Santa Barbara Independent 5/26/22

Page 1

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

1


Santa Barbara County’s Leading Provider of Life-Changing Treatment for Adolescents Struggling with Drug and/or Alcohol Abuse

We’re in a Nationwide Opioid Crisis And it’s a real and growing public health emergency in our own community. Fentanyl in particular is now widely available, highly addictive, and increasingly deadly. As a result of the pandemic, more teens are suffering from mental health issues, including depression, high anxiety, loneliness, and having suicidal thoughts. Local youth from families of all types—regardless of education, occupation, wealth or address—are turning to drugs and alcohol for comfort.

In 2021, there were 19 opioid overdose deaths among 15 to 24 year-olds in Santa Barbara County, more than double the number in the previous year. All of them were due to fentanyl.*

The Daniel Bryant Youth & Family Center (a program of the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse) was first in the county to provide Substance Abuse Treatment for adolescents. Safe and effective treatment plans are customized for youth ages 10-21, and all decisions are made in collaboration with the client and their family. Our clients are served by highly experienced, dedicated professionals in an environment of respect and understanding. We provide the structure, knowledge, and support they need to find a healthy path to wellness and achieve their full potential.

Our Substance Abuse Treatment Includes Drug Testing • Individual Therapy • Group Therapy • Family Therapy • Mental Health Therapy Gender-Specific Therapy • Parenting Resources • Coordinated Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT)

All Services Available in English and Spanish Medi-Cal, CenCal, and many private insurance providers accepted. No client is ever turned away for inability to pay and scholarships are available.

Early Substance Abuse Treatment can save a young person’s life. Call or visit us today! Locations

Santa Barbara 1111 Garden Street 805.730.7575

Santa Maria 526 East Chapel Street 805.925.8860

Lompoc 106 South C Street, Suites A-C 805.741.4243

*Source: Santa Barbara County Coroner

www.cadasb.org @cadasb 2

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

3


SANTA BARBARA HALF MARATHON ART MATTERS LECTURE The Multiple Surrealisms of Wifredo Lam Mey-Yen Moriuchi, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Art History La Salle University

thursday, june 2, 5:30–6:30pm mary craig auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art

Students and Museum Circle Members: Free SBMA Members: $10 Non-Members: $15 Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desks in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net. For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters

The Cuban artist Wifredo Lam (1902-1982) is acclaimed for his semi-abstract, polymorphic paintings that draw on African motifs and the Santeria religion, in addition to avant-garde movements such as Cubism and Surrealism. His hybrid animalhuman figures and fragmented, flattened compositions are linked to his Afro-Cuban culture, as well as to his experimentation with automatism and surrealist games, yet his encounter with European modernism has neglected the influence of Lam’s Chinese culture on his art. This lecture explores the impact of Lam’s Chinese heritage on his artistic production and considers the significance of multiple Surrealisms present in his oeuvre.

1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday 11 am–5 pm Thursday 11 am–8 pm www.sbma.net Wifredo Lam, The Eternal Presence (An Homage to Alejandro García Caturla) (detail), 1944. Oil and pastel over papier mâché and chalk ground on bast fiber fabric. RISD Museum, Nancy Sayles Day Collection of Modern Latin American Art. Courtesy of the RISD Museum, Providence, RI.

4

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Intern Madison Smoak, Sarah Stephens, Veronica Vo Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

23

I Madonnari’s Imagineers Kathy Koury and Kai Tepper Celebrate Return of Street Painting Festival by Charles Donelan

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 NEWS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

OBITUARIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

LIVING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

ARTS LIFE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 ASTROLOGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 CLASSIFIEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 ON THE COVER: Kathy Koury and Kai Tepper. Photo by Ingrid Bostrom. Design by Xavier Pereyra.

SO LONG, DR. DONELAN This week, the Independent says a fond farewell to longtime arts editor Charles Donelan, who has taken a position with UCSB Arts & Lectures as a senior writer and publicist. We’re sad to see him go but are deeply grateful for all his years of stellar work. Before he left, Charles penned one last cover story for the paper and answered a few questions about his Indy career.

PAUL WELLMAN

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 36, # 854, May 26-June 2, 2022

When did you start at the Independent, and who were the big acts at the time? I started in March 2004. The hottest ticket that year was Jack Johnson at the Bowl on Labor Day weekend. He talked about Kim and sang “Banana Pancakes.” My favorite show of that year was a tribute to Gram Parsons, also at the Bowl. Keith Richards was on stage all night backing up every singer. Tell us one of your favorite anecdotes as arts editor. I used to cover various music festivals such as Coachella, Ultra, and Sea of Dreams. One year, the people behind Bonnaroo and Outside Lands decided to do a festival in Las Vegas on Halloween weekend. It was called Vegoose. A couple of weeks beforehand, one of the promoters called me and offered a very Santa Barbara–specific pitch that I will never forget. He said, “Please tell all the kids who got arrested in Isla Vista last year during Halloween that they should come to Vegoose instead. They can do whatever they want here, no consequences!” I went, and he wasn’t lying. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

5


BEST WEED, BEST PRICES 5.30.22

5.27.22

FRIDAY

MONDAY

5.31.22

6.2.22

BUY AN 8TH GET AN 8TH FOR $1

TUESDAY

BUY ANY 2 STIIIZY & GET THE 3RD FOR $1 *TWO ITEMS MUST BE SAME STIIIZY PRODUCT*

BUY 2 GET 1 FOR $1

THURSDAY

BUY 1G CART & GET A INFUSED PREROLL FOR $1

5.30.22-6.5.22 5 2

OFFERING PICK-UP

DELIVERY

ONEPLANTGOLETA ONEPLANT.LIFE

*STHGIR LLA SEVRESER TNEMEGANAM*

BUY (2) 1G CARTS GET THE 3RD FOR $1

290 STORKE RD #G, GOLETA, CA (805) 770-3275 // LIC#: C10-0000813

PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street Suite 302, Santa Barbara CA. Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

6

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until July 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


Endorsements

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

H

ere are our abbreviated endorsements. Complete versions can be found on Independent.com. As always, the Independent does not endorse in every race but only in those that we have researched and can confidently suggest a candidate. Thank you for considering our endorsement.

HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

Congress: Salud Carbajal Salud Carbajal deserves to be sent back to Congress for another term representing Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Ventura voters. Carbajal, a Democratic reach-across-theaisle pragmatist, was first elected to Congress in 2016. He is skilled at bringing opposing groups together and will work effectively on behalf of his district and constituents, finding ways to expand health care and educational opportunities. He has been a leader in promoting environmental issues, most recently, wind energy off Santa Barbara’s coast. And on fundamental issues — such as a woman’s right to choose, now under attack — he has been and will continue to be an unwavering supporter.

State Assembly: Gregg Hart As 2nd District county supervisor, Gregg Hart has been a forceful but thoughtful advocate for criminal justice reform, for programs for people without homes, and for those suffering from mental-health and addiction issues. As board chair, Hart displayed strong leadership during the COVID crisis. He was always prepared and used his bully pulpit to push better education over more enforcement, a plan that worked well. Hart, a successful career politician and accomplished policy wonk, knows how government actually functions and will provide strong support for his district in solving our massive challenges.

County Superintendent of Schools: Susan Salcido

The County Superintendent of Schools is without a doubt the most important elected position in Santa Barbara County that most people have never heard of. This office — now capably occupied by Susan Salcido — provides essential support for the 20 public school districts throughout the county and the 70,000 students who rely on these schools for their education. Now, for the first time in more than 40 years, there’s a genuine contest for this crucial position. And the choice confronting voters could not be starker. The incumbent, Susan Salcido, is an uncommonly energetic career educator who has worked in education for 26 years — as a former teacher and junior high school principal — and an exceptionally experienced administrator, not to mention a Santa Maria native. Her opponent, Christy Lozano, has a palpable lack of relevant experience. She has worked 18 years as a physical education teacher in the county, most recently at Dos Pueblos High School, where after just three months, she took a leave of absence, having complained about a student discipline case in which she believed administrators had been too lax. She spoke at school board meetings and wrote on the electronic pages of Nextdoor. The County Superintendent of Schools is a complex and challenging job that involves overseeing a staff of 550 people and a $105 million budget. The office must certify all teachers in all 20 districts, review all 20 budgets, administer or oversee the special education programs for 812 students, run 10 preschools for children living in poverty, and administer education programs for migrants and for the children of homeless

Endorsements At a Glance U.S. Congress:

parents. Plus, it is constitutionally charged with translating state codes more complex than anything Hammurabi ever dreamed up. Now is not the time for on-the-job training for an administratively inexperienced ideologue. The stakes are too high.

County Clerk, Recorder, Assessor and Registrar of Voters: Joe Holland For the past 20 years, Joe Holland has made the county’s elections train run on time, an amazing feat most voters have never particularly noticed. With his very able staff, Holland has quietly toiled in the shadows, expanding the ways residents can vote without sacrificing the integrity of the results. During the 2020 COVID shutdown, Holland joined other state election officers in successfully pushing for an all-mail ballot. Even Republican Party apparatchiks — who for decades have been raising fears of voting abuse in Isla Vista — conceded the election results were squeaky clean. Not a small achievement.

2nd District Supervisor: Laura Capps Though Capps is running unopposed, it is important to explain why having Laura Capps as 2nd District supervisor is a very good thing for the county. Born and raised in Santa Barbara, Capps has immersed herself in the nitty-gritty of schoolboard politics and educational policy. Tireless in trumpeting alarm over the prevalence of child poverty in Santa Barbara County, she has worked to feed hungry kids and their families throughout the year. An independent thinker and a proven courageous politician, she is willing to work constructively and civilly in forwarding good governance in Santa Barbara.

5th District Supervisor: Steve Lavagnino Given that Steve Lavagnino is running unopposed yet again — for the third time — this endorsement might seem superfluous. But we’re endorsing Lavagnino anyway to make a larger point: The entire county has benefited from the levity, candor, and consideration he unfailingly brings to supervisorial deliberations. He has consistently represented a pragmatic brand of pro-business conservativism without getting doctrinaire, aggrieved, or personal about it. Yes, Lavagnino — along with Supervisor Das Williams — has worked to create a cannabis industry, a little too quickly and with too broad a stroke, but Lavagnino said he pushed it forward because without oil revenues in Santa Barbara, other revenue is needed to expand programs for mental health and those facing homelessness.

Sheriff: No Endorsement The candidates running for sheriff — incumbent Sheriff Bill Brown and Lt. Juan Camarena — are both serious, thoughtful, and dedicated public servants. Both have accomplishments of which they can rightfully boast. Both have much to recommend them. But both have given us cause for pause, and we can endorse neither. n

Salud Carbajal U.S. Senate: Alex Padilla California Governor: Gavin Newsom Lt. Governor: Eleni Kounalakis Attorney General: Rob Bonta Insurance Commissioner: Ricardo Lara State Assembly: Gregg Hart Santa Barbara County Auditor Controller: Betsy Schaffer Clerk Recorder: Joe Holland District Attorney: John Savrnoch Sheriff: No Endorsement Treasurer Tax Collector: Harry Hagen County Superintendent of Schools: Susan Salcido

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

7


MAY 19-26, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CORONAVIRUS

COVID Cases Double but Hospitals Keep Pace

COU RTESY SANTA BAR BAR A ZO O

ANIMALS

Test to Treat Program Launches as New Wave of Cases Rolls Across State

COU RTESY PU B LIC H EALTHSBC.ORG

by Jean Yamamura f grocery markets and crowded retail stores are anything to go by, about half of Santa Barbara thinks it’s a good idea to wear a mask indoors in public places, even though the mask mandate was eliminated in February. Employees who meet regular customers and first-time visitors face-to-face every day have seen coworkers and friends absent from work because of a rise in COVID cases, and they’ve decided to be careful. The numbers at the county COVID dashboard bear out what they’ve seen: The new-cases graph bounces up and down, but since April, the trajectory has steadily gone up, with the county’s weekly coronavirus cases this past week ALL IN ONE: The nationwide Test to Treat program has assembled all the ingredients for COVID care, including medication, in a single place. roughly doubling. While infections have increased significantly, hospitalizations — though medication should be started within five data, too, and from the Santa Barbara and Los Angeles results, “It’s certainly possible higher — have not compromised the days of the onset of symptoms. health-care system. Illnesses are less severe The new wave of cases is rolling across that we could already be on the downthan before — many patients learn they California, with average cases for the week swing,” she said with optimism, but she have COVID when they go to the hospi- rising to more than 9,000 last Friday, agreed with Ansorg that it meant there tal for other procedures — either due to compared to 7,000 the Friday before, and was a lot of disease in Santa Barbara. vaccination or remaining immunity from 5,000 the Friday before that. San Francisco As well as being less severe — more apt a recent infection. COVID remains the is seeing the greatest spikes in the num- to cause cold-like symptoms rather than leading cause of respiratory illness in the ber of cases, according to the Los Angeles pneumonia — Omicron produces sympcommunity, said Dr. Lynn Fitzgibbons, an Times, but Santa Barbara County has the toms more rapidly. They start within two infectious-disease specialist and educator largest percentage rise — 112 percent dur- or three days of exposure, rather than the at Cottage Health. And testing remains ing the past two weeks, going from 107 to three to five days with the earlier variimportant to know the level of what is a 228 cases a week for every 100,000 resi- ants, which means home COVID tests dents — followed by Santa Clara County work sooner. To protect against the corovery, very contagious disease, she said. A new nationwide program, Test with 111 percent. navirus, Ansorg recommended what to Treat, has assembled all the ingrediAt work, said Dr. Ansorg, is infection Public Health has been advising all along: ents for COVID care in a single place. and reinfection. “Unfortunately,” he said, Wear a good mask (N95s and KN95s are In Santa Barbara, they can be found at “persons who got COVID during the best), avoid crowds, and get vaccinated the Public Health trailer at Direct Relief Delta wave last summer could get it again or boosted. and the Santa Maria Fairgrounds. (See with the original Omicron.” That bug, Currently, second boosters are recompublichealthsbc.org/test-to-treat or call prevalent during January, created a short- mended for Pfizer and Moderna vaccines the Santa Maria site at [888] 634-1123 x8 lasting immunity. “The later-appearing five months after the last shot for people to make an appointment.) Anyone with Omicron variants — BA.2 and BA.2.12.1 over the age of 50, for people over the age a positive test either at home or at the — are now able to reinfect someone who of 12 who have compromised immune health-care site will speak with a nurse had Omicron earlier this year,” Ansorg systems, and for those 18-49 years old who in person or through video, explained Dr. explained. got a Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Wastewater, which is another way Henning Ansorg, Santa Barbara County’s They remain a good protection against health officer, to check them out for the to track the COVID virus, is measured COVID, especially with Omicron BA.5 a medication — most often Paxlovid. weekly in Santa Barbara; it was up for the concern across Europe and South Africa, “Test, telehealth consult, and medica- first week of May and down in the second which test more extensively and have been tion are all free of charge at those sites!” week. San Francisco and Los Angeles are early barometers of health for the United Ansorg said. CVS has some locations that measuring wastewater two or three times States. Vulnerability to disease remained fulfill all these needs, he added, and most a week, and the 10-day rolling average was a question, Dr. Ansorg said: “It is not clear pharmacies are now carrying the medi- declining or leveling off, according to data if someone who has immunity from BA.2 cation, after a shortage last month. Time at the Cal SuWers Network. Dr. Fitzgib- or BA.2.12.1 will be protected against that is of the essence in getting tested, as the bons has had her eye on the wastewater version and for how long.” n

I

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. 8

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

The first baby wallaby born at the S.B. Zoo has begun to peek out of the pouch of its mother, Kalina (pictured). The joey is about five to six months old, the age joeys typically begin to come out of their mother’s pouch. “It will still be a while before the joey is ready to come all the way out of the pouch and spend time exploring the habitat with Kalina, and it will continue to hop in and out of the pouch until it is about one year old,” said Dr. Julie Barnes, the zoo’s vice president of animal care and health.

BUSINESS The Press Room at 15 East Ortega Street has been saved from the wrecking ball, according to James “Raf” Rafferty, the English-style pub’s longtime proprietor. S.B.’s die-hard soccer fans had feared they’d lose their favorite gathering place when a development proposal targeted the pub for demolition. As word of the bar’s impending doom spread almost two years ago, a “Save the Press Room” movement generated a petition with more than 13,000 signatures. “We signed a 10-year lease,” Rafferty said. “The landlord [SIMA Management] pulled its application for the development.” Full story at independent.com/press-room. Carpinteria City Council resumed its discussion on an urgency ordinance that would limit the opening of new “formula,” or chain, businesses in the city. This proposed moratorium aims to protect the city’s interests by fostering diversity of businesses and preserving the city’s “essential character as a classic, small beach town in Southern California,” according to the staff report. The issue was first brought before the City Council last week, and the council decided on 5/23 to discuss the proposed moratorium again when all members were present at its 6/13 meeting.

PUBLIC HEALTH The Center for Disease Control has sent a warning regarding an outbreak of salmonella, infecting 14 people across 12 states, and believed to have been caused by Jif brand peanut butters. On 5/20, J.M. Smucker Company recalled multiple Jif brand peanut butter types, including creamy, crunchy, natural, and reduced fat. Recalled products include lot codes 1274425 through 2140425, with “425” at the end of the first seven numbers. The CDC advises to check any Jif brand peanut butter to verify if it has been recalled and throw it out if it has. CONT’D ON PAGE 12 


CANNABIS

Stricter Permits Are Coming for North County Cannabis

F

uture “grows” will have to be “compatible” with the neighborhood, county supervisors say. Two years after roundly rejecting the idea, the county Board of Supervisors this week voted 3-2 in concept to tighten its regulation of outdoor cannabis cultivation on large farming properties, primarily in the North County. The measure, which will return to the board for a final vote on August 16, comes after the county has already approved 1,575 acres of outdoor cannabis in unincorporated areas under more permissive permits. That’s the current cap that the county sets on outdoor cultivation; but some growers who are eligible could drop out, and future boards could decide to raise the cap. On Tuesday, board Chair Joan Hartmann and supervisors Bob Nelson and Das Williams voted tentatively to require conditional-use permits for all future outdoor “grows,” beginning four months from now. Supervisors Gregg Hart and Steve Lavagnino opposed the measure, as they did when it first came up in mid-2020.

In recent years, bitter conflicts have arisen between North County cannabis growers and their neighbors, especially over the “skunky” smell of pot that drifts into the City of Buellton and the region’s wine tasting rooms during harvest time. Under conditional-use permits, growers must show that their operations would be “compatible with surrounding uses” and “not detrimental to neighborhood comfort, convenience, general welfare, health, and safety.” Public hearings before the county Planning Commission would be required. At the same time, the board majority on Tuesday did not favor requiring odorcontrol plans for all future outdoor cannabis. Such plans would be required only for “grows” proposed next to rural neighborhoods or urban-rural boundaries, or on farming properties where cannabis would cover more than 51 percent of the land, the majority said. The proposed new permit requirements would not apply to cannabis greenhouse operations in the Carpinteria Valley. —Melinda Burns

ENVIRONMENT

Pelican Health Crisis Continues

A

COU RTE SY SANTA BAR BAR A WI LDL I FE CAR E N ETWOR K

fter the deluge of sick brown pelicans last week, the Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network (SBWCN) was finding its hands less full as of Monday, when only three of them were taken into care. The number had been dropping since a peak of 51 pelicans last Wednesday; the following days saw an intake of 37, 16, 14, and 18 birds, respectively. SBWCN communications manager Lauren Gonzales says that of the 230 SICK SEABIRDS: The Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network pelican patients received over the last had received 230 sick pelicans as of Monday. 10 days, 67 percent are still in care or were transferred, while 33 percent themselves are fairly high-maintenance; staffers need to keep up with their schedule died. California Fish and Wildlife is still inves- of feeding and hydration, and each pelican tigating the cause of the pelican health crisis, generally requires two people to handle at and officials there are reluctant to make any a time. speculations. SBWCN Executive Director The timing of the pelican health crisis Ariana Katovich anticipates that some infor- has constituted an additional challenge for mation will be released later this week. SBWCN, as brown pelicans and many other Most of the pelicans under SBWCN care species of local wildlife undergo baby seaare now healthy enough to be put in a secure son from around March to July. “Intake is aviary outdoors, where there is fresh air and always higher among all animals during this large pools of water. The conditions are con- time of year,” Katovich explained. “There siderably more tolerable in the aviary than are orphans in need of care because parinside the building’s seabird pen, where the ents sometimes die from natural causes or room is overwhelmed by the smell of animal human error.” SBWCN takes in around 30 to waste and buckets of fish that the pelicans 40 of these orphans per day during baby seafeed on. “It can get pretty stinky in there, son. This year has not seen a notable increase especially since we need to keep the [seabird among animals that are not pelicans. pen] warm for the pelicans,” said Katovich. Anyone who finds a pelican in need SBWCN staff have been reinforced by of help can call the SBWCN Helpline at local volunteers and personnel from partner (805) 681-1080. Deceased birds should also organizations like the Oiled Wildlife Care be reported, but not touched or handled. Network. Forty-five pelicans initially under According to the Sheriff ’s Office, there is no SBWCN care have been transferred to the animal care number after 5 p.m. that is guarInternational Bird Rescue. The pelicans anteed to have an operator. —Nicholas Liu

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

9


MAY 19-26, 2022

CITY

A Clean Slate for State Street?

Locally Owned and Operated

A

www.santacruzmarkets.com 2021

bestof

RA o St

THANK

Santa barbara

®

Winner

BEST CORNER STORE!

Santa Barbara

By The Bag

TIP

BEEF TRI TIP

BANANAS

PORK CHOPS

$1.98 lb.

49

$1.99

$4.29 lb.

ERS

PINEAPPLES

LONG GRAIN RICE

¢

$

$

1

NCHERA

INSTANT COFFEE $

89

MANGOS

FILET MIGNON

$9.98 lb.

59 ¢

89

89¢ ea. $4.98 lb. FUJI APPLES

289

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

4 for $2 $2.98 lb.ROMA TOMATOES ¢ Thin Sliced MARINATED STEAKS

199

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

39¢ $ 99

PORK SPARE RIBS

T

ER IC K M ADR I D

contingent of Santa Barbara architects and downtown business interests is asking City Council to remove State Street’s parklets in order to reestablish a more even playing YOU FOR VOTING US field among the corridor’s retailers GOLETA and restaurateurs. Ave themselves 5757 HollisterCalling Citizens for the Restoration of Community Equity, the group — led Mahatma 2# by Riviera Bar owner Kevin Boss and State Street LOCAL STRAWBERRIES architect Cassandra Ensberg — says the an open-air trolley and provide space for move is necessary to codify State Street as a parades. Among the signatories to a letter public space while the city’s Master Plan for sent this week to the council are bar operators Thomas Byrne (The James Joyce) and the promenade is drafted. BOX lb. In an interview, Ensberg acknowledged Patrick Casey (Dargan’s); former Downtown how critical the city’s early pandemic mea- Organization director Bill Collyer; historian 7# sures were to keeping downtown businesses Erin Graffy; public relations executive John SEEDLESS WATERMELON afloat. But two years later, a host of unin- Davies; SIMA Corp president Jim Knell; and tended consequences has emerged, she said. developer Barrett Reed. “Some businesses have done very well while Ensberg, an AIA-accredited architect lb. others have not done so well,” Ensberg said who participated in the recent State Street of the proliferation of parklets among res- charrettes, said the parklets as they appear ea. El Pato 7 oz.taurants. “Some of them have more than today “feel very thrown-together.” She FRESH CORN doubled their seating,” she insisted. “It’s out acknowledged good design takes time, but that’s why it’s important to wipe the slate of balance right now.” By way of a solution, the group is sug- clean now then let the Master Plan process gesting the city clear the street of tables and play out with plenty of community buy-in chairs and make it easier for restaurant own- and consensus. “This is the public realm,” Folgers 8 oz. ers to secure sidewalk dining permits. They she said. “It’s the right of way. It belongs to lb. HEAD LETTUCE are also asking that the central bike lane be you; it belongs to me; it belongs to everyone. reconfigured into two lanes on either side Let’s allow the discussion to happen and let of the road, which would make room for democracy work.” —Tyler Hayden

¢

589

Springfield 15 oz.EDUCATION

PEAS & CARROTS

Teachers ¢ Protest School Board, Superintendent

lb.

