Santa Barbara Independent 06/9/22

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Election Results FREE

Santa Barbara

JUNE 9-16, 2022 VOL. 36 • NO. 856

e u l B n e e r &G ADVE

E D I U G E R NTU

Our Annual Ode to the Great Outdoors e

Insid

Best of Santa Barbara Nominations Now Open! ®

Opera S.B.’s La Traviata Cuyama Buckhorn BBQ Chick-fil-A Okay Appreciating Al-Anon INDEPENDENT.COM

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10 Steps to Homeownership

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FINAL LOAN APPROVAL

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APPRAISAL & HOME INSPECTION

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2021 Best Mortgage Company - SB Independent @montecitobank #CreatingHome

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WWW.LAMADOG.COM | @LAMADOGTAPROOM 116 SANTA BARBARA ST IN THE FUNK ZONE INDEPENDENT.COM

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SANTA BARBARA HOSPITALITY CAREER FAIR 20+ LOCAL BUSINESSES HIRING: Restaurants, Transportation, Hotels...and many more!

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June 14, 2022 4 PM - 6 PM at Courtyard by Marriott Santa Barbara Goleta No Registration Required - View Jobs at SantaBarbaraCA.com/CareerFair 4

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ON TO THE NEXT CHAPTER

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman

COVER STORY

Name: Veronica Vo Title: News Intern

Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

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Big Blues & Glorious Greens

Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra

Our Annual Ode to the Great Outdoors

Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Intern Madison Smoak, Sarah Stephens, Veronica Vo Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 34 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 ON THE COVER: “Cedars at Mission Pine Spring,” painted by Chris Potter, Memorial Day weekend, 2022. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

What attracted you to UCSB’s journalism minor, and what would you say to students considering it? I discovered an interest in journalism after writing for the Daily Nexus my sophomore year, but became truly interested in pursuing it after joining WORD Magazine my junior year. I decided then that I wanted to apply to the journalism minor, and I’m so glad I did because it gave me amazing opportunities! To students considering it, I would say to go for it; the best way to find out what you want to do is to try everything you’re even vaguely interested in. What are your plans after graduation? I plan to move back to my hometown in Orange County and start applying to graduate school in creative writing. What was your favorite article to work on during your time with the Independent? My favorite was the TikTok article. It might not have been the most hard-hitting news, but it was my favorite kind of story — one that highlights creativity and the community. I had a lot of fun writing it, and a lot of fun at the Independent overall! INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 36, # 856, June 9-16, 2022

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PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until July 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


NEWS of the WEEK

JUNE 2-9, 2022

by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

ELECTIONS

Early Returns Show Salcido and Brown Winning Big in Low-Turnout Election The Votes Counted as of Press Time Wednesday

NEWS BRIEFS CORONAVIRUS The latest COVID outbreak at the county’s two jails has reached 34 cases, with 22 individuals reported to have tested positive at the Main Jail and 14 from the Northern Branch Jail. One individual required hospitalization, and 23 are asymptomatic, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Due to the outbreak, visitation is currently suspended at both jails, and court procedures will also be readjusted to minimize the spread of the virus.

DAN I EL DR EI FUSS F I LE PHOTO

HEALTH

FRONTRUNNERS: County Superintendent of Schools Susan Salcido and Sheriff Bill Brown celebrated their early leads on election night. by Nick Welsh and Jun Starkey Photos by Ingrid Bostrom

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espite efforts by elections workers throughout the state to make voting as easy as humanly possible, Santa Barbara voters—like voters throughout California—embraced their franchise with a great big yawn this Tuesday, posting the lowest turnout in many moons. As of Wednesday morning, voter turnout weighed in at a less

than whopping 20.95 percent, only slightly above the 19.06 percent reported Tuesday night and the 16 percent Monday afternoon for this pretty much all mail-in ballot. Elections czar Joe Holland is now estimating that there remain roughly 26,000 ballots left to count. That does not include any ballots that arrive in the mail over the next three days postmarked June 7. Based on this, Holland is guesstimating at this point that voter turnout

June 7 Primary Election Results For the latest, most complete election results, visit Independent.com.

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

Total Votes: 49,288 Total Registered Voters: 235,212 Turnout: 20.95%

County Superintendent of Schools Susan Salcido: 28,877 (64.06%) Christy Lozano: 16,093 (35.70%)

Clerk, Recorder and Assessor

STATE

Under California’s system, the top two vote-getters will face off in November.

Governor — Statewide Results Gavin Newsom: 1,913,657 (56.3%) Brian Dahle: 572,472 (16.8%)

U.S. House of Representatives District 24 — Districtwide Results

Joseph Holland: 35,989 (80.97%) Elrawd MacLearn: 8,356 (18.80%)

Salud Carbajal: 59,055 (62.6%) Brad Allen: 27,712 (29.4%)

Sheriff-Coroner

State Assembly District 37 — Districtwide Results

Bill Brown: 25,913 (56.79%) Juan Camarena: 19,599 (42.96%)

Gregg Hart: 29,916 (58.4%) Mike Stoker: 19,495 (38.0%) Bruce Wallach: 1,841 (3.6%)

for this election will be 32 percent. That’s still lower than any that Holland recollects. In 2014, for example, the turnout was 38 percent. But complicating matters somewhat, Holland said, is that even though this year’s turnout is lower in terms of percentages than 2014, more people actually voted this year than then. That being said, real candidates did run for real offices and ran real campaigns with reallife consequences. Susan Salcido, Santa Barbara County’s incumbent Superintendent of Education, appears well ahead over challenger Christy Lozano, an 18-year physical education instructor in the Santa Barbara Unified School District and a conservative culture wars crusader. In the initial returns — in which 21 percent of the registered voters cast ballots —Salcido won 64 percent of the ballots, and Lozano took the remaining 35.7 percent. This year’s election marked the first time in no less than 40 years that the seat has been contested, forcing Salcido, a former school principal and administrative über-wonk with 26 years in the educational trenches, to actually explain what she and her office—with 500 employees and a budget of $105 million—do and does. Lozano sought to reach out to conservative voters fed up with the progressive agenda of “equity, inclusion, and diversity,” appearing on Fox News and stressing the need for schools to focus more instead on the basics of math and reading. To the extent any local race generated much political electricity, this one was it. In the other most locally significant race, between incumbent Sheriff Bill Brown and challenger Sheriff ’s Lieutenant Juan CONT’D ON PAGE 16 

Van Do-Reynoso, director of County Public Health for the past five years, will be stepping down to take a new gig with public health network CenCal effective 8/1. Over the last two years, Do-Reynoso found herself leading the county’s charge against COVID and communicating the many twists and turns along the way to the public and elected officials. More fundamentally, it was her department’s role to procure the necessary vaccinations, test kits, and protective gear for public clinics and oversee the massive public outreach required to ensure it all got where it needed to go.

COURTS & CRIME A person suspected of an attempted murder in Santa Maria was taken into custody by the Santa Maria Police Department SWAT team on 6/4 after officials received a tip that the suspect was staying in a hotel on Cabrillo Boulevard in S.B. A joint law enforcement contingency from Santa Maria coordinated with S.B. Police to execute the arrest and search warrants. The suspect was arrested and transported to County Jail for booking. La Luz del Mundo megachurch leader and former S.B. County pastor Naasón Joaquín García pleaded guilty to multiple felony counts of sexual assault involving three separate minors as part of a plea deal. The multi-year investigation and prosecution began in 2018, ending with the arrests of García and two other church members, Susana Medina Oaxaca and Alondra Ocampo, accused of grooming congregants in L.A. County for sexual purposes. García and Oaxaca pleaded guilty 6/3 and were to be sentenced this week; Ocampo reached a similar deal in 2020 and will be sentenced later. A fourth suspect, Azalea Rangel Melendez, remains at large. The police deployment that closed Los Aguajes Avenue for a few hours on 6/1 apprehended a man in connection with a shooting in the city of Tulare, Tulare’s police department stated on 6/6. Tulare police alerted S.B. police on 6/1 that a subject, Logan Dalton Starkey, 19, of Tulare, was wanted in connection with CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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to Our th Grade Graduates

Owen Anton Rowan Brownlee Andrew Gielow Lillian Hendershot Esme Mazurkiewicz Isaac Relis Kai Tautrim

CITY PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

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JUNE 2-9, 2022

A-OKAY: Chick-fil-A has worked with city staff since March on strategies to prevent its busy drive-thru line from spilling off the property onto State Street.

Chick-fil-A Drive-Thru Avoids the Ax Council Content with Traffic Improvement Plan by Tyler Hayden nder intense pressure from Santa Barbara officials to fix its traffic problems or face the closure of its drive-thru, Chick-fil-A has successfully staved off the chopping block. The City Council voted this Tuesday to enact a new traffic management plan for the fast food restaurant rather than declare it a public nuisance, as it had threatened to do in March. During that hearing, the council gave Chick-fil-A 90 days to work with city staff on strategies to prevent its busy drive-thru line from spilling off the property onto State Street, a hazard that has plagued the area for the better part of a decade. In the last three years alone, police recently said, 24 accidents occurred along the 3700 block, with 11 collisions taking place directly in front of Chick-fil-A. The new plan — which includes a designated traffic attendant, reconfigured lanes and parking, and increased staffing during peak hours — has worked so far, Assistant City Attorney Dan Hentschke told the council. Overflow queues are forming less often and for shorter amounts of time. “The conditions are within range of expected business traffic around town,” he said. A handful of neighbors told the council the improvement was obvious. Councilmember Eric Friedman, in whose district the restaurant is located, said he was glad a solution could be reached without invoking the public nuisance ordinance, a move that could have opened up the city to lengthy and expensive litigation. “I do appreciate that Chick-fil-A and our staff have been working collaboratively and that the interim measures appear to be working,” he said. “That moves us in the correct direction.”

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Friedman did express frustration, however, that Chick-fil-A had failed to address the issue for so many years, despite countless public complaints and multiple injury accidents. He pointed specifically to a letter sent to the company by City Administrator Rebecca Bjork in January 2020 that requested many of the same traffic improvements the restaurant is only now adopting. “I wish we could have implemented them then, but we didn’t, and that’s the past,” he said. Hentschke emphasized that Chick-fil-A’s new traffic plan is enforceable, meaning if it fails to abide by the agreed-upon measures, the restaurant could once again risk losing its drive-thru. The official abatement order also requires Chick-fil-A to provide city officials with monthly reports for the next year, seek additional off-site parking for employees, prevent truck deliveries during peak hours, and not allow armored cars servicing the site to park on State Street. Chief traffic engineer Derrick Bailey said he was confident pending improvements to the property, including a widened driveway and third lane for waiting customers, would reduce congestion even further. The designs are working their way through Santa Barbara’s review boards. In response to a question from Friedman about a 30-yearold city ordinance that seemed to prohibit the expansion of drive-thrus, City Attorney Ariel Calonne clarified the law only applied to banks with drive-up ATMs. Meanwhile, Chick-fil-A has proposed a second South Coast location for 4765 Calle Real, which is currently occupied by an IHOP. “I believe the location being developed in Goleta will help dilute the market,” said Mayor Randy Rowse, referencing Chick-fil-A’s immense popularity that draws fried-chicken-sandwich lovers from far and n wide. “I’m very optimistic,” he said.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D VICTOR B RYANT

WILDFIRE

THE OAK COTTAGE OF SANTA BARBARA A unique approach to memory care . . . The Oak Cottage of Santa Barbara is home of the signature Vibrant Life program, specializing in unique activies such as gardening, walking clubs, scenic drives and more. Designed to connect residents with family, friends, and the local community, our Vibrant Life program truly inspires.

Living life to the fullest through ourOaksignature Cottage is specifically designed for residents with cognitive impairment including Alzheimer’s disease and age-related dementia. Call now to join us for Vibrant Lifeourprogram. UNDER INVESTIGATION: The remains of what looks like a burned sofabed at Via Quintero, a street at the end next virtual “Lunch and Learn” event. Lunch will be delivered to your door!

AtSocial Oak media Cottage, we make dreams come true, stay connected of the Bridge to Nowhere that Santa Barbara County Fire describes as the origin of the Bridge Fire. to the local community and showcase theCottage rich lives of our Oak Memory Care messages indicate the fire started from a burning sofa. residents through the Vibrant Life program. Oak Cottage is 1820 De La Vina St. specifically designed for residents with cognitive impairment, Santa Barbara, including Alzheimer’s disease and age-related dementia.CA 93101

Bridge Fire Brouhaha

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by Jean Yamamura

unday night’s Bridge Fire in Santa Barbara was called fully contained Monday morning, but firefighters stayed on site to dig out any hot spots. Mapping using infrared sensors put the fire at just under 8.2 acres, and no injuries were reported. Controversy and complaints, however, are being voiced online about how some people received notification of the fire and others did not. The cause remains under investigation, and it appears to have had a suspicious origin, according to County Fire’s tweets, next to the fields by the Bridge to Nowhere, properly called Salvar Road. Social media messages identified the starting place as a couch and said five people were seen nearby. Photos of what looks like a burned-out sofa bed above Cieneguitas Road were posted on social media, too, which seems to give truth to that rumor. While fire ordinarily runs uphill, this one moved downhill, pushed by winds of about 10 mph, rising to gusts of 20 mph, said County Fire spokesperson Captain Scott Safechuck, headed toward the homes on Cieneguitas Road. Low-flying aircraft carrying water and fire retardant were nearly over the heads of the people evacuating the area, though a drone was also spotted, endangering the air operation. About 120 individuals fought the fire, including engine, dozer, and aircraft crews, chiefs, and firefighters from the County and City of Santa Barbara. The winds blew the smoke across the canyons and along Foothill Road as emergency alerts went out first across the wireless system and then the reverse dialing system. Sheriff ’s deputies and Search & Rescue volunteers went door to door, knocking and ringing doorbells to evacuate the people on Calle Caridad and Cieneguitas closest to the fire above Foothill. Numerous complaints were made to responding agencies because the telephone alerts arrived seemingly at random. Kelly Hubbard, who leads the county’s Office of Emergency Management, explained how

the emergency alert systems worked. Once oakcottagesb.com the fire department assesses the fire, her office and the Sheriff ’s Office identify and outline the area to be evacuated. The emergency alert messages first go out via cell towers in the evacuation area, but the towers, which are owned by individual carriers, broadcast the message to all the carrier’s cell phones in the zone, whether or not the owner is registered in the evacuation area. Hubbard said this is further complicated by the fact that all carriers might not have a cell tower in the emergency area. Confusion arises when some people who are near the fire receive the message, but often people beyond the fire — but within the range of particular carriers’ cell towers — also receive the message. Both the Wireless Emergency Alert system and cell tower technology are in the hands of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, which is working to enable all towers to connect to all cell phones in an emergency, Hubbard said. It is the fastest way to reach the most people. Opting for the virtues of redundancy, the county uses three systems to alert its residents, and the wireless alert is just one of them, said Hubbard. The other two are the reverse 9-1-1 dialing system and the knocks on doors by emergency personnel. Alerting the nearest neighbors is most important, Hubbard said, but once those are underway, they turn to the county websites; next are the Twitter networks of the Office of Emergency Management — in English and Spanish — Santa Barbara County, and the Sheriff ’s Office to provide the information again. “We are always working to improve the data that we can control,” she said, “and part of that is needing residents to update their information.” Hubbard recommended making sure all phone numbers and email addresses are correct and up to date, as well as the method of alert — such as text, phone call message, and so on — and the locations or addresses for which you want to be notified. The website readysbc.org contains the n sign-up links.

Lic #425802118

GIVE BENEFIT SALE! Be green! Recycle-Reuse-Restyle and GIVE back to the local community! 100% of the proceeds are donated!

Thousands of items donated by UCSB students! Saturday, June 18 & Sunday, June 19 8AM-4PM Embarcadero Hall Parking Lot 935 Embarcadero Del Norte, Isla Vista

https://seal.sa.ucsb.edu/civic-community-engagement/give-benefit-sale INDEPENDENT.COM

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ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA

JUNE 2-9, 2022

COMMUNITY

ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS OBTAINED OVER ONE HUNDRED AND NINTY MILLION DOLLARS ($190,000,000.00 ) FOR CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEES IN WAGE & HOUR CASES INVOLVING: · UNPAID OVERTIME · UNPAID WORK OFF THE CLOCK · MISCLASSIFICATION AS INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS · MEAL & REST VIOLATIONS · UNPAID MINIMUM WAGES

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SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series Today! Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with

SKIP ABED

Santa Barbara Sailing Center

MICHAEL COHEN Santa Barbara Adventure Company

HEATHER DEUTSCH SB Bike

Blue and Green

Thursday, June 9 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

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‘OVERSIGHT IN NAME ONLY’: Community Formation Commission Chair Gabe Escobedo voiced his disappointment with the civilian oversight recommendations presented to City Council on Monday.

Formation Commission ‘Frustrated’ by Police Oversight Pivot

City Council Moves Forward with Proposal to Give Oversight Duties to Fire & Police Commission, City Administrator’s Office by Ryan P. Cruz uring a contentious special meeting of the Santa Barbara City Council on Monday — which reportedly ended in a sharp exchange involving the city’s interim police chief and the chair of the Community Formation Commission (CFC) — councilmembers moved forward with city staff ’s recommendations to give greater police oversight and monitoring powers to the Fire & Police Commission and the City Administrator’s Office in lieu of creating the Civilian Oversight Board championed by the CFC. Members of the CFC — which had spent the past 13 months working toward its recommendations — spoke out at Monday’s meeting, saying they were “disappointed” and “frustrated” by the recommendations made in the final proposal presented to the City Council, which amended the proposal before moving forward with it in a 6-1 vote. Formed in the wake of George Floyd’s murder by Minneapolis police, the CFC had asked for a separate 11-person Civilian Oversight Board with its own mission statement to “ensure that SBPD is responsive to the concerns and needs of all members of the Santa Barbara community while promoting transparency and accountability and building public trust between the community and the SBPD.” The CFC’s final draft recommendation was a detailed outline for the makeup, duties, responsibilities, and processes for a civilian oversight model, which included ideas for review, training, and community engagement.

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City staff explained that some of the CFC’s recommendations—such as asking for subpoena power and the ability to hold closed sessions — were already under the Fire & Police Commission’s purview, making this implementation both quicker and more cost-efficient. Councilmembers commented that the final recommendations did not represent what the CFC had put forward, and many councilmembers said they were not prepared to pass it through. Then Councilmember Meagan Harmon suggested they push the recommendations forward with added provisions to require at least one year with an independent auditor; a total reconstitution of the Fire & Police commission; a public meeting to narrow down a threshold for outside investigations; and collaboration with the CFC before finalizing an ordinance. The oversight duties would fall under the Fire & Police Commission, with the City Administrator’s Office handling personnel-related issues. Several CFC members voiced their opposition to the new proposal during public comment, along with representatives from Healing Justice S.B., and community activists who called the final recommendations a “slap in the face” to the work the committee had done to tailor its recommendations to the city’s needs. CFC Chair Gabe Escobedo was the first to criticize what he said represented only a portion of the group’s work. “While the staff ’s report would like you to think that this recommendation is in line with the CFC recommendation, it is not,” Escobedo CONT’D ON PAGE 15 É


EDUCATION

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

S.B. Unified Sees Grad Rates Improve

T

J U N STAR KEY

housands of high school students have graduated from the Santa Barbara Unified School District this year as students slowly begin to overcome hurdles created by the COVID-19 pandemic, such as learning loss and the exacerbation of the achievement gap. The district provided a breakdown of graduation rates among students for the past five years, from 2018 to 2022, though the 2022 graduation rate is subject to some changes due to the upcoming summer of learning, CAPS AND GOWNS: Santa Barbara High School’s graduation ceremony which will allow students to was held Thursday, June 2. make up some lost credits. From 2019 to 2021, the total graduation tion rate in 2019. Students who are sociorate for the district hovered between 90 and economically disadvantaged also saw an 91 percent, and in 2022, the total jumped to increase in graduations, going from an 86 94 percent. The breakdown of demograph- percent graduation rate in 2019 to 92 perics among graduates includes language, cent in 2022. Hispanic/Latino students saw a steady socioeconomic background, and race or ethnicity. incline in graduation over the past five years, Emergent multilingual learners, or stu- with 93 percent of students graduating in dents whose first language is not English, 2022. From 2018 to 2021, the graduation rate had a 78 percent graduation rate in 2022, remained between 87 and 90 percent. Asian as compared to 72 percent in 2019, though and White students had a 97 percent and 2019 saw a much larger population of EML 96 percent graduation rate, respectively, in students. In 2019, the district had 217 EML 2022, and Black students had a 100 percent students eligible for graduation, compared graduation rate this year, compared to a 76 percent rate in 2019. to 70 in 2022. The district will further break down Among students with varying socioeconomic backgrounds, homeless students graduation statistics at the June 14 Santa jumped to a 90 percent graduation rate in Barbara Unified School Board meeting. 2022, compared to an 85 percent gradua—Jun Starkey

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CITY

Council Puts Halt on New Hotels

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anta Barbara City Council decided to temporarily halt any new hotels while the city tackles the housing element process, in which the city will have to show a specific plan on how it will meet the state allocation of 8,000 new housing units by 2031. The urgency ordinance will prevent any new projects, though there are currently 21 hotel projects either recently approved or pending approval in various stages of review — from pre-application to receiving building permits — that would be excluded from the interim ordinance. “This isn’t a ban on new hotels,” said Councilmember Eric Friedman. “This is a temporary moratorium while we’re going forward with the housing element update.” The city is on course to have a preliminary draft of the housing element by the fall, and it will receive feedback from the state before a final draft at the end of the year. The hotel ordinance, Friedman said, would help show the community that city leaders are focused on addressing the city’s housing shortage. “We need to send a message to our com-

munity that we are listening, and that housing — in particular affordable housing — is the top priority,” he said. Mayor Randy Rowse was against the moratorium, saying it was a “knee-jerk” response to the city’s housing needs. “I think we’re going about this the wrong way,” Rowse said. “I will not be supporting this effort.” Rowse and Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez voted against the ordinance, but the council voted 5-2 to direct staff to return with a final-draft ordinance on June 28, effectively banning any new hotel developments for up to 22 months. City Planner Renee Brooke presented the ordinance to City Council and said allowing additional hotel development to continue could make it more difficult for the city to meet the regional housing need allocation. The emergency ordinance removes the danger of housing being converted to hotels or increased land values that make new housing “infeasible.” Council will return on June 28, where they will vote on a final draft for the urgency —Ryan P. Cruz ordinance. INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 9, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

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JUNE 2-9, 2022

NEWS BRIEFS

the shooting of a man in a Tulare parking lot on 5/30. The man, Damean Fish, 27, was taken to a hospital with a gunshot wound but died the same day. No charges or further details on the shooting have been released.

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permits allowing the fracking and acidizing of oil wells in federal waters off the coast of California were prohibited by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals last Friday. The suits go back to 2013, when Santa Barbara’s Environmental Defense Center (EDC) got word that Venoco was fracking wells in Los Alamos. “We went out there, and Venoco admitted what they were doing,” said Linda Krop, chief counsel for the EDC. “Then we realized they operated offshore.” The government agencies involved in offshore oil permits—the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement —denied any fracking permits existed for offshore operations, but Krop said they GOLETA decided toHollister ask forAve permit records through 5757 the Freedom of Information Act. It took Mahatma 2# about a hundred hours to wade through all LONG GRAIN RICE that came into their offices, the information 99 $ but by the end of it, they were shocked at what they found and angry that officials had

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fracking or acidizing wells at six offshore platforms, primarily Gilda and Gail. All that information was compiled in an EDC report, “Dirty Water,” which informed the lawsuits and appeals that followed, insisting that environmental review was necessary given the poisonous chemicals known to be used in fracking and acidizing. At first, the government agencies agreed to a review, which resulted in an Environmental Assessment that found no significant impacts. EDC filed suit again, and this time, the federal District Court found species and coastal effects should be reviewed, but there were no environmental impacts. “How could you say there were species and coastal impacts, but not environmental ones?” Krop asked, but it was enough to get an injunction to block those well-stimulation practices until a full environmental review. Seven appeals followed by oil companies, the State of California, and environmental groups, which were consolidated at the Ninth Circuit Court. The latest federal ruling keeps offshore fracking and acidizing off the table because without a complete environmental impact statement, the permits issued violate three important federal laws—the National Environmental Protection Act, the Coastal Zone Management Act, and the Endangered Species Act — said Krop. “The Court of Appeals totally got our point,” she said. “On appeal, we won everything, even those issues we lost at the District Court level.” —Jean Yamamura


COURTS & CRIME

City Must Provide Info in Sexual Harassment Suit

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he City of Santa Barbara must turn over records of a sexual harassment investigation against former finance director Bob Samario, a judge ruled this week, as well as information related to Samario’s sexual history at the workplace. Judge Thomas Anderle’s decision was the latest legal turn in a pending lawsuit filed last year by former deputy finance director Jennifer Tomaszewski, who alleges Samario repeatedly subjected her to inappropriate comments and touching, including referring to her as his “work wife” and insisting she join “Bob’s Hug Club.” Tomaszewski has also accused City Hall of unfairly passing her over for a promotion after she filed a complaint against Samario. Anderle’s ruling grants Tomaszewski’s legal team access to the identities and statements of Santa Barbara staff who were interviewed during the city’s ensuing investigation. The city must also disclose the nature and date of any action it took in response to Tomaszewski’s complaint, Anderle said. Moreover, Anderle went on, the city is required to turn over records related to allegations made against Samario many years earlier that he had engaged in an

COU RTESY

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Former finance director Bob Samario

extramarital relationship with a subordinate. City attorneys had argued such a disclosure would infringe on Samario’s right to privacy, but Anderle disagreed. “[The question] relates to whether the City was aware of Samario’s conduct, which plaintiff contends included improper sexual affairs with subordinate employees,” he stated. “Therefore, the information sought would be relevant and may lead to the discovery of admissible evidence.” In short, Anderle said, quoting previous case law: “The right to privacy does not come into play simply because the litigant would rather not reveal something.” City attorneys had repeatedly resisted Tomaszewski’s lawyer’s requests for information, though not always fairly, Anderle also found. Their motions opposing disclosure were often “not substantially justified,” he said. Anderle therefore fined City Hall $3,000, which will be paid to Tomaszewski’s attorney. —Tyler Hayden

HOUSING

I NGR I D B OSTROM

New Tiny-Home Village Sprouts Up

NEW DIGS: DignityMoves’ tiny-home village is on the 1000 block of Santa Barbara Street.

