Santa Barbara Independent 06/2/22

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SCHOOL DISTRICT DISCONTENT MEET S.B.´S TIKTOK STAR JUNE SOCHEL REMEMBERED OJAI MUSIC FEST RETURNS WATERFRONT EATS ♦

FREE

Santa Barbara

JUNE 2-9, 2022 VOL. 36 ♦ NO. 855

RIDING THE

WAVES OF

SAGE ADVICE FROM SURFER SHAUN TOMSON AND PHILOSOPHER NOAH BENSHEA

LIFE

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Thank you The SBCC Foundation is grateful to all of the generous sponsors, donors, and guests who made our third annual Spring Forward! Gala a huge success! The event raised more than $300,000 to support our community’s college and its students.

Spring Forward! Gala 2022 sponsors: TRUSTEE

CHANCELLOR

Herbert & Bui Simon Foundation Rachel Kaganoff Stern

Roger Durling & Daniel Launspach Rachil & Scott Vincent Zegar Family Foundation

DEAN PRESIDENT

Laurie Ashton & Lynn Sarko Luria/Budgor Family Foundation Frank Schipper and Leslie Meadowcroft-Schipper

Bright Rentals Leslie & Ashish Bhutani Lalla & Rinaldo Brutoco / Omega Point Institute Perri Harcourt Giffin Equipment Griffith & Thornburgh, LLP Dr. Kindred Murillo, SBCC Superintendent / President Carrie Towbes & John Lewis

DEPARTMENT CHAIR American Riviera Bank The Emmett Family Robert & Christine Emmons Judy & Rob Egenolf eTeamSponsor ExxonMobil Farmers & Merchants Trust Company Fielding Graduate University Coleen Richardson Friedel & Ted Friedel Stina Hans & Joel Kreiner Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara Madeleine & Peter Jacobson J.P. Morgan Private Bank Junior League of Santa Barbara KBZ Architects

KCRW Keller Rohrback L.L.P. Mosher Foundation Moss Adams Nicholson & Schwartz CPAs Pacifica Graduate Institute / Pacifica Graduate Institute Alumni Association (PGIAA) Pacific Premier Bank Ridley-Tree Cancer Center Santa Barbara International Film Festival Ken & Jo Saxon Maryan Schall Seasons Catering Anne Smith Towbes Danna & Zohar Ziv

ADDITIONAL SUPPORTERS Ambient Event Design Moss Floral Special thanks to those who donated their time and talents and shared their stories: Glen Phillips, Alisha Sanchez, Rosette Strandberg, Kandy Luria-Budgor, Gordon Morrell, SBCC’s Atkinson Gallery, and the students and faculty of SBCC’s Art and Music Departments. 2

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Thank you to the SBCC musicians who played at the Gala: Julio Longcob—alto sax; Eli Nania—tenor sax; Owen Richards—bari sax; Seku Fujino-Harmachis—guitar; Jay Real—piano; Jack Egawa—bass; Ethan Fossum—drums; Jeremy Light—drums; John Douglas—director/piano; James Watson—tech support


M U S I C A C A D E M Y S E V E N T Y - F I F T H A N N I V E R S A R Y 19 4 7 - 2 0 2 2

MUSIC ACADEMY

JUNE 13- AUGUST 6 MORE THAN 100 EVENTS at the Music Academy, Santa Barbara Bowl, and Granada and Lobero Theatres Hear 136 BRILLIANT CLASSICALLY-TRAINED MUSICIAN FELLOWS FROM 19 COUNTRIES & Academy artists in public masterclasses, chamber music, concerts, and opera $10 COMMUNITY ACCESS TICKETS FOR ALL EVENTS – ON SALE FRI, JUN 10, 10 AM 7-17s ALWAYS FREE with ticketed adults

MUSICACADEMY.ORG INDEPENDENT.COM

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TABLE of CONTENTS

Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Intern Madison Smoak, Sarah Stephens, Veronica Vo Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

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WRITE ON TRACK Name: Sarah Stephens Title: News Intern

The Surfer and the Sage Wave-Riding Champ and PhilosopherPoet Pen Pandemic Pick-Me-Up by Keith Hamm

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 NEWS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

OBITUARIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

LIVING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

ARTS LIFE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 ASTROLOGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 CLASSIFIEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 ON THE COVER: Shaun Tomson at Waimea Bay, Hawai‘i, 1977. Photo by Dan Merkel. Design by Ava Talehakimi.

COURTESY

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman

volume 36, #855, June 2-9, 2022

What attracted you to UCSB’s new journalism minor, and what would you say to students who may be considering it? I found my passion for journalism at 15 years old, and when it became part of the Professional Writing minor in 2020, I immediately signed up because I wanted to gain knowledge from experienced journalists like my track coordinator, Nomi Morris. If you’re a curious individual, have some writing skills, value journalistic integrity, and can handle working on a deadline, then the journalism track is the perfect option.

What are your short-term and long-term plans after graduation? After a trip home, I’ll be coming back to live in the southern California area to explore some job opportunities so I can tackle my student loans. Ultimately, I hope to one day work for a news publication or magazine and also increase my skills in graphic design for printed media. What was your favorite article to work on during your time with the Independent? My recent piece on the opioid crisis in Santa Barbara. I was able to hear real stories of people who have been affected by addiction and explored what Santa Barbara is doing about it. Oh, I also really loved when Nick Welsh had me investigate conspiracy theories around the Freemasons—I don’t think I’ve ever watched that many documentaries in one night. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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Endorsements

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

H

ere are our abbreviated endorsements. Complete versions can be found on Independent.com. As always, the Independent does not endorse in every race but only in those that we have researched and can confidently suggest a candidate. Thank you for considering our endorsement.

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH was always prepared and used his bully pulpit to push better education over more enforcement, a plan that worked well. Hart, a successful career politician and accomplished policy wonk, knows how government actually functions and will provide strong support for his district in solving our massive challenges.

County Superintendent of Schools: Susan Salcido

COU RTESY

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Congress: Salud Carbajal

Endorsements At a Glance U.S. Congress:

Salud Carbajal U.S. Senate: Alex Padilla California Governor: Gavin Newsom Lt. Governor: Eleni Kounalakis

Salud Carbajal deserves to be sent back to Congress for another term representing Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Ventura voters. Carbajal, a Democratic reach-across-theaisle pragmatist, was first elected to Congress in 2016. He is skilled at bringing opposing groups together and will work effectively on behalf of his district and constituents, finding ways to expand health care and educational opportunities. He has been a leader in promoting environmental issues, most recently, wind energy off Santa Barbara’s coast. And on fundamental issues — such as a woman’s right to choose, now under attack — he has been and will continue to be an unwavering supporter.

COU RTESY

State Assembly: Gregg Hart

As 2nd District county supervisor, Gregg Hart has been a forceful but thoughtful advocate for criminal justice reform, for programs for people without homes, and for those suffering from mental-health and addiction issues. As board chair, Hart displayed strong leadership during the COVID crisis. He

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Attorney General: Rob Bonta State Assembly: Gregg Hart The County Superintendent of Schools is without a doubt the most important elected position in Santa Barbara County that most people have never heard of. This office — now capably occupied by Susan Salcido — provides essential support for the 20 public school districts throughout the county and the 70,000 students who rely on these schools for their education. Now, for the first time in more than 40 years, there’s a genuine contest for this crucial position. And the choice confronting voters could not be starker. The incumbent, Susan Salcido, is an uncommonly energetic career educator who has worked in education for 26 years — as a former teacher and junior high school principal — and an exceptionally experienced administrator, not to mention a Santa Maria native. Her opponent, Christy Lozano, has a palpable lack of relevant experience. She has worked 18 years as a physical education teacher in the county, most recently at Dos Pueblos High School, where after just three months, she took a leave of absence, having complained about a student discipline case in which she believed administrators had been too lax. She spoke at school board meetings and wrote on the electronic pages of Nextdoor. The County Superintendent of Schools is a complex and challenging job that involves overseeing a staff of 550 people and a $105 million budget. The office must certify all teachers in all 20 districts, review all 20 budgets, administer or oversee the special education programs for 812 students, run 10 preschools for children living in poverty, and administer education programs for migrants and for the children of homeless parents. Plus, it is constitutionally charged with translating state codes more complex than anything Hammurabi ever dreamed up. Now is not the time for on-the-job training for an administratively inexperienced ideologue. The stakes are too high.

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Santa Barbara County Auditor Controller: Betsy Schaffer Clerk Recorder: Joe Holland District Attorney: John Savrnoch Sheriff: No Endorsement Treasurer Tax Collector: Harry Hagen County Superintendent of Schools: Susan Salcido


Endorsements

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH good thing for the county. Born and raised in Santa Barbara, Capps has immersed herself in the nitty-gritty of school-board politics and educational policy. Tireless in trumpeting alarm over the prevalence of child poverty in Santa Barbara County, she has worked to feed hungry kids and their families throughout the year. An independent thinker and a proven courageous politician, she is willing to work constructively and civilly in forwarding good governance in Santa Barbara.

5th District Supervisor: Steve Lavagnino

For the past 20 years, Joe Holland has made the county’s elections train run on time, an amazing feat most voters have never particularly noticed. With his very able staff, Holland has quietly toiled in the shadows, expanding the ways residents can vote without sacrificing the integrity of the results. During the 2020 COVID shutdown, Holland joined other state election officers in successfully pushing for an all-mail ballot. Even Republican Party apparatchiks — who for decades have been raising fears of voting abuse in Isla Vista — conceded the election results were squeaky clean. Not a small achievement.

Now Open in Santa Barbara Upper State

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

County Clerk, Recorder, Assessor and Registrar of Voters: Joe Holland

Cottage quality. Urgent care.

NEW! Santa Barbara Upper State Goleta Calle Real Goleta Hollister Village

COVID assessment and testing Open 8 a.m.–8 p.m., 365 days a year Goal of complete care in less than 45 minutes Walk-ins and online appointments X-ray and lab services Cottage clinical providers

cottagehealth.org/urgentcare

M A NJA R I SHA RM A

2nd District Supervisor: Laura Capps

Given that Steve Lavagnino is running unopposed yet again — for the third time — this endorsement might seem superfluous. But we’re endorsing Lavagnino anyway to make a larger point: The entire county has benefited from the levity, candor, and consideration he unfailingly brings to supervisorial deliberations. He has consistently represented a pragmatic brand of pro-business conservativism without getting doctrinaire, aggrieved, or personal about it. Yes, Lavagnino — along with Supervisor Das Williams — has worked to create a cannabis industry, a little too quickly and with too broad a stroke, but Lavagnino said he pushed it forward because without oil revenues in Santa Barbara, other revenue is needed to expand programs for mental health and those facing homelessness.

Sheriff: No Endorsement

Though she is running unopposed, it is important to explain why having Laura Capps as 2nd District supervisor is a very

The candidates running for sheriff — incumbent Sheriff Bill Brown and Lt. Juan Camarena — are both serious, thoughtful, and dedicated public servants. Both have accomplishments of which they can rightfully boast. Both have much to recommend them. But both have given us cause for pause, and we can endorse neither. n

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A H a! TM

Healthy Attitudes, Emotional Harmony, and Lifelong Achievement for Teens

JENNY

AHA! HONORS OUR 2022 GRADUATES (Partial list)

AHA! Peace Builders and Out-of-School Participants

ISAIAH

ALDAIR

QUETZALLY

VANESSA

MARILENA

JULIETA

JOSE JUAN

GLORIA

JULIAN EMILY

PERLA

GABRIEL

ANNA

AIDEN

ZOE

DANIEL

Agents of change to build a better future! RUBEN

RESILIENCE

EMPATHY

LARISSA

www.ahasb.org

ELAN

MINDFULNESS

AWARENESS

CONNECTION

PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street, Suite 302 Santa Barbara CA. I Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until July 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


MAY 26-JUNE 2, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COMMUNITY

I Madonnari Festival Drew Huge Crowds I N G R I D B OSTROM

A

beautiful Memorial Day weekend brought larger crowds than ever to the I Madonnari chalk-painting festival held in front of Old Mission Santa Barbara. “Everyone was really happy to be back out together in person. It was packed,” said Kai Tepper with a note of awe in her voice, as she sat on the Mission lawn on Tuesday, watching a continuing stream of visitors peruse the chalk drawings, which will remain on the pavement until wind and weather wash them away. Tepper, the new director of the Children’s Creative Project—which originated the event under founder Kathy Koury, who retired in 2021 — said an estimated 35,000 people attended daily, some coming after sundown to view the colorful drawings. I Madonnari, named for the 16th-century Italian street painters whose subject was often the Madonna, is the major fundraiser for the Children’s Creative Project. “A lot of youth artists, as well as youth performers, were here all weekend,” Tepper said. Though many professional artists had drawn some of the striking pictures that were in squares sponsored by organizations and companies, youth artists also partici-

BUSINESS

PUBLIC SAFETY

pated, such as those from the Turner Foundations after-school art project. Many tourists intrepidly crossed the busy streets to the Mission all weekend, but there were also a lot of Santa Barbara residents who hadn’t viewed the I Madonnari festival before in its 35-year history, said Tepper. The popular food booths manned by project volunteers were supplemented by Dave’s Dogs, Rascal’s Vegan Pop-Up, and the United States of Coffee this year, who

chipped in a percentage of their proceeds to the Children’s Creative Project. Tepper said they will definitely be back next year, pandemic willing. (During the two COVID years, the festival went online in photographs and onto the artists’ sidewalks instead.) Tepper and her staff will continue throughout the year to sponsor artists of all stripes—from painting to storytelling — in schools around the county. —Jean Yamamura

HOUSING

Housing vs. Hotel Showdown Looming Could Bed-Tax Revenues Be Siphoned to Subsidize Affordable Housing? by Nick Welsh ith Santa Barbara’s hotels now 80 percent full and bringing in—on average—$130 more per room per night than they did in 2019, it’s little wonder that the South Coast’s hotel market has reached a state of permanent explosion. It’s little wonder, too, that there are now 650 new hotel rooms poised to jump off their various drawing boards and open their doors for customers. Even less wonder is that Rob Fredericks, executive director for the City of Santa Barbara Housing Authority, is champing at the bit to tap into the some of the bed tax revenues—more officially known as Transient Occupancy Taxes—to build capital-“A” affordable housing. With city’s bed tax revenues projected to weigh in significantly higher than initially projected for this year—$31 million, Fredericks said, as opposed to the $25,716,170 budgeted—Fredericks is hoping to persuade city councilmembers and administrators to set aside $5.1 million of that gravy for housing efforts. Fredericks said that “$5.1 million may not sound like a whole lot, but I can leverage that 10-to-1 with tax credits and loans. With $50 million, we can make a dent.” City budget director Keith DeMartini said

W

A new 250-room hotel project tucked behind the Funk Zone is back on the table at City Hall, with the Historic Landmarks Commission unanimously agreeing on 5/25 to move the project forward to the Planning Commission nearly three years after the city last reviewed the application. The site stretches along the southwest corner of Garden Street, from Yanonali to the train tracks, where the 4.5 acres of storage sheds and five existing structures will have to be cleared to make room for the 235,690-squarefoot project, tentatively named the Garden Street Hotel. Full story at independent.com/garden-st-hotel.

he could not confirm Fredericks’s $31 million estimate but did say revenues are expected to be significantly higher than initially projected. Fredericks recognizes he’s facing a serious uphill climb. For the past three years, COVID took a heavy toll on the bed taxes and sales taxes on which City Hall disproportionately relies. City administrators were forced to dip into reserves for the past three years and, as a result, are now projecting budget deficits for the next three. Many staff positions have been left intentionally vacant to cut costs; employees who remained on the job have now gone several years without cost-of-living adjustments, let alone raises. Many experienced employees are leaving to take jobs elsewhere; finding replacements has proved challenging in the extreme. Fredericks said he recognizes these problems are serious and real. But he doesn’t want to wait. “I’m tired of talking about how housing is our number-one problem and just wringing our hands,” he said. “We need to do something.” If need be, Fredericks said he’d support collecting the signatures needed to take a bed tax increase before city voters. The nexus, he said, is obvious. Hotels rely largely on lowincome workers. If hotels want a reliable employee base, far more below-market rental

housing must be built. And right now, City Hall is legally on the hook to allow for the development of 8,000 new housing units to address what state housing officials have deemed is Santa Barbara’s fair share of the statewide housing deficit. A 2 percent bump in the bed tax rate would provide a modest but steady revenue stream to allow City Hall—in partnership with the Housing Authority—to chip away at what seems like a monstrously unattainable goal, Fredericks stated. Simply allowing developers to fill the void by building market-rate units, he added, won’t come close to cutting it. When Fredericks begins his power meetand-greets in earnest, his pitch is likely to generate mixed reactions. “From a policy point of view, you can’t oppose it. Clearly, we need a sustainable and reliable revenue stream for housing,” said City Councilmember Eric Friedman, “but it’s complex.” City Hall has many competing financial needs, Friedman cautioned, and local governments can only ask voters to dip into their pockets so many times. In addition, he noted, the County of Santa Barbara is contemplating putting a library tax before voters in 2024. Two measures on the same ballot could serve CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

The Sheriff’s Office on 5/31 released the names of the three people killed in the fatal collision on El Colegio and Stadium Road in Isla Vista on 5/28. They are Jose Luis Hernandez, 28, and Sebastian Gil, 20, both of S.B., and Daniel Razo, 20, of Yorba Linda. Three vehicles were involved in the collision, and CHP reported that one of the vehicles was driving recklessly and ran a red light, likely causing the crash. Aside from the three deceased, three people sustained moderate injuries, and two people sustained severe injuries. A suspected homemade bomb was found by a Caltrans crew member on Highway 101 near Cat Canyon Road on 3/27, leading to a full closure of both the northbound and southbound lanes of the freeway for several hours while CHP and the Sheriff’s Office’s Bomb Squad investigated the threat, according to a CHP report. The Bomb Squad “exploded” the package around 3:30 p.m., authorities said, but there has been no information released as to the contents of the package. In the wake of the deadly shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, Rep. Salud Carbajal wrote to Senate leaders to push his bill in the House, HR 3480, which would allow family members who believe a person is a threat to themselves or someone else to petition the courts to remove their firearms. Carbajal wrote the letter to rally support for a parallel bill in the Senate, sponsored by Senator Dianne Feinstein, to encourage states through federal grants to enact similar red flag gun laws. Full story at independent.com/carbajal-pushes-red-flag-laws. A man died after falling while riding his bicycle on the 6200 block of Cathedral Oaks Road in Goleta, in what the Sheriff’s Office describes as a “solo accident” on Tuesday morning. The rider—William Poehler of Santa Barbara—was cycling when he suddenly went down around 11 a.m., according to the individual who called for emergency response. Poehler, who was 80 years of age, had not been hit but simply fell, said Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Raquel Zick. Found by medics to be unconscious, Poehler was immediately taken to the hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries.

COURTS & CRIME The Sheriff’s Office has provided additional information on what was initially described by an inmate’s family member as a “very large riot” at the county’s Main Jail on 5/22. Public information officer Raquel Zick told reporters that three separate fights broke out in three different housing units, “one after another—not at the exact same time.” Deputies used pepper spray, a PepperBall launcher, and Tasers to regain control, and 15 inmates were removed from the units. Four received medical treatment. No custody CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series Next Week! Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with

SKIP ABED

Santa Barbara Sailing Center

MICHAEL COHEN Santa Barbara Adventure Company

HEATHER DEUTSCH SB Bike

Blue and Green

Thursday, June 9 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

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MAY 26-JUNE 2, 2022

EDUCATION

S.B. Teachers Demand More from District Leadership Claim District Leadership Dysfunctional, Breakdown in Communication ADDRESSING CONCERNS: Santa Barbara Teachers Association president Joyce Adriansen spoke during a closedsession school board meeting Tuesday, May 31.

by Jun Starkey eachers within the Santa Barbara Unified School District are facing an everdeclining loss of morale, and many have attributed this to a dysfunction of district leadership, culminating in three school sites penning letters from teachers to the school board, expressing their lack of faith in the board and Superintendent Hilda Maldonado. The first letter sent to the board came from the Dos Pueblos Faculty Senate, a group of about 75 teachers, and expressed concerns over how money was being distributed, a breakdown of communication, and a desire for teachers to be included in the process of hiring new administrators. After the letter was sent, dozens of teachers protested outside the district building during a school board meeting on Tuesday, May 24. A handful of teachers also spoke during public comment, and Goleta Valley Junior High and Santa Barbara High School subsequently sent their own letters. Accounts from teachers, administrators, or district employees have been made to the Independent entirely off the record, many citing a fear of retaliation. The majority of claims from these individuals are that Maldonado creates a toxic work environment through micromanaging employees, creating barriers that discourage direct communication between school employees and district administrators, and by belittling those who work beneath her. Sources from the district further claim that Maldonado has created an unsustainable system of communication between instructors and administrators. When a teacher needs supplies, such as computers or textbooks, they are required to filter requests through school officials, who then take it to district administrators, who then pass the request to the superintendent cabinet. This process, sources say, is inherently slow-moving, but it has worsened as administrators, principals, and other employees leave, creating gaps in the system of communication. One teacher from Dos Pueblos High School, Olivia Happel-Block, who spoke at the school board meeting on May 24, said her class, the International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge course, will not have textbooks next year because the district has not approved the funding requests. “This

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COU RTESY

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

board needs to take a discerning look at these top-down procedures and truly evaluate how effective you are at serving our students and teachers,” she said. Letters from instructors at Dos Pueblos and Santa Barbara High School include a list of district employees who have left in the past two years, many of whom had resigned within the last few months. Some of these include Shawn Carey, assistant superintendent of secondary education; Frann Wageneck, assistant superintendent of student services; Ana Escobedo, assistant superintendent of elementary education; and Sierra Loughridge, director of secondary and elementary education. Maldonado’s response to claims that she has caused a toxic environment, which has pushed nine of the 10 members of her cabinet to retire, was that she “can’t make life decisions for others.” She said in the conversations with administrators that have resigned, the reasons for their leaving were “professional, personal, or promotional.” In response to teachers’ concerns, Maldonado said one of the things she reflected on after the Santa Barbara Teachers Association (SBTA) survey came out in late 2021, which reflected poorly on her leadership, was to adjust her schedule to allow more meetings with teachers. “I want to encourage [teachers] to come and talk to me directly,” she said. Maldonado also said she would continue working with SBTA president Joyce Adriansen. Several sources from within the district have also said the Santa Barbara Teachers Association is “dysfunctional,” with leadership and teachers divided on how to address teachers’ concerns to the board and superintendent. In a closed-session board meeting Tuesday, Adriansen spoke about the concerns brought up by teachers, though she did not directly address the letters sent. In her comments, she commended Maldonado and the board for their efforts to listen and respond to teachers’ concerns. “[The teachers’ union] is encouraged by the supportive actions the board has taken,” she said. Adriansen did not list any specific actions taken but did say a future meeting between Maldonado and new Assistant Superintendent of Student Services ShaKenya Edison was “a step in the n right direction.”