¢

89 D WHIP TOPPING $ 49 1

¢

ORANGE JUICE

99¢ ea.

MEDIUM YAMS JALAPENOS

ozens of teachers protested outside the Santa Barbara Unified School District Fresh Daily Springfield 8 oz. building during a school board GROUND BEEF meeting Tuesday, after a letter from the & TOMATILLOS Dos Pueblos Faculty Senate (DPFS) was lb. sent out, expressing a lack of confidence in lb. lb. the school board and superintendent and accusing district leadership of misusing Springfield (24 pk.) La Fortaleza (14 oz.) funds. Minute Maid 59 oz. The letter and much of the criticism WATER TORTILLA CHIPS seemed mostly aimed at district Superintendent Hilda Maldonado, including +ea. an accusation that the school board has “allowed the Superintendent to deplete the district’s reserve account at an alarming Estrella (12 pk.) antacruzmarkets.com www.santacruzmarkets.com rate, potentially leading us into significant MICHELADAS GOLETA GOLETA SANTA BARBARA debt.” The letter provided no specifics on 5757 Hollister Ave 5757 Hollister Ave 324 W. Montecito St what amount has been depleted and when, By the bag ANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAIN RICE BEEF TRI TIP + BANANAS ¢ 99 $ 99 and district chief of communication Nick D TO STOCK HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS 49 ¢ ON$1 49 $ 59 1 2 NOVEMBER 2ND Masuda said this is an outright false claim. FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH Chicken MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL NEAPPLES PINEAPPLES 89 $ QUARTERS FOLLOW USLEGON INSTAGRAM The total available reserve for this fiscal year $ 89 2 2 $ 99 $ 99 ¢ 1 El Pato 7 oz.AND LIKE US 1 69 El Pato 7 oz. is $32.8 million, Masuda said. Next fiscal ON FACEBOOK HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE ¢ MA TOMATOES year, this number will decrease to $28.5 milPORK BUTT ¢ ROMA TOMATOES 59 59 ¢ $ 59 lion, and the year after will be $27 million. 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE ST Best 89 BE 1 ARA BARB SANTA INSTANT COFFEE Barbara SantaThin $ 89 sliced The letter goes on to demand immedi$ 89 winner R E N N I W 5 UJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES CARNE RANCHERA WINNER ¢ ate accounting of the district’s spending ¢ $ 98 89 PEAS & CARROTS 89 PEAS & CARROTS 5 ¢ practices, implementation of hiring prac¢ 89 89 Santa Cruz EDIUM YAMS MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO tices that GOLETA include a panel of district leaders SANTA BARBARA GOLETA ¢ WHIP TOPPING ¢ SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA 59 59 $ 49 2 St St $ 49 who5757 haveHollister been at Avethe district for at least Montecito W.W.Montecito 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister 1 324324 1 EAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS five years, exit interviews for all leadership HEAD LETTUCE ORANGE JUICE Mahatma 2# ¢ By the bag $ 98 Mahatma 2# 79 ¢ ORANGE$JUICE 79 personnel leaving the district, and board 89 $ 389 Support1local people at3 LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAINworking RICE acknowledgement of the Santa Barbara bread daily from Now featuring fresh bread daily from ¢ ¢ sa Bakery $ 99 La Bella Rosa Bakery businesses! 99 $ Teachers Association survey that expressed $ locally 59 lb.NOowned lb. SALES TO DEALERS lb. significant grievances with Maldonado’s LIMITED STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS

ORIZO

59

69¢

$1.98

OPS

HEAD LETTUCE

79

2 for $4

$3.99

$

389

featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery

$12.99

Mahatma 2#

lb.

lb.

lb.

7#

ea.

lb.

Mahatma 2#

7#

lb.

ea.

20 20

2018

Folgers 8 oz.

of

lb.

lb.

of

®

Springfield 15 oz.

lb.

lb.

Springfield 8 oz.

Springfield 8 oz.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

ea.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

BANANAS BEEF TRI TIP

249

ES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS UGH NOVEMBER 2ND

10

By the bag

Chicken

SANTA BARBARA THE INDEPENDENT 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

BANANAS ea.

lb.

1

LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

49

MESQUITE CHARCOAL PINEAPPLES

$BANANAS ¢99

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

2 LONG GRAIN RICE $

89

INDEPENDENT.COM

Mahatma 2#

$

Mahatma 2#

1

7#

7#

FROM MAY 26 THROUGH JUNE 1

PINEAPPLES MAY 26, 2022 LEG QUARTERS

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

Folgers 8 oz.

Santa Barbara

Springfield 15 oz.

lb.

®

®

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

99

$

289

performance. The letter also demanded that Maldonado move to “a primary, permanent residence within the five sections of the new district map.” This demand had little basis, said Masuda, who confirmed Maldonado lives within the district. Masuda also said the district has and will continue to conduct exit interviews. Another teacher group, the Association of Raza Educators (ARE), made clear that the group does not align itself with views of the Dos Pueblos Faculty Senate. “The direction and character of the accusations and demands of the DPFS is a mostly white-led formation,” the letter read. “It aligns with agendas in other spaces that do not center the voices of the most vulnerable in our district.” The ARE letter also defended Maldonado, expressing that while there is a need for healing between the BIPOC community and Maldonado, the group believes she has been “unfairly targeted.” The letter detailed incidents at past board meetings, such as Brian Campbell making a comment that the district is “creating the next generation of gardeners, maids, and servant people.” Santa Barbara High School and Goleta Valley Junior High have also reportedly sent formal letters to the district expressing concerns similar to those outlined in the DPFS letter, though the Independent had not obtained copies of those two letters as —Jun Starkey of press time.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOUSING

Pacaso Property Faces Pushback

Cottage quality. Urgent care. Now Open in Santa Barbara Upper State

A

by Ryan P. Cruz

DON VO GT

Neighbors Speak Out Against ‘Suspiciously Timeshare-Like’ Business Model new, “fractional” type of home ownership may have crept its way into Santa Barbara, raising the eyebrows of neighbors who say the business model is “suspiciously timesharelike,” although the company’s website boasts a “modernized and simplified” practice of DIY co-ownership, outside of what is typically considered a timeshare. The company in question is Pacaso, a new-age real estate SIGN OF THE ‘TIMESHARE’: Signs reading “NO PACASO” have startup that claims to have reached been placed around the Las Alturas Road property by concerned “unicorn” status: earning more than neighbors opposed to the new fractional ownership model. a billion-dollar valuation within a year of launching. The startup’s website lawsuit against the City of St. Helena, the lists hundreds of prospective properties company contends that it has “created a new — stretching across the United States and and more accessible pathway for secondoverseas in Europe — offering the chance home ownership by allowing co-owners to for “second home” co-ownerships in which buy partial interests in real property,” and investors can own one-eighth of a home for that it would not fall under the purview of as much as $2 million. Each home functions timeshare ordinances. The main distinction under its own LLC, in which co-owners can between a timeshare and fractional ownerstay up to 44 days a year and are each free to ship is that with a timeshare, you buy the right to use a property, but with fractional sell their shares after one year. Riviera neighborhood resident Don Vogt ownership, you are buying a piece of real is leading the charge against Pacaso, after estate. A Pacaso spokesperson said the comfinding out a home on Las Alturas Road — pany believes the federal courts will ultiright across the street where he and his wife mately reverse the application of timeshare take their daily walks — had come under ordinances to Pacaso. new ownership. “I went over to introduce The City of Sonoma took it a step further, myself to the new neighbors,” Vogt said. snuffing out any new Pacaso properties by “Come to find out it’s not one new owner declaring an emergency order prohibiting but eight of them.” both timeshare and “fractional interest uses.” Vogt recalls a loud house party one This comes at a time when Santa Barbara November evening, about a month after the is facing its own housing crisis, and Vogt property changed hands. He said it raised contends that this is just one of the few reaalarms that they did not adhere to the com- sons that city leaders should follow St. Helpany’s ownership code of conduct, which ena and Sonoma in being proactive before requires that “quiet hours are observed from the company acquires additional proper9 p.m. to 7 a.m.” ties. Pacaso’s website lists at least two more After looking up the company and the “prospects” in Santa Barbara, along with community opposition in at least 15 other another Montecito property that has two cities — including St. Helena, Sonoma, and more shares available for $1.29 million each. Napa — Vogt and his wife, Carolyn Vogt, “No neighborhood is safe,” Vogt said. He began notifying neighbors and organizing hopes that working alongside the Riviera their own opposition. He created bright- Association and city leaders like Councilyellow “NO PACASO” signs to be placed member Kristen Sneddon will help bring around the neighborhood and encouraged this issue to the forefront before more propothers to get in touch with city leadership to erties are sold. “They’ve taken a single-family push for a specific ordinance regarding this home and turned it into a business,” he said. In an official statement to the Indepennew type of “fractional ownership.” “We are doing as much as we can to get dent, Pacaso spokesperson Brian McGuigan in their face,” Vogt said. While almost every said, “The average second home sits empty city has a timeshare ordinance to prohibit for almost 10 months a year, which is a hotel-like activity in single-family-residence wasteful use of single-family homes. Pacaso zones, he added, many of these restric- provides an alternative that allows multiple tions do not include Pacaso’s co-ownership second-home buyers to co-own one, highend home rather than individually own mulmodel. Pacaso maintains that regulations against tiple single-family homes. We are confident short-term rentals and timeshares don’t this approach will benefit Santa Barbara and apply to them, including the taxes these are prepared to meet with community leadtypes of properties typically must pay. In a ers to answer any questions.” n

THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

NEW! Santa Barbara Upper State Goleta Calle Real Goleta Hollister Village

COVID assessment and testing Open 8 a.m.–8 p.m., 365 days a year Goal of complete care in less than 45 minutes Walk-ins and online appointments X-ray and lab services Cottage clinical providers

cottagehealth.org/urgentcare

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

11


MAY 19-26, 2022

COU RTESY

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 8

Senior Resource Summer Fair Wednesday, June 1

Join the Alzheimer’s Association and our community partners to learn about resources, activities & opportunities available to seniors and families in Santa Barbara County. Carrillo Recreation Center 100 E. Carrillo Street

COURTS & CRIME The relative of a Santa Barbara County Jail inmate reported that a “very large riot” took place at the facility on 5/22. “Many of the inmates were forced out into the yard, where they were made to lie on the ground,” she said, “and almost all of them were pepper sprayed.” Tracy Macuga, head of the Public

Producer to Stand Trial for Sex Assault

David Guillod

H THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS PRESENTING SPONSOR

SPONSORS

12

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Defender’s Office, said her department was advised Tuesday that “a major incident occurred at the [jail] which is now under investigation and that the jail would be on lockdown the balance of the week.” No additional information was provided, Macuga said. Attempts to reach the facility’s top official, Chief Deputy Vincent Wasilewski, were not successful by press time. n

COURTS & CRIME

COU RTESY

Come by anytime from 9AM-12PM. Free entry for all guests. Entertainment & snacks provided.

Santa Barbara County Main Jail

ollywood producer and talent manager David Guillod was ordered Monday by a Santa Barbara County judge to stand trial on eight counts of sexual assault following alleged attacks on actress Jessica Barth and an unnamed waitress in 2012 and 2018. If found guilty of the charges, which include rape, sodomy, and forced oral copulation, Guillod would face up to 12 years in prison. Judge James Voysey, however, dismissed a number of other counts in the case related to four more Jane Doe accusers, who said they were raped by Guillod while intoxicated and unconscious between 2014 and 2020. Voysey questioned the credibility of the alleged victims and said he couldn’t find probable cause to allow the additional charges against Guillod to move forward. With respect to Jane Doe 1 — Guillod’s 21-year-old former assistant who accused him of raping her following a night of heavy drinking at a work retreat in Buellton — Voysey insisted the woman’s allegations weren’t believable and evidence showed the sex between them was consensual. He cited text messages and witness testimony that

claimed Doe 1 had flirted and cuddled with Guillod after the reported assault. He also referenced her behavior leading up to the incident. “When I hear an allegation of rape, I look at the facts,” Voysey said in court on Monday at the end of the case’s preliminary hearing. “She was highly intoxicated. She was dancing on the tables. She drank 10 glasses of wine. Her dress was hiked up so everybody could see her undergarments. Her behavior was outrageous. She was outrageously drunk.” “But look what happened the next day,” Voysey continued. “If she felt something had been done to her, she would not have stayed there. She would have gone back to L.A. and said, ‘I’ve had enough of this. I’m done with this,’ and left. That would have been logical and consistent for somebody who felt they had been raped.” The woman later sued Guillod and his company, Intellectual Artists Management, and reached a $60,000 settlement. The other three Jane Does, whose accusations Voysey also rejected, all claimed Guillod offered them wine laced with some type of drug before they passed out and were raped. Voysey said their subsequent text exchanges with Guillod didn’t accuse him of any wrongdoing. Santa Barbara County Deputy District Attorney Jennifer Karapetian said her office “is going to evaluate the case in light of Judge Voysey’s rulings and decide how to move forward from here.” Options available to the department include refiling the case or asking the trial judge to review and potentially overturn Voysey’s decision. They could also take the matter to a grand jury. Guillod, who was facing a possible life sentence before Voysey’s ruling, remains under house arrest in Los Angeles and will —Tyler Hayden return to court June 14.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D TRANSPORTATION

MTD Forges Ahead with New Moves PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Planning Manager Hillary Blackerby Opens Up About Future of Bus Services

FIVE-YEAR PLAN: MTD’s New Moves Short Range Transit Plan is looking at how public transit can be more efficient and accessible. by Ryan P. Cruz fter two years of drastic changes — forced by the pandemic’s public health restrictions, a steady drop in daily ridership, and a shortage of bus operators — Santa Barbara MTD is still standing and has adapted to thrive in this new normal. “It’s been a ride, for sure,” MTD Planning and Marketing Manager Hillary Blackerby told the Independent, reflecting on the big changes and what lies ahead with MTD’s New Moves Short Range Transit Plan, a fiveyear community-driven process that will take a look at how public transit can be more efficient and accessible while still working within the new cutbacks. “We didn’t want to have to do this, but we had to,” Blackerby said. MTD recently announced changes to its routes and frequency of stops for a number of major lines, citing a lack of bus drivers in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. It was the latest in what has been two years of forced adjustments that began in March 2020, when bus occupancy and ridership plummeted with the lockdowns. Despite the setbacks, Blackerby said that it was never an option to suspend public transit for the hundreds of workers who ride each day. In fact, MTD was one of the first to institute its own mask mandate in May 2020, before state and local governments had enforced the issue. “We were really proud of that,” she said. According to the MTD Moves Ahead website, ridership dropped by about 70 percent at its worst, with student ridership taking the biggest hit. “About a third of our riders are students, either K through 12 or at UCSB,” Blackerby said. With schools shut down, the first lines to go were the shuttles and SBCC-centered routes. When schools opened back up, MTD was faced with a new hurdle of finding enough bus operators to fill the positions of drivers who had retired or left in the past two years. Hiring stalled during the lockdowns when the Department of Motor Vehicles had its own restrictions effectively putting a hold on administering new commercial driver’s license tests. Since new operators

A

could be trained but not licensed, Blackerby said MTD was forced to wait until things opened up. Since then, MTD was able to certify its own training and safety officer to administer the behind-the-wheel tests, but applications are still trickling in slowly. “We think those people are out there, but we need to bring them in,” she said. She described how the agency is in a unique position, processing these forced changes due to a worldwide public health crisis and picking up plans for the future that had been put on hold for two years. MTD has launched a community-outreach campaign in the past year, surveying the public about who exactly was riding, and what those riders wanted. Using the feedback from the community, it became clear that 70 percent of riders preferred frequency and flexibility, with faster trips to more destinations. In response, MTD adjusted lines 1, 2, 4, and 17 to every 30 minutes throughout the day and extended late-night service until midnight on some lines. The most popular lines, the 6 and 11, were adjusted to arrive at least every 15 minutes throughout the day, while the collegefocused lines 15x, 27, and 28 returned to pre-pandemic levels. “It’s super complex how all of these are constructed on the back end,” Blackerby said. Among the biggest changes is the new “micro-transit” on-demand service, The Wave, which would use three new electric vans as a sort of Uber- or Lyft-esque curbto-curb pickup service, which would cost $3 per ride and could be ordered through a smartphone app. The idea, Blackerby said, is to provide service to areas that are “unconnected” or “underserved” by current transit lines, specifically areas of Goleta like Trader Joe’s and the neighborhoods off Cathedral Oaks. The program is funded through a grant for one year, but Blackerby said they still need to find drivers for the vans. For more information on MTD’s New Moves Short Range Transit Plan, visit sbmtd n .gov/MTDMovesAhead.

Endorsed by

PAID FOR BY GREGG HART FOR ASSEMBLY 2022 FPPC ID #1444010

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

13


SPRING CLEANING? FREE RECYCLING

MAY 19-26, 2022

ENVIRONMENT

All’s Well That Ends Wells by Nick Welsh t’s one thing for Governor Gavin Newsom to issue an executive decree ordering tougher rules for issuing new water wells permits; it’s quite another for the county supervisors to craft a new emergency ordinance making it happen. But that happened at the Tuesday, May 24, board meeting. Supervisors Bob Nelson and Steve Lavagnino worried that the proposed language they were considering at this board meeting was too restrictive, especially for farmers; Supervisor Das Williams worried that the language was too loose, allowing multinational corporations to continue to suck dry the already badly depleted groundwater basins of the Cuyama Valley. Despite such seemingly irreconcilable differences, the supervisors unanimously backed a new emergency ordinance that will require the county’s Department of Environmental Health, which is responsible for issuing well permits, to take additional steps to ensure that new wells are not allowed to negatively impact the production of nearby wells—defined as within 1,000 feet of each other — or cause subsidence of the ground. Still very much a point of contention is whether those steps will be enough to protect the county’s five groundwater basins already facing over-drafting. Williams, whose district includes three of those five challenged groundwater basins—Cuyama’s, Carpinteria’s, and Montecito’s—was dubious the new safeguards offered meaningful protection. “Sure, we’ll deal with it years later, after they’ve sucked the valley dry,” he protested, alluding to the aggressive over-drafting that’s put Cuyama’s massive underground water basin in serious jeopardy. Water levels in some parts of the valley, Williams claimed, are dropping by 100 feet per year because of massive over-irrigation. To come into balance and meet state water requirements — passed in recent years — water use in the Cuyama Valley will have to drop by two-thirds over the next 20 years. The first three months of 2022 were the driest ever in California’s recorded history, according to Governor Newsom’s office. The state’s largest reservoirs are only half full, and this year’s snowpack was only 14 percent of average. This week Newsom put California water agencies on notice that unless he saw a major bump in conservation over the next two months, he would order a 30 percent reduction in water consumption. Last July, Newsom urged Californians to cut back by 15 percent. The results were mixed; water use either stayed the same or actually increased. The past 10 years have been the driest —on average—in Santa Barbara’s recorded

I

Community Hazardous Waste Collection Center HOUSEHOLD HOURS Saturday: 9 am- 3 pm; Sunday: 11 am- 3 pm UCSB CAMPUS on Mesa Road, Building 565, in Goleta Examples of residential household hazardous waste accepted: • automotive fluids • paints and filters • stains • paint thinner • pesticides • fertilizers • solvents

• cleaners • aerosols • glues • corrosives

• fluorescent lighting • kitchen grease • smoke alarms • and much more!

No needles, controlled substances, electronics, or materials that are radioactive, biological, or explosive in nature.

FREE for residents in the cities of Santa Barbara and Goleta, and in the

unincorporated areas of Santa Barbara County. Residents are required to show proof of residency by bringing one of the following at every visit: driver’s license, utility bill, or car registration. • Up to 15 gallons (net liquid) or 125 pounds per trip. • Fee for business waste — call ahead for more info and to schedule an appointment. • Closed for major holidays and rain. In partnership with:

Provided by:

FOR MORE INFORMATION

(805) 882-3602 OR VISIT: www.LessIsMore.org/hazwaste CALL:

14

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

C HAD R ESS

Supes Tighten Rules for Approving New Water Wells

history. Deliveries of state water into the reservoir at Lake Cachuma have dropped to zero. Were it not for the City of Santa Barbara’s desalination plant, the situation throughout the South Coast (Montecito buys water from the desal plant) would be even more urgent. Santa Barbara has five groundwater basins of moderate to high overdraft concern; in addition to the three already mentioned, there’s the Santa Ynez basin and the San Antonio Creek basin. Each of these, by law, has had to form a Groundwater Sustainability Agency (GSA), which in turn is charged with the creation of a Groundwater Sustainability Plan (GDP). Under the county’s new ordinance — and the governor’s executive order—these GSAs are charged with making the technical determination whether a new well would adversely affect the production of a nearby well. In the past, such well permits were strictly over-the-counter transactions. Under the new ordinance, county officials must verify that a licensed hydrogeologist — or a licensed geologist with hydrogeological expertise — has signed off on the GSA’s attestation that the new well would not reduce the productivity of any nearby wells. The “fatal flaw” in this, according to Supervisor Williams, is that most GSAs are severely understaffed and lack the necessary expertise for such work. Other supervisors and county counsel countered that the governor’s executive order does not give county governments the legal authority to deny a proposed well that had been approved by a GSA. Nor does the county have the resources to conduct independent assessments on their own. The compromise agreed upon was that county officials could review the analysis provided by GSAs and then comment if it seemed sound or not. As such, it could function as a speedbump rather than a blockade. In the past five years, about 110 well permit applications have been permitted annually. Of those, 57 percent would be bound by the new rules. Since the governor’s executive order—issued March 28—six new well applications have been submitted. Of those, only one fell within 1,000 feet of another well. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D EDUCATION

New S.B. Unified Administrator Pledges to Support Teachers

T

COU RTESY SANTA BAR BAR A U N I F I ED SC HO OL DISTR ICT

he Santa Barbara Unified School District has hired two new district administrators, ShaKenya Edison, a director of student services in Menifee, and Dr. Stanley Munro, a principal of an elementary school in Fresno. Following several high-ranking Santa Barbara Unified School District administrators leaving their positions in the last year, the district has hired two new administrators to take over the roles of Assistant Superintendent of Student Services, currently held by Frann Wageneck, and Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Schools, currently held by Ana Escobedo. Munro, originally born and raised in Canada, is taking over the position of Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Schools, transferring from his current position as principal of Ayer Dr. Stanley Munro Elementary School in Fresno. Munro has been an educator for more than 19 Munro would later resign in January 2020. years, beginning as a teacher in Baltimore, His resignation from the district included and later working as an administrator in a non-disparagement clause — as reported Dallas, Texas; the District of Columbia; San by the Beloit Daily News — which preDiego; and Beloit, Wisconsin. vents Munro from commenting negatively “The leadership that he has shown at about the district and its leadership in any positions in Dallas, Baltimore, and San communication. Diego is what we need in this district at The Santa Barbara Unified School Disthis moment,” Superintendent Hilda Mal- trict has its own set of evolving issues, donado said. “He offers a fresh perspective from teachers feeling disconnected with that we will immediately infuse into not the administration to parents and commuonly our executive cabinet, but also into nity members demanding to have a role in our schools.” deciding curriculum. When asked about While working in the Beloit School Dis- how to approach these concerns as a new trict, Munro had three complaints filed leader, Munro said, “I don’t want teachers against him, accusing him of intimidation left out of the equation in any way, shape, or —Jun Starkey and attempting to suppress public records. form.”

