & Symbols” and features lesser lithographs of famed artists. Lee Krasner (Jackson Pollock’s wife and widow) shows spare and becalmed “action” pieces in varied shades, while Jasper Johns’s “Souvenir I” contrasts a gradated gray expanse with a mugshot-like self-portrait in the lower corner. Meanwhile, back in the op-art zone, we find the woozy mesmeric optical charm of “Annul” (1965), by Bridget Riley, a star of the genre. Literally shifting perspective, as beholders, is required to fulfill the desired impact and optical trickery of Yaacov Agam’s “New Year, III.” He craftily packs three bright-hued compositions into one, depending on the position of the beholder. Other artists bring personal underpinnings and guidance mechanisms to their work represented here. Kenzo Okada’s large but soothing “Insistence” insightfully blends the calligraphic impulses from his native Japan with Abstract Expressionist impulses not too dissimilar from, say, Franz Kline. Famed Brit artist Ben Nicholson’s loosely geometric and drawing-like “Topaze” is, the artist claims, a reflection on his foggy seaside family home, turning still lifes into “land-sea-sky-scapes.” Elsewhere, the distance between carefully curated abstraction and realism becomes a central driving expressive driving force. Of the photographs in the show, the strongest and most relevant is André Kertész’s “Martinique,” in which an image of an ocean-front hotel balcony—with a figure blurred behind frosted glass—is a mysteriously elegant, minimal jewel of a vision. Possibly my own Best of Show nod, partly for sentimental reasons, goes to Gunther Gerzso’s “Le temps mange la vie/El tiempo se come a la vida” (“Time Devours Life”), from 1961. With its poetically layered group of forms, as if furling fabric pieces in an alternate dimension, the painting triggers real-world and dream-like responses. From another in-house historical angle, the painting is a beautiful reminder of SBMA’s important one-person exhibition of Gerzso’s art in 2003, through which I and many others “discovered” this tooobscure Mexican artist’s voice and vision. A single painting, abstract or otherwise, can have the power to fling us back in time and memory, even as time devours life. — Josef Woodard


a&e | ART PREVIEW

“Secretary “ by Olexander Zinovyev “How Small We Are” by Anne Ward

SEA AND SUMMIT

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right blue waves crash distance. The mounagainst sweeping mountains, jagged and tain-scapes in the latest contoured by the exhibit at the Marcia Burtt sun shining on the Gallery in Santa Barbara, Sea rocks, are reflected and Summit, on view through in the gleaming surface of the ocean August 14. This series of paintings and photographs — feabelow. The expanse turing artists Robert Abbott, of sky rests behind by Ellie Bouwer Marcia Burtt, Patricia Doyle, the peaks, mirroring Marilee Krause, Ann Lofquist, the vast blueness of Susan Petty, Ian Roberts, Erling Sjovold, the ocean below, casting soft white clouds Randall David Tipton, Marilyn Turtz, like a halo behind the summits. Jeff Yeomans, Anne Ward, and Robert Marcia Burtt, one of the artists and Zaca, and photographer Bill Dewey — is the owner of the Marcia Burtt Gallery, inspired by towering, shadow-lined peaks remarks at the way the artists are able to dropping into the vast expansiveness of the capture such vast, fleeting landscapes and ocean below. Some pieces show a gentle immortalize them on canvas: “Horizon glimpse of shining ocean poking over the lines pulled into taut blue stripes appear peaks of the mountains in the foreground, both reachable and boundless. Gestural while others display white water colliding brushstrokes and vibrant lines forever with cliffs, splashing and glinting in their suspend tidal surges and crashing waves moment of impact, or tall, solemn moun- on canvas and paper.” tains sinking quietly into a sea of fog. The artists’ attention to light and The Marcia Burtt Gallery (artlacuna.com) is shadow create an acute sense of depth and open Thursday-Sunday, 1-5 p.m.

MOUNTAIN AND OCEAN INSPIRATION SHOWCASE AT MARCIA BURTTGALLERY

ARTIST FATHER AND SON UNITE TO SUPPORT UKRAINE ZINOVYEV & ZINOVYEV EXHIBIT AT ALEXANDER GARDENS by Leslie Dinaberg

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ather and son Ukrainian artists Olexandr Zinovyev and Olexandr Zinovyev (senior and junior)—recent arrivals to Santa Barbara — will exhibit their work at Alexander Gardens Assisted Living (2120 Santa Barbara St.) Thursday, July 14, from 3-5 p.m. The artists will donate the proceeds from the event to the Ukrainian efforts. Olexandr Sr., a graduate of the Krupskaya Art University in Moscow, works in a variety of mediums, using caricatures to bring visual humor to political context. His work, which has been exhibited in art museums in Ukraine, Poland, France, Turkey, and Belgium, eventually struck a nerve with pro-Russian Ukrainian officials, forcing him to move to the U.S. in 2016, where he received political refugee status.

His wife, Tatiana, left their hometown of Vasilevka at the end of April, after it was heavily bombarded by Russian troops. She is currently in Western Ukraine, close to the Polish border, and hoping to reunite with her family in Santa Barbara soon. Olexandr Jr. (who studied graphic design at the Zaporizhzhia National University and graduated in 2020) is a prolific calligraphy artist, specializing in creating murals in public buildings and community spaces that are enjoyed and admired by the public at large. He also has more than 1,000 works on canvas. As Russia was preparing for invasion, Olexandr left Ukraine through Poland before joining his father in Santa Barbara in April.

See alexandergardensal.com/activities/events.

ART FROM THE TRAIL

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nspired by the beautiful landscapes enjoying the rich landscapes and and historic trails that connect Mission sites. Santa Barbara County’s three MisShowcasing 100 plein air paintsion sites — Santa Bárbara, Santa ings available through July 24 for Inés, and La Purísima Concepción sale online, half of the proceeds —artists with the Southern California go to the artist and half support nonprofits including the CaliforArtists Painting for the Environment nia Missions Trail Alliance, Los (SCAPE), who have traditionally put Padres Forest Association, and brush to canvas in support of environby Leslie Dinaberg mental causes, recently set their eyes SCAPE. “This is a really exciting on painting scenes from the California Missions Trail collaboration between artists and nonprofits,” said between Carpinteria and Guadalupe. Mark Wilkinson, Executive Director of the Santa For their first online exhibition in SCAPE’s 20-year Barbara County Trails Council. “Each painting that history, the plein air artists set up easels near the trail is purchased and hung on a wall will not only inspire to capture images of the historic trail that represents exploration and foster appreciation for the Trail, but a journey in time that begins with the footsteps of also help to fund future trail projects.” the Native Americans, traces historical expeditions, and continues today with pilgrims, hikers, and bikers See californiamissionstrail.org/art-overview.

ENVIRONMENTAL ART SHOW HITS THE MISSION TRAILS — AND THE INTERWEBS

“Tree of Light” by Kevin Gleason

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EMPLOYMENT COMPUTER/TECH TO APPLY, send resume to: 3423@ google.com. Must reference job code # below: Technical Program Lead (Goleta, CA) Function as the internal or client‑facing Google projects expert. Job Code: 1615.65642 Exp Inc: program mgmt of technology‑based products; Research in Quantum Computing Technologies w/ publications& presentations at academic conferences; C, C++, Java, or Python; Physics or applied mathematics; Create digital educational content on quantum computation w/ problem‑based learning; building quantum education tools & programs; & dev, implementation & launch of programs for tech products in quantum computation. Position reports to the Google Goleta office & may allow partial telecommuting.