POLITICS

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COU RTESY

Supe of Schools Candidates Face Off Clockwise from top left, moderators Jerry Roberts and Lanny Ebenstein and County Superintendent of Schools candidates Christy Lozano and Susan Salcido during Tuesday’s forum

I

n the contentious race for the typically uncontested position of County Superintendent of Schools, current superintendent Susan Salcido and challenger Christy Lozano faced off in an online forum held Tuesday night, exactly one week before the June 7 primary election. The forum came together after two earlier attempts fell through. Community advocate and former school boardmember Lanny Ebenstein joined Newsmakers host Jerry Roberts in moderating the event, sponsored by nonprofits The Resource Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara County Taxpayers Association. In the 75-minute forum, Roberts and Ebenstein gave the candidates a chance to spill their guts on the biggest issues facing schools, from literacy to learning loss to critical race theory, with both Salcido and Lozano being asked direct questions and taking the opportunity to hit all their talking points. When asked if critical race theory was being actively taught in schools — a fact vehemently denied by Salcido — Lozano said it “absolutely” was in S.B. Unified School District. When Roberts asked her

how she defines the theory, she described it as “closed-minded thinking.” Salcido responded, saying it was “a theory in which race is used as a lens to look through policies,” primarily taught in universities and not offered in any K-12 course in the county. “Using an example from one school district to then say that all school districts are doing the same is irresponsible,” Salcido said. Salcido used her time to address several misconceptions, including the idea that the Superintendent of Schools had the power to make broad decisions or overrule decisions voted by the County Board of Education. “If I were to overrule,” Salcido said, “that kind of behavior does not go within the democracy that is set up.” Salcido also addressed budget concerns and said that nearly 70 percent of a more than $100 million budget is used toward student services. Lozano said the budget is “too long and obtuse,” with too much money being spent on nonprofits. For the full story and to watch the forum, visit independent.com/superintendent-forum.

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But sales tax measures are also harder to pass: Local voters would bear the fiscal burden. Such proposals are typically blasted by liberals and Democrats for being “regressive,” meaning their burden falls disproportionately on those with less means. Currently, hotel and motel clients are charged 12 percent in city taxes in addition to their hotel room rate. Of that, 10 percent goes to the general fund and 2 percent to a segregated fund to keep city creeks clean and restored. The last time City Hall increased its bed tax rate was 1987, when the choice was that or laying off cops. In 2000, voters approved the additional set-aside for creeks. In 2012, the governor and the state legislature abolished redevelopment agencies throughout the state, arguing they siphoned off tax revenues that would otherwise go to school districts. In the intervening 10 years, no substitute has emerged to make up for the lost housing dollars — roughly $5 million a year — that the City of Santa Barbara’s Redevelopment Agency contributed. This bed-tax bump, Fredericks has argued, would be a step in the right direction. In the meantime, however, many councilmembers worry that the proliferation of new hotels has become too much of a good thing. Later this summer, the council will discuss a possible moratorium on new hotels, the argument being that too frequently developers are favoring new hotels over new housing on land that’s zoned for both. n

Santa Barbara police detained 16 Santa Barbara High School students 5/30 around 10:30 p.m. after nearby residents called 9-1-1 to report loud noises coming from the campus. According to Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Sgt. Ethan Ragsdale, the students appeared to be performing a senior prank “that involved gallons of baby oil, Vaseline, raw fish, and oysters being placed all over the floors and door handles,” as well as “numerous items of vandalized property inside the school, including broken windows and items spray-painted.”Principal Elise Simmons was notified and responded to the campus, and the incident is under police investigation. On 5/27, S.B. detectives who’d been investigating drug activity in the area served a search warrant near the 3700 block of State Street. They detained 38-year-old Viviana Martinez-Perez, 25-year-old Rachel Delgado-Garcia, 36-year-old Titan Nolet, and 31-year-old Natali Ontiveros. The detectives also located 53 pounds of methamphetamine, one ounce of fentanyl, and three semi-automatic handguns in the cars. All four suspects were charged with multiple felonies and are being held on $1 million bail.

CANNABIS The potential for strong cannabis odors coming from an outdoor project proposed for Winchester Canyon Road brought three appeals to the County Planning Commission on 5/25, from the Bacara Resort, City of Goleta, and neighboring farmers Danny and Michael Cavaletto. By the time of the hearing, most issues in two of the appeals had been settled the night before, the commissioners learned. They ultimately denied all the appeals, but not before neighbors protested the strong smell from previous grows at the property. Full story at independent.com/winchester. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COUNTY JAIL

Autopsy Report Finds No Foul Play in Inmate’s Death

S A N TA B A R B A R A P E R M AC U LT U R E N E T WO R K

G O O G LE EARTH

A Glimpse Into Jonathan Paul Thomas’s Final Moments

ECO HERO AWARD 2022 HONORING

Santa Barbara County’s Main Jail

R

by Ryan P. Cruz

eleased more than four months after Jonathan Paul Thomas died in Santa Barbara County’s Main Jail in January, an autopsy report obtained by the Independent concluded that there was no foul play leading to his death but offers a glimpse into Thomas’s final moments, from being arrested for domestic violence in Santa Maria to being pronounced dead a half hour after arriving at the South County jail. The announcement of Thomas’s death — naked, alone, facedown, and handcuffed in a single-occupancy “safety” cell — raised concerns among advocacy groups at the time, leading to a community “vigil” at the courthouse and demands for an explanation of the incident. This report is the result. The autopsy, signed by Santa Barbara County Sheriff ’s Deputy and Coroner’s Detective Chad Biedinger, ruled Thomas’s official cause of death as “sudden death due to the combined effects of morbid obesity, dilated cardiomyopathy, acute methamphetamine intoxication, active resistance, and restraint.” According to Biedinger’s report, Thomas arrived at the Main Jail around 1:30 a.m. During the intake process, he was heard to make “suicidal statements,” resulting in his being moved to a single-occupancy safety cell. Following jail procedure, custody deputies were to remove his clothing to prevent him from injuring himself. “The safety cell did not have any utilities in it, meaning no toilet, chair, or bench, and it had only one door for entrance and exit,” the report read. Once inside the concrete cell, Biedinger reported that, from the vantage angle of the surveillance camera, Thomas “became resistive” as two custody deputies held his handcuffed arms, and a third began to remove his pants. Thomas, who was nearly 320 pounds, required three sets of handcuffs and at least three custody deputies to be restrained, with several more deputies entering the cell when he began to twist his arms and torso. “None of the custody deputies appeared

to be putting pressure or their bodies on his upper torso as he was restrained,” the report states, with one custody deputy controlling Thomas’s left arm, another holding his right, and a third controlling his legs and feet. Once Thomas’s clothes were removed, he was “helped to the floor of the safety cell” by deputies who placed him facedown. “Based on the images I viewed, he appeared to be actively resistive to deputies, moving around as they tried to remove the handcuffs,” Biedinger said. According to the description of the video, Thomas was “remaining lying facedown, unclothed, and he was no longer actively moving as they all left” the cell. Footage from the hallway cameras shows deputies shut the door and then begin calling through the food tray opening, noticing that Thomas had not moved. “After a period of time,” deputies requested medical aid, but attempts to resuscitate Thomas were to no avail. At 2:03 a.m., he was pronounced dead. The autopsy report shows that Thomas, 45 years old, had dilated cardiomyopathy, a condition in which the heart’s main pumping chamber is enlarged and affects the heart’s ability to pump blood to the rest of the body. Coupled with alcohol consumption, drug use, and a smoking habit, the heart condition could lead to severe health problems. The body’s response to being restrained, exacerbated by a stimulant like methamphetamine, caused Thomas’s heart to suddenly stop. His death was ruled accidental, with Biedinger finding “no sign of foul play, trauma, or anything suspicious.” The medical examiner found no signs of trauma other than contusions near Thomas’s wrists and knees, likely from being restrained. The autopsy also found several rib and sternum fractures consistent with CPR compression, and evidence of dilated cardiac chambers. Thomas has no next of kin on the Central Coast, and his remains were released to his brother, who lives outside the area. His girlfriend, who lives in Santa Maria, was also notified of his death. n

PAUL STAMETS & LOUIE SCHWARTZBERG Santa Barbara Permaculture Network celebrates its Second Annual Eco Hero Award honoring visionary mycologist Paul Stamets, & award-winning filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg. Joining us to receive the award, Paul Stamets live via Zoom, with Louie Schwartzberg live in theater, it will be an exciting interactive evening. Paul & Louie will share their life’s work & passion for nature, and how they came to collaborate on projects together, including the amazing Fantastic Fungi book & film. Their work will awe & inspire you!

FRIDAY, JUNE 17, 2022 • 6:30-9:00PM LOBERO THEATRE 33 E. CANON PERDIDO ST. SANTA BARBARA TICKETS ➤ $20, $40 and Friends of Eco Hero Premium $100 TICKETS ON SALE NOW: Lobero Ticket Office 805.963.0761 or Lobero.com

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ENVIR

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ALLIANCE

Santa Barbara County Museums

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JUNE 2, 2022

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Fighting Fentanyl

HEALTH

COU RTESY

Sheriff Bill Brown Organizes Project Opioid to Combat Overdose Deaths

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DEATH IN THE FAMILY: Montecito resident Stephanie Forrester joined Project Opioid after her 22-year-old son, Justin, died from a fentanyl overdose in February. by Sarah Stephens n an average morning in 2020, Montecito resident Stephanie Forrester woke up and began preparing for the workday. While she usually never checked in on her son, Justin, 20 years old at the time, she decided to crack open his bedroom door to say goodbye until the evening. Forrester saw her only child lying in a pool of sweat, cold and clammy to the touch, a faint purple hue to his face and lips. Justin was overdosing on fentanyl — the manmade synthetic opioid that has been the primary driver in the increase of overdose deaths across the country. Justin had shattered his ankle several months prior, and his doctors prescribed him OxyContin to deal with the immense pain he was having. After several refills of the prescription, Forrester’s son had become addicted to the opioid and began seeking the drug from other illicit sources. After being in the ICU for two days after this first overdose, Justin was okay — until his second overdose on February 22, 2022. “I thought he was getting back to his normal self. He had an apartment and was living on his own, and the next day he was gone,” Forrester said. Justin took what he thought was oxycodone, a blue circular pill with “M30” pressed on the front, but that tiny pill was laced with enough fentanyl to take his life. Illegal manufacturers of fentanyl add a near-microscopic amount of the drug to other pill compounds, then press them to perfectly model a prescription opioid, such as OxyContin or Norco. These fakes earn the counterfeiters a large profit when sold at the same street price as the real drugs — $20$30 per pill — because fentanyl is extremely cheap to make. “Mexican drug cartels figured out they could counterfeit legal-looking pills with fentanyl,” Sheriff Bill Brown said. “There was no quality control, and each pill contained fatal doses and people were dying.” Opioid overdoses have been ticking upward for the last 30 years, and in the County of Santa Barbara, 133 deaths were caused by opioid overdoses last year alone. More than 50 percent of these deaths were caused by fentanyl — the drug that took Jus-

O

tin’s life. A lethal dose can sit on the sharpened tip of a #2 pencil, barely visible to the naked eye. Brown has been the county’s sheriff for 16 years — he’s now making his bid for a fifth term in the June primary — and announced Project Opioid during his election kickoff. Before organizing the broad-based coalition — composed of governments in Santa Barbara County, medical personnel, rehabilitation specialists, education leaders, and businesses — Brown had talked with Sheriff Dennis Lemma in Seminole County, Florida, who was the first to launch Project Opioid, which eventually spread throughout the state and is now a nationwide campaign. “We knew we couldn’t arrest our way out of this problem,” said Brown, stating he had fewer deputies than before. “We had to do something about the supply and the demand.” The coalition was already ahead of the curve, he added. “We already have robust treatment programs and great resources. We didn’t have to reinvent the wheel on this one.” A key leader of the project is Kristin Flickinger, executive director of Pacific Pride Foundation (PPF), an organization that provides services to the HIV/AIDS and LGBTQ+ communities. PPF has long had experience with needle exchanges and intravenous drug use in its battle to keep the spread of HIV at bay. That knowledge extended to the use of Narcan, or naloxone — the life-saving opioid overdose treatment — and now to fentanyl testing. The test strips can warn of fentanyl’s presence in black market drugs, and the strips are provided to community members, whether they themselves are using or someone they know is using drugs. “[Project Opioid is] doing everything that we can do to collaborate and make this community more livable, because we’ve lost so many kids,” Flickinger said. Justin’s mother, Stephanie Forrester, is a member of Project Opioid. She never thought she would need to learn about Narcan, but she now urges all parents to educate themselves and their children on the dangers of fentanyl. Her hope is that the knowledge and acceptance will spread across the county and that fewer mothers will lose a child to the ongoing opioid crisis.

For more tips on how to keep your baby safe, visit cottagehealth.org/safesleep

n

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Shoot First: The Dog May Be Packing

TRIGGER TRAUMA? The thing about a derringer is it won’t make your ass look fat. That’s an important consideration in considering how to accessorize when packing heat.

I confess I’ve always had a hankering for a derringer, either a one-shot or two. Anything beyond that is, well, just plain sloppy. I figured a little pearl-handled piece might provide all the subdued menace one man would need. And as a daily bicycle commuter, I wanted something small and light enough to fit in a fanny pack. But to be fair, if you’re wearing a fanny pack, no amount of menace can ever really suffice. Somehow, I mustered the willpower to resist this temptation, mostly because I had other things on which to squander $500 — about what one of these babies costs. More’s the pity; I could have been ahead of the game. Sometime this June, members of the United States Supreme Court are expected to issue a ruling that will allow all of us to carry concealed weapons pretty much anywhere we want without enduring the imposition of asking Sheriff Bill Brown for permission to do so. This discretionary approval, the Supremes are expected to rule, violates our constitutional right to arm ourselves. Not to be pedantic, but it’s worth noting this specific right wasn’t invented until 2008; before that, the Second Amendment was solely about “serving in a well-regulated militia.” Derringers, by virtue of their size, come

pre-concealed. Even if you strapped one onto your thigh with ostentatious masculine abandon — the way some supermarket customers

do in open-carry states when shopping by the frozen turkey section — a derringer is a fashion statement at great risk of going unheard. In California, there are said to be 120,000 concealed-carry-permit holders. Nationwide, the number was reported as 14.5 million as of 2016. That’s an increase from 2.7 million in 1999. We are an anxious people. Of course, that’s nothing. In 2021, we sold about 20 million guns — for the record, that’s a new record — up from about 15.5 million in 2019. In that timespan, we saw about 7.5 million new first-time gun owners. In 2020, we saw our gun violence death rates hit a new 20-year high. In a survey of 129 law enforcement agencies conducted in 2021, 57 percent reported an increase in fatal shootings, and 70 percent reported an increase in non-fatal shootings. Correlation, I know, should not be confused with causation, but one doesn’t need a PhD to know not to pour gasoline on a fire. One year ago this week, a federal judge ruled that California’s Assault Weapons Ban — enacted by the state legislature in 2000 — was unconstitutional. In his ruling, the judge famously likened the AR-15 to a Swiss Army knife, noting — with an abundance of accidental irony — that more Californians are stabbed to death than are shot to death by

rifles. He left unanswered how many of those stabbings were by Swiss Army knives. When I first read this ruling, I couldn’t help but wonder whether the state’s assault weapons ban — however imperfect — might have had some bearing on California’s relatively low number of rifle-inflicted deaths. But now I am more struck that in the short time since Uvalde, there have been no less than 17 more mass shootings. I asked the Sheriff’s Office how many concealed-weapons permits have been issued in Santa Barbara County, and how many were to judges, who, according to courthouse lore, pack heat for personal protection. It did not seem a question too difficult to answer. I was told a Public Records Act request was necessary. To issue such a permit, Sheriff Brown must make the finding that a person is “of good moral character” and has demonstrated “good cause” that his or her life is in danger. It’s worth noting that concealed-carry permittees are required to take eight hours of training and undergo actual shooting time on a firing range before being issued a license to kill. The judge in California’s Assault Weapons Ban case described AR-15s as “average guns used in average ways for average purposes.” In fact, he said they were more average than a Ford pickup truck. For every new Ford F-150 on the road, he opined, there were two AR-15s that we don’t see.

But even this judge agreed that high-capacity magazines — the ammo clips that allow mass shooters to spray out 30 rounds of hot lead in less than a minute and then reload

without missing a beat — pose a significant problem. Even this judge conceded that bloodshed could be limited by regulating the sale of these ammo clips. Which brings me back to the derringer. Back when the Second Amendment was being written, an exceptionally skilled rifleman might be able to squeeze off three rounds in a minute. Back then, aim mattered. Today, any unhinged 18-year-old can now obtain an AR-15 replica capable of spewing 45 rounds per minute from a company that sells directly to customers on a buy-now-pay-later plan. Aim is beside the point. Shooting a gun is like spraying a fire hose. I don’t know how long it takes to reload a derringer. But the most you can get off is two shots. Americans, we know, have to have our guns. And some of us — it’s obvious — are hardwired to go on rampages. In this context — with Sheriff Bill Brown’s discretionary authority to deny anyone a concealed-carry permit about to be decreed unconstitutional — we need to consider all options. Maybe we should all be packing derringers. As recent events have shown, there are worse things in the world than having a fat—Nick Welsh looking ass.

RE-ELECT SHERIFF BILL BROWN. JANET WOLF

former SB COUNTY SUPERVISOR

HELENE SCHNEIDER former SANTA BARBARA MAYOR

BENDY WHITE

BRAD STEIN

former SB COUNCILMEMBER

former CARPINTERIA MAYOR

ALL SB POLICE CHIEFS

MARTY BLUM

former SANTA BARBARA MAYOR

CYNTHIA BROCK former GOLETA MAYOR

CA PEACE OFFICERS ASSN.

MARGARET CONNELL former GOLETA MAYOR

ERIC ONNEN

former GOLETA MAYOR

CA POLICE CHIEFS ASSN.

“SHERIFF BILL BROWN IS THE ONLY QUALIFIED CANDIDATE.” JOYCE DUDLEY

DISTRICT ATTORNEY, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

Vote on or before June 7 to Re-Elect Sheriff Bill Brown. See Sheriff Brown’s list of over 1,000 endorsements at www.BillBrownforSheriff.com Paid for by the Committee to Re-Elect Sheriff Bill Brown 2022.

16

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JUNE 2, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


OPINIONS CONT’D

EMAD HA JJA J, AL AR ABY AL JADEED NEWSPAPER

Letters

A Vote for Camarena

K

udos to the Independent for its lack of endorsement for either candidate for Sheriff. While I do not know much about Lt. Juan Camarena, I have had direct interaction with Sheriff Bill Brown’s policies toward the Latino community. I was a board member of PUEBLO from 2009-2012, a nonprofit that merged with CAUSE in 2013. Our main role was to defend immigrants’ rights by stopping car impounds for unlicensed drivers and the arrest of drivers. It wasn’t until 2013 that AB460 granted a driver’s license to immigrants who had proof of local residency regardless of immigration status. We held community meetings to instruct Latinos of their rights and how to handle unlawful stops. Under Brown’s leadership 2009-2012, DUI checkpoints were set up on Friday and Saturday nights in Latino areas looking for those without a driver’s license — which most immigrants could not access —arresting them for driving without a license, incarcerating them, impounding their vehicle, and waiting for them to be picked up by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). ICE’s mission is to protect the U.S. from crossborder crime and illegal immigration that threaten national security and public safety, such as narcotics transport, illicit currency and assets, human trafficking, and aggravated felons. Someone coming home after work does not fit that bill. Families were separated without due cause. Longtime residents made plans for their children in case they disappeared during these “raids.” I lost two friends to deportation, both of whom had lived here for more than 20 years, were fully employed, and contributed to the community in many ways. Forty-six percent of our county’s residents are Latino; “white non-Hispanics” are 43.6 percent. I do not see this balance in Brown’s flashy, well-financed endorsements. His support from the Latino community reflects those who have achieved the American dream but little from those Latinos who contribute in so many ways to the quality of life we all enjoy. I will be voting for Lt. Camarena. —Barbara Lotito, Goleta

Step Up, Gun Owners

I

lived in Texas in the late 1990s, and I quickly became keenly aware that Texans own guns. You don’t get in arguments or freeway altercations in Texas because you know it could all end very badly. Texas police officers know this too. School shoot-

ers with assault rifles have nothing to lose; they plan to die by cop today — and take as many innocents with them as they can, to immortalize themselves and inflict their cup of poison on the entire world. They’re packing bigger guns than the cops. The cops that stood around in Uvalde for more than an hour? There’s no excuse, but this is the calculus in a state where people are loaded with guns. The future in a gun-heavy culture is the death of more innocents. Arming schools, as was pushed by the NRA, is insanity. What parent embraces having their small child walk past people with guns to get to class? When the Founding Fathers penned the Second Amendment, they never envisioned that future Americans would open fire on small children in school or people shopping at a grocery store or people praying in a church. They worried that we might be invaded by Spain, France, or Holland and would have to push the invaders back, as we’d just done with England. It was the 1780s—the era of European military empires, the biggest threat to this newly emerging country. Today, we are the biggest threat to our country, as we promote citizen access to military-grade firepower, which are used to shoot our own. Gun-rights proponents want to believe that we’re all sane, capable of being responsible gun owners, and that there’s no problem here. Those people who go off the rails and commit mass murder are evil anomalies. They’re not us. Unfortunately, indiscriminate access to guns lets the unhinged acquire guns, too. Stop assuming all gun owners are like you. They clearly aren’t! You have to be part of this solution, of stopping unfettered access to guns. Step up now. Gun control works. England has proven it. New Zealand and Australia have proven it. California is proving it. Why can’t we as Americans step up, and prove it too? Aren’t our children, our families, our loved ones, —Sharon Byrne, S.B. worth it?

For the Record

¶ We incorrectly inferred that the American Institute of Architects was an accreditation program in our story about State Street last week; it is a membership organization.