Trusted by Students, Parents, Teachers, and Community Leaders Vote by June 7, 2022 Learn more at SusanSalcido.com Paid for by Susan Salcido for Santa Barbara County Superintendent of Schools 2022, FPPC #1445114 226 E. Canon Perdido St., #D Santa Barbara, CA 93101

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT

e u l B reen &G NT E V D A

Say Hi to High Fire Season

E

• More than 26 years serving our students • Increased access to high-quality childcare and preschool • Expanded career and vocational education • Invested in school-based mental health and wellness services

DE I U G URE

PUBLIC SAFETY

very season has been fire season in Santa Barbara County for a long time now, but this year, “high fire season” came earlier than usual, precipitated by the two fires that happened this past month, the Glen and La Patera incidents. Both were put out with significant help from a new firefighting helicopter just secured by the Santa Barbara County Fire Department. “We were a little startled by those,” conceded county Fire Chief Mark Hartwig. Memorial Day marks the arrival of flocks of people roaming Santa Barbara’s backcountry, and Los Padres Fire Chief James Harris noted that 95 percent of the fires started in the Los Padres are started by humans. Lightning and natural causes are rarely involved. Temperatures have been slightly cooler than usual, but sundowner winds have been more intense and frequent. And the moisture level of the county’s chaparral is considerably

Endorsed by:

drier than usual. Historically at this time of year, the live fuel moisture level is 96 percent. Today, it’s 81 percent. “No, we don’t make the cut for the hottest, driest in the history of the world,” Hartwig said. “Northern California does, but we’re dry.” The high fire season declaration means that local fire commanders will now be throwing more resources at a fire. “Instead of just one engine, we’ll now send three, a dozer, a hand crew, and a copter,” Hartwig explained. As of June, he added, local fire agencies will be enforcing longstanding laws requiring homeowners to clear defensible space from around their dwelling units from five to 100 feet. “First we’ll send a notice,” Hartwig said. “Then another. After that, we’ll just send a crew out to clear it out and do it ourselves.” There’ll be no fine, but the homeowner will get a bill. “Typically, those bills run from $5,000 to $10,000,” Hartwig said.

Publishing

June 9

Ad Deadline fri.

June 3 at noon

contact your advertising representative today!

advertising@independent.com

—Nick Welsh

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

15


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

That Dog Don’t Hunt

BANG BANG: When these things happen, people in other countries vow “Never again” and do something. Look at New Zealand after

a 2019 massacre that left 51 dead. Within the month, New Zealand banned semi-automatic weapons and launched an aggressive campaign to buy back as many guns as possible. Within the month. In the United States, instead, we wail pathetically and ask pointlessly, “When will we do something?” To answer my own question, only when Black people embrace mass shootings with the same Samson-and-Delilah Old-Testament end-of-days Biblical abandon that White people have. I know that sounds glib. It also happens to be true. Back in the late 1960s, Republicans in California’s state legislature learned to love gun control only after heavily armed members of the Black Panther Party loudly embraced their Second Amendment rights while patrolling the streets of Oakland. After 30 party members showed up in the State Capitol armed and loaded to protect their Second Amendment rights, then Governor Ronald Reagan lunged for his pen and signed the bill. Even the National Rifle Association approved. No, not all mass shootings are inspired — a word, which incidentally, means “to be filled with God’s breath” — by racial hatred. A whole lot, however, are. Buffalo is not an anomaly. An American mass shooter is five times more

likely to be a White crazy person than a Brown

crazy person and four times more likely than a Black crazy person. “Gun control” of course is a misnomer. With 300 million guns strewn hither, thither, and yon throughout all 50 states, that genie can’t get squeezed back into the toothpaste tube. In these United States, we have 120.5 guns per every 100 people. We also have the highest rate of gun deaths on the planet. Since 1970, 1.4 million Americans have died from lead poisoning administered by a firearm; that’s slightly more than the 1.3 million killed in all the wars we’ve fought — combined. It’s worth remembering that a one-way shootout at Stockton’s Cleveland Elementary School in 1989 led to the passage of the Federal Assault Weapons Ban of 1994. Only five elementary school kids — all Southeast Asian immigrants, by the way — got killed. Yet we somehow managed to act. It must have been a more innocent time. It’s hard to ascribe a precise number to all the people who didn’t get killed because of that bill. Because of that — and a whole lot of elbow grease by the gun lobby — Congress allowed it to expire in 2004. One year later, Congress would see fit to pass one of the great obscenities of our nation’s history, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act (better known as PLCAA), which bestowed upon the gun industry what the Mexican government is now calling a “veil of impunity.” This bill — also cheerfully dubbed the “Child Safety Lock Act”

by the gun lobby — gave gun manufacturers broad immunity from civil litigation, making it all but impossible to sue gun makers for the inevitable downstream consequences of firing firearms into human bodies. This bill does not imbue the industry with absolute immunity. Just enough to be all but impregnable. Bulletproof, you might say. There are, however, a few exceptions that allow litigation if it can be proven that the industry marketed its wares in such a way as to appeal to the prurient interests of the mentally unhinged — as was the case with the Sandy Hook shooter — or to a criminal element, such as Mexican drug cartels. For those squinting for hope in the face of what most assuredly seems a hopeless situation, it’s worth noting that the families of the Sandy Hook victims just finalized a $73 million settlement with the insurance companies insuring the Remington gun company, which by the way just filed for bankruptcy. At the heart of that suit was the recklessness and wantonness with which Remington abdicated its responsibility for keeping its product out of unstable hands. The case was set to go to trial this September. The Mexican government, to which I alluded, filed a similar but very novel $10 billion lawsuit against six major U.S.-based gun manufacturers last August, alleging that they intentionally targeted their sales and marketing campaigns to Mexican drug dealers. Why else, the government demanded, would the industry give its product such names as “El

Jefe,” “El Grito,” and the “Emiliano Zapata”? Little-known fact: Mexico has some of the strictest gun control laws on the planet. In all of Mexico, there is only one gun shop, and it operates behind the bunker of a well-fortified military base. The sale of semi-automatics is not allowed at all; in fact, the hairiest gun one can legally buy south of the border is a .38 caliber handgun. Since our federal assault weapons ban expired in 2005, Mexico has been awash in American-manufactured weapons as cartels there began arming themselves against its government’s war on the drug trade. Mexico’s lawsuit alleges that more than half a million U.S.-made weapons are smuggled into Mexico a year with the nudge-nudge-wink-wink

acquiescence of the American gun industry. As a result, 94 Mexicans are murdered every day. Of the weapons recovered at Mexican crime scenes, as much as 90 percent are of American origin. By any reckoning, this case is a legal longshot. The gun industry argues it should be tossed because of PLCAA. The Mexican government, they insist, is trying to intrude on the rights and privileges of a sovereign people. If we’re lucky, the case will drag on for a while. In the meantime, how many more Buffalos and Uvaldes will there be? Too many to either count or remember. When will we do something? Never. Let’s hear it for foreign interference. —Nick Welsh

SHERIFF BILL BROWN. EVERYBODY’S SHERIFF. UNCERTAIN TIMES DEMAND A CERTAIN SHERIFF.

ALL SB POLICE CHIEFS

JOYCE DUDLEY SB DISTRICT ATTORNEY

STEVE LAVAGNINO

HELENE SCHNEIDER

5TH DISTRICT SUPERVISOR

FORMER SB MAYOR

ALICE PATINO

ROGER ACEVES

SANTA MARIA MAYOR

FORMER GOLETA MAYOR

CALIFORNIA PEACE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION

BILL CIRONE

SUPERINTENDENT SB SCHOOLS - RET.

CALIFORNIA POLICE CHIEFS ASSOCIATION Vote on or before June 7 to Re-Elect Sheriff Bill Brown.

See Sheriff Brown’s list of over 1,000 endorsements at www.BillBrownforSheriff.com Paid for by the Committee to Re-Elect Sheriff Bill Brown 2022.

16

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Santa Barbara Independent Ad


OPINIONS CONT’D DAVE GRANLUND

Letters

All About the Climate

S

anta Barbara’s “Sea-Level Rise Adaptation Plan” makes a mockery of the seriousness and urgency of the climate crisis. In the face of dire warnings from climate scientists that unless we transition away from burning coal, oil, and gas fast — as in a few years — tipping points and feedback loops will lock in irreversible climate impacts. This is as true for sea rise as it is for droughts like we’re experiencing now or the devastating wildfires we’re expecting this summer. It’s ridiculous to present a 30-year plan that focuses only on adapting to increased flooding along the waterfront during a time when seas are anticipated to rise as much as two feet. Surely our leaders understand that actions to “adapt” to sea-level rise (such as adding sand to beaches, building sea walls, or relocating coastal homes and infrastructure) will not stop the sea from rising. The only way to protect coastal communities like ours is to support congressional action to drastically reduce emissions, phase out fossil fuels, and make the transition to clean energy. Adaptation is not a solution. I was so excited last August when our city expressed its support for HR-2307, the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act. This legislation would jump-start the transition to clean energy by charging coal, oil, and gas companies a fee on their carbon pollution, distributing the revenue to American households, and establishing a carbon tariff at the border to incentivize all nations, including China, to adopt similar policies. If enacted, we could achieve the goal of reducing emissions in half by 2030. To have any chance of saving our beaches and protecting our coastal communities, we need our leaders to do all they can to get Congress to include these policies in climate legislation. —Robert Taylor, Montecito

S

***

anta Barbara County is actually doing a lot better job at reducing greenhouse-gas emissions than anyone thinks. Emissions from oil production and processing have been cut in half — from 492K to 189K — over the past decade due to the shutdown of Exxon and withdrawal of new onshore projects. This success is buried deep in the county’s climate report and excluded from the emissions inventory because supervisors remain split over the issue of oil drilling. Recent reductions from methane capture at Tajiguas landfill and 100 percent renewable energy

goals achievable through community choice programs have not yet shown up in the data either but will be huge. We also scored major climate wins as supervisors directed county staff to “develop an ordinance to restrict natural gas infrastructure and increase energy-efficiency performance and electric-vehicle charging infrastructure for new construction and major renovations.” They voted to make county buildings all-electric and to buy only electric vehicles for the county fleet. A Zero-Emission Vehicle Plan will identify gaps, resources, projects, and programs to advance the county and community’s zero-emission vehicles. The one-two punch of 100 percent renewable energy combined with electrifying buildings and transportation is how the county can achieve carbon neutrality by 2045, while improving people’s health and saving money. This is what progress looks like. We can do this, people.

—Katie Davis, Chair, Sierra Club Los Padres Chapter

F

***

ew people are aware that the city is planning to spend a huge sum to create an urban heat island where historic De la Guerra Plaza is now. All the grass in the plaza will be replaced with impermeable paving. Rainwater runoff will go into cisterns and then the storm drain system. City Project Manager Brad Hess confirmed this and said there are currently no plans to use cistern water on the new landscaping for City Hall or the Plaza. The “revitalization” of the Plaza includes a splash pad/bubbler fountain that will use potable water. While it will recirculate some water, much will evaporate from the wet pavement. Ironically, the splash pad will probably use more water than the conventional recirculating fountains that the city has turned off during this mega-drought. The “revitalization” of De la Guerra Plaza will have a negative impact on the environment, not to mention our historic cultural landscape.

SATURDAY FISHERMEN’S MARKET Every Saturday 6-11AM on the Navy Pier in the harbor rain or shine

Come get the freshest catch in town! Sustainably caught and farmed local seafood, straight from us to you. Find out more at cfsb.info

—Susan Chamberlin, S.B.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions. INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

17


obituaries Dorothy (Shuman) Pickering 5/18/2022

Dorothy (Shuman) Pickering, beloved wife of David Pickering, passed away peacefully on May 18, 2022 after a courageous battle with renal failure. Dottie was born into a large, wonderful Bostonian family, the dear daughter of Israel and Elsie (Brams) Shuman. She was the sister of the late Melvin (Toby) Shuman and the late Bertram (Jetty) Shuman. Also, the loving sister of Arnold and his wife Sandra Shuman. Dear sister-in-law of the late Ronald Pickering and Judy Zarate. Dottie was the loving Aunt of numerous nieces and nephews and grand nieces and nephews. Devoted life-long friend of Pauline (Sheinberg) Maltz since they were four years old. Dottie’s life journey took her from Boston, to Alaska, to Long Beach, to Santa Barbara. Two years after high school, she moved to Kenai, Alaska, where she was a Purchasing Agent for the U.S. Army. Then in 1959 to Long Beach, CA where she was employed by the Veterans Hospital as a Purchasing Agent and also started her interior design career. She came to Santa Barbara in 1969 where she met and married her future husband, David. They had forty-seven love-filled years of marriage, enjoying travel to many countries and art museums, and were active members for three decades in the Stardusters Dance Club. While continuing her interior design career in Santa Barbara, Dottie obtained her B.A. degree in Art and Art History at UCSB. She was a prolific artist and devoted art teacher at Santa Barbara City College for more than 30 years. Dottie was a member of several art associations and numerous civic organizations. Funeral services will be held Mon18

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

day, May 23, 11:30 A.M. at Temple B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Road, Santa Barbara 93111. Shiva and a luncheon will be held at Temple B’nai B’rith immediately following the burial service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Temple B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Road, Santa Barbara 93111, or Santa Barbara City College Foundation, 721 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara 93105, or Serenity House – VNA Health, 930 Miramonte Drive, Santa Barbara 93109.

Betty Ann Oakes

8/8/1928 - 5/17/2022

Betty Ann Oakes, born August 8, 1928, passed away peacefully in her sleep on May 17. Betty was born in Maumee, Ohio to Linus H. & Inez Weis, and spent her early years living in the northern Ohio area. She moved to Santa Barbara in 1962 and raised her young family, working in the hospitality industry and professional photography painting. In 1996, she became a resident at Valle Verde Retirement Community after the passing of her husband, George F. Oakes. Betty’s 25 years spent at Valle Verde provider her with many friendships, volunteer opportunities, and a safe environment in which to live. She is preceded in death by her husband George F. Oakes and daughter Deborah Culpepper. She is survived by sister Ann Krischack of Toledo, Ohio, daughter Lyn Anderson & sonin-law David Anderson of Ketchum, ID, son Dennis J. Reneau & daughter-in-law Madeline Reneau of Santa Barbara, CA, daughter Geralyn McCafferty & son-in-law Francis McCafferty of Jacksonville, FL, son Terence Reneau of Toledo, OH, 10 grandchildren, 12 great grandchildren. A Valle Verde community memorial services will be held later this year.

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Susan Anne Hendricks 5/27/1961 - 5/3/2021

Born the middle child of five children to Deane and Dolores Hendricks in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Susan Hendricks was a ball of fire from the get go! Susan told happy stories about her early years in the heavy snows of Minnesota and the hot summers full of giant mosquitos. In 1966, the family moved to Encino, California, and then on to Carmel, California in 1972, at which point Susan became a California girl for life. Susan loved Carmel, the ocean and mountains. She met her lifelong best friend, Carolyn Erner, there and the town by the sea would launch Susan on a truly adventurous and joyful life. In her early teens Susan moved out of her parents’ house and took a room in a rented house in town and worked while attending Carmel High School. Susan was always a scrapper – she was able to make beautiful things and experiences with limited resources. Adversity was fuel for Susan’s fire, and she thrived. Among Susan’s most often shared stories were the many escapades with Carolyn, and the wonderful family of Captain Erner; about Flaherty’s Fish Market where Susan worked; about the best, freshest fish and oysters you ever tasted; about the hottest fisherman you ever saw (Maynard – looking at you!); about Steven Seaweed on the radio and in the studio; about Johnny Mieske and adventures on Cannery Row. In approximately 1985, Susan moved down the coast to Santa Barbara. Susan was drawn to the authentic, historic side of Santa Barbara. She loved horses and could often be found in full costume riding in the Fiesta parade celebrating with confetti,

and later with drinks at Joe’s. She loved a great restaurant or bar, and frequented Cold Spring Tavern, and Josie’s Four Winds. Susan made numerous lifelong friends in Santa Barbara, including Buzzy McGillis, Dawn Pennington, Judy and Steve Pearce, and Molly Barker –each of whom would co-pilot with Susan on so many wild adventures that one newspaper could not hold them all. From Mexico to New Orleans, to just down the highway to Ventura, life was an adventure with Susan on board, and the mundane somehow became the fantastic. Muleje, Baja and Jalama Beach were places Susan mentioned often with colorful stories and fond memories of blown tires, the freshest food, and days under the sun. Susan did a little of everything career-wise, and excelled wherever she went. Susan often spoke proudly of her time as a floral designer with Scott Hoag in Montecito, and she continued to “Wow!” her friends and family with her flair for flowers, including amazing holiday centerpieces and wedding arrangements all of her life. Susan also had a love of words, wrote heartfelt poetry and fiction, and always had a great joke to share. Susan loved life and loved her friends and family. She was always the first to offer a hand, and the last to leave, always willing and ready with a smile. Susan was amazing in so many ways to so many people. She will always be remembered by those whose lives she touched. Susan is survived by her mother, Dolores Hendricks; her loving siblings Bruce, Sharon, and Dale; her “Black Hole” family Sara, Bryce, Liam, and Aubreigh Killen; and a host of amazing friends who miss her dearly. Whoohoo!! We love you Nunu!

Willa Mann 1941 - 2022

Willa Mann passed away on April 30, 2022, after a two year battle with Cystic Fibrosis. She was 80 years old. Willa was born and raised in San Francisco, California, a place that nurtured her love for ballet, classical music and art. San Francisco is also where she met her husband of 55 years, Thomas, and where they had two daughters, Kari and Wendy. Willa and her family moved to Southern California in 1974 and to Santa Barbara in 2003. After working various jobs while raising their daughters, Willa’s thirst for knowledge pushed her back into school at age 52. At age 58 Willa had earned her Masters in Geography and started part time teaching at Long Beach State. She also taught online at Columbia college in Missouri. Willa had a love for learning but nothing gave her more joy than her grandchildren. She loved hearing about everything they were interested in and was their biggest cheerleader. Willa was also an animal lover and an avid reader. She was known to read out loud to Tom while he painted so they could share books together. Willa was diagnosed with Cystic Fibrosis at age 78 which made breathing a daily struggle. She adhered to a strict schedule of breathing treatments without any complaints. Her husband Tom was by her side taking care of her every step of the way. Willa is survived by her husband Tom, her daughter Kari Mann (Kevin Tolley), daughter Wendy Kaufmann (Eric), grandchildren Loren, Charlie and Logan and her brother Robert Andrews. The family would like to thank Dr. Belkin and the Cystic Fibrosis Clinic, Dr. Yim and the nurses at Cottage hospital and Serenity House.


obituaries David Roy Martinez 1/2/1955 - 4/2/2022

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of David Roy Martinez on April 2, 2022. He passed from this life exactly as he lived it, surrounded by love from his family and friends. David was born Jan. 2,1955, and raised in Texas by his loving family, which included his parents, Roy and Carolyn Martinez, and his younger brother, Danny. The family moved from Texas to Santa Maria, CA, in 1961. Several years after the death of Carolyn, Roy remarried to Connie Winslow, and the blended family now included a younger sister, Valiene. David earned his LVN license in the late ‘70s and began working at Cottage Hospital in the orthopedics unit. His good looks, exuberant personality and outstanding nursing care got him noticed by a physician who had been asked by one of his older patients to help her find a companion who could care for her on an “around the world cruise” on the QE 2. Thus began the trip of a lifetime for David, circumventing the globe for 6 months. It never took much encouragement for him to recall all the wonderful sights he witnessed in Europe, the safari in Africa, the Great Pyramids, the Taj Mahal, or flying home on the Concorde supersonic airplane from Paris to New York. Upon returning to the US, David began another amazing journey. He completed his ADN nursing degree at Santa Barbara City College while working full time at Cottage Hospital. But he wasn’t done; he also dreamed of becoming a nursing educator. David subsequently received his BSN and MSN from Cal State LA., and in 2007 he began his career on the faculty of Santa Barbara City College in the nursing program, where it all began for him. David was a very well loved and respected educator in the nursing community on campus and in the hospital. One of his most prized accomplishments was starting a Men in Nursing program at SBCC to support male students in a his-

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

torically female occupation. After a reintroduction in 2006 by a mutual friend, David began a relationship that had been years in the making with Jeffrey Paaske. In 2014 while in Hawaii, Jeff proposed to David and he finally accepted. David married his love, Jeffrey, on May 5, 2015, in Solvang. Together David and Jeff had a beautiful life and home. David had a magnetic personality and was the life of any gathering. He had accrued a very large group of friends from New Jersey, Oregon, Denmark and California. Every year he would gather his troops from far and wide for Fiesta, and what a time was had. “What happened at Fiesta stayed at Fiesta.” Unless of course, it was just too good not to talk and laugh about. David’s life was filled with laughter, love and adventure. He was deeply loved and will be greatly missed every day by all his friends and loved ones. A special thanks to Linda Macias, Micheal Paquette and Suzanne Edick for the tender care given in David’s last year. David is survived by his husband, Jeffrey Paaske, father and step mother Roy and Rosie Martinez, and his sister, Valiene Vannocker, as well as many nieces and nephews. Those who wish to honor David may make a donation to Men in Nursing ( make checks to SNA/MIN c/o SBCC ADN Nursing ,721 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109).

Dylan Corselius Willson 5/27/1986

Happy Birthday May 27th You are forever in our hearts and we are so grateful for the years we had you here with us. Love Mom and Dad, Maggie, Peter, Lorrie, David, Michael, Brad, Shayna and Hannah

Bill Davis

2/27/1946 - 7/28/2021

In celebration of a life well lived, we will gather on Thursday, June 2nd at 1:00p at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in Montecito. A joyful reception at the Santa Barbara Yacht Club will immediately follow. Parking is available in the city lots at the harbor. Music, great conversation, and wonderful memories will be shared. A previous obituary appeared in the August edition of The Independent. We have been unable to gather until now due to Covid restrictions. He was an incredible person, and will be missed by all who knew him. Forever and always, my love.