A

gatheringof politicians, activists, young philanthropists, downtown residents, and a few people who now live in their vehicles showed up for the official ribboncutting at the DignityMoves tiny-home village that’s recently sprouted up on an old parking lot on the 1000 block of Santa Barbara Street. Soon, 34 people now living on the streets of downtown Santa Barbara —or in their vehicles—will be moving in to each eight-foot-by-eight-foot home by June 15. The project is the culmination of a yearlong effort to create transitional housing for

those struggling with challenges afflicting chronically homeless people while offering a range of services designed to help them get on their feet. Residents will be selected based on need, vulnerability, and likelihood of success with an emphasis on those who habituate the streets of downtown. Spearheading the effort has been the Bay Area philanthropy DignityMoves, working in conjunction with county administrators, who in turn contracted day-to-day operations to the Good Samaritan Shelter. Elizabeth Funk of DignityMoves said offering individuals a room of their own with a door they can lock and store their belongings is key to helping people get off the streets. Sylvia Barnard of Good Samaritan vowed the operation would be a good neighbor, a key concern for an enterprise located in the heart of downtown. The model stands in distinct contrast to the traditional homeless shelter where individuals share bunk beds in a large common space. The homes themselves were designed with architectural finesse and come equipped with lighting, heating, air conditioning, and four private showers and bathrooms. Two weeks ago, supporters of the project showed up to install pillows, bed coverings, artwork in each of the project units, and doormats —Nick Welsh reading “Welcome.” INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 9, 2022

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D OVERSIGHT BOARD

CONT’D FROM P. 10

Melekian’s scheduled last day at the end of the month. Mayor Randy Rowse was adamant on moving the recommendations forward as is, saying the Santa Barbara Police Department presented none of the nationwide symptoms that this sort of sweeping reform was meant to remedy. One of the most contested aspects of One of the most the oversight falling to the Fire & Police contested aspects of the oversight Commission was whether a board that falling to the Fire was technically under the City Council & Police Commiscould have hiring or firing power that sion was whether a board that was the council itself didn’t hold. technically under the City Council monitor of the Police Department will could have hiring or firing power that fall — said she was taken aback by alle- the council itself didn’t hold. Currently, gations from some members of the CFC the Fire & Police Commission advises that they had not been informed of the the City Council and City Administrator changes and their feedback had not been “in all matters relating to efficient and sought. Anderson stated she and Interim adequate fire and police protection for Chief Melekian had five or six meetings the City” and can make recommendawith Escobedo since the council’s April 22 tions for regulations, budget, and chief meeting. Escobedo, she stated, had been appointments. But it has little power designated the point person by the coun- currently and meet only once a month. cil to hash out a deal with Melekian. In Ultimately, 10 of the recommendations addition, Anderson said, she had met with were folded under the commission’s four other members of the commission. responsibilities, with the other two dealBeyond that, she stated, she’d communi- ing with employee matters falling to the cated the proposal as it evolved in writing. City Administrator. Anderson went on to explain the role There is still plenty of work to be done, of the Administrator’s Office and Fire & as the city is planning to work with memPolice Commissioners in the new sys- bers of the CFC to create the ordinance, tem. The five-person commission would which will bounce back to the City Counbe expanded to a seven-member group, cil. City Attorney Ariel Calonne said he which would require a new roster front- expects the ordinance will require “extento-back, she said, “because the com- sive civil engagement with the ordinance missioners would be getting a lot more committee,” and may take until after responsibility and power.” Expanding and summer to be finalized. recruiting seven members would have to Shortly after the meeting, conflictwait until 2024, leaving the immediate ing reports emerged from witnesses at future of police oversight in flux while the City Hall about an interchange between Melekian and Escobedo over whether details are worked out. Several councilmembers shared their Escobedo had accused Melekian of lying. own disappointment and frustration that Melekian told the Independent that the the final product was so far from what exchange was straightforward and calm. CFC had recommended, though Coun- Since he and Escobedo had worked cilmember Kristen Sneddon was the only together for the better part of a year, he one to vote against the proposal, saying felt they could speak frankly together. she felt like “it wasn’t ready” to move Escobedo, who did not comment forward. on the incident, told the Independent, Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez “Frankly, this was a long and difficult agreed that the recommendations were process for everyone involved, but I’m different than those made by the CFC encouraged that we were able to pass an but encouraged the council to move for- oversight model that will hopefully make n ward before Interim Police Chief Barney Santa Barbara safer for everyone.” said. “What you have before you is an advisory board, not an oversight board — in other terms, oversight in name only.” In a follow-up interview with the Independent, Barbara Anderson — senior assistant to the city administrator and the person on whom the duties of auditor and

NEWS BRIEFS

CONT’D FROM P. 12

COMMUNITY The street outreach organization City Net hosted a job fair on 6/3 for members of the city’s homeless population, about 50 of whom lined up for free haircuts, raffle tickets, pizza, and even free government phones and stopped by the booths inside Franklin Neighborhood Center to hear

more about new job opportunities. A variety of employers and other outreach organizations — including the Department of Rehabilitation, Goodwill, and New Beginnings — set up their tables at the community center to assist applicants with creating a résumé or job applications and to hire people on the spot. Full story at independent. com/city-net-job-fair. n

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

JUNE 2-9, 2022

ELECTION RESULTS

CONT’D FROM P. 7

Camarena, Brown — with 16 years behind the Sheriff ’s badge — had amassed 57 percent to Camarena’s 43 percent. At an election night party at the Courthouse Tavern, Brown expressed confidence that victory would be his. “I’m very confident there’s more than two-thirds of the vote.” He thanked his supporters and said he hopes to pursue Project Opioid, an initiative to enlist the medical, educational, philanthropic, and business communities in a campaign against opioid use. “I want to knock the death rate down and make some differences,” Brown stated. Camarena — who argued the department had grown stagnant and non-responsive during the campaign — had pledged to restore trust with elements of the community. Although Camarena, who grew up in Santa Maria, did more than respectably as a fundraiser, his campaign never seemed to find traction. Four years ago, Brown faced two opponents who collectively garnered 48 percent of the vote. This time around, Brown bested that by 5 percent. Camarena — who spent election night gathering with friends and supporters in Santa Ynez — did not respond to multiple calls for comment. The most striking thing about other local races was the extent to which some candidates ran unopposed. Assistant District Attorney John Savrnoch ran to fill the shoes of his boss, Joyce Dudley; county supervisor Steve Lavagnino in the 5th District; and Laura Capps for the 2nd District seat ran

without opposition, as did Judge Steven Foley, Auditor-Controller Betsy Schaffer, and Treasurer-Tax Collector Harry Hagen. But even among the unopposed, there were tiny pockets of discontent, voters who chose to write in names of other candidates not on the ballot. Of all the unopposed candidates, Capps garnered the largest number of write-ins in her bid for the county supervisorial seat with 449. Incumbent Supervisor Lavagnino garnered the least with just 54. Elrawd MacLearn, another conservative cultural warrior, challenged incumbent elections czar Joe Holland, who crushed in his bid for a sixth term. As of Wednesday morning, Holland had won 81 percent of the votes cast; MacLearn had 18.8 percent. Holland, recovering from surgery to both knees, didn’t run much of a campaign either. In fact, he ran no campaign at all. “I didn’t spend a red cent or one thin dime,” Holland stated. When asked why not, he replied, “What for?” With the outcome of the governors’ race all but in the bag nine months ago when Governor Gavin Newsom survived a recall effort by winning two-thirds of the vote, there was little chance Newsom would experience any political turbulence from any of the 25 candidates on the ballot against him. Governor Newsom won Santa Barbara voters by 59.88 percent. California Senator Alex Padilla, another liberal progressive Democrat, found himself running twice — once to finish the term he

inherited from his predecessor and once for the full term that starts after that. In the second, he faced 22 challengers, and in the first, he faced seven. Of local interest in that effort, Padilla, a Democratic Party powerhouse, was opposed by Santa Barbara software gazillionaire Dan O’Dowd, who spent millions of his own money to highlight the dangers he claims are inherent in the software platform relied upon by Tesla’s Elon Musk in his manufacture of self-driving vehicles. O’Dowd came sixth in Santa Barbara, winning 4.3 percent of the votes cast in the county. Closer to home, Salud Carbajal, former county supervisor now running for his fourth congressional term, cleaned the floor with his three rivals — one State Assembly candidate Gregg Hart Republican, one Declined-to-State, and The outcome was somewhat closer in the one Democrat. But even so, Carbajal will still have to run again this fall to clinch the battle for the new State Assembly district seat, this time against Brad Allen — the only created by redistricting. County Supervisor registered Republican in the race — a Sum- Gregg Hart — and Democratic Party stalwart merland resident and former heart surgeon and county supervisor — won convincingly, who happens to be married to actress Jaclyn but not enough to avoid a November runSmith, who famously played one of the three off against Republican Mike Stoker, himself Charlie’s Angels. In Santa Barbara County, a former county supervisor and longtime Carbajal won 62 percent of the ballots, and Republican candidate. Hart took 59.3 percent Allen took 28.7 percent. The district now also of the vote, and Stoker took 37.2 percent, but includes substantial swaths of Ventura and the presence of Bruce Wallach, a left-leaning San Luis Obispo counties. But district-wide, Democrat — who garnered a scant 3.5 perCarbajal is well ahead with 62 percent of the cent — pushed this one into overtime, when the real fireworks are expected to occur. n vote.

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OPINIONS CONT’D

About All Those Guns

T

hough I am not a constituent of Mitch McConnell’s, I am an American citizen, and I have an opinion to share with the Majority Leader of the United States Senate: Under former President Bill Clinton, the House and Senate, of which you were a part, passed a ban on automatic assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines. However, rather than renew it in 2004, you and your gun-sponsored Republican colleagues refused in favor of unleashing them on the streets with nary a background check. As you well know, deadly mass shootings have increased steadily since then. How dare you utter the words “sickening” when describing the massacre of 19 students and two of their teachers? The only “sickening, sickening” (in your punctuated voice) thing you can claim is your very own behavior relative to any sensible gun safety regulation that the House of Representatives has sent your way. You have not been willing to consider mandatory background checks for anyone buying any gun, mandatory training on how to safely use and maintain a weapon in the home, and a total ban and buyback of all assault weapons and high capacity magazines (by a date certain). Until you do, your bloody hands are on display every time you take the podium, and we are watching. This is your legacy, a servant of merchants of death. Most emphatically, I remain a voting citizen of these United States —Sharon Hoshida, S.B.

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ow about we start acknowledging the first four words of the Second Amendment? “A wellregulated militia.” The laws that allow flooding of our nation with readily available weapons of war are not “well-regulated.” A pilot’s license is well-regulated (train, test, qualify, license, insure, and stay current). A driver’s license is well-regulated (train, test, qualify, license, insure, and stay current). A doctor’s license is well-regulated (train, test, qualify, license, insure, and stay current). A barber’s license is well-regulated (train, test, qualify, license, insure, and stay current). A manicurist’s license is well-regulated (train, test, qualify, license, insure, and stay current). This is not a big stretch. —Garred Joseph, S.B.

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he Second Amendment guarantees a person’s right to own a musket or flintlock pistol — not an automatic weapon or a weapon of war — to be used as part of a well-regulated militia to defend against an oppressive government.

DAVE WHAMOND / POLITICALCARTOONS.COM

Letters

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There is nothing in the Second Amendment about self-defense. —Christine Salvia Milne, S.B.

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ur Founding Fathers were idealistic, educated men, but they were human. For some of their actions, follow the money. Most of them were slave owners or benefited from the slave trade. We have to recognize the true history of the Second Amendment and understand its complicated writing. The Second Amendment was enacted to protect the safety of slave owners in case of slave revolt. All white males were required to bear arms, and when a bell rang announcing a slave revolt, they had to grab a musket — there’s your militias — and go to protect the slave owner. The slave states could not rely on the federal government to send troops to put down slave revolt. The Second Amendment has nothing to do with self-protection or fear of big government.

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—Danute Handy, S.B.

houghts and prayers, moments of silence, candlelight vigils. A few days of political shouting matches. No change. Reset for the next round of thoughts and prayers. We are reluctant to set aside the Senate filibuster and pass the overwhelmingly supported legislation to ban military-grade assault weapons and enact thorough background reviews. We the people have allowed the minority more than a seat at the table. We have given them power over the majority. Time to ask the Senate to do more than offer condolences to grieving families. —Allen DeForrest, Santa Ynez

For the Record

¶ Last week’s story on I Madonnari should have said about 35,000 visitors came for the three-day weekend, not per day; also, the coffee vendor was United States of Espresso. ¶ The Angry Poodle Barbecue stated last week that the U.S. has the highest rate of gun deaths based on developed countries statistics. On the planet, the U.S. is number two, behind Brazil, in firearms deaths. ¶ Clara Svedlund had worked at Kunin Wines’ tasting room since 2012, not 2021, as we mistakenly said last week. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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17


obituaries Dixie Garbutt Young

Owen John Cowgill

11/15/1935 - 05/23/2022

09/08/2005- 06/03/2022

Dixie Garbutt Young, beloved mother, exceptional grandmother, doting great-grandmother, and loving friend passed away quietly at her Carpinteria home on May 23, 2022. Born in Los Angeles in 1935 to Frank and Princess Garbutt, Dixie grew up among the hills overlooking Silver Lake. After graduating Thomas Marshall High School in 1953 and attending Stephens College, she married Arthur G. Clarke and they had three children, Robin (Clarke) LaFevers, Timothy Clarke, and Matthew Clarke. In 1960, Dixie and Art crewed on the schooner Wanderer, sailing from Sausalito, California to Tahiti. Art and Dixie divorced in 1965. Shortly thereafter, Dixie moved her family to Carpinteria. She joined the Carpinteria Community Church and became deeply involved in the community, volunteering at soup kitchens and the women’s shelter among many others. In 1981 Dixie met and married Lloyd Young, with whom she was blissfully happy for 36 years before he passed away in 2017. With Lloyd, Dixie formed Today’s Child Charitable Trust, and spent the next 25 years focusing on placing abandoned children in foster homes in Brazil. They worked closely with churches and Rotarians until Lloyd retired in 2006. Dixie had a deeply developed spiritual life and was one of the original founders of Stillpoint, the Center for Christian Spirituality. She served on its board and acted as spiritual advisor for 20 years before retiring. Dixie adored her family, friends, color, children, laughter, and handicrafts of all kinds. From fiber arts to paper arts, and everything in between she mastered them all, finding a deep sense of joy and self expression through her art. She was a kind and loyal friend, wise and loving. She will be deeply missed all who knew her. Dixie is predeceased by her husband Lloyd Young (2017) and her son Matthew Clarke (2021). She is survived by her children, Robin LaFevers (Mark) and Timothy Clarke (Susan), her grandchildren, Adam LaFevers (Ashley), Eric LaFevers, Tony Clarke, Corissa Davidson, and six great grandchildren. A Celebration of Life will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, June 17, 2022 at the Carpinteria Cemetery pavilion. In lieu of flowers, those wishing to honor Dixie’s memory may make a gift to the Matthew Clarke Scholarship Fund at SBCCFoundation.org 18

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We are heartbroken to announce that our sunshine, Owen John Cowgill, has left this world. Born in Santa Barbara on September 8, 2005. His first word was ball. We knew immediately he’d fit right in with the family and our love of sports. He did not inherit his father’s loyalty to losing teams and never met a winning team that he didn’t root for. He might even change sides mid-game, LA Kings excluded. Owen loved the challenge of sports and how it channeled his energy, but he especially adored all the gear. One of his first aspirations was to earn his track spikes. He found early success in running. Owen was the first ever 8-and-under Jr. Grand Prix Champion of the Santa Barbara Athletic Association and competed in the Southern CA Jr. Olympics in 2015. As a very young athlete, winning was everything, but as he matured, Owen valued being part of a team more than anything. In his 16 years, Owen competed in soccer, basketball, baseball, flag football, track and field, long-distance running, volleyball, and ice hockey. Owen had a gift for encouraging others. He volunteered to coach younger kids and also motivated his family to achieve their goals. He was our family’s best cheerleader. We worked and played together. Perhaps you saw us win the Goleta Beach Triathlon long course relay in 2017. Owen had achieved 2nd and 3rd place behind his brother in previous years and hedged his bets to join with family for the win. Owens dreams ranged from professional athlete to farmer. He grew an excellent radish. Owen attended Roosevelt Elementary, The Howard School, and Garden Street Academy where he found a love for music and played the drums in the rock band. Most recently he was a student at Anacapa School where he had many friends and was admired as a star athlete with an easy smile and a good sense of humor. He was a loyal friend and inspired many. Those closest to him saw his pure and sensitive soul. We will always be inspired by the gifts he has given us. Owen is survived by his mother

JUNE 9, 2022

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Debbie Pichla, father Dennis Cowgill, sister Ana Cowgill, brother Andrew Cowgill, grandparents Sally and Walt Pichla, grandmother Betty Cowgill and preceded in death by grandfather Joe Cowgill. A celebration of life will take place Saturday, June 11, 11 am at 2300 Garden Street in Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Greater Los Angeles and Central Coast Chapter (https://supporting.afsp.org/ campaign/OwenCowgillMemorialFund) or The Glendon Association (https://glendon.org)

Matthew Justin Dyet 05/02/1991- 04/28/2022

It is with heavy heart that we share the sad news of the sudden passing of our beloved son and brother Matthew Justin Dyet on April 28, 2022. Matthew was born on May 2, 1991, at University Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona. Matthew spent his early years discovering the Sonoran desert through hiking and camping with his parents and brother. These experiences led Matthew to a profound respect for all wildlife and the outdoors. Matthew was introduced to music at an early age and began playing the guitar and eventually performing on stage as a pre-teenager. This eventually led him to become an accomplished string instrument musician. Matthew than decided to pursue a musical career by attending Santa Barbara City College. After two years at City College Matthew transferred to UCSB where he primarily studied ethnomusicology. Matthew also had the privileged to be part of the Middle Eastern ensemble while at UCSB which he thoroughly enjoyed. Matthew left his family and friends too soon. He will be forever missed by those that were close to him and shared so many fond memories both locally and abroad.

Anna Ruth Franklin

05/06/1935- 06/01/2022

Anna Ruth Franklin, age 87, died on June 1, 2022, in Santa Barbara, California, with family by her side. Born Anna Ruth Ruetting in Memphis TN, May 6, 1935, to Herbert (“Dutch”) Ruetting, a cabinetmaker, and Alice Ruetting who worked in retail (Sears & Roebuck). She is survived by her children Janet Franklin, Lisa Franklin Johnson, Scott Franklin and Bruce Franklin; her grandchildren, Allie Hager, Savannah Franklin Rey, Connor Franklin Rey, Miles Johnson and Cooper Johnson, and her great granddaughter Laney Bryson. She is also survived by her sister, Mary (“Kay”) Simpson, and her brother, Robert (“Bobby”) Ruetting, and their children and grandchildren. Anna spent summers growing up exploring Memphis far beyond her working-class neighborhood on her bicycle. At age 18 she was a labor union activist. She went to Union College in Lincoln, Nebraska for several years, and then moved to Chicago and became a flight attendant for American Airlines where she met Denis Franklin. They were married to for 17 years and they had four children. Anna later owned a barber shop, The Hairport, and worked as a book keeper. She is remembered for her feminism, her feminist and LBGT activism, her decades of sobriety, and her work in addiction education. In the 1970s and 80s she was active in the National Organization for Women, working for legislation and social change in support of gender equality, and getting her picture taken once with Gloria Steinem. One of her children recalls at middle school age being taken to a protest rally at a Safeway supermarket in support of Cezar Chavez’ United Farmworkers table grape boycott. Another child remembers riding around in Anna’s VW bus with the 3-foot lettering on both sides: “E.R.A. N.O.W.” (Equal Rights Amendment & National Organization of Women). She created a warm, welcoming, vibrant home and family life in all of her homes, full of her favorite things -- conversation, good food, sunshine, swimming pools, and people. Her personality was as dynamic and loud as the bright colors she favored and she left an indelible impression on everyone who crossed her path. Anna sheltered battered women in her homes. Her hobbies included candle making, leather working and wood working. Anna loved art museums & galleries, especially

modern sculpture. She loved theater; and had season passes to the opera. She hiked with the Sierra Club and was a card carrying “Wild Woman” who did not lightly suffer fools. She cruised the Pacific Coast with the whales and dolphins. She fiercely loved and was fiercely loved by her children, grandchildren, and greatgrandchild. She influenced three generations of feminists in formative ways, and is remembered by her family and friends, children of her friends, her children, friends of her children, her grandchildren, and friends of her grandchildren, for whom she was foundational to their understanding of feminism and sense of personhood. She insisted that everyone respect, love and value themselves and expect others to do so too. Anna spent much of her life in service to others – caregiving, helping, supporting, advising, and protecting. Mother, trailblazer, leader by example, iron willed warrior with a poet’s soul, Anna was as unconditional in her love as she was intense in her passions. Though her candle has extinguished, she leaves in her wide tumultuous wake a glowing constellation of lights that continue to spread and illuminate the way forward. She was a force of nature and she will be missed terribly. If she is in a better place, that place is free of patriarchy, misogyny, bigotry and injustice. It is full of love, books, nature, art and ideas. And it has a Starbucks and a pool.

Mary Erlinda Zamora 11/29/1938 – 02/15/2022

Mary Erlinda Zamora was born November 29, 1938 in Santa Barbara, California to the late Theresa De La Torre of Aguascalientes, Mexico and Luis Zamora of Puruandiro, Mexico. Mary passed from this life May 15, 2022 with her children by her side. Mary is survived by her five children Eddie Madrigal, Greg Madrigal, Linda Madrigal-Nix ,Elizabeth MadrigalImperato, and James Snyder, as well as fourteen grandchildren and one great grand child. Mary was a single mother who taught her children to work hard, be responsible, and be kind to others in need. She was a talented artist, seamstress, and singer, and worked in a local school as a bilingual Teachers Aid. She attended SBCC, including numerous Adult Education classes. Her funeral service will be 10 AM June 10, 2022 at Holy Cross Church, 1740 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara. A reception will follow at Holy Cross reception hall.