SATURDAY FISHERMEN’S MARKET Every Saturday 6-11AM on the Navy Pier in the harbor rain or shine

Come get the freshest catch in town! Sustainably caught and farmed local seafood, straight from us to you. Find out more at cfsb.info

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions. INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 2, 2022

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17


obituaries Cheryl Joy Anderson 2/2/1953 - 5/15/2022

It is with deep sorrow that the Anderson family announces that Cheryl Joy Anderson passed due to cancer on May 15, 2022. Cheri's roots in the area go back to 1915 when her great grandmother, a newly widowed woman, traveled with four daughters from Minnesota to settle permanently in Santa Barbara. Cheri grew up in the 1950's and was raised on More Mesa near where her grandparents named the road they lived on, Anderson Lane. She graduated from Dos Pueblos in 1971 and stayed in very close touch with many of her classmates throughout her life. She was a frequent and adventurous traveller, often traveling the world with her best friend, Kelly Spangler. In the 70's Cheri moved to San Francisco and furthered her career as a medical coding specialist. Her career allowed her to travel the world from Dubai to Germany, from Texas to Manhattan. She loved all Broadway musicals and was especially proud of her fellow DP graduate, the Broadway star, Howard McGillin. Cheri also loved mysteries and enjoyed streaming British mysteries, she had an amazing collection of vintage hats (thanks to her decades long enjoyment of thrift stores) and like her mother, adored chocolates, especially See's Candies and Belgian chocolates. Cheryl settled in Sebastopol, California where for many decades she shared the rural beauty of Sonoma County with 18

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

her brother Dave and sister Patty. We will miss so much of Cheri, her fun loving spirit, her curiosity, her honesty and especially her strong sense of fairness and justice that continually shaped and informed the strong minded person that she was. Cheryl was very loyal to her family, friends and adorable pets (the little ferocious papillon, Ollie and her gorgeous blue eyed, rag doll cat, Carson). In her last few years, she was grateful to her sister Patty for helping her manage her health concerns. With Patty at her side Cheri enjoyed long drives to the rugged Bodega coast, and most especially, it gave her the ability to stay in her cherished country home, where in her last days she so appreciated the springtime beauty of green meadows and the precious views of cows grazing on her fields. A special thank you goes to brother-in-law, Mark Jackson, who brought Cheri his specially crafted coffee each morning and did so many things to make her feel supported and comfortable. We will remember Cheryl and miss her every single day. She is survived by sister Cynthia Anderson of Goleta, sister Patricia Anderson (Mark Jackson) of Sebastopol, brother James Anderson of Goleta, son Stephen Medlock-Todd (Alyx) of Albuquerque, NM and nephew Nicholas Krawchuk of Sebastopol. Cheri was predeceased by her father, Robert W. Anderson (1926-1986) mother, Joyce Anderson Caspers (19272013), and brother David Scott Anderson (1959-2016).

JUNE 2, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

China. She would often send

loving mother, grandmother

containers of antiques and

and great-grandmother.

unique rugs back to Los Ange-

Helene lost her husband Joseph

les. Her friends would want to

Pollock in 2013 and her old-

buy them at a marked-up price

est child Thomas Pollock in

and Helene quickly realized

2020. She is survived by her

there was a business opportu-

daughter Margo (Pollock)

nity there. In the early 1970s,

Sinclair and Danny Sinclair,

she opened H. Pollock Rugs

her son Kenneth Pollock, her

on Melrose and became the

four grandchildren: Alexandra

Helene Zalk Pollock was born

premiere rug dealer in Beverly

(Pollock) Gagerman and Ryan

on January 8, 1919, in Duluth,

Hills (among her most famous

Gagerman, Allegra (Pollock)

MN. Her parents Estelle and

clients were Jim Morrison and

Brandano and Paul Brandano,

Louis Zalk moved to Los

Natalie Wood). Helene and Joe

Luke Pollock and Ariel (Sin-

Angeles in the early 1930’s. Her

also spent a lot of time at their

clair) Stern and Peter Stern,

father Louis found success

ranch in Montana in the 1970’s

six great grandchildren: Haley

in the early days of the steel

and Helene loved buying cows

Gagerman, Benjamin Gager-

industry and later as a business

at local auctions.

man, Amelia Brandano, Owen

leader when he introduced the-

Helene and Joe moved to Santa

Brandano, Madeline Stern and

osophy to Southern California

Barbara in 1986 and became

Jacob Stern as well as by many

and co-founded the Happy Val-

heavily involved in the com-

wonderful friends including

ley School (now Besant Hill) in

munity. While Joe ran the Santa

Denis Napton, Ralph Webb,

Ojai (along with theosophists

Barbara Film Festival for sev-

Jack Lowrance, Richard Gaz,

Aldous Huxley, Dr. Annie

eral years, Helene continued

Steve Guy, Tamara Asseyev

Besant, Beatrice Wood, Jiddu

to collect and promote local

and Linda May. Donations in

Krishnamurti, and others).

artists at H. Pollock Fine Art at

Helene's name can be made to

Helene's perspective on life

two different galleries in Sum-

The Amanda Foundation.

was in part influenced by her

merland well into her '90s. She

father's work. After attending

donated art to LACMA and

The Santa Barbara Girls School,

the Santa Barbara Natural His-

she later spent some time at

tory Museum. She founded the

UCLA before meeting her hus-

Pollock Theater at UCSB along

band and life partner Joseph

with her husband Joe. Helene

Pollock.

passed away peacefully in her

Helene was a socialite of the

sleep at her home in Montecito

highest order. Helene and her

on March 15th at age 103.

husband Dr. Joseph Pollock,

Helene had a true passion for

chief surgeon at Cedars Sinai

life, art, business, friendship,

Hospital, were the quintessen-

and family. She was the arche-

tial Beverly Hills entertainers.

type of the modern successful

They were locally famous for

business woman, a clever mind,

the parties they hosted at their

a talented painter, a dedicated

home on Alpine Drive in the

Sunday New York Times cross-

'50s and '60s and the room

word puzzle solver, an incred-

was always filled with amazing

ible baker, and a voracious

houseguests like Dinah Shore,

reader. She kept current on all

international designer Kalef

issues of politics, news, and life.

Alaton and other luminaries

Her endeavors often placed her

of the interior design industry.

in the midst of history. Notably,

She would travel internation-

she served on the grand jury

ally as a hobby and bring back

of Robert Kennedy's assassin

rugs from her travels through-

Sirhan Sirhan. She will always

out Europe, India, Iran, and

be remembered as the most

Helene Zalk Pollock 1/8/1919

Jean Marie Gardner 10/1/1932 - 4/20/2022

There will be a celebration of Jean’s life Sunday, July 10, 2022, 1 p.m. – 4 p.m., Rocky Nook Park, Group Site 1. Friends are invited to come and share memories and stories. Parking is limited, carpooling suggested.


obituaries Kathryn Shedd McLain 4/22/1933 - 10/16/2021

Kathryn McLain passed away peacefully October 16, 2021, at her home at Valle Verde in Santa Barbara. She was 88. She was born at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara on April 22, 1933, to Kathryn and Edward Shedd. She was the youngest of four Shedd children; Edward (Bobby), Margaret (Peggy) and Helen (Honey) Mathers. She was an avid horsewoman in her youth and graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1951. She attended UC Santa Barbara at both the Riviera campus and the current site of the university. She earned her bachelor’s degree in Sociology from UCSB and married Richard Edward McLain in 1956. They had two children, Leslie, and Laird McLain. Kathryn served the local community as a 32-year employee of the social services department and was the senior employee of the County of Santa Barbara upon her retirement in 1995. She held many positions within the social services department in her tenure that spanned four decades. She was widely respected for her diligence and devotion to her job and those she served. She was heroic raising two children singlehandedly while running the household and completely giving herself to her job. She enjoyed a well-earned retirement engaging in things she never had time for while a working single Mom. Drawing and painting, travelling to Alaska and Hawaii and enjoying her two grandchildren. She was a cheerful, steady, selfreliant person who weathered and achieved many things in

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

her life and possessed remarkable perspective and wisdom. It was a life well lived and she was loved and revered by her family. She is survived by sisters Peggy Shedd of Santa Rosa, CA, Helen Mathers of Kingston, Ontario Canada, her daughter Leslie Foster of Shingletown, CA, son Laird McLain, daughter in law Sue McLain, grandson Ian McLain and granddaughter Rory McLain all of Santa Barbara. Her ashes will be interred at the Santa Barbara Cemetery with her parents and brother.

Lucille Viola Wulff 12/2/1921 - 4/13/2022

Lucille Wulff’s Celebration of Life Lucille Viola Nedegaard Wulff was born in Askov, Minnesota on December 2, 1921. She grew up on a farm with 10 brothers and sisters: Emery, Margaret Lunde, Ivo Jacobsen, Arnum (died young), Mabel Peterson, Jack, Lucille Wulff, Irene Madsen, Dickie (died young), and Cora Vandecar. Life was difficult in Minnesota, so the children started to move

Brett M. LeCouvre 6/18/1965 - 12/7/2020

to the Danish community of Solvang. Ivo was 16, Margaret was 17, and Emery was 19. They sent money back home when they could. Emery got a job in a dairy and the girls got jobs in Santa Barbara as maids. Every Thursday and every other Sunday there were dances in Solvang at Atterdag College.

(Words of Tribute from Heartbroken Friends) "You left too soon! You left too suddenly!" "Brett was such a good man for a tragic time, under a load too much to carry. Now we have him in our brains & hearts & he is weightless at perfect Peace. We will say his name often he had a lot of love & did good work. We all carry him now, better for the privilege." My dearest exquisite son Brett, your blazing blue eyes, impish grin & amazing compassion for others will be forever in our hearts. Love is Eternal. A scattering of ashes will be held in the Fall. lynnelecouvre@gmail.com for details. A donation in Brett's name to a charity of your choice or to helping animals is appreciated.

Then, when Lucille was 15, she got on the train with her lunch and $5.00 and set off for Solvang. When she arrived they picked her up and took her to the Sunday dance where she met and danced with Viggo (Vic) Wulff. She worked with Ivo on the Jacobsen dairy. Then she became a maid in Hope Ranch in Santa Barbara. After she worked there awhile, the woman asked her to cook. She said she didn’t know how to cook, so her employer gave her a cookbook. Lucille became a very good cook, and one year she got an award for being the best cook in Santa Ynez Valley where they lived. Lucille and Vic dated for 6 years and married in Las Vegas

on Feb. 15, 1942. In humor, Vic

Alfred was married to Danna

often said it was the biggest

Toomey and is now married

gamble of his life. Vic worked

to Janet. Alfred and Danna

for the shipyard during the war,

have one daughter (Nicole)

and Lucille worked for the Air

and two sons (Richard and

Force under contract, and they

Troy). Richard is married to

farmed in Rolling Hills.

Annie and they have 3 children

Lucille and Vic had two sons:

(Amanda, Jacob and Lucas).

Alfred Earl Wulff and Eric Alan

Amanda Nelson is married to

Wullf. They moved back to

Brendan, Lucas is married to

Santa Ynez in 1954 and farmed

Alexiss, and Jacob is married

the Mitchell ranch together.

to Jordan. Nicole is married to

Some of the many jobs Lucille

John Arabia. Nicole has 3 girls,

had were: waitress, bookkeeper

Erica Torina who is married to

at the Red Barn, bookkeeper

Blake; Ashley Scurria who is

and teller at the bank, assis-

married to Stuart; and Morgan

tant and bookkeeper for cattle

Lee. Troy Wulff has 2 children,

rancher Cornelius. She also

Naomi and Tory Wulff. Alfred

did the banking for Bethania

has 8 grandchildren and 4

Church and kept the Christ-

great grandchil- dren.

mas fund for Atterdag Village.

Eric was married to Jeanette

She was very good with money

Jenkins. They have two daugh-

and a hard worker; she was a

ters (Carolina and Tami)

woman who you could trust.

and one son (Rob). Carolina

The most important thing to

Aguirre, whose partner is

Vic and Lucille was family.

Doc Gumfrey, has lived in

They had many relatives living

Wyoming for over 20 years.

in Solvang, and frequent din-

Carolina has two sons – San-

ners were held at their home.

tiago and Miguel – and 6

She loved to cook and set a

grand- children. Their son Rob

beautiful table. Two things

lives in Santa Ynez and is a

she was famous for were her

plumber with Smith Electric.

Peanut Clusters and Bacon

He and his former wife, Jeannie

Crackers.

Halverson, have two daughters

Lucille loved to work in her

– Kaylee and Kasey. Tami mar-

beautiful garden and excelled

ried Richard Myer and has two

at flower arrangements. After

children, Skyler and Torin. She

Vic died she worked hard in

has a great job and they live in

the garden. When we went to

Illinois. Eric and Betty Elings

see her, she said she was work-

Wells have been together for

ing hard and thought about

26 years and come to Solvang

moving up to Atterdag because

every weekend except when

she was lonely and her garden-

traveling. They both loved Vic,

ing was not as satisfying as

who died in 2000, and Lucille,

before. She did make the move

who was a mother to both Eric

in 2002. Everyone at Atterdag

and Betty.

loved her and she loved them.

Memorial Funeral Service

She took an active role in all of the events and loved their many parties. She dressed up and put on her jewelry every day. She had costumes for every holiday. Lucille and Vic loved their boys, Alfred and Eric, and were so proud of them. INDEPENDENT.COM

will be Saturday June 4th at 11:00 am at Bethania Lutheran Church in Solvang, CA Donation’s in Lucille’s name to: Bethania Lutheran Church, Atterdag Village and/or VNA Health in Solvang Loper Funeral Chapel, Directors

JUNE 2, 2022

Continued on p.20

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19


obituaries Richard Casey Talbot, DDS

10/31/1933 - 5/25/2022

Richard Casey Talbot, DDS, age 88 and former resident of Joliet, passed away peacefully on May 25, 2022 in Santa Barbara, California surrounded by loving family members. He was born on October 31, 1933 in Joliet, he was the son of the late Joseph and Kathleen (nee Casey) Talbot. Dick was a graduate of St. Raymond Elementary School and Joliet Catholic High School where he began an awardwinning swimming career after spending afternoons in the YMCA pool with a classmate stricken by polio. At a Chicago swim meet held in Lake Michigan, Dick’s skills impressed the Purdue University swim coach who happened to be sitting next to Dick’s parents. Dick’s swimming led to a scholarship to Purdue where he was captain of the swim team and a three-time AllAmerican swimmer. He served in the ROTC, pledged the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, and earned a BS in Business in 1955. After graduation, Dick was commissioned as an ensign for two years in the US Navy stationed in Long Beach, California aboard the USS Point Defiance. Dick later earned his DDS from the Dental School of University of Illinois at Chicago. He joined his father’s dental practice in Joliet where they practiced together for a 20

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

year before his dad retired.

his expertise to take care of

new great-grandchild, Jay.

Selina grew up in Kingsford,

In 1965, he married Sharon

people’s dental needs and Jane

A Mass of Christian Burial for

Michigan. She met Kenneth on

O’Connell and they raised four

taught school. After another

Dr. Richard C. Talbot will be

Halloween night 1953 in Flor-

children together; Sean, Eliza-

successful mission and years

celebrated Tuesday June 7, 2022

ence Wisconsin. They married

beth, Megan and Casey. The

serving on the board of the

at 10 AM CT at the Church

June 19, 1954. After their first

Talbots enjoyed hosting par-

Mission Doctors, Dick and Jane

of St.Jude, 2212 McDonough

son Ken was born they moved

ties, spending time outdoors,

were given their highest honor,

Street, Joliet. Visitation will be

to Milwaukee, Wisconsin when

traveling in their epic van

the Heart of the World award.

held Monday June 6 from 6

Kenneth took a job with Gen-

trips across the country, and

Dick was a lifelong swimmer,

PM to 8 PM CT at the Fred C.

eral Motors. For the next few

celebrating holidays and birth-

avid golfer, and active member

Dames Funeral Home, 3200

years they moved from Mil-

days in regal style. In the 1980’s,

of the Joliet Country Club. He

Black at Essington Road, Joliet.

waukee to Baltimore, MD, to

the Talbots participated in an

loved scuba diving, water and

A memorial service will be

Coco Beach, FL, to Little Rock,

exchange program with the

snow skiing, and served on the

held in Santa Barbara at a later

Ark. In 1964 they returned to

Irish Children’s Fund, hosting

Wilmot Mountain Ski Patrol

date.

Wisconsin. The family enjoyed

Liam Mulholland from Belfast

for many years. He was also

In lieu of flowers, memorials

life on a small farm where

who became one of the family.

an enthusiastic outdoorsman

are appreciated in Dick’s name

Selina learned to can fruits

Dick continued practicing fam-

who loved to take his family

to Mission Doctors Association

and vegetables. Selina loved to

ily dentistry in Joliet eventually

hunting, fishing, and camping,

at https://www.missiondoctors.

bake cookies, and pies (French

partnering with Patrick Smith,

and treasured long treks in the

org.

apple was the family favorite).

DDS, retiring after more than

Canadian Boundary Waters.

40 years in practice. He cared

Dick enjoyed frequent family

for his wife Sharon as she

vacations to Ponte Vedra, FL,

a vacation property near Flor-

fought pancreatic cancer, and

Vail, CO, and Minocqua, WI.

ence Wisconsin. This property

was sadly forced to say farewell

Dick will be fondly remem-

provides the family with won-

in 2007.

bered for his fun-loving, outgo-

derful memories of gatherings

After several difficult years,

ing nature, his resourcefulness

with friends and relatives.

Dick found joy again in 2008,

and champion-level putzing,

Selina enjoyed spending her

reconnecting with an old high

his deep love for his family and

summers after retirement in

school pal, Jane Fehrenbacher.

friends, and his insistence on

They married in 2009, and

a nightly bowl of ice cream.

Dick moved to Santa Barbara

Dick enjoyed recounting tales

to be with Jane, where he was

of bravery and adventure, as

welcomed by her large family.

well as stories from his family’s

He became active in St. Antho-

history.

ny’s church community, vol-

Dick is survived by his loving

unteered for Transition House,

wife, Jane Fehrenbacher, eight

kept up his daily swimming

step-children: Anne (Alex)

routine, and planned global

Cole, Carey (Jeffrey) McKin-

adventures with Jane.

non, Martha (Michael) Lee,

Dick and Jane went to four

James C. Carey III, Eileen

continents on their many many

(Chris) Vansell, Jane Carey,

trips together. Everywhere they

Clare (Seth) Carey Seaberg,

went, they shared laughter and

Dan Carey, and 15 grandchil-

stories with the locals. Their

dren as well as great-grand-

grandkids always looked for-

children. He is also survived

ward to receiving their colorful

by his children with his first

postcards from far reaching

wife, Sharon: Sean (Kelley)

destinations such as Norway,

Talbot, Elizabeth (Max) Janairo,

Prague, China and Peru.

Megan (Kurt) Atchison, and

In 2010, they combined their

Casey (Jill) Talbot, 8 beloved

love of travel and volunteerism

grandchildren: Emma, Wes,

and went on a service mission

Hayden, Max, Vivien, Macilin,

to Cameroon, Africa. Dick used

Lilah, and Ellery, and brand

JUNE 2, 2022

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Selina Suzanna Kolberg 5/5/2022

Selina Suzanna Kolberg passed away peacefully at 1:00 on May 5, 2022. She went to be with the lord at the age of 89 years. Selina was born in Hubbell, Michigan. She was predeceased by her father Walter Joseph St. Peter and her mother Mary Josephine Lenz. Selina was survived by her loving husband of 68 years Kenneth Gordon Kolberg. She is lovingly remembered by her sons Kenneth John Kolberg (Mary “Genia” Kolberg) of Santa Barbara, CA, Kevin Robert Kolberg (Elizabeth Kolberg) of Ventura, CA, Donald Gordon Kolberg of Lompoc, CA, John Joseph Kolberg of Goleta, CA, and Mary Kay Fallon (John Fallon) of Redondo Beach, CA; her grandchildren Katelin Kolberg of Ventura, Ca, and Jake Fallon of Redondo Beach, CA.

During the summer of 1966, Kenneth and Selina purchased

Florence. In the fall of 1972 the family moved to Goleta, California. Selina loved the warm weather. She was very proud of her children as they all completed their education in Goleta. In 1980 she went to work for the Devereaux Foundation and became a “house mom” as a caregiver for those with learning disabilities. During her retirement years, Selina’s greatest joy was to spend time with her grandchildren, Katelin and Jake. She often traveled with them and visited frequently. Selina made Birthdays and Holidays extra special for them. Katelin and Jake dearly miss their Grandma. Celebration of Life services will be held at Starbuck-Lind in Lompoc, Ca on Thursday, June 16,2022 at 1:30.


In Memoriam

June Carol Sochel 1933-2022

A Change Maker for Good

BY R I C H A R D S O C H E L he tables were adorned with deco-

rative linen and mouth-watering foods. Lovely centerpieces were surrounded by political swag, pamphlets, and bumper stickers. White and red wines, sparkling beverages, and sometimes champagne chilled in anticipation of guests. Soft music played in the background, or my dad played jazz standards on the piano. Then the guests, community leaders, change-makers, change-seekers, and the honored public figure filed in for the gathering: a meeting, a fundraiser, a campaign event, or just a private party with friends. This was the scene that played out and repeated at my childhood home on the border of Santa Barbara and Montecito for more than six decades. It was because of my mother, June Carol Sochel. June Carol Cosner was born May 1, 1933. She passed away peacefully at her Santa Barbara home on April 18, 2022, after a brief and serious illness. She was 88 years young, leaving an indelible mark on Santa Barbara. Although she was less than five feet tall, June cast a long shadow and left large tracks around our city and county. Her decades of contributions were easy to miss because they were typically from behind the scenes. Unknown to June, close friends affectionately nicknamed her “The Little General.” Though not a public figure herself, June informed, chastised, molded, and inspired many who were, or who were to become community leaders, including nonprofit executives, mayors, city councilmembers, and county supervisors among them. June was a force of nature, quick to laugh and smile, and equally quick to give her opinions, usually with passion, underpinned by concern, care, and love. June and her late husband, Allen Sochel, moved to Santa Barbara in 1959. They found it to be a charming community with tremendous potential. At first, June taught school at La Cumbre Junior High. Later, she plotted, toiled, and strove to keep Santa Barbara beautiful and strong by serving with innumerable social and political groups, nonprofits, and on boards, too many to name. She served these organizations in myriad ways with seemingly inexhaustible energy, vigor, and vitality, including managing many political campaigns for 50-plus years, including her last mayoral campaign winner in 2020 at the tender age of 86. June was born and raised in small towns all over Texas. Her father, Wesley LeRoy “Roy” Cosner, worked at Sinclair Oil Company as a pump station manager, so the family moved wherever the company needed Roy to be: Pampa, Alice, Turner Town, and finally Corpus Christi, where June went to high school. June drove to California for a visit with two girlfriends in 1955 and never left. But she always clung to her Texas roots, remaining close to her Roy Miller High School Class of 1951, and Southwest Texas University friends. June graduated college in 1954 with her bachelor’s in education, followed by a secondary school teaching credential. She was a voracious reader who consumed more books in a year than most people read in a lifetime. Her profound curiosity about life, information, and politics started in early childhood. Public libraries in the rural Texas

The Arlington Theatre COURTESY

T

­ ­

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towns where she lived were her luminous portals to a wider fascinating world. As a child and as an adult, books were a way June accessed a much larger and expansive reality. Late in life, she traveled to places she read about as a child: Egypt, Turkey, France, Italy, and Israel, to name some. June leaves a Texas-sized hole in our hearts by her passing. She was a 4-foot-10-inch pistol who packed an energetic kick toward the things that she cared deeply about, including family, friends, leadership, the natural environment, reading, cooking, fashion, traveling, fine foods and wines, and her beloved Santa Barbara community. June loved her country and sought to steward its democratic promise and health. June’s life was an example of someone who cared courageously, worked tirelessly, played vigorously, entertained generously, and loved deeply. June lived life on her terms, even to the end. She refused to be restrained by the myopic religious constraints and social conventions of rural life. A child of the Great Depression, she threw off economic, social, and political limitations, and charted her own course. She left a legacy of inspiration to professional women, community leaders, a long list of friends, and to her remaining family. June is survived by her son, Richard Sochel; daughter-in-law, Kathy Navarro Sochel; and two grandchildren, Jonathan and Juliana. A memorial will be hosted by the family at 10 a.m. on June 26, at Simmons Global Leadership Center at Westmont College in Santa Barbara. The family requests that guests please register at Eventbrite.com to reserve a seat or receive information on how to attend online.