Jean Marie Gardner 10/1/1932 - 4/20/2022

Jean Marie Gardner of Santa Barbara, California, passed away peacefully on April 20, 2022 from complications resulting from a fall. She was 89 years old. Jean is survived and remembered lovingly by her five children, Leslie Prado (Rene) of Novato, California, Josie Cappel of Novato, California, Tony Gardner (Michele) of Fairfax, California, Mary Mota (Larry) of Petaluma, California, and Michael Gardner (Valerie) of Goleta, California; brother Tom Lynard (Wally) of Redlands, California; grandchildren Justin Bucksbaum of West Hollywood, California, Jasmine Gardner of Washington, D.C., Andy Gardner of Fairfax, California, and

Sterling Gardner of Goleta, California; by various nieces and nephews; and by many friends all over the world. She was predeceased by her parents Wilma and Ambrose Lynard; and siblings John, Mary Jo, and Kay. The fourth of five children in a happy family, Jean was born in 1932 in Owatonna, Minnesota, where her family owned several farms and a produce brokerage. When the Depression worsened, the family lost its farms and business and was forced to move to Duluth, Minnesota, where her father found work at a steel company. He died not long after from cancer. Despite these hardships, Jean retained a positive spirit. She discovered passions for figure skating and singing, and loved attending Saint Scholastica School for Girls. Shortly after graduating from high school, she and her sister Kay took off for Yellowstone National Park, where they both worked in the Yellowstone Hotel. Jean then moved to Washington, D.C., where she trained for a job with the U.S. Information Agency, and met Jack Gardner, a handsome student at Georgetown University. She received a posting to Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, but instead married Jack, choosing marriage over career aspirations like many women of that era. Jean found a job on Capitol Hill as a secretary for Senator Hubert Humphrey (a family friend), and in quick succession had three of her five children. She finally made it overseas in 1959, when Jack joined the U.S. Foreign Service and the family moved to Jakarta, Indonesia. They led a glamorous life, making many international friends, throwing fabulous parties, and traveling in Java, Bali, and around the world. Two more children came along. Jean taught herself to play guitar and became the lead singer of a locally popular Indonesian band. This exotic existence came to an abrupt end in 1965, when the family was evacuated from Indonesia during the coup that overthrew President Sukarno. Jean settled in Santa Barbara with their five children, while Jack went off to his next posting – in wartime Vietnam where families could not go. In Santa Barbara, Jean worked fulltime as a secretary for the Superintendent of the Goleta Union School District while single-handedly raising five children. Her separation from Jack contributed to their divorce in 1968. Like many others during that period, she began to question the conformism of American life. She met Peter (Pinche Pete) Velasquez, a master conga drummer, and moved with Pete INDEPENDENT.COM

and the family to a hippie commune in Big Sur. After returning to Santa Barbara, the family became regulars at parties and drum circles on Banana Road and Mountain Drive. With her children grown up, Jean began a series of adventures and journeys of personal and spiritual growth. She learned video journalism and traveled to Hopiland in Arizona, where she helped document the Hopi struggle at Big Mountain against relocation and the Peabody Mining Company. She was proud to receive the honorary Hopi name of White Raven. She also lived for extended periods on the Big Island of Hawaii, where she made close friends and used her video skills in the fight for Hawaiian independence. She attended many annual gatherings of the Rainbow Tribe, and took part in an extended journey of members of the Rainbow Tribe through Mexico and Central America. In her late 50s, she returned to school, receiving a B.A. in video journalism from the College of Saint Scholastica in Duluth (her high school had since become a college) and an M.A. in the same subject from the University of Wisconsin at Superior. A highlight of this time for Jean was a semester in Ireland, where she traveled the country and researched her Irish ancestors. Back in Santa Barbara, Jean moved to the Presidio Springs community on De La Guerra Street and was a beloved teacher of Video Journalism and Native American Studies at Santa Barbara City College. She continued traveling regularly to visit her children and to visit friends in Hawaii and Ukiah. She was a regular at East Beach Hawaiian music jams, practitioner of qigong and meditation, reader of the I Ching and Tibetan Buddhist teachings, and participant in the Summer Solstice Parade and Fiesta. She was a great support for her sister Kay, in Kay’s final years. There will be a celebration of Jean’s life Sunday, June 12, 2022, 1 p.m. – 4 p.m., Rocky Nook Park, Group Site 1. Friends are invited to come and share memories and stories. Parking is limited, carpooling suggested.

MAY 26, 2022

Continued on p.21 THE INDEPENDENT

19


1st THURSDAY JUNE 2, 5-8 PM Join us for an evening of art and culture in downtown Santa Barbara! Activities include art openings, live music, artists’ receptions, wine tastings, and hands-on activities. ALL FREE!

1 THOMAS REYNOLDS GALLERY, 1331 State Street, 415-676-7689 2 SBIFF’S SB FILMMAKER SCREENING SERIES, SBIFF Education Center, 1330 State Street 3 ENGEL & VÖLKERS, 1323 State Street, 805-342-0227 4 SANTA BARBARA FINE ART, 1321 State Street, 805-845-4270 5 MAUNE CONTEMPORARY, 1309 State Street, 805-869-2524 6 LONETREE, 1221 State Street, Suite 24, 805-892-7335 7 CHRIST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 36 East Victoria Street, 805-957-4200 8 10 WEST GALLERY, 10 West Anapamu Street, 805-770-7711 9 SULLIVAN GOSS – AN AMERICAN GALLERY, 11 East Anapamu Street, 805-730-1460 10 CHANNING PEAKE GALLERY, 105 East Anapamu Street, 1st Floor, 805-568-3990 11 SUNFLOWERS ON STATE, Various locations on State Street 12 FAULKNER GALLERY, 40 East Anapamu Street, in the SB Public Library 13 SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART, 1130 State Street, 805-963-4364 14 GALLERY 113, 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #8, 805-965-6611 15 WATERHOUSE GALLERY, 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #9, 805-962-8885 16 GRASSINI FAMILY VINEYARDS, 24 El Paseo, 805-897-3366 17 CITY HALL GALLERY, 735 Anacapa Street, 805-568-3990 18 SANTA BARBARA HISTORICAL MUSEUM, 136 East de la Guerra Street, 805-966-1601 19 MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, 653 Paseo Nuevo, Upper Arts Terrace, 805-966-5373 20 IDYLL MERCANTILE, 703 Chapala Street 21 PURA LUNA APOTHECARY, 633 Chapala Street, 805-450-2484 22 SBCAST, 513 Garden Street

LEARN MORE

THE ART CRAWL & STATE ST PROMENADE MARKET

Entertainment by:

OUT OF THE BLUE, 5:00 - 8:00 PM JAMS AFTER-SCHOOL MUSIC EXPLORATION PROGRAM & LADIES STRUMMING SOCIAL CLUB

SCAN ME

Thank You Sponsors!

Is Your Boss Violating Your Rights? Adams Law focuses on Advocating employee rights in claims involving: • Wrongful Termination • Pregnancy Discrimination • Disability Discrimination • Hostile Work Environment • Sexual Harassment • Racial and Age Discrimination

• Misclassified “Salaried” Employees and Independent Contractors

• Working “Off the Clock” • Unpaid Overtime Compensation/Bonuses • Reimbursement for Work-Related Expenses

CALL US TODAY 805-845-9630 Visit our website at www.adamsemploymentlaw.com

Adams Law Serving the Employment Law Needs of California’s Central Coast 20

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

INDEPENDENT.COM in your inbox, every morning.

Sign up for

PARTICIPATING VENUES

Also Enjoy:

Get fresh news from

(805) 845-9630

INDY TODAY! Independent.com/ newsletters


Opinions

CONT’D

Raising the Bar

voices

obituaries Lucia Preciado-White 1/5/1933 - 5/13/2022

Making Honors Classes Universal Benefits All Students S.B. UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT

BY BRADLEY B R O C K , A R I E L L E C U R RY, J E N N I F E R FOSTER, CLANCI CHIU

MERRITT, KIP GLAZER, ELISE SIMMONS, BILL WOODARD

W

e’ve seen the concerned social media

posts and communication regarding our “Universal Access” initiative — or co-seating, as it is commonly called — in Santa Barbara Unified. And we want to open this critical conversation to everyone. We have collectively served your families for decades, and we believe that in order to best prepare students for college and careers, we must ensure that all of our courses and programs reflect the diversity of our schools, eliminate real or perceived barriers of access, and provide rigorous preparation for all students. Plenty of genuine questions from concerned parents and community members need to be answered — and we own that. But, before we do, let’s be very clear what “Leveling Up” — a clearer and more accurate name for Universal Access — is and what it is not. It is not lowering rigor or expectations for any student. It is a commitment that all students will receive grade-level curriculum and be provided support and enrichment to learn at the highest levels. It is not putting all students together in classes and hoping for the best. It is planning and supporting our teachers for the different learning needs that inevitably exist in any classroom. It is not taking honors-only classes away. It is clearly defining how all students will have the opportunity to demonstrate achievement to earn honors credit. It is not mandating this change from the District Office. It is responding to a desire from teachers to change a system that has not guaranteed a quality education for all students to one that will meet the needs of all students. It is not a curriculum or a program. It is a more equitable opportunity for all students to reach mastery of the standards. So why heterogeneously grouped classes? The main driver is to give all students a rigorous, standards-based curriculum that offers all students the opportunity to earn honors. By giving all students a more rigorous experience in grades 7-10, we will see more students prepared to succeed in our advanced courses — Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), and Santa Barbara City College dual enrollment — in 11th and 12th grade. This was initiated at the urging of teachers who had continually expressed frustration around the ways we have historically grouped students and conferred honors credit in these courses, and their desire to “level up” the experience for all. Yet, while internally supported, we know that all of this inevitably brings questions from our parents and community: Shouldn’t we group students by ability? Won’t teachers have to meet a wider array of student abilities that will lead to a more “watered-down” experience for more advanced students? The simple answer is “no.” Since we eliminated the requirement of prereq-

uisites for honors, 60-70 percent of all students have requested honors, and teachers are already responding to a wide array of student needs. Unfortunately, even with many more students enrolling in honors courses, a persistent opportunity gap remains for our students of color and those from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. By leveling up the courses that feed into AP, IB, and SBCC dual enrollment, we will ensure that all students have the rigorous preparation needed for success in these classes. This work has already been in action. Over the past year at the three traditional high schools, students have been heterogeneously grouped in English 9 and English 10 courses. The student feedback has been encouraging — “challenging,” “opened my eyes to new learning,” and “I feel ready for the next step.” And that’s why we feel ready to expand the “Leveling Up” initiative to English 7 classes across the four junior high schools, as well as Science 7 and Math 7 at La Colina Junior High. Participating teachers will continue to refine the curriculum of the respective courses over the summer and into the school year to ensure that all students will receive a curriculum that supports and enriches their learning. As we continue the thoughtful transition to this new paradigm for the 2022-23 school year, students who have selected honors during registration will retain the honors designation on their transcript. Continuous training for staff, as well as investing in additional support resources, is paramount, and is a standing commitment at each of our secondary schools. Already, each site has a Multi-Tiered System of Supports (MTSS) Teacher on Special Assignment, school counselors, and an Assistant Principal of Student Outcomes who monitor student-learning data to ensure that all students are making progress and are supported as needed. Bottom line — we are committed to providing the opportunity for all to level up. Want to learn more? Join us for a community forum on May 31 from 6:30-8 p.m. via Zoom. After nearly a century of combined service to this district and to the community, we will proudly stand this work up, even in the face of criticism. Our children’s futures deserve it. The authors are principals of the following schools: Bradley Brock, La Cumbre Junior High; Arielle Curry, Santa Barbara Junior High; Jennifer Foster, La Colina Junior High; Clanci Chiu Merritt, Goleta Valley Junior High; Kip Glazer, San Marcos High School; Elise Simmons, Santa Barbara High School; Bill Woodard, Dos Pueblos High School.

Lucia Preciado-White passed away peacefully on May 13, 2022, at 89 years old. Lucia was born January 5, 1933, in Solana Beach, CA and raised in Mexico by her mother Maria del Carmen Cesena Preciado and her father was Balbino Preciado Michel. At age six she moved in with her grandmother, for two years, and had the fondest memories of that time. Growing up in Mexico, she was the eldest of eleven children. Her siblings are, Jose, Javier, Francisco, Dolores, Maria, Esperanza, Ramon, Gregorio, Lourdes, and Guadalupe Alicia. At 23 years old, Lucia left Mexico and moved to Oxnard California where her large extended family lived. She attended Ventura Community College where she studied bookkeeping and clerical work. After completing her AS degree in Bilingual /Cross Cultural Studies, she moved to Santa Barbara, CA where she met and later married Joseph Earl White. Lucia worked for Santa Barbara School district. Joseph (Earl) and Lucia had five children: Mary, Lucia, James, Joseph and Robert. Joseph Earl passed away in 2004, he was 84 years old. Having been brought up to value education, Lucia attended Santa Barbara City College and eventually UCSB. She earned an AS degree in Bilingual / Cross Cultural Studies, a BA in Spanish and a teaching credential in Bilingual Special Education in 1983 from UCSB. One of her favorite jobs was teaching ESL classes through the Allen Hancock College Adult Outreach Program, as well as the ESL adult INDEPENDENT.COM

program Santa Barbara City College. She was loved and admired by all as a caring, capable and creative teacher. Lucia enjoyed going back to Mexico with her children to visit with family and friends. She also lived in Colorado for a five-year period, before moving back to Santa Barbara where she eventually resided at Pilgrim Terrace for fifteen years. Within the last year and a half, she moved in with her daughter Mary’s family, who lovingly cared for her. Lucia loved her family and friends beyond measure and was loved by all who had the pleasure to connect with her. She was passionate about birds, cooking, crocheting, sewing, reading and her 9 grandchildren, Aubrey, Kimmie, Emily, Jarod, Alexander, Max, Dylan, Scarlett, Reef. She also has one great grandson, Roman. We will always remember her for her beautiful smile, her warm hospitality, and her unconditional love. She will remain in our hearts forever.

Rose J. Favela 4/19/2022

Rose J. Favela shed her last petal on April 19, 2022, at the age of 85. She passed peacefully at her home, with her children and grandchildren by her side. Rose is one of the bravest people, who lived most of her life blind and deaf. “Through your bravery, courage, wisdom and strength, you showed us anything was possible”. Remembrance will be held at Church of God of Prophecy, 1735 San Andres St., at 1:00pm, on June 15, 2022. A Celebration of Life will be held at The Moose Lodge, 110 W. Victoria St., at 3:00pm Email: memoryofrose85@gmail.com for more information.

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

21


ALWAYS

AMAZING.

NE VER

ROUTINE. LUIS R CONRIQUEZ JUNE 24 | FRIDAY | 8PM

Santa Barbara

EATS & DRINKS Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm 1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) • (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

HOTEL CALIFORNIA

Now Open for Late Night Eats!

AUGUST 6 | SATURDAY | 8PM

Hours: Sun-Thur 11am - 8pm w/ Late Night Menu Fri & Sat 11 - 2:30 am

RODNEY CARRINGTON AUGUST 12 | FRIDAY | 8PM

GABRIEL IGLESIAS

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events. Chumash Casino Resort supports responsible gaming. For information about problem gambling, call the Problem Gambling Helpline at 1-800-522-4700.

Welcome to Freedom THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

AUG 26 + 27 | TWO NIGHTS | 8PM

22

805.705.0991 • 5 W. CANON PERDIDO THEBLUEOWLSB.COM • @BLUEOWLSB

INDEPENDENT.COM

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael MA Michael H H Kreitsek, Kreitsek, MA

Michael HCounseling Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286


COVER STORY

BOLD LEADERS: Kai Tepper and Kathy Koury keep the promise of the Children’s Creative Project alive through I Madonnari and much more.

�Chalk to the Future� Coming Back and Looking Forward at I Madonnari by Charles Donelan

� I Madonnari Info At Old Mission Santa Barbara, 2100 Laguna St.; May 28-30, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. It is a free event, with live music, food, drink, and a festival items market. Small squares can be purchased for $15 for children. See ccp.sbceo.org/i-madonnari/welcome.

The Art of Mass Gatherings Info The Art of Mass Gatherings in Santa Barbara workshop and networking event happens Saturday, May 28, 12:30-5:30 p.m., amid the I Madonnari festival. The free event invites artists, musicians, event producers, and emergency professionals to discuss safety and sustainability of large events. See tinyurl.com/ massgatheringsworkshop.

W

Photos by Ingrid Bostrom

hen the annual I Madonnari street-

painting festival returns to the Old Mission this weekend after two years of operating online, participants and attendees will celebrate more than just la dolce vita, Santa Barbara–style. From its beginning, this iconic expression of collective effervescence has had its roots in the year-round activities of the Children’s Creative Project (CCP), an enduring and influential public-private partnership dedicated to bringing the arts and artists into Central Coast schools. The founder of I Madonnari, Kathy Koury, was also the executive director of the Children’s Creative Project for 44 years. CCP’s new director, Kai Tepper, inherits a much-cherished community event and an organization that exemplifies the public spirit of our city and region. Held on the plaza in front of the Mission Santa Barbara, I Madonnari takes place over the three days of Memorial Day weekend. The organizers divide the asphalt in front of the Mission into 130 squares. On Saturday morning, participating artists arrive with supplies and receive colored chalk, ready to realize their visions for their piece of the festival’s giant mosaic. Original designs, copies of Renaissance masterpieces, and everything in between take shape over the next 72 hours as the artists lie, sit, and kneel on their asphalt canvases, sketching and shading their creations. In the surrounding area, vendors offer fresh food and cold beverages to a crowd of friends and onlookers. With the Mission as a backdrop in one direction and the Channel Islands in the other, it’s as picturesque as anything in Santa Barbara—which says a lot.

Behind all the fun and beauty of this special holiday weekend event lies a host of fascinating and influential factors that give depth and consequence to the sheer pleasure of the scene. When the event was founded by Koury in 1987, it was the first such festival dedicated to the art of street painting in the Western Hemisphere and Mexico. Based on a similar festival in the small Italian city of Grazie di Curtatone, I Madonnari offers a modern California take on a tradition that dates back to the 16th century. Sponsorships for the artworks fund the CCP, which has served hundreds of schools and tens of thousands of children for more than four decades. The festival quickly set off a chain reaction that spread all over North America and Mexico. There are now dozens of such festivals everywhere, from Provo to Austin and Denver to Puerto Vallarta. This year is different for several reasons. First, it represents the resumption of the event at its original location on the Mission plaza. It’s also the first year under new leadership, with Tepper now serving as executive director following Koury’s retirement. Finally, for the first time, the festival will host a workshop on Saturday called “The Art of Mass Gatherings.” This experiential learning opportunity offers artists, event planners, emergency first responders, and interested citizens a chance to learn about the latest thinking regarding the safety, sustainability, access, and community of public events. As we shall see, the timing, vision, and scope of this initiative reflect a new mindset regarding festivals and emergency preparedness, the formation of community, and the role of the arts in public life.

CONTINUED→


COVER STORY

BALLOONS ARE NO PARTY FOR SANTA BARBARA SEA LIFE... After graduation, hundreds of balloons end up in the Santa Barbara Channel. Dolphins, whales, seabirds and other wildlife may ingest or become entangled in balloon litter which can result in injury or death. This year, celebrate graduates AND local sea life with balloon substitutes. Never release balloons– it's against the law! FIRST ONE: When Kathy Koury started I Madonnari in 1987, it was the only festival of its kind in the Americas.

Celebrate with these fun balloon alternatives:

I MADONNARI ORIGINS

Flowers Non-toxic bubbles Pom poms Recyclable posters Pinwheels Colorful flags Streamers

s d a garre ! d a r Let’s celebrate the class of 2022 and give them the special recognition they deserve! Share a photo of a graduate in your life on our online photo gallery.

INDEPENDENT.COM/CLASSOF2022

24

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

Kathy Koury grew up in Santa Barbara. She attended public schools and graduated from Santa Barbara High. She first heard about the annual street painting event in Grazie di Curtatone in 1986 from the photographer Jesse Alexander. He showed Koury some photographs and suggested that she head to Italy to see it in person. She came back with the idea that this might be something that could work here and almost immediately ran into a neighbor who was on the Old Mission bicentennial celebration committee. Koury arrived at the committee’s next meeting, snapshots of the Italian street painting festival in hand, and told Father Virgil Cordano and the rest of the group, “I have an idea.” Fifteen minutes later, the committee said yes. Father Virgil even accepted Koury’s observation that the plaza would need resurfacing with fresh asphalt. “We were going to make some improvements anyway,” he conceded, and he gave I Madonnari the green light. At that time, Koury had already served several years as director of the Children’s Creative Project. She conceived and implemented the idea of businesses, organizations, and individuals sponsoring the squares to raise money for the organization. Building from an original all-volunteer program at Franklin School, and with the help of legendary schools leader Bill Cirone, the CCP expanded, year after year, until it was in more than 100 schools serving 50,000 students throughout Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties. Visual and performing arts programs proliferated, and the CCP served as a hub for artists to network and develop relationships with schools. Koury calls Cirone “a visionary of what could happen when private and public organizations collaborate” and expresses her lasting gratitude to him and to “the Mission, the artists, the musicians, the board members, and the sponsors” who made both I Madonnari and the CCP successful. To this day, the Children’s Creative Project maintains its unusual and

r ad !

powerful status as both an independent philanthropic organization and a program of the county education system.

A STORYTELLER IN THE CLASSROOM To get a sense of who the Children’s Creative Project supports and what that means, I spoke with storyteller Michael Katz. Katz is one of the most familiar and beloved figures in our region’s arts education ecosystem. For decades, he has traveled up and down the coast and into the valleys, delivering high-quality workshops in storytelling that children love. When I spoke with Katz by phone last week, he was finishing up a string of school visits around the Bay Area and Santa Cruz. Katz told me that although “it’s hard to fully define what the Children’s Creative Project is” because the scope of its sponsored activities is so vast, “it’s central to what I and other artists who work with schools have done over the years.” Through the CCP’s nonprofit status, individual artists can apply for grants for which they would otherwise not be eligible. “They take care of the billing, which gives me freedom.” When a teaching artist like Katz needs help, CCP is there. Most recently, the program connected Katz to the Audacious Foundation, which sponsored his newest project, a program designed to increase mindfulness in elementary schools. Asked to describe his work’s impact, Katz waxes enthusiastic, praising the students he encounters for being “courageous and proud” and laughing on the way to a greater sense of agency. Anyone who has seen Katz work with students knows how open-hearted and caring he is. There’s no one better at creating a safe environment where young people can be comfortable taking social risks and exploring their feelings with imagination. Katz is justifiably proud that wherever he goes, students “grow up thinking it’s normal to have a storyteller in the classroom.” After one of his workshops, children listen better and feel more confident, two critical elements in their success throughout the curriculum.


COVER STORY

PRESENTED BY: SANTA BARBARA WINE EVENTS

JAZZ In The Vines!!

FEATURING THE MUSIC OF MILES DAVIS

Come to our lovely venue in the vineyards in the heart of Sta Rita Hills and hear our fantastic musicians playing the music of Miles Davis! The best kept secret in Sta Rita Hills.

Performed By: DISNEY MUSICIANS: The Nick Schaadt Quartet Brian Mantz, Trumpet Nick Schaadt, Stand Up Bass Adam Bravo, Pianist/Keyboardist Sam Webster, Drums

COLOR ME IMPRESSED: There’s always plenty of chalk on hand at Mission Santa Barbara for Memorial Day weekend.

MEET THE CHALK ARTISTS As the earliest and best-known streetpainting event in this country, I Madonnari attracts top talent. Koury has always vetted the artists herself, helping them find sponsors and providing them with everything they need to create beautiful art. This year, the festival’s featured artist is Dawn Morrison Wagner, a Santa Barbara High and Cal Poly S.L.O. graduate who lives in Thousand Oaks. Wagner gets a big 12-by-12-foot square in a prominent spot on the plaza. She earned the title in 2020, but thanks to COVID-19, she had to wait to draw at the Mission again. She’s sticking with the design she had in mind two years ago, a composition of multiple images incorporating aspects of her previous work and celebrating 35 years of past festivals. Having continued to draw in her driveway at home through the pandemic, Wagner looks forward to being back on the plaza, where she can talk to people and connect with other artists. “I came to a stark realization last year,” she told me. “While it was great being at home because I was close to my snacks, it was too quiet! I missed the excitement and the community of being together at the Mission.” For Sharyn Chan, another longtime regular at the festival, the appeal of the experience comes down to three things: “art, friends, and food.” Chan discovered I Madonnari in 2001 when her primary hobby was riding motorcycles. The Vespa shop in town sponsored a square, and she volunteered to help the principal artist. At first, the collaboration was chaotic, with many people involved and not enough coordination. Gradually, the others drifted away, but Chan stayed on. She’s been soloing since 2004, mainly with the larger squares. This year, she’s also going big with a 12-by-12 that will feature a dancer surrounded by roses. “Chalk-art people are generous and giving,” she said. “They share chalk and everything else.” Asked about the heat and the physical demands of drawing on asphalt, Chan politely but firmly upended my assumptions with a different viewpoint. “Yes, it is very physical, and I have kneepads, but think of it this way — working on the ground, you’re aided by gravity. If you’re painting a mural, you’re fighting gravity. When you are working on the ground, gravity is helping you.” Chan spoke for many of the I Madon-

nari artists when she praised the event’s location, saying, “Being at the top of a hill makes it into a destination.” Where other streetpainting festivals tend to take place in the middle of town, I Madonnari feels special because it’s perched up above, with an incredible view.