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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS ANALYST

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING Responsible for all academic personnel matters including departmental administration of all faculty recruitments and merit and promotion cases. Serves as department resource for and advises Department Chair, Academic Business Officer, Financial/ Academic Affairs Manager, and all faculty on academic personnel policies including procedures covering academic recruitment, appointment and advancement; compensation, and salary administration; labor contracts; visa procurement; benefits; payroll; training and development; and faculty equity. Coordinates the academic search process, including placement of ads, drafting of search plans, and conducting the initial screening of materials submitted. Tracks and analyzes senate and non‑senate faculty teaching assignments, sabbatical leaves, and other leave requests. Manages and analyzes problems and issues of diverse scope and determines solutions; resolves moderate to complex Academic Personnel/HR issues affecting a broad range of academic titles in creative and practical ways. Participates in long range planning at meetings with the Chair and Academic Business Officer. Provides analytical support to the Academic Business Officer and Department Chair, such as data coordination of multiple reports for college, campus, and other agencies, and review and analysis of work operations, policies, and efficiencies. Coordinates data collection and related accreditation processes. Responsible for planning and implementing department distinguished lecture series and other special events. Coordinates high‑level department projects. Manages Kronos electronic timekeeping for department. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/ or equivalent experience /training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $68,700 yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants

40 40

will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/12/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 37929.

ACADEMIC AND STUDENT AFFAIRS MANAGER

EARTH SCIENCE The Academic and Student Affairs Manager has primary responsibility for coordinating all aspects of academic personnel, student advising and outreach services, academic and personnel employment matters. Serves as an adviser to Faculty on all of the above matters. Responsible for relevant budgets such as Temporary Sub 0, TA support, Block Grant, Fellowship accounts. Collaborates with the Department Business Officer in developing and instituting policies and initiatives. Supervises the Graduate and Undergraduate Advisers, and student workers. Provides direct professional support to the Chair and Department Business Officer, and serves in their absence. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. 1‑3 years experience in an academic setting. Ability to review, apply, interpret, and keep updated on the ever changing Academic Personnel policies and procedures. Highly proficient in computer usage with systems including but not limited to the following: Word, Excel, Box, Adobe Acrobat and Google Drive. Strong written and verbal communication skills. Strong business writing skills. Ability to interact well with various and diverse populations, including faculty, staff and students. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $62,300‑$67,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/12/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 37761

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RESIDENTIAL AND COMMUNITY LIVING Under the general direction of the Administrative Manager, the Assistant Administrative Manager provides analytical and administrative support in the areas of office management and resident services, annual Move in/ Move out of Apartments (approx. 5,000+ residents) and cross department collaboration. Oversees 3 complex offices providing services to residents living in 8 unique apartment complexes. Supervises 3 career Administrative Services Coordinators managing the offices. Coordinator

THE THEINDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT JULY JULY7, 7,2022 2022

for RCL’s annual Move‑In/ Move‑out for the 8 apartment complexes. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree. 1‑3 years work experiene in college/university administration, or equivalent. Interpersonal skills including verbal and written communication, active listening, critical thinking, persuasiveness, advising, and counseling to effectively motivate others. Skills to evaluate issues and identify resolutions. Strong service orientation with the ability to effectively manage multiple priorities. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $62,300 ‑ $75,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/7/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37850

ASSOC. DIR. OF DEVELOPMENT, ANNUAL FUND & DIGITAL FUNDRAISING

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Works to optimize philanthropic support in response to university priorities established by the Office of Development. As a member of central development, fund raising efforts are devoted to a broad array of philanthropic initiatives, including interdisciplinary programs and other university initiatives, as appropriate. Associate Director assists in the creation, design and implementation of a comprehensive, multi‑year, plan to increase financial support from a broad constituency of alumni, parents and friends primarily through phone solicitations, supported by direct mail, text and email solicitation follow up. The Associate Director serves as both a fundraiser and as the associate director of the Annual Fund. The Associate Director is responsible for overseeing all calling floor operations of the Annual Fund to produce strong fundraising results. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in relate field or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated track record of managing professional relationships in business, preferably in a Development environment. Persuasive verbal and written communication skills, and the ability to relate to and communicate with a wide array of constituents. Proficiency with Microsoft Office and donor/ customer relationship databases in order to search for new possible donors to the University. Notes: May be called upon to work occasional evenings and weekends at various Development Office, Institutional Advancement or campus‑wide events. This is an annually renewable contract position. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $78,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation,

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gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37688

ASSOCIATE BUSINESS MANAGER

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Responsible for complex financial and payroll analysis and processing for the Intercollegiate Athletics Department. Assists the Associate Athletics Director for Business Operations in the overall operation of the department’s $21M budget. Acts for the Associate Athletic Director in his/her absence and has signature authority over all department accounts. Under the direction of the Associate Athletic Director prepares required documentation for NCAA audits and other annual reports. Responsible for management of department expenditure and revenue accounts, including review and reporting. Serve as liaison between staff, coaches, the department, and other campus departments by resolving various inquiries and requests. Reqs: Sound judgment and decision‑making skills. Excellent written and verbal communicator at all levels. Ability to multi‑task. Advanced MS Excel knowledge. Ability to quickly assess and annotate financial data. Advanced knowledge of the organization’s operational and financial transactions and systems. Ability to understand internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Mandated Child Abuse Reporter. Campus Security Authority under the Clery Act. Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. $66,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/17/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38397

AUTO TECHNICIAN ‑GROUNDS

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Responsible for maintenance and repair of all motorized equipment in HDAE. Establishes and maintains a preventative maintenance program. Documents and maintains repair records, and training records, as required by HDAE, EH&S & OSHA. Will comply with department safety and illness program as implemented by supervisor and /or co‑workers. Professional Expectation/Attitude Standard/Customer Service: Promotes customer service programs in the Grounds unit to residents/clients. Assists with the development and maintenance of a work environment that is conductive to meeting the mission of the organization.

Completes job duties in a manner that demonstrates support for Housing & Residential Services. Reqs: Minimum of 2 years of experience working on small engines, ride‑on mowers, electric carts, and tractors in an institution and/or commercial setting. Ex. College Residence Hall, Hotel, resort, school. Basic computer experience. Experience in a customer service environment. Ability to install outdoor equipment Ex. BBQ grills, trash receptacles, bike racks, benches. Ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing. Ability to communicate and work effectively with diverse clientele such as, employees from other departments, students, parents, etc.Maintain safe and organized work area. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice

Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $25.15 ‑ $28.33/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37760

CLUB CHEF

THE CLUB & GUEST HOUSE The Club Chef will report to the Kitchen Manager as the co‑designer of all menus, including daily luncheon and event menus. Supervise and train all back of the house kitchen staff, manage the purchasing and inventory of all food and kitchen items, and be responsible for cleanliness and organization of the entire kitchen area. Provide meal service for member lunches Monday through Friday, and evenings and weekends as needed for Club events and private parties. Reqs: 1‑3 years Restaurant experience

Continued on p. 42

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Production Designer The Santa Barbara Independent is seeking a part-time, inhouse production designer to join its creative team. Candidates must have knowledge and experience with Adobe Creative Cloud on a Mac platform. Experience with layout design, font management, print publishing and file handling, preferred. The candidate will possess strong and professional communication skills, and be able to work well under pressure. This position works alongside multiple departments and under strict deadlines. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

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@sbindependent

COMPETENT AND capable 51‑year‑old woman with child and two dogs (all well behaved and respectful) looking for live‑in caregiver opportunity. Very experienced in caring for kids, horses dogs and cats. Former veterinary technician and canine behaviorist. Honest, reliable and drug free. References upon request.