Bob’s Burgers* (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:15, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:15, 7:45. Downton Abbey: A New Era (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 1:40, 4:30, 7:20. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:55, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 4:55, 8:00.

Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Fri: 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45, 9:45. Sat: 12:15, 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45, 9:45. Sun: 12:15, 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45.Mon-Tue: 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45. Wed/Thur: 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri: 2:25, 3:45, 5:15, 6:40, 8:05, 9:30. Sat: 12:05, 2:25, 3:45, 5:15, 6:40, 8:05, 9:30. Sun: 1:00, 2:25, 5:15, 8:05. Mon: 2:25, 5:15, 8:05. Tue-Thur: 2:25, 3:45, 5:15, 6:40, 8:05. MET Opera Hamlet* (NR): Sat: 9:55. Wizard of Oz* (G): Sun/Mon: 3:00, 7:00.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Crimes of the Future* (R):Fri: 2:15, 5:00, 7:30, 10:05. Sat/Sun:11:45, 2:15, 5:00, 7:30, 10:05. Mon-Wed: 2:40, 5:10, 8:00.Thur: 12:00, 2:40, 5:10, 8:00. Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Fri: 1:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 3:40, 4:00, 4:45, 5:30, 6:15, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30, 9:55. Sat/Sun: 10:45, 11:30, 12:15, 1:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 3:40, 4:00, 4:45, 5:30, 6:15, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30, 9:55. Mon-Wed: 1:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 4:00,4:45, 5:30, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30.Thur: 11:30, 12:15, 1:00, 2:30, 4:00, 5:30, 7:00, 8:30, 9:55. Men (R): Fri-Sun: 9:15. Mon: 7:30. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri: 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:15. Sat/Sun: 10:40, 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:15. Mon-Wed: 2:20, 5:20, 8:15. Thur: 11:20, 2:20, 5:20, 8:15. Jurassic World Dominion* (PG13): Thur: 4:15, 5:45, 7:30, 9:00, 10:45. Rise of the Guardians (PG): Thur: 10:00.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

Benediction (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. Downton Abbey A New Era*: (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:15, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 1:20, 4:15, 7:05.

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Crimes of the Future* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:45, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 3:15,5:45, 8:15. Bob’s Burgers* (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:15, 6:45, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:15, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00. Montana Story (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:20. Sat/Sun: 2:45. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 5:00. The Bad Guys (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 4:45, 7:15. Northman (R): Fri-Thur: 7:45. Madagascar (PG): Tue/Wed: 10:00.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Eiffel (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:50, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 4:50, 7:20. Thur: 4:50. Downton Abbey (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:40, 4:30, 7:30. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:00, 8:05. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 5:00, 8:05. Thur: 8:05. Fantastic Beast: The Secret of Dumbledore (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:40, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45. Jurassic World Dominion* (PG13): Thur: 5:30, 6:30, 8:45, 9:45.

Top Gun: Maverick* (PG13): Fri-Wed: 1:15, 4:30, 7:45. Thur: 1:15. Jurassic World Dominion* (PG13): Thur: 4:30, 7:45.

JUNE 2, 2022

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C ARLA TOMSON

THE

SURFER

AND THE

Authors Noah benShea (left) and Shaun Tomson

E

merging from the lingering pandemic, an

upbeat new book — and first-time collaboration — by Shaun Tomson and Noah benShea hits coffee tables and nightstands this month. While Tomson and benShea share little by way of upbringing — Tomson grew up surfing in South Africa as benShea followed scholarly paths from his native Canada —their mutual interest in bettering the often-bleak outlooks of the audiences they speak to brought them together as coronavirus uncertainties spread worldwide. Published by family-focused Familius, The Surfer and the Sage: A Guide to Survive & Ride Life’s Waves is a compact self-help collection of insights, poems, and vignettes that take on 18 life dualities chaptered across 196 pages —from from

by Keith Hamm “Despair and Hope” to “Isolated and Connected” to “Fear and Courage,” with dozens of color photographs by Santa Barbara–based Dan Merkel. For the chapter themes, “We put the negative before the positive so people can see that there’s a path — moving from despair to hope, for example,” explains Tomson. “It’s about finding your footing, keeping your balance.” For Tomson, who started surfing competitively at 12 and captured the 1977 world title a decade later, the book advances his work as a pro surfer turned motivational speaker. But more importantly, it’s the ongoing effort of a grieving father

using his reach and experience to help people, especially Talk about the seed of this project. teens, make better decisions. In 2006, Tomson’s son Mathew, Noah benShea: Shaun and I spoke at the same TEDx in 15 at the time, died while playing a “choking game” that Paris, where I gave the keynote. We didn’t meet at the time, restricts oxygen to the brain, according to news reports. In but Shaun spoke profoundly and his remarks were sent my The Surfer and the Sage, Tomson describes regaining his faith way. We met for lunch early in 2020 [in Santa Barbara]. Both after that terrible loss. This is his third book. of us felt it was like meeting an old friend for the first time, Best-selling author of more than two dozen books, ben- and we wanted the excuse of more time together and doing Shea’s Jacob the Baker series is his most widely known and something that shared our mutual life agenda to make a diftranslated. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree in English ference in the lives of others. Shaun suggested the book’s title. from UCLA in 1967 and in 1974 earned an advanced degree in I suggested its subtitle. Honoring that, we both began typing. poetry from Goddard College in Vermont. In the early 1990s, his syndicated “Noah’s Window” column Shaun Tomson: We simply liked each other immediately. was nominated for the Noah said, “Let’s write a book together.” I said, “Yes!” And we Pulitzer Prize. Over were away on that ride together. the decades, he has also worked as a professor, C O N T I N U E D >>> translator, resident phi philosopher, lecturer, and speaker. To young peo people struggling with mental illness, he reminds them that they’re not in this alone. “Don’t con confuse how you feel with who you are,” he says. “Know that you’re somebody special. Know that somebody wanted you to know about this [perspective] — that’s why we’re putting this out there.” Ahead of their book launch, the Independent caught up with Tomson and benShea to get more background on the project and deeper insight on some of its themes. Wild coast of South Africa DAN MERKEL

WAVE-RIDING CHAMP AND PHILOSOPHERPOET PEN PANDEMIC PICK-ME-UP

SAGE

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EVENTS

DAN MERKEL

THE SURFER AND THE SAGE Tecolote Book Shop (1470 East Valley Rd., Montecito): In-person book launch and signing, Sat., June 4, 3 p.m. Patagonia (235 W. Santa Clara St., Ventura): Inperson book signing, Thu., June 9, 6:30 p.m. Santa Barbara Maritime Museum (113 Harbor Wy.): In-person lecture, discussion, and booksigning, plus a presentation of surf photographs, Thu., June 16, 7 p.m. Registration required: sbmm .org/santa-barbara-event. Montecito Country Mart (1016 Coast Village Rd., Montecito): In-person book signing, Wed., June 22, 5 p.m. What helped you decide he’d make a good writing partner? NB: In life, more often than not, we know what doesn’t fit. But when the right fit comes into play — wow! And scripture says that two should travel together so if one should falter the other would be there. Shaun and I lift each other so our work might lift others. ST: I think at heart we have a great love for helping people be better. Both of us have separately been in the positive-inspiration world for decades.

"

How did the pandemic influence your writing? NB: During the pandemic, as many lost their balance and many others were tragically lost forever, I was even more self-reminding that things don’t have to be going good for people for them to be great. Falling is not failing. For the child in all of us, falling is a preamble to learning to stand, a preamble to walking, and a promise that one day you will run to the best in you.

Surfers on the North Shore of Oahu, Hawai‘i

and accessible, yet many of us choose otherwise. Why? NB: Neurophysiology reminds us that the information we take in from the time we are children runs like rivers making alleyways in our brain. All future information wants to run down those alleyways. The choices we make in our lives tend toward what is familiar and perhaps negative. You have to stop and think: Does this way of thinking serve me or enslave me? ST: Our choices define us. Professor Ralph Keeney at Duke University released an interesting paper saying

"

Of all the things you can make in life, why not make a difference?

JUNE 3 - 9 “TOUGH, VIBRATING ITALIAN DRAMA” Los Angeles Times

ST: Through the pandemic, I did virtual presentations to schools, universities, sports teams, a drug rehab clinic, a group of PTSD survivors, and some of the world’s largest corporations. At the beginning of each livestream, I would ask people to send me a word that described how they were feeling. The four most common words were “stress,” “anxiety,” “depression,” and “disconnection.” I called it a SADD mindset. The book had a strong mission to try to help change that mindset as it settled over the world.

FRI: 5:00pm & 7:30pm SAT: 2:30pm & 5:00pm & 7:30pm SUN: 2:30pm & 5:00pm MON - THURS: 5:00pm & 7:30pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM 24

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ST: I talk to tens of thousands of young people across the globe — at poor schools and posh schools. I tell simple and emotional stories about character that are genuine and authentic. To reach youth, you better tell it straight from the heart. Part of the book’s message is about making better choices. Often, the better choice is clear

that poor choices lead to a million preventable deaths each year in the U.S. alone. It’s a calamity hiding in plain sight. In the book, we try to show the duality of life and offer perspectives and perhaps ways to make transitions from darkness to light. I specifically encourage people to create their own “Code” for positive decision-making: Write 12 lines, each beginning with “I will….” Complete the exercise in 15 minutes. This simple method can help allay the feeling of being swept along powerlessly — a way to find the internal power to make the right choices.

How did your faith inform this book? Some people are receptive to religious doctrine. Others are not. Was there a balancing act? NB: While faith is a bedrock in religions, faith is not singularly a religious doctrine. Faith is the courage to see what is unseen. And faith’s first requirement is to have faith in yourself. If you cannot trust yourself, you will not trust others. If you cannot be honest with yourself, you will not be honest with others. Faith is commonly at play — when we drive through the green light at an intersection, we have faith we will not get hit. Will someone ever run a red light? Yes.

DAN MERKEL

The book’s themes aren’t lost on young adults, teens, or even kids. What’s the best way to connect to that audience? NB: Keep it simple. Don’t talk down to anyone because they are younger, and always try to lift whomever you are speaking with or writing for. At the same time, I know I am no longer young enough to know everything. The old are wise, and the young will lead them.

— Noah benShea


C O V E R S TCO OR V EYR S T O R Y est stone dropped in the widest sea will send radiating circles to shores you will never know.

But regardless of your religious faith or lack thereof, you are inclined to believe — to have faith — that you will arrive home safely.

ST: We wanted an interdenominational book that anyone of any religion could pick up and perhaps glean some hope, truth, and faith from our perspective. While this is not a religious book, it is a deeply spiritual book. I agree with Noah that faith is a bedrock of religion. What we have faith in is what we stand on and is seldom revealed — but we believe anyway. My bedrock of belief was fractured when I lost my son. It was like an earthquake broke my faith. In the book, I write how a single bolt of lightning, out of a clear blue sky, miraculously restored that foundation. At this point in your life, what are you hoping to share with the next generation? NB: The act of reaching out with kindness is transforming. A “small act of kindness” is a contradiction in terms. Kindness is not bordered by size. All kindness expands infinitely — the small-

ST: With age and joy and pain comes a measure of wisdom and knowledge. This little book is a perspective, not a prescription; a guide, not an instruction manual. Our time here is limited, so you better make it count. Love your family and friends and stay connected to them. Find a physical pursuit that gets you out in nature and gets your heart beating. Volunteer and make a difference to something or someone. Get involved in a project or work that inspires you and uplifts others too. If needed, reconnect with your faith, whatever that might be. And know that no matter how dark the night may seem during those despairing hours, the sun will rise again.

Explore the underwater world of the Santa Barbara Channel in our updated upstairs exhibit. Encounter a Two-spot Octopus, Moon Jellies, Giant Pacific Seahorses, a California Moray, and more. Learn about the channel’s unique habitats from rocky reefs to kelp forests and

Anything you’d like to emphasize or add? NB: The most common shared password in life these days is “anxiety.” Knowing this about each other is our shared brotherhood and sisterhood. Shaun and I are two souls a little further down the trail than some, and we hope to be guides of caring and insight to all.

see the animals that live there.

ST: At every keynote, I ask the audience to write their Code — those 12 lines, each beginning with “I will….” This is a way to find and define purpose. From students at humble schools in Africa and Asia to CEOs and their teams at the world’s hottest corporations, I have read thousands of lines of Code over the last 16 years since I started this process at Anacapa School [in Santa Barbara]. Everyone writes the same two lines: “I will be better” and “I will help others be better.” We hope this book helps with being better.

211 Stearns Wharf Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805-962-2526 sbnature.org/seacenter

The Rotary Club of Los Olivos Presents

The 16th Annual

n

(Regular $25 Exam & X-Ray value of 218) limited time offer

GREAT MUSIC, FOOD & WINE Saturday, June 11th 2022 Downtown Los Olivos

1:00-4:00 pm

Featuring Live Jazz performed by The Idiomatiques

30 Vintners 30 Chefs All-inclusive

Double rainbow off the North Shore of Oahu, Hawai‘i

expiration date - 6/5/22

95.00

$

Order tickets online at JazzAndOliveFestival.org

805 560 0123 INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 2, 2022

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EARL MINNIS PRESENTS & LOBERO LIVE PRESENT

N I V L A E V A D t s e u g with ver y special

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6, 7:30 PM

LOBERO THEATRE - SANTA BARBARA

With a sound that ignores the lines between Rock & Roll, Country, Blues, and Rockabilly, The Blasters carry on a hard-won legacy as one of the most recognizable and credible bands in American Music. Fronted by Phil Alvin's powerful vocals, the band follows through with spontaneity, power, and grit – making this rare 40th Anniversary Concert an experience not to be missed.

TICKETS AT LOBERO.ORG OR (805)963 0761 26

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JUNE 2, 2022

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

JUNE

2-8

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event. COURTESY

6/2, 6/5: Eos Lounge Thu.: IV’IZA Island with Kevin Knapp, 9pm. Free. Sun.: SonicBass Society: Tisoki, 8pm. $12.36. 500 Anacapa St. Call (805) 5642410. eoslounge.com

tinyurl.com/SoulRejuvination

6/4: Goleta Valley Library Writers’ Monthly Workshop This gathering is for

6/2-6/5, 6/7-6/8: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Slenderbodies, 8pm. $23. Ages 18+. Fri.: Uncle Uncle with Pat Curran, 9pm. $10-$12. Ages 21+. Sat.: Russ

writers with all levels of experience to share work, exchange feedback, and discuss the tools of the trade with this month’s discussion topic of When Words Collide: Saying Everything with (Almost) Nothing. 12:30pm. Goleta Valley Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Free.

Blvd. with The Framers, ExPorters, and Modern Genre, 8:30pm. $12-$15. Ages 21+. Sun: Jazz in the Bar with Kalinka, noon. $10. Tue.: Laguna Blanca School Band Spring Showcase, 7pm. $7. Wed.: Belly Dancing with Alexandra King, 7pm. $10-$12. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/

tinyurl.com/WritersMonthlyWorkshop

COURTESY

SUNDAY 6/5

6/2-6/6, 6/8:

Butterflies Alive! Walk

through a beautiful garden while nearly 1,000 live butterflies flutter freely around you. See a dazzling variety of butterflies, from local favorites to exotic tropical species. The exhibit goes through September 5. Reservations are recommended. Thu.-Mon., Wed.: 10am5pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$18. Call (805) 682-4711. tinyurl.com/ButterfliesAlive2022

6/2: Art Matters Lecture: The Multiple Surrealisms of Wifred Lam Mey-Yen Moriuchi, PhD, Associate Professor of Art History at La Salle University will discuss the impact of Wifred Lam’s heritage on his semi-abstract, polymorphic paintings that draw on African motifs in addition to avant-garde movements such as Cubism and Surrealism. 5:30-6:30pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free-$15.

sbma.net/events

6/2: 1st Thursday Art Walk Stroll

Flamenco Company and the tourism office of Spain will present extraordinary, emotionfueled interpretations of song and dance in a range of flamenco styles with composer Juan Parilla on flute, Adolfo Herrera on percussion, and vocalists Manuel Gago, David El Galli, and Ismael Fernandez. 6:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido. GA: $61-$101; meet & greet: $181. Call (805) 963-0761.

lobero.org/whats-on

6/5:

Chaucer’s Almost Summer Sundays: Sojourner Kincaid Rolle

Poet and author Sojourner Kincaid Rolle will talk about her latest book, Free at Last: A Juneteenth Poem, a lyrical celebration of Juneteenth deeply rooted in Black American history that reverberates loudly and proudly today. 2pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787. Read more on p. 45. chaucersbooks.com/event COURTESY

through participating downtown venues for free access to art openings and artist receptions, live music, lectures, wine tastings, and more in a fun and social environment. 5-8pm. Downtown S.B. Call (805) 962-2098.

events

tinyurl.com/1stThursdaysSB

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events 6/4: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar

Rusty Lindsey, 6-9pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126. tinyurl.com/RustyLindsey

and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 9670066. coldspringtavern.com

6/4-6/5: Topa Topa Brewing Co. (S.B) Sat.: Tom Relling featuring Tom

6/3-6/5: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Brian Kinsella Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.:

Sun.: Coveralls, 5-7pm. 120 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call (805) 324-4150. topatopa.beer/pages/happenings

Adrian Galysh, 1-5pm; Farm Truck, 8:3011:30pm. Sun.: About Time, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/ 6/3-6/4: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Paradise King, 6-8pm. Sat.: The Last Decade, 6-9pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

6/5: SB Wine Collective Will Breman, 3pm. 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C. Free. Call (805) 456-2700. santa

barbarawinecollective.com/events

6/6: The Red Piano Church on Monday: RJ Mischo, 7:30pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 3581439. theredpiano.com/schedule

6/5: Prime Time Band Spring/Summer Free Concert Enjoy classics, show tunes, marches, and pop performed by S.B.’s 60-plus-member community concert band who are ages 50 and older. 2-4pm. San Marcos High School, 4750 Hollister Ave. Free.

tinyurl.com/PrimeTimeBand

6/5: Met Live in HD: Lucia di Lammermoor Music Academy alumna soprano Nadine Sierra will play the haunted heroine of Gaetano Donizetti’s tragic masterpiece, Lucia di Lammermoor in an electrifying new staging by in-demand Australian theater and film director Simon Stone and conducted by Riccardo Frizza. 2pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. Free-$28. tinyurl.com/MetLiveJun5

MONDAY 6/6

6/4-6/5:

COURTESY

6/3: Prohibition Speakeasy Pop-Up Put your gladrags on and

tinyurl.com/SpeakeasyPopUp

6/3: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Call (805) 560-7254.

6/3-6/5: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Collab, 6-9pm. Sat.: Sean Wiggins & Lone Goat. 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball

FRIDAY 6/3 meet new friends as you travel to the 1920s with vintage decorations, classic cocktails (receive a bonus drink if you’re in costume), appetizers, and a deejay spinning jazz, blues, and dance band sounds. 8-11pm. 747 Designs, 619A State St. $75. Ages 21+.

Slenderbodies

Conneely & Birds of Paradise, 5-9pm.

SATURDAY 6/4 6/4: Flamenco Intimo Siudy Garrido

6/3-6/4: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: The Last Great Decade, 7-9pm. Sat.: The Academy, 6-8pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY AY 6/2 D S R U TH

Shows on Tap

6/4: Soul Rejuvenation This holistic, three-hour workshop is intended to help heal and rejuvenate the mind, body, and soul through restorative yoga, Reiki (channeling healing energy through the hands), sound healing, and essential oils. 1-4pm. S.B. Yoga Center, 32 E. Micheltorena St. $75.

Mujeres Makers Market There will be a special

6/6:

Monday Milonga: Once in a New Moon — Gemini

Edition Nomad Tango & S.B. Association for the Advancement of Tango invite you to learn then dance with Argentinian tango and folklore dancer Martin Almiron and U.S.A. championships competitor Lauren Woods. Class: 7-8pm; dance: 8-11pm. Leslie Sack Dance Studio, 20 W. Calle Laureles. $20. Call (805) 455-1906 or email info@nomadtango .org. tinyurl.com/MondayMilonga

market at Fox Wine Co. on Saturday featuring goods from 20 vendors, lotería games with Game Seeker, and live music after 3pm. The monthly community market will be on Sunday with goods from more than 50 women-owned businesses. Sat.: noon-5pm. Fox Wine Co.,120 Santa Barbara St.; Sun.: 10am-4pm. El Presidio de Santa Bárbara, 123 E. Canon Perdido St. Free. mujeresmakersmarket.com/events

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

JUNE 2, 2022

Fundraiser

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6/3 - 9:00 pm

UNCLE UNCLE WITH PAT CURREN / VAL-MAR RECORDS SB FOLK/SURF ROCK 6/4 - 8:00 pm

RUSS BLVD. WITH THE FRAMERS, EXPORTER, & MODERN GENRE SB ROCK & ROLL 6/5 - 12:00 pm

JAZZ IN THE BAR WITH KALINKA JEWISH KLEZMER, GYPSY SWING & TRADITIONAL JAZZ 6/7 - 7:30 pm

LAGUNA BLANCA SCHOOL BAND SPRING SHOWCASE 6/8 - 7:00 pm

BELLY DANCING WITH ALEXANDRA KING HOT DANCING ON A SPRING NIGHT 6/9 - 8 pm

(((FOLKYEAH!))) PRESENTS:

ISOBEL CAMPBELL INDIE POP

FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

EVENTS

The Lens of Architecture: Photography, Buildings, and Meaning

Thursday, June 2, 5:30 pm

Through August 7

The Multiple Surrealisms of Wifredo Lam Art Matters Lecture Get tickets at tickets.sbma.net. Sunday, June 12, 1:30 – 4:30 pm

Studio Sunday

Mediated Nature

Grayscale Chalk Pastels Family Resource Center Free

Ongoing

For more exhibitions and events, visit www.sbma.net. 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday 11 am–5 pm • Thursday 11 am–8 pm Get advance tickets at tickets.sbma.net.

SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776

STAY CONNECTED

EXHIBITIONS ON VIEW

Janna Ireland, Hillside Memorial Park, Number 1 (detail), 2019. Archival pigment print. SBMA, Museum Purchase, Eric A. Skipsey Acquisition Fund. Image courtesy of Janna Ireland. © Janna Ireland

INDEPENDENT.COM/THEWAYWEWORK

(805) 692-2226 zoe@sbhabitat.org

WE WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE WORKERS AND THE EMPLOYERS IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY.

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FOLLOW US ON

FILL OUT THE SURVEY

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CONTRIBUTE TO OUR SPECIAL ISSUE ON THE JOB WORLD

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“A wickedly fun thriller!”

THE PLAIN DEALER

ON STAGE JUNE 9-26

T HE

TUESDAY 6/7 6/7: An Evening Poetry Event This in-person poetry reading will feature National Poetry Series Winner and author of the poetry book An Incomplete List of Names Michael Torres and S.B.’s former Poet Laureate and author of four collections of poetry, most recently, These Many Rooms, Laure-Anne Bosselaar. Poet introductions will be by Christopher Buckley, author and editor of the S.B.-based poetry journal, SALT. 7-8:30pm. Fireplace Rm., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 564-5653 or email jaurner@santabarbaraca.gov. tinyurl.com/APoetryEvent

BY

DIRECTED BY

ANTHONY SHAFFER COURTESY

WEDNESDAY 6/8

JENNY SULLIVAN

6/8:

Public Meeting: Ortega Park Master Plan — Revised Pool Design/Reunión Pública: Plan Maestro del Parque Ortega — Diseño Revisado de la Piscina

Join City staff for a presentation on aquatic programs and facilities in our community, review the revised pool design, and hear from Parks and Recreation staff about what’s coming up for the Ortega Park improvement project. Únase al personal de la ciudad para una presentación sobre los programas e instalaciones acuáticas en nuestra comunidad, revisar el diseño revisado de la piscina y escuchar al personal de Parques y Recreación sobre lo que está por venir para el proyecto de mejora del Parque Ortega. 6pm. Ortega Park Welcome House, 604 E. Ortega St. Free. Email parksandrec@santabarbaraca.gov.

tinyurl.com/PublicMeeting-ReunionPublica

A Good Cause

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

6/4: A Toast to Home: A Fundraiser for PATH S.B. Join this exclusive rendezvous to honor and celebrate the support PATH (People Assisting the Homeless) receives from the S.B. Community. There will be live music, a silent auction, and more! Round-trip transportation from S.B. to Santa Ynez will be available. Proceeds will go toward supportive services for the homeless. VIP hour: 4-5pm; GA: 5-8pm. Sunstone Winery, 125 North Refugio Rd., Santa Ynez. GA (no transportation): $100; GA + transportation: $150; VIP (includes transportation): $200. Ages 21+. tinyurl.com/ToastToHome

6/4: Zoo Brew This annual fundraiser will bring beer lovers and animal lovers together for appetizers and unlimited beer, wine, cider, and hard seltzer tastings with proceeds to benefit the animals at the zoo. VIP hour: 2-3pm; GA: 3-6pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. GA: $65; VIP: $105. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-5339.sbzoo.org/zoobrew/

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

6/5: Green & Blue: A Coastal Celebration

COURTESY

cfsb.info/sat

Enjoy a short program with Environmental Heroes Violet Sage Walker and her father, Fred Collins (in memoriam), and special guests, delicious food and beverages, and a silent auction. Call or email to ask about sliding scale ticket prices. Proceeds will go toward the Environmental Defense Center work to protect clean air, clean water, open space, and regional animals. 2-6pm. Rancho La Patera & Stow House, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. $125. Call (805) 963-1622 x103 or email jdias@environmental defensecenter.org. EnvironmentalDefenseCenter.org/gb

6/4:

7th Annual “Spay-ghetti” Dinner Santa

Ynez Valley Humane Society & Dog Adoption and Welfare Group invite you to enjoy a “yappy” hour with area wine and beer along with an Italian dinner and a live auction, music, and more at their largest fundraiser of the year. “Bone” appetit! 5pm. Santa Ynez Valley Marriott, 555 McMurray Rd., Buellton. $85. Call (805) 688-8224. tinyurl.com/Spay-ghetti2022

33 W VICTORIA ST ETCSB.ORG | 805.965.5400

THE ADELFOS ENSEMBLE PRESENTS

ՅԱՐ ՋԱՆ ԱՐԻ COME, MY BELOVED A CONCERT OF ARMENIAN CHORAL AND VOCAL MUSIC TEMMO KORISHELI | ARTISIC DIRECTOR STEVEN THOMSON | GUEST CONDUCTOR WITH MARTA HOVHANNISYAN, MEZZO-SOPRANO APRIL AMANTE, SOPRANO MI-YOUNG KIM, PIANO

TUESDAY, JUNE 07 7:30 PM TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 1500 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA, CA 93101 TICKETS AT THE DOOR $15/20 INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 2, 2022

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Dear Wellness Connection Council Graduating Seniors,

We are so proud of you and all you have accomplished over the last year and beyond. Thank you for being such strong advocates and leaders for mental health in our community. Your passion and commitment to ending the stigma around mental health and making wellness a central part of the conversation is inspiring and we are so grateful for the time you have spent with us serving on the Wellness Connection Council. We are excited to see what the future has in store for each of you. Keep leading with kindness and speaking up for the causes that matter most! — From Alexis, Sophie, Annmarie, and the Board of Directors of the Mental Wellness Center

ISABELLA VALENTINE | DOS PUEBLOS

What I’ve Learned: You never know what someone else is going through, so take a step back, be loving, and be forgiving. Attending: Princeton University.

CHARLOTTE CAESAR | SANTA BARBARA

What I’ve Learned: Learning more about my personal mental health and my relationship with myself and also growing to help with others. Attending: University of California Los Angeles (UCLA).

AUDREY BRECHER | DOS PUEBLOS

What I’ve Learned: I am grateful for the connections I have made over time and how we have channeled them into creating a better community. Attending: Mount Holyoke College.

MADISON SPARRE | SAN MARCOS

What I’ve Learned: I’ve learned about the importance of self care, and the fact that mental health is something that must constantly be tended to, not something we focus on only in times of crisis. There are so many valuable ways to practice self care and I’m very grateful for it. Attending: UC Davis.

KATHRYN CHENOWETH | SAN MARCOS

What I’ve Learned: Through the Wellness Connection Council, I have learned to not be afraid to take initiative, and to actively listen to the concerns/needs of others. Attending: Northeastern University.

CAMILLA PETOTE | SAN MARCOS

What I’ve Learned: I am grateful for Wellness Connection Council for giving me the tools and education in order to spread awareness surrounding mental health and help others with their own mental health journeys. Attending: NYU.

LILY POEHLER | SAN MARCOS

What I’ve Learned: I learned skills to be compassionate towards those around me who are struggling with mental health. Wellness Connection Council gave me a place to feel safe and supported, which I am very grateful for. Attending: UCSB.

SOPHIE SUH | DOS PUEBLOS

What I’ve Learned: One thing I took away from Wellness Connection Council is the power that my voice has. I learned that even as an 11th grader in high school, I can still impact not only the people around me, but the people in my state and beyond. Wellness Connection Council was what opened my eyes to my skill set and how it can be used in advocacy work and for mental health. (Planning on) Attending: UCLA.

HANNAH GODLIS | DOS PUEBLOS

What I’ve Learned: Wellness Connection Council taught me the importance of supporting others in our community as well as being able to accept that same support from others. Attending: Clark Honors College at the University of Oregon.

KENZIE YOUNG | SAN MARCOS

What I’ve Learned: One thing that I’m grateful for in my experience with Wellness Connection Council is being able to come together and really bond with other people who have similar passions of raising awareness of the importance of mental health. Attending: Clark University in Massachusetts.

DYLAN ROOT | SANTA BARBARA

What I’ve Learned: Wellness Connection Council has been great place to learn about mental health and wellness as well as make change within my community. It has also been an amazing place to create connections and somewhere that I feel safe and not judged. Attending: University of Utah.

MIA AMBERGER | SAN MARCOS

What I’ve Learned: Taking a few moments to slow down and breathe can really improve your day. Attending: Pomona College.

mentalwellnesscenter.org 30

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JUNE 2, 2022

wcclubs.org INDEPENDENT.COM

SANTA BARBARA HALF MARATHON


grads

are rad!

SEAN CAMPBELL

Santa Barbara City College

MICHAEL JAMES HAYES Bishop Garcia Diego High School

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

R.J. PEREZ

Santa Barbara High School

MIA AHLSTROM

West Coast Baptist College

On behalf of the entire staff of the Santa Barbara Independent, we would like to congratulate every graduate on their accomplishments. We are honored to highlight a few members of the Class of 2022 in our print pages. Thank you to Senator Monique Limón for supporting this initiative. To see even more graduate photos or to submit one of your own, visit independent.com/classof2022.

PEGGY MARIANA OCHOA VELAZQUEZ

NICHOLAS ANDREW CAMPOS IBARRA

Santa Barbara City College

Alta Vista Alternative High School

MAX MAHOTA

MADDOX RICHARD DE NUNZIO

Bishop Garcia Diego High School INDEPENDENT.COM

Bishop Garcia Diego High School JUNE 2, 2022

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v

MACKENZIE ENSIGN Dos Pueblos High School

JOSEPH SINGER

Dos Pueblos High School

JORDAN BANCROFT Homeschool

ISAIAH PETTY

San Marcos High School

e h t o t s n o i t Congratula

s s cloaf ! 2 202

ALEXANDRA DIEDEN Santa Barbara City College

32

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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JUNE 2, 2022

ADRIAN MONTALVO San Marcos High School

INDEPENDENT.COM

ABBY RADELFINGER

San Ynez Valley Union High School

KRISSY SANCHEZ Cal State Fullerton


EZELLE JARAMILLO FREES Santa Barbara High School

DYLAN JAMES STREETT ANNIE LYNN BROWN Willamette University

San Marcos High School

ALIYAH FIGUEROA San Marcos High School

Thank you to

SENATOR MONIQUE LIMÓN for supporting this initiative.

To view the online gallery or to submit one of your own graduate photos, visit independent.com/classof2022

ANTHONY VILLA

Bishop Garcia Diego High School

ISAIAH MYERS

Santa Barbara City College

ANNE PARAYIL

University of California Santa Barbara INDEPENDENT.COM

JINHEE HWANG

Santa Barbara City College

JUNE 2, 2022

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June is National Homeownership Month! Sharpen your financial expertise on home buying! Check out our Facebook page @montecitobank for more tips on #CreatingHome.

Benefits of Homeownership

Value Appreciation

Tax Savings

Your house can increase in value over time, which is as good as money in the bank!

Mortgage loan interest may be deducted from your state and federal income taxes.1

Build Equity

A Place to Call Home

Your home’s equity can help you secure a loan or line of credit to remodel, invest in your child’s future and more.

Owning a home allows you the freedom to change your living space to reflect your tastes and lifestyle and gives you a feeling of permanence in your community.

Financial Stability Your mortgage payment (principal and interest) may remain constant for certain mortgages, unlike a monthly rent might.

Ready for the key to homeownership? Ed Soto

Gina Blankenship

AVP / Sr. Mortgage Loan Originator NMLS # 633117 (805) 698-8437 esoto@montecito.bank

Mortgage Loan Originator NMLS # 380975 (805) 979-4479 gblankenship@montecito.bank

2021 Best Mortgage Company - SB Independent @montecitobank #CreatingHome 1. Consult a tax adviser for further information regarding the deductibility of interest.

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montecito.bank/NHM NMLS ID#: 472185


History

L

living

p. 35

The Blessing of St. Vincent COURTESY

ack of affordable childcare has been a chronic problem in Santa Barbara since the early 20th century. The city, however, may look with pride to its past when trying to address the problem in the future. The opening of St. Vincent’s Day Nursery in 1918, the first such facility in the state of California, was an important milestone in making the area a welcoming place for working parents and their children. Curiously, it was the outbreak of World War I in 1914 that played a key role in the establishment of St. Vincent’s. National labor shortages also affected the local Santa Barbara economy, bringing women into the workforce in greater numbers. For some, this presented an exciting opportunity to find dignified and gainful employment. For others, it was a decision dictated by the need to provide for their families. In both cases, however, the glaring absence of childcare facilities made their participation in the labor market nearly impossible. The September 1918 issue of a local Santa Barbara newspaper, The Daily News and the Independent, described the urgency of the situation: “The present war conditions have made the need of woman’s labor one of the essentials of the day. Many women willing to work, and at times dependent for their support upon daily work, find it impossible to accept positions on account of having to care for a child or FILLING A NEED: St. Vincent’s Day Nursery opened in Santa Barbara in 1918 and was the first such childcare facility in California. children while their mothers are at work.” The Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, an apostolic ployment spiked while property values plunged dramatically. bara community until 1977, when the Daughters of Charity order of Catholic nuns who served the people of Santa Bar- St. Vincent’s, however, played an integral part in shielding made the difficult decision to close down the facility. A combination of financial strains and the changing character of the families from the impact of poverty. bara since 1858, responded to the crisis. Reporting on the services provided by the nursery, a local neighborhood due to the departure of families from the area The proposal to open the city’s first day nursery received overwhelming public support. Working hand-in-hand with newspaper published an article titled “Aid to Working Moth- caused by high rents and the shortage of affordable housing local benefactors, the Daughters of Charity opened the nurs- ers” on January 24, 1936: “Hundreds of mothers compelled compelled the Sisters to shut the nursery’s doors for good. ery on the premises of the St. Vincent’s Orphanage that was by dire necessity to work to support themselves and their located on 925 De La Vina Street on August 7, 1918. The news children have found reason to bless St. Vincent’s Day Nursaccounts emphasized that the nursery was “strictly non-sec- ery. In the shelter of this kindly institution, their little ones tarian and [took] children of any denomination.” In addition have found watchful care and protection while their mothers to welcoming children from all religious backgrounds, St. earned the money to meet family expenses…. If the mother’s Vincent’s Day Nursery maintained flexible payment sched- salary is too small to pay for the care of the child, the service by Sergey Salushchev ules. A nominal fee was charged to those parents who could is rendered until such time as she may pay the institution afford it: 25 cents for one child, 40 cents for two children, and in part for its care. In many instances the parent can never repay for the health and strength that is imparted to the child 50 cents for three children. In 1923, a new fundraising model to support the work of through the regular hours and meals that the institution The news elicited genuine sadness from the public. The Santa the nursery was elevated to the county level, and that year, St. furnishes. In many cases the noon day meal is the best meal Barbara News-Press described the nursery as “a landmark Vincent’s Day Nursery became one of the 15 founding agen- the child receives during the day due to the financial distress facility,” which became a “home for thousands of children of working parents.” cies of the Santa Barbara Community Chest, an endowment in the home.” Today, the Daughters of Charity continue to provide qualThe deprivations of the Great Depression paled in comfund that consolidated charitable donations and distributed funds to the member organizations. In 1925, the nursery parison to the devastations of World War II. Once again, ity, affordable childcare to parents in the Santa Barbara area. moved to 220 West Canon Perdido Street shortly before a the nursery provided indispensable social services for Remaining committed to the vision of building a diverse terrible 6.8 earthquake struck the city, causing widespread working mothers with children whose husbands joined the multicultural community, in 1999, St. Vincent’s opened damage and the tragic deaths of 13 people. When the time military or worked in related industries during the war years. NAEYC-accredited Early Childhood Education Center for came to rebuild Santa Barbara, the Daughters of Charity According to a Los Angeles–based newspaper, The Tidings, infants, toddlers, and preschoolers on its new campus on in the year 1945 alone, “1,300 children, whose mothers are Calle Real. The collaboration between local government, became outspoken advocates for state relief efforts. As the city rose from the rubble of the earthquake, yet occupied at regular employment, were given daytime care by private interest, and charitable organizations more than a another hardship loomed on the horizon. The Wall Street the Daughters of Charity at St. Vincent’s Day Nursery. The century ago made Santa Barbara a leader in addressing the need for adequate childcare. Perhaps we can accomplish the Crash of 1929 rippled across the nation, and the difficult years fathers of most of these tots were G.I.’s.” n St. Vincent’s remained an integral part of the Santa Bar- same feat of community partnership in the future. of the Great Depression did not spare Santa Barbara. Unem-

In 1918, California’s First Day Nursery Opened in Santa Barbara

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living

Social Media Tickets!

June 7 - August 11

TikTok Stardom in Santa Barbara COURTESY

$2

SUMMER KIDS MOVIES

New Family Movies Each Week! Fiesta 5 Theatres

10am every Tuesday & Wednesday

6/7 & 8

6/14 & 15

7/19 & 20

7/12 & 13

7/5 & 6

6/28 & 29

6/21 & 22

INTERNET FAMOUS: Austin Boller’s TikTok videos have racked up an impressive 3.7 billion views.

S

7/26 & 27

8/9 & 10

8/2 & 3

Camino Real Cinemas 10am every Thursday

6/30

6/23

6/16

6/9

7/28

7/21

7/14

7/7

8/4

8/11

MetroTheatres.com 36

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JUNE 2, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

anta Barbara High School student Austin Boller never expected to be famous. Boller, known as @sadtok101 on TikTok, has accumulated more than 1.6 million followers on the platform. He started making videos in 2020 in quarantine. Feeling down and finding inspiration through other TikToks he’d seen, Boller decided to create his own, and his account took off as people related to the things he was going through. According to Boller, the name @sadtok101 originates from the fact that his content often talks about being sad, and the 101 alludes to course numbers, as if viewers were taking his class on sadness. The format of @sadtok101’s videos consist mostly of Boller wearing sunglasses and staring at the camera as text hovers above his head, with differentcolored LED lights behind him. “The sunglasses kind of just came naturally,” he said. “I just wore them in a few [TikToks], and it became my niche.” Boller rarely takes his sunglasses off in his videos, and they’ve more or less become his brand online. He draws inspiration for his posts from things he thinks of in his daily life or sees online. Boller first went viral when one of his videos got 20 million views, and he realized he could continue producing viral videos following a similar format. Boller’s account, which began blowing up in December 2021, is growing quickly, gaining 500,000 followers in just a month. The fame was a big surprise to him. “At school, there are people that like to call me by my TikTok name instead of my real name,” he said. He’s even been recognized in public a few times and finds his newfound stardom “pretty cool.” Boller attributes his account’s popularity to the relatability of his content, and how viewers are able to see their own experiences and concerns reflected in his posts. Hundreds of people on the Internet have started to come to Boller for advice. “They’ll message me and send paragraphs and paragraphs about things they’re going through,” he said, with the topics ranging from losing friends to breakups.

Boller is glad that his content is connecting with people and that he can help others through listening to their concerns. “I think they just want a person to talk to,” he said. Being sought out for advice is unexpected, Boller said, because he’s just a normal kid. When he’s not working at the Eagle Inn or in school, he’s coming home to do homework and film TikToks.

17-Year-Old Austin Boller Rises to Internet Fame by Veronica Vo TikTok isn’t his source of income, as, according to Boller, you have to be 18 years old to apply for the TikTok Creator Fund or be verified to be paid. However, artists occasionally will pay him to promote their music by playing it in the background of his TikToks. Despite having received requests to run advertisements in his videos, Boller hasn’t done so yet, feeling like they might stunt his account growth or mess up the flow of his current content. Living in a TikTok house with other content creators is one of Boller’s eventual goals. “If I keep growing consistently, [TikTok] could definitely turn into something like a career,” he said. “I’m just gonna keep going and see where it takes me.” For now, he’s thinking about starting a merchandise line selling sunglasses-branded T-shirts. He also has plans to incorporate different content into his account by interviewing people, in his sunglasses. “I want to take the time to ask people why they’re sad and if I can do anything to make it better,” Boller said. “If they wanted something to eat, I’d buy it for them, or if they just wanted a hug, I’d give them a hug.” Boller wants his TikTok account to be a space where people can realize they’re not alone in their struggles, where they can find comfort through content they relate to. n


living

Go Berserk with Solvang Vikings

GARETH KELLY

History

WHO GOES THERE? A life-size berserker stands guard in the museum.

W

hat do Lego, Thursday, and going berserk all have in common? They’re all Danish! Lego was invented in Denmark, Thursday owes its origin to the Danish god Thor(sday), and going berserk is a reference to the famously naked and bloodthirsty Viking warriors. Such information and more can be found at the new Solvang Amber & Viking Museum located in The Copenhagen House in Solvang — the Danish by Gareth Kelly capital of America. The museum, located within the building’s former bank vault, complete with an impressively thick door, is guarded by an 800-pound, 10-foot-tall wooden sculpture of the Danish mythical hero Holger Danske, one of only two such sculptures outside of Denmark. Inside the museum, visitors step back in time — more than 1,000 years in the past — and view ancient Viking artifacts such as three swords dating back to 800-950 AD, arrowheads, coins depicting the god Odin, burial urns, and even a first edition of Gesta Danorum — “Deeds of Danes” — printed in 1575. There’s even a life-size berserker figure wearing little else but a shield for protection. “The artifacts are truly unique to this Danish-settled town — which is, in and of itself, unique,” said ElseMarie Lund, Manager of The Copenhagen House. “Our Viking history is ingrained in Danish culture, and this enhanced exhibit gives us an avenue for educating visitors about our storied past.” Also on display are many amber artifacts. Jewelry, stones, and trinkets feature this precious commodity highly prized in Viking culture and still sought-after in modern-day Denmark. There’s even a nod to the role amber played in the Jurassic Park movie with a velociraptor head leaping from the wall as well as details of amber’s geographic origins and even fake pieces to test your powers of deduction. Museum curator and real-life Dane Rene Kaerskov hopes to continue adding to the museum. “There’s few genuine Viking artifacts outside of Denmark, but I hope to find some more items such as swords and helmets and possibly even a replica Viking longboat,” he said.