ARTS EDUCATION HAS IMPACT

Sat. May 28th

Gates Open: 2:00pm • Enjoy Music from 3-6pm Private Family Vineyard in Sta Rita Hills 1700 Gypsy Canyon Dr. Lompoc Ca. 93436

Tickets from $50 (includes a glass of wine), Special Packages available

FOR MORE INFO and to RESERVE YOUR SPOT, VISIT: www.JazzInTheVinesKhVineyard.eventbrite.com SantaBarbaraWineEvents.Net/upcoming-events CATERING BY: SUPER GRILL

SANTA BARBARA DOLL CLUB PRESENTS THE 59TH ANNUAL

NEXT GENERATION: Kai Tepper now heads both I Madonnari and its parent organization, the Children’s Creative Project.

After 44 years of Kathy Koury’s leadership, Kai Tepper now has the reins of the Children’s Creative Project and I Madonnari. The two women have a lot in common. They both grew up in town and graduated from Santa Barbara High School. They are both accomplished artists and passionate community organizers. Finally, when it comes to seeing the bigger picture, they are both visionaries. Koury helmed CCP through a period in which various political decisions, most prominently Proposition 13 in 1978, put funding for arts education into a state of perpetual vulnerability. When the California budget ran a surplus, like in the early 2000s, there would be money to support arts education programs, but arts education suffered when the state’s balances dipped. For Kai Tepper, funding remains an issue, but other factors, such as climate change, pandemics, wildfires, mudslides, and questions of cultural inclusion, have come to the fore. Working in partnership with the county office of arts and culture and its head, Sarah York Rubin, Tepper hopes to position

y o T & Doll 

 

HO

THE BEST IN ANTIQUE & COLLECTABLE DOLLS • TEDDY BEARS TOYS • MINIATURES CHILDREN’S ANTIQUES DOLL RESTRINGING

New ! Location l o c at i o n

SANTA BARBARA ELKS LODGE #613 150 NORTH KELLOGG AVE. SANTA BARBARA, CA 93111 admission

$5 DOLLARS

CONTINUED→

MagicToyShoppe_2022.indd 1

INDEPENDENT.COM

o ed t ne aid t a don Ukrai e b ill f for w s ie eed ct Rel c o Pr Dire MAY 26, 2022

4/12/22 THE INDEPENDENT

25

12:24 PM


Join us in reading May’s book of the month! MAY’S THEME:

LITERARY FICTION

BO OK OF T HE MONT H :

Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera independent.com/indybookclub

ARE YOU HIRING? Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com

Contact advertising@independent.com for more details and in-print rates 26

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


AMY C ANDIS

COVER STORY

Changing your own motor oil is low-cost, easy, and can be done right at home.

RECYCLE YOUR USED OIL and FILTERS! Remember, it’s illegal to dump motor oil in the trash or down the drain. Make sure to recycle oil and filters at a center near you.

ABOVE IT ALL: I Madonnari’s spectacular location makes it a destination event.

CCP and I Madonnari as leading lights in the drive to confront these 21st-century challenges. One big step toward taking them on is “The Art of Mass Gatherings” workshop on Saturday, May 28, from 12:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. at the Mission. The pandemic hit the arts hard. Arts organizations had to cancel entire seasons of live events and exhibitions. Thousands of artists, performers, and support personnel were out of work for long periods. Saturday’s workshop will focus on exciting new ideas about how the art and events sector might assist with crisis management and emergency preparedness. Representatives from a national organization called Majestic Collaborations will guide the process. They work to help communities respond to humanitarian and environmental concerns with art, culture, design, and planning. For Tepper, who was previously a director of outreach programs at the Santa Barbara Bowl and ran the Arts Fund of Santa Barbara, cultivating this new mindset represents an opportunity that our city cannot afford to miss. Looking back on the devastation caused not only by the pandemic but also by wildfires, debris flow, and drought, Tepper sees this as the right time to reimagine how we value public art and how artists participate in our community. “An arts-based approach to resilience,” she calls it, and “a new way for artists to serve the community in crisis.”

THE ACE OPPORTUNITY Think for a moment about a group of people who have already had a significant impact on everyday life in Santa Barbara: workers in Arts, Culture, and Events. Let’s call them “ACE workers.” Here are four ways to think about their potential value. First, they have transferable skills. They know how to produce safe, accessible, and sustainable live events. That means they could be helpful in other contexts that require building temporary infrastructure, managing large groups of people, and supporting people’s mental health and wellness. Tepper points to examples of how this connection already gets made. During the wildfires, Earl Warren Showgrounds

became a key location for the emergency response, sheltering large animals and providing a command post for first responders. When mudslides rendered Montecito Union School unusable, students and teachers continued learning at MOXI and the Santa Barbara Zoo. In Los Angeles, Dodger Stadium served as a giant mobile testing and vaccination center during the heaviest surges of the COVID pandemic. As Rubin explained, this is far from an eccentric or merely local observation. It’s happening on a national level. In its National Disaster Recovery Framework, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) cites ACE workers as key players in a whole community approach to emergency preparedness. FEMA is actively looking to artists, arts organizations, and event presenters for existing community leaders who can respond to and mitigate unexpected events. FEMA leadership believes that rooting response and recovery efforts in existing communities increases trust, values local knowledge, encourages inclusion, and enables cross-cultural communication. What’s in it for the ACE workers? Plenty. The ACE sector is overly vulnerable to disruption — see COVID-19. ACE workers with relevant training could go to work rather than sit on the sidelines when trouble hits in future emergencies. Allowing ACE workers access to paid positions when venues are closed would save money and lives. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, as we return to holding significant public events such as I Madonnari and Old Spanish Day s, we need to look at our community differently. Framing arts and events workers as potential leaders in preparedness and resiliency could allow us to establish a more inclusive understanding of who we are and who these events serve. We all saw how quickly the pandemic revealed other fault lines in our national culture. Public events can serve as catalysts for social transformation, but not without analysis and understanding from today’s perspective. Optimizing our outcomes in celebration and crisis ought to be one goal, not two, and rethinking mass gatherings is a great place to start. With a better understanding of how things like I Madonnari and Old Spanish Days work, we can begin the more significant task of working together for a better Santa Barbara every day. n

FREE Collection Centers in Goleta Auto Zone at 5799 Hollister Ave., (805) 770-4019 Fast Lane Oil Change at 180 N. Fairview Ave., (805) 683-9640 Jiffy Lube at 6015 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-4100 MarBorg Industries at 20 David Love Place, (805) 964-1498 O’Reilly Auto Parts at 5754 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-1318 Toyota of Santa Barbara at 5611 Hollister Ave., (805) 967-5611 UCSB Campus at Mesa Road, Building 565, (805) 882-3602 Please call ahead for hours of operation. Find additional collection centers and other helpful recycling information at:

www.LessIsMore.org/oil

Provided by:

In partnership with:

FOR MORE RECYCLING INFORMATION

(805) 882-3603 www.LessIsMore.org

PLEASE CALL: OR VISIT:

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

27


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

MAY JUN. by

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.

Geoff Dyer, author of The Last Days of Roger Federer: And Other Endings, will be in conversation with UCSB professor Sameer Pandya to take a closer look at endings of significant events in life, and even life itself, with a book-signing to follow. 5:30pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $5-$10.

sbma.net/events

5/26-5/28: UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Presents The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee This Tony Award–winning musical, complete with audience participation, follows an eclectic group of 6th-graders who are participating in a spelling bee, and each is eager to win for very different reasons. Thu.-Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 1pm. UCSB Ballet Studio, $13-$19. theaterdance.ucsb.edu

FRIDAY 5/27 5/27: Comedy Is a Drag Experience live comedy with comedians Noah Copfer, Maple the Goddess, Ben Thompson, Emili Peach, Lulu Stiletto, and Sam Bear. Food and drink will be available for purchase. 7-9:30pm. Wildcat Lounge, 15 W. Ortega St., GA: $25; VIP: $35. Email sambearcomedy@ gmail.com.

5/27, 6/1: S.B. Bowl Concerts Fri.:

FRIDAY

Rainbow Kitten Surprise, 99 Neighbors, 7pm. $36-$72; Wed: Rex Orange County, 8pm. $45-$65. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

SATURDAY 5/28 survival skill that will equip you with the knowledge to protect yourself and your loved ones. This high-energy workshop will be filled with fun with an overview of basic strikes (punches and kicks). 11am-12:30pm. S.B. Krav Maga Family Self Defense Center, 325 Magnolia Ave., Goleta. $20/solo; $30/pair; mothers train free. Ages 12+ (minors must be accompanied by a parent). Call (805) 280-9101 or email info@sbkravmaga.com.

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

5/28: Women’s Self-Defense Workshop Learning self-defense is an essential

WEDNESDAY

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY

tinyurl.com/DefenseWorkshop

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

cfsb.info/sat 5/28: Bake Sale & Dancing for Ukraine Every Saturday

through June 18, the Ukrainian women of S.B. will sell handmade treats and sweets Medicinal Herbs of the and World Dance for Humanity will perCalifornia Coast: Gavi- form Ukrainian dances with all donations ota Wind Caves Artemisia Academy and the going to their families and others suffering Gaviota Coast Conservancy invite you to join in Ukraine. Noon-3pm. State and Cota sts. Free. tinyurl.com/FundsForUkraine area herbalist Emily Sanders to learn about medicinal and edible plants of the Gaviota 5/28-5/29: Shen Yun Experience Coast. Social distancing and face coverings China before communism in a performance will be required. 10am-noon. Gaviota Wind of classical Chinese dance, authentic cosCaves, 17620 Gaviota Beach Rd., Gaviota. tumes, and patented interactive backdrops Free-$30. tinyurl.com/HerbWalkMay28 with a live orchestra. Sat.: 2 and 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $86-$171. Call (805) 899-2222 or email info@granadasb.org.

5/28:

COURTESY

tinyurl.com/ComedyDragMay27

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

COURTESY

5/26: S.B. Museum of Art Parallel Stories: Considering Creativity and Aging with Geoff Dyer

THURSDAY

5/27:

Próxima Parada, Dante Marsh & The Vibe Setters San Luis Obispo is in

the house with Próxima Parada, who will bring their soulful, California feel-good vibe to S.B. in support of their new album, Second Brother. Fellow S.L.O. band Dante Marsh & The Vibe Setters will open the show. 8:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15-$17. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

Próxima Parada

ticketing.granadasb.org/events

5/28-5/30: I Madonnari Italian Street Painting Festival Chalk pastel street paintings will be drawn by artists in front of the Old Mission for festival sponsors. Enjoy an authentic Italian market with an array of cuisine and specialty items and live music. Funds raised go toward Children’s Creative Project, which reaches more than 50,000 children annually in 100 S.B. County and San Luis Obispo County schools. 10am-6pm. Old Mission Santa Barbara, 2201 Laguna St. Free. Read more on p. 23.

imadonnarifestival.com

Shows on Tap

5/26-5/31: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Battle of

the Bands: Hominid, Ray and Paul, Field Daze, Duende, 8pm. $6. Ages 18+. Fri.: Próxima Parada, Dante Marsh & The Vibe Setters, 8:30pm. $15-$17. Ages 21+. Sat.: Banda Night with Los Coyulitos, 9pm. $35. Ages 21+. Sun: Sandy Cummings & Jazz du Jour, 12:30pm. $10; S.B. Acoustic presents Kaki King, 7:30pm. $25-$30. Mon.-Tue.: Young Singers Recital, 5-7pm, 6-8pm. Free. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

5/27-5/30: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Nombres, 6-9pm. Sat.: Lenny Kerley, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:30-4:30pm. Mon.: Tina Schlieske and the Graceland Exiles with Sister Laura, 1-4pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspring

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

5/27-5/28: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Christopher Hawley Rollers, 7-9pm. Sat.: Joystix, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta.

Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

5/27-5/28: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: James Beau Wilding & Friends, 6-8pm. Sat.: Budunkafunk, 7-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

tavern.com

5/27: Pali Wine Co. Live music.

5/27-5/29, 6/1: Maverick Saloon Fri.: The Robert Heft Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Medicine Hat, 1-5pm; LiveWire, 9pm-midnight. Sun.: Jimmy Rankin, noon-4pm. Wed.: Tales from the Tavern

Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254. urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

presents Jonathan McEuen and guest, 7:30-9:30pm. $34.16. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/

event-calendar/ tinyurl.com/TalesFromTavernJun1

6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1.

5/28: Sunburst Wine Bar Rick and Jenny’s Flower Power Songs, 6-8pm. 5080 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. Free. Ages 21+. Email rickandjenny805@gmail.com.

tinyurl.com/RickAndJenny

5/28: Art at the Mission Club This show will feature stunning artwork for purchase in a variety of media such as oil and watercolor, ceramics, glass, felt hats, woodworking, and more, to be enjoyed in a beautiful setting while partaking in light refreshments. 10am-4pm. Mission Club, 4300 Clubhouse Rd., Lompoc. Call (805) 733-3535 or email office@ missiongolfclub.com.

tinyurl.com/ArtAtMission

SUNDAY 5/29 5/29: S.B. Acoustic Presents Kaki King Alt/indie composer and musician Kaki King, known for her technical mastery and her original scores for August Rush and Into the Wild, has released nine albums, including 2020’s Modern Yesterdays, will be in S.B. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $25. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 28

COURTESY

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

TERRY ORTEGA

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

THURSDAY 5/26

1

26

T HE

5/29:

Chaucer’s Almost Summer Sundays

Kids are invited to join Karina Evans, author of Grow Up, Tahlia Wilkins!, her debut novel, a fun and truthful romp about friendship, puberty, and growing up — a modern-day version of Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret that fans of Pixar’s Turning Red will enjoy. 2-3pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787. chaucersbooks.com/event

Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser


T HE

COURTESY

MONDAY 5/30

May 28–September 5 Walk through a beautiful garden while nearly 1,000 live butterflies flutter freely around you. The exhibit features a dazzling variety of butterflies, from local favorites to exotic tropical species. Learn about the life cycle and behavior of these spectacular invertebrates while observing them up close.

5/30:

PCVF Memorial Day Ceremony Pierre Claeyssens Veterans Foundation invites you to join them and area first responders as they pay tribute to those who died serving our country. They will be joined by the UCSB ROTC, the S.B. Choral Society, and the Gold Coast Pipe Band, followed by a flyover of the Condor Squadron’s four T-6 Texan airplanes. 11am. S.B. Cemetery, 901 Channel Dr. Free. Email media@pcvf.org. pcvf.org

TUESDAY 5/31 5/31: New Moon Mantra-Songwriting Participants will learn songwriting techniques from modern folk troubadour Samara Jade for how to put a melody to their affirmation and create a pocketable song that can be sung throughout the moon cycle to anchor those intentions. 7-8:30pm. Yoga Soup, 28 Parker Wy. Early bird (before May 27): $15; GA: $25. Call (805) 965-8811. tinyurl.com/NewMoonSongwriting

WEDNESDAY 6/1 COURTESY

Amos Lee

2559 Puesta del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105 805-682-4711 • sbnature.org MEDIA SPONSORS: SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NOOZHAWK

The Rotary Club of Los Olivos Presents

The 16th Annual

6/1:

Lobero Live Presents Amos Lee, Neal Francis Take in the folk with blues, country, and ‘70s-style R&B sounds of singer/songwriter Amos Lee, who will be in S.B. in support of his 2022 album, Dreamland. Chicago rocker Neal Francis will open the show. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $66-$85; VIP: $131. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/events

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

COURTESY

Featuring GREAT MUSIC, FOOD & WINE Saturday, June 11th 2022 Downtown Los Olivos

1:00-4:00 pm

Featuring Live Jazz performed by The Idiomatiques

6/1:

Wharf Wednesday Visit the wharf every first Wednesday

of the month to celebrate Stearns Wharf’s 150th birthday. Shop for merchant specials and see the firing of the historic cannon while you listen to the classic rock sounds of Tequila Mockingbird at 6pm. Stearns Wharf, 217 Stearns Wharf. Free. stearnswharf.org/events

30 Vintners 30 Chefs All-inclusive

95.00

$

Order tickets online at JazzAndOliveFestival.org

ently An indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! hop since ently ASn indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! Shop since

Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

805.569.2323

THE INDEPENDENT

29


living ACBL

Games The Arlington Theatre

­ ­

$2 10am: SUMMER KIDS MOVIES Tickets! Fiesta 5: Tuesday & Wednesday Camino Real: Thursday *Kids Series Only This Summer! June 7 - August 11 *

5/27: TOP GUN: MAVERICK

5/27: BOB’S BURGERS

5/27: MONTANA STORY

6/2: 6/10: 6/17: CRIMES OF THE JURASSIC WORLD CHA CHA FUTURE DOMINION REAL SMOOTH

AMONG THE ELITE: Newly anointed bridge master Danning Lu (right) with teammate Andrew Rowberg Metro • Arlington • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairveiw

Fiesta 5

Fiesta 5

COMING SOON:

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for May 27-June 2, 2022 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Bob’s Burgers* (PG13): Fri: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45. Sat-Mon: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45.Tue-Thur: 5:15, 7:45. Downton Abbey: A New Era (PG): Fri: 1:40, 4:30, 7:20. Sat-Mon: 1:00, 4:30,7:20. Tue-Thur: 4:30, 7:20. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): Fri: 1:50, 4:55, 8:00. Sat-Mon: 1:50, 4:55,8:00. Tues-Thur: 4:55, 8:00.

CAMINO REAL

916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Fri: 12:15,12:40, 1:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 3:40, 4:00,4:45, 5:30, 6:15, 7:00,7:45, 8:30, 9:15,10:00, 10:45. Sat/Sun: 10:45, 11:30,12:15,12:40, 1:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 3:40, 4:00, 4:45, 5:30, 6:15, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30, 9:15,10:00, 10:45. Mon: 10:45, 11:30,12:15,12:40, 1:00, 1:45, 2:30, 3:15, 3:40, 4:00,4:45, 5:30, 6:15, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30, 9:15,10:00. Tue-Thur: 1:00, 1:45, 2:05, 2:30, 3:15, 4:00, 4:45, 5:05,5:30, 6:15, 7:00,7:45, 8:30, 9:15. Men (R): Fri-Mon: 7:10, 9:40. Tue-Thur: 8:05. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri: 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10. Sat-Mon: 10:40, 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10. Tue-Thur: 2:20, 5:20, 8:15.

HITCHCOCK

Top Gun Maverick* (PG13): Fri: 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45, 9:45. Sat/Sun: 11:15, 12:15, 2:15, 3:15, 5:30,6:30, 8:45, 9:45. Mon: 11:15, 12:15, 2:15, 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45.Tue-Thur: 2:15, 3:15,5:30, 6:30, 8:45. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri-Sun: 11:30, 1:00, 2:25, 3:50, 5:15, 6:40, 8:05, 9:30. Mon: 11:30, 1:00, 2:25, 3:50, 5:15,6:40, 8:05. Tues-Thur: 2:25, 3:50, 5:15,6:40, 8:05.

F I E S TA 5

7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Bob’s Burgers* (PG13): Fri: 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15. Sat-Mon: 12:45, 2:00, 3:15, 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15.Tue-Thur: 4:30, 5:45, 7:00, 8:15. Montana Story (R): Fri-Mon: 2:20, 5:00, 7:40. Tue-Thur: 5:00, 7:40. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 (PG): Fri-Mon: 1:45, 5:15. Tue-Thur: 5:15. The Bad Guys (PG): Fri-Mon: 1:30, 4:45, 7:15. Tue/Wed: 4:45, 7:15. Thur: 4:45. Massive Talent (R): Fri-Mon: 8:00. Tue-Thur: 8:00. Crimes of the Future* (R): Thur: 7:30.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Downton Abbey (PG): Fri-Thur: 1:40, 2:40, 4:30, 5:30, 7:30. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): Fri-Thur: 1:55, 5:00, 8:05. Fantastic Beast: The Secret of Dumbledore (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45. Men (R): Fri-Thur: 8:20.

Downton Abbey A New Era*: (PG): ARLINGTON Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:30, 7:05. Sat-Mon: 1317 STATE STREET 1:55, 4:30, 7:05. SANTA BARBARA The Duke (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:45. 805-963-9580 Sat-Mon: 2:10, 4:45. Top Gun: Maverick* (PG13): Fri-Thur: Northman (R): Fri-Thur: 7:20. 1:15, 4:30, 7:45. 30

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

S.B.’s Bridge Master A

t age 27, Danning Lu can now call himself a bridge master. The UCSB PhD student accumulated enough masterpoints in March to attain the rank from the American Contract Bridge League, an organization of more than 165,000 players, after winning a tournament with his partner, Andrew Rowberg.

Grad Student Danning Lu Achieves Official Rank After Tournament Win by Nicholas Liu Lu, a Shanghai native, started playing the card game at age 9 but didn’t reach the competitive level until recently. In 2017, Lu came to UCSB to study mathematics at a propitious moment — Rowberg, a materials science grad student, was in the process of forming a bridge club that came to be known as Overbidders Anonymous. Three years after the group convened and in the middle of the COVID19 pandemic, the Overbidders played their way to the finals of the 2020 Online Collegiate Bridge Championships. A year later, they won the title. In bridge, each partnership must coordinate their hands to outbid their opponents in a series of rounds known as tricks. Most verbal communication and all physical signaling is forbidden; the only permitted language is expressed by specific terminology and by the cards they play in the initial round of contract-setting. “Different bids and plays have different meanings,” Lu said. “Even if the language is quite standard, you and your partner have a lot of freedom to design the round.” Craftiness is also an important part of the game, Lu explained. “There is a lot of bluffing your opponents into thinking you’ll do one thing, when actu-

ally you don’t even have the cards to carry it out,” he said. But a lot of it comes down to luck. “Taking advantage of what luck comes your way — that comes with experience,” he said. Lu can certainly make his own luck. “I love to gamble,” he said. “Those gambles don’t always work, but as long as I keep the winning percentage above 50 percent, that’s enough.” About halfway through the semifinals of the 2020 collegiate championships, Overbidders was falling far behind Georgia Tech, one of the oldest and most illustrious bridge teams in the country. The UCSB team responded with renewed boldness, pouncing on whatever opportunities they could and wresting back the initiative. “We tried lots of risky things,” Lu reminisced. “During some bids, we decided not to communicate about our hands and just jump right into it; the advantage was that our opponents had no idea what we had in mind.” At game’s end, it was the Overbidders who emerged victorious. “Of course we could have failed badly… but taking the risk is better than playing safe, because playing safe would give us no chance of catching up.” Lu’s aggressive style often confounds and disorients his opponents. But as he plays more games and learns what works and doesn’t work, Lu says that he is now more comfortable with playing conservatively if need be. “There is a lot of knowledge you gather over time, and you can then do a lot more analysis about your hands based on previous games,” he explained. Time and experience have also affected how Lu approaches the challenge. “I’m quite relaxed now,” he said. “Before, it took a lot of brainpower to think of calculations and plans of action; with experience, all that comes much more naturally.” n


Did you know… 1 in 5 people in Santa Barbara County live at, near, or below the California Poverty Measurement of $35,600 annually for a family of four. *

* Public Policy Institute of California report, Poverty: Just the Facts, July 2021

For 55 years, CommUnify has helped Santa Barbara County’s most vulnerable residents achieve economic security, become self-sufficient, and retain their dignity.