Vaccinated. publichealthsbc.org/vaccine 56. Lyricist who wrote “Ain’t We Got Fun?” and “Makin’ 1. British comedian who plays Whoopee” 57. Basketball players Broyles Ivan on “Our Flag Means and Benjamin (but not Death” Wade) 8. Lake rental 15. Post-1968 tennis period 16. City with a SUNY school 1. Use sparingly, with “on” 17. Wool extract 2. In a tough jam 18. Mark of shame that can be 3. Emmy-winning “Euphoria” “hit” or “reached” star 19. “Piece of cake” 4. Bumpy, like tires 21. Pre-packaged meals and 5. Capital near Yellowstone desserts for a speedy 6. “Single Ladies (Put ___ On checkout It)” 22. Pogues bassist (and 7. Title hunter of a 1922 film former spouse of Elvis (whose real name was Allakariallak) Costello) O’Riordan 24. Nearly 20-year-old OutKast 8. 2013 hit that mentions a tiger hit 25. NASCAR Cup Series champ 9. “Step ___ pets” (palindrome that’s good of 2015 and 2019 advice) 29. 4:00 function 10. Hall of Fame NFL coach 30. Respectful act Ewbank 31. Symbols of September 11. “Dumb & Dumber” 35. Frisbee sport hairstyles 38. Brisbane bouncer 12. Rented out 41. Prepared in advance 13. Science that deals with 43. Frere’s sibling nuclear energy 45. Bachelor chaser? 14. Spotted, Tweety-style 46. City dweller 20. Pumped 48. Up and running, like a 23. Iron Maiden’s “Hallowed Be ___ Name” credit card reader 26. Law, in Lyon 52. Original and influential 27. Slov.’s setting 53. Tries to whack 28. ___-Z (rapper who played 54. Like some hobbitses Freda Gatz on “Empire”) 55. Auricular

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INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY JULY 7, 7, 2022 2022

31. Certain ally 32. Schumer of “Life & Beth” 33. Jim’s love on “The Office” 34. Local fundraising gp. 35. Ultravox leader Midge 36. It got its current half-oval shape in 1629 37. Japanese floor mats 38. Gets control of, as spending 39. Slip-up left off 40. Euripides protagonist 42. Set the DVR back to 0%, say 43. Weaving of “Bill & Ted Face the Music” 44. Characteristic of lowquality TP 47. Club regulation 49. ___ Paqcha (Peruvian mountain) 50. Rhymester Ogden 51. Novelist Elinor who coined the “It girl” nickname for Clara Bow 52. Brit. money abbr., once ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1090

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT Required Thorough knowledge of food and production. Thorough verbal and written communication in the English language, active listening, dynamic flexibility, critical thinking, and ability to multi‑task and ensure effective time management. Thorough decision making and reasoning skills, and ability to develop original ideas to solve problems including operations analysis and quality control analysis. Intermediate computer application skills. Thorough and effective interpersonal and work leadership skills to provide guidance to all levels of personnel. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Valid driver’s license and clean driving record. CCC certification with the American Culinary Federation or equivalent. $51,800 ‑ $67,500/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/18/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38518

DIGITAL & VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST

HOUSING DINING & AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES This position is the webmaster for the largest department on campus that offers a broad range of auxiliary services. Responsible for creating and managing the design and technical implementation of web site architecture for four complex websites and the design of digital signage visual content and print publications, offering informational resources and direction to a broad audience. Works in partnership with staff from Multimedia Communications & Marketing, Conference & Hospitality Services, Campus Dining, Residential & Community Living and The Club & Guest House to develop, implement and continually update various marketing campaigns. Communicates strategies to departmental senior leadership as necessary. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related field and/ or equivalent experience/training. 4+ years of experience with both Mac and Microsoft platforms using Adobe Creative Suite design software, Microsoft office applications, and other graphic and web applications. 4+ years of experience in graphic design, marketing, and/or web design and development. 4+ years of experience with website content management systems (such as Drupal), web authoring and development tools. Solid written, verbal, and interpersonal communication skills and active listening skills. Knowledge and skills to advise and consult with management to ensure the delivery of the desired message to the target audience. Knowledge and understanding of technical applications to effectively direct technical staff. Ability to work in a deadline‑oriented environment, to display self discipline to organize, plan and prioritize, and meet goals given by deadlines, manage multiple projects at the same time while maintaining high quality. Knowledge of printing process and related production activities including file preparation and output, prepress, and print requirements. Knowledge of layout principles and aesthetic design concepts. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $61,200‑$93,200/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

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Application review begins 7/08/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37989

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT END USER COMPUTING ENGINEER ‑ TELECOM

COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES UCSB is looking for an End User Computing Engineer for our Telecom unit! If you have initiative, strong customer service orientation we would like to welcome you to UCSB, a world‑class institution. This position provides a diverse collection of services that are highly integrated with departmental operations and telecommunications systems and are critical to the department’s ability to provide services to our campus‑wide customer base. Reqs: 4‑6 years experience as a customer service representative. 4‑6 years experience with service intake systems. 1‑3 years experience in a high volume call center. 1‑3 years experience working as a help desk technician. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $33.04 ‑ $39.94/ hr., commensurate with experience and internal equity. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #36822

EQUIPMENT AND SURPLUS ADMINISTRATOR

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Responsible for the identification, classification, tracking, reporting, capitalization, and disposition of all UCSB capitalized equipment consisting of over 11,000+ assets and book value exceeding $300M. The Equipment & Surplus Administrator is responsible for maintaining UCSB’s property management system in compliance with US FAR 52.245‑1, BUS 29, and BUS 38 and is responsible for developing policies and procedures concerning UCSB assets. The Equipment & Surplus Administrator supervises a dedicated Equipment Administrative Specialist and coordinates the transfer and sales of campus assets between UCSB Equipment Custodians and the UCSB Surplus Sales. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Experience in a professional atmosphere, in a finance/ business capacity with knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Experience in financial products, asset management, and corporate finance with broad knowledge of financial transactions and financial systems, as well as related policy, accounting, and regulatory compliance requirements. Strong interpersonal skills and ability to work effectively across the organization at all levels. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $70,815‑ $77,225/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/8/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 37872

THE THEINDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT JULY JULY7, 7,2022 2022

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING Under the general supervision of the Financial Manager, the Financial Assistant is responsible for coordinating a majority of Residential & Community Living financial matters and accounting systems. Prepares all paperwork to effect financial transactions. Compiles and enters data for financial reporting. Works closely with the Financial Manager & Administrative Manager to identify fiscal patterns. Monitors and reconciles financial reporting systems, ensuring accuracy, correcting discrepancies and ensuring liens are cleared. Processes all accounts payable, travel & entertainment documents, and other special projects. Coordinates hiring & departure payroll processes for new and existing staff & student employees. Reqs: 1‑3 years general office administration experience. Financial analysis skills and detail‑oriented. Good verbal and written communication skills and ability to multi‑task. Excellent customer service skills. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $29.58/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/12/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38203