Opinions

CONT’D

voices

obituaries

Al-Anon: Support for Family and Friends

Warren Pullman Miller

05/25/1940 – 05/24/2022

PRISCILLA DU PREEZ/UNSPLASH

Group Offers Help to Those Affected by Alcoholics

F

BY ALEXANDRA A. AND JOH N D. ifteen million Americans over the age of 12

suffer from alcohol use disorder, and for alcoholics in particular, the disorder can lead to a variety of losses ranging from health, employment, and family, all the way to the 88,000 people who die from alcohol-related causes each year. Their friends and family members who care about them suffer also. While Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) offers help to alcoholics who wish to become sober, the AlAnon Family Groups offer help to the friends and family who seek recovery from the effects of living, or having lived, with an alcoholic. For family and friends, efforts to control alcoholic drinking are seldom successful. As one of the Al-Anon publications titled Understanding Ourselves—Families and Friends Are Affected says, “Friendships, employment, childhood, parenthood, love affairs, and marriages all suffer from the effects of alcoholism. Those special relationships in which a person is really close to an alcoholic are affected most, and the people who care are the most caught up in the behavior of another person. We react to an alcoholic’s behavior. Seeing that the drinking is out of hand, we try to control it. We are ashamed of the public scenes but try to handle it in private. It isn’t long before we feel we are to blame and take on the hurts, the fears, the guilt of an alcoholic. We, too, can become ill.” People who find Al-Anon are often in despair with anxiety, anger, denial, and guilt. They often have lost themselves, and their lives have become unmanageable. Through regular Al-Anon meetings, they can learn that alcoholism is a disease recognized by the American Medical Association and that they alone cannot cure the alcoholic. They realize that their wellmeant aid is actually keeping the alcoholic from finding recovery. The program helps them focus back on themselves, even if their loved one is still drinking. One Al-Anon member, whom we’ll call “Ally,” shared that in her mid-twenties, she started to feel depressed and anxious. She was in a romantic relationship with a man suffering from substance abuse, including alcohol. “I felt like I was going crazy. I became hysterical, controlling, and very watchful of my loved one. I stayed in this relationship for many years, even

though the relationship was not healthy. Later on, a few years after this first relationship ended, I began a new relationship with another man who was recovering from alcoholism. Once again, I was in a relationship with an alcoholic. “When the relationship ended, I felt in despair. This led me to walk into the rooms of Al-Anon. As I listened at meetings, I realized that I was affected by growing up in an alcoholic home, and engaging in relationships with those struggling with substance abuse was familiar. This program saved my life. “I have attended Al-Anon meetings since 2009, and I continue to find them extremely helpful. The meetings have improved my relationships, confidence, self-worth, and spirituality. I will continue to attend meetings for the rest of my life, because they are full of wisdom. The members of the program have different stories and different situations that brought them into recovery. Some members have a spouse, a sibling, a son or daughter, or grandchildren who struggle with the disease of alcoholism. My situation is that I grew up in an alcoholic home.” The Al-Anon Family Groups were formed in the 1930s by two wives of alcoholics who realized that they too needed recovery, Lois W. and Anne B. Today, the Al-Anon groups exist in the United States as well as other countries. The Al-Anon literature is translated into Spanish and French. “We work on the 12 steps with a sponsor, and we keep the focus on ourselves, not on the alcoholic. We learn to have compassion for the alcoholic and allow them the dignity to recover on their own,” said Ally. Currently, there are 22 Al-Anon meetings held in the Santa Barbara area each week. Some of them meet in person and others via teleconference. There are also a few meetings for Spanish speakers. Membership is anonymous and confidential. There are no dues. No one’s social status, profession, or level of education matters at Al-Anon meetings. Beginners’ meetings are held via Zoom on Tuesdays at 6 p.m. For details about this meeting and for other information about Al-Anon Family Groups, please visit the Al-Anon website, alanonsanta barbara.info or call our phone line at (805) 8998302. n

Warren Pullman Miller passed away peacefully, on May 24, 2022, at home in Santa Barbara, California, surrounded by his family. He died after a losing battle with lung cancer one day short of his 82nd birthday. Mr. Miller was born in Chicago, Illinois to Florence Lowden Miller and Dr. C. Phillip Miller. HIs grandfather, Frank O. Lowden, was the Illinois governor from 1917-1921. His great-grandfather George Mortimer Pullman developed the Pullman sleeper car and founded the company town of Pullman, now part of Chicago’s Southside. Throughout his life, Mr. Miller had a passion and love for the environment, conservation, travel, flying and above all his family, both the two-legged and four-legged ones (many cats and dogs were lucky enough to call the Miller household their home). Mr. Miller spent his early life in Illinois. His weekends, holidays, and summers were spent primarily at Sinnissippi Farm, the family’s farm and forestland established by his grandparents, located 100 miles west of Chicago, in Oregon, Illinois. He attended Lawrenceville Academy in New Jersey and received his undergraduate degree in Political Science from Harvard University in 1962. Upon graduation, he joined the Marine Corps Reserve serving for four years. Mr. Miller’s early career was taken up by governmental management, natural resources administration and the forest products industry. He served on several advisory panels for state and local governments and as an officer, director, and trustee of several non-profits in the Midwest. In 1966, Mr. Miller joined the newly formed nonprofit and Presidentially appointed Citizens Advisory Committee on Recreation and Natural Beauty. During that time, he INDEPENDENT.COM

met and married his first wife, Nancy. Throughout the years, he remained close to the family property and businesses at Sinnissippi and in 1978 he and Nancy moved to Oregon, Illinois to help run the family business. They built a new lumber mill, expanded the logging operations, increased the size of the Christmas tree farm to become the second largest Christmas tree grower in the state for some time. He became involved with the Pullman Historic Foundation and the Pullman Historic District in Chicago and continued as a board member of the George M. Pullman Educational Foundation; a foundation established by his great-grandfather in 1949.The Foundation is ongoing awarding scholarships to outstanding high school seniors throughout Illinois. In 1989, Nancy wanted to reconnect with her family in California, eventually settling in Santa Barbara. Nancy passed away unexpectedly in 1997. Mr. Miller continued to be active in a number of Santa Barbara’s community organizations, among them the Wildling Museum of Art and Nature, the Santa Barbara Historical Museum, the Hope Ranch Park Association and the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County. He met Gallery owner Marlene Schulz, and they married in 1999. This would prove to be a new chapter in his life. They collaborated on numerous art exhibitions and publications. Warren Miller is survived by his wife, Marlene R. Miller, two nieces; Kimberley Lowden Miller, Jennifer Pullman Tadjedin (Amir), cousins; Deborah Lowden Daspit (William), Elizabeth Pullman Daspit, Richard Winslow Daspit Jr. (Cecilia), Anne Deverman Daspit (Kenneth), Amy Drake Daspit, Catherine Elizabeth Culbertson (Charles), Edward Albert Culbertson (Robin), George M. Pullman Drake Jr. (Linda), Christopher A. Drake (Lori), Patricia Lowden Drake, Scott Folker Madlener and numerous grand nieces and nephews. A sister-in-law, Ingrid Cali and her children; Marty Fiolka (Susan), Leeann Folse (Dee). In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Santa Barbara Historical Museum, the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County, or The Wildling Museum of Art and Nature. Continued on p.20

JUNE 9, 2022

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19


obituaries Irene O’Connor

Irene passed away peacefully at home on April 24, 2022, at the age of 84. She is survived by her children Kevin O’Connor (Nancy) of Santa Ynez, CA, Sheila Starnes (Rick) of Santa Barbara, CA, Christina Lund (Cory) of San Rafael, CA, Kathleen Gash (Dave) of Rancho Santa Fe, CA, Michael O’Connor of Santa Barbara, CA, and her nine grandchildren, Nicholas, Kelly, Colleen, Michael, Jacqueline, Connor, Heather, Nathan and Lauren. Irene was one of six children born in Los Angeles, CA, to Gonzalo and Helen Camacho. She attended an all-girls Catholic school, Norte Dame Academy, where she especially enjoyed singing, dancing and acting in school plays. She met Daniel O’Connor, who attended the all-boys Catholic Notre Dame High School, at a dance arranged by the two schools. The high school sweethearts were married five years later. In 1960, they moved to Santa Barbara from Los Angeles, where they began building businesses from their initial Hydrex Pest Control franchise, subsequently expanding throughout California. Irene often joked that she lived in her car, considering the amount of driving she did taking her five children to and from their various schools, and extracurricular activities. Nothing brought Irene more joy than the multi-generational holiday gatherings with her family. She stayed active throughout her life, even hitting the slopes of Mammoth well into her late 70s. Whether just with Dan, or with family and friends, Irene made great memories and treasured the natural beauty of all four seasons at their Bass Lake home. Volunteering was an important part of Irene’s life, and she cherished the many profound friendships she made in Sigma Tau Psi and Assistance League of Santa Barbara, as well as in her book club 20

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com and playing Mahjong. She was a true Patriot, who always had a deep sense of gratitude and respect for veterans and those who have fought, and who continue to fight, for the preservation of our country’s freedoms. Irene will be most remembered for her generous spirit, warm smile and unshakable positive outlook. She was predeceased by her husband, parents, four siblings and grandson Brave. A Memorial Mass was held at San Roque Catholic Church in Santa Barbara at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, May 26, 2022.

Paul Francis Strittmatter

05/12/1925 – 05/15/2022

Paul Francis Strittmatter, beloved husband, dad and grandad, died Sunday, May 15, 2022, at home in Santa Barbara. He had just celebrated his 97th birthday three days before with champagne and shrimp. A lifelong engineer who loved offering technical support to family and friends, Paul was born May 12, 1925, to Helen and Otto Strittmatter in Hastings, PA. His earliest memories were waking up before sunrise to feed the chickens and start a fire in the basement furnace for hot water in the house. When he was a boy, his grandpa took him on his first airplane ride at a country fair. He knew then that he wanted to be a pilot. By the time Paul graduated from high school, World War II was raging and, rather than wait to be drafted, he enlisted with the Army Air Corps and was sent to basic flight training at Garner Field in Uvalde, Texas, flying the PT-19. Shortly after, he was combat qualified for the B-17. With the war winding down, he was sent to Roswell, NM, for B-29 training. While at Buckley Field, Colorado, waiting for a crew and aircraft, the war ended. Though his active duty ended, he continued as a reservist pilot until 1972. Paul graduated from Penn State

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in 1950 with a degree in civil engineering. After college he worked at the family lumber company before being hired by Babcock and Wilcox in Barberton OH, where he designed the world’s largest electric overhead traveling crane. In 1956 Paul was hired by General Motors (Delco) in Milwaukee, where his adventures really began. Paul was sent to Morocco, Tangier, Germany, Libya and the UK as a field representative providing technical support. In 1958 he began his space career with the Thor Missile Program, working with the Royal Air Force. Paul was called back to Milwaukee to develop an all-forces airplane and oversee the modular cockpit systems. He began flying C-130s on weekends for the Air Force 440th Tactical Airlift Wing. In 1972 in Milwaukee, he married Kathleen Kelly, whom he had met at a St. Patrick’s Day party. After their wedding reception, they loaded up her VW bug and drove to Santa Barbara, where he began work on the Apollo program. He was in charge of flight readiness for the Guidance and Navigation systems of Apollo and the Skylab project. After the birth of their daughter Elizabeth, Paul took up the mantel of doting father, attending piano recitals, volleyball games and poetry competitions. He also loved to travel, ski, write lists, make omelets and barbecue tri-tip with the Bishop Diego H.S. Dads’ Club. Paul had a keen mind and an amazing memory, which remained clear to the end. He had a font of knowledge, a deep faith and strong principles. His was a long and well-lived life. He leaves behind his loving wife Kathleen, precious daughter Elizabeth (Charlie) Roberts, grandchildren Willie and Gracie Roberts, and sisters Eileen Alvarez and Margaret Rider. There will be a vigil for Paul on Wednesday, June 15th at 7 p.m. at WelchRyce-Haider Mortuary, 15 E. Sola Street. Funeral services will be at San Roque Catholic Church, 325 Argonne Circle, on Thursday, June 16th at 11 a.m., luncheon to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the Fr. Virgil Cordano Center, c/o St. Vincent’s, 4200 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, CA 93110, or to Catholic Relief Services, 228 W. Lexington St., Baltimore, MD 21201.

Sandra Petertyl Hill

11/28/1926 – 05/13/2022

Sandy, the first of two children, was born to Willard and Camilla Petertyl in Traverse City, Michigan. She enjoyed her early childhood years living on the shores of Long Lake, where she spent her days fishing, exploring and sailing. As a child, she was chosen Cherry Princess for the Traverse City Annual Cherry Festival. After her parents’ divorce, Sandy moved with her mother to Santa Barbara, California and graduated with honors from Santa Barbara High School. Soon after, she was introduced to her future husband, Stanley D. Hill, by his sister Donna. Stan and Sandy married in 1948 and raised three children, Leslie, Randy and Erika, while they dedicated their weekends to building a Mexican haciendastyle home on East Mountain Drive. Sandy immersed herself in many creative activities. Her hobbies included reading, pleinair painting, beekeeping, raising chickens, growing herbs, vegetables and orchard fruits, gardening, and cooking delicious meals for friends and family. She was an avid birdwatcher and identifier of local flora and wildlife, and volunteered as a Santa Barbara Botanic Garden docent working with a group of her botanist friends on a UCSB Herbarium project collecting, preparing and identifying native plants along the Gaviota Coast. Sandy was predeceased by her son, Randy in August 2007, and by her husband, Stan in December 2008. She is survived by her daughters, Leslie (and her husband Arturo Flores) and Erika (and her husband Bruce Reitherman and their daughter, Camilla). Sandy is also survived by her granddaughter Shannon Hill, as well as her nieces and nephews Melissa Avery, Leslie Young, Carrie Hill, Christian Hill, Stuart Kneeland, Marshall Kneeland, Sally Petru, Nancy Whitelock and their families. Sandy and her family deeply appreciate her caregivers Rose Andongo, Rosa Garcia and especially the staff at Villa Alamar for all of the loving attention they devoted to her the final year of her long and fruitful life. Instead of flowers, please make a donation to Planned Parenthood

or the charity of your choice. A private memorial for Sandy will be held at a later date.

Wymond (Bill) Whitgift Bradbury

12/23/1936 – 05/27/2022

Wymond (Bill) Whitgift Bradbury passed away on May 27th at Cottage Hospital after a short, brave fight with Pancreatic cancer. Bill was a native of Santa Barbara, born at Cottage Hospital at Christmas 1936 to Doris Darby Bradbury and Wymond Bradbury. He lost his mother when he was 3 and his father when he was 10 and was raised by his maternal aunt, Ruth Burkhardt, and her husband Carl. He inherited a small rental property from his father which developed into a lifelong business. Bill attended local schools and graduated from SBHS in 1954 and immediately entered Cal Poly as an engineering candidate. After graduation, he went to work at Pacific Coast Publishing and attended to his career of acquiring and remodeling rental properties. Bill was a real estate broker for 50 years and spent half of those years owning his own firm at 1625 State Street. Bill also served in the National Guard. Bill married Sue Lake in 1967 at the Biltmore in Santa Barbara. They had one child who died at 1 year in 1976. Bill and Sue were married for 54 years, were always best friends, and spent many happy years traveling the world, working hard, and thoroughly enjoying life. Things Bill loved… swimming, volleyball (beach and indoor), Adult Ed computer classes, SCUBA diving, traveling the world with Sue and friends, animals in general, and a good conversation. What he loved most was sailing his Catalina sloop “Brisa” and anchoring at the Channel Islands. Bill leaves behind many good friends and will be sorely missed by all who knew him. Sue extends many thanks to those who tried to make him comfortable at the end of his life. There will be no formal funeral.


obituaries Dr. Richard B. Shelton 1937-2022

Former Superintendent of Schools A community celebration of life for Dr. Richard B. Shelton, 84, beloved superintendent of schools and beloved husband, father, and grandfather, will be held at 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 25, in the multipurpose room of Isla Vista Elementary School, which he was instrumental in building, at 6875 El Colegio Rd, in Goleta. Dr. Shelton passed away peacefully surrounded by love ones at Cottage Hospital as he succumbed to a weakened heart May 23. He was a force of nature. He was widely known for his quick wit, his keen intellect, and his tender heart. He had a strong presence and always commanded a room. He was always funny. He never suffered fools. He was also extremely intuitive and perceptive. He missed nothing. He wasn’t just a boss, but a leader, mentor, confidante, and the greatest of friends. His intellect and wisdom were a guiding force, but underlying it all was his deep, unending empathy. It brought him great joy to help the less fortunate in ways large and small. He was one of a kind. Many suspected he had an internal calculator, evidenced by his speedy and unfailingly accurate computations; an internal Wikipedia database because of his staggering breadth of knowledge (his kids learned early never to say “Daddy, guess how many…” or “guess how high…”); and an internal GPS system, as he navigated repeated cross county travels to new places without missing a turn, enabling him to tell anyone traveling roads he had driven where the closest restaurant or gas station would be, having never forgotten any along his path. Many of his trips involved tailgating at his beloved Rutgers football games. An only child, he was born in 1937 in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. to Jack and Anne Shelton, who each owned local retail stores. By age 13 he had been interviewed extensively in local newspapers and radio stations because of his skills on the baseball field, traveling with one of the nation’s first Little League teams all over the East Coast, just missing out on the Little League World Series.

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com He was also a star basketball player. After high school he dabbled at college, and then joined the Army, where he was stationed at Fort Bliss, in that safe space between the Korean and Vietnam wars, and was tapped to play on the traveling Army basketball team. He returned to marry his first wife, Judy, and they had two children Jay and Amy. After the Army, college was a breeze. He graduated from Rider College with a B.A. in labor relations, but always loved working with young people as a counselor and coach, so he turned down a lucrative job in industry to instead help the Trenton, N.J. school district fill its dire teacher shortage. He worked as a fifth grade teacher and math specialist for five years, while earning an M.A. at Temple University in elementary administration. He subsequently worked as an acclaimed elementary principal in Pottstown, P.A., and an assistant to the superintendent of schools in Bound Brook N.J., while completing his doctorate in Educational Administration from Rutgers University in 1976. He married his wife Wendy in 1973, and they had two children, Jeffrey and Leslie. After earning his doctorate from Rutgers, he was named assistant superintendent for curriculum and instruction in a K-12 school district in Waynesboro, P.A. He then became the district’s superintendent of schools for three years, earning numerous distinctions and statewide accolades. But he always wanted to come to California and realized that goal when he was named superintendent of schools in Goleta in 1987, where he was widely respected and admired for his leadership skills and his humanity. He retired in 2000, and was then recruited to serve in positions as an interim school superintendent in Cold Spring, Buellton, and Los Olivos school districts. He served on the boards of the South Coast Railroad Museum and Goleta Valley Hospital, among many others. His remarkable spirit will always live on in those who adored him and survive him: wife Wendy; son Jeffrey and his wife Sonia and daughter Aniyah; daughter Leslie; son Jay; daughter Amy and her husband Dave and their four sons Meyer, Marley, Cassidy, and Dylan. The community is welcome to attend his memorial celebration of life at 3 p.m. on Saturday, June 25 at Isla Vista Elementary School. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the American Heart Association, the Anti-Defamation League, or the South Coast Railroad Museum.

Austin James (Jim) Cappon

05/30/1931 – 05/11/2022

Austin James (Jim) Cappon passed away peacefully at home on May 11, 2022, just shy of his 91st birthday. He was born on May 30, 1931 in Detroit, Michigan, the second son of Norbert and Olive (Austin) Cappon. After his mother died when Jim was very young, he was raised by his grandparents and his Aunt Irene in the Milwaukee, Wisconsin area. Despite the challenges of the times, Jim looked back fondly on his childhood filled with neighborhood paper routes and pick-up baseball games. After graduating from Wauwatosa High School, he enlisted in the Air Force in 1949 serving in Japan during the Korean War. After being honorably discharged as a staff sergeant in 1953, Jim’s journey home took him to the Pacific Northwest where he worked in a silver mine in Idaho followed by a stint in the naval shipyards in the Seattle area. It was there he realized his calling to be an engineer. Jim returned to Wisconsin and attended Milwaukee School of Engineering on the GI Bill, graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. He would later earn a Master’s degree in Systems Management from the Florida Institute of Technology. While attending college, Jim began working nights at AC Spark Plug, which later became Delco Electronics. This began what would be a distinguished 37-year career in the aerospace industry. Jim and his young family moved frequently in the early sixties across the Midwestern and Western United States as he installed guidance systems as part of the country’s missile defense system. This experience led to his move to Cape Canaveral, Florida in 1965 where he worked on the Apollo program. As the Lead Spacecraft Engineer for Guidance and Navigation, Jim had a seat at Mission Control for six Apollo launches including Apollo 11, the first moon landing; the challenges of Apollo 13; and Apollo 17, the final mission of the program. Jim then transferred to Santa Barbara where he worked on a number of projects until his retirement from Delco Systems Operations in 1993. After retiring, Jim embarked on a second career utilizing his many

skills on volunteer work teams to benefit those in need. Locally he was involved in a number of projects including the expansion of Transition House and the refurbishment of his church. Building wooden toys for the Unity Shoppe every year ahead of the holiday season was deeply important to him to ensure a memorable Christmas for a child. Jim participated on numerous church-based work teams, often in collaboration with Congregation B’nai B’rith, and was forever grateful for the many friendships he made along the way. Work team projects took him to the Midwest to repair homes damaged by flooding, and to the South to rebuild churches victimized by arson. In the wake of Hurricanes Hugo and Katrina, Jim traveled to the U.S. Virgin Islands and New Orleans to repair storm damage. Jim’s travels took him internationally as well, participating in humanitarian projects in Guatemala, Kenya, Slovakia and South Africa. He also graciously and patiently served as a 24/7 hotline for his children and grandchildren, advising them which electrical wire not to touch and when it was time to call a plumber. Jim took up softball in his seventies playing in the local Seniors League. He relished his daily bicycle rides and rode his bike well into his eighties, often with his best friend Bill. His rides seemed all about the destination be it ice cream in Montecito, a sausage at Camino Real Marketplace in Goleta, or a cup of coffee at Goleta Beach. His life-long love for camping evolved from tents to shell campers to tent trailers to his beloved motor home, each being considered a significant upgrade by his children. Watching his children and grandchildren play sports brought him great joy. He was a true connoisseur of both ballpark and movie theater popcorn. Jim was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Santa Barbara for over forty-five years where he served as an usher and a member of the Board of Trustees. Jim is survived by his wife Sally, whom he married in 1956 in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, sons Jim, Jon and Chris, daughters-in-law Kathy and Alesia, grandchildren Alex, Austin, Kevin, Tyler, Jonathan and Michael, great-granddaughter Violet, sister-in-law Marion Cappon, and his many nieces and nephews. Jim was predeceased by his brothers Norbert and William. He will be deeply missed by all. A celebration of Jim’s life will be held at Giorgi Park on Saturday, June 25, 2022 at 1:00 pm. All who knew Jim are welcome. The park is located at 1027 N. San Marcos Road. In lieu of flowers, the family would be grateful for your gifts in Jim’s memory to the First United MethINDEPENDENT.COM

odist Church of Santa Barbara (305 E. Anapumu Street, Santa Barbara, CA. 93101), or VNA Health of Santa Barbara (512 E. Gutierrez Street, Santa Barbara, CA. 93103).

Denis James Norton

07/22/1942 – 03/05/2022

Denis James Norton left his body behind on March 5, 2022 and headed for his next adventure. Denis was born in Brooklyn in 1942, raised in Huntington NY, a proud graduate of UCLA, worked in the video industry while residing in Venice, CA, retired to Sedona, AZ and later Santa Barbara, CA. If you met Denis you probably remember him by a story he told you. I always said he Irished-Up his stories as the ones that involved me were much better than my memories. For the ones before my day, did he really chauffeur Richard Nixon around as a young unlicensed driver? Meet John Wooden in the elevator at UCLA and be invited to try-out for the team? Did it matter? The stories were always entertaining. Denis was a regular at the Senior Softball games in Ehlings Park, the hot tub at the YMCA, golfing early in the morning, and walking everywhere. He traveled all ovwwer the USA and the world. He loved happening upon creatures in the wild, although the bear not so much, but it was a good story. Denis was predeceased by his parents and brother James Norton. He is survived by his brother Hugh Norton of Huntington NY, ex-wife Victoria Norton of Sedona, AZ, lifelong friends Nick DeJesu of Huntington, NY, Mike Hayes of Glen Allen, VA, and Gabe Conte of Lake Worth, FL, and his best friend, travel and life companion Sandra Howard of Santa Barbara, CA. May the sun shine warm upon your face until we meet again.

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Diana Thater, Untitled (Butterfly video wall #1), 1998. Flat panel monitors, DVD player, synchronizer and orange gels. SBMA, Museum purchase, the Suzette Morton Davidson Art Acquisition Endowment Fund. ©Diana Thater

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Cover Story

From Big Waves to Tall Trees Our Annual Blue & Green Ode to Outdoor Adventure in Santa Barbara

F Shooting from the Sea or more than two decades at the Santa Barbara Independent, we’ve welcomed the summer season with

our Blue & Green issue, our annual ode to outdoor adventure. In this year’s edition, you’ll learn how to better take photos from a kayak, get to know adventurer Chuck Graham, take a trip to the Los Padres high country, get in on the HipCamp secret, and much more. Please enjoy, and hike on.