New Museum Opens in The Copenhagen House

Solvang Festival Theater

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welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls Goleta Haven Marie McGlothlin, 4/8/2022 Lompoc Kumiko Arrington, 3/16/2022 Camila Jiménez Rangel, 4/21/2022 Santa Barbara Amira Anderson, 4/8/2022 Lucy Elizabeth McSwain, 4/15/2022 Sofia Miabella Jimenez, 4/18/2022 Ayla Miranda Williams, 4/23/2022

Baby Boys Carpinteria Cruz James Garcia, 4/25/2022 Lynx River Farrell, 4/30/2022 Goleta Navy Virgil O’Neil Stewart, 3/31/2022 Leon Chase Kreisberg, 4/25/2022 Antonio Rodolfo Gutierrez, 4/26/2022 Lompoc Xavier E. Jimenez, 4/18/2022 Aadi A. Mehta, 4/25/2022 Nathan Adriel Lopez, 4/27/2022

Adrian and Alan | Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara Oliver James Conway, 4/22/2022 Ventura Logan Daniel Coudray, 4/26/2022

“It all happened so quickly. Cottage saved their lives.”

Identical twins Adrian and Alan were born via emergency caesarean section three months early. Weighing approximately two pounds each at birth, the twins spent their first 12 weeks in the Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit where they grew bigger and stronger. Adrian and Alan came home from the hospital a week before their original due date weighing more than six pounds each. Their three

- Adriana, Adrian and Alan’s mother

older siblings, along with their parents, are overjoyed to have them home.

health e baby

Are you expecting or do you have an infant? Sign up for our free newsletter specific to your due date or your baby’s age. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

At Cottage Children’s Medical Center we care for more than 12,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and 11 specialized outpatient clinics. Learn more at cottagechildrens.org.

The

Angry Poodle Full Belly Files

Matt Kettmann’s Full Belly Files serves up multiple courses of food & drink coverage every Friday, going off-menu from our regularly published content to deliver tasty nuggets of restaurant, recipe, and refreshment wisdom to your inbox.

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FOOD &DRINK

rner chef’s co

COURTESY PHOTOS

Gunnar Planter @ Mar Monte’s Costa Kitchen & Bar

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

2022 Election hef Gunnar Planter’s cooking experience

goes back to childhood — when he’d make breakfast in bed for his parents — and moved to restaurants soon after, starting at the Rancho Santa Fe fine-dining hotspot Mille Fleurs when he was just 16 years old. Sixteen years later, Planter is in charge of the kitchens at the Mar Monte Hotel on the Santa Barbara waterfront, preparing Italian-leaning cuisine at Costa Kitchen & Bar in the evenings and all-day dishes for poolside enjoyment at Café Lido. He tells us more below. Mentor respect: Planter trained under Mille Fleurs’

longtime leader Martin Woesle, once recognized as the region’s best chef by the James Beard Foundation. “He taught me the French techniques that are the basis of most modern-day cuisine,” said Planter. “He’s still a good mentor and friend of mine. He comes to visit every single restaurant I work at.” Away from home: This is Planter’s first time liv-

ing outside of San Diego County. “I lived all over San Diego, from Ocean Beach to Oceanside, but I’m 32 years old, and it’s the first time I’ve moved out of the county,” said Planter. After seven years at Mille Fleurs — during which time he earned a degree in culinary arts and business management from the Art Institute — he learned about international cuisine and “giving guests what they want” at the private University Club in downtown San Diego and then practiced the restaurant-inhotel game at the Inn at Rancho Santa Fe, working right across the street from Woesle. Most recently, he opened Viewpoint Brewing in Del Mar and Ebullition Brew Works in Carlsbad, a steakhousemeets-brewery concept where he remains a minor partner. Fast fish: Planter loves how easy it is to get fresh

fish in Santa Barbara. “Even though we had a lot of fish in San Diego, it’s a lot bigger,” he said of that

market. “If you didn’t order the night before, the chances of getting something the next day were pretty slim. Whereas up here, they actually prefer you to call them in the morning.” Small-town respect: “Everything is like five or 10

minutes away,” said Planter, who lives near De la Guerra and Garden, close to both the State Street scene and his job. “I truly didn’t understand how small this town is until I moved here.”

Menu highlights: Planter took over in January

FOOD & DRINK

C

MEET THE CANDIDATES. WATCH THE DISCUSSIONS. GET INFORMED.

from Chef Nathan Lingle, who opened Costa as an Italian restaurant with Mediterranean and Middle Eastern influences and then stayed ★★ about a year. (He appears to be roasting coffee in Ventura now.) “I was able to make my mark on the menu pretty quick,” said Planter. He’s looking to launch an extensive dry-aged steak program — there’s a 30-day New York with bone marrow right now — but is equally proud of dishes like squid ink linguine and clams with uni butter and snow peas. Lido, too: He’s spreading his wings at Lido, where

anyone can dine on crispy masala shrimp, harissacrusted lamb chops, or salmon niçoise salad. “We really focus on Costa,” said Planter, “but Lido is our little surprise.”

Overcoming invisibility: “If you’re not staying at our hotel, it’s hard to really know we’re there because we’re tucked away — we don’t have a huge sign saying we’re a restaurant,” said Planter. “But once people do find out, we get a lot of repeat business from locals. Once they come, they come back. We’re trying to get that perception changed from being a hotel to being an awesome restaurant as —Matt Kettmann well.”

1111 E. Cabrillo Blvd.; (805) 882-1234; marmontehotel.com

★ VOTE ★ PRIMARY BALLOTS DUE: JUNE 7, 2022 Find voting information, candidate profiles, Santa Barbara Independent endorsements, and a Discussion with candidates for Sheriff at independent.com/2022elections

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Santa Barbara

Bluewater Grill Renews S.B. Ties

EATS & DRINKS

BOB OCHSNER PHOTOS

g staffin

Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service.

SEASIDE SEAFOOD: Bluewater Grill’s new executive chef Alberto Torres serves swordfish, scallops, and other seafood dishes — much of it caught by the restaurant’s own fishing boat — down on Cabrillo Boulevard.

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FOOD & DRINK

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm

he steadily growing Bluewater Grill chain may

be opening a new outpost every year — there are 10 so far from Catalina Island to Phoenix — but the goal for each restaurant is to stay grounded (or “sea-ed” perhaps?) in its region. The pandemic provided the opportunity to refocus that mission at our own Bluewater on Cabrillo Boulevard, which opened in 2018. Specifically, the restaurant hired new executive chef Alberto Torres, a 30-year Santa Barbara resident formerly at Hollister Brewing Company and Chuck’s Waterfront, as well as a new GM, Autumn Vaughn, a rising star in Bluewater’s ranks.

Cabrillo Boulevard Seafood Restaurant Welcomes New Chef and GM by George Yatchisin Vaughn started as a food runner at the Coronado location in 2019, quickly moved up to assistant general manager there, and then in October 2021 took the top position in Santa Barbara. “They always try to promote from within,” she explained. Moving to San Diego from Florida, she quickly valued the employee-focused approach at Bluewater. “You can text the owners, and they will text you back,” she said. “They know about everybody’s lives in the company, and that’s not easy to find.” That team spirit led her to hire Torres. It was Christmas week of 2021, and he came to an interview ready to work. “He’s very creative, but he also treats his staff really well,” she said. “If he needs to, he’ll jump on the line or even into the dish pit.” Vaughn also values how Torres helps the whole kitchen become more inventive. “On weekends, we do family meals after the shift, and the crew gets to lead,” she explained. “It’s been exciting to watch.” All this growth behind the scenes means that what shows up on the plates is even better. There’s the luscious house-cured salmon Torres makes for weekend brunch as just one example, or Bluewater’s signature dish: chipotle swordfish harpooned by the restaurant’s dedicated fishing boat. A mouthful of the delicious plate — the fish steak cooked perfectly in its warming-not-intense spice rub, along with some avocado and roasted corn — is everything one could hope from a Pacific land/sea meeting. Despite coming from Amelia Island on the Atlantic, Vaughn didn’t grow up liking to eat fish, even while working at her grandfather’s seafood shop. “But I fell in love with the swordfish, and now I eat it once a week,” she said. “It’s a dish that has

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never changed on the menu — if it’s not broken, don’t fix it.” This Bluewater location does its best, however, to fix its dishes with Santa Barbara County wines, beers, and spirits. They particularly like to pair up with their Funk Zone neighbors, like J. Wilkes, Margerum, and Melville, and serve a private beer made especially for Bluewater by Figueroa Mountain. That house-cured salmon on the brunch menu might be paired with a crisp Margerum rosé, for instance, although Vaughn also joked, “Most people still go for the bottomless mimosas.” The cocktail list takes cues from Cutler’s Artisan Spirits, yet another neighbor. “Ian Cutler did a tasting himself for our team,” she said, explaining that these sort of welcoming vibes remind her of her small hometown. “He’s the name on the label and he’s taking time out of his day to taste with us.” Connecting with locals is critical for Vaughn, as she knows that the tourist business waxes and wanes over the seasons. When she first arrived in Santa Barbara, Vaughn talked to vendors at the weekend Santa Barbara Arts and Crafts Show. “I asked them, ‘What would you want from us?’ ” she recalled, “and many of them didn’t even know what Bluewater was — and they were across the street from us.” That’s one reason she started a Locals Appreciation Day. Now, every Wednesday, residents can enjoy happy hour drinks from noon ‘til 9 p.m. The whole point is pleasing all sorts of customers, which is quite easy when serving Bluewater’s scrumptious ponzu sashimi sea scallop — bright, briny, and beautiful, with a late hit of ginger that goes great with a Storm sauvignon blanc. “When people ask about ordering the fresh scallop, I tell them, ‘If you don’t like it, I’ll pay for it’ ”she admitted, adding after a brief pause, “I’ve never had to pay for one.”

15 E. Cabrillo Blvd., (805) 845-5121, bluewatergrill.com


Do This

Here’s to Clara

AMAZING.

COURTESY

Rosé Party

ALWAYS

NE VER

ROUTINE. LUIS R CONRIQUEZ JUNE 24 | FRIDAY | 8PM

FOOD & DRINK

HOTEL CALIFORNIA AUGUST 6 | SATURDAY | 8PM

I

RODNEY CARRINGTON

n honor of the late Clara Svedlund, who passed away in

December, Kunin Wines is hosting a Here’s to Clara Rosé Release Party on Sunday, June 5, at their new Presidio Neighborhood location. Svedlund taught at Laguna Blanca for nearly 20 years and was a tasting room associate at Kunin. They will be pouring the namesake rosé alongside a spread from Cheese Shop Santa Barbara. Magan Eng, the late Seth Kunin’s wife and owner of Kunin Wines, wanted to create an event where all of Svedlund’s friends could celebrate her life. Guests can purchase the Clara Rosé by the bottle or by the case with 100 percent of the proceeds going toward Svedlund’s family and her favorite causes. “Whether it was teaching or volunteering for the environment or organizing a Swedish meet-up club, Clara loved bringing people together,” said Eng, noting that those gatherings were often around wine. “We thought it would be very fitting to have special bottling for her that people could enjoy together in her honor.” Svedlund’s dedication to teaching in the sciences complemented her love for the outdoors, which she shared with her husband and daughter. She started working at Kunin back in 2021. “Her passion for people, her intelligence, and her love of wine were apparent to anyone who came through our door,” said Eng. “She really helped us set a tone. Most of all, we considered —Rebecca Horrigan her a dear friend.”

Sun., June 5, 3-6 p.m., 831 Santa Barbara St. See kuninwines.com

AUGUST 12 | FRIDAY | 8PM

GABRIEL IGLESIAS AUG 26 + 27 | TWO NIGHTS | 8PM

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events. Chumash Casino Resort supports responsible gaming. For information about problem gambling, call the Problem Gambling Helpline at 1-800-522-4700.

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PHOTOS BY MATT KETTMAN

Decade Diving at

Fess Parker Winery A

mid alluring aromas of smoked meat, stewed berry,

and peppery soy sauce, there’s a strong scent of validation coming out of the glass of a 2001 Rodney’s Vineyard syrah, the most enduring of the wines offered during my recent visit to the brand new library tasting rooms at Fess Parker Winery. “The ’01 really has become my favorite while opening these rooms, and it’s the oldest we have in here,” said the winery’s president Tim Snider, the son-in-law of the late actor, who founded this property in 1989. “I’ve got to stop opening them, because there are not that many.”

FOOD & DRINK

Remodeled Tasting Room Features Library Flights in Contemporary Setting Whether the ’01 was the very best of our flight depends on the palate of the beholder, of course, and the options for Snider, winemaker Blair Fox, and me were quite competitive: 2010 Bien Nacido and 2012 Ashley’s chardonnays, both still loaded with acidity while picking up that slight nutty tone that comes with age; 2005 Pommard clone, 2007 Bien Nacido, and 2010 Ashley’s pinot noirs, all still with structure intact, the latter barely showing any years at all; and that ’01 Rodney’s as well as the 2007, 2008, and a 2010 Big Easy, which incorporates petite sirah and grenache in the mix. They all impressed, though the syrahs, which come from the family’s estate vineyard, showed the most unique qualities. Rodney’s sits up on a mesa above the winery’s setting on Foxen Canyon Road, so it gets hammered with cool breezes daily, yet it also bakes in warmer sunshine than is typically seen in the Sta. Rita Hills and Alisos Canyon to the west. That means cool-climate syrah qualities of cracker pepper, iodine, and smoked game are present alongside riper, richer blackberry and tobacco elements, providing a benefit-of-both-worlds combo. Fox said he can easily pick out Rodney’s syrahs when tasting blind from big lineups, and he had plenty of practice preparing to open these rooms. With more than 200 library wines to choose from, he started with about 75 options, tasting them each to write sensory notes, suggest ongoing aging potential, and just ensure that they were worth popping. He found that “line of demarca-

BOTTLE BONANZA: A recent tour through the Fess Parker Winery library featured numerous syrahs, pinot noirs, and chardonnays from the 2001 vintage through 2012. These historic wines are now served in the remodeled tasting room, which is contemporary in design.

tion” between wines that were still singing and those that weren’t to be around 2001 for the syrahs and 2005 for the pinots. People who appreciate the nuances of properly aged wines — and, perhaps better yet, the stories that they tell—can now book these library tastings, which include five wines of your choosing (or by suggestion), come with a booklet full of relevant maps, and are served by a specially trained associate. The tastings cost $75, though the bottle prices themselves are the best deal: just $80 for older pinots that are usually $60 and $70 for syrahs that are usually $54. The library sessions happen in one of two glass-walled cellar rooms in the middle of the hospitality center, the centerpieces of a long-desired but pandemic-triggered remodel. The five-month process, which finished with an opening on April 1, turned the old bar into a reception area and spruced up the patios, where most of the tastings occur today. (Watch out for a Funk Zone tasting room this fall, likely coming to the original Pali Wine Co. location on East Yanonali Street at Gray Avenue.) Most dramatic was redeveloping the main interior room into a modernized version of cozy. “We wanted this to be like a hunting lodge,” said Snider. On a prominent wall across from the fireplace, a massive map of the 714acre property is helpful both for setting the scene and

finding the stables for vineyard tours on horseback. Since many of the current generations know the name “Fess Parker” more for wine than his onscreen roles as Davy Crockett and MANN Daniel Boone, the T KETT T A M BY decor was adjusted to be a little less Fess, whose visage dominated the former scene. But he’s not totally gone: His first audition guitar, an edited “Ballad of Davy Crockett” lyric sheet, and a photo of Fess with Walt Disney on Disneyland’s opening day tastefully represent the family patriarch. With more than 30 years of winemaking under their collective belts, the Parker family felt that sharing their older vintages with fans was always a critical component to the project. “We’ve been trying to activate the library wines,” said Snider. “It’s an interesting juxtaposition of a newer, contemporary tasting room and 30 years of wines.”

ES BOTTLARRELS &B

See fessparker.com.

BUFFALO GAP SUMMIT PULLING STRINGS: Winemaker Blair Fox (seen in the reflection) checks out the guitar that Fess Parker played to get his famous role as Davy Crockett.

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This summer, Fess Parker Winery is hosting the Buffalo Gap Food & Wine Summit, an event founded by the late actor-vintner and his Texas friends who own Perini Steakhouse and Becker vineyards. Usually held in Buffalo Gap, Texas, the three-day affair from July 1517, which is called the Rhône Rodeo, is the first time it will be held in Los Olivos. There’s a reception, symposium, tour, BBQ lunch, multi-course dinner, and goodbye brunch for the all-inclusive price of $800. The symposium alone is $200. See buffalogapsummit.com or call (800) 367-1721.


THE RESTAURANT GUY

AUR ST A E

Family Service Agency Thanks Our Event Sponsors Presenting Tania & John Burke Marni & Michael Cooney

T N

HN DICKSON JO

The R

GUY • by

Advocate Santa Barbara Foundation

SUPPORTING YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH

Hummus Republic Hits I.V.

with

MODERN MED: Hummus Republic opened to big lines in Isla Vista recently.

R

eader Brendan let me know that Hummus Republic has

Partners Jill & John C. Bishop, Jr. Ginny & Tim Bliss Zora & Les Charles One Digital Montecito Bank & Trust Union Bank

opened to big crowds at 6546 Pardall Road in Isla Vista, the former home of Blaze Pizza and Pasta House. Founded in 2013, the fast-casual modern Mediterranean food franchise specializes in “healthier, faster, fresher, lighter, and tastier customizable bowls, wraps, and pitas” based on “organic, sustainable, and locally grown ingredients whenever possible.” They have nine locations in California and some more in Massachusetts and New Jersey. See thehummusrepublic.com. CHEF’S NIGHT OUT: Chef Justin West tells me that Handlebar Coffee

MANGIONE’S ITALIAN ICE: Way back in March 2019, reader Steve H.

noticed that a sign for Mangione’s Italian Ice Company was posted in the window at 1222 State Street, the former home of Spoon. After a near-record three-year run in the Crystal Ball, reader Harry tells me that the dessert destination has finally opened. The longest tenant in the Crystal Ball was the former Sublime at 901 N. Milpas Street, which was “coming soon” for five years (paying rent the whole time, I was told), then stayed open for five months. Italian ices, known as “granita” in Italy, do not require dairy products or eggs. They are made from fresh fruits or juices, sugar, and water. Air beaten into the mixture is what distinguishes granita from a fruit-flavored chunk of solid ice. Italian ice is denser, so it can be scooped and eaten with a spoon or in a cone, just like ice cream. Call (805) 968-0000. SEE’S IN GOLETA: Earlier this month, reader Sande sent me a tip that See’s Candies will be opening a new store in the Calle Real Shopping Center in Goleta. But after reporting that news, reader Natalie quickly shot the info down, explaining that the Calle Real space will soon be a home goods store called Macher Shop. Reader Sweet Tooth then decided to contact See’s directly and received this response from Lisa Tate: “The rumor is true! We are very excited to be opening a new location at Camino Real Marketplace, 7044 Market Place Drive, Goleta. We estimate opening by late summer or early fall and hope to see you there!” I found out that the See’s representative is referring to the former GNC space immediately to the left of the Goleta Police Department and Camino Real Cinemas. LA SALSA CLOSED? Readers Josh and TPF were at Five Points Shop-

ping Center recently and said that La Salsa at 3987 State Street was giving off “closed for good” vibes. In the opinion of La Salsa corporate, however, the news is not so grim. A notice on their website says: “We are temporarily closed. We apologize for the inconvenience.”

Supporters Liz & Andrew Butcher CenCal Health Dignity Health Tisha Ford Carole MacElhenny Jane & Fred Sweeney

VIPs

Friends

Paula & Mark Bottiani

Advance Auto Parts

Cottage Health

Katya Armistead & Tom Pritchard

Jean & William Howard

Lisa Brabo

Chana & James Jackson

Community Bank of Santa Maria

Kiwanis Club of Santa Maria Noontime

Rod Durham

Mental Wellness Center

The Fund for Santa Barbara

Mary & James Morouse

Deborah & Stuart Fuss

FOOD & DRINK

Roasters at 2720 De La Vina Street is holding an event on June 6, 6-9 p.m., titled Chef ’s Night Out, to benefit the Santa Barbara Rescue Mission. Chef ’s Night Out is a benefit that was started by West’s late father, Mike West, in Eugene, Oregon, the hometown of both Justin and Handlebar cofounder Aaron Olson. They decided to bring the event to Santa Barbara for the benefit of men’s and women’s recovery programs. Tickets are available on eventbrite. com (search for “chef’s night out”) for $65, which include unlimited food and drink options such as rabbit terrine, watermelon salad, prawn and crab siu mai, Chinese steam cakes, and much more.

DR. SARAH Y. VINSON

Kathy O’Leary

Robert Janeway

Tricia & Craig Price

Teressa & Chuck Johnes

Doug Rossi & Ryan Zick of

Indira & Paul Katan

Price, Postel & Parma LLP

Maria McCall

Sybil Rosen

Moats Laser & Skin Care

Santa Barbara City College Foundation

Sandy & Dave Nordahl

SEIU Local 620

Christie & Roderick Ontjes

Spach & Associates – Ameriprise Financial

Linda Sessler

Leslie & Paul Van Meel

South Side Coffee Co.

Wealth Management Strategies

Twitchell & Rice, LLC

Andrew R. Wilson

Vanguard Planning Inc.

Proceeds benefit the little house by the park Ce dillo Community Center

t, dy, a podcas t with The In en nd pe e. de or In and m is week’s e cover story e scenes of th lists about th na Go behind th ur jo r ou ight from and hear stra

in

Listen at odcasts! ou listen to p y r e v re e h w or om/theindy dependent.c

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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I’m a , a stroke survivor, an avid cyclist, a coffee lover, an Ojai native...

YOUR KINDNESS MATTERS ! Please care for us as we care for you and our community.

And today, I am also

Dr. Daniel Shepherd Cottage Health Emergency Department

cottagehealth.org/kindness

1222 State Street • Santa Barbara • California 44

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

OJAI MUSIC FESTIVAL COURTESY

WHERE SITE AND ADVENTUROUS SOUNDS MEET

L I F E

A

PAGE 45

SOJOURNER KINCAID ROLLE’S NEW JUNETEENTH BOOK

A CINEMATIC BRIDGE How did the first-ever Sri Lankan Film Festival organized outside of Sri Lanka end up in Santa Barbara? This island country in South Asia (formerly known as Ceylon) is the hometown of organizer Aruni Boteju, but she’s lived with her family in Santa Barbara for 26 years. “My goal was to create a bridge from one paradise on the Indian Ocean to another on the Pacific,” said Boteju, whose inaugural Ceylon International Film Festival (ceyiff.com) features more than 10 live action feature films, as well as an array of animation, documentaries, and shorts over the course of three days (June 10-12) at The Lobero Theatre.