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

EARTH SCIENCE Areas of responsibility include purchasing, receiving, employment of all non‑academic temporary employees, travel and entertainment, reimbursements, posting/reporting, monthly recharges, filing and retrieval of documents, and equipment and key inventories. The Department of Earth Science is a large complicated science department and the Financial Assistant must demonstrate accuracy and attention to detail, and work independently utilizing a complex financial system.Reqs: High school diploma. Working knowledge of financial and administrative policies and procedures. Proficiency in the use of spreadsheet and database software. Ability to act independently with sound judgment and confidentiality. Possess attention to detail and the ability to assess and adjust priorities adeptly, while balancing a high volume workload. Ability to interface professionally with a broad range of staff, faculty, students, and others on behalf of the departments. Strong analytical, and critical thinking skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/12/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38082

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

FOOD & BEVERAGE MANAGER

THE CLUB & GUEST HOUSE The Food & Beverage Manager is responsible for the overall foodservice of The Club & Guest house, a 150 seat dining facility with an event space, located within a hotel setting. The Food & Beverage Manager reports to the General Manager and will oversee all food and beverage service functions of The Club & Guest House. This role is crucial to ensuring The Club & Guest House is represented to both the campus and the surrounding community as an organization that provides the highest degree of customer satisfaction and standards of excellence in all aspects of guest services. The Food & beverage Manager will be responsible for the day‑to‑day food & beverage operations, event services planning and execution. Reqs: 4‑6 years of progressive experience in collegiate or high volume food service operations and/or hotel/ restaurant management. Thorough Knowledge in food service operations and sanitation regulations. A high degree of flexibility, energy, initiative, problem solving and resourcefulness. Demonstrated leadership abilities, customer service and communication skills, interpersonal savvy, strategic and organization agility, managing vision and purpose, innovation management and business acumen. Highly developed organizational skills, including attention to detail, accuracy, and ability to manage multiple and often conflicting priorities, meet deadlines and delegate with accountability. Financial and analytical skills to manage food cost, labor and controllable targets. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $67,500 ‑ $85,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/18/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38488

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians, as well as scheduling appointments. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required at time of hire is required and non‑negotiable. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Pay Rate/Range: Starting at $23.97/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and

all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 37796

identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 31222

PHYSICIAN PATIENT SERVICES ASSOCIATE

STUDENT HEALTH Using a computerized scheduling system and a virtual calling system to schedule medical appointments both by telephone and in person. Accurately determines patient’s medical needs with regards to urgency and appropriateness of patient’s appointment request. Assists patients by providing information on general Student Health services and programs. Utilizes substantial customer service experience and demonstrated abilities to clearly explain appointment procedures and uses sound judgment to handle non‑routine appointment requests. Performs a variety of clerical tasks as assigned. Prepares and scans all incoming paper medical records into the electronic medical record appropriate categories. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. Work experience in a customer service environment. Excellent written and oral communication skills, effective interpersonal skills and the ability to exercise independent judgment. Demonstrated attention to detail with frequent interruptions. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. $21.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37555

STUDENT HEALTH Provides direct clinical services in Primary Care Family Medicine OR Primary Care Internal Medicine and Immediate Care for all eligible patients at UCSB Student Health. Also provides consultation on a per case basis if needed, for all members of the professional staff to assist them with diagnosis and treatment of their patients. Provides supervision for the Physician Assistants when the Primary Supervisor is unavailable as assigned by the UCSB SHS Executive Director and/or Medical Director. Reqs: Doctor of Medicine (MD) Degree, Doctor of Osteopathy (DO) Degree or recognized equivalent is required. Must be Board Certified by the American Board of Medical Specialties. Current CA Medical license and DEA license required at all times during employment. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must complete and pass the background and credentialing process before date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Medical licenses and DEA at all times during employment. Must be Board Certified. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month at 100% position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/11/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #37977

PHYSICIAN, LIMITED RECOVERY STUDENT HEALTH PROGRAM Provides professional care for college‑age outpatients requiring ASSISTANT medical care and consultation, MANAGER including diagnosis and treatment. Provides consultation services on a per case basis as required for all members of the professional staff in assisting them with diagnosis and treatment for their patients. Reqs: Must have a valid CA medical license and DEA license at all times during employment. Board eligible or certified in Family or Internal Medicine with experience in working with college‑age patients. Notes: Must successfully complete and pass a background check and credentialing process before date of hire. Credentials are renewed periodically. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and of Dependent Adult Abuse. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of COVID‑19 vaccination and annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a limited position (no more than 20 hours per week). Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender

STUDENT HEALTH Provides wrap‑around care and case management to residents of the UCSB recovery‑supportive housing program, as well as non‑resident students in the Gauchos for Recovery Program. The Assistant Manager will be available to provide support after hours and where students live. They will help students to navigate university life, including (but not limited to) advising around academics, access to disability accommodations, safe housing options and other basic needs, as well as ongoing recovery support. The Assistant Manager will conduct individual and group meetings with students. This position will report to the Recovery Program Manager. Clinical supervision available for AMFT, ACSW, and CADC interns. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, Social Work, Counseling, Health Education or other related field, or equivalent experience. Knowledge of co‑occurring mental health and substance use. Ability to provide counseling support (under supervision as required by licensing status) and case management. Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing

process before employment and date of hire. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a 50% position, working M‑F 2:00pm – 6:00pm (or weekends/evenings as needed). Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #37623

SHOP & MACHINE SAFETY SPECIALIST

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Under the general supervision of the Industrial Safety Program Manager, develops, implements, manages, and identifies needs for a diverse set of campus‑wide occupational health and safety programs, including but not limit to: Shop Safety, Energy Isolation (Lock‑out/Tag‑out), Powered Industrial Trucks & Heavy Equipment, Machine Safety, and Crane & Hoist Safety. Additional areas of responsibility include performing job hazard and personal protective equipment assessments, developing and providing training and technical information, performing audits and compliance inspections, generating reports and corrective action notifications, providing injury prevention program assistance, implementing injury prevention strategies, and monitoring injury trends on campus. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/ or equivalent experience /training. Have completed all state courses and have a minimum of at least 3 years of relevant experience. Comprehensive working knowledge / understanding of a specific EH&S field including related laws and regulations, and general understanding of all EH&S fields. Excellent organizational skills to plan, organize, and prioritize multiple projects. Excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively in a diverse environment. Working skills in the appropriate use of technology and relevant scientific equipment as required. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work some evenings and weekends. Must be willing to work with and respond to emergencies (on and off‑hours) involving potentially hazardous materials. $61,200 ‑ $95,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #37914

SR. PARKING REPRESENTATIVE

TRANSPORTATION & PARKING SERVICES Enforces University parking regulations by issuing citations and courtesy warnings to vehicles illegally parked. Identifies vehicles to be “booted” and process them according to California Vehicle Code. Keeps current of campus events and their locations. Directs traffic and escort vehicles including semi‑trucks and buses. Provides parking instructions and


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT give directions. Reqs: Demonstrated exceptional customer service by providing and delivering professional, helpful, high quality service and assistance. Ability to work as part of a team, maintain a positive attitude and work together to achieve a common goal of providing world class customer service. Excellent interpersonal skills, including the ability to collaborate with students, staff, faculty and the general public. Ability to grasp new concepts. Ability to maintain professionalism and composure under high customer demand and challenging customer interactions. Excellent written and verbal communication. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability to work nights and weekends. $22.17/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/15/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38491