Kayaking

s two seafaring bald eagles perched 50 feet

above me on Santa Cruz Island, I battled with a persistent 15 mph northwest wind while attempting to maintain position in my kayak. I was searching for a suitable composition against the honeycombed cliffs to photograph this majestic keystone species of the Channel Islands National Park. Using a rudder stroke in a sit-on-top kayak, I glided atop a canopy of giant bladder kelp and made like a sea otter to ease into position. I swung my right leg into the water and wrapped my leg in kelp, that natural anchor affording me the photo opportunity I was looking for beneath the sheer, volcanic, wave-battered cliffs. It was a unique backdrop only attained from the seat of a kayak. The dense canopy of kelp also forced the wind to lie down, thwarting any sea spray from coating my camera and 300 mm image-stabilizing lens. It also allowed me to steady my kayak and limit any camera shake as I photographed the two raptors before they flew off to catch another fish or antagonize the nearby western gulls yet again. Photography from a kayak offers a unique, on-the-water perspective that you can’t achieve on foot or in the air. However, it’s a constant game of chess gauging wind, swell, and current while using these natural elements to your advantage and seeking out subjects in their native habitat. A good percentage of my photography is from a sit-ontop kayak, which offers more flexibility than a closed-deck boat. In a sit-on-top, I can move around the boat freely, even lying down and facing forward to garner that sea-level perspective. It also allows me to throw a leg over either side of my kayak to steady it when kelp isn’t present. Due to unpredictable sea conditions and constant movement, whether it’s sheet glass or a scene out of The Perfect Storm, shutter speeds are heightened from the kayak, and ISOs range from 3200 and higher. The image of one bald eagle lifting off in front of the other on Santa Cruz Island was taken about a month ago, and was shot at 1/1000 of a second, at F8, and the ISO at 3200. For years, I’ve gambled with camera gear in a kayak, playing Russian roulette when exposing my gear to the elements. There’s always that risk, but over the years, the rewards have far outweighed any possible snafus. I typically keep a dry

CHUCK GRAHAM PHOTOS

A

by Chuck Graham

CAPTURING CAVES & CREATURES: Nature works on its own schedule, so those wanting to take photographs from the seat of their kayaks should always be ready for the shot, whether it’s cruising through sea caves of Santa Cruz Island or capturing bald eagles on a cliffside.

bag resting in my lap, so my camera gear is always at the ready. I also keep a T-shirt in the dry bag to wipe down my hands before using my camera, as well as a leash attaching the paddle to the kayak. The ocean realm’s occupants are also unpredictable. It’s never known when a northern fur seal, humpback whale, or a rare seabird like a rhinoceros auklet might surface while I’m paddling across the Santa Barbara Channel or, say, around San Miguel Island. So, the camera is always on, the lens cap is off, and my longest lens is always attached. After all, I can always set up for a seascape and quickly switch to a wide-angle lens. Wildlife has always been on its own schedule, especially in the water, so it’s best to be ready and expect to be surprised from the seat of a kayak.

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Cover Story

C OV E R S T O R Y

CHUCK GRAHAM PHOTOS

Adventurers

Chuck Graham’s

Life Outside

Lifeguard-Paddler-Author-Photographer’s New Channel Islands Book

C

by Matt Kettmann

huck Graham would have reason to celebrate even

if it were just his 30th year of being a lifeguard for the City of Carpinteria, where he’s lived almost his PASSION FOR PADDLING: Longtime Carpinteria resident Chuck Graham turned his love for the outdoors into a dynamic career. He works the beaches as a lifeentire life. guard, guides tourists around on kayak, and covers his adventures for multiple publications. His latest book about hiking the Channel Islands came out in March. But saving sunbathers is a small part of this outdoor enthusiast’s resume. He’s also a veteran Channel Islands kayak Barbara 10 years later with his mom and dad, who worked as Does he ever worry that his work is bringing too many guide and explorer; a volunteer ranger at San Miguel Island; a stockbroker for Paine Webber. “We moved to Carpinteria in people to this special corner of the world? a longtime freelance writer-photographer for National Geo- 1975, and I’ve been here ever since,” said Graham, who remem“It has grown in popularity, but it’s also limited,” said Gragraphic, the BBC, and this publication, among many others; bers his parents worrying how they’d pay their $400-a-month ham, explaining that visitation is automatically restricted by and an author of nature-focused books, the first being 2021’s mortgage for their Sandyland Cove home. His mom, who died ferry and campsite capacity. “I definitely catch myself saying, last year, and dad, who died in 2018, weren’t that outdoorsy. ‘There’s a lot of people out there today.’ But all it takes is padCarrizo Plain: Where the Mountains Meet the Grasslands. In March, Graham published his second book, a co- “But they were always 100 percent supportive of whatever I dling around one end of the island—all of the sudden, you feel like you’re far, far away.” authored guide with John “The Trailmaster” McKinney did,” he said. “They were great in that way.” called Hike the Channel Islands: The Best Day Hikes in Channel That included his earliest passion. “I was pretty narrowSometimes that gets hairy, like when paddling around San Islands National Park. Featuring 20 hikes, of which Graham minded,” said Graham. “I just wanted to surf.” Miguel Island. “It’s so wild and raw, and there’s a lot of water wrote 12 and photographed almost everything, the book moving around and lots of wildlife,” he explained. But outlines the walkable highlights of each of the park’s five the scariest was crossing the Potato Patch between Santa islands, from Santa Barbara in the south to San Miguel Cruz and Santa Rosa during sustained winds of 47 mph, in the northwest. Even though the islands are becoming plus gusts. “I remember having to do a lot of swimming a well-known destination both near and far, this book is toward the kayak,” said Graham. basically the first of its kind. Though still proud of being a lifeguard, Graham is “There’s nothing out there, no real trail guide like spending more and more time at the islands, usually in this,” said Graham. “It’s not just a guidebook that says his role as guide for Channel Islands Adventure Company (islandkayaking.com). “I still like the beach, but ‘go here and go there.’ There’s definitely much more of a I’m looking at the islands most of the time when it’s not personal touch for each hike.” He eventually found his way through SBCC, Westmont, foggy,” he said. “I like always knowing that I can go back to the That’s something he can provide. As a boy, he stared at the islands during surf sessions, touched them for the first time in and then, via a snail mail correspondence course with East islands. The next trip is always coming up real soon.” 1987, and then became a regular visitor in the mid-1990s. He’s Coast professors, the Institute for Children’s Literature. “They circumnavigated them all on kayak, often two at a time, and showed me how to write stories and create proposals,” said See chuckgrahamphoto.com and @chuckgrahamphoto on Instagram. once even all four northern islands. But as he’s grown into his Graham. “I went in that direction. Then I developed a thick storytelling career, Graham is realizing that less can be more. skin for all the rejection letters and just moved on from “I want to do all four again, but as a photographer and there.” writer, I just wanna slow down and take in as much as every Graham is probably the most prolific author about the trip allows,” he explained. “I definitely spend more time in Channel Islands today, at least when it comes to stories about First time kayaking? “Go with a guide first instead of one spot, just because eventually you’re gonna see something outdoor adventure and appreciating nature. He’s at work on going on your own. There are so many pitfalls with the tides, amazing when you’re concentrating on certain areas.” a third book as well, currently titled as Paddling Into Natural wind, and swell. It’s better to go with a guide and get a feel Born in Santa Monica in 1963, Graham moved to Santa Balance: Stories of Kayaking and Conservation on the Chan- for it.” nel Islands National Park. First time hiking? “It’s not a bad idea to go with a naturalist, or at least get a good feel from the ranger about what things are like before heading off on your own. Those resources are there, and it’s probably the best overall experience for those that are curious about the islands.”

‘It’s been a good life. I’ve got no complaints. I love what I do. I love the people I work with, and I don’t think I could see myself doing anything else.’ —Chuck Graham

Chuck’s Channel Islands Advice

Fave Santa Cruz Island hike? “I really love the Montana Ridge Loop, basically a new trail. It shows you a great look at the north side of Santa Cruz, but when you pop out onto Montana Ridge, you get Anacapa, Santa Barbara, and San Nicolas islands.” Fave hike overall? “The Point Bennett Trail on San Miguel. Not only does it take you through caliche forest, but it also runs you out to Point Bennett, where the largest concentration of seals and sea lions are in the world. That’s always entertaining out there. There’s lots of drama, lots of sights, and lots of smells.”

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CHUCK FLACKS PHOTOS

Accommodations

CUYAMA ESCAPE: The badlands of Cuyama are home to Songdog Ranch, where Santa Barbara resident Chuck Flacks (below) recently stayed with a bunch of friends by booking through HipCamp.

Outdoor Exploration

with HipCamp by Vanessa Vin

W

hat do you do when you live in par-

adise but still desire the adventure of a weekend excursion? Many Santa Barbarans are turning to HipCamp, an online booking site that combines the novelty of “glamping” with the rustic simplicity of homesteading. This online platform allows private landowners to act as “hosts” to campers looking for memorable outdoor stays in nature. As the name implies, this is camping, but it’s hip, with infinite add-on possibilities, from coffee service and fresh bread to guided hikes and even tarot card readings. Accommodations range from basic to lush, including tent camping, cabins, RV hookups, and more, all within the intimate setting of private property. HipCamp has saved many families during the pandemic, including Laura Borneman Birch, who often travels with two kids under 5 years old. “During the pandemic, traveling was limited, which opened up the opportunity to explore our local area,” she explained.

That was also a primary motivator for Chuck Flacks, who does an annual camp trip with about 10 friends. He discovered Songdog Ranch, one of

HipCamp’s “Best of 2022” awardees. The $40-pernight trouvaille in the Cuyama Valley exceeded his expectations. “New Cuyama was not a place I’d ever thought about going to, so I was excited that HipCamp connected us to a place that I wouldn’t have necessarily gone to otherwise,” said Flacks, who visited last fall. “Another big draw was the extra privacy we would be enjoying in comparison to state campsites or federal land.” Although Songdog Ranch offers many different accommodation types, Flacks and his buddies kept it simple. “We chose a very basic, bare-bones site on what might have formerly been a working farm,” said Flacks. “It was very comfortable.” Located in what HipCamp categorizes as the “Cuyama Badlands,” the ranch sits in the rugged scrublands just south of the intersection of Highways 166 and 33, between New Cuyama and Ventucopa, as the car drives. It’s less than half an hour from the entrance to the Carrizo Plain National Monument, and there are trails off into the Los Padres National Forest in multiple directions. The group originally intended to explore nearby attractions but opted to stay on property and chill out instead. “The landscape looked barren, like what you might find in the high desert — quiet and beautiful,” Flacks described dreamily, recollecting a peaceful state of mind. “It almost felt like camping on the moon, just completely away from everyone.” With so much going on in our day-to-day, his description of otherworldly campgrounds — and immaculately maintained outhouses — sounds idyllic. Far enough to feel like a getaway, but close enough to feel like home, these HipCamps offer just the ticket for off-the-grid adventure in a nearby paradise.

SATURDAY FISHERMEN’S MARKET Every Saturday 6-11AM on the Navy Pier in the harbor rain or shine

Come get the freshest catch in town! Sustainably caught and farmed local seafood, straight from us to you. Find out more at cfsb.info

See hipcamp.com.

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The Rotary Club of Los Olivos Presents

The 16th Annual

GREAT MUSIC, FOOD & WINE Saturday, June 11th 2022 Downtown Los Olivos

1:00-4:00 pm

Featuring Live Jazz performed by The Idiomatiques

All-inclusive $95.00 30 Vintners • 30 Chefs Order tickets online at JazzAndOliveFestival.org or call 805-895-0476 for info

No Pets Please

Please note event is rain or shine* and tickets are NOT refundable.

Santa Barbara Ecotherapy • Nature-based clinical psychotherapy for individuals 12 and up, couples and families • Group retreat experiences for businesses, organizations, and schools • Therapeutic garden design for public and private spaces • Nature connection mentoring for everyone

Sierra Boatwright M.A., LMFT

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Adventure for Hire A-Frame Surf Shop: Retail surf shop offering lessons. 3785 Santa Claus Ln., Carpinteria; (805) 684-8803; aframesurf.com. Bici Centro: Nonprofit bike shop, education center, and repair help. 434 Olive St.; (805) 617-3255; bicicentro.org. Bicycle Bob’s: Bike shop with service. 320 S. Kellogg Ave., Goleta; (805) 682-4699; bicyclebobs-sb.com. Bluewater Hunter: Dive & fishing shop with classes and charters. 117 Harbor Way #D; (805) 294-0013; blueh20.com. Cal Coast Adventures: Bike/kayak/paddleboard rentals/tours, surf lessons. Bikes: 736 Carpinteria St.; Boards: West Beach by Stearns Wharf; (805) 628-2444; calcoastadventures.com. Calico Hunter Charters: Fishing trips specializing in sea bass. (805) 794-4821. Captain Jack’s Tours & Events: Every type of tour. (805) 564-1819; captainjackstours.com. Celebration Cruises: Public, private, and parasailing tours. 237 Stearns Wharf; (805) 465-6676; celebrationsb.com. Channel Islands Adventure Company: Guided Channel Islands and Santa Barbara kayaking, surf lessons, stand-up paddleboarding, wine tours, and more. (805) 884-9283; islandkayaking.com. Channel Islands Expeditions: Kayaking, camps, dive trips, and more. (805) 899-4925; explorechannelislands.com. Circle Bar B Stables: Renting horses for 81 years. 1800 Refugio Rd., Goleta; (805) 968-1113; circlebarb.com. Cloud Climbers Jeep Tours: Wine, adventure, and more in Santa Barbara and Ojai. (805) 646-3200; ccjeeps.com. Condor Express: Whale-watching and more. 301 W. Cabrillo Blvd.; (805) 882-0088; condorexpress.com. E-Bikery: Electric bike rental/sales/tours/accessories. 506 State St., (805) 869-2574; e-bikery.com. El Capitan Canyon Resort: Coastal nature lodging. 11560 Calle Real, Gaviota coast; (866) 685-3887; elcapitancanyon.com. Eagle Paragliding: Paragliding lessons, pilot training, and tours by a team of instructors led by Rob Sporrer. 415 W. Anapamu St.; (805) 968-0980; eagleparagliding.com. Fastrack Bicycles: Bike shop. 118 W. Canon Perdido St.; (805) 884-0210; fastrackbicycles.com. Fly Away Hang Gliding: Lessons and new and used equipment. (802) 558-6350; flyawayhanggliding.com. Hazard’s Cyclesport: Bike shop. 110 Anacapa St.; (805) 966-3787; hazardscyclesport.com. Island Packers: Transportation to Channel Islands, whale-watching, and harbor cruises. 1691 Spinnaker Dr., Ste. 105B, Ventura; (805) 642-1393; islandpackers.com. Isla Vista Bicycle Boutique: Bike shop serving the Isla Vista community for more than 30 years. 880 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista; (805) 968-3338; islavistabicycles.net. J7 Surfboards: Surf shop. 24 E. Mason St.; (805) 290-4129; j7surfdesigns.com. Ka Nai’a Outrigger Canoe Club: Competitive and noncompetitive canoeing and lessons. (805) 969-5595; kanaia.com. Mountain Air Sports: Skis, snowboards, camping equipment, kayaks, footwear, trail running,

specialty, and more. 14 State St.; (805) 962-0049; mountainairsports.com. Muller Aquatic Center: Aquatic physical therapy, open swim, and aquatic fitness classes. 22 Anacapa St.; (805) 845-1231; mulwebpt.com. Open Air Bicycles: Sales, rentals, repairs, and safety checks. 1303 State St., Ste. A; (805) 962-7000; openairbicycles.com. Paddle Sports Center: Stand-up paddleboard and kayak rentals. 117 Harbor Wy., Ste. B; (805) 617-3425; paddlesportsca.com. Play It Again Sports: Secondhand and new gear. 4850 Hollister Ave., Ste. B; (805) 967-9889; playitagainsports.com. REI: Gear, rentals, repairs, classes, and organized outings. 321 Anacapa St.; (805) 560-1938; rei.com/stores/134. S.B. Adventure Company: Outdoor tours including kayaking at Channel Islands and S.B. coastline, wine tasting, and more. (805) 884-9283; sbadventureco.com. S.B. Aquatics: Scuba shop offering lessons, equipment, rentals, classes, scuba certification, and more. 5822 Hollister Ave., Goleta; (805) 967-4456; santabarbaraaquatics.com. S.B. Bicycle Coalition: Advocacy and resources for bike safety, access, and education. (805) 845-8955; sbbike.org. S.B. Rock Gym: Indoor gym, outdoor tours, classes, and youth programs. 322 State St.; (805) 770-3225; sbrockgym.com. S.B. Sailing Center: Coastal and Channel Island cruises, a sailing club, rentals, lessons, kayaking, stand-up paddleboarding, and more. 302 W. Cabrillo Blvd.; (805) 962-2826; sbsail.com. S.B. Sea Charters: Fishing, charters, tours, filming, photography, and transportation. (805) 896-0541; sbseacharters.com. S.B. Swim Club: Make swimming a daily routine. Youth and adult programs offered. 401 Shoreline Dr.; (805) 966-9757; sbswim.org. S.B. Wine Country Cycling Tours: Pedal through the vines. 1693 Mission Dr., Solvang; (805) 557-8687; winecountrycycling.com. Santa Barbara Landing: Jet Ski and kayak rentals, fishing, charters, scuba, whale-watching, and more. 301 W. Cabrillo Blvd.; (805) 963-3564; sblanding.com. Segway Of S.B.: Multiple tours, Segway and SoloCraft sales, Polaris Slingshot rentals. 122 Gray Ave.; (805) 963-7672; segwayofsb.com. Sunset Kidd: Sails, whale-watching, charters, cruises, and more. 125 Harbor Wy., Ste. 13; charters: (805) 962-8222, yachts: (805) 965-1675; sunsetkidd.com. Surf Happens: Surf lessons and camps for all ages and retail shop. 3825 Santa Claus Ln., Carpinteria; (805) 966-3613; surfhappens.com. Surf ’N’ Wear Beach House: Retail surf shop offering lessons. 10 State St.; (805) 963-1281; surfnwear.com. Velo Pro Cyclery: Rentals, sales, and repair. 15 Hitchcock Wy. and 5887 Hollister Ave., Goleta; (805) 963-7775 and (805) 964-8355; velopro.com. Wheel Fun Rentals: Skates, bikes (specialty and otherwise), boogie boards, and more. 24 E. Mason St.; Hilton S.B. Beachfront Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd.; (805) 966-2282; wheelfunrentalssb.com.


Outdoor Adventure Gear Guide E

njoying nature gets even better with the right gear. Here are three items to enhance the outdoor stoke.

Third Eye Headlamps: Carpinteria contemporary artist Sean Anderson combined technical specs and personalized style to create this headlamp line. From flowers and tie-dye to outer space and just plain black, these bands light up your mood and your campsite. ($12$50; thirdeyeheadlamps.com)

Make new records.

High Camp Flasks: Just because you’re in the woods doesn’t mean your cocktails should suffer. Ranging in size from 750 to 375 mL and coming with 11 oz. glasses, these feature a magnetic locking system, no-drip lip, and the ability to stay hot or cold for 24 hours. ($85-$125; highcampflasks.com) High Water Shirt: A groovy-looking collared shirt with built-in functionality for opening and holding beer bottles while keeping your phone and sunglasses safe? Sign us up, California Cowboy! ($145; california cowboy.com)

Open Daily, 10 AM – 5 PM.

Visit moxi.org for tickets + admission policies.

Art

Hike to the Historical Museum Take a Hike, Save the World is the new exhibit at the Santa Barbara Historical Museum that allows visitors to explore the great outdoors in the comfort of a downtown adobe. Featuring work from 1875 to the present by artists and photographers, it’s a great place to appreciate how many open spaces have been saved from development in the region. And it’s the best exhibit we’ve ever seen when it comes to putting Santa Barbara’s Blue & Green on a proper pedestal. The exhibit will stay until November 13. (136 E. De la Guerra St.; [805] 966-1601; sbhistorical.org.)

The

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INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 9, 2022

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27


ALWAYS

AMAZING.

Meditation

‘SilentWalk’ the Carpinteria Bluffs Connecting to Nature Through Compositions and Concentration

NE VER

ELLIE BOUWER

by Ellie Bouwer

ROUTINE. TOWER OF POWER JULY 8 | FRIDAY | 8PM

QUIET CONTEMPLATION: Participants in last weekend’s SilentWalk meandered the Carpinteria Bluffs while listing to music and meditative musings.

I

THERESA CAPUTO JULY 29 + 30 | TWO NIGHTS | 8PM

HOTEL CALIFORNIA AUGUST 6 | SATURDAY | 8PM

FRANKIE VALLI AUGUST 19 | FRIDAY | 8PM

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events. Chumash Casino Resort supports responsible gaming. For information about problem gambling, call the Problem Gambling Helpline at 1-800-522-4700.

Welcome to Freedom 28

THE INDEPENDENT

JUNE 9, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

f you happened to visit Carpinteria Bluffs this past Saturday,

June 4, you might have seen a procession of about 20 people, hiking together in silence, their heads wrapped in wireless headphones. This was the latest session of SilentWalk, a guided musical meditation experience by composer, meditation expert, and MindTravel founder Murray Hidary. Created in 2013, MindTravel uses music and meditation to help people deepen their connection with nature, their community, and themselves, and SilentWalk is just one of the many meditative experiences they offer. Hidary believes music, community, and nature are the three essential elements of a MindTravel experience. “When you put these ingredients together, most of the time, magic happens,” he explained. “They each have their own connective, healing properties.” SilentWalk participants are given a pair of wireless headphones connected to a transmitter that broadcasts Hidary’s original compositions, along with his live voiceover. His microphone picks up small ambient noises from the environment, like birds, waves, and the group’s footsteps, which overlap with the gentle piano, immersing participants in the auditory richness of their surroundings. Other distractions, such as conversations from passersby, are reduced to a faint echo. As he walks, Hidary urges his participants to notice sensations in their body and move with intention. His emphasis on simple sensory experiences allows even those unpracticed in meditation to enjoy the benefits of mindfulness. Through this shared human experience, Hidary hopes his audience is reminded that they are not alone. This is the first time the SilentWalk has been offered in Santa Barbara since 2019 due to the COVID pandemic. Hidary shifted to offering his tours via Zoom, where participants can join from wherever they are. “We get people from dozens and dozens of different cities joining on a walk together,” Hidary said. “There’s something very uniting and connected about that.” MindTravel is hosting a silent piano experience on Leadbetter Beach on Tuesday, June 28. See mindtravel.com.