Empowering Sustainable Independence

www.CommUnifySB.org


CommUnify is... Uniting Our Community Against Poverty Since 1967, CommUnify (formerly Community Action Commission), has worked to improve the lives of Santa Barbara County’s residents who have the greatest need. For thousands of people each year, CommUnify represents the difference between living in uncertainty and living in stability. CommUnify is a nonprofit organization, with a true north and south county commitment, sustained by individual giving, foundation funding, and government grants. We empower our low-income neighbors to: • • • •

Access education and career opportunities Remain safely in their homes Become self-sufficient Improve financial literacy

• Learn parenting and life skills • Obtain mental health and behavioral wellness support • Create a better future

We are Countywide

24

Head Start and Early Head Start campuses

800

state and local partners

17

programs serving children, adolescents, families, and seniors

300+

people employed


50,000 +

children in our county have been served by Head Start and Early Head Start since 1967

“Head Start is not just for children. It serves multiple generations: children, parents, and guardians.” LORRAINE NEENAN, DIRECTOR OF CHILDREN’S SERVICES

21,505

calls and texts were answered by the 2-1-1 Helpline last year

4,500+

youth ages 6-17 participate in our programs each year

1,353 961

seniors were served by CommUnify programs in 2021

families received assistance with their energy bills, home repairs, and energy-efficiency upgrades

“Being retired and living on a limited income, your Utility Assistance program was a blessing in my time of need. Thank you for being there for me!” B. FRANKLIN, RETIREE


Poverty is a complex issue... And having a safety net is critical. If you, or someone you know, need our help, please contact us through the 2-1-1 Helpline, (800) 400-1572; TTY (805)-919-1148. It’s free, confidential, and available 24/7 in 150 languages.

CommUnify is good for the whole community, not just the people we serve. Our 17 Programs: • • • • •

California State Preschool Program Early Head Start (ages 0-3) Head Start (ages 3-5) Adolescent Family Life Planning (AFLP) California Student Opportunity and Access Program (Cal-SOAP) • Economic Empowerment Program • Family Self-Sufficiency Program • Family Wellness Behavioral Health Services • Health and Life Skills for Teens / Salud y Vida • Los Compadres and Las Comadres Youth Mentoring • New Heights for Transition Aged Youth • Rental Payment Assistance • South Coast Youth Safety Partnership • Seniors Safe at Home • Utility Payment Assistance • Weatherization and Energy Services • 2-1-1 Helpline for Santa Barbara County

We can’t do this vital work without your support. For more information on how you can support CommUnify, please contact:

development@communifysb.org or call (805) 964-8857, ext. 3

www.CommUnifySB.org Our Offices North County 201 W. Chapel St. Santa Maria, CA 93458

Mid-County 120 W. Chestnut St. Lompoc, CA 93436

Central Administration and South County 5638 Hollister Ave., Suite 230 Goleta, CA 93117

MISSION STATEMENT: In partnership with the community, we provide education and supportive services to residents of Santa Barbara County, resulting in improved economic security and self-sufficiency.


living

Sports

Gaucho Baseball’s Golden Era

JEFF LIANG

MAY 27 - JUNE 2 “A LOVABLE AND AFFECTING CROWD-PLEASER” IndieWire

ON A ROLL: Not content to rest on their laurels, the Gauchos look ahead to the College World Series.

G

oing into the 2019 season, the UCSB baseball team had not won a Big West Championship for 30 years, but the Gauchos have quickly become accustomed to lifting that once elusive trophy. After Saturday’s conference-clinching victory over UC Riverside, the Gauchos have now won two of the last three Big West Championships and show no signs of slowing down going into the final series of the regular season at Cal State Bakersfield this weekend. “They’ve had a heck of a run,” said head coach Andrew Checketts of his team just moments before he was drenched by Gatorade in celebration on Saturday. “Three really good seasons with a chance to win 40 games.”

UCSB Wins Big West Championship, Sets Sights on NCAA Regionals by Victor Bryant The Gauchos have also not lost a series the entire season, a feat that perhaps no other team in the country can boast. Despite the recent success, the 2022 Big West Championship is only the fifth title in program history, which points to this being a golden era of UCSB baseball. “For a program that didn’t win the conference for 30 years until my freshman year, and now we’ve got two in three years, it’s amazing,” said UCSB junior outfielder Christian Kirtley, a stalwart hitter in the middle of the lineup. “But this is only step one.” According to Checketts, the next step is building momentum over the last series of the season before matching up against some of the top teams in the country at NCAA regionals. The Gauchos have struggled, however, in nonconference games. Much of that can be attributed to inconsistency in the bullpen. UCSB’s top three starting pitchers — Cory Lewis, Michael Gutierrez, and Ryan Gallagher — have a combined win/loss record of 22-1 this season.

“Our bullpen throwing strikes has been an issue all year,” Checketts said. “Going into the weekend, we were leading the conference in ERA but second to last in walks per nine innings, and I don’t know if I’ve ever experienced that.” Will the Gauchos suddenly be able to throw strikes out of the bullpen against some of the best teams in the country? That question that will likely decide their fate when postseason play begins. UCSB last won an NCAA regional title and advanced to the College World Series during their memorable run in 2016 that was highlighted by clutch moments, heroic performances, and edge-of-yourseat nail-biters. Catching lightning in a bottle again will be a tall task. In order to win the title, a team must first make the field of 64. The Gauchos have done so in six of Checketts’s 11 seasons at the helm, which is no small feat. “We’ve had some big weekends where we’ve scored a lot of runs, but for the most part we’ve been in close games a lot this year,” said Checketts following UCSB’s 9-8 victory over UC Riverside on Friday night. “I think they’re accustomed to being in close games.” After the three-game series with Cal State Bakersfield, the Gauchos will find out their NCAA tournament regional on Selection Sunday.

FRI: 5:15pm & 7:30pm SAT, SUN, MON: 3:00pm & 5:15pm & 7:30pm TUES - THURS: 5:15pm & 7:30pm

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

Westmont Advances to NAIA Baseball World Series

Alamar Dental Implant Center

The brackets have been released for the 2022 Avista NAIA Baseball World Series, and Westmont received the sixth seed in the 10-team double-elimination tournament. The World Series will take place at Harris field on the campus of Lewis-Clark State in Lewiston, Idaho, beginning Friday, May 27. Westmont (45-11) will open against the host Lewis-Clark State (54-5) on Friday, beginning at 7 p.m. This is Westmont’s first berth to the NAIA World Series in program history. Fans can tune into the NAIA broadcast at portal.stretchinternet.com/naia. n

sbimplants.com INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

31


Bar Le Côte’s Luis Gomez Cooks Cultural Comfort Food L uis Hernandez Gomez’s vision couldn’t be clearer.

Within two years, he’ll master his role at Bar Le Côte, where he now works in Los Olivos, and then open his own brick-and-mortar business. These may seem like ambitious goals for a 25-year-old chef from Santa Maria, but Gomez is confident for good reason. Not only is he making a name for himself as the youngest member of the kitchen team at Bar Le Côte—the second restaurant opened by the owners of Bell’s in Los Alamos, winner of one of Santa Barbara County’s first Michelin stars—but Gomez is turning street-style tacos into soldout pop-ups under the name Gomez y Gomez. Despite working up to 12-hour days at BLC, Gomez remains enthusiastic about his chosen career. “We’re an accumulation of like-minded people who are passionate about what we do,” he explained, “and actually having a good time while doing it.”

Chef Making His Mark with Gomez y Gomez Taco Pop-Up BY VANESSA VIN

While BLC is simply described as a “seafood tavern,” the operation is a tightly controlled, well-oiled machine. Beneath the cool, calm exterior of dinner service, there’s a pervasive air of subtle perfectionism, from meticulous interior design and precise menu descriptions down to every carefully spaced spoon and fork. One might imagine a restaurant that whips out a ruler to measure every place setting would leave little room for creativity, but that’s not the case. “We’re always talking about what we can do better, what we can do differently, and we are constantly pushing each other to try something new,” he said. That’s a good fit for Gomez, who’s been “switching it up” for years. After graduating from Pioneer Valley High School in Santa Maria, he went straight into the Art Institute’s culinary program in Santa Monica but dropped out after five months in 2015. Still just 18 years old, he started working full-time at Fishing with Dynamite, a seafood joint in Manhattan Beach run by Michelin-starred Water Grill veteran David LeFevre. Also in the kitchen was Brad Mathews, now the executive chef and co-owner of BLC, who quickly noticed Gomez’s focused determination and cool confidence. But Gomez would work at Baran’s 2239 in Hermosa Beach and rise to executive chef at 1865 Crafthouse and Kitchen in San Luis Obispo before he came into the Bell’s fold in 2020. When it was time to staff up for BLC, hiring Gomez was an easy choice for Mathews. Amid all the mentors he’s found in the restaurant business, Gomez points to his mother, Maria de Los Angeles Gomez, as the inspiration for Gomez y Gomez. “As a single mother, tacos were a festive and affordable way to make a large meal for a family gathering,” he explained. When Gomez was 21 years old, he helped his mom get permanent United States residency, and that opened the 32

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

THE SMILING CHEF: Luis Gomez is still smiling even though he’s so busy working in the kitchen of Bar Le Côte, running a taco pop-up called Gomez y Gomez, and searching for community in the Santa Ynez Valley.

door for him to visit her native land of Mexico for the first time. Trips to Loreto, Zacatecas, gave Gomez a true taste of his family’s heritage, and those lessons became strong influences in the food he serves today. Gomez y Gomez, which he runs with sous chef Jose Gomez (no relation), typically serves just three items: street tacos of varying flavors, Estrella Jalisco beer, and duros, a crunchy snack made of puffed wheat that’s similar to chicharrones. Past pop-ups have featured squash with soyrizo, bistec, and other flavors, but the signature taco is called a discada, a style popular in the border towns of northern Mexico. It involves cooking a mixture of meats—usually pork and beef, but everything from bacon and hot dogs to ham and steak—in a giant metal disc over an open flame. The meat rations and types vary, so the cooking method is key, producing taco fillings that vary in texture and flavor: tender and chunky, rich and savory, with moments of spicy, sweet, and salty, like a warm chutney wrapped up in each bite. The pop-ups, which tend to sell out within hours of starting, are leaving an influential mark on the wine country hub of Los Olivos, bringing Mexican comfort food into a town that’s traditionally lacked much diversity. They’re cross-cultural mashups of skin colors and classes, and a bit of fusion too, as patrons order fine wines off of the BLC list to pair with their duros and discadas. Although these events sport a vibe somewhere between backyard barbecue and family reunion, Gomez is struggling to find community outside of his pop-ups. “When you work in a restaurant, it’s hard to make friends outside of the industry,” he said. “We work nights and weekends, so going to events is difficult. Especially in a small town like Los Olivos, there isn’t much to do other than wine tasting.” For a brief moment, his smile disappeared. “To be honest, I almost feel as though I am in a foreign land in Solvang,” said Gomez of where he lives, even though it’s just a half hour from his hometown. “In L.A., there was much more diversity and so much to do on my days off.” But he’s making an effort, he explained while regaining his grin. “Our team at Bar Le Côte is like a family.” On top of BLC and the pop-ups, Gomez is starting to cater private events, including a recent birthday for winemaker Drake Whitcraft, who was an early supporter of

INDEPENDENT.COM

Guerrilla Tacos founder Wes Avila, now a superstar chef. It’s hard to imagine that Gomez would have the energy to do more, but he’s ready. “I love where I live in Solvang, I love my job, I love the people I work with, I love restaurants, and I love the family we have,” said Gomez. “Honestly, I’m just thankful to n be doing what I love.”

FOOTWEAR FANATIC Gomez loves sneakers, sporting different pairs fre frequently at work and sometimes changing several times in an evening. “We are on our feet for sometimes 16 hours a day,” he said. “You never wanna wear the same shoes for that long.” For Work: “My most-worn pair for work are my Yeezy

Boost 350 V2 Citrin Non-Reflectives. I usually wear these at the start of my shift. They are beat-up and so comfortable. Sometimes I’ll switch it up and wear Vans. My Birkenstock clogs are classic kitchen shoes and what I wear toward the end of my shift.” For Going Out: “My Sean Wotherspoon Jiminy Crickets

or Yeezy Desert Boots, for sure. But I’m also a big fan of The Ten from Off-White by Virgil Abloh, pretty much all the Pharrell shoes, and a classic Air Force 1.”

JOHN TROXELL @TROXPHOTOS

s los olivo

FOOD &DRINK

p. 32


2018

Best of

Santa Barbara

®

Runner-Up

VOTED SANTA

BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 27 YEARS

IN A ROW!

BREAKFAST

COURTESY

Rare Society for Funk Zone

Super CuCaS EVERY DAY!

BURRITO $739 Micheltorena & Mesa Locations

2018

Best of

Santa Barbara

®

winner

e Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Fre Mesa Locations) (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena &

DAILY $899 LUNCH

SPECIALS 2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863

FOOD & DRINK

626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028 6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806

The Rotary Club of Los Olivos Presents

The 16th Annual

MEAT SHOWCASE: Rare Society is bringing steakhouse vibes to the Funk Zone.

R

are Society is set to open their steakhouse

this summer in the Funk Zone at 214 State Street, the former home of Corazón Cocina, American Ale, Yankee Noodle, Rebar Coffee, Tri Tip Company, Union Ale Brewing Company, and Couchez. The third location of the San Diego–born concept, Rare Society is the brainchild of Chef Brad Wise, who has combined inspiration from the infamous Vegas-style steakhouses of the early 2000s with his signature style of Santa Maria– style grilling. Wise’s menu places proteins and seafood in the spotlight, with cuts of dry-aged rib-eyes, American Wagyu, and classic filet mignon complementing steakhouse specialties such as oyster Rockefeller, snow crab legs, and Caesar salad. Extra touches will include classic caviar service, a seafood tower, house-made sauces, and a dessert selection. Rare Society is brought to us by Trust Restaurant Group, a San Diego–based hospitality collective helmed by Wise. The group’s portfolio includes five distinct concepts that run the gamut from fine dining to a butcher shop to an ice cream window. PARADISE STORE PLANS? This just in from reader Joseph: “As the ‘Restaurant Guy’ I would like you to look into the recent sale of the Paradise Store [at 1 Paradise Road] and its potential of being a restaurant/store again. I live in the canyon and believe that the property has much potential as

a halfway stopping point for the recent wine/ beer tasting industry in Santa Ynez. The always available customer base of locals and visitors in the Paradise Canyon area could make it a great local destination again. My understanding is that Derek Duncan (Seymour/Duncan family) was the purchaser.” ALMA FONDA STOPPAGE: Reader Leonard says that

he saw a bright red “Stop Work Notice” for Alma Fonda Fina restaurant, coming to 1024 Coast Village Road, the former home of Little Alex’s. I am told that the sign is dated April 19, 2022, and indicates that all construction must stop for lack of a permit. NO FOOD AT PIANO? Tom says that he went to The

Red Piano at 519 State Street recently and noticed they are no longer serving food. They used to have a contract with Patxi’s Pizza next door. They said it has since ended but you are allowed to bring your own food in. SHALHOOB NOLETA UPDATE: In April, I wrote that

Shalhoob’s has signed a lease to take over 5112 Hollister Avenue in Noleta, the former home of Woody’s BBQ. I called the Funk Zone location and was told they are planning to open at the old Woody’s spot but don’t yet have a timeline. Reader Eric says that a Shalhoob’s sign has just gone up, signaling that things are rolling.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

GREAT MUSIC, FOOD & WINE Saturday, June 11th 2022 Downtown Los Olivos

1:00-4:00 pm

Featuring Live Jazz performed by The Idiomatiques

All-inclusive $95.00 30 Vintners • 30 Chefs Order tickets online at JazzAndOliveFestival.org or call 805-895-0476 for info

No Pets Please

Please note event is rain or shine* and tickets are NOT refundable.

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

33


BATTLE OF THE BANDS LOCAL ROCK BAND COMPETITION 5/27 - 8:30 pm

PRÓXIMA PARADA WITH DANTÉ MARSH & THE VIBE SETTERS FEEL GOOD SURF ROCK 5/28 - 9:00 pm

BANDA NIGHT WITH LOS COYULITOS

STAY CONNECTED

5/26 - 8:00 pm

THE KOLLECTION PRESENTS:

5/29 - 12:30 pm

SANDY CUMMINGS & JAZZ DU JOUR JAZZ IN THE BAR!

5/30 - 5 pm and 5/31 - 6 pm

YOUNG SINGERS RECITAL 6/2 - 8:00 pm

WE THE BEAT PRESENTS:

SLENDERBODIES DREAM-POP DUO 6/3 - 9:00 pm

UNCLE UNCLE WITH PAT CURREN / VAL-MAR RECORDS SB FOLK/SURF ROCK

Y L N O E MANC

R O F R E P ONE

JUNE 12, 2022 GRANADA THEATRE 805-898-3890 operasb.org Anya Matanovic as Violetta • Dana Sohm for Utah Opera

t, dy, a podcas t with The In en nd pe e. de or In and m is week’s e cover story e scenes of th lists about th na Go behind th ur jo r ou ight from and hear stra

in

34

Listen at odcasts! ou listen to p y r e v re e h w or om/theindy dependent.c

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776

FOLLOW US ON

COMPOSER & GUITAR INNOVATOR

INSTAGRAM

KAKI KING MODERN YESTERDAYS

@sbindependent

La Traviata VERDI

5/29 - 7:30 pm

SB ACOUSTIC PRESENTS:


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

FLAMENCO INTIMO TWIRLS INTO TOWN SIUDY GARRIDO BRINGS A MODERN SENSIBILITY TO TRADITIONAL DANCE

L I F E

JORGE LOSADA

ART AND NATURE INTERTWINE

COURTESY

PAGE 35

B

ringing a contemporary vision to an ancient Spanish art form is no small task, but internationally acclaimed dancer/choreographer Siudy Garrido manages to swirl traditional and ultramodern techniques into a brand of flamenco that’s entirely her own. The artistic vision of Siudy Garrido Flamenco Company’s Flamenco Intimo takes the stage on Saturday, June 4, at the Lobero Theatre. We caught up with Garrido while she was in tech rehearsals in her birthplace, Caracas, Venezuela. Now headquartered in Miami, her company travels the world, exciting audiences with a unique blend of this vibrant art from. Flamenco is in your blood, and your mother was very accomplished with an academy of her own. What are the distinctions between traditional flamenco and your contemporary, cutting-edge interpretation that brings in other styles of dance and music? I first studied traditional flamenco at my mother’s academy but had an early taste of stage work when Joaquín Cortés invited me back to Caracas to dance a bulería in a 2,000-seat venue. When I was 17, superstar Antonio Canales’s company had me audition to substitute for the principal lead female in Bernarda de Alba (the lead was sick). I had to learn the whole show and rehearse in a day and perform the next day, again, at a 2,000-seat

venue. Mr. Canales wanted to take me on tour, but my family didn’t allow it. My mother dedicated her life to teaching, but my call was to work on the stage. I founded a professional dance company when I was 19. This is where my inspiration to move forward with my search for a different take on flamenco aesthetics came. Canales was a visionary and soon I learned that I had a different tradition in my own growth. With different influences, since I grew up in America and not in Spain. My footwork became essential, and I was dedicated to learning with top masters in Madrid and Seville. I also learned overall techniques and styles. To be honest, I love traditional flamenco music and styles (palos) of flamenco. But in dance, my approach to my work is incorporating my contemporary dance study, enhancing traditional flamenco dance lines. Your costumes are also not traditional. I design costumes with contemporary influences of my own cultural reality, including pop and fashion influences. For instance, I love Tim Burton’s ideas, and they inspired my costumes for Falla & Flamenco with Gustavo Dudamel in 2015, with those timeless ideas in some of his costumes designed by Colleen Atwood. You will see me dancing very traditional flamenco moves but in very non-traditional costumes.

What about music? I incorporate fragments of music like the jazz standard “Take 5” taken to bulerías or Salsa Pasajes taken to alegrías, but I keep the music centered in the flamenco codes and rules. What can guests expect to see with Flamenco Intimo? Flamenco Intimo is part of our expression from these two years of uncertainty. Even though it’s a repertoire show and was created in 2015, I changed it quite a bit to allow a sensible commentary of humanity — opening with a piece that represents us coming out of isolation into the joy of life. We will perform a guajira, which is a style of flamenco with a Cuban influence. Seguirilla and alegrías in choreography with our beautiful ballet performing with Spanish shawls, and music solos by our great musicians, including Juan Parrilla on the flute (Joaquín Cortés composer) and José Luis de la Paz on guitar (Cristina Hoyos composer). And I will perform my dearest Soleá por Bulería, which is my favorite flamenco style where I do my solos. We hope the audience can enjoy our work and that we can bring joy here, too. —Leslie Dinaberg

See tinyurl.com/flamencointimotrailer for a preview of the performance.

CLINT WEISMAN

QUIRE OF VOYCES There’s something soul-stirring about choral music, especially with great acoustics. For a taste of timelessness, the a cappella group Quire of Voyces (quireofvoyces.org) comes to St. Anthony’s Chapel Saturday and Sunday, May 28-29 (both at 3 p.m.) with a new show, Sacred Love. “I’ve been thinking about this type of concert for quite some time now,” shared artistic director Nathan Kreitzer, who founded the choir—made up of professional singers who recreate world-class renditions of the finest a cappella works from the Renaissance and modern eras in acoustically stunning

historic venues—in 1993. Among the works is Sviridov’s “Sacred Love,”a hauntingly beautiful piece of Russian music sung by soprano Dr. Nichole Dechaine. “I think I have found some tremendous music that should culminate in a glorious concert,”said Kreitzer. Tickets are available at the door starting 30 minutes before the performance, as well as at the Garvin Theatre box office and Chaucer’s Books until noon on Friday, May 27. Quire of Voyces will also perform a free concert on Sunday, June 5, at 2 p.m. at St. Mark’s-in-the-Valley in Los Olivos. —LD

Portals & Pathways, Kerrie Smith The vast beauty of the trails and sweeping ocean and mountain views of Santa Barbara’s More Mesa open space provide inspiration for Portals & Pathways, a yearlong installation at the Wildling Museum of Art and Nature in Solvang. Artist Kerrie Smith (kerriesmithstudio .com) designed the site-specific work to be an evolving meditation on the changing seasons and local flora and fauna. A resident of the More Mesa neighborhood for two decades, Smith’s daily walks have covered the more than 340 acres of beautiful trails and pristine beaches that make up this stunning part of our coastline. A combination of mobiles, banners, paintings, and photography, Smith said she hopes her art will inspire others to “take their own journeys and joyous walks” into More Mesa. “My banners rise out of the light and shadows that I witness through the seasons at various times of the day and early evenings. I recreate the ephemeral as organic, naturedriven forms that reflect this shape-shifting landscape. These shapes, bounded by curves, mirror the constantly unfolding transitions of light and color,” said Smith. “For me, they reveal optimism, expansiveness, creation, and the life force. I build my compositions with multiple layers and an array of techniques and tools as I seek a balance between the once tamed landscape and its original feral state.” Also on view in Solvang is a new photography exhibition Greenland — Land of the Midnight Sun at the Elverhøj Museum of History & Art through September 18. The exhibition features dramatic images of the world’s largest island, which, contrary to its name, is not very green, but rather covered in ice and known for its glaciers. “Greenland is majestic—and so important. What happens in Greenland affects people everywhere,” said museum executive director and curator Esther Jacobsen Bates. Created in collaboration with the Environmental Alliance of Santa Barbara County Museums (sbmuseumsalliance .org), exhibition viewers will learn more about the vast Greenland ice sheet and the Ilulissat Glacier (the fastestmoving glacier in the world), which are often included in conversations about the global climate system. —LD

4-1-1:

The Wildling Museum (1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang; wildlingmuseum.org)) is open Mon.-Fri. 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; wildlingmuseum.org Sat. and Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Elverhøj Museum (1624 Elverhoy Wy., Solvang; elverhoj.org elverhoj.org)) is open Thu.-Mon., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 26, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

35


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF MAY 26

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): In defining the essential elements at play in a typical Aries person’s agenda, I’m not inclined to invoke the words “sometimes” or “maybe.” Nor do I make frequent use of the words “periodically,” “if,” or “ordinarily.” Instead, my primary identifying term for many Aries characters is “NOW!!!” with three exclamation points. In referring to your sign’s experiences, I also rely heavily on the following descriptors: pronto, presto, push, directly, why not?, engage, declare, activate, venture into, enterprising, seize, deliver, and wield. You are authorized to fully activate and deploy these qualities in the next three weeks.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): I like Joan Didion’s definitions of selfrespect. As you enter a favorable phase for deepening and enhancing your self-respect, they may be helpful. Didion said self-respect is a “sense of one’s intrinsic worth,” and added, “People who respect themselves are willing to accept the risk that the venture will go bankrupt, that the liaison may not turn out to be one in which every day is a holiday. They are willing to invest something of themselves.” And maybe the most essential thing about self-respect, according to Didion, is that it is “a discipline, a habit of mind that can never be faked but can be developed, trained, coaxed forth.”