“Sri Lanka is our motherland,” said Boteju, who came up with the idea during the pandemic. “I wanted to find help and bring two paradises together with a common passion — cinema. Our goal is to let voices be heard through cinema. Cinema can educate people, bring cultures together, and teach us who we are. Cultural diversity is a beautiful thing, and when we are exposed to many cultures through cinema, we learn and see how well we are connected as one. We create differences, and we pass that down to our children. But with cinema, we bring those differences and address them to educate our children and the world.” For the complete schedule and ticket information, visit lobero.org/events. —LD

featured item is a new production of late great French composer Olivier Messiaen’s song cycle Harawi, featuring soprano Julia Bullock (whose 2017 Ojai presence and her 2018 Hahn Hall recital are well-etched in memory), and pianist Connor Hannick, with choreography/dance by Bobbi Jene Smith and Or Schraiber. Not-incidentally, Messiaen himself was a featured guest and showcased composer in 1958’s Ojai festival. The 2022 program is enriched by new music by young living composers, but the program also covers a gamut from a focus on late Black minimalist composer Julius Eastman to Sunday evening’s assortment including Vivaldi and Schubert. Schubert’s “Ständchen” precedes the festival closer, Eastman’s “Stay on It” — a reasonable enough mantra for this dedicated, forwardleaning festival. Apart from luring die-hard contemporary music fans, the Ojai Music Festival also extends appeal to more casual observers who like the idea of spending some leisurely, pre-summer quality time in the embracing environs of this coveted destination outpost. Beauty of place and cultural adventurism make a happy pact come Ojai Festival time. It’s that time. See ojaifestival.org. —Josef Woodard

COURTESY

Opera debut in January 2020 and had its Met premiere last November. Aucoin also has had tentacles in Santa Barbara, as part of the Music Academy of the West in recent years. In an interview, he spoke about feeling at home at the Music Academy in a period that the institution placed more focus on contemporary music than in years past. Still, Aucoin has no new music-obsessive blinders on, keeping a wide open approach across the continuum of western musical evolution. As he commented, “I believe — and I hope my colleagues do too — that any supposed conflict between ‘tradition’ and ‘innovation’ is bogus. The tradition of classical music is a tradition of innovation. Beethoven was the ultimate innovator. Schumann, Debussy, Stravinsky — it was all new, startling, groundbreaking music at the moment of its birth. One of our jobs at the Music Academy (was) to show these young musicians the living links between past, present, and future. Hopefully it will all come to feel ‘present.’ ” A similar objective has long been underway in Ojai. In varying degrees, festivalgoers find linkages between old, deeply entrenched music values and the fresh fruits of modern musical thinking. This year, one

Poet, playwright, and educator Sojourner Kincaid Rolle reads from her new book, Free at Last: A Juneteenth Poem, on Sunday, June 5, at 2 p.m. at Chaucer’s Books (3321 State St.). Poet Laureate of Santa Barbara from 2015-2017, Rolle’s poignant free-verse take on Black American history is a lyrical celebration of Juneteenth—recognized as a symbolic holiday marking the end of slavery in the United States—and is illustrated in kid-friendly fashion by Alex Bostic. Now celebrating its first year as a national holiday, Rolle said Juneteenth first came to her attention in the late ’80s, when a friend from Texas suggested that they organize a Juneteenth celebration for Santa Barbara. She wrote the poem in 2004, and it has since been used in countless ways by educators, activists, journalists, bloggers, and community organizers. Her words now magnify their impact even further as the poem emerges in this new book designed to teach young readers about this important holiday. See chaucersbooks.com. After 300 years of forced bondage; hands bound, descendants of Africa picked up their souls — all that they owned — leaving shackles where they fell on the ground, headed for the nearest resting place to be found. —From Free at Last: A Juneteenth Poem by Sojourner Kincaid Rolle —Leslie Dinaberg

Web Exclusives Rainbow Kitten Surprise James Ehnes’ CAMA Finale & ENTERTAINMENT Olivia Rodrigo Smashing Pumpkins S.B. Symphony Riffs on Gershwin Hot Fun in the Summertime Free Cinema Quire of Voyces

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n argument can be made that, despite the ample cultural riches in the 805, the Ojai Music Festival (June 9-12) garners the greatest respect beyond its area code—within its own specific realm. Unlike other 805 events, the festival is routinely covered by taste arbiters the New York Times and the New Yorker, with generally high praises. International forces and talents converge in this small, beauteous valley location. The caveat is that the festival’s particular “world” is a somewhat esoteric, focused primarily on contemporary and modern classical music. Legendary names and historical cachet precede the festival’s legacy, sporting such famed music figures as Stravinsky, Aaron Copland, Eric Dolphy, Elliott Carter, Esa-Pekka Salonen, multiple visits from Pierre Boulez, great American composer John Adams, and countless other musicians-who-matter. As with all festivals and other annual cultural events, the pandemic threw best-laid plans off course. Ojai’s planned 2020 festival, featuring music director designate Matthias Pintscher, had to go the way of streaming. Then to celebrate the festival’s grand 75th anniversary in 2021, boasting John Adams as music director, the time frame shifted to last September, with triumphant results. This year’s festival changes up the tradition of singular music directors by handing the directorial reins to a respected, fast rising group, AMOC (American Modern Opera Company), founded in 2017 but on a rapid upward path in music circles. Matthew Aucoin, whose cycle of miniconcertos entitled “Family Dinner” will be one of nine world premieres in Ojai, is a co-founder of AMOC, with Zack Winokur. Aucoin’s trajectory as a vital new force in opera leapt upward via his new opera Eurydice, which made a splash in its L.A.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF JUNE 2

ARIES

Join us in reading June’s book of the month! JUNE’S THEME:

LITERARY FICTION

BOOK OF THE M ONTH :

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi independent.com/indybookclub

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Who loves the truth better than you Aries people? Who has the greatest potential to speak the real story in every situation, even when it requires extra courage? Who has more fun than you in discovering and defining and expressing the raw facts? In my Book of Life, you Rams are radiant beacons of candor—the people I go to when I need accuracy and honesty. And all I’m saying here will be especially crucial in the coming weeks. The whole world needs concentrated doses of your authenticity. Now read this pep talk from Aries philosopher St. Catherine of Siena: “Let the truth be your delight; let it always be in your mouth, and proclaim it when it is needed. Proclaim it lovingly and to everyone, especially those you love with a special love—but with a certain congeniality.”

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Before the 20th century, you couldn’t buy a loaf of bread that was already sliced into thin pieces. Then in 1912, the American inventor Otto Frederick Rohwedder developed a slicing machine. But all his work, including the blueprints and the machine prototypes, was destroyed in a fire. He had to seek new funding and begin again. Sixteen years later, his innovation was finally ready for broad public use. Within five years, most of the bread in the U.S. was sold sliced. What does this have to do with you? I am picking up an Otto Frederick Rohwedder vibe when I turn my visions to you, Taurus. I suspect that in the coming months, you, too, will fulfill a postponed dream.

GEMINI

philosopher and psychologist William James, who wrote, “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.”

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Author Mustafa Mahmoud described the signs of love between two people: (1) feeling a comfortable familiarity; (2) having no urge or need to lie; (3) being natural, not trying to be different from who one is; (4) having little or no possibility of being embarrassed in front of the other person; (5) experiencing silence as delicious, not alienating; (6) enjoying the act of listening to the other person. I bring these pointers to your attention, Libra, because the coming months will be a favorable time to define and redefine your understandings about the signs of love. How do you feel about Mahmoud’s ideas? Are there any more you would like to add?

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “We do not love each other without changing each other,” wrote author Madeleine L’Engle. Meditate on that gem, Scorpio. Now is a perfect time for you and your loved ones to acknowledge, honor, and celebrate the ways your love has changed each other. It may be true that some transformations have been less than ideal. If that’s the case, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to correct those trends. As for the positive changes that you and your allies have stimulated in each other: I hope you will name them and pledge to keep doing more of that good work.

(May 21-June 20): A blogger named Sweetlikeacherry reminds us, “Some epiphanies are only possible when you put away your phone and go completely offline for a while.” She adds that sometimes you also need to at least partially avoid your phone and the internet if you hope to incubate new visions of the future and unlock important discoveries in your creative work and summon your untamed genius. According to my astrological analysis, all these possibilities are especially likely and necessary for you in the coming weeks. I trust you will carry out the necessary liberations to take full advantage.

SAGITTARIUS

CANCER

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1963, Jim Munro and Alice Munro founded Munro’s Books, a store in Victoria, British Columbia. After being on the job for a few months, Alice found she was not impressed with many of the products they sold. “I can write better books than this,” she told Jim. Five years later, she published her first collection of short stories, Dance of the Happy Shades. Fourteen books later, she won the Nobel Prize in Literature. Will the coming months bring your equivalent of Alice Munro’s pivotal resolution? I suspect they could.

(June 21-July 22): Poet Carolyn Kizer (1925–2014) won a Pulitzer Prize for her poetry. She was smart! But when she was young and still studying her craft in college, a professor objected to one of her poems. He said, “You have pigs in this poem; pigs are not poetic.” Kizer was incensed at such ignorance. She testified, “I got up and walked out of that class and never went back.” Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect you may have comparable showdowns headed your way. I advise you to be like Kizer. You are the only one who truly knows the proper subjects of your quest. No one else has the right or the insight to tell you what your work (or play) should be about.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Leo author James Baldwin said it wasn’t often “that two people can laugh and make love, too— make love because they are laughing and laugh because they’re making love. The love and the laughter come from the same place: but not many people go there.” Your assignment, Leo, is to be the exception to Baldwin’s rule during the coming weeks. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, there’s a high possibility that interesting eros can converge with humorous fun in a glorious synergy. You will have a knack for conjuring up ribald encounters and jovial orgasms. Your intuition will guide you to shed the solemnity from your bliss and replace it with sunny, carefree cheer.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’m worried you will over-indulge in your pursuit of perfection during the coming weeks. It’s fine to be exquisitely skillful and masterful; I hope you do that. But if you get obsessed with flawlessness, you will risk undoing your good intentions. As an antidote, I offer you two pieces of advice. The first is from actor and activist Jane Fonda. She said, “We are not meant to be perfect; we are meant to be whole.” The second counsel is from

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I always deserve the best treatment, because I never put up with any other,” wrote Sagittarian novelist Jane Austen. Sagittarian politician Stacey Abrams said, “From the moment I enter a room, I am clear about how I intend to be treated and how I intend to engage.” You’ll be wise to cultivate those attitudes in the next seven weeks, Sagittarius. It’s high time for you to raise your self-respect in ways that inspire others to elevate their appreciation and regard for you.

CAPRICORN

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “True love for whatever you are doing is the answer to everything,” proclaimed performance artist Marina Abramovic. Amen to that righteous attitude! I hope you will embrace it in the coming weeks. I hope your heart and imagination will reveal all you need to know to bring tender fresh streams of true love to the essential activities of your life. Now is an excellent time to redefine the meaning of the word “love” so it applies to all your relationships and pursuits.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): A homeless woman in a wheelchair stopped where I was sitting outside a café. She was pushing her belongings in a small shopping cart. “Would you like to go dancing?” she said to me. “There’s a nearby park that has a great grassy dance floor.” “Maybe another day,” I told her. “My energy is low. I’ve had a lot of personal challenges lately.” I’m sure the expression on my face was less-thanebullient. “Cheer up, mister,” she told me. “I’m psychic, and I can tell you for sure that you will live a long life and have many more fine adventures. I’ll be in the park if you change your mind.” My mood instantly brightened. “Thanks!” I yelled toward her as she rolled away. Now I predict that you, Pisces, will have comparable experiences in the coming days. Are you willing to welcome uplifting surprises?

Homework: If there were a clone of you, what alternate life might they be living? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 46

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EMPLOYMENT ADMIN/CLERICAL AELUMA, INC. is looking for an Executive Assistant & Office Manager. This part time position (~20 hrs/ wk) will report to the CEO at the headquarters in Goleta, CA. Job duties include supporting the executive team as well as managing the office. Flexibility and prioritization are needed to handle this fast‑paced key position in our growing company. Please contact rjkdsmith@gmail.com.

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LOVE THE outdoors and working with children? Join the Elings Park team as a fulltime Summer Camp Counselor for eight weeks this summer (June 13 ‑ August 12). You will oversee and plan camp activities, teach kids outdoor and recreation skills, lead games and arts and crafts, and also interact with parents. 40 hours per week required, $23/hour, must be at least 18 years old. Please contact Marinella Baker at mbaker@ elingspark.org.

COMPUTER/TECH FRAUD DATA SCIENTIST sought by AppFolio, Inc. in Goleta, CA. Telecom prmtd. Apply at jobpostingtoday.com #25252.

EDUCATION COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1‑855‑554‑4616 (AAN CAN) EDUCATION OUTREACH Coordinator Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Responsibilities include overseeing the development of the new SciTrek/Biotech Program modules in collaboration with SciTrek research students, faculty, teachers and graduate students. This will involve assisting in training new UCSB volunteers by leading module orientations, working with teachers to maintain the program and assistance in running the SciTrek Summer Program for teachers. Department: https://scitrek.chem.ucsb.edu. Req: BA in Chemistry, Biochemistry or a related field at time of application. The department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through teaching and service. The posting will remain open until filled. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/16/22. Apply online at https:// apptrkr.com/3108890.

ASSISTANT DEAN, SPACE MANAGEMENT FOR HFA & SOCL

COLLEGE OF LETTERS & SCIENCE Acts as Assistant Dean in all aspects of space and facilities functions in the College of Letters and Science. Manages multiple, concurrent space projects from planning through implementation. Handles project planning, management, and fiscal oversight of building and renovation projects. Prepares justification and planning documents pertaining to space needs for review by deans and campus administrators. Reqs: Minimum of 4‑ 6 years of project and facilities planning experience. Excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills, including expert level political acumen and negotiation skills. Excellent analytical, organizational, project management and problem recognition / avoidance / resolution skills. Within area of expertise, excellent skill in advising and consulting with all levels of management and / or capital planning, budgeting and construction professionals. Excellent project management skills to effectively manage highly complex projects or highly specialized and critical components of projects with a significant impact on the organization. Excellent skill in promoting, advancing and implementing programs within area of expertise. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $89,000‑$125,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/2/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35700

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Assistant Director of Business Services is responsible for providing leadership and management of all

administration, customer service, and business functions across the Residential Operations department. As a senior member of the Residential Operations Management Team, the Assistant Director of Business Services provides the leadership and direction for Physical Resource Procurement, Storekeeping and Inventory Control, Human Resources, Payroll, Travel and Training. The Assistant Director also manages a financial office that partners closely with HDAE Business & Financial Planning. Reqs: Requires extensive knowledge of accounting theory and fund accounting, UC personnel and payroll policies & procedures, auditing and internal control practices. Solid understanding of financial and resource planning concepts as well as how to control organizational budgeting. Proven ability to facilitate decision‑making and problem‑solving. Ability to use discretion and maintain confidentiality. Proven ability to deal with changing priorities and direct the work of others accordingly. Effective verbal, written and interpersonal communication skills. Ability to work effectively across all levels of the organization. Solid understanding of financial and resource planning concepts as well as how to control organizational budgeting. Ability to work under deadline pressure, handling multiple projects concurrently, while dealing with sensitive and confidential issues. Thorough knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Ability to utilize conflict resolution skills to effectively lead and motivate others. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $84,000‑$92,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/3/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36127

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL ANALYST

Dean Graduate School of Education Serves as a key member of the school’s financial management team. Collects financial data, provides analyses, and recommends courses of action to the Dean and senior management. Conducts special studies as requested by the Dean or senior management. Maintains and applies working knowledge of fund accounting, UC policies and procedures, internal control practices as well as numerous sets of personnel policies and procedures. Maintains a high level of confidentiality and discretion as it pertains to handling confidential and sensitive personnel and payroll matters in a diplomatic fashion. Analyzes, recommends and implements changes in existing administrative policies, procedures, guidelines and initiatives for more efficient and effective operations. Exercises advanced problem solving skills and knowledge to plan, recommend and execute courses

of action. Uses independent judgment, decision making and initiative to set priorities, plan, and coordinate projects and activities. Uses sophisticated organizational and analytical skills and applies best business practices to ensure that all functions operate smoothly and efficiently. Exercises superior level of professionalism, tact and diplomacy while performing the critical duties of this position. Demonstrates good judgment in selecting methods and techniques for obtaining solutions, including resolving problems that are not routine in nature. Handles sensitive and confidential issues. Works under the pressure of deadlines, handling multiple projects concurrently. Coordinates training and provides recommendations on implementation of enterprise‑wide systems to administrative staff in all the units within the GGSE. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Prior administrative, financial and/ or office management experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36580.

CARPENTER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the supervision of a supervisor or lead personnel, performs skilled cabinetry making for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining commons and related buildings as outlined below to accomplish the operational needs of the department. Duties: light framing to finish carpentry for the repair and maintenance of University owned properties, including structural repair, back priming, installation and repair of doors and trim, weatherproofing and sealing of exterior openings. Installation and repair of drywall and stucco. Repair to cabinetry. Preparation and installation of various types of counter tops. Formica repair and installation. Reqs: 5+ years demonstrated work experience in the carpentry trade, showing multiple skills within the trade. Ability to safely erect, work on and operate scaffolding, high ladders and various lifts. Demonstrated ability to work in a diverse work environment. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Knowledge and ability to correctly and safely perform work in other trade disciplines such as plumbing, locksmithing, and light electrical. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $39.34/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other

characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #35663

COMMUNITY HAZARDOUS WASTE SR. TECHNICIAN

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY Conducts operational aspects of the Santa Barbara County Hazardous Waste Management Program including all physical handling of hazardous waste generated by the Santa Barbara community in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations as well as the University policies and procedures. Follows the procedures and responsibilities included in the Santa Barbara County Household and Small Business Hazardous Waste Collection Program Operations Manual. Assures continuous flow of materials through the facility to appropriate disposal options. Collects, segregates, packages, manifests and prepares shipments of hazardous waste. Works with waste haulers and coordinate shipments. Organizes and prepares the facility for public use each week. Coordinates community collection program operations with UCSB program staff. Maintains equipment and supplies. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED Required. Knowledge of applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations pertaining to hazardous waste. Minimum of one years of relevant work experience in the operational aspects of the hazardous waste, recycling, solid waste or related field experience. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean

DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to obtain HAZWOPER Certificate within 6 months of employment. Willing to work four‑ten hour shifts and weekends. Pass a physical exam. Medically qualified to wear self‑contained breathing apparatus and able to move heavy object. Valid Class “C” California Drivers license and be eligible for a Commercial Drivers License with Hazardous Materials endorsement. Willing to work/respond to emergencies. $27.13 ‑ $29.08/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/7/2022. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 36386

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND OPERATIONS

ARTS & LECTURES The Director of Finance and Operations has full functional responsibility for all financial, personnel and administrative operations of the Arts & Lectures unit. Serves as an advisor to the Executive Director and Associate Director on high‑level matters of critical importance, creating and implementing short and long‑range strategic financial, personnel, and operation plans and goals. Directs contractors, vendors and departmental staff at select

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A&L events. Serves as a senior point of contact in the absence of the Executive and Associate Director. Responsibilities include management of all Arts & Lectures finances, including complex income accounts exceeding $10 million annually, as well as management at the department level of the Arts & Lectures $30 million endowment campaign funds. Additionally, the A&L unit is granted procurement authority to execute contracts for professional services in excess of $3 million annually; the Director of Finance and Operations establishes structures, policy and procedures to ensure success in delegation and auditability of all department transactions. Handles high level contractual negotiation with agents/ artists/managers. Responsible for complex financial reporting, including economic forecasting and modeling, projections on investment income, and advising the Executive Director on financial strategies and risks. Prepares reports and presents on financial performance and projections to the Arts & Lectures Finance Council. Responsible for directing daily administrative operations including managing personnel, space and facilities. Independently identifies issues, initiates research, interprets information, and acts on issues regarding personnel, space and facilities management, grants management, accounting, travel, payroll, procurement, contracting, and business services. Under severe time constraints, solves a variety of complex problems that require professional experience, operational and organizational knowledge. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability to work occasional evening and weekend hours. $90,000‑130,000/yr. The

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EMPLOYMENT University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34141

EXECUTIVE CATERING AND CONCESSIONS CHEF

CAMPUS DINING The Executive Catering and Concessions Chef is responsible for overseeing complex catering food preparation, menus, nutritional needs, sanitation and cost effectiveness in campus catering and concessions, using advanced food services concepts. Exercises independent judgment in methods, techniques and evaluation criteria for obtaining results in food services. Considered a technical leader in the culinary field. Some areas of responsibility include: ‑Develops quality control programs for optimal product quality in Campus Catering and Concessions. ‑Creates and provides continuous training to all food production staff and managers in food preparation, presentation, customer service, sanitation and safety. ‑Oversees compliance of food prep to QA standards and safety / security related to handling and preparation of food. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree, or Culinary Degree, or Equivalent combination of education and experience, 5 years work experience in catering operations, or Equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check, Valid driver’s license and clean driving record. $72,000‑ $80,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/8/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36294

FINANCIAL OPERATIONS ANALYST

STUDENT HEALTH Incumbent performs responsible and complex professional financial analysis and processing for Student Health. Extracts, researches and analyzes financial data and reports to the Financial Operations Manager as appropriate. Provide policy information to staff and handle multiple complex and confidential projects that require strong analytical and organizational skills. Serves as a primary preparer for financial and salary adjustments requiring accurate interpretation of policies and procedures. Independently develops appropriate business procedures and best practices with financial, procurement, billing, and payroll processes ensuring that the department is in compliance with University Business & Financial policies. Manages the billing component of Student Health Service’s (SHS) Electronic Medical Record system.Acts as liaison with various on‑campus and off‑campus entities concerning billing issues. Oversees the flow of data between the SHS Billing system and other various systems. Audits and oversees payment processing and general ledger reconciliation. Analyzes and interprets new campus business processes and provides recommendations to the Manager and writes and disseminates

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information to department staff members. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training.Strong analytical skills, critical thinking, organizational skills, and attention to detail. Working knowledge of financial processes, policies and procedures. Proficiency in the use of spreadsheet and database software. 1‑3 years’ experience in finance or related field. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $24.62/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/9/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36062

GRADUATE ADVISOR

COMPUTER SCIENCE Participates in all aspects of student life in Computer Science. Coordinates and manages the graduate admissions program, advises approximately 190 graduate students and 400 undergraduate students on a wide variety of issues, including requirements for graduate admissions, program requirements and options, grades, courses, financial aid, petitions, leaves, exam schedules, housing, cost of living, community issues, employment, and other personal and academic issues related to their welfare. Position requires extensive knowledge of University and Graduate Division policies and procedures regarding graduate and undergraduate student affairs, and requires the ability to interpret regulations from various administrative offices to students and faculty. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$27.21/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34129

GRADUATE PROGRAM ASSISTANT

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Assists in managing all graduate programs and services in the Departments of French & Italian; Germanic & Slavic Studies; Spanish & Portuguese; and the Programs of Comparative Literature and Latin American & Iberian Studies. Works closely with Faculty Graduate Advisors in advising students and faculty on most aspects of graduate matters. Assists in advising prospective applicants on degree programs and in coordinating the admissions process. Acts as departmental liaison with all relevant campus agencies. Assists in coordinating graduate students’ block grants, fellowships and teaching assistantships. Prepares

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payroll for graduate student services and processes accounting and reimbursement transactions as needed. Assists in designing and maintaining departmental databases as needed. Assists in coordinating, designing, composing and editing departmental publications and announcements. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent. 1‑3 years of administrative work experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/9/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36331.