Backpacking

The Friendships of Nature

Putting People over Place in the Los Padres High Country h e n hiking, especially with half a week of

supplies and sustenance on your back, mileage really is nothing but a number. There’ve been times when my buddies and I cruised 10-plus miles in a relative breeze, and other times when we covered barely one mile during an entire, utterly grueling day. (Thanks, Sespe Gorge!) Nonetheless, whenever I learn the itinerary for the annual Los Padres National Forest backpacking trip that my friends organize each Memorial Day, I study the mileage like it’s all that matters when deciding how much to pack. This year, for the first time ever, not only was the firstday mileage short and seemingly innocuous — just 3.7 miles, quickly up and gradually down — but we’d be staying in the same location for all three nights, using it as an outpost for day hikes and trail work. Concerns about anything being too heavy went out the window, and my existing tendency to overload just got amplified. I didn’t fret tossing in more than the usual bags of wine, plus beer, sausages, anchovies, spicy peppers, two kinds of cheese, multiple onions, garlic heads, bagel thins, chili mix, bagged tuna, a full jar of jalapeño mustard, even actual tin cans of beans — not to mention the book, binoculars, hatchet, hacksaw, journal, oatmeal, and assorted items that never even saw the light of backcountry day. Which is the long way of complaining that this 3.7 miles to our own paradise in the Los Padres high country felt like a lot more, at least with what felt like 100 pounds on my back — and, for a while, my front, thanks to my less-than-brilliant plan to walk with a daypack strapped to my chest. (Don’t do that; just hook that one to your back too.) Of course, upon reaching camp, none of that mattered. We were beneath towering sugar pines and incense cedars, steps from a constantly gushing, pure-as-rain spring, and near rock perches with views from Vandenberg to the Channel Islands to Ventura County. It was, as advertised by chief trail master Coyote Dave, an incredibly special spot, the ideal place for the mellowest ever of these adventures. He’d plotted as much because one of the other cofounders of this annual affair, the well-known plein air artist Chris Potter (chrispotterart.com), had been diagnosed with cancer around his lungs last fall, a couple of days after we’d all celebrated Halloween by camping at El Capitan State Beach. While the initial rounds of treatment fought back the disease, Potter isn’t quite his full-strength self, so a more relaxed itinerary was planned. To ease things further, we all volunteered to help the Los Padres Forest Association in their efforts to clear trails of download trees and encroaching scrub brush, which granted us vehicular access past the usual trailheads, chopping off considerable hiking mileage. And, for reasons that should be abundantly clear, the trip’s longtime nickname “The Death March” was officially rechristened as “The Life March.” There’s usually at least half a dozen participants in this trip, which started 18 years ago and kept on marching during COVID’s darkest days. But this year, because of Potter’s predicament and, presumably, the less horrific hiking route, there were a dozen of us. We even welcomed brand-new faces, which is a rarity; exponentially elevating our musical game was the guitarist/sailor Jon Payne, a musician of indefatigable reserves (I’ve requested he add “Tequila, Sheila!” to his repertoire), and upping our backcountry celebrity status was the LPFA’s executive director Bryan Conant, who charted and designed the best Los Padres wilderness maps on the market. He also hauled in a crosscut saw, Pulaski ax, and a number of

loppers to empower our trail projects. On our first full day in camp, while most went off in search of some hermit’s abandoned cave, I practiced the overlooked art of doing nothing. It’s challenging to not do very much of anything for hours, and there’s no MARCHING ON: Hikers on the 18th annual Los Padres backpacking trip, now called The Life March, shame in it, especially when a couple sit atop a mountain while the artist Chris Potter works on a landscape and Coyote Dave (left) and Jon of your friends are equally engaged, Payne (center) jam on the guitar. Sunset views extended from the Channel Islands to Vandenberg. content just shooting the breeze, starAm I going too slow? (Impossible.) Am I gonna pass out? ing up at trees, taking in views. By the way, there’s also no shame in bringing up the rear of the hik- (Not yet.) Is this fun? (I think so.) Though uncomfortable, ing column: Slow and steady might not really win races, but there’s catharsis in this mind game — the forest is a wise place you’ll eventually cross the finish line, which is all that counts to confront demons, and these ponderings are humbling, if nothing else. out here. The following day, I barely touched my iPhone, another In between steps, I snapped shots of the flora that never fails liberating non-move, although it put a gap in my photographic to mesmerize me on these treks: the subtle purple and white evidence. We found a couple of dunking holes downstream of the mariposa lilies, the stark yellow of blooming goldfields, from camp and rinsed off our accumulating dust and sweat in the tiny fuchsia bells of Fremont’s monkeyflower, the oddly bracing baths. Payne and Coyote Dave jammed in the dappled outlined pods of the woolly fruit desert parsley, the prehistoric sunshine as carpets of ladybugs swarmed on the mint-lined protruding of snow plant. And there were acres and acres of creek banks. young green pines, bringing a frothy shade of green back to a On the appointed day of work, we hauled out nearly four wildfire-decimated basin. These scenes of nature at its finest are what lured us out miles, using the crosscut, Pulaski, and loppers to clean up the trail in ways small and large. While sawing, chopping, and here in the first place. But as we grow older, it’s not the places clearing a number of downed trees, we quickly understood that keep us coming back; it’s the people. The real appeal the need to be strategic in how and where we moved the logs: of these adventures emerges around the cookstoves every Use the wrong tool, and it takes 10 times as long; shove in the morning and night, whether we’re jostling for the next cup of wrong direction, and the massive wood might fall right back rum-spiked coffee or perfecting the cheese crust on tortillas for smoked pork-butt tacos. The conversations are kinetic, on you. It was a long walk back, some of us running low on water. bouncing from hilarious to insightful to introspective, and the We walk alone much of the time, leaving your mind plenty camaraderie only intensifies as the wine flows and music rises. Long ago, these trips taught me that the great outdoors of chances to wander. As sweat drops from my hat brim, as my thighs pang with soreness, as my CamelBak dwindles, I aren’t going anywhere, that — apocalypses aside — I’ll be able often fight through unpleasant waves of self-doubt during to take my own grandkids to these same places and find simisuch solo stretches. lar wonder. But on this year’s mission, with mortality thrown Did I pack too much? (Yes.) Do I have enough water? so abruptly in our faces, we were reminded that people aren’t (Probably.) Should I have sawed more? (Perhaps.) Am I the as timeless as nature. Friends are not actually forever. Enjoy worst ax wielder? (Unclear.) Should I be in better shape? (Yes.) them all while you can. n BRIAN HALL PHOTOS

W

by Matt Kettmann

INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 9, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

29


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

JUNE

9-15

T HE

by

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

THURSDAY

THURSDAY 6/9

6/10-6/12: The Ceylon International Film Festival (CEYIFF) This film festival is a

6/9: Community Virtual Public Forum on New Treatment Program at the Juvenile Justice Center The

nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting Sri Lanka and their cinema to the world to inspire and support independent films. Visit the website for a schedule of films. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. Films and ceremonies: free-$25; Festival Pass: $350. Call (805) 963-0761. tinyurl.com/CEYIFF2022

S.B. County Juvenile Justice Coordinating Council (JJCC) and the Probation Department are seeking community input and will answer questions regarding the proposed transition of the Los Prietos Boys Camp program to a new treatment commitment program at the Juvenile Justice Center. 6pm. Free. To submit questions in advance, email kmillig@co.santa-barbara .ca.us. tinyurl.com/LosPrietosForum

6/9-6/12, 6/14-6/15: Ensemble Theatre Company Presents Sleuth Follow mystery writer Andrew Wyke in an ultimate game of cat and mouse played out with his wife and a young rival who also shares a love of games in this play with a heart-stopping end written by Anthony Shaffer. The play shows through June 26. Thu.: 7:30pm; Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2 and 7pm; Tue.-Wed.: 7:30pm. The New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $25-$77.Call (805) 965-5400 or email boxoffice@etcsb .org. Read more on p. 41. etcsb.org

excitement and thrills with the Circus Vargas Express. This show is sure to thrill with the Wheel and the Globe of Death, contortionists, an aerial acrobat, trapeze artists, jugglers, and more. Fri.: 7:30pm; Sat.: 1pm, 4pm, 7:30pm; Sun.: 12:30pm, 3:30pm, 7pm. Mon.: 6:30pm; Wed.: 7pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. GA: $19-$59; VIP: $65-$75 (children under 2 are free on adult’s lap).

circusvargas.com/tour

SATURDAY 6/11 6/11: World Oceans Day Celebrate World Oceans Day at the Sea Center with free admission for all! 10am-5pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History Sea Center, 211 Stearns Wharf. Free. Call (805) 962-2526.

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

ROBERT MOSLEY

FRIDAY 6/10

6/10-6/13, 6/15: Circus Vargas in Santa Barbara Step into a world of

Gina Papadakis

SUNDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

FRIDAY

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

cfsb.info/sat 6/11: Los Olivos Jazz & Olive Festival Enjoy an afternoon in a beautiful setting with wine poured by 30 vintners, delicious food tastings created by 30 chefs, and great live jazz performed by the Idiomatiques. 1-4pm. Downtown Los Olivos at Lavinia Campbell Park, 2398 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Child (under 12): $10: GA: $95.

jazzandolivefestival.org

6/11: 2nd Annual Paddle-Out for S. B Maritime Museum: Celebrating the Channel Join to sponsor the event or a paddler, paddle out on a self-powered craft, watch from the shore, and attend the opening ceremony. There will be food from Romanti-Ezer, surf Exhibit Opening: Rare Earth This special summer music by the Wrinkled Teenagexhibit will show an astonishing collection of minerals at ers, beach games, and crafts. their finest, from precious stones like emeralds to fossils Funds raised go toward SBMM’s such as a rare baby Triceratops skull. Uncover the science exhibits and experiential educaand discover where minerals can be found, including in tion programs. 1-4pm. Leadbetyour very own body. The exhibit shows through Septemter Beach, Shoreline Dr. Ages ber 5. 10am-5pm. Fleischmann Auditorium, S.B. Museum 6-17: $40; Ages 18+: $75. Call of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$18. Call (805) 962-8404 or email (805) 682-4711. sbnature.org/visit/calendar mdonelan@sbmm.org. sbmm

6/11-6/13, 6/15:

6/10:

Annual Jury Competition 2022 Artist Reception and Awards: Aquatic More than 40 artists are represented by

a variety of mediums — oil, acrylic, encaustic, collage, photography, and mixed media — with the theme that dictates a wide range of interpretations of all things aquatic, including environmental issues, seascapes, water sports, backyard pools, and reservoirs. The exhibit shows through June 30 with daily hours of 9am7pm. 4:30-6pm. S.B. Tennis Club, 2375 Foothill Rd. Free. Call (805) 682-4722.

2ndFridaysArt.com

.org/santa-barbara-events

6/11: Star Party at the Museum The astronomy staff will answer all of your questions as the Palmer Observatory will open its doors and its roof to share a remarkable view of the wonders of the night sky through a state-of-the-art 20-inch telescope. 8:30-10pm.

Shows on Tap

6/9-6/11: Eos Lounge Thu.: Joshwa. Fri.: Fort Romeau. Sat.: Ardalan. 9pm.

$6.18. 500 Anacapa St. Call (805) 564-2410.

eoslounge.com

6/9-6/11: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Thu.: Bob Thakara. Fri.: Hoodlum Friends. Sat.: Dissappointments. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

6/9, 6/11: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Thu.: Modern Genre, Electric Vibe, The Helltones, 6-9pm. Sat.: Marika & the Ohms, 7-9pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

6/10-6/12: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Cyrus Clark and the Sons of Joe Satterly, 6-9pm. Sat.: Bobby Fin & Dave, 1:304:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

THE INDEPENDENT

JUNE 9, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

6/10: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

6/10-6/12, 6/14-6/15: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Fri.: Area 51, 8:30pm. $10. Ages 21+.

Sat.: Banda Night, 9pm. $30-$35. Ages 21+. Sun.:

S.B. Jazz Society: Tony Ybarra’s Elementos Project, 1pm. $10-$35; S.B. Acoustic presents Joe Robinson, 7:30pm. $25. Tue: Singer-Songwriter Showcase: Joey La Macchia, Ben Catch, Sharad Shankar, 7pm. $10. Wed.: Madeleine Mayi, Cecilia James, 7:30pm. $15. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

6/11: Uptown Lounge Out of the Blue, 7:30-10:30pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800.

coldspringtavern.com

uptownlounge805.com/events

6/10: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar Adri-

6/12: S.B. Wine Collective Let’s Be Frank Jazz Trio, 2-5pm. 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C. Free. Call (805) 456-2700.

enne, 6-9pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126.

arrowsmithwine.com/events

6/10-6/12: Maverick Saloon Fri.:

Jimi Nelson Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Brian Black, 1-5pm. Crown City Bombers, 8:3011:30pm. Sun.: Robert Heft & Dave Wilson, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

santabarbarawinecollective.com/ events

6/13: The Red Piano Church on Monday: Dallas Hodge, 7:30pm. 519 State Street.

Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 358-1439. theredpiano.com/schedule

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free. Call (805) 682-4711. sbnature

.org/visit/calendar

6/11: Clay Studio Summer Open House & Fundraiser View the Gallery show and Raku firing and enjoy the ceramics shop, lawn games, food truck, wine and beer (for purchase), music from the Summerland Band, and a silent auction with proceeds going toward the studio. RSVP online. Noon-6pm. Clay Studio, 1351 Holiday Hill Rd., Goleta. Free. (805) 565-CLAY or email info@ClayStudioSB.org.

tinyurl.com/ClayOpenHouse 6/11: Summer Reading Kickoff Party/ Fiesta del Inicio del verano Come get a library card and reading log, pick up your summer reading materials (including a free book), and enjoy a Kona Ice. There will be crafts, games, an interactive hula-hoop performance, our Book to Action Poetry Walk where you

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 30

TERRY ORTEGA

can enjoy poems inspired by the Channel Islands, and much more! Venga a obtener una tarjeta de la biblioteca y un registro de lectura, a recoger sus materiales de lectura de verano, incluyendo un libro gratuito, y a disfrutar de un Kona Ice. Habrá manualidades, juegos, una actuación interactiva con hula hoop, nuestro Paseo de la Poesía del Libro a la Acción, donde podrás disfrutar de poemas inspirados en las Islas del Canal, ¡y mucho más! 11am-12:30pm. Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call (805) 564-5602: para español: (805) 962-7653 x3, or email youthservices@santabarbaraca .gov. tinyurl.com/SummerReading

LecturaVerano

6/11-6/12: Momentum Dance Company Presents The Flourish Gala The community is invited to the end-of-year spectacular showcase featuring 80 dancers ages 3-18, 40 dances, and dances in tap,

Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser


“A wickedly fun thriller!”

ON STAGE JUNE 9-26

T HE

WEDNESDAY 6/15 RANDY WRIGHT

hip-hop, jazz ballet, and contemporary. 2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $35. Call (805) 963-0408 or email cstheater@sbcoxmail.com. centerstagetheater.org

SUNDAY 6/12 6/12: S.B. Acoustic Presents Joe Robinson Australian native and acoustic and electric guitar virtuoso Joe Robinson will bring his soulful and finely crafted songs to S.B. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $25. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com

6/12: Opera S.B.: La Traviata Enjoy Giuseppe Verdi’s

THE PLAIN DEALER

6/15:

Free Senior Day at Santa Barbara Botanic

BY

DIRECTED BY

ANTHONY SHAFFER

JENNY SULLIVAN

Garden Seniors can enjoy S.B.’s beautiful

Botanic Garden for free thanks to sponsor Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapels. 10am5pm. S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. Free. Call (805) 682-4726, x103.

La Traviata, which tells the story of a real-life courtesan in mid-19th-century Paris and stars soprano Anya Matanovic and tenor Nathan Granner with full OSB chorus and sbbg.org/classes-events 35-member orchestra conducted by Kostis Protopapas. 2:30-5pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $79-$249.Call S.B. UNIFIED SCHOOL (805) 899-2222 or email info@granadasb.org. Read more on DISTRICT FREE MEALS p. 41. ticketing.granadasb.org/events Free breakfast and lunch for all youth 18 years and younger. For more information, call (805) 963-4338 x6385, text “food” to 304-304,or download the CA Meals for Kids App.

MONDAY 6/13

6/13: Science Pub from Home: Geology Road Trip Listen to geological stories from UCSB Prof. Emeritus Arthur Gibbs Sylvester, PhD, about the mines of eastern California, including the Woodhouse Mine, where Charles Douglas Woodhouse collected more than 10,000 mineral and ore specimens that are now stewarded by UCSB and with some on display in the museum’s summer exhibit Rare Earth. Register online. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Email jrolle@sbnature2.org.

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

6/13: Free Online Talk: Herbal/Nutritional Considerations for Cancer Learn about oncology nutrition in a nuanced, bio-individualized way; discuss herbal and nutritional approaches that are simple and available in your home right now; and equip yourself with resources and tools to further your learning and exploration on this topic with clinical herbalist and holistic nutritionist Andrea Rossi. 5-6pm. Free. Call (805) 769-4926 or email info@ artemisiaacademy.com. tinyurl.com/Herbs-Nutrition

6/13: Met Live in HD: Hamlet Watch this riveting contemporary masterpiece by Australian composer Brett Dean with an English libretto by Matthew Jocelyn based on William Shakespeare’s play that follows Hamlet, prince of Denmark, as he avenges his father’s death. 6pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. Free-$28. Call (805) 969-4726. musicacademy.org/

calendar

TUESDAY 6/14 6/14: Paint & Sip Night at S.B. Wine Collective Area artist Jana Brody will lead you through this painting workshop for a night of creativity. Ticket includes all materials, instruction, and a glass of sparkling wine. 5:30-7pm. S.B. Wine Collective, 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C. $38. Ages 21+. Call (805) 456-2700. santabarbarawinecollective

.com/events

6/15: Land Trust Virtual Lunch & Learn: Land Conservation with Dr. Alvarez Deputy General Manager Dr. Ana Alvarez of the East Bay Region Park District, the largest local park agency in the U.S., will lead this virtual conversation about land conservation’s role in promoting vibrant, healthy communities through natural benefits, parks, recreation, and more. Register online to receive a link. 12:30-1:30pm. Free. Call (805) 966-4520.

tinyurl.com/Lunch-LearnDrAlvarez

DISTRITO ESCOLAR UNIFICADO DE S.B. COMIDAS GRATIS Desayuno y almuerzo gratuitos para todos los jóvenes de 18 años o menos. Para más información llame al (805) 963-4338 x6385, envíe un mensaje de texto con la palabra “food” al 304-304, o descargue la App CA Meals for Kids.sbunified.org/support/foodservices 33 W VICTORIA ST ETCSB.ORG | 805.965.5400

FOODBANK PICNIC IN THE PARK 2022

FOODBANK PICNIC EN EL PARQUE 2022

The Foodbank offers free, nutritious meals, activities, and enrichment opportunities to all children ages 1-18 in our county, Monday-Friday, June 6-August 12, unless otherwise stated. Visit the website for North County locations. Call (805) 967-5741, text “SUMMERFOOD” to 304-304, or download the CA Meals for Kids App. El Foodbank ofrece comidas nutritivas gratuitas, actividades, y oportunidades de enriquecimiento para todos los niños de 1 a 18 años en nuestro condado, del 6 de junio al 12 de agosto, de lunes a viernes si no se indique lo contrario. Visite el sitio web por las ubicaciones de North County. Llame al (805) 967-5741, envíe un mensaje de texto que dice “SUMMERFOOD” al 877 877, o descargue la App de CA Meals for Kids. tinyurl.com/ FoodbankSummerFood

ALISO ELEMENTARY (JUNE 13-AUG. 12) Carpinteria: 4545 Carpinteria Ave. 11am-noon

CARPINTERIA HIGH SCHOOL (JUNE 13-JULY 8) Carpinteria: 4810 Foothill Rd. 11:15-12:15pm

GOLETA VALLEY COMMUNITY CTR. (JUNE 6-AUG.12) Goleta: 5679 Hollister Ave. 11am-noon

PARQUE DE LOS NIÑOS (JUNE 6-AUG.12) Santa Barbara: 520 Wentworth Ave, noon-1pm

S.B. CENTRAL LIBRARY (JUNE 6-AUG.12) Santa Barbara: 40 E. Anapamu St. Tue.-Fri., noon-1pm INDEPENDENT.COM

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$2

SUMMER KIDS MOVIES

Tickets!

Happening Now!

My Life

New Family Movies Each Week! Fiesta 5 Theatres

living

The Weight of Things

10am every Tuesday & Wednesday

6/14 & 15

6/21 & 22

6/28 & 29

7/5 & 6

7/12 & 13

7/19 & 20

7/26 & 27

8/2 & 3

8/9 & 10

Camino Real Cinemas 10am every Thursday

O

ne of the gifts of having been a teacher is that sometimes grown-up former students stay in touch with you, and it makes you feel that somewhere along the line, you mattered. I have a few of these former students in my life to this day; one of whom (I’ll call her Ming) was in my class as a 6th-grader in the early 1990s. Not long ago, Ming came out for a visit and a walk, along with a mutual friend named David, who happens to be an equine veterinarian. For no particular reason, we decided to look at the cattle scale at the corral at the western end of this ranch, the oldest such scale in Santa Barbara County.

Our Hearts Are Heavy, but We’re Trying Our Best by Cynthia Carbone Ward

6/16

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6/30

7/7

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We ventured up and down a hill or two, and across a railroad track to an area where fencing, cattle chutes, and other old structures from the ranching operations are clustered. The wood housing that encloses the scale had recently been rebuilt, but the scale itself has been in use since 1892. It is still used today and is known for its accuracy. Based on the design and time frame, David speculated that it is a Fairbanks scale, and he told us about the Fairbanks brothers of Vermont—Erastus and Thaddeus—who developed a reliable weighing machine in the 1820s. An enthusiastic explainer, David pointed out the route the cattle would take to get onto the platform. He showed us the balances and counterbalances, and he talked about feed conversion, weight loss, and profitability. There’s a whole science to this, and accuracy is crucial. A red-and-white seal showed that our scale had been certified by the Santa Barbara County Department of Agriculture Weights and Measures. But by now I found my attention drawn to the beautiful rippled patterns and complex texture of the weathered wood fencing, the comforting chug and

whistle of a passing freight train, and the familiar golden hills framed in the window of a barn. From the broken limb of an ancient oak, there sprang a bough of new green leaves. A hawk glided by, like a king of the sky. Everything was shining, being. Meanwhile, Ming had discovered a tiny, emaciated calf with a patch over its eye in a nearby corral. At first glance, David didn’t think the prognosis was great, but maybe, with the special care it was evidently getting, the little animal might manage to pull through. We talked and fell silent in comfortable waves. Ming had life events to share, the kind that seem to come at you fast when you’re young, when the ground keeps shifting and you’ve barely found your footing. “But it seems like everything we care about is threatened,” she said. “I guess I don’t feel hopeful anymore.” I knew what she meant. Life seemed easier when I wasn’t bombarded moment by moment with terrible news near and far, when I thought that suffering was not in vain and some kind of everything-will-be-okay-ness ultimately awaited. Now it all weighs so heavy, it’s hard to stand up. But despair, like hope, is a self-fulfilling prophecy. To be alive is to have your soul carved out with grief and then discover that the cut has left you lighter and more akin to stardust. To be alive is to strive for meaning while at the same time accepting absurdity. To be alive is to connect to other kindred souls, but to stand alone in the dark sometimes too, as steadily as you can, feigning courage. Our hearts are heavy, but we’re trying our best. And although my teaching days have long passed, I remain one of hope’s intrepid foot soldiers, and I’m always seeking symbols and sturdy stepping-stones. The oldest scale in Santa Barbara County is still truthful. That bottle-fed calf survived. The tree you plant today may well outlive you, and the things you knew were right still are. I like the way Rebecca Solnit puts it: “The future is dark, with a darkness as much of the womb as the grave.” And look how the earth sometimes holds its breath. Unanticipated events are yet to happen, and some of them will be good. n


living

Tourism

COURTESY

Hotels a Go-Go

Santa Barbara

EATS & DRINKS Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

The Leta Z ACH SORENSON

A

s the world tentatively reopens post-pandemic, the Santa Barbara hotel scene is humming with changes. One of the most heavily impacted industries during the pandemic, hotels are finally starting to see light at the end of the tunnel. And with fresh optimism, they’re using this time to renew or even restart their properties in order to entice visitors and residents alike back into their spaces. Here’s a rundown.

1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) • (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

Updates on The Leta, Canary, and Riviera Beach House

Get fresh news from

INDEPENDENT.COM

by Gareth Kelly The Leta (5650 Calle Real, Goleta): Formerly known as the Kimpton Goodland, this property was acquired by AWH Partners and is now managed by Spire Hospitality. The charming beach-chic property retains much of what made the hotel an area favorite, including the Airstream, the Woody, and long-time GM Barry Dorsey. Updates to the property include highspeed Wi-Fi, higher-quality bedding, and big-screen TVs in every room, with the welcoming lobby, pool, and fire pits still very much at the heart of the property. Dorsey hopes this new revamp will keep much of the cool, hip, carefree Californian personality the hotel is known for while also making use of the significant investment in renewing the guest experience for all. The restaurant area is slated to be expanded along, and live music is already back at the property, with art, food and wine, and other events coming back as well. While the individual record players no longer reside in each room, they are still available upon request, as is the quaint vinyl room in the lobby. See theleta.com. Canary Hotel (31 W. Carrillo St.): In the heart of downtown, the Kimpton Canary Hotel underwent a renovation under the stewardship of new GM Richard Cox, who expects to conclude the project in January 2023. The changes start in the lobby and Finch & Fork restaurant, where one will notice lighter tones, a more open environment, and a color palette that reflects the new menus’ Californian cuisine, featuring plenty of seafood and Central Coast wines. The private event and meeting spaces, all 97 guest rooms,

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm

Canary Hotel

and even the roof will be transformed over the next few months. Los Angeles interior design firm Beleco was tapped for the reimagining of the Canary’s interior with the aim of channeling an elegant California estate while still paying homage to the property’s Mediterranean inspiration. Even the art throughout the hotel’s public spaces is getting an update, thanks to Eaton Fine Art of Austin along with in-the-room artwork exhibiting unusual, playful pieces. See canarysantabarbara.com. The Riviera Beach House (121 State St.): In another name change, the Hotel Indigo is transitioning into the Riviera Beach House. The new ownership is a collaboration between the family that owns the historic Culver Hotel in Los Angeles and the team behind Pacifica Hotels, which claims to be the largest independent owner of design-inspired hotels on the Pacific Coast. The hotel’s update draws inspiration from Santa Barbara’s Mediterranean style while still hazily dreaming of its quintessentially Californian beach town roots. Located right next to the humdrum of the Funk Zone and just blocks to the beach with the on-site restaurant, Santo Mezcal, the new design hopes to impress with curated programming and personalized experiences. More details to be announced. See pacificahotels.com. n

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Cuyama Buckhorn’s Chuck-Wagon Chow-Downs S

eventy years ago, the Cuyama Buckhorn opened along

JOEL BARGER PHOTOS

s

roadtrip

FOOD &DRINK

p. 34

Highway 166, bringing an oasis of culture and cuisine to the high-desert moonscape of the Cuyama Valley. The Buckhorn quickly became a community hub for this hardscrabble region of northeastern Santa Barbara County, historically home to oil drilling, ranching, vineyards, orchards, and industrial carrot farming. The bar was bumping, and people came from all around to enjoy a chuck-wagon BBQ every Sunday, when beef, beans, and more could be enjoyed for just $2 a head.

