Santa Barbara Independent 5/19/22

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Santa Barbara

MAY 19-26, 2022 VOL. 36 ⬘ NO. 853

Dip Into Our

HOME &

GARDEN Issue

New Book About Madame Ganna Walska’s Lotusland and Much More

⬘ BY LESLIE DINABERG ⬘


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MAY 19, 2022

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China Before Communism

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MAY 10–11 Performing Arts Center, San Luis Obispo MAY 28–29 The Granada Theatre, Santa Barbara Use code Independent to waive all fees. Expire 5/29.

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MAY 19, 2022

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$100,000 to $25,000,000 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Retail Motels Cannabis Industrial Factories Non-Profits Apartments Warehouses Strip Centers Office Buildings Churches / Temples Automotive Centers Mixed-Use / Single Use Non-Conforming Properties Residential / Commercial Properties

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(805) 455-4088 Lending in California, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, Utah & Washington Non-consumer, Business Purpose Loans secured by commercial or residential property We pay referral fees | California Bureau of Real Estate License Number 00388229

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PARALLEL STORIES The Sound of Stars

SUNDAY, MAY 22 | 3 PM In this unique collaboration between SBMA and Opera Santa Barbara and in celebration of the exhibition Through Vincent’s Eyes: Van Gogh and His Sources, composer, pianist, Grammy nominee, and Guggenheim Fellow Jake Heggie discusses the coming together of “The Starry Night,” a song cycle inspired by the art of Vincent van Gogh with text taken from his letters and poetry by Anne Sexton and Emily Dickinson. Performed by mezzo soprano Erin Alford. Heggie is the composer of eight full-length operas, several one acts, nearly 300 art songs, as well as chamber, choral, and orchestral works.

Location: The New Vic, 33 West Victoria Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

$25 SBMA MEMBERS/$30 NON-MEMBERS Purchase tickets online at tickets.sbma.net. 4

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MAY 19, 2022

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Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net


TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 36, # 853, May 19-26, 2022

Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

COVER STORY

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Name: Leslie Dinaberg Title: Culture Editor

Home & Garden

New Book About Madame Ganna

Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth

Walska’s Lotusland and Much More

Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Graphic Designers Jinhee Hwang, Xavier Pereyra

by Leslie Dinaberg

Web Content Managers Amanda Correa, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Marketing and Promotions Administrator Anne Parayil Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Intern Madison Smoak, Sarah Stephens, Veronica Vo Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 NEWS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

OBITUARIES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman

OUR HOME & GARDEN GO-TO Once again, we turned to longtime contributor Leslie Dinaberg to take on our annual Home & Garden issue, when we highlight many of the indoor and outdoor design tales and trends from around Santa Barbara. As she worked on this edition, we also hired Leslie as our new Culture Editor to lead our arts and entertainment coverage and manage many of the special sections, just like this week’s. She tells us more below.

The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

What did you learn about Lotusland and Madame Ganna Walska while reporting this week’s cover story? Like Madame herself, Lotusland is much, much more than just a pretty face. One of the best “work perks” of being a journalist in Santa Barbara is that I’ve been fortunate to spend a lot of time at Lotusland over the years. But I really had no idea about all the behind-the-scenes efforts that have gone on FOR DECADES to make this gorgeous garden a more environmentally sustainable place, in addition to being such an inspiringly beautiful and peaceful spot.

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 LIVING. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 ARTS LIFE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

ASTROLOGY. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 CLASSIFIEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 ON THE COVER: Madame Ganna Walska, taken c. 1958. Photo by J.R. Eyerman/Lotusland Archives. Design by Ava Talehakimi.

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MAY 19, 2022

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Endorsements

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he Santa Barbara Independent presents its third and final endorsements for the Tuesday, June 7, primary elections. As always, the Independent does not endorse in every race but only in those that we have researched and can confidently suggest a candidate. Thank you for considering our endorsement.