STUDENT LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING The Student Leadership Program Manager is responsible for the development of the Resident Hall Association (RHA). Also provides leadership development for the Residence Hall staff (RD/ARD) in regards to hall government. The SLPM represents Residential & Community Living (as well as Housing & Residential Services) on campus wide committees with focus on Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD), Spring Insight, Convocation, weekend programming, voter registration and other university‑wide student programs as well as programs to promote academic recognition and support. This position collaborates with Office of Student Life, Business Services, and Risk Management so that residence hall programs meet the policies and mandates of the campus for safety, security and contract requirements. Advises all Residential & Community Living staff on the campus regulations and requirements Residential & Community Living programs produce a residential experience that insures the quality of life, well‑being, and personal development for more than 5,700+ diverse students residing in eight residence hall communities operating 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Reqs: 1‑3 years Related experience in student leadership programs. Bachelor’s Degree. Interpersonal skills including verbal and written communication, active listening, critical thinking, persuasiveness, advising, and counseling to effectively motivate others. Strong service orientation with the ability to effectively manage multiple priorities. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, and clean DMV record. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $69,750 ‑ $81,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/12/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #38134

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UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR

MATHEMATICS Provides academic advising to over 1200 majors, pre‑majors, transfer students, prospective, and enrolled students in the Department of Mathematics. Duties include advising, consulting, assisting with and coordinating articulation, testing, outreach, recruitment, registration, orientation, degree certification, Mathematics Achievement, internship programs; and supervising the departmental peer program. Serves as liaison to UCSB Offices, community college, students, faculty, and department undergraduate committee. Is also responsible for maintaining student records, on‑going assessment of student progress, course and student data management, maintaining all student files and records, assisting with curriculum planning, course scheduling, and works collaboratively with faculty and campus agencies on all issues relating to Mathematics curriculum, articulation, academic policies, and procedures. Responds to queries by phone, electronically and in person from prospective students about department programs. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in a related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Proficient in the use of MS Office Suite and familiarity with online systems. Possesses a strong professional orientation, excellent verbal and written communication skills, and the ability to work effectively with all levels of the University community. Ability to multi‑task. $55,100 ‑ $60,000/ yr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 7/11/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 37934

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATOR

HSSB ADMIN SUPPORT CENTER The Religious Studies Undergraduate Program Coordinator is responsible for independently overseeing all aspects of the Religious Studies Undergraduate Program. Provides academic advising for majors, minors, and potential new students. Collaborates with colleagues within HASC, as well as other campus offices such as the College of Letters and Science, EAP, DSP, and the Office of the Registrar to provide holistic and accurate guidance to all students. Coordinates undergraduate services including preparing and managing the quarterly schedule of classes, updating annual copy for the general catalog, and submitting and managing master course approvals. Maintains departmental statistical reports and completes IRAL and Instructor Workload reports. Works closely with the Department Chair and Faculty Undergraduate Advisor. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience in a higher education setting. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 38365

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: CAROL ANN DONOVAN, CASE NO.: 22PR00281 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: CAROL ANN DONOVAN, A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Irene O’Hagan in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: IRENE O’HAGAN be appoint‑ ed as personal representative to administer the estate of the dece‑ dent. THE PETITION requests the dece‑ dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami‑ nation in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent admin‑ istration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as fol‑ lows: 07/28/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: SBA5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 Santa Barbara‑ Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec‑ tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representa‑ tive, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California stat‑ utes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 06/3/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Brian L. Fox, 290 Maple Court, Suite 126, Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 964‑1170. Published June 16, 23, 30, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHELE FITZPATRICK CASE NO.: 22PR00316 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interest‑ ed in the will or estate, or both of: MICHELE FITZPATRICK AKA MICHELE A. FITZPATRICK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: KATHLEEN CARLSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

The Petition for Probate requests that: Kathleen Carlson be appointed as personal representative to admin‑ ister the estate of the decendent. THE PETITION requests author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent admin‑ istration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 08/04/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec‑ tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representa‑ tive, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California stat‑ utes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 06/15/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy Clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Susan H. McCollum, Hollister & Brace, 200 East Carrillo Street, Suite 100, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: CHERI M. AGARANO be appointed as personal representative to admin‑ ister the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent admin‑ istration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 07/28/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec‑ tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representa‑ tive, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California stat‑ utes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 06/09/2022 By: April Garcia, Petitioner: Cheri M. Agarano, 735 W. Islay St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Deputy. 805‑708‑7738 Published June 23, 30. July 7, 2022.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RUTH MYERS‑AGARANO Case No.: 22PR00298 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: RUTH MYERS‑AGARANO A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: CHERI M. AGARANO, in the Superior Court of California,

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LINDSLEY FALLON WESSBERG CASE NO.: 22PR00289 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: LINDSLEY FALLON & LINDSLEY FALLON WESSBERG A PETITION FOR PROBATE has

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been filed by: RICHARD MICHAEL ROSENWALD in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. The Petition for Probate requests that: RICHARD MICHAEL ROSENWALD be appointed as per‑ sonal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent admin‑ istration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 07/28/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec‑ tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representa‑ tive, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California stat‑ utes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 06/9/2022 By: Jessica Vega, Deputy Clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Richard Michael Rosenwald, PO Box 40307, Santa

Barbara, CA 93140. 805‑455‑6979 Published June 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

BULK SALE AUCTION – Tuesday, July 19, 2022 10:00 a.m.; 316 E. Haley Street, Santa Barbara 93101; Held by: LJ Severance Contact: LJSeverance@msn.com This is a legal sale of abandoned personal property, to be sold in one or more lots to the highest bidder, for cash only, plus sales tax (7.75%), paid at time of sale. All items are sold as is, where is, and must be removed at the time of sale, or within 24 hours by arrangement. Note: all business/per‑ sonal sensitive information documents, etc., are not included in the sale and must be left behind. Sale is subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Items include, but are not limited to: Art; and art supplies: Multiple origi‑ nal paintings/drawings of various sizes on mounted and unmounted canvasses; 1 framed painting. Misc. new and used art supplies – pens, pencils, markers, acrylic paints. Art drawing technique books; (8) frames for art – various sizes; 1 bag of shredded paintings; Household items: misc. kitchen supplies, microwave, juicer, utensils, bedding, dry goods, small electronics, bath supplies and linen, misc. household tools, costume jewelry, glass pipes, desk supplies, case of CDs, 2 lamps, tattoo kit. Multiple boxes, storage bins, totes, storage trunks, small locked safe, contents unknown; 2 lamps, tattoo kit, hair shearers, trimmer; Clothing, shoes: 2 wardrobe boxes with hanging clothes, women’s medium; 6 bags/boxes of clothes, shirts, sweaters, jackets tops; misc. shoes; leather gloves; Furniture: Bed/mattress, small couch, chests, small tables, round table w/ chairs, stool, standing work table, 2 mirrors, stackable shelves.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALSCO at 900 N Highland Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90038, ALSCO INC. (Doing Business in California as “Steiner Corporation”), 505 East 200 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84102 This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by SHANDA MAPLE, SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 08, 2022. This

Isla Vista Recreation & Park District announces request for proposals (RFP) for Children’s Park and Pardall Gardens Renovation Projects. Proposals due 8/2/2022 by 5pm in electronic and paper copy. For ques-tions, please email ivrpd@ivparks. org, dial (805) 968-2017, or visit www.ivparks.org.