2022

Annual Awards

Breakfast

Date:

JUNE 1, 2022

Time:

7:30 AM - 9:30 AM

Location:

EL PASEO RESTAURANT

GET YOUR TICKETS

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): “Reality is not simply there; it does not simply exist,” claimed author Paul Celan. “It must be sought out and won.” I think that is excellent advice for you right now. But what does it mean in practical terms? How can you seek out and win reality? My first suggestion is to put your personal stamp on every situation you encounter. Do something subtle or strong to make each event serve your specific interests and goals. My second suggestion is to discern the illusions that other people are projecting and avoid buying into those misunderstandings. My third suggestion is to act as if it’s always possible to make life richer, more vivid, and more meaningful. And then figure out how to do that.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Wilma Mankiller was the first female Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation. She said, “The cow runs away from the storm, while the buffalo charges directly toward it—and gets through it quicker.” Political analyst Donna Brazile expounded on Mankiller’s strategy: “Whenever I’m confronted with a tough challenge, I do not prolong the torment. I become the buffalo.” I recommend Mankiller’s and Brazile’s approach for you and me in the coming days, my fellow Cancerian. Now please excuse me as I race in the direction of the squall I see brewing in the distance.

LEO

Tickets at dsb-annual-awards-2022.eventbrite.com

PRESENTING SPONSOR

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

the best you can. The cosmic rhythms will support you if you make a fun and earnest effort to cultivate liberation through discipline.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Some nights you are the lighthouse, some nights the sea,” writes Libran author Ocean Vuong. According to my astrological analysis, you are better suited to be the lighthouse than the sea in the coming days. Lately, you have thoroughly embodied the sea, and that has prepared you well to provide illumination. You have learned new secrets about the tides and the waves. You are attuned to the rhythms of the undercurrents. So I hope you will now embrace your role as a beacon, Libra. I expect that people will look to your radiance to guide and inspire them.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Movie people are possessed by demons, but a very low form of demons,” observes author Edna O’Brien. She should know. She has hung out with many big film stars. Since you’re probably not in the movie business yourself, your demons may be much higher quality than those of celebrity actors and directors. And I’m guessing that in the coming weeks, your demons will become even finer and more interesting than ever before—even to the point that they could become helpers and advisors. For the best results, treat them with respect and be willing to listen to their ideas.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’m all in favor of you getting what you yearn for. I have no inhibitions or caveats as I urge you to unleash all your ingenuity and hard work in quest of your beautiful goals. And in the hope of inspiring you to upgrade your ability to fulfill these sacred prospects, I offer you a tip from Sagittarian author Martha Beck. She wrote, “To attract something that you want, become as joyful as you think that thing would make you.”

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): According to author Caroline Myss, “You should see everything about your life as a lesson.” Whoa! Really? Each trip to the grocery store should be a learning opportunity? Myss says yes! For example, let’s say you’re in the snack foods aisle and you’re tempted to put Doritos nacho cheese tortilla chips and Lay’s barbecue potato chips in your cart. But your gut is screaming at you, “That stuff isn’t healthy for you!” And yet you decide to ignore your gut’s advice. You buy and eat both bags. Myss would say you have squandered a learning opportunity: “You’ve harmed yourself by blocking your intuitive voice,” she writes. Now, in accordance with astrological omens, Capricorn, here’s your homework assignment: Regard every upcoming event as a chance to learn how to trust your intuition better.

(July 23-Aug. 22): The New Yorker is an influential Pulitzer Prize–winning magazine that features witty writing and impeccable fact-checking. In 2017, its stories exposed the extensive sexual misconduct committed by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein—and helped lead to his prosecution. How did the magazine get its start? It was co-founded in 1925 by Harold Ross, who had dropped out of school at age 13. He edited every issue for the next 26 years. I’m sensing the possibility of a comparable development in your life, Leo. In the coming months, you may get involved in a project that seems to be beyond the reach of your official capacities or formal credentials. I urge you to proceed as if you can and will succeed.

AQUARIUS

VIRGO

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): “I need a playlist of all the songs I used to love but forgot about,” wrote Tumblr blogger Yuyuuyuyuu. I think you could use such a playlist, too, Pisces. In fact, I would love to see you receive a host of memos that remind you of all the things you love and need and are interested in—but have forgotten about or neglected. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to recover what has been lost. I hope you will reestablish connections and restore past glories that deserve to accompany you into the future.

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo-born Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer and author. In his book Discipline Equals Freedom: Field Manual, he lays down his manifesto: “Become the discipline—embrace its cold and relentless power. And it will make you better and stronger and smarter and faster and healthier than anything else. And most important: It will make you free.” While I don’t expect you to embrace Willink’s rigorous ethic with the same fanatical grip, I think you will benefit from doing

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An Aquarian poet was disturbed when a suitor told her, “I’m really very fond of you.” She responded, “I don’t like fond. It sounds like something you would tell a dog. Give me love, or nothing. Throw your fond in a pond.” I don’t advise you to adopt a similar attitude anytime soon, Aquarius. In my oracular opinion, you should wholeheartedly welcome fondness. You should honor it and celebrate it. In itself, it is a rich, complex attitude. And it may also lead, if you welcome it, to even more complex and profound interweavings.

PISCES

Homework: Is there a postponed dream that you might be able to resume working to fulfill? What is it? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 36

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

CLASSIFIEDS S A N T A

B A R B A R A

I N D E P E N D E N T

Reaching 68,000 Readers Each Week

EMPLOYMENT CHILDREN’S SERVICES

LOVE THE outdoors and working with children? Join the Elings Park team as a fulltime Summer Camp Counselor for eight weeks this summer (June 13 ‑ August 12). You will oversee and plan camp activities, teach kids outdoor and recreation skills, lead games and arts and crafts, and also interact with parents. 40 hours per week required, $23/hour, must be at least 18 years old. Please contact Marinella Baker at mbaker@ elingspark.org.

COMPUTER/TECH AMAZON.COM SERVICES LLC, an Amazon.com company ‑ Santa Barbara, California. Software Development Engineer II: Design, develop, implement, test, & document embedded or distributed SW apps, tools, systs, & servs. (AMZ5749249). Multiple job openings. Apply online: www.amazon.jobs – search by AMZ5749249. EOE.

EDUCATION COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1‑855‑554‑4616 (AAN CAN) TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certified & ready to work in months! Call 1‑844‑268‑5058 (AAN CAN)

PEOPLE CREATING SUCCESS focuses on Person Centered Thinking and inclusion. This position is excellent for individuals with experience in caregiving, participants in Personal Care Attendant or Nursing programs, students with an interest in social work or psychology, and retirees looking for companionship and meaningful work! employment@pcs‑services.org

NONPROFIT SANTA BARBARA New House Seeks Executive Director Founded on 12‑step principles, Santa Barbara New House is a California nonprofit public benefit corporation that provides 3 clean and sober residences for men in recovery, with a capacity of approximately 98 beds. We are seeking a full‑time Executive Director with excellent management and financial skills, networking and fundraising abilities, who is knowledgeable and passionate about recovery. We offer competitive compensation commensurate with experience. Applicants should submit their resume and cover letter describing their interest in the position and qualifications together with salary requirements to newhouse@labordeanddaugherty. com. For more information, please visit our website, www.sbnewhouse.org. Application deadline is May 31, 2022.

PROFESSIONAL

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

GENERAL PART-TIME MUSEUM JOB Are you retired ? Historical Manuscript Museum PT desk attendant needed Please call Norm: 805‑571‑6866

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE ALOE CARE Health, medical alert system. The most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice‑activated! No wi‑fi needed! Special offer call and mention offer code CARE20 to get $20 off Mobile Companion. Call today 1‑844‑ 790‑1673. (SCAN)

construction professionals. Excellent project management skills to effectively manage highly complex projects or highly specialized and critical components of projects with a significant impact on the organization. Excellent skill in promoting, advancing and implementing programs within area of expertise. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $89,000 ‑ $125,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/2/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35700

ASSISTANT DEAN, SPACE MANAGEMENT FOR HFA & SOCL

COLLEGE OF LETTERS & SCIENCE Acts as Assistant Dean in all aspects of space and facilities functions in the College of Letters and Science. Manages multiple, concurrent space projects from planning through implementation. Handles project planning, management, and fiscal oversight of building and renovation projects. Prepares justification and planning documents pertaining to space needs for review by deans and campus administrators. Reqs: Min. of 4 – 6 years of project and facilities planning experience. Excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills, including expert level political acumen and negotiation skills. Excellent analytical, organizational, project management and problem recognition/avoidance/resolution skills. Within area of expertise, excellent skill in advising and consulting with all levels of management and / or capital planning, budgeting and

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Assistant Director of Business Services is responsible for providing leadership and management of all administration, customer service, and business functions across the Residential Operations department. As a senior member of the Residential Operations Management Team, the Assistant Director of Business Services provides the leadership and direction for Physical Resource Procurement, Storekeeping and Inventory Control, Human Resources, Payroll, Travel and Training. The Assistant Director also manages a financial office that partners closely with HDAE Business & Financial Planning. Reqs: Requires extensive knowledge of accounting theory and fund accounting, UC personnel and payroll policies & procedures, auditing and internal control practices. Solid understanding of financial and resource planning concepts as well as how to control organizational budgeting. Proven ability to facilitate decision‑making and problem‑solving. Ability to use discretion and maintain confidentiality. Proven ability to deal with changing priorities and direct the work of others accordingly. Effective verbal, written and interpersonal communication skills. Ability to work effectively across all levels of the organization. Solid understanding of financial and resource planning concepts as well as how to control organizational budgeting. Ability to work under deadline pressure, handling multiple projects concurrently, while dealing with sensitive and confidential issues. Thorough knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Ability to utilize conflict resolution skills to effectively lead and motivate others. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $84,000‑$92,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/3/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 36127

CARPENTER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the supervision of a supervisor or lead personnel, performs skilled cabinetry making for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining commons and related buildings as outlined below to accomplish the operational needs of the department. Duties: light framing to finish carpentry for the repair and maintenance of University owned properties, including structural repair, back priming, installation and repair of doors and trim, weatherproofing and sealing of exterior openings. Installation and repair of drywall and stucco. Repair to cabinetry. Preparation and installation of various types of counter tops. Formica repair and installation. Reqs: 5+ years demonstrated work experience in the carpentry trade, showing multiple skills within the trade. Ability to safely erect, work on and operate scaffolding, high ladders and various lifts. Demonstrated ability to work in a diverse work environment. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Knowledge and ability to correctly and safely perform work in other trade disciplines such as plumbing, locksmithing, and light electrical. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $39.34/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/26/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #35663

food service applications such as point of sale and inventory control software. Basic mathematical and cash control skills to accurately complete drawer counts and prepare deposits. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $3,575‑$4,075/ mo. Tuesday‑Saturday, 10:00am‑6:‑ 30pm, may vary. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 30416

CONTRACTS & GRANTS ANALYST

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Responsible for managing successful contract and grant proposal submission and administration as part of a team. Prepares detailed budgets and all necessary University and agency forms and works closely with Principal Investigators to ensure submission deadlines are met. Shares responsibility for the financial administration of research funds in which duties include but are not limited to ensuring that all expenses charged to extramural funds are appropriate and allowable according to all agency and campus policies, and that adequate funds are available; analyzing expenditures and spending patterns; advising faculty, staff, and students of campus policies for employment, purchasing, and travel; disseminating financial reports.

Maintains knowledge of contract and grant policies of the University and funding agencies. Demonstrates flexibility in learning, interpreting, adapting and implementing new policies and procedures. Maintains effective communication and individual working relationships with Principal Investigators, administrative staff, Office of Research, Business & Financial Services, granting agencies, other institutions, and other campus departments. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. $25.00 ‑ $31.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application Review Date: 6/1/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35694

DIRECTOR OF FINANCE AND OPERATIONS

ARTS & LECTURES The Director of Finance and Operations has full functional responsibility for all financial, personnel and administrative operations of the Arts & Lectures unit. Serves as an advisor to the Executive Director and Associate Director on high‑level matters of critical importance, creating and implementing short and long‑range strategic financial, personnel, and operation plans and goals. Directs contractors, vendors and departmental staff at select

A&L events. Serves as a senior point of contact in the absence of the Executive and Associate Director. Responsibilities include management of all Arts & Lectures finances, including complex income accounts exceeding $10 million annually, as well as management at the department level of the Arts & Lectures $30 million endowment campaign funds. Additionally, the A&L unit is granted procurement authority to execute contracts for professional services in excess of $3 million annually; the Director of Finance and Operations establishes structures, policy and procedures to ensure success in delegation and auditability of all department transactions. Handles high level contractual negotiation with agents/artists/managers. Responsible for complex financial reporting, including economic forecasting and modeling, projections on investment income, and advising the Executive Director on financial strategies and risks. Prepares reports and presents on financial performance and projections to the Arts & Lectures Finance Council. Responsible for directing daily administrative operations including managing personnel, space and facilities. Independently identifies issues, initiates research, interprets information, and acts on issues regarding personnel, space and facilities management, grants management, accounting, travel, payroll, procurement, contracting, and business services. Under severe time constraints, solves a variety of complex problems that require professional experience, operational and organizational knowledge, and a thorough understanding of Federal, State, UC and University policies and procedures. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability to work occasional evening and

Continued on p. 38

CATERING SUPERVISOR

CAMPUS DINING Responsible for event preparation and supervision. Acts as onsite manager at events throughout the year. Acts as onsite manager at events throughout the year. Core job responsibilities are Event Set‑Up, Student Staff Management and Event Management. Responsible for adhering to budgeted labor costs while also ensuring the highest degree of excellence in service and meeting the client’s needs. Reqs: Working knowledge in foodservice and sanitation regulations. Working verbal and written communication skills in the English language, including active listening, dynamic flexibility, critical thinking, and ability to multi‑task and ensure productive time management. Working knowledge to make appropriate decisions, reasoning skills, ability to develop original ideas to solve problems, and conduct basic operations analysis and quality control analysis. Working skills to provide effective interpersonal and work supervision guidance to other personnel and work effectively with partners on joint projects. Intermediate computer application skills to include

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY26, 26,2022 2022 THE MAY THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

37 37


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT weekend hours. $90,000‑130,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34141

GRANT ADMINISTRATOR

SERVICE

(CONT.)

or institutional HVAC mechanical equipment. Required Universal EPA Certification. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. EPA Universal Technician Certificate. Must be able to take night and weekend call‑backs. Hours and days may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. $39.81/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #35564

Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required at time of hire is required and non‑negotiable. This is an 11‑month per year career position. Four weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Notes: Student Health requires all clinical staff to successfully pass the background check and complete the credentialing process before the employment date. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $23.27/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #34192

LEAD LABORER

DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCE Works with minimal guidance performing tasks that provide a high level of computing functionality for instructional, research, computational, and network systems in Earth Science (ES) and other departments served by the Life Sciences Computing Group (LSCG).Recommends, installs and integrates computing equipment in keeping with LSCG, ES, UCSB and UCOP policies. Researches, troubleshoots and resolves hardware, software and networking issues on Windows and Macintosh computers and other equipment such as printers, phones, tablets and NAS devices for users in offices, research and instructional labs, and multi‑use facilities. Provides network support and development. Develops, maintains and upgrades computing lab facilities in coordination with users and supervisors. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree

WANTED: REAL ESTATE FOR SALE HAVING TROUBLE staying in your house? Young Santa Barbara family seeking mutually beneficial long‑term no‑rush arrangement to buy a house. Call/text Dan to discuss creative arrangement 202‑907‑8510.

RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT STUDIOS $1440, Studios with patio $1500, 1BDs $1560, 1BDs with patio $1620, in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 805‑967‑6614

ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule free LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490

MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION: VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special ‑ Only $99! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW: 888‑531‑1192 (AAN CAN) DENTAL INSURANCE ‑ Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance ‑ not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1‑888‑623‑3036 www.dental50plus.com/58 #6258 VIAGRA AND CIALIS USERS! 50 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00. 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 Hablamos Español

PERSONAL SERVICES

55 Yrs or Older?

Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531

TECHNICAL SERVICES

COMPUTER MEDIC

FOLLOW US ON

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SYSTEM & NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR

REAL ESTATE

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23. 1‑833‑872‑2545

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391

CLASSIC CARS

WANTED Running or not. We are local to S.B. Foreign/Domestic. Porsche, Mercedes, Ford, Chevy etc. We come to you.

805-699-0684

AUTO AUTO PARTS CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast ‑ FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1‑800‑245‑0398

CAR CARE/REPAIR AIS MOBILE AUTO REPAIR‑ 20 yrs. exp. I’ll fix it anywhere! Pre‑Buy Inspections & Restorations. 12% OFF! 805‑448‑4450 DONATE YOUR CAR OR TRUCK TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

TWITTER

MAY 26, 2022

STUDENT HEALTH Exciting career opportunity working in a multidisciplinary, comprehensive University Student Health Service. Works under UCSB Standardized Procedures in a collaborative and collegial relationship with physicians, Advanced Practice Providers and other clinical staff at UCSB Student Health. Responsibilities include evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of acute illnesses and injuries, common chronic health conditions; assessment, management and/or referral of primary mental health conditions, routine gynecologic care, physical examinations, prescribing medications under the legal scope of practice and arranging follow up care and referrals as indicated. Reqs: Must have a current California Physician Assistant License and DEA registration schedules 2‑5 at all times during employment in order to practice and function in their clinical role. Notes: Student Health requires that clinical staff must

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the general supervision of the Residence Hall Manager; the Sr. BMW performs senior building maintenance tasks on a regular and continuing basis and performs custodial work for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Commons. May perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. May work shifts other than Monday through Friday in order for the department to cover operational needs. Reqs: Training in the basics of plumbing repairs, patch and painting, simple beginning carpentry repairs, and simple (non‑licensed) electrical repairs. Experience making apprentice level repairs in plumbing, patch and paint, carpentry, and electrical. Basic knowledge of the safe use of maintenance equipment such as drills, saws, cordless screwdrivers, and some drain snakes. Experience as an exceptional customer service representative with the ability to communicate effectively and professionally with diverse student and family clientele. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $22.07 ‑ $26.89/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/31/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu. Job #35853

TAI CHI private instruction for advanced practitioners and for beginning students. Emphasis on details to improve your stance, avoid knee pain and damage. Improve and learn to increase internal energy. Learn methods for superior BALANCE. Understand and improve Push Hands. Suitable for students of any Tai Chi style or school. 50 years experience. Toni DeMoulin 805‑570‑6194, taichitoni1@hotmail.com

FOLLOW US ON

THE INDEPENDENT

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

SR. BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER

HSSB ADMIN SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for independently coordinating and managing all aspects of the Undergraduate Program in the Department of History. Provides knowledgeable and holistic advice to prospective, incoming, and current undergraduate students and the campus community. Manages all administrative aspects of the undergraduate program, including consulting on course offerings, facilitating the creation of new courses, creating quarterly course schedules, and coordinating departmental events such as the annual awards ceremony. Provides timely and detailed information and reports to faculty and staff, and serves as liaison to multiple departments on campus such as the College of Letters and Science, the Office of the Registrar, the Disabled Students Program, the Department of Admissions, the Academic Senate, and more. Maintains an in depth understanding of Departmental and University policies and procedures, and interprets regulations for students, staff, faculty, and the general public. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of training and work experience in a higher education setting. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61 ‑ $26.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 6/4/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35943.

FITNESS

AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. Includes 1 TB of data per month. Get More For Your High‑Speed Internet Thing. Ask us how to bundle and SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. Call us today 1‑855‑397‑7909. (SCAN)

FOLLOW US ON

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians, as well as scheduling appointments. Required: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California

STUDENT HEALTH Responsible for maintaining a clean and safe environment for our patients and staff. Provide the following support to meet the clinic needs such as: 1) Receiving goods, stocking the supply room, delivering supplies and other items to the departments and individuals. 2) Ordering maintenance, repairs, furniture move. 3) Phone service. 4) Autoclave and infection control needs of the clinics. Works independently and as part of the Operation Support team and with campus and external partners and vendors. Reqs: Proficiency with email and MS Office, effectively communicate and work with a diverse clientele and workgroup, excellent organizational skills and to work effectively in a service‑oriented environment subject to frequently changing priorities. Experience working in a healthcare setting preferred. Notes: Must successfully complete and pass a background check before employment. Working in a healthcare setting is preferred. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $18.72/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34741

UNDERGRADUATE ADVISOR

HOME SERVICES

@sbindynews

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

OPERATIONS SUPPORT COORDINATOR

or equivalent combination of training and/or experience. Experience with proactive defense, incident response and analysis. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $68,000‑$75,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 6/1/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 35816

INSTAGRAM

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Lead Laborer serves as working lead for team of Sr. Custodians, Sr. Building Maintenance Worker, student employees and seasonal workers, working various assignments. Responsible for work assignment and quality, safety, employee training, building security, oversight of special projects and maintenance tasks, emergency response and customer service. Orders and distributes supplies. Also responsible for employee time cards and equipment maintenance for building. In compliance with HDAE goals and objectives, affirms and implements the department Educational Equity Plan comprised of short and long term objectives that reflect a systematic approach to preparing both students and staff for a success in a multi‑cultural society. Works in an environment which is ethnically diverse and culturally pluralistic. Reqs: Minimum 3 years of custodial or maintenance work experience in an institution and/or commercial setting. Example: College Residence Hall, hotel, resort, or school. Some computer experience, including Microsoft Office programs. Ability to motivate staff and maintain positive morale. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Experience in a customer service environment. Ability to communicate effectively with a diverse work force. Ability to communicate and work effectively with staff and others such as, employees from other departments, students, parents, project managers, conference organizers, etc. Organizational experience. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $21.33 ‑ $29.89/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #34594

successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment start date. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month partial‑year career 100% position; 4 weeks of furlough must be taken during quarter breaks. Works hours as assigned, which may include occasional evening hours. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #33985

WELL DIRECTORY BEING

@sbindependent

38

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

FACEBOOK

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Working on a zone maintenance team composed of all trades, incumbent performs HVAC maintenance work. Installs, repairs, maintains, and inspects heating, ventilating, air conditioning and pneumatic systems and equipment. Installs, repairs and maintains pumps, air compressors, steam and hot water boilers, heating and boiler tubes, heat exchangers, fans, dampers, hydraulic units, control and monitoring systems. Makes working drawings and control diagrams for heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment. Work with others as part of a team. Provide direct customer service to campus community. Reqs: Knowledge of methods, materials, tools and equipment used in the installation, repair and maintenance of refrigeration, chilling, air‑conditioning and heating equipment up to 550 tons in capacity, including absorption chillers, pumps, condensers, heat exchangers, cooling towers, reciprocating, centrifugal and screw type compressors, thermostats, electrical, pneumatic and PLC and micro‑processor based controls. Skilled in installing, repairing and maintaining a wide variety of air conditioning, refrigeration, absorption chillers, heating and related systems and equipment. 3‑5 years experience repairing and servicing commercial

|

@sbindependent

HVAC MECHANIC

PHONE 805-965-5205

STAY CONNECTED

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION RESEARCH Coordinates and administers a wide range of activities in professional support of the day‑to‑day operations of the LGBTQ+ Health Disparities Initiative: a joint collaboration between California Department of Public Health and UCSB. Objectives include supporting the Project Director with planning and executing administrative needs, including travel, coordinating community input meetings. Under the general supervision of the Director, is responsible for the financial administration of the Initiative and serves as the primary staff resource for the successful development and implementation of all programs and events. Responsible for the monthly financial reports to CDPH. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Exceptional written and interpersonal communication skills. Skills in public relations writing, social media management, content design, networking and media relations. Knowledge of LGBTQ+ health needs. Ability to provide excellent customer service. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Grant funded position. The contract is from 4/1/22 through 3/31/24. Reappointment is contingent on future funding. $24.62 ‑ $33.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application Review Date: 6/3/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35820

|


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS !!Amplifiers and Guitars working or not, wanted. Free estimates. Local Santa Barbara based collector. Call or text (310) 251‑6765 !!OLD GUITARS WANTED!! GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN, Etc. 1930’s to 1980’s. TOP DOLLAR PAID. CALL TOLL FREE 1‑866‑433‑8277 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) ALOE CARE Health medical alert system. Most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voice‑activated! No wi‑fi needed! Special offer w/code CARE20 for $20 off Mobile Companion. 1‑855‑521‑5138 AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/ mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855‑761‑1725 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 1‑877‑649‑5043 (AAN CAN) BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920. Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) BECOME A published author. We want to read your book! Dorrance Publishing trusted since 1920. Consultation, production, promotion & distribution. Call for free author’s guide 833‑719‑3029 or visit dorranceinfo.com/acp

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844‑511‑1836. (AAN CAN)

LOOKING FOR assisted living, memory care, or independent living? A Place for Mom simplifies the process of finding senior living at no cost to your family. Call 1‑844‑ 741‑0130 today. (Cal‑SCAN)

DIRECTV ‑ Watch your favorite live sports, news and entertainment anywhere. More top premium channels than DISH. Restrictions apply. Call IVS ‑ 1‑888‑641‑ 5762. (Cal‑SCAN)

LOOKING FOR assisted living, memory care, or independent living? A Place for Mom simplifies the process of finding senior living at no cost to your family. Call 1‑833‑386‑1995 today!