Redeveloped Resort Launches Third Sunday BBQ Series BY MATT KETTMANN

In recent years, as the ranches around New Cuyama and Ventucopa became epicenters for sustainable farming and climate resiliency, the Buckhorn underwent its own evolution. Through the vision of Ferial Sadeghian and Jeff Vance — partners in the Los Angeles design and architecture firm iD Group, who purchased the property in 2018 — the Buckhorn is now a full-service resort and event space, fully open since early 2021. “Finally, everything is becoming a reality,” said Sadeghian last month. “Everything is operating.” At its heart is The Buckhorn Restaurant & Bar, run by Chef Daniel Horn, who’s developed menus to meet today’s farm-to-table standards while focusing as much as possible on Cuyama Valley purveyors. He’s used to the challenges of remote resorts, having worked in the Cambodian jungle, Utah desert, and Caribbean islands before starting at the Buckhorn in November 2020. Staffing from the region’s tiny population remains difficult — Sadeghian recently worked the line in the kitchen herself — but Horn is keeping the restaurant open seven days a week. Taking cues from the past — specifically, from newspaper clippings about the original Sunday series, started in 1958 by then-proprietor Russ Princeton — the Buckhorn just launched a new Chuck Wagon BBQ series, happening every third Sunday of the month through October. The prices are a bit higher than it was back then — now $30 for adults, $18 for kids — but the food’s probably a bit tastier and healthier. The kick-off menu in May featured oak-roasted brisket, tri-tip, chicken, veggies, and pinquito beans, but specials such as orzo salad with grilled veggies in chipotle pesto and stonefuit cobbler are expected to come in future chow-downs.

4-1-1

The Cuyama Buckhorn’s Chuck Wagon BBQ Series is every third Sunday of the month until October, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at 4923 Primero St. in New Cuyama. See cuyamabuckhorn.com.

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GRILLIN’ SUNDAYS: Chef Daniel Horn fires up the Cuyama Buckhorn grill every third Sunday of the month through October for the high desert resort’s Chuck Wagon BBQ series. The meaty affair takes cues from the original 1958 menu (below) that was found in old newspaper clippings.

The series shows how much the new owners are trying to embrace the culture of Cuyama, albeit in updated digs. There were initial concerns that this L.A. outfit, which advertised the resort on a Sunset Strip billboard, would try to wipe out the Buckhorn’s Western character, but that’s really what drew them in. “We’ve always wanted to cherish that more,” said Sadeghian. “Whenever we sit with anyone, the stories you hear about the way of life here — it’s just amazing and it’s beautiful.” She hopes to add even more events to enhance that, much like the Wild Flour Celebration held each spring to toast the region’s wildflowers while learning how to bake. They’re also playing up Cuyama culture by showcasing live music, hosting readings by “The Cowboy Poet” Dick Gibford, and offering equestrian and real ranching experiences at the nearby Hidden Creek and Johnston ranches.

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The strongest evidence that the approach is working comes back to the BBQ series itself. The granddaughter of Russ Princeton, the property’s longtime owner and Chuck Wagon creator, threw a 70th birthday party for her dad at the Buckhorn, where they shared pictures and stories with the current crew. But they’re finding fans from much farther away as well. “We’ve gotten a few international people,” said Sadeghian. “That was fascinating. I never thought we would get that here.” She believes the Chuck Wagon series will deepen ties to locals and visitors alike, reporting that the first one in May was “amazing” and attracted ranchers that she’d never met before. “When food is cooked on an open fire outdoors,” she explained, “it hits on so many levels.”

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A

ugie’s of Santa Barbara,

which is coming to 700 State Street this August, just announced the hiring of Eduardo Gonzalez as chef de cuisine. “You’ll find an amazing selection of agave spirits, modern takes on great cock- HAPPY CHEF: Chef Eduardo Gonzalez tails, superb service, and a fun will run the kitchen at Augie’s when it vibe,” explains the restaurant’s opens later this summer. proprietor, Berkeley “Augie” Johnson. “We knew we needed a chef that could absolutely wow our guests with fabulous flavors and presentation. We are so grateful to have found Santa Barbara native Eduardo Gonzalez.” Gonzalez’s passion for food was born from his maternal grandfather, a chef/owner in Guadalajara, Jalisco. “His stories put the love for cooking in me, and my experience as a restaurant owner, and a culinary team leader at Santa Barbara five-star properties, such as Hillstone Group, Four Seasons, and Caruso’s, have fueled my passion and love for cooking, ” said Gonzalez. “I love the Augie’s project because I can show the fabulous flavors of Mexico with a great service experience.” Call (805) 664-0516 or visit augiessb.com.

Come see one of the most exceptional displays of minerals and gems ever presented in our region. More than an assembly of specimens, Rare Earth will be rich in story, cultural heritage, global connections, and compelling discussions about how we assign value to natural beauty.

FOOD & DRINK

FORTY YEARS OF FIVE-YEAR PHOTOS: My Santa Barbara friends and I have been taking a group photo (with the exact same pose) every five years since 1982. See fiveyearphotos.com. We do this at tiny Copco Lake in Northern California, where my friend John Wardlaw owns a cabin. In 2012, on the verge of taking our seventh photo 30 years after that first one, Santa Barbara’s resident CNN producer Paul Vercammen heard about us and did a report. To our amazement, it went viral, getting 50 million views in a week and making news around the world, including in People Magazine. NBC even flew us to New York City to be on the Today show. CNN did a follow-up report in 2017 about our eighth photo. On June 15, we’re taking our ninth five-year photo, 40 years after the first, and CNN is covering it again. I’m told that Vercammen is actually coming to Northern California to do a live report. With so much drama in the news, I guess they decided that it’s time for a happy story. If you happen to see a series of pictures of five guys sitting on a bench on the news later this month, The Restaurant Guy is the one on the right.

COURTESY

Augie’s Hires Chef Eduardo Gonzalez

2559 Puesta del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105 805-682-4711 sbnature.org

FATHER’S DAY AT FINCH & FORK: This Father’s Day, consider celebrating at

the recently remodeled Finch & Fork inside the Kimpton Canary. From 8 a.m. until 2 p.m., Chef Craig Riker will be serving specials just for Dad—a double Wagyu beef burger with egg, bacon, American cheese, and BBQ sauce, and a breakfast burrito with short rib, tater tots, and white cheddar—as well as short rib/sweet potato hash with poached eggs, chilaquiles, huevos rancheros, and a selection of toasts alongside signature cocktails, wine, and beer.

Volunteer With Us!

PASCUCCI RAISES DOUGH: On May 25, Reader Primetime, The Res-

taurant Guy & Kid, Mayor Randy Rowse, and many others volunteered at Pascucci restaurant to help raise money for the 2022 Solstice Parade and Festival. All purchases that night, including tips, went to Solstice, and I am told that the amount generous diners donated exceeded $4,500. John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara .com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

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Java Station Celebrates Pride

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ley’s inaugural Pride celebration at the end of June, Future Perfect Wine founder Sunny Doench Stricker crafted a rosé of grenache called PRIDE to support the cause. “I’ve had it heavy on my heart to do something, many things, that can help bring inclusivity and benefit

Public

Coursework

the LGBTQ+ community,” she explained. “Aside from making sure the community knows that I am an ally and that Future Perfect is a safe place for everyone, including those transitioning, I know I have to find a way to do more.” Stricker collaborated with two friends, Jenae Unruh, who works at Two Wolves, and her wife, Nikki Faragasso, to bottle 22 cases of the $38 wine, with all proceeds going FOLLOW US ON to the Pacific Pride Foundation. TWITTER “There is no magic day when @sbindynews things get better for the excluded,” reads the back of the bottle. “We create that day, with every decision we make and every decision made from love & acceptance ushers in FOLLOW US ON a more inclusive world for us all.” INSTAGRAM Stricker plans to bottle an even @sbindependent bigger batch for Pride 2023. “I know I need to do much more,” she said. “This is just a start.” See future perfectwine.com. The first-ever S.Y.V. Pride, meanwhile, is going down June 22 to 26, with a full slate of events, including parties, a parade (June 25), drag brunch (June 26), and multiple food & wine offerings throughout the entire month. See syvpride.org for the full schedule. —Matt Kettmann

STAY CONNECTED ust in time for the Santa Ynez Val-

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in the Hope Ranch Annex neighborhood, is showing its colors this June to celebrate Santa Barbara Pride. For the second year in a row, Java Station’s all-female, mostly queer team is showing their LGBTQIA+ unity by hoisting rainbow flags and pouring colorful lattes — despite the disapproving reactions of some patrons. “We’re getting mixed reviews from customers,” said assistant manager Jordyn Terry. “Some people are telling us they don’t need ‘it’ shoved in their face, but then others tell us how much they love the decor.” Considering Pride’s 1969 Stonewall roots, having a bit of pushback is not surprising. The team at Java Station is emblematic of a generation who’s help-

ing to evolve the movement into an international celebration of support and inclusion. “It’s one thing to show your unwavering support for the community, and it’s another to provide them a safe space where they can unapologetically be themselves and know they’re loved and appreciated,” said barista Katleyn Tymon. Guests looking to join the cause should order Java Station’s signature “Out & Proud Mocha,” which is topped with house-made strawberry whipped cream and rainbow sprinkles. Then pose and post a selfie showing off the colorful, community-minded decor of this Pride—Vanessa Vin themed café.

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best of Santa barbara 2022

®

READERS’ POLL

Nominations

are open June

09

To

July

06

INDEPENDENT.COM/BESTOF2022 38

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Here’s

how it works

Y

ou will determine who deserves to be a nominee for

each category by nominating your favorites online at independent.com/bestof2022 from June 9 - July 6. You must nominate in at least 20 different categories. In keeping with our mission to support our community, only locally-based businesses are eligible to be on the final ballot. Chains or big box stores will be disqualified. Once the nomination period is over, we will create the voting ballot based on your responses. The number of final nominees in each category will vary based on the number of nominations received in that category. Voting will be open from August 4 - August 31. Once the voting period is over we will tally up the winners and publish them in our annual Best Of Santa Barbara® issue hitting stands October 20. Please note, all nominations and voting will be *Please done exclusively online. There will be no paper ballots. All questions or concerns can be directed to bestof@independent.com.

Santa Barbara

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LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 Just Announced

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Just Announced

Tab Benoit

Thank you to all of our loyal patrons and impactful supporters! The Lobero is the heart and rhythm of Santa Barbara, and it is what it is ... because of you.

with special guest JD Simo

The GRAMMY® nominated singer, songwriter, and guitarist has built a remarkable 30+ year career on the foundation of his gritty and soulful Delta swamp blues, acquiring a devoted legion of fans along the way.

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JUNE 9, 2022

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THIS WEEKEND! JUNE 10 - 12 LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION

Artwork by Brandon Terris

The famed solo acoustic guitarist is known for syncopated, polyphonic melodies and a fingerpicking style that draws on blues, jazz, and folk music. The two-time GRAMMY® nominee is a master of the guitar, whose playing has influenced generations of musicians and listeners.


L I F E

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hen the Granada comes alive with the production of Giuseppe Verdi’s masterpiece La Traviata on Sunday, June 12, it marks a return to the land of grand opera for Opera Santa Barbara (operasb.org). It also marks a long-awaited return to an ambitious company mission already in progress. Since the company’s last “grand opera” project in November 2019, Opera Santa Barbara (OSB) has embarked on resourceful rethinking over how to operate under fire and lockdown. Among its creative workaround achievements were drive-in operas at the Ventura Fairgrounds and unique smaller productions at the Lobero Theatre. Those included the mariachi opera Cruzar la Cara de la Luna, the transgender one-act As One, a Halloween-timed Puccini/Da Falla doubleheader, an updated take on Handel’s Semele, and an abridged spin on Wagner’s Das Rheingold. Driving the company’s admirable initiative-amid-adversity is Kostis Protopapas, the artistic and general director (and conductor this Sunday). He explained, “the Traviata performance will be a celebration of everything we have accomplished since March 2020. Our company was one of the few performing arts organizations in California that remained active throughout the lockdown and successfully navigated through the post-reopening ups and downs. Returning to grand, full-length opera with a large orchestra and chorus feels like the final chapter of Around the World in 80 Days, except our journey was about 800 days.” This production of Verdi’s 1853 adaptation of Alexander Dumas’s novel La Dame aux Camélias features some familiar faces/voices. Soprano Anya Matanovic takes on the lead role, after roles in OSB’s The Crucible and Das Rheingold, alongside tenor Nathan Granner, memorable in OSB’s 2018 La Bohème. “La Traviata is one of the most important works of the repertoire,” Protopapas asserts. “First, it was the first ‘realist’ opera in the history of the genre. Up until then, any opera included a large element of fantasy—ancient myths and gods,

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DANA SOHM

GRAND OPERA RETURNS WITH LA TRAVIATA Opera Santa Barbara’s Season Finale

historical figures, exotic locales, etc. Then the music is absolutely perfect. It is masterfully designed to give the singers the opportunity to sculpt lifelike characters. It is also remarkable how Verdi creates a new kind of musical drama without substantially departing from the established musical norms.” Director Tara Faircloth, previously behind OSB’s 2017 production of Puccini’s La Rondine, has conceived a fresh interpretation of La Traviata. Protopapas explains that the director “envisions the story as a memory play.”

Faircloth said, “Anytime you bring a group of artists together to create live opera, there is a bit of magic in the air. Our production features quite traditional, lush costumes, but we have a gorgeous new scenic design by François-Pierre Couture and also a small troupe of dancers from the State Street Ballet. The visual world is a gorgeous blend of delicate, feminine symbology and dancer-driven transitions, which help create a dreamlike state of memory and emotion.” OSB, founded in 1994, has worked through many phases and changes and has survived and, in its way, thrived during a potential downtime. In one sense, the extreme challenges to performing arts in the past two years instilled a call to rise to the occasion. “There are no crises in art, only opportunities, painful as those sometimes may be,” said Protopato his preoccupation with games and intrigue. He invites his pas. “John F. Kennedy said, ‘The artist becomes the wife’s lover, Milo Tindle (Matthew Floyd Miller), to the manor, last champion on the individual mind and sensibility ostensibly to stage a jewelry heist. Tindle wants to convince against an intrusive society and an officious state.’ Wyke to sign divorce papers to free up the current Mrs. Wyke Society has never been more intrusive, and the state for a new marriage. “Wyke is the embodiment of reactionary never more officious than during the pandemic and charm and nostalgic creativity,” says Gerroll of his characthe years leading up to it. In that sense, the artist’s duty ter. “Milo starts off as a necessary irritant, but circumstances has never been more urgent. elevate the young man to a place of colloidal symbiosis.” “Additionally, the disruption of the pandemic was The action in Sleuth takes place in Wyke’s home, a massive, also a reset button in the arts. We were forced to think impressive set. “Since Andrew Shaffer is obsessed with games creatively and economically and forget ‘business as and is also a writer of detective crime novels, the set works as usual.’ As a result, we have become more efficient and a puzzle to reveal these aspects of the play,” says Sullivan. “It is more focused on the essentials of the art: the music, a giant game board with lots of surprises.” the artists, and the storytelling.” Written in 1970, this play, which touches on issues related OSB’s future looks bright — and grand — again. to social class designations, remains relevant today. Sullivan “What our company does is produce vibrant music describes the play as “a tight whodunnit” that focuses on the theater that both draws on the past of the operatic characters’ one-upmanship with steadily mounting stakes. tradition and envisions its future,” said Protopapas. “The metaphor of a tennis match is a good one,” says Sullivan. “Artistically, we plan to be producing classic and con“You play better against a worthy opponent.” For tickets and temporary works with equal passion and audacity for more information, visit etcsb.org. —Maggie Yates a long time.” —Josef Woodard

ZACK MENDEZ

SLEUTH Ensemble Theatre Company Closes Season With Comedic Thriller

Matthew Floyd Miller and Daniel Gerroll star in the Ensemble Theatre Company production of Sleuth.

E

nsemble Theatre Company concludes its 2021-22 season with Anthony Shaffer’s popular thriller, Sleuth. Directed by Jenny Sullivan, Sleuth features two men in a battle of wills and wits as they vie for dominance in a psychological game. Sullivan calls this play “a twisting, turning, comedic thrill ride that’s part psychological thriller and part murder mystery ... but does a murder actually take place? This calls for the audience to participate as sleuths.” Andrew Wyke (Daniel Gerroll) is a successful mystery writer who lives in a large manor full of artifacts that allude

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EMAIL : ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

ECHOES OF A CREATIVE FORCE Tom Huston Pop-Up at Silo 118

PRESENTING SPONSOR:

Community West Bank

THURSDAY, JUNE 16 5 - 10 pm $85.00 all inclusive

Tickets available at: www.nightout.com/events/a/ fiesta-ranchera AT

304 LOS CARNEROS RD., GOLETA 21 and older only

I

first became aware of the artist Tom Huston in the way back, when I rented an office space in the Park Building, Huston’s former studio. Before the walls were neutralized with off-white, the space was literally splashed with multi-colored bursts, like accidental abstract expressionist gestures. The previous tenant, I quickly realized, was a vibrant and sometimes fit-to-burst creative force, who I came to know and appreciate and whose work was fueled by a certain wild passion — and activist compassion. A compact but sturdy dose of those qualities, on canvases and in drawings and other artifacts, can be found in the current pop-up show of his work at Silo 118 Gallery (118 Gray St., silo118.com) called Restivo. Huston, who passed away in 2009 and left a sizable cache of artworks to be tended by his sister Charlene, dealt with matters cosmic (with the Radii series he described as “portable meditations”), futuristic and also innately, caringly earthly.

Tom Huston's Restivo exhibit is on view through June 12.

Before concern over climate change became as pressing an issue as it is today, Huston painted early cautionary tales in his Sea Level Rise series. An ambiguous cityscape, festooned with Japanese characters, is threatened by the rising sea, as is, in another canvas, Santa Barbara herself: Only tops of palm trees and oil platforms survive as visible icons in paradise are swept under. Aside from the visual intrigue of his visions in this sampler of a Santa Barbara art scene original, Huston was a fever dreamer and a concerned planetary citizen, with his head in the stars, the dirt, and the impending water. Fittingly, part of the exhibition’s proceeds will be donated to Heal the Ocean. —Josef Woodard

A ‘SACRED PINT’ FOR BLOOMSDAY James Joyce Pub Toasts Its Namesake Novelist

B www.sbfiesta.org www.goletahistory.org

Support the Zoo Donate today at sbzoo.org

We’ve got a lot of mouths to feed!

(805) 962-5339 • sbzoo.org Just off Cabrillo Blvd. at East Beach

loomsday will soon be upon us — the annual June 16th celebration where James Joyce’s Ulysses breaks out of the classroom and hits the bars. And where better to celebrate this hallowed literary tome than at one of State Street’s favorite watering holes, The James Joyce pub? This year marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of Joyce’s famously formerly banned book, a revered 1922 novel that follows the streamof-consciousness thoughts of the main character, Leopold Bloom, on June 16, 1904 (hence the name “Bloomsday”). Event organizers James Buckley Jr. and D.J. Palladino — both local authors and bona fide literary fanboys — have lots of fun on tap for all who want to imbibe in the free festivities. Coffee with a Black Guy founder and Santa Barbara mayoral candidate James Joyce III will be on hand to read select passages from Ulysses, along with Buckley and Palladino. Other readers include the Santa Barbara International Film Festival’s Roger Durling, former Santa Barbara Poet Laureate Perie Longo, novelist and SBCC professor Emerita Jinny Webber, historian and professor Jay Carlander, and actor Leslie Story. Bloomsday is sure to be a lively event, with musical interludes between readers by Folk Orchestra Santa Barbara, and a beautifully illustrated edition of Ulysses raffled off, with donations to the Santa Barbara Public Library Foundation encouraged. The bar is unhosted, but The James Joyce is offering happy hour pricing, and the Irish themed nibbles are free, as are the music and what’s sure to be some highly theatrical entertainment.

THE THE SANTA SANTA BARBARA BARBARA BLOOMSDAY BLOOMSDAY COMMITTEE COMMITTEE

Join us for an evening at the beautiful Rancho La Patera gardens to sample appetizers, wine and beer from local restaurants, wineries and breweries, as well as a performance by the 2022 Spirit of Fiesta and Junior Spirit, musical entertainment by Tony Ybarra and dancing under the stars with Area 51.

Event organizers D.J. Palladino and James Buckley Jr.

4-1-1

Thursday, June 16, 5-8 p.m., The James Joyce, 513 State St. sbjamesjoyce.com. “I think it’s really important to speak Ulysses out loud in America, because for the first 11 years after it was published, it was illegal to own a copy of Ulysses in the United States,” said Palladino, who owns The Mesa Bookstore with his wife, Diane Arnold. “Certainly Joyce fans and Ulysses fans will find something to enjoy and share on this important anniversary,” said Buckley. “But even if you’re not a Joyce fan, but have heard about this famous author, come and have a Guinness and learn more about him. And if you want to come help the Library Foundation, that’s a nice thing too.” —Leslie Dinaberg

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 42

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MUSIC ACADEMY’S SUMMER SEASON RETURNS PHIL CHANNING PHOTOS

75th Anniversary Brings a Stellar Schedule

T

he hills come alive with the sounds of music once again, as the Music Academy of the West (MAW) kicks off its 75th anniversary summer season, bringing the annual summer school and festival back to full strength for the first time since the start of the pandemic with eight weeks of exciting live events. Featured artists for the June 15-August 6 season include Augustin Hadelich, Susanna Phillips, Sō Percussion, and composers Tom Cipullo, Robyn Cee Kay Jacobs, Molly Joyce, and Jessie Montgomery, who will all be in residence, honoring a tradition that includes public performances and masterclasses, as well as private lessons for fellows. Special appearances include Distinguished Alumni Award winner Isabel Leonard, the red-hot Metropolitan Opera star who receives the Academy’s highest honor and headlines the anniversary signature benefit event on June 18. Grammy-winning mezzo-soprano Sasha Cooke makes a special appearance as well, for the world premiere of a new commission from Composer-in-Residence Tom Cipullo on June 28. Teddy Abrams, Musical America’s 2022 Conductor of the Year, leads this season’s five Academy Festival Orchestra concerts. Other highlights include three-time Diapason d’Or-winner Stéphane Denève; Hannu Lintu, making his festival debut; new Principal Opera Conductor Daniela Candillari, who takes the podium for a fully staged production of Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin July 15 and 17; Creative Producer of Special Projects James Darrah directs the world premiere presentation of Hahn Hall 1922-2022, an original new cabaret event on July 28; and returning favorite Larry Rachleff conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5, the annual Community Concert at the Santa Barbara Bowl on June 25. A special gift to the community in remembrance of Léni Fé Bland, all tickets are only $10, and kids are free with ticketed adults. Finally, 1996 Academy alumna Speranza Scappucci — who looks forward to making her Metropolitan Opera debut next season after making history as the first female Italian conductor at La Scala — leads the season-closing concert: a program of Rossini, Respighi, and more on August 6. For more information, visit musicacademy.org. —Leslie Dinaberg

Y BU

W! O N

CircusVargas.com FUNDRAISING DINNER

FOR TIBETAN TEMPLE, CLINIC and CHILDREN'S SCHOOL Please visit our event to raise funds for the Temple at Pema Kod. Variety of delicious Himalayan food, appetizers, desserts and drinks. There will be a talk and slideshow describing the Pema Kod Temple and Pema Kod Clinic and Pema Kod Children’s Clinic Celebratory group Tibetan Circle Dance and much more.

Saturday, June 11, 6-8pm

At the Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara 1535 Santa Barbara St Advance tickets are $35 per person / $45 at the door get advance tickets at www.odiyanacs.org or odiyananaac@gmail.com (805)776 8018 Fundraiser to help the completion of The Odiyana Temple, The Odiyana Clinic & The Odiyana Children’s School. INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 9, 2022

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The Arlington Theatre

­ ­

$2 10am: Tickets! Fiesta 5: Tuesday & Wednesday Camino Real: Thursday *Kids Series Only *

SUMMER KIDS MOVIES Happening Now! 6/10: JURASSIC WORLD DOMINION

6/14, 15, 16: METRO SUMMER KIDS MOVIES

6/3: BENEDICTION

6/16: LIGHTYEAR

Join us in reading June’s book of the month! JUNE’S THEME: LITERARY FICTION

BOOK O F T H E M O N T H :

Transcendent Kingdom Arlington • Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairveiw

Fiesta 5 • Camino

Hitchcock

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for June 10-16, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Bob’s Burgers (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 4:45, 7:20. Downton Abbey: A New Era (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:05. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 5:05. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): Fri-Wed: 7:55. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:45, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:05, 4:55, 7:45. Thur: 4:55, 7:45. Lightyear* (PG13): Thur: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00.