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JULY 7, 2022

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001501. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRANADA THEATRE, THE GRANADA, THE GRANADA THEATRE, SBCPA, TICKETSSB.ORG 1214 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Center for the Performing Arts, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by A Corporation. Signed by CAREN RAGER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001405. Published: June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MIRA SANTA BARBARA, 1060 Alamo Pintado, Solvang, CA 93463, NICOLE BALL, 411 E Canon Perdido St, Unit 15, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed by NICOLE

BALL, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 6, 20022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001490. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001478. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CLAUDIA COFFEE BAR,1445 Harbor View Dr, Apt #125, Santa Barbara, CA 93103, IAN LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by CLAUDIA J SERRANO RUEDA, PRESIDENTE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001299. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LE SOL DESIGN STUDIO, LE SOL LANDSCAPE DESIGN STUDIO 414 Olive Street, Santa Barbara, CA, 93101, Chantal H Vo, 1252 Las Canoas Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is con‑ ducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY CHANTAL VO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 3, 2022. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001459. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SB TOOL & MANUFACTURING at 75 Robin Hill Road, Goleta,CA 93117, Atomica Corp. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by RALPH FRECHE, GENERAL MANAGER

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as MOTEL 6‑SANTA MARIA at 2040 Preisker Lane, Santa Maria, CA 93454; Dutt Hospitality LLC, 3455 E La Palma Ave, Ste 101, Anaheim, CA 92806 This business is conducted

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and Virtual) July 19, 2022, at 5:30 P.M. Title 17 (Zoning) Amendments for Electronic Changeable Copy Signs Case No. 22-0001-ORD ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and virtually via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing to consider adoption of Title 17 Amendments for Electronic Changeable Copy Signs (Case No.: 22-0001-ORD). The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, July 19, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PROJECT LOCATION: The amended regulations would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: On March 3, 2020, City Council adopted Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code. The proposed amendments are limited to changing the permit requirements for existing signage using manually changeable copy to be replaced with electronic changeable copy. The change would reduce the permit required for these existing signs from a Conditional Use Permit to a Zoning Clearance and Design Review Board approval. Environmental Review: This Ordinance for changing the permit requirement for a specific type of sign is not subject to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Section 15060(c)(3) of the CEQA Guidelines (Title 14, Chapter 3 of the California Code of Regulations) because the activity is not a project as defined in Section 15378(b)(5) as an organizational or administrative activity by government that will not result in direct or indirect physical changes in the environment. The Ordinance is also exempt from CEQA pursuant to Section 15061(b)(3) of the CEQA Guidelines because the activity is covered by the general rule which exempts activities that can be seen with certainty to have no possibility for causing a significant effect on the environment. PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact J. Ritterbeck, Senior Planner, at (805) 961-7548 or jritterbeck@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www. cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent July 7, 2022 44 44

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by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by HIMANSHU SARVAIYA, MANAGING MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 9, 2022. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001506. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PRIVATE EQUITY GROUP, 252 Coronado Drive, Goleta, CA 93117, Joel M. Silverman (same address). This busi‑ ness is conducted by an Individual. Signed by JOEL SILVERMAN, SELF. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 1, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001436. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14,

Number: 2022‑0001469. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOHEMIAN WAFFLES, 432 E Cota, Santa barbara, CA 93101; Bohemian Breakfast,112 Los Aguajes Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by ANGELA ONEILIN, OFFICER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001658. Published: July 7, 14, 21. 28, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: IN HOPE COUNSELING, 5662 Calle Real, #149, Goleta, CA 93117; Sheena Escobedo, 7382 Davenport RD Apt

Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001527. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LILY at 1131 Coast Village Rd., Santa Barbara, CA 93108, LISSA A LIGGETT, 411 Lemon Grove Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by an individ‑ ual. Signed by LISSA A LIGGETT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001333. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom) July 19, 2022 at 5:30 PM ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing for the levy and collection of taxes for the Goleta Library Special Tax for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2022, and ending June 30, 2023. An Administration Report consisting of, among other things, the assessed parcels, is filed in the Office of the City Clerk for public review. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, July 19, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, July 14, 2022, on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 961-7505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish: July 7, 2022 and July 14, 2022 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Z & Z INVESTIGATIVE AND PROTECTION SERVICES, 7127 Hollister Avenue 25A‑217, Goleta, CA 93117; Christopher Lee Zbinden (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by CHRISTOPERH LEE ZBINDEN, OWNER, QUALIFIED MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E51. FBN Number: 2022‑0001590. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RUI’S CREATIONS, 4141 State St Suite E1, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Flourish Local (same address). This business is conducted by a corpo‑ ration. Signed by STACY REBICH HESPANHA, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 06, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47. FBN

B, Goleta, CA 93117. This busi‑ ness is conducted by an Individual. Signed by SHEENA ESCOBEDO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001670. Published: July 7, 14, 21, 28, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REGALITO at 515 E. Arrellaga, #4, Santa Barbara, CA 93103, Sergio A Lagunas, Julia Lara, (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. Signed by SERGIO LAGUNAS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E29. FBN Number: 2022‑0001485.Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as OAK STATE AUDIO & LIGHTING, 1470 Andrea St, Carpinteria, CA 93013, Kian C Hamilton (same address) This business is conducted by an indi‑ vidual. Signed by KIAN HAMILTON.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HOTEL HYGGE, 550 Avenue of the Flags, Buellton, CA 93427; FLT Hygge, LLC, 2082 Michelson Drive, 4th FL, Irvine, CA 92612. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by MICHAEL B. EARL, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001558. Published: June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PROLOGISTIX, 25 W. Anapamu ST Suite C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Real Time Staffing Services, LLC, 1040 Crown Pointe Parkway Suite 1040, Atlanta, GA 30338; Select Staffing; Resource MFG. This busi‑ ness is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by DAVID D KRUPCZAK, VICE PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 02, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)

E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001446. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PELICAN SHORE PROPERTIES, 4874 8th Street, Unit B, Carpinteria, CA 93013, William R Loomis, (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. Signed by ELIZABETH LOOMIS. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 1, 2022, This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E35. FBN Number: 2022‑0001435. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as CROCKER REFRIGERATION HEATING & AIR at 5531 Ekwill St, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Crocker Group Corp. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by LUCILLE CROCKER, CFO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001518. Published June 30, July 7, July 14, 21, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUNKISSED PANTRY, 31 E Canon Perdido, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kiersten L Ozhelevskiy, 2226 Ermine Ave, Ventura, CA 93003. This business is conducted by a cor‑ poration. Signed by KIERSTEN OZHELEVSKIY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001614. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BETH KIMBERLY LLC, 313 Sycamore Dr, Buellton, CA 93427; Beth Kimberly LLC, (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by KIM HARRIES. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001595. Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: X‑TECH SYSTEMS at 360 Storke Road, Goleta, CA 93117, I COPY, INC., 11266 Monarch St. Suite B, Garden Grove, CA 92841. This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by RONALD VARING, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001528. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THERAPY WITH MAX at 1227 De La Vina St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Max Golding at 277 Alamar Ave. #12, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by MAX GOLDING. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001474. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 20022.