DIRECTV SATELLITE TV Service Starting at $59.99/month! Free Installation! 160+ channels available. Call Now to Get the Most Sports & Entertainment on TV! 877‑310‑2472 (AAN CAN)

NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 1‑855‑667‑0380 (Cal‑SCAN)

DO YOU owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 877‑414‑2089. (AAN CAN) (Hours: Mon‑Fri 7am‑5pm PST)

PAYING TOP cash for men’s sportwatches! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 833‑603‑3236

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Help Find Missing Kids! Call 1‑888‑491‑1453. (CalSCAN) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877‑266‑0681 (AAN CAN) HERO TAKES stress out of managing medications. Hero sorts & dispenses meds, sends alerts at dose times & handles prescription refill & delivery for you. Starting at $24.99/ month. No initiation fee. 90‑day risk‑free trial! 1‑888‑684‑0280 HUGHESNET ‑ Finally, super‑fast internet no matter where you live. 25 Mbps just $59.99/mo! Unlimited Data is Here. Stream Video. Bundle TV & Internet. Free Installation. Call 866‑499‑0141 HUGHESNET SATELLITE Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1‑844‑416‑7147 (AAN CAN) LONG DISTANCE MOVING: Call today for a FREE QUOTE from America’s Most Trusted Interstate Movers. Let us take the stress out of moving! Speak to a Relocation Specialist, call 844‑857‑1737 (Cal‑SCAN)

PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator. $0 Money Down + Low Monthly Payment Options. Request a FREE Quote ‑Call now before the next power outage: 1‑844‑439‑5645 (SCAN) PREPARE FOR power outages today with a GENERAC home standby generator $0 Down + Low Monthly Pmt Request a free Quote. Call before the next power outage: 1‑844‑334‑8353 PUT ON your TV Ears & hear TV w/ unmatched clarity. TV Ears Original ‑ originally $129.95 ‑ now w/ this special offer only $59.95 w/code MCB59! 1‑833‑530‑1955 SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/ year! Call 1‑844‑410‑9609! (M‑F 8am‑8pm Central) (Cal‑SCAN) THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. We deliver the largest consortium of trusted news publishers in California and beyond. For more info on multi‑market solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. Mark Twain said, “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind

of advertising”. So why spend your hardearned dollars on social media where you already have an audience? For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. CNPA’s Advertising Services’ power to connect to nearly 13 million of the state’s readers who are an engaged audience, makes our services an indispensable marketing solution. For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing an election is how campaign dollars are spent. Get the best ROI by using our deep relationships in every community in California. Our on‑the‑ground knowledge is indispensable to campaigns that want results. For more info on multi‑market ethnic and non‑ethnic solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@ cnpa.com THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1‑855‑270‑3785

LEGAL NOTICES‑ TO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DONNA DELIBRO Case No.: 22PR00218 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: DONNA DELIBRO, DONNA MARIE DELIBRO A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: THOMAS WIDDERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: THOMAS WIDDERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court

93101; (805) 687‑1204. Published May 12, 19, 26, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: THOMAS R. ALLYN Case No.: 22PR00124 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: THOMAS R. ALLYN A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Allen Thomashefsky, Trustee of the David W Doner Trust in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: DENISE H. ALLYN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decendent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/23/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Sunrise 5:48 Sunset 8:04

High

Thu 26

2:21 am 0.7

8:15 am 3.8

1:40 pm 1.2

8:12 pm 5.6

Fri 27

3:01am 0.2

9:11 am 3.7

2:10 pm 1.6

8:38 pm 5.7

Sat 28

3:39 am -0.1

10:03 am 3.6

2:38 pm 2.0

9:03 pm 5.8

Sun 29

4:14 am -0.3

10:52 am 3.5

3:05 pm 2.3

9:29 pm 5.8

Mon 30

4:49 am -0.4

11:39 am 3.4

3:31 pm 2.6

9:56 pm 5.8

Tue 31

5:24 am -0.4

12:26 pm 3.3

3:56 pm 2.8

10:26 pm 5.7

Wed 1

6:02 am -0.4

1:15 pm 3.3

4:22 pm 2.9

10:58 pm 5.5

Thu 2

6:42 am -0.2

2:11 pm 3.3

4:49 pm 3.1

11:34 pm 5.3

30 D

7H

14 D

20 source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“OK Computer” -- each has an integral component.

TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920‑1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker, Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877‑589‑0747 (AAN CAN) WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833‑664‑1530 (AAN CAN)

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES GARAGE SALE: Saturday May 28th from 8 to 2pm at 939 Via Nieto, SB, CA 93110. Items include; hutch, roll a‑way bed with linens, books by Evonovich, Peterson, Woods, etc.

WANT TO BUY WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

LEGALS should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/30/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 04/27/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: ROSALEEN WYNNE 222 East Carrillo, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 05/16/2022 By: Rosa Reyes, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Allen & Kimbell, LLP attn: James M. Sweeney, Esq. 317 East Carrillo Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑8611 Published May 26, June 02, 9, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PETER ANTHONY REMEDIOS Case No.: 22PR00231 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: PETER ANTHONY

Across

1. When quadrupled, a Crash Test Dummies hit 4. “Dog Day Afternoon” chant 10. Crypto art initials 13. 2010 health law, for short 14. Umpire’s error 16. Gp. with auditors 17. Paste that can be used in breads and meat dishes 19. ___ au vin 20. “The Usual Gang of ___” (Mad Magazine group) 21. Screen that may loop until you start the movie 23. Heat, in Honduras 24. “Night” essayist Wiesel 26. It is, to Iglesias 27. Entity that manages composers’ intellectual property 30. Prepare a slingshot 31. River painted by van Gogh 32. It’s south of Leb. 35. 1998 Matthew Lillard film set in Utah 38. 6-pointers, briefly 39. Complete beginners, slangily 41. It may offer couples packages 42. Pressure-driven apparatuses 49. Last half of a ball game? 50. Alley group 51. “Fiddlesticks!” 53. One of Paul Revere’s signals

55. Possible choice 56. “Addams Family” cousin 57. Nurikabe, Masyu, or sudoku 60. Advanced degree in math? 61. More racy, as humor 62. Snakelike fish 63. Garage opener? 64. Decorated again 65. Source of the skit “Word Crunch,” where players find inappropriate words in a word search

25. Groups indiscriminately 28. Hall-of-Famer Ripken 29. Tick off 32. Getting some air 33. Vegan coffee shop order 34. Nicholas Sparks’s “Nights in ___” 35. 9-digit no. issuer 36. Bars in supermarkets 37. Time out 40. Telly watcher 43. Commotion 44. Van ___ Mungo (‘30s-’40s baseball player with a novelty song named for him) 1. Specialty of the late Amazing 45. Tarnished Johnathan 46. Chrissy of “This Is Us” 2. Engineer for whom a type of 47. Game show giveaways paving is named 48. Taken dishonestly 3. Henner of “Evening Shade” 52. Tackle box line and “Taxi” 4. “Roll to Me” group Del ___ 54. Links star Ernie 55. Receptive 5. Eyelid twitches, e.g. 58. “___ be an honor!” 6. Cough syrup amt. 59. 1955 merger with the AFL 7. “ER” setting ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. 8. “Bodak Yellow” rapper Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1085 9. Sussex secondary school LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: exam 10. Compliment from a tennis opponent 11. User interface 12. Drafting tools 15. Was winning 18. “Happy Birthday” playwright Anita 22. Blend together 24. “Lawrence of Arabia,” for one

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY26, 26,2022 2022 THE MAY THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

39 39


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 05/03/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Cristi Michelon Vasquez, 132 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 882‑2226. Published May 12, 19, 26, 2022

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: OTTER ROCK PROPERTIES at 4874 8th Street, Unit B, Carpinteria, CA 93013. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 11/07/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2019‑0002790. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Elizabeth Loomis (same address), William III Loomis (same address), Christine Reynolds, 5295 Calle Barquero, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. The business was conducted as a Joint Venture signed by ELIZABETH LOOMIS, GENERAL PARTNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 5/06/22. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001208. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑

ORDINANCE NO. 22-07 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADDING CHAPTER 8.18 TO TITLE 8 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE ENTITLED SINGLE-USE FOODWARE ACCESSORIES AND STANDARD CONDIMENTS On May 17, 2022 at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) adopted Ordinance No. 22-07 that will bring Goleta into compliance with California Assembly Bill 1276, mandating that single-use foodware accessories and standard condiments be made available only upon request by the consumer. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 2207 at a regular meeting held on the 17th day of May, 2022, by the following roll call vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO TEMPORE KYRIACO, COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND RICHARDS NOES: NONE ABSENT: NONE ABSTENTIONS: NONE The Ordinance will be effective 31 days from the date of adoption. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk Santa Barbara Independent, May 26, 2022

ORDINANCE NO. 22-XX AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADDING A NEW CHAPTER 2.18 (ELECTRONIC FILING) TO TITLE 2 ADMINISTRATION AND PERSONNEL) OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE RELATING TO ELECTRONIC FILING OF CAMPAIGN STATEMENTS AND STATEMENTS OF ECONOMIC INTERESTS On June 7, 2022, at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) will consider the second reading and possible adoption of a proposed ordinance that would permit the use of an online filing system as an option for filing and designating the filings received electronically by the City Clerk’s Office as the filings of record for the City. In addition, the system would operate securely and effectively, have no cost to filers, be available to the public to view filings, not place an undue burden on filers, and include procedures for filers to comply with the requirement that they sign statements and reports under penalty of perjury and will meet the requirements of California Assembly Bill 2151. If adopted, the Ordinance will be effective 31 days from the date of adoption by the City Council. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, May 26, 2022 40

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

REMEDIOS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: JOY ETIENNE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: JOY ETIENNE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/30/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before

Publish:

|

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 26, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

(s) is/are doing business as: CYPRESS PSYCHOLOGY at 3463 State Street, Suite 160 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Rebecca D Sandhu 2858 Ben Lomond Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: REBECCA SANDHU, FOUNDER & CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001141. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ONE.SOCCER SCHOOLS at 315 Meigs Rd, Suite A‑431 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; One. Skill Factory (same address) This business is conducted by A Corporation Filed by: JEFFERY K. JOHNSON with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E955. FBN Number: 2022‑0001032. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: COACH B SPORTS at 5288 University Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Bryan Hergenroether (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: BRYAN HERGENROETHER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001048. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THYMELESS MY CHEF at 1626 Garden St #A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Thymeless Santa Barbara LLC (same address) This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company Filed by: BOB PEEBLER, MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 25, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001106. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SPS PROPERTIES at 3820 State Street Suite B Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Shannon P Sorensen (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: SHANNON P SORENSEN with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2022‑0001063. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STEPHENS FARM at 200 Calle Ecuestre Goleta, CA 93117; Eunice Stephens (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: EUNICE STEPHENS, INDIVIDUAL with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2022‑000953. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB Animal Things at 3047 Samarkand Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Athena G.A. Veatch (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: ATHENA VEATCH with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2022‑0000989. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SERVICES at 555 Corporate Dr, Ste 100 Ladera Ranch, CA

92694; C Financial Investment Inc (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Corporation Filed by: CEJAY HELMER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001116. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: XANADU SKATE BOUTIQUE at 1436 Santa Fe Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Valerie A. Selvaggio (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Individual Filed by: VALERIE SELVAGGIO, PROPRIETOR with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 2, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001174. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LORETO PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER at 3311 B State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93130; James M DeLoreto, 1243 Camino Rio Verde, Santa Barbara 93111; Edward S DeLoreto, 1361 Mission Ridge Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Trust, Filed by: JAMES M. DELORETO, TRUSTEE with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E4. FBN Number: 2022‑0001030. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SZABO FINISH CARPENTRY AND WOODWORKS at 210 W. Micheltorena St, Unit E, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Andrew J. Szabo (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, filed by ANDREW SZABO, OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 06, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001207. Published May 12, 19, 26, June 8, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA GIFTS&MORE at 4010 Calle Real, Ste #3, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Ziyad Abdulhai 4515 Chapparral Drive, Carpinteria, CA 93013. This business is conducted by A Individual Filed by: ZIYAD ABDULHAI,OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001202. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ABSTRAX TITLE SERVICES at 315A Meigs Road #178, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Patricia L O’Connell (same address); Ralph P. Folson 12348 A Cactus Drive Desert Hot Springs, CA 92240. This business is conducted by copartners. Signed by: PATRICIA L. O’CONNELL, MANAGING PARTNER Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E40 FBN Number: 2022‑0001213. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GAMISODES at 40 Oceano Avenue, #10, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Kids Media, Inc (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by: DAVIS BRIMIR, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 09, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001218. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 09 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: HAMMERHEAD CONSTRUCTION, 6070 Ashley Place, Goleta, CA 93117; Brandon Montano Construction Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation, signed by BRANDON MONTANO, CEO with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001119. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SPONSORPITCH at 3463 State Street, Suite 525, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Riviera Group SB, LLC, same address. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by STEPHEN C. TICHES, CO‑OWNER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001350. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RBX LAW at 924 Anacapa Street, Suite 1‑T, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Russell A. Brown, 226 N. Juanita Avenue Unit B, Redondo Beach, CA 90277. This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by RUSSELL BROWN, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001309. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ERA PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES at 4880 Market Street, Ventura, CA 93003 ; ERA Psychological Services, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by DOUGLAS MOES, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 10, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001234. Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THEPARTNERS WEALTH MANAGEMENT at 1129 State Street, Suite 29, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Partners Wealth Management, LLC , (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. Signed by: ALEXANDER POPOVICH, CEO/ MANAGING MEMBER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001220. Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LILY HAYS WINES at 207 Cordova Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; King Brodie Enterprises, 2007 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by: LILY HAYS, MANAGER Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 29, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001164. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARTESANIAS 805 at 302 W Micheltorena St, 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wendy K. Barboza Martinez (same address); This business is conducted by an individual. Signed by: WENDY KARINA BARBOZA MARTINEZ, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 11, 2022. This statement

expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E47 FBN Number: 2022‑0001243. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUOY WATER CLUB at 500 Maple Avenue, Lot 4, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Air Brothers LLC, 380 Miramonte Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by: SCOUT VERNON, CO FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30 FBN Number: 2022‑0001150. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CLEAR CABINETRY at 525 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, ABC CASEWORK LLC 6255 Inez Street, Unit 1, Ventura, CA 93003. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. Signed by BAILEY HOCHHALTER, MANAGING MEMBER, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001248. Published May 26, June 2, 9, 16 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BARNES & BARNES at 1900 State St Ste M Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Margaret V Barnes 4635 Sierra Madre Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: MARGARET V BARNES with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001031. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: EL CONGRESO at El Centro 406 UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, Erik Magana (same address) Jazmin R. Ramirez (same address). This business is conducted by an Unincorporated Assoc. Other Than a Partnership. SIGNED BY: ERIK MAGANA, CO‑CHAIR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001300. Published: May 26, June 2, 9 16 2022.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SCOTT CRAIG VANSANFORD TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV00713 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SCOTT CRAIG VANSANFORD TO: SCOTT CRAIG VAN SANFORD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 15, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

|

PHONE 805-965-5205

|

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

for hearing on the petition. Dated April 27, 2022. by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TRAM DINH BICH PHAM TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01609 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Tram Dinh Bich Pham TO: Elva Tram Pham THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 27, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 04, 2022, Colleen K. Sterne, Judge of the Superior Court, County of Santa Barbara, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LUZ ANGELICA LESLIE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01577 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Luz Angelica Leslie TO: Luz Angelica Coronado THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 06, 2022 Thomas P. Aderle, Judge of the Superior Court, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SHEVA UNTERMAN, TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01546 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: SHEVA UNTERMAN TO: CAPPY UNTERMAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without

a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 24, 2022 10:00 am, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 4, 2022, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court, Published May 26, June 2, 9 16, 2022. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF NAOLU LY TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01000 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Naolu Ly TO: Jubei Naolu Ly THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 29, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 19, 2022. Thomas P. Aderle, Judge of the Superior Court, County of Santa Barbara, Published May 26, June 2,

9 16, 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KATHERINE ANN BRUNE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01347 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KATHERINE ANN BRUNE TO: KATHERINE ANN DOBBS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 17, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated April 22, 2022 by, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022.

PUBLIC NOTICES WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD; SPECIAL NOTICE OF LAWSUIT (Pursuant to Labor Code section 3716 and Code of Civil Procedure section 412.20 and 412.30) WCAB No. ADJ11488066 To: DEFENDANT, ILLEGALLY UNINSURED EMPLOYER:

AVISO: Usted esta siendo demandado. La corte puede expedir una decision en contra suya sin darle la oportunidad de defenderse a menos que usted acute pronto. Lea la siguiente informacion. APPLICANT, JUAN BARRETO DEFENDANT(S), DAVID JESUS ROSALES: dba CONCRETE & PAVERS SPECIALIST NOTICES 1) A lawsuit, the Application for Adjudication of Claim, has been filed with the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board against you as the named defendant by the above‑named applicant(s). You may seek the advice of an attorney in any matter connected with this lawsuit and such attorney should be consulted promptly so that your response may be filed and entered in a timely fashion. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney reference service or a legal aid office. You may also request assistance/information from an Information and Assistance Officer of the Division of Workers’ Compensation. (See telephone directory.) 2) An Answer to the Application must be filed and served within six days of the service of the Application pursuant to Appeals Board rules; therefore, your written response must be filed with the Appeals Board promptly; a letter or phone call will not protect your interests. 3) You will be served with a Notice‑ (s) of Hearing and must appear at all hearings or conferences. After such hearing, even absent your appearance, a decision may be made and an award of compensation benefits may issue against you. The award could result in the garnishment of your wages, taking of your money or property or other relief. If the Appeals Board makes an award against you, your house or other dwelling or other property may be taken to satisfy that award in a non‑judicial sale, with no exemptions from execution. A lien may also be imposed upon your property without further hearing and before the issuance of an

ORDINANCE NO. 22-06 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADOPTING VARIOUS AMENDMENTS TO TITLE 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE On May 17, 2022, at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta adopted Ordinance No. 2206 that includes several “minor” and “clean-up” amendments to the recently adopted Title 17 to remedy issues identified during early implementation and also includes other “required” amendments to address General Plan and State law consistency. The topics for these amendments include: • General Plan and State law consistency related to electrical vehicle charging stations, noise exposure levels, eligible appellants, and projects requiring only ministerial review • Director actions and responsibilities • Building separation and allowable height for accessory structures • Retaining walls • Sign standards • Changes to previously-approved permits • Zoning Clearance permits • Emergency generators • General Plan Amendment Initiations • Zoning enforcement and remedies • Noticing requirements • Revised definitions • Other clarifying revisions The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 22-06 at a regular meeting held on the 17th day of May, 2022, by the following roll call vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO TEMPORE KASDIN, COUNCIL MEMBERS ACEVES, KYRIACO AND RICHARDS NOES: NONE ABSENT: NONE ABSTENTIONS: NONE The Ordinance will be effective 31 days from the date of adoption. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, May 26, 2022

award. 4) You must notify the Appeals Board of the proper address for the service of official notices and papers and notify the Appeals Board of any changes in that address. TAKE ACTION NOW TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS! Issued by:

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD Name and address of Appeals Board: Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board 130 East Ortega Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Name and address of Applicant’s Attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA

93101; FORM COMPLETED BY: Wendy Uribe Telephone No.: (805) 965‑4540. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served: as an individual defendant Published: May 26, June 2, 9, 16, 2022.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL (Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom) June 7, 2022 at 5:30 PM ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will that the City Council will conduct a public hearing on the Hollister Avenue Old Town Interim Striping Project. The purpose of the public hearing is for the City Council to receive a, update on the progress of the subject project, approve a preferred alternative to move forward into final design, and find the project exempt from the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) under Public Resources Code 21080.20. HEARING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, June 7, 2022, at 5:30 PM

LOCATION: Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta, CA, 93117 and Teleconference Meeting; this meeting will be held in person and via Zoom (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www. cityofgoleta.org). PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the City Council meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the City Clerk at CityClerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to Council and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, June 2, 2022, on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 9617505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Dates: May 26, 2022, and June 2, 2022

The Housing Authority of the CityThe of Santa Barbara Announces Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara Announces APPLICATIONS FOR SECTION 8 HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHERS BEING8ACCEPTED APPLICATIONS FORARE SECTION HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHERS ARE BEING ACCEPTED Applications will be accepted online at www.hacsbwaitlist.org from Applications will be at accepted Monday May 2, 2022 8:00 AM online through at www.hacsbwaitlist.org from Friday June 17, 2022 at 11:59 PM. Monday May 2, 2022 at 8:00 AM through If Friday you require accommodation and/or paper June a 17,reasonable 2022 at 11:59 PM. application, please contact our office at the number below. If you require a reasonable accommodation and/or paper application, please contact our office at the number below.

To apply scan or visit www.hacsbwaitlist.org. To apply scan or visit

www.hacsbwaitlist.org.

Eligible households under this program are offered a Section 8 voucher allowing them to choose a unit to Eligible under this programpay are a offered rent fromhouseholds private landlords. Participants portiona Section 8 voucher allowing them to choose a unit to of their income toward rent directly to the landlord rentthe from private landlords. a portion and remainder is paid by Participants the Housing pay Authority. of their income toward rent directly to the landlord Families, and isdisabled receive and theseniors, remainder paid byindividuals the Housing Authority. waitlist priority. Families, seniors, and disabled individuals receive waitlistranking priority.is based on date and time of Waitlist application and preference points. Waitlist ranking is based on date and time of application and preference points.

The Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara 808 Laguna Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 www.hacsb.org │ ( 805) of 965-1071 The Housing Authority the City of Santa Barbara TTY808 (EN)(800) (SP) (800) 855-3000 Laguna735-2929 Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 www.hacsb.org │ ( 805) 965-1071 INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 26, 2022 THE INDEPENDENT.COM MAY(SP) 26,(800) 2022 THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT TTY (EN)(800) 735-2929 855-3000

41 41