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 12:45, 1:45,2:45, 3:45, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, 7:45, 8:45, 9:45. Mon-Thur: 1:45, 2:45, 3:45, 5:45, 6:45, 7:45, 8:45. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri-Sun: 12:35, 3:35, 6:30, 9:20. Mon-Thur: 2:30, 5:20, 8:15.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Crimes of the Future (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:30, 8:05. Sat/Sun: 3:00, 5:30, 8:05. Thur: 8:05. 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE Bob’s Burgers (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 7:15, GOLETA 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45. 805-688-4140 Sonic the Hedgehog 2 (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: Crimes of the Future (R): Fri-Thur: 4:40, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:40, 7:30. 3:45. The Bad Guys (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:50, 7:15. Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Fri: 12:20, Sat/Sun: 2:20, 4:50, 7:15. 1:15, 2:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, Northman (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:00, 8:00. 9:15, 10:15. Sat/Sun: 10:20, 11:20, Sat/Sun: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. 12:20,1:15, 2:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, Lightyear* (PG13): Thur: 3:00, 4:15, 5:30, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15. Mon-Wed: 12:20, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15. 1:15, 2:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, Abominable (PG): Tue/Wed: 10:00. 9:15. Thur: 10:20, 11:20, 12:20, 1:15 2:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15. PA S E O N U E V O Jurassic World Dominion* (PG13): 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET Fri: 12:10,1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:45, 5:45, SANTA BARBARA 6:45, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00. Sat/Sun: 10:10, 805-965-7451 1:10, 12:10,1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:45, 5:45, Jurassic World Dominion* (PG13): 6:45, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00. Mon-Wed: 12:10,1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, Fri/Sat: 12:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30, 8:00, 9:00. Thur: 10:10, 1:10, 12:10, 1:30, 2:30, 3:30, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, 8:00, 8:15, 9:00, 9:45. Sun: 12:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30, 8:15, 9:00. Mon-Thur: 1:45, 9:00. Captain Underpants (PG): Thur: 10:00. 3:15, 5:00, 5:45, 6:30, 8:15, 9:00. Eiffel (R): Fri-Sun: 12:05. Mon-Thur: 3:00. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): HITCHCOCK Fri-Sun: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 1:30, 371 South Hitchcock Way 4:40, SANTA BARBARA 7:45. 805-682-6512

CAMINO REAL

Benediction (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. Downton Abbey A New Era: (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:15, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 1:20, 4:15, 7:05. 44

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ARLINGTON

1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Jurassic World Dominion* (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:00, 4:15, 7:30.

JUNE 9, 2022

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by Yaa Gyasi independent.com/indybookclub


POP, ROCK & JAZZ

REVIEWS 

SOHO ‘SANTA BARBARA ACOUSTIC’ SERIES SOARS

& ENTERTAINMENT

JOSEF WOODARD

U

nder normal conditions, the admirable series of top-drawer acoustic-guitar artists hosted by the “Santa Barbara Acoustic” series — currently monthly on Sundays at SOhO (1221 State St., sohosb .com) — consists of music with the a-word upfront, if not completely acoustic and “unplugged,” and often aided by transducers and evolving electronics geared toward making “acoustic” clarity all the more so. It’s a fairly conservative world, in the main. It was a different story or three the night Kaki King came to town last week. For one important distinction, King — who burst on the scene in the mid-00s and played SOhO around that time — has long been one of the rare and rightfully acclaimed women in the stubbornly male-dominated field of instrumental acoustic guitarists. She has carved out her own musical language, related to the world of post-folk and progressive instrumental guitar sounds we know and love, such as the late Michael Hedges’s highly percussive approach to the instrument and a wizardly way with open tunings and spidery fretboard adventuring. Veering refreshingly away from the “purity” of the acoustic guitar scene, she has incorporated such added technological elements as a running light show projected on the very face/screen of her mounted guitar, and spare use of sampling, from the conceptual art side of things. Among the visual stimuli projected onto her instrument were pure abstractions, nature imagery, and phrases airlifted from psychological inquiries. She is also openly gay and, as the years mount up

JUNE 10 - 16 “A ROLLICKING, HEARTFELT SHOUT-OUT” Los Angeles Times

Kaki King

for this feisty and funny 41-year-old, a free-spirited performer with few filters on what makes for good performer-audience conversation or would-be altstand-up comedy. For those focused more strictly on her musical vision, King — with 10 albums from the past 19 years to draw from — offered plenty of propulsive rippling rhythms, exotic ambiences, and open-tuned lyricism to savor and anticipate the next time around. King’s altogether fantastic SOhO journey was the penultimate show in the current acoustic spring season, which closes on June 12 with the prized — and prize-winning — Australian-bred guitarist Joe Robinson. Expect no visual projections on that occasion. —Josef Woodard

FRI: 5:00pm & 7:30pm SAT: 2:30pm & 5:00pm & 7:30pm SUN: 2:30pm & 5:00pm MON - THURS: 5:00pm & 7:30pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

DANCE

JORGE LOSADA

Siudy Garrido in Flamenco Intimo

added some Cuban spice to the mix, followed by alegrías featuring the entire company of dancers in shimmering black fringe, creating snappy shapes with chairs as props, which brought Bob Fosse’s All That Jazz to mind. The power, control, musicality and athleticism of these dancers was on full display throughout the night. Particularly with Garrido’s soleá, a powerful performance that brought the appreciative audience to its feet for a thundering standing ovation. Though Santa Barbara enthusiasts are quite familiar with flamenco thanks to the traditions of Old Spanish Days, the intensity, fervor, and nods to contemporary dance techniques — along with the sheer command of Garrido’s star power — made Flamenco Intimo an exciting and innovative show from start to finish. —Leslie Dinaberg

Get Vaccinated.

W

ith an astoundingly rapid click of her sparkling heels, Siudy Garrido and her troupe of artists transported the Lobero Theatre’s appreciative audience to an exotic world of Spanish artistry far away from home. Unlike Dorothy’s escalating journey to maturity in The Wizard of Oz, Garrido takes authoritative command from the moment she steps on the stage. The opening moments of the seguirilla make it crystal clear that this is a woman who knows her own power, and she uses it to make a dramatic solo entrance that showcases both her strength and emotion, then amps things up even higher as the company’s four musicians and six additional dancers slowly enter the production. Known for her collaborations with Gustavo Dudamel, Cirque du Soleil, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, as well as flamenco stars Farruquito and Antonio Canales, dancer, choreographer, and artistic director Siudy Garrido and her Siudy Garrido Flamenco Company definitely delivered on the promise of a modern take on flamenco dance that does justice to its traditional roots. Musical director, composer, and Spanish guitarist José Luis de la Paz — another extraordinarily charismatic presence — had a solo rondeña that garnered enthusiastic rounds of olé from the audience. And singers Rafael de Utrera and Manuel Gago, as well as Diego Álvarez on percussion, kept the music in fine form for the evening. Garrido’s saucy guajira

publichealthsbc.org/vaccine

SIUDY GARRIDO FLAMENCO BRINGS EXCITING DRAMA TO THE LOBERO

6/10 8:30 pm

FUNK IT UP WITH AREA 51 DANCE PARTY! 6/11 9:00 pm

BANDA NIGHT 6/12 1:00pm

SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY

FEAT. TONY YBARRA’S ELEMENTOS PROJECT STRAIGHT AHEAD JAZZ WITH LATIN INFLUENCE 7:30 pm

SB ACOUSTIC PRESENTS:

JOE ROBINSON ACOUSTIC GUITAR! 6/14 7:00 pm

SINGER SONGWRITER SHOWCASE

W/ JOEY LA MACCHIA, BEN CATCH, & SHARAD SHANKAR HIGHLIGHTING LOCAL SONGWRITING TALENT 6/15 7:30 pm

MADELEINE MAYI WITH CECILIA JAMES INDIE POP 6/16 8:30 pm

SHAKY FEELIN’ WITH SPOONFUL

HIGH ENERGY GROOVE-BASED JAMS 6/17 9:00 pm

SOUL MAJESTIC

EARTH CONSCIOUS REGGAE

FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 9, 2022

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9 CNPA AWARDS

Santa Barbara Independent Wins for 2021

Coverage and Design FIRST PLACE Delaney Smith’s

“The Struggle Against Learning Loss,” for Coverage of Youth and Education.

Tyler Hayden’s

column examining Bellosguardo — “Santa Barbara’s most nakedly corrupt institution” — for Editorial Comment.

Nick Welsh’s

Angry Poodle for Columns.

Ricky Barajas won second place &

DESIGN CATEGORIES

Caitlin Fitch

also received fifth place

Ben Ciccati

won second place for Illustration.

for Inside Page Layout & Design.

OTHER AWARDS

Charles Donelan

won third place for Arts & Entertainment Coverage for “‘Tenderly: The Rosemary Clooney Musical’ at ETC”

Tyler Hayden

won third place for Land-Use Reporting for coverage of UCSB’s Munger Dorm — which he dubbed “Dormzilla”

Daniel Dreifuss

won fifth place for Photo Story/Essay for “Inside the Organized Chaos of Santa Maria’s COVID ICU”

Read all of our award-winning coverage at independent.com/cnpaawards2021 Santa Barbara

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF JUNE 9

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): “It takes a spasm of love to write a poem,” wrote Aries author Erica Jong. I will add that it takes a spasm of love to fix a problem with someone you care about. It also takes a spasm of love to act with kindness when you don’t feel kind. A spasm of love is helpful when you need to act with integrity in a confusing situation and when you want to heal the past so it doesn’t plague the future. All the above advice should be useful for you in the coming weeks, Aries. Are there any other variations you can think of? Fill in the blank in the next sentence: It takes a spasm of love to _____________.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): “The great epochs of our life come when we gain the courage to rechristen our badness as what is best in us,” wrote philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. When I read that ambitious epigram, I didn’t know what he was referring to. By “badness,” did he mean the ugly, pathological parts of us? That couldn’t be right. So I read scholars who had studied the great philosopher. Their interpretation: Nietzsche believed the urges that some religions seek to inhibit are actually healthy for us. We should celebrate, not suppress, our inclinations to enjoy sensual delights and lusty living. In fact, we should define them as being the best in us. I encourage you Bulls to do just that in the coming weeks. It’s a favorable time to intensify your devotion to joy, pleasure, and revelry.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): It’s an excellent time to correct and uplift your self-image. I invite you to speak the following affirmations aloud: “I am not damaged. I am not on the wrong path. I am not inept or ignorant or off-kilter. The truth is, I am learning how to live. I am learning how to be a soulful human and I am doing a reasonably good job at that task. I do a lot of things really well. I’m getting to know myself better every day. I constantly surprise myself with how skilled I am at adjusting to life’s constant changes. I AM AMAZED AT HOW MUCH PROGRESS I HAVE MADE IN LEARNING HOW TO LIVE.”

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): In the Tibetan language, the term nyingdula means “most honored poison of my heart.” Many of us know at least one person who fits that description: an enemy we love to hate or a loved one who keeps tweaking our destiny or a paradoxical ally who is both hurtful and helpful. According to my analysis, it’s time for you to transform your relationship with a certain nyingdu-la in your life. The bond between you might have generated vital lessons for you. But now it’s time for a reevaluation and redefinition.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): “Don’t pray for the rain to stop,” advises Leo poet Wendell Berry. “Pray for good luck fishing when the river floods.” That’s useful advice for you, my dear. The situation you’re in could turn out to be a case of either weird luck or good luck. And how you interpret the situation may have a big impact on which kind of luck it brings. I urge you to define the potential opportunities that are brewing and concentrate on feeding them.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo writer Julio Cortázar (1914–1984) once remarked, “How tiring it gets being the same person all the time.” That’s surprising. In fact, Cortázar was an innovative and influential author who wrote more than 30 books in four genres and lived for extended periods in five countries. It’s hard to imagine him ever being bored by his multifaceted self. Even if you’re not a superstar like Cortázar, Virgo, I expect you will be highly entertained and amused by your life in the coming weeks. I bet you will be even more interesting than usual. Best of all, you will learn many fresh secrets about your mysterious soul.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The blogger Frogbestfriend says, “One of the biggest problems with society nowadays is that I am so, so sleepy.” Frogbestfriend is humorously suggesting

that his inability to maintain good sleep habits is rooted in civilization’s dysfunctions. He’s right, of course! Many of our seemingly personal problems are at least partially rooted in the pathological ways the whole world operates. Our culture influences us to do things that aren’t always healthy and wise. I bring this to your attention, Libra, because now is a favorable time to meditate on society’s crazy-making effects on you. Now is also a pivotal moment to heal yourself of those crazy-making effects.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Poet Maggie Smith writes, “We talk so much of light. Please let me speak on behalf of the good dark. Let us talk more of how dark the beginning of a day is.” I offer her proposal as a fertile theme for your meditations. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Scorpios are most skilled at teasing out the good stuff from shadows and secrets and twilight. And your potency in these matters is even higher than usual right now. Do us all a favor and find the hidden redemptions and potential regenerations.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When actors and other creative people in film win Oscars at the Academy Awards ceremony, they come on stage and deliver short talks, acknowledging their honor. These speeches often include expressions of gratitude. An analysis revealed that over the years, Sagittarian director Steven Spielberg has been thanked by winners more often than anyone else—even more than God. Based on my reading of astrological omens, I believe you deserve that level of appreciation in the coming weeks. Please show this horoscope to everyone you know who may be willing to carry out my mandate. Be proactive in collecting tribute, credit, and favors.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the ancient Greek story of Odysseus, the hero leaves his home in Ithaka to fight in the Trojan War. When the conflict is over, he yearns to return to the beloved life he left behind. But his journey takes 10 years. His tests and travails are many. The 20th-century Greek poet C. P. Cavafy offered advice to Odysseus at the beginning of his quest: “As you set out for Ithaka, hope your road is a long one, full of adventure, full of discovery . . . Keep Ithaca always in your mind. Arriving there is what you’re destined for. But don’t hurry the journey. Better if it lasts for years, so you’re old by the time you reach the island, wealthy with all you’ve gained on the way.” As you begin your new phase of returning home, Capricorn, I invite you to keep Cavafy’s thoughts in mind. (Read the poem: tinyurl.com/HomeToIthaka. Translated by Edmund Keeley.)

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “I have never, ever, EVER met anyone who has regretted following their heart,” writes life coach Marie Forleo. But what exactly does she mean by “following their heart”? Does that mean ignoring cautions offered by your mind? Not necessarily. Does it require you to ignore everyone’s opinions about what you should do? Possibly. When you follow your heart, must you sacrifice money and status and security? In some cases, yes. But in other cases, following your heart may ultimately enhance your relationship with money and status and security. Anyway, Aquarius. I hope I’ve inspired you to meditate on what it means to follow your heart—and how you can do that intensely during the coming months.

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PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Actor and author Jenny Slate testifies, “As the image of myself becomes sharper in my brain and more precious, I feel less afraid that someone else will erase me by denying me love.” That is the single best inspirational message I can offer you right now. In the coming months, you will earn the right and the capacity to make the same declaration. Your self-definition will become progressively clearer and stronger. And this waxing superpower will enable you to conquer at least some of your fear about not getting enough love.

Homework: What part of your life would most benefit from redemption and regeneration? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

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EDUCATION COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1‑855‑554‑4616 (AAN CAN) E D U C AT I O N OUTREACH Coordinator Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Responsibilities include overseeing the development of the new SciTrek/Biotech Program modules in collaboration with SciTrek research students, faculty, teachers and graduate students. This will involve assisting in training new UCSB volunteers by leading module orientations, working with teachers to maintain the program and assistance in running the SciTrek Summer Program for teachers. Department: https:// scitrek.chem.ucsb.edu. Req: BA in Chemistry, Biochemistry or a related field at time of application. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through teaching and service. The posting will remain open until filled. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/16/22. Apply online at https://apptrkr. com/3108891.

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Conducts all daily campus capital asset operations, interpreting and implementing governmental and university policies as they apply to capital asset management. Maintains the Asset Management module of the PeopleSoft financial system, assigning asset numbers and processing all acquisitions, transfers, loans, disposals and other inventory modifications.Conducts the capital assets reconciliation process and the physical inventory and statistical sampling programs. Reviews all Extramural Award synopses to ensure compliance with all contracting agency requirements, analyzes and prepares all related reports and correspondence. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience. Thorough knowledge in administrative procedures and processes including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. Requires good verbal and written communication skills, active listening, critical thinking, multi‑task and time management skills. Requires interpersonal and work leadership skills to provide guidance to other non exempt personnel. 1‑3 years ofexperience in an administrative, clerical, or operations role. 1‑3 years Computer skills and experience of Microsoft suite products. 1‑3 years data collection, analysis and reporting experience using spreadsheets and charts. 1‑3 years experience following procedures and processing of departmental financial transactions. 1‑3 years experience in a customer service environment with an emphasis on researching and resolving customer problems. Note: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. $24.61‑$25.16/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/17/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36721

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financial systems and procedures; monitors budgets; prepares cost analyses and projects expenses; reviews and reports on monthly expenses and analyzes spending patterns. Oversees and processes payroll and personnel actions for career staff, limited staff, graduate and undergraduate students. Provides direction and support to staff regarding accounting procedures and policy in areas of purchasing, payroll, personnel, gift administration, accounts payable, and other areas as needed.. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Working knowledge of financial processes, policies and procedures. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.62 ‑ $31.30/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/20/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36389

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Assistant Director of Business Services is responsible for providing leadership and management of all administration, customer service, and business functions across the Residential Operations department. As a senior member of the Residential Operations Management Team, the Assistant Director of Business Services provides the leadership and direction for Physical Resource Procurement, Storekeeping and Inventory Control, Human Resources, Payroll, Travel and Training. The Assistant Director also manages a financial office that partners closely with HDAE Business & Financial Planning. Reqs: Requires extensive knowledge of accounting theory and fund accounting, UC personnel and payroll policies & procedures, auditing and internal control practices. Solid understanding of financial and resource planning concepts as well as how to control organizational budgeting. Proven ability to facilitate decision‑making and problem‑solving. Ability to use discretion and maintain confidentiality. Proven ability to deal with changing priorities and direct the work of others accordingly. Effective verbal, written and interpersonal communication skills. Ability to work effectively across all levels of the organization. Solid understanding of financial and resource planning concepts as well as how to control organizational budgeting. Ability to work under deadline pressure, handling multiple projects concurrently, while dealing with sensitive and confidential issues. Thorough knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Ability to utilize conflict resolution skills to effectively lead and motivate others. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory criminal history background check.

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$84,000‑$92,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36127

CARPENTER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the supervision of a supervisor or lead personnel, performs skilled cabinetry making for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining commons and related buildings as outlined below to accomplish the operational needs of the department. Duties: light framing to finish carpentry for the repair and maintenance of University owned properties, including structural repair, back priming, installation and repair of doors and trim, weatherproofing and sealing of exterior openings. Installation and repair of drywall and stucco. Repair to cabinetry. Preparation and installation of various types of counter tops. Formica repair and installation. Reqs: 5+ years demonstrated work experience in the carpentry trade, showing multiple skills within the trade. Ability to safely erect, work on and operate scaffolding, high ladders and various lifts. Demonstrated ability to work in a diverse work environment. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Knowledge and ability to correctly and safely perform work in other trade disciplines such as plumbing, locksmithing, and light electrical. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $39.34/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu. Job #35663

COMMUNITY HAZARDOUS WASTE SR. TECHNICIAN

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Conducts operational aspects of the Santa Barbara County Hazardous Waste Management Program including all physical handling of hazardous waste generated by the Santa Barbara community in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations as well as the University policies and procedures. Follows the procedures and responsibilities included in the Santa Barbara County Household

and Small Business Hazardous Waste Collection Program Operations Manual. Assures continuous flow of materials through the facility to appropriate disposal options. Collects, segregates, packages, manifests and prepares shipments of hazardous waste. Works with waste haulers and coordinate shipments. Organizes and prepares the facility for public use each week. Coordinates community collection program operations with UCSB program staff. Maintains equipment and supplies. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED Required. Knowledge of applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations pertaining to hazardous waste. Minimum of one years of relevant work experience in the operational aspects of the hazardous waste, recycling, solid waste or related field experience. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’ss license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to obtain HAZWOPER Certificate within 6 months of employment. Willing to work four‑ten hour shifts and weekends. Pass a physical exam. Medically qualified to wear self‑contained breathing apparatus and able to move heavy object. Valid Class "C" California Drivers license and be eligible for a Commercial Drivers License with Hazardous Materials endorsement. Willing to work/respond to emergencies. $27.13 ‑ $29.08/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online

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DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION PROJECT MANAGER

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SERVICES Is responsible for all aspects of the administration and oversight of Capital Improvement Projects, and of deferred maintenance and major infrastructure upgrade projects. The Project Manager has the authority to independently interpret contracts, negotiate changes in the Work, hire and manage professional consultants, oversee development of plans and specifications, create budgets and manage expenses, direct the work of project support staff, serve as liaison with all campus departments, and obtain project approvals and permits. The Project Manager is responsible for all aspects of the programming, design, bid and construction process and must possess advanced project management skills to effectively manage complex projects with critical timelines. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree In Architecture, Engineering, Construction Management or related field. 5+ years of progressively responsible experience in the area of project management of capital improvement projects. Demonstrated experience with managing new construction and renovation of office, classroom, laboratory, infrastructure, housing and/or athletic facilities preferably within a University environment or other Public Works domain. Demonstrated ability to manage, project scope, schedule and budget, professional services and construction agreements,

development of and compliance with plans and specifications, and contractor coordination. Knowledge of business and fiscal analysis, processes, and techniques related to project management and the ability to analyze data and make accurate cost projections. Working knowledge of or ability to quickly learn and apply University policies and procedures. Excellent communication skills with an ability to effectively communicate information in a clear and understandable manner, both verbally and in writing, and ability to apply a high level of judgment and discretion. Demonstrated ability to use a variety of computer applications including project management and scheduling software. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Hours and days may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/16/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36890

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Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Thu 9

12:45 am 1.8

Fri 10

1:32 am 1.0

Sat 11

2:16 am 0.2

Sun 12 Mon 13

Sunrise 5:45 Sunset 8:12

Low

High

6:07 am 3.6

12:02 pm 1.1

6:49 pm 5.2

7:20 am 3.6

12:41 pm 1.4

7:18 pm 5.7

8:26 am 3.6

1:20 pm 1.7

7:51 pm 6.2

3:01 am -0.6

9:28 am 3.6

2:00 pm 2.0

8:29 pm 6.6

3:47 am -1.1

10:26 am 3.7

2:42 pm 2.2

9:11 pm 6.9

Tue 14

4:35 am -1.5

11:22 am 3.7

3:26 pm 2.4

9:56 pm 7.0

Wed 15

5:25 am -1.6

12:19 pm 3.7

4:15 pm 2.6

10:44 pm 6.9

Thu 16

6:16 am -1.5

1:15 pm 3.7

5:09 pm 2.7

11:36 pm 6.6

14 D

20

28 D

6H source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

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“Room Dividers” -- some partitioned phrases.