NAME CHANGE


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

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PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ROBERT DANIEL LANE BURNS, CASE NUMBER: 22CV01910 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: ROBERT DANIEL LANE BURNS TO: BOB DANIEL LANE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JULY 25, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 5/26/2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KELLY RYAN TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01895 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KELLY RYAN TO: RENE SOLEIL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing July 15, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 26, 2022. by DONNA D. GECK, Judge of the Superior Court. Published June 16, 23, 30, July 7, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ANITA SUSAN KAPLAN, 3091 Calle Rosales, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; NUMBER: 22CV02141 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: ANITA SUSAN KAPLAN TO: ANITA HARRIS KAPLAN. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec-

tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing August 8, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated June 16, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published June 23, 30, July 7, 14, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: A. NICHOLAS TOROK, CASE NUMBER: 22CV02089 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: A. NICHOLAS TOROK TO: NICHOLAS TOROK THE COURT ORDERS that all per-

sons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING AUGUST 5, 2022, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated 6/16/2022, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court, Published June 30, July 7, 14, 21 2022.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF DECEASED SETTLOR OF TRUST

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ANACAPA DIVISION In the Matter of The Craddock Living Trust U/D/T dated September 29 1987, as amended and completely restated on July 8, 2020 Case No.: 22PR00294 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the creditors and contingent credi‑ tors of the above‑named dece‑ dent ANTHONY J. CRADDOCK, also known as ANTHONY JOHN CRADDOCK and TONY CRADDOCK (“DECEDENT”), that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court of Santa Barbara, 11 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121, AND deliver pursuant to Section 1215 of the California Probate Code a copy to Frances Patricia Craddock as Trustee of the Craddock Living Trust U/D/T dated September 29, 1987, as amended from time to time and as amended and completely rein‑ stated on July 8, 2020, wherein Decedent was the Settlor, in care of her attorney, Timothy J. Kay, Esq. at 600 Anton Blvd. Ste. 1400, Costa Mesa, CA 92626 within the later of four (4) months after June 23, 2022, the date of the

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and Virtual) July 19, 2022, at 5:30 P.M. General Plan Amendment Initiation – Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan Case No. 22-0001-GPA ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and virtually via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing to consider initiating a General Plan Amendment to incorporate the forthcoming adoption of the Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan for the Santa Barbara Airport by the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (Case No.: 22-0001-GPA). The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, July 19, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PROJECT LOCATION: The amended regulations would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The City of Goleta adopted the Goleta General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan (General Plan) on October 2, 2006 and has since been amended on 25 occasions. The proposed initiation of this General Plan Amendment would allow staff to begin processing required edits to the Land Use Element, Safety Element, Noise Element, and Figure 5-3. The amendments are required to satisfy State aviation law, which requires that local General Plans integrate airport plans within a 180-day timeframe after the airport plan is adopted by the local Airport Land Use Commission. The Santa Barbara County Association of Governments serves as this Commission for the Santa Barbara Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan. Environmental Review: The initiation of a General Plan Amendment is not a project under the California Environmental Quality Act because the initiation merely instructs staff to further consider the amendment and does not obligate the City to any further action in the future or result in any direct physical change in the environment or any reasonably foreseeable change in the environment. PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact J. Ritterbeck, Senior Planner, at (805) 961-7548 or jritterbeck@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www. cityofgoleta.org. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent July 7, 2022

first publication of notice to creditors, or if notice is mailed or personallyh delivered to you, sixty (60) days after the date this notice is mailed or person‑ ally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Section 19103 of

the California Probate Code. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk, For your protec‑ tion, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Date 6/14/22 Timothy J. Kay, Esq.

Attorney for Frances Patricia Craddock, Trustee Snell & Wilmer L.L.P. 600 Anton Blvd., Suite 1400, Costa Mesa, CA 92626‑7689 BSC 221847 6/23, 6/30, 7/7/22. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 2022

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE CROSSWALK AT CALLE REAL / FAIRVIEW CENTER - PEDESTRIAN HYBRID BEACON (PHB) PROJECT NO. 9099 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., July 21, 2022, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 non-refundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http://www.cityofgoleta. org/i-want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plant and equipment necessary to construct and deliver a finished CROSSWALK AT CALLE REAL / FAIRVIEW CENTER - PEDESTRIAN HYBRID BEACON (PHB) PROJECT NO. 9099. Work includes construction of a new Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon (PHB) signal-controlled crosswalk with mast arms, developing a power supply, installing pedestrian push buttons, constructing ADA accessible ramps, new crosswalk striping, pavement markings and installing applicable PHB warning and control signage. Night-work is required for project activities that will impact traffic at the intersection of Calle Real and Fairview Avenue, such as but not limited to, demolition, reconstruction of driveways, and striping. The contract period is Forty (40) Working Days. This contract period excludes time for equipment procurement and coordination with outside agencies, such as Southern California Edison (SCE). Coordination and scheduling of new service with SCE shall be Contractor’s responsibility, and reasonable project schedule impacts shall be negotiated with the Agency as needed. A Pre-Bid Meeting is not scheduled for this project. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed or submitted to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received or postmarked within three (3) City business days after the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR CROSSWALK AT CALLE REAL / FAIRVIEW CENTER PEDESTRIAN HYBRID BEACON (PHB) PROJECT NO. 9099.” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded the islowest responsive and responsible bidder The to Project subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Departme that holds a valid Class “A” Contractor’s license, Class “C”Code Electrical specialty, or prevailing w Relations (DIR) per California Labor Section 1771.4, including apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure specialty licensing in accordance with the provisions of the California Business against di employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or r and Professions Code. be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises w The successful Bidder will befullrequired furnish Performance Bond a discriminated opportunity to to submit bids ina response to this notice and willand not be basisequal of race,to color, national origin, ancestry, Price. sex, or religion in any consideration Payment Bond each in an amount 100% of the Contract Each bond award of contract. shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, defined in Codeandofresponsible Civil bidder th A contract may only be awardedas to the lowest responsive Class ”C-27 Landscaping admitted Contractor” Contractor’s license in accordance with th Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a– California surety insurer. the California Businessand and Professions Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 1771.1, Code. all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid be listed proposal, enter into a and a Paym The on, successful Bidder in will a bebid required to furnish or a Performance Bond in an amount to 100% of thewith Contract bond shall be in the forms s contract to perform public work must equal be registered thePrice. DIR.Each No Bid will shall be secured from without a surety company State of California bonding be accepted, nor any contract entered into proofthat of meets the all contractor’s as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California a and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If insurer. awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain to Labor Code sections and Failure 1771.1, allto contractors active registration with the DIRPursuant for the duration of the 1725.5 Project. provideand subcontra to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted, nor any contract entered into, with 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bidand as subcontractors’ non-responsive. contractor’s current registration with the DIR to perform public w contract, the Bidder22300, and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain Pursuant to Public Contract aCode section the successful bidder may active regis DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s curr substitute certain securities for funds withheld by CITY to ensure performance pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-re under the Contract or, in the alternative, request the CITY to make payment of retention to an escrow agent. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addres Clerk priorof to the Any protest maybe be considered acted on by the City Any protest to an intended award thisaward. contract shall made inandwriting time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda fo addressed to the City Clerk prior tothethe Any protest may on betheconsidered contact Cityaward. Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register CITY’s website (www.cityo and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To Foragenda informationfor relating to the please details of contact this Project the and bidding requirements contac request a copy of the notice of award, City Clerk in writing at pmedel@cityofgoleta.org. (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements CITY OF GOLETA contact Debbie Talarico in writing at dtalarico@cityofgoleta.org. Published: Santa Barbara Independent: June 30, 2022, and July 7, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM Published: JULY 7, 2022

_____________________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk

THE INDEPENDENT

45

Santa Barbara Independent: December 10 and December 17, 2020


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

PHONE 805-965-5205

ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing for the levy and collection of assessments within the Goleta Street Lights Assessment District for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2022, and ending June 30, 2023. A draft Engineer’s Report consisting of, among other things, the assessed parcels, will be filed in the Office of the City Clerk for public review. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta. org). HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, July 19, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, July 14, 2022, on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 961-7505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish: July 7, 2022 and July 14, 2022