LAB ASSISTANT

MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORY Conducts various scientific measurements on scientific equipment/instruments in the Spectroscopy facility of the Materials Research Lab (MRL) including, but not limited to, solution NMR, solid‑state NMR, EPR, DNP‑NMR, MRI, QCM, Fluorimeter and measurement devices. Assists and trains users on how to operate instruments to conduct measurements for their research projects. Debugs, repairs, and maintains the instruments and accessories. Assists in data acquisition, sets up devices, and conducts training for new equipment. Reads and writes comprehensive user guides and manuals for various instrumentation. Maintains a safe, clean, and user‑friendly lab environment. Manages recharge billings, lab access and lab supply inventories. Reqs: Upper division college coursework in science, preferably in Chemistry, Materials, Physics, or Engineering. Hands‑on experience in laboratory setting. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $23.72 ‑ $27.66/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/9/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36285.

PATIENT SERVICES ASSOCIATE FOR PHYSICAL THERAPY

STUDENT HEALTH Provides front office support for the patients, therapists and staff in the Physical Therapy Department, and provides coverage for the Student Health appointment desk, if needed. Using a computerized scheduling system, schedules medical appointments both by telephone and in person. Accurately determines patient’s medical needs with regards to urgency and appropriateness of patient’s appointment request. Requires coverage for back office duties during PT aide breaks, vacations or absences. Will need to assist appointment desk in scheduling appointments. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent. Experience working in customer service. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. This is a 100% 11‑month position.Four weeks of furlough are taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Starting at $21.28/hr. The University of

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California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/10/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36471

PROGRAM ASSISTANT

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER The Humanities Administrative Support Center (HASC) provides administrative support for over 110 faculty, 784 majors and minors, and 225 graduate students. The Program Assistant provides the full range of administrative functions and services for the Departments of History, Classics, Religious Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultural Studies, and several research centers and initiatives. Provides high level support to the areas of operations, student services, finance, and academic personnel. Develops and implements procedures and manages day‑to‑day and long‑term general office operations by anticipating, evaluating and resolving potential conflict or problems independently. Manages DSP exams and course evaluations for HASC’s student services area, purchasing for four academic departments and HASC, and oversees daily facility needs. Maintains a strong knowledge of UC and departmental policies governing student services, copyright, procurement, record retention, travel and entertainment. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent training and/or experience in a higher education setting. Prior experience working in a front office. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/8/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36251.

SR. BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the general supervision of the Residence Hall Manager; the Sr. BMW performs senior building maintenance tasks on a regular and continuing basis and performs custodial work for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Commons. May perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. May work shifts other than Monday through Friday in order for the department to cover operational needs. Reqs: Training in the basics of plumbing repairs, patch and painting, simple beginning carpentry repairs, and simple (non‑licensed) electrical repairs. Experience making apprentice level repairs in plumbing, patch and paint, carpentry, and electrical. Basic knowledge of the safe use of maintenance equipment such as drills, saws, cordless screwdrivers, and some drain snakes. Experience as an exceptional customer service representative with the ability to communicate effectively and professionally with diverse student and family clientele. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee

Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $22.07 ‑ $26.89/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/31/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu. Job #35853

SR. CUSTODIAN ‑ WEEKEND WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the supervision of the Custodial Supervisor or Residence Hall Manager, the Sr. Custodian performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. Reqs: Working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable. Will train on all equipment and chemicals used. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multicultural work environment. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Days/Hours: Thu‑Mon, 7:30am‑4pm. $20.74 ‑ $22.44/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 33993

TEMPORARY PAINTER

MAINTENANCE Under the supervision of a supervisor or lead personnel, the incumbent is responsible for performing skilled painting tasks for University owned Residential Halls/Housing and its related buildings at on and off campus locations as outlined below, and may be assigned other duties (including those in other craft areas). Reqs: 4+ years demonstrated work in the painter trade, showing multiple skills within the paint trade. Similar type apartment paintwork experience as well as paint applications to wood and stucco buildings. Knowledge and ability to perform interior and exterior wall repairs to various wall types such as drywall, wire lath, and plaster and stucco. Ability to safely erect, work on, and or operate scaffolding, high ladders, various lifts, power washers, airless and HVLP spray systems, and air compressors. Ability to meet critical timelines and work independently or in teams. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Must maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Must be able to lift a minimum of 50 pounds and work while on a ladder. Must use a respirator upon hire. Multiple positions available. This is a limited appointment from June 2022 ‑ September 2022. $37.65/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/7/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36373

UCEN EVENTS MANAGEMENT ASSISTANT SYSTEM & NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCE Works with minimal guidance performing tasks that provide a high level of computing functionality for instructional, research, computational, and network systems in Earth Science (ES) and other departments served by the Life Sciences Computing Group (LSCG).Recommends, installs and integrates computing equipment in keeping with LSCG, ES, UCSB and UCOP policies. Researches, troubleshoots and resolves hardware, software and networking issues on Windows and Macintosh computers and other equipment such as printers, phones, tablets and NAS devices for users in offices, research and instructional labs, and multi‑use facilities. Provides network support and development. Develops, maintains and upgrades computing lab facilities in coordination with users and supervisors. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of training and/or experience. Experience with proactive defense, incident response and analysis. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $68,000‑$75,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35816

UNIVERSITY CENTER Assists the Meetings and Events Manager with checking event confirmations, placing work orders, checking event set‑ups, scheduling students, recruiting, hiring and training student employees. Assists in updating event confirmation prices after events have taken place and emails invoices to clients. Reqs: May require moving furniture over 50lbs. Must be Organized, able to adapt to difficult situations and detail‑oriented. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record. This is a limited position working less than 1000 hours. $19.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/13/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #36619

UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR

HSSB ADMIN SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for independently coordinating and managing all aspects of the Undergraduate Program in the Department of History. Provides knowledgeable and holistic advice to prospective, incoming, and current undergraduate students and the campus community. Manages all administrative aspects

of the undergraduate program, including consulting on course offerings, facilitating the creation of new courses, creating quarterly course schedules, and coordinating departmental events such as the annual awards ceremony. Provides timely and detailed information and reports to faculty and staff, and serves as liaison to multiple departments on campus such as the College of Letters and Science, the Office of the Registrar, the Disabled Students Program, the Department of Admissions, the Academic Senate, and more. Maintains an in depth understanding of Departmental and University policies and procedures, and interprets regulations for students, staff, faculty, and the general public. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of training and work experience in a higher education setting. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$26.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/4/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35943.

WRITER, SOCIAL SCIENCES

OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS Writer for Social Sciences and Humanities and Fine Arts The Office of Public Affairs & Communication Provides multi‑platform coverage of UC Santa Barbara with a focus on the social sciences and humanities & fine arts. Responsible for working closely with the academic and research community on a wide range of functions and tasks related to the presentation of UCSB to the general public, campus community, and local, national, and global media through a variety of electronic and print means, including The Current website and UC Santa Barbara Magazine. With a goal of advocacy, conducts in‑depth reporting, including background research and interviews, and practices long‑form storytelling; prepares news releases and media advisories; pitches stories to media outlets and responds to media inquiries; identifies faculty experts and arranges media interviews. Reqs:Bachelor’s Degree Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Thorough knowledge of the concepts and principles of news, media communications and media relations. Proven written, verbal and interpersonal communication skills. Familiarity with the modern digital landscape. 2 or more years of experience in communications, working with news and media outlets and reporters. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work occasional weekends and evenings to meet the operational needs of the department. Up to 63,000/Yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/13/2022. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36478


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56. 22-Down variant 60. “Yeah, I get it” 1. Popeyes side 61. Magazine for the discerning 5. “Surprise” subtitle in “The Abominable Snowman? Price Is Right”’s “Hole in 64. Lt. Dangle’s city One” game 65. Prolific writer Asimov 10. Sherman ___, CA 66. Finn on a raft 14. Nautical prefix 67. Words of clarification when 15. Ecstatic hymn spelling 16. “On Air with ___ Seacrest” 68. Lose intentionally 17. Cash cab, really? 69. Accident-monitoring gp. 19. Architect Saarinen 20. Construction worker on “Fraggle Rock” 1. Right ___ Fred 21. Brand in the dairy aisle 2. Host of the recent “You Bet 23. Dumbstruck Your Life” revival 26. Too inquisitive 3. Gas brand that’s also a 27. On the clock? musical direction 30. Gary’s st. 4. More dizzy 32. Doesn’t give up 5. “Jerry Springer: The ___” 35. Recovered from 6. Templeton, in “Charlotte’s 36. Make it through Web” 38. “___ Junipero” (Emmy7. Spilled drink winning “Black Mirror” 8. Like some cheese rinds episode) 9. Vegetable for which goggles 39. Petty peeve may be used when prepping 40. Item near a litter box 10. End of an ultimatum 41. ___ nutshell 11. Electronic assistant for a 42. “Get ___ Ya-Ya’s Out!” Madagascar lemur species? (Rolling Stones album) 12. Byron of “MythBusters” 43. Like some wages 13. Runny nose problem 44. Long journey 18. Become well 45. Parenthetical comment 47. Lao-___ (Chinese philosopher) 22. See 56-Across 48. “The ___” (podcast hosted 24. Triumph in the end 25. Countersign by Michael Barbaro and 27. Margot played her in 2017 Sabrina Tavernise) 28. Elite eightsome of higher ed 49. Math subj. 51. Commend highly 29. Author Morrison, when 53. Willingly obedient writing poetry?

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31. Two-unit home 33. Team of judges 34. Like a winding road 36. “Foucault’s Pendulum” author Umberto 37. “Curious George” author H.A. ___ 40. Display unit 44. Word to a hound 46. Japanese radish 48. Means of escape 50. Ark measurement unit 52. “Penn & Teller: Fool Us” network 53. Bilingual explorer 54. Jake Shimabukuro instruments 55. Phil who jammed with Jerry Garcia 57. God, to Caesar 58. Carve in stone 59. “Morning Joe” cohost Brzezinski 62. Stuff in a pit 63. Principle behind yin and yang ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1086

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

JUNE2,2,2022 2022 THE JUNE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

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LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: THOMAS R. ALLYN Case No.: 22PR00124 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: THOMAS R. ALLYN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Allen Thomashefsky, Trustee of the David W Doner Trust in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: DENISE H. ALLYN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decendent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/23/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 05/16/2022 By: Rosa Reyes, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Allen & Kimbell, LLP attn: James M. Sweeney, Esq. 317 East Carrillo Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑8611 Published May 26, June 02, 9, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: FREDA LESLIE NAKON CASE NO.: 22PR00243 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: FREDA LESLIE NAKON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: DAVID ROSSMAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. The Petition for Probate requests that: DAVID ROSSMAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decendent. THE PETITION requests authority

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to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/30/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 05/11/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Marilyn D. Anticouni, Attorney at Law, 1234 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑882‑9255 Published June 02, 9, 16 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MIN LI CASE NO. 22PR00258 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the WILL or estate, or both of MIN LI. A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by GEORGE AMBROSE in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA BARBARA. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that GEORGE AMBROSE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 07/14/22 at 9:00AM in Dept. 5 located at 1100 ANACAPA STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93121‑1107 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person

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or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner DARIN M. KARPEL, ESQ. ‑ SBN 186395 KARPEL LAW FIRM 4500 PARK GRANADA, STE. 202 CALABASAS CA 91302‑1613 BSC 221738 6/2, 6/9, 6/16/22 CNS‑3590509# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: OTTER ROCK PROPERTIES at 4874 8th Street, Unit B, Carpinteria, CA 93013. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 11/07/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2019‑0002790. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Elizabeth Loomis (same address), William III Loomis (same address), Christine Reynolds, 5295 Calle Barquero, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. The business was conducted as a Joint Venture signed by ELIZABETH LOOMIS, GENERAL PARTNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 5/06/22. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001208. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY SOLAR at 571 Hill Street Los Alamos, CA 93440. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 12/14/2020 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2020‑0002977. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Fresource Energies Inc (Same address) The business was conducted as a Corporation signed by GARY GORDON, PRESIDENT. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 5/25/2022. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001377. Published: June 2, 9, 16, 23 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: XANADU SKATE BOUTIQUE at 1436 Santa Fe Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Valerie A. Selvaggio (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Individual Filed by: VALERIE SELVAGGIO, PROPRIETOR with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara

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County on May 2, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001174. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LORETO PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER at 3311 B State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93130; James M DeLoreto, 1243 Camino Rio Verde, Santa Barbara 93111; Edward S DeLoreto, 1361 Mission Ridge Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Trust, Filed by: JAMES M. DELORETO, TRUSTEE with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E4. FBN Number: 2022‑0001030. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SZABO FINISH CARPENTRY AND WOODWORKS at 210 W. Micheltorena St, Unit E, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Andrew J. Szabo (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, filed by ANDREW SZABO, OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 06, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001207. Published May 12, 19, 26, June 8, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA GIFTS&MORE at 4010 Calle Real, Ste #3, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Ziyad Abdulhai 4515 Chapparral Drive, Carpinteria, CA 93013. This business is conducted by A Individual Filed by: ZIYAD ABDULHAI,OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001202. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GAMISODES at 40 Oceano Avenue, #10, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Kids Media, Inc (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by: DAVIS BRIMIR, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 09, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001218. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 09 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAMMERHEAD CONSTRUCTION, 6070 Ashley Place, Goleta, CA 93117; Brandon Montano Construction Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation, signed by BRANDON MONTANO, CEO with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001119. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ABSTRAX TITLE SERVICES at 315A Meigs Road #178, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Patricia L O’Connell (same address); Ralph P. Folson 12348 A Cactus Drive Desert Hot Springs, CA 92240. This business is conducted by copartners. Signed by: PATRICIA L. O’CONNELL, MANAGING PARTNER Filed with the County

Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E40 FBN Number: 2022‑0001213. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BUOY WATER CLUB at 500 Maple Avenue, Lot 4, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Air Brothers LLC, 380 Miramonte Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by: SCOUT VERNON, CO FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001150. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LILY HAYS WINES at 207 Cordova Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; King Brodie Enterprises, 2007 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by: LILY HAYS, MANAGER Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001164. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARTESANIAS 805 at 302 W Micheltorena St, 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wendy K. Barboza Martinez (same address); This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by: WENDY KARINA BARBOZA MARTINEZ, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47 FBN Number: 2022‑0001243. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RBX LAW at 924 Anacapa Street, Suite 1‑T, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Russell A. Brown, 226 N. Juanita Avenue Unit B, Redondo Beach, CA 90277. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by RUSSELL BROWN, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001309. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ERA PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES at 4880 Market Street, Ventura, CA 93003 ; ERA Psychological Services, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by DOUGLAS MOES, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001234. Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THEPARTNERS WEALTH MANAGEMENT at 1129 State Street, Suite 29, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Partners Wealth Management, LLC , (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by: ALEXANDER POPOVICH, CEO/MANAGING MEMBER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara

County on May 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001220. Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SPONSORPITCH at 3463 State Street, Suite 525, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Riviera Group SB, LLC, same address. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by STEPHEN C. TICHES, CO‑OWNER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001350. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BROKKR MEDICAL at 233 W Arrellaga, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, CRISTIAN WILLIAM GOEBNER, (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual. Signed by CRISTIAN GOEBNER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 25, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001379. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 5 STAR AUTO REPAIR at 5737 Thornwood Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; SCOTT ANDERSSON at 945 Ward Drive #29, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by SCOTT ANDERSSON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 16, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001294. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COASTAL CLEANUP at 10 E. Yanonali Street, #43, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; COASTAL CLEANUP SPC, 2909 Dinwiddie Way, Elk Grove, CA 95758. This business is conducted by a corporation. Signed by KYLIE GANNON, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 25, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001374. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DRONE OPTICS at 500 Zink Avenue, Santa Barbara CA 93111, Clay Bougher (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by CLAY BOUGHER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001306. Published: June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOTHER MADRE BEES at 7127 Hollister Avenue, Ste 25A‑259, Goleta, CA 93117, Finnigan’s Wild LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by FINNIGAN JONES, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001281. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS

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STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PATHWAY DENTAL GROUP SANTA MARIA at 426 Barcellus Ave, #201, Santa Maria, CA 93454; Pathway Dental Group Santa Maria (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by STEN ERICSON, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001390. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SHAKA BITES at 435 De La Vina Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Shaka Bites LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by VIR SINGH, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47, FBN Number: 2022‑0001387. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YONG CHIROPRACTIC & SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC, 351 Hitchcock Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Bruce A.Yong, 2961 Foothill Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed by BRUCE A. YONG, DOCTOR OF CHIROPRACTIC, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, E40, FBN Number: 2022‑0001223. Published June 2, 9, 16, 23, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CLEAR CABINETRY at 525 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, ABC CASEWORK LLC 6255 Inez Street, Unit 1, Ventura, CA 93003. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by BAILEY HOCHHALTER, MANAGING MEMBER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001248. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: EL CONGRESO at El Centro 406 UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, Erik Magana (same address) Jazmin R. Ramirez (same address). This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Assoc. Other Than a Partnership. SIGNED BY: ERIK MAGANA, CO‑CHAIR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001300. Published: May 26, June 2, 9 16 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SCOTT CRAIG VANSANFORD TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV00713 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SCOTT CRAIG VANSANFORD TO: SCOTT CRAIG VAN SANFORD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be


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granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 15, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated April 27, 2022. by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TRAM DINH BICH PHAM TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01609 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Tram Dinh Bich Pham TO: Elva Tram Pham THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 27, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 04, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, County of Santa Barbara, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LUZ ANGELICA LESLIE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01577 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Luz Angelica Leslie TO: Luz Angelica Coronado THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks

prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 06, 2022 Thomas P. Aderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SHEVA UNTERMAN, TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01546 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SHEVA UNTERMAN TO: CAPPY UNTERMAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 24, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 4, 2022, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF NAOLU LY TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01000 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Naolu Ly TO: Jubei Naolu Ly THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 19, 2022. Thomas P. Aderle, Judge of the Superior Court, County of Santa Barbara, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF NR LH NICOLE MARIE NOEL RENETZKY TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 21CV03524 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: NICOLE MARIE NOEL RENETZKY TO: NICOLE MARIE WEBER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. P.O. Box 21107,

Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 20, 2022, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Chavez, Terri, Deputy Clerk, Superior Court, Published June 2, 9 16, 23, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF I‑TE Hsieh TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01867 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: I‑TE HSIEH TO: PETER I‑TE HSIEH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing July 15, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 26, 2022, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Baksh, Narzralli, Deputy Clerk, Superior Court, Published June 2, 9 16, 23, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KATHERINE ANN BRUNE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01347 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom) June 7, 2022 at 5:30 PM ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will that the City Council will conduct a public hearing on the Hollister Avenue Old Town Interim Striping Project. The purpose of the public hearing is for the City Council to receive a, update on the progress of the subject project, approve a preferred alternative to move forward into final design, and find the project exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) under Public Resources Code 21080.20. HEARING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, June 7, 2022, at 5:30 PM

LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www. cityofgoleta.org). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, June 2, 2022, on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 9617505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Dates: May 26, 2022, and June 2, 2022

above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KATHERINE ANN BRUNE TO: KATHERINE ANN DOBBS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 17, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated April 22, 2022 by, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022.

PUBLIC NOTICES WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD; SPECIAL NOTICE OF LAWSUIT (Pursuant to Labor Code section

3716 and Code of Civil Procedure section 412.20 and 412.30) WCAB No. ADJ11488066 To: DEFENDANT, ILLEGALLY UNINSURED EMPLOYER: AVISO: Usted esta siendo demandado. La corte puede expedir una decision en contra suya sin darle la oportunidad de defenderse a menos que usted acute pronto. Lea la siguiente informacion. APPLICANT, JUAN BARRETO DEFENDANT(S), DAVID JESUS ROSALES: dba CONCRETE & PAVERS SPECIALIST NOTICES 1) A lawsuit, the Application for Adjudication of Claim, has been filed with the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board against you as the named defendant by the above‑named applicant(s). You may seek the advice of an attorney in any matter connected with this lawsuit and such attorney should be consulted promptly so that your response may be filed and entered in a timely fashion. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney reference service or a legal aid office. You may also request assistance/information from an Information and Assistance Officer of the Division of Workers’ Compensation. (See telephone directory.) 2) An Answer to the Application must be filed and served within six days of the service of the Application pursuant to Appeals Board rules; therefore, your written response must be filed with the Appeals Board promptly; a letter or phone call will not protect your interests. 3) You will be served with a Notice‑ (s) of Hearing and must appear at

all hearings or conferences. After such hearing, even absent your appearance, a decision may be made and an award of compensation benefits may issue against you. The award could result in the garnishment of your wages, taking of your money or property or other relief. If the Appeals Board makes an award against you, your house or other dwelling or other property may be taken to satisfy that award in a non‑judicial sale, with no exemptions from execution. A lien may also be imposed upon your property without further hearing and before the issuance of an award. 4) You must notify the Appeals Board of the proper address for the service of official notices and papers and notify the Appeals Board of any changes in that address. TAKE ACTION NOW TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS! Issued by: WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD Name and address of Appeals Board: Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board 130 East Ortega Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Name and address of Applicant’s Attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; FORM COMPLETED BY: Wendy Uribe Telephone No.: (805) 965‑4540. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served: as an individual defendant Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 2022.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, June 14, 2022 at 3:00 P.M. ATTENTION: The Virtual Meeting is held pursuant to Assembly Bill (AB) 361. The meeting will be Virtual because meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees. The public may only view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings and not in Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following projects: Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review Karma Indian Grocery Signage 557 Asilomar Way Unit 101 (APN 071-450-006) Case No. 21-0011-ZC/22-0005-DRB Willow Springs I & II Apartments Paint Alterations 60 Willow Springs Lane (APNs 073-600-037, 073-590-049, 073-580-045, 073-570-037, 073-560-033, 073-550-040, 073-640-041, 073-660-033, 073-650-029) Case No. 22-0012-DRB Final Review Yardi/Ekwill Fowler Development Agreement 420, 430, 490 S Fairview Ave (APNs 071-130-057/071-130-062/071-130-061) Case No. 21-0002-ORD IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice include new and continued items from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, June 2, 2022

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