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Across

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33. Singer Coppola 34. “Cars” and “Are ‘Friends’ Electric?” singer Gary 35. Duane Allman’s brother 40. Second-oldest of the Jackson 5 42. Use a pulley 45. Bamboo-munching beast 47. Type of test no longer done on “Maury” (once the series ends in 2022) 50. ___-well 51. Z-lister 54. Grilling events, briefly 55. Gomez Addams portrayer Julia 56. Operatic highlight 58. Blue Ivy Carter’s dad 59. “Uh, I’m right here ...” 60. Designer Wang 62. Brockovich who inspired a movie 63. ___ point (never) 64. Leave out of the freezer 66. Texting shorthand that some end with “dubs” 67. Haunted house decoration ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1087

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EMPLOYMENT DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND OPERATIONS

ARTS & LECTURES The Director of Finance and Operations has full functional responsibility for all financial, personnel and administrative operations of the Arts & Lectures unit. Serves as an advisor to the Executive Director and Associate Director on high‑level matters of critical importance, creating and implementing short and long‑range strategic financial, personnel, and operation plans and goals. Directs contractors, vendors and departmental staff at select A&L events. Serves as a senior point of contact in the absence of the Executive and Associate Director. Responsibilities include management of all Arts & Lectures finances, including complex income accounts exceeding $10 million annually, as well as management at the department level of the Arts & Lectures $30 million endowment campaign funds. Additionally, the A&L unit is granted procurement authority to execute contracts for professional services in excess of $3 million annually; the Director of Finance and Operations establishes structures, policy and procedures to ensure success in delegation and auditability of all department transactions. Handles high level contractual negotiation with agents/ artists/managers. Responsible for complex financial reporting, including economic forecasting and modeling, projections on investment income, and advising the Executive Director on financial strategies and risks. Prepares reports and presents on financial performance and projections to the Arts & Lectures Finance Council. Responsible for directing daily administrative operations including managing personnel, space and facilities. Independently identifies issues, initiates research, interprets information, and acts on issues regarding personnel, space and facilities management, grants management, accounting, travel, payroll, procurement, contracting, and business services. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability to work occasional evening and weekend hours. $90,000‑130,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34141

EQUIPMENT AND SURPLUS ADMINISTRATOR

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Responsible for the identification, classification, tracking, reporting, capitalization, and disposition of all UCSB capitalized equipment consisting of over 11,000+ assets and book value exceeding $300M. The Equipment & Surplus Administrator is responsible for maintaining UCSB’s property management system in compliance with US FAR 52.245‑1, BUS 29, and BUS 38 and is responsible for developing policies and procedures concerning UCSB assets. The Equipment & Surplus Administrator supervises a dedicated Equipment Administrative Specialist and coordinates the transfer and sales of campus assets between UCSB

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Equipment Custodians and the UCSB Surplus Sales. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Experience in a professional atmosphere, in a finance/business capacity with knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Experience in financial products, asset management, and corporate finance with broad knowledge of financial transactions and financial systems, as well as related policy, accounting, and regulatory compliance requirements. Strong interpersonal skills and ability to work effectively across the organization at all levels. Experience in a role preparing financial graphs, charts, reports, with strong skills in use of spreadsheet and database software. Skills include sophisticated service orientation, ability to multi‑task effectively in a varied, high volume environment, sound judgment and decision‑making, reasoning, ability to develop original ideas to solve problems, and effective verbal and written communication skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $70,815 ‑ $77,225/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/17/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35091

FINANCIAL OPERATIONS ANALYST

STUDENT HEALTH Incumbent performs responsible and complex professional financial analysis and processing for Student Health. Extracts, researches and analyzes financial data and reports to the Financial Operations Manager as appropriate. Provide policy information to staff and handle multiple complex and confidential projects that require strong analytical and organizational skills. Serves as a primary preparer for financial and salary adjustments requiring accurate interpretation of policies and procedures Independently develops appropriate business procedures and best practices with financial, procurement, billing, and payroll processes ensuring that the department is in compliance with University Business & Financial policies. Manages the billing component of Student Health Service’s (SHS) Electronic Medical Record system. Acts as liaison with various on‑campus and off‑campus entities concerning billing issues. Oversees the flow of data between the SHS Billing system and other various systems. Audits and oversees payment processing and general ledger reconciliation. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training.Strong analytical skills, critical thinking, organizational skills, and attention to detail. Working knowledge of financial processes, policies and procedures. Proficiency in the use of spreadsheet and database software. 1‑3 years experience in finance or related field. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $24.62/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and

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JUNE 9, 2022

all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36062

GRADUATE ADVISOR

COMPUTER SCIENCE Participates in all aspects of student life in Computer Science Coordinates and manages the graduate admissions program, advises approximately 190 graduate students and 400 undergraduate students on a wide variety of issues, including requirements for graduate admissions, program requirements and options, grades, courses, financial aid, petitions, leaves, exam schedules, housing, cost of living, community issues, employment, and other personal and academic issues related to their welfare. Position requires extensive knowledge of University and Graduate Division policies and procedures regarding graduate and undergraduate student affairs, and requires the ability to interpret regulations from various administrative offices to students and faculty. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$27.21/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34129

Application review begins 6/9/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 36331.

PROGRAM ASSISTANT PATIENT SERVICES ASSOCIATE FOR PHYSICAL THERAPY

STUDENT HEALTH Provides front office support for the patients, therapists and staff in the Physical Therapy Department, and provides coverage for the Student Health appointment desk, if needed. Using a computerized scheduling system, schedules medical appointments both by telephone and in person. Accurately determines patient's medical needs with regards to urgency and appropriateness of patient’s appointment request. Requires coverage for back office duties during PT aide breaks, vacations or absences. Will need to assist appointment desk in scheduling appointments. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent. Experience working in customer service. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. This is a 100% 11‑month position.Four weeks of furlough are taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Starting at $21.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/10/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36471

PROGRAM ASSISTANT GRADUATE PROGRAM ASSISTANT

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Assists in managing all graduate programs and services in the Departments of French & Italian; Germanic & Slavic Studies; Spanish & Portuguese; and the Programs of Comparative Literature and Latin American & Iberian Studies. Works closely with Faculty Graduate Advisors in advising students and faculty on most aspects of graduate matters. Assists in advising prospective applicants on degree programs and in coordinating the admissions process. Acts as departmental liaison with all relevant campus agencies. Assists in coordinating graduate students’ block grants, fellowships and teaching assistantships. Prepares payroll for graduatestudent services and processes accounting and reimbursement transactions as needed. Assists in designing and maintaining departmental databases as needed. Assists in coordinating, designing, composing and editing departmental publications and announcements. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent. 1‑3 years of administrative work experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Responsible for the administrative functions for the Mellichamp Sustainability Cluster. The Cluster consists of four faculty members from various UCSB departments. The ProgramAssistant assists these faculty with various tasks as needed. This position is responsible for coordinating and managing various workshops, seminars, summits and conferences. Is responsible for managing the cluster’s operating budget, assistance in contract & grantsubmissions and content management of the cluster website. Reqs: Thorough knowledge in administrative procedures and processes including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. Good verbal and written communication skills, active listening, critical thinking, multi‑tasking and time management skills. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check $24.61 – $25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35946

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER The Humanities Administrative Support Center (HASC) provides administrative support for over 110 faculty, 784 majors and minors, and 225 graduate students. The Program Assistant provides the full range of administrative functions and services for the Departments of History, Classics, Religious Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, and several research centers and initiatives. Provides high level support to the areas of operations, student services, finance, and academic personnel. Develops and implements procedures and manages day‑to‑day and long‑term general office operations by anticipating, evaluating and resolving potential conflict or problems independently. Manages DSP exams and course evaluations for HASC’s student services area, purchasing for four academic departments and HASC, and oversees daily facility needs. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience in a higher education setting. Prior experience working in a front office. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36251.

SR. BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the general supervision of the Residence Hall Manager; the Sr. BMW performs senior building maintenance tasks on a regular and continuing basis and performs custodial work for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Commons. May perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. May work shifts other than Monday through Friday in order for the department to cover operational needs. Reqs: Training in the basics of plumbing repairs, patch and painting, simple beginning carpentry repairs, and simple (non‑licensed) electrical repairs. Experience making apprentice level repairs in plumbing, patch and paint, carpentry, and electrical. Basic knowledge of the safe use of maintenance equipment such as drills, saws, cordless screwdrivers, and some drain snakes. Experience as an exceptional customer service representative with the ability to communicate effectively and professionally with diverse student and family clientele. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $22.07 ‑ $26.89/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #35853

TEMPORARY PAINTER

MAINTENANCE Under the supervision of a supervisor or lead personnel, the incumbent is responsible for performing skilled painting tasks for University owned Residential Halls/Housing and its related buildings at on and off campus locations as outlined below, and may be assigned other duties (including those in other craft areas). Reqs: 4+ years demonstrated work in the painter trade, showing multiple skills within the paint trade. Similar type apartment paintwork experience as well as paint applications to wood and stucco buildings. Knowledge and ability to perform interior and exterior wall repairs to various wall types such as drywall, wire lath, and plaster and stucco. Ability to safely erect, work on, and or operate scaffolding, high ladders, various lifts, power washers, airless and HVLP spray systems, and air compressors. Ability to meet critical timelines and work independently or in teams. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Must maintain a valid CA driver's license. Must be able to lift a minimum of 50 pounds and work while on a ladder. Must use a respirator upon hire. Multiple positions available. This is a limited appointment from June 2022 ‑ September 2022. $37.65/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36373

TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES PROGRAM (TAP) SUPERVISOR

TRANSPORTATION & PARKING SERVICES Develops, directs, administers, evaluates and continuously improves the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP). Provides leadership and direct analytical and administrative support to Campus wide initiatives to reduce parking demand at UCSB. Creates educational and training programs to enhance customer awareness of current, new, and emerging Transportation Alternatives Program to all Campus constituents. Develops budgets, meets financial objectives and oversees all aspects of the Transportation Alternatives Program. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and three years’ experience in a sustainable transportation position, or relevant experience. Proficiency in MS Office and Google G Suite applications. Skill in public speaking and comfort in representing the university and the department to the community and general public. Ability to resolve customer service issues quickly and tactfully and proven skill in listening, anticipating, and responding to the needs of customers to achieve excellent customer services measured by outcomes. Excellent interpersonal skills, including skills to clearly communicate information to a broad variety of people in written form, in person, and on the telephone. Skill in working independently and effectively, following through on assignments with minimal direction and a fluctuating workload. Demonstrated ability to extract data, organize, and manipulate data

from multiple sources, and to use appropriate analytical procedures to identify problems and trends, recommend action to be taken, and implement necessary solutions, policies and procedures. Knowledge of and experience in delivery of transportation demand management services and general operations of a successful program. Note: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $5,416 ‑ $6,694/ mo. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/16/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36888

UCEN EVENTS MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT

UNIVERSITY CENTER Assists the Meetings and Events Manager with checking event confirmations, placing work orders, checking event set‑ups, scheduling students, recruiting, hiring and training student employees. Assists in updating event confirmation prices after events have taken place and emails invoices to clients. Reqs: May require moving furniture over 50lbs. Must be Organized, able to adapt to difficult situations and detail‑oriented. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record. This is a limited position working less than 1000 hours. $19.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/13/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #36619

UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR

FILM AND MEDIA STUDIES The Undergraduate Advisor serves over 500 undergraduate majors and pre‑majors. Provides advice to students on all aspects of their academic experience, including all departmental major requirements, college requirements, and solutions to progression and registration issues. Coordinates departmental internship program, annual student awards/scholarships, and leads new student orientation sessions. Mentors department related student clubs. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree In related area and/or equivalent experience /training. 1‑3 years experience in a customer service role within student affairs or closely related role within an academic or learning environment. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.82 ‑ $29.98/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/15/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36581.


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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: THOMAS R. ALLYN Case No.: 22PR00124 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: THOMAS R. ALLYN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Allen Thomashefsky, Trustee of the David W Doner Trust in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: DENISE H. ALLYN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decendent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/23/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 05/16/2022 By: Rosa Reyes, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Allen & Kimbell, LLP attn: James M. Sweeney, Esq. 317 East Carrillo Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑8611 Published May 26, June 02, 9, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: FREDA LESLIE NAKON CASE NO.: 22PR00243 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: FREDA LESLIE NAKON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: DAVID ROSSMAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. The Petition for Probate requests that: DAVID ROSSMAN be appointed as personal representative

to administer the estate of the decendent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/30/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 05/11/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Marilyn D. Anticouni, Attorney at Law, 1234 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑882‑9255 Published June 02, 9, 16 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PETER G. SIMETH CASE NO.: 22PR00274 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: PETER G. SIMETH, A.K.A PETER GEORG SIMETH A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SERENA L. SINGER AND JEFFREY D. WILSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: SERENA L. SINGER AND JEFFREY D. WILSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court

should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 07/21/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 Santa Barbara‑ Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 06/3/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Ian M. Fisher, Price, Postel & Parma, LLP 200 East Carrillo Street, Ste. 400, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 962‑0011. Published June 9, 16, 23, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MIN LI CASE NO. 22PR00258 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the WILL or estate, or both of MIN LI. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by GEORGE AMBROSE in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA BARBARA. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that GEORGE AMBROSE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 07/14/22 at 9:00AM in Dept. 5 located at 1100 ANACAPA STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93121‑1107 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice

under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner DARIN M. KARPEL, ESQ. ‑ SBN 186395 KARPEL LAW FIRM 4500 PARK GRANADA, STE. 202 CALABASAS CA 91302‑1613 BSC 221738 6/2, 6/9, 6/16/22 CNS‑3590509# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY SOLAR at 571 Hill Street Los Alamos, CA 93440. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 12/14/2020 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2020‑0002977. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Fresource Energies Inc (Same address) The business was conducted as a Corporation signed by GARY GORDON, PRESIDENT. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 5/25/2022. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001377. Published: June 2, 9, 16, 23 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ABSTRAX TITLE SERVICES at 315A Meigs Road #178, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Patricia L O’Connell (same address); Ralph P. Folson 12348 A Cactus Drive Desert Hot Springs, CA 92240. This business is conducted by copartners. Signed by: PATRICIA L. O’CONNELL, MANAGING PARTNER Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E40 FBN Number: 2022‑0001213. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GAMISODES at 40 Oceano Avenue, #10, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Kids Media, Inc (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by: DAVIS BRIMIR, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 09, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001218. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 09 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAMMERHEAD CONSTRUCTION, 6070 Ashley Place, Goleta, CA 93117; Brandon Montano Construction Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation, signed by BRANDON MONTANO, CEO with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County

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Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001119. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RBX LAW at 924 Anacapa Street, Suite 1‑T, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Russell A. Brown, 226 N. Juanita Avenue Unit B, Redondo Beach, CA 90277. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by RUSSELL BROWN, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001309. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ERA PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES at 4880 Market Street, Ventura, CA 93003 ; ERA Psychological Services, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by DOUGLAS MOES, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001234. Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THEPARTNERS WEALTH MANAGEMENT at 1129 State Street, Suite 29, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Partners Wealth Management, LLC , (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by: ALEXANDER POPOVICH, CEO/MANAGING MEMBER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001220. Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BUOY WATER CLUB at 500 Maple Avenue, Lot 4, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Air Brothers LLC, 380 Miramonte Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by: SCOUT VERNON, CO FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001150. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARTESANIAS 805 at 302 W Micheltorena St, 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wendy K. Barboza Martinez (same address); This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by: WENDY KARINA BARBOZA MARTINEZ, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47 FBN Number: 2022‑0001243. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SPONSORPITCH at 3463 State Street, Suite 525, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Riviera Group SB, LLC, same address. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by STEPHEN C. TICHES, CO‑OWNER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it

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was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001350. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LILY HAYS WINES at 207 Cordova Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; King Brodie Enterprises, 2007 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by: LILY HAYS, MANAGER Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001164. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YONG CHIROPRACTIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC, 351 Hitchcock Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Bruce A.Yong, 2961 Foothill Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed by BRUCE A. YONG, DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, E40, FBN Number: 2022‑0001223. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DRONE OPTICS at 500 Zink Avenue, Santa Barbara CA 93111, Clay Bougher (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by CLAY BOUGHER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001306. Published: June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person GOLETA DUCT CLEANING at 7640 Cathedral Oaks Road, apt 7, Goleta, CA 93117, JOHN T PULA, same address. This business is conducted

by an individual. Signed by JOHN T PULA. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001399. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOTHER MADRE BEES at 7127 Hollister Avenue, Ste 25A‑259, Goleta, CA 93117, Finnigan’s Wild LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by FINNIGAN JONES, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001281. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BROKKR MEDICAL at 233 W Arrellaga, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, CRISTIAN WILLIAM GOEBNER, (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed by CRISTIAN GOEBNER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 25, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001379. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PATHWAY DENTAL GROUP SANTA MARIA at 426 Barcellus Ave, #201, Santa Maria, CA 93454; Pathway Dental Group Santa Maria (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by STEN ERICSON, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001390. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following

person(s) is/are doing business as: SHAKA BITES at 435 De La Vina Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Shaka Bites LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by VIR SINGH, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47, FBN Number: 2022‑0001387. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 5 STAR AUTO REPAIR at 5737 Thornwood Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; SCOTT ANDERSSON at 945 Ward Drive #29, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by SCOTT ANDERSSON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 16, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001294. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COASTAL CLEANUP at 10 E. Yanonali Street, #43, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; COASTAL CLEANUP SPC, 2909 Dinwiddie Way, Elk Grove, CA 95758. This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by KYLIE GANNON, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 25, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001374. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LE SOL DESIGN STUDIO, 414 OLIVE STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA, 93101, CHANTAL H VO, 1252 LAS CANOAS LANE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY CHANTAL VO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on June 3, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom) June 21, 2022 at 5:30 PM ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing to consider adoption of resolutions modifying the City of Goleta Operating and Capital Improvement Programs Budget for Fiscal Year 2022/23. The agenda for the hearing will be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta. org). HEARING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, June 21, 2022, at 5:30 PM

LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, June 16, 2022, on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 961-7505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Dates: June 9, 2022 Publish Dates: June 16, 2022 52

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Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001459. Published June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BROD & KAGE BY DANISH MILL BAKERY at 1578 Mission Drive, Solvang, CA 93463, DANISH MILL BAKERY INC, 1682 COPENHAGEN DRIVE Solvang, CA 93463. This business is conducted by A Corporation. SIGNED BY RENE GROSS KAERSKOV. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 25, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001382. Published: June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: WE ARE AIRSTREAM SANTA BARBARA at 404 E Hwy 246, Buellton, CA 93427, AIRSTREAM OF SANTA BARBARA, CA (same address) This business is conducted by A Corporation. SIGNED BY AARON KORGES, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001416. Published: June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRANADA THEATRE, 1214 STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101; SANTA BARBARA CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, INC. (same address). This business is conducted by A Corporation. SIGNED BY CAREN RAGER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR & PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001405. Published: June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY SOLAR, 571 HILL STREET, LOS ALAMOS, CA 93440, GARY GORDON (SAME ADDRESS). This business is conducted by an Individual. SIGNED BY GARY GORDON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001413. Published June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: AZUUL BOUTIQUE 53 Nectarine Ave, Goleta, CA 93117, Honoria Charco (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed by HONORIA CHARCO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001393. Published June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: EL CONGRESO at El Centro 406 UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, Erik Magana (same address) Jazmin R. Ramirez (same address). This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Assoc. Other Than a Partnership. SIGNED BY: ERIK MAGANA, CO‑CHAIR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001300. Published:

May 26, June 2, 9 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CLEAR CABINETRY at 525 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, ABC CASEWORK LLC 6255 Inez Street, Unit 1, Ventura, CA 93003. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by BAILEY HOCHHALTER, MANAGING MEMBER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001248. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LUZ ANGELICA LESLIE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01577 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Luz Angelica Leslie TO: Luz Angelica Coronado THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 06, 2022 Thomas P. Aderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SHEVA UNTERMAN, TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01546 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SHEVA UNTERMAN TO: CAPPY UNTERMAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 24, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 4, 2022, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TRAM DINH BICH PHAM TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01609 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Tram Dinh Bich Pham TO: Elva Tram Pham THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 27, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 04, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, County of Santa Barbara, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF NAOLU LY TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01000 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Naolu Ly TO: Jubei Naolu Ly THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 19, 2022. Thomas P. Aderle, Judge of the Superior Court, County of Santa Barbara, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF NR LH NICOLE MARIE NOEL RENETZKY TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 21CV03524 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: NICOLE MARIE NOEL RENETZKY TO: NICOLE MARIE WEBER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting

to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. P.O. Box 21107, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 20, 2022, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Chavez, Terri, Deputy Clerk, Superior Court, Published June 2, 9 16, 23, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF I‑TE Hsieh TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01867 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: I‑TE HSIEH TO: PETER I‑TE HSIEH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing July 15, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 26, 2022, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Baksh, Narzralli, Deputy Clerk, Superior Court, Published June 2, 9 16, 23, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JENNEFER ALCOVA UHRMACHER, TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01866 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: JENNEFER ALCOVA UHRMACHER TO: JENNEFER ALCOVA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing July 20, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 25, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the


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Superior Court, Published June 9, 16, 23. 30, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: GUADALUPE GARNICA, CASE NUMBER: 22CV01701 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: GUADALUPE GARNICA TO: MA.GUADALUPE GARNICA GUTIERREZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing July 11, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on

the petition. Dated May 26, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, Published June 9 16, 23, 30 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RAMIRO PALLEJA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01691 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RAMIRO PALLEJA TO: RAYMOND L. PALLEJA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JULY 25, 2022 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation,

printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 24, 2022 by, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published June 9, 16, 23, 30, 2022.

PUBLIC NOTICES WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD; SPECIAL NOTICE OF LAWSUIT (Pursuant to Labor Code section 3716 and Code of Civil Procedure section 412.20 and 412.30) WCAB No. ADJ11488066 To: DEFENDANT, ILLEGALLY UNINSURED EMPLOYER: AVISO: Usted esta siendo demandado. La corte puede expedir una decision en contra suya sin darle la oportunidad de defenderse a menos que usted acute pronto. Lea la siguiente informacion. APPLICANT, JUAN BARRETO DEFENDANT(S), DAVID JESUS ROSALES: dba CONCRETE & PAVERS SPECIALIST NOTICES 1) A lawsuit, the Application for Adjudication of Claim, has been filed with the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board against you as the named defendant by the above‑named applicant(s). You may seek the advice of an attorney in any matter connected with this lawsuit and such attorney should be consulted promptly so that your response may be filed and entered in a timely fashion. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney reference service or a legal aid office. You may

also request assistance/information from an Information and Assistance Officer of the Division of Workers’ Compensation. (See telephone directory.) 2) An Answer to the Application must be filed and served within six days of the service of the Application pursuant to Appeals Board rules; therefore, your written response must be filed with the Appeals Board promptly; a letter or phone call will not protect your interests. 3) You will be served with a Notice‑ (s) of Hearing and must appear at all hearings or conferences. After such hearing, even absent your appearance, a decision may be made and an award of compensation benefits may issue against you. The award could result in the garnishment of your wages, taking of your money or property or other relief. If the Appeals Board makes an award against you, your house or other dwelling or other property may be taken to satisfy that award in a non‑judicial sale, with no exemptions from execution. A lien may also be imposed upon your property without further hearing and before the issuance of an award. 4) You must notify the Appeals Board of the proper address for the service of official notices and papers and notify the Appeals Board of any changes in that address. TAKE ACTION NOW TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS! Issued by: WORKERS’ COMPENSATION

The Rotary Club of Los Olivos Presents

The 16th Annual

APPEALS BOARD Name and address of Appeals Board: Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board 130 East Ortega Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Name and address of Applicant’s Attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; FORM COMPLETED BY: Wendy Uribe Telephone No.: (805) 965‑4540. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served: as an individual defendant Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 2022. EXTRA SPACE Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal

property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. June 30, 2022 at 3:30 PM Gary Beynon Office equipment, business supplies KC Goodwin Tools, furniture and some boxes Samuel Sanchez personal items Lynda Baxis pictures, dining room tbl, 2 small picnic benches, clothes, boxes, armoire Timothy Neros Bikes, Bike parts, Totes, Luggage,

Tools The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING (Hybrid Public Meeting - Held in Person and via Zoom Tuesday June 21, 2022, at 5:30 P.M. NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING AMENDING COUNCIL RESOLUTION NO. 22- 10 TO ADD AN ADDITIONAL PROPERTY TO RECENTLY ADOPTED HISTORIC RESOURCES INVENTORY AND TO RE-ADOPT/CLARIFY FINDINGS REGARDING BISHOP RANCH Case Nos. 16-092-OA ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a hybrid public hearing to consider adding 290 (295) Ellwood Canyon Road property to the City’s Historic Resources Inventory (HRI) and to re-adopt/make clarifications to the designation of Bishop Ranch’s (located at 96 Glen Annie Road) placement on the HRI and as a Goleta Historic Landmark. If the property at 290 (295) Ellwood Canyon is added to the HRI, then the property would be subject to the development requirements of Chapter 17.33 (Historical Resources) of the Goleta Municipal Code. The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org) The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth as follows: HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, June 21, 2022, at 5:30 PM LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PROJECT LOCATION: 290 (295) Ellwood Canyon Road, Goleta CA 93117 (APN: 073-121-014); and 96 Glen Annie Road, Goleta CA 93117 (APN: 077-020045) The City Council agenda for the public hearing will be posted on the City website (https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/governmentmeeting-agendas-and-videos) at least 72 hours prior to the City Council meeting. The agenda will have instructions on how to participate in the public hearing. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINATION: Pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15061(b)(3) and §15378(b)(5), the proposed addition to the Historic Resources Inventory of 290/295 Ellwood Canyon Road and clarifying the findings relative 96 Glen Annie Road do not qualify as a “project” for the purposes of CEQA because adding properties to the HRI does not result in direct or indirect physical changes in the environment. The listing proposed does not, by itself, have the potential to cause a significant effect on the environment. Any subsequent development project will be separately examined in accordance with CEQA. As such, the action to add the subject property to the HRI is exempt from CEQA review.

GREAT MUSIC, FOOD & WINE

PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page.

Saturday, June 11th 2022 Downtown Los Olivos

FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Lisa Prasse, Current Planning Manager, at (805) 961-7542 or lprasse@ cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www. cityofgoleta.org.

Featuring Live Jazz performed by The Idiomatiques

Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)).

1:00-4:00 pm

30 Vintners 30 Chefs Order tickets online at JazzAndOliveFestival.org All-inclusive $95.00

or call 805-895-0476 for information

Please note event is rain or shine* and tickets are NOT refundable.

No Pets Please

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent June 9, 2022 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE9,9,2022 2022 THE JUNE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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