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal prop‑ erty described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. July 28, 2022 at 3:30 PM. Richard Schroeder Personal Items Jahseh Ahlem Business equipment Samantha Carey Personal The Auction will be listed and adver‑ tised on W W W. S T O R A G E T R E A S U R E S . COM. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to com‑ plete the transation. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind and purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

STATEMENT OF DAMAGES STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) PLAINTIFF: MARSHALL BERNES, ET AL Attorney for PLAINTIFF: Stephen Allen Jamieson (SBN 115805); Ryan Michael Kroll (SBN 235204) Case number: 20CV00235. DEFENDANT: Camilla Meldahl, et al. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, Trustee, seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1.General Damages b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00 2. Special damages c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00 d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00 e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other (specify) Lost income, inciden‑ tal, and consequential damages $5,000,000.00 3. Punitive dam‑ ages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Date: April 30, 2021. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa

CITY OF GOLETA PUBLIC NOTICE The following list of disbursements are unclaimed by the listed payees and held by the City of Goleta. If you have a claim against these funds, please contact the City of Goleta City Treasurer, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117, phone (805) 961-7500. Proper proof of claim and current identification must be provided before funds will be released. A claim form will need to be obtained from the Finance Department and submitted by the date below. Funds not claimed by August 29th, 2022, become the property of the City of Goleta. This notice and its contents are in accordance with California Government Code Section 50050. Per Resolution No. 17-45 Adopting the City of Goleta Escheatment Policy. Check Number 80796

Amount $21.24

City Fund General

Payee Miriana Muzar Hall

09/23/2016

81013

$50.00

General

Advanced Laminates & Design

09/29/2016

81069

$48.00

General

Chilas Catering

01/25/2018

84772

$150.00

General

Orbital ATK

03/07/2019

88027

$120.00

General

Cal Green Medical Center

04/25/2019

88444

$21.60

General

Courtyard Marriott

07/18/2019

90160

$1,674.75

General

David Burton III

07/18/2019

90165

$1,656.00

General

Frontier CA Inc

07/25/2019

90219

$9.00

General

Agua Azul Pool Service

08/08/2019

90391

$93.57

General

URS Corp

08/29/2019

90509

$150.00

General

Carl Givens

09/05/2019

90577

$105.00

General

League of California Cities

City Treasurer

Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent July 7, 2022, and July 14, 2022 46 46

THE THEINDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT JULY JULY7, 7,2022 2022

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St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) PLAINTIFF: MARSHALL BERNES, ET AL Attorney for PLAINTIFF: Judith Dannett (SBN 115805); Ryan Michael Kroll (SBN 235204) Case num‑ ber: 20CV00235. DEFENDANT: Camilla Meldahl, et al. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Judith Dannett, an indi‑ vidual seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1.General Damages b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00 2. Special damages c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00 d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00 e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other (specify) Lost income, inciden‑ tal, and consequential damages $5,000,000.00 3. Punitive dam‑ ages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Date: April 30, 2021. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) PLAINTIFF: MARSHALL BERNES, ET AL Attorney for PLAINTIFF: Elinor Fisher, individ‑ ual (SBN 115805); Ryan Michael Kroll (SBN 235204) Case num‑ ber: 20CV00235. DEFENDANT: Camilla Meldahl, et al. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Elinor Fisher, Individual seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1.General Damages b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00 2. Special damages c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00 d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00 e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other (specify) Lost income, inciden‑ tal, and consequential damages $5,000,000.00 3. Punitive dam‑ ages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Date: April 30, 2021. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) PLAINTIFF: MARSHALL BERNES, INDIVIDUAL ET AL Attorney for PLAINTIFF: Stephen Allen Jamieson (SBN 115805); Ryan Michael Kroll (SBN 235204) Case number: 20CV00235. DEFENDANT: Camilla Meldahl, et al. To: Camilla Meldahl, aka Camilla Mehdahl, an individual Plaintiff: Marshall R. Bernes, an individual seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: 1.General Damages b. Emotional distress $5,000,000.00 2. Special damages c. Loss of earnings (to date) $5,000,000.00 d. Loss of future earning capacity (present value) $5,000,000.00 e. Property Damage $5,000,000.00 i. Other (specify) Lost income, inciden‑ tal, and consequential damages $5,000,000.00 3. Punitive dam‑ ages: Plaintiff reserves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $10,000,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. Date: April 30, 2021. Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 9321‑1107 Anacapa Division.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Camilla Meldahl AKA Camilla Mehdahl, an

individual; ED ST. George, an indi‑ vidual; JAMES GELB, an individual; JAMES M. GELB, as Trustee of the 2010 JAMES M. GELB Revocable Trust, MARIO MELENDEZ, an individual; Melendez Construction, an Unknown Business entity; MATTHEW CROTTY, an individ‑ ual; FRANCES CROTTY, an indi‑ vidual; Bank of America National Trust and Savings Association, a national banking association, as Trustee under that certain Pooling and Service Agreement dated as of October 1, 1992 for RTC Commercial Pass‑Through Certificates, Series 1992‑CHF; ROBERT L. LOVGREN, an Individual; DOREEN J. LOVGREN, an individual, 6651 L.P., a California limited partnership; HARVEY H. WIPF, an Individual; HARVEY H. WIPF, as Trustee of the Wipf Family Trust; BERNICE A. WIPF, an Individual. BERNICE A. WIPF, as Trustee for the Wipf Family Trust. ERNEST G. GULSRUD, an individual; ERNEST G. GULSRUD as Trustee of the Gulsrud Family Trust; MURIEL GENEVIEVE GULSRUD, an individual; MURIEL G. GULSRUD, as Trustee for the Gulsrud Family Trust; CURTIS R. JAHNKE, an Individual; and DOES 1 through 100, inclusive. You are being sued by plaintiff: MARSHALL R. BERNES, an indi‑ vidual; MARSHALL R. BERNES, as Trustee of the MARSHALL R. BERNES Family Trust; JUDITH DANNETT, AN INDIVIDUAL; AND, ELINOR FISHER, AN INDIVIDUAL. Notice! You have been sued. The court may decide against you with‑ out your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center(www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Website (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self‑ help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informa‑ cion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales papa pre‑ sentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo pro‑ tegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte

que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es reco‑ mendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte. ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de aboga‑ dos locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recupera‑ cion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso): 20CV00235 Pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure Section 872.320 (c), the following language shall be included in the publication of the Summons: “The Property which is the subject of this action is located at 708 East Haley Street, Santa Barbara, California.” The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA 1100 ANACAPA STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 93121‑1107

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personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in California Probate Code section 19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encour‑ aged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Dated June 14, 2022. By: Margaret V. Barnes, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 attorney for Lawrence T. Sorensen Independent Temporary Trustee. Published June 23, 30, July 7, 2022.

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them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver pursuant to Section 1215 of the California Probate Code a copy to LAWRENCE T. SORENSEN, as trustee of the WILLIAM SAFINA REVOCABLE TRUST dated 3‑7‑1995, amended and restated 4‑13‑2015, of which the Decedent was the settlor, at the office of the Trustee’s attor‑ neys located at 1900 Sate STreet, Suite M, Santa Barbara, California, 93101, within the later of four (4) months after 6/23/2002, (the dated of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom) July 19, 2022 at 5:30 PM

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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FROM THE court clerk. from the SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ANACAPA DIVISION In re the William Safina Revocable Trust dated 4‑13‑1995, amended and restated 4‑13‑2015 by William Safina, Decedent. Case No. 22PR00057 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Prob. C. §§I9040(b), 19052) Notice is hereby given to the credi‑ tors and contingent creditors of the above‑named decedent, that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file

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