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For Sheriff: No Endorsement

Endorsements At a Glance U.S. Congress: Salud Carbajal U.S. Senate: Alex Padilla California Governor: Gavin Newsom Lt. Governor: Eleni Kounalakis

I N GR I D B OSTROM PHOTOS

Attorney General: Rob Bonta Insurance Commissioner: Ricardo Lara State Assembly: Gregg Hart Santa Barbara County Auditor Controller: Betsy Schaffer

Clerk Recorder: Joe Holland District Attorney: John Savrnoch Sheriff: No Endorsement Treasurer Tax Collector: Harry Hagen

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Lt. Juan Camarena

Sheriff Bill Brown

he candidates running for sheriff — incumbent Sheriff Bill Brown and Lt. Juan Camarena — are both serious, thoughtful, and dedicated public servants. Both have accomplishments of which they can rightfully boast. Both have much to recommend them. But both have given us cause for pause, and we can endorse neither. Of the two, Brown clearly has the most abundant experience and the requisite political chops needed to do the job. Sixteen years ago, we endorsed Bill Brown when he first ran for sheriff. We are proud of that decision. For many years, Sheriff Brown was a forward-thinking and effective public servant who worked hard to achieve the promises he made to voters. But now we do not believe that after four terms in office, he offers the invigorated vision needed for how the largest law enforcement agency in the county should respond and adjust to the contemporary problems and realities of the whole community. For Juan Camarena, this is his first run at elected office. Though we have been impressed by his openness to greater community engagement, and by the knowledge his 23 years in the Sheriff ’s Office has given him, including his outstanding leadership running the law enforcement operation in Isla Vista, and now as a lieutenant at the head of the criminal investigations department, we nevertheless believe he still needs more seasoning in the rough, political world the sheriff of Santa Barbara County must navigate. During the campaign, Sheriff Brown has stated that American law enforcement is now facing transformational challenges. We agree. But Brown — who occupies leadership posi-

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MAY 19, 2022

tions within statewide and national law enforcement organizations — has not presented a response to this historic moment, which offers opportunities for change. Instead, his response has been both defensive and traditional. Brown — as both supporters and critics can attest — is a formidable counterpuncher. Given the urgency of the political moment, we wish Brown were more mindful of the pain underlying the anger that has been simmering within our community and is now being expressed more openly than in recent memory. We had hoped that Brown, with his political stature and gifts, would have not relied on a rebuttal to the demands but instead engaged the moment more constructively. For example, Brown was quick to reject out of hand the idea of a civilian oversight board. He called it a national solution in search of local problem that doesn’t exist here in Santa Barbara. It’s important to recognize that the County of Santa Barbara has paid out $9 million in the last 10 years to settle excessive-force or wrongful-death lawsuits involving deputies who answer to Bill Brown. Several of these involved an officer involved in multiple fatal shootings and several serious injuries. In stark contrast to Brown, the City of Santa Barbara’s acting police chief, Bernard Melekian, has repeatedly embraced the concept of civilian oversight as a tool to build or repair community trust. Melekian regularly stood up on behalf of his cops while in the same breath constructively engaging in City Hall’s extensive deliberative process. In so doing, he made his objections to elements of the initial proposal well-understood, and changes were made accordingly.

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County Superintendent of Schools: Susan Salcido Brown is a genuine enigma. How is it that that someone so politically gifted and so accomplished could have such rocky relations with the county supervisors — who control the purse strings on which Brown relies — with the union that represents his own troops, with not one but all the fire chiefs in Santa Barbara County, and with the four cities that currently contract with his department for law enforcement services? Maybe it’s a function of time; 16 years, after all, is plenty long enough to step on a lot of toes. Maybe it’s a function of temperament. Some people always have to be right even when they’re not. For us, it’s a painful reckoning. We like Sheriff Brown personally and find much to admire about him. He has helped move the needle in significant ways in responding to the special challenges posed by people with serious mental illnesses caught in the criminal justice system. He initiated an innovative program to help restore the competency of those unable to assist in their own defense because of mental-health challenges. We are also struck by Brown’s powerful and abiding belief in the possibility of redemption for people who find themselves behind bars. And he has put that belief into programmatic action. However, we differ from Brown on some key concerns. Many people are more likely to find their path to redemption and recovery outside of jail, no matter how well-designed it may be. For many, time in jail inhibits that recovery and promotes recidivism. And lastly, the cost of providing such services in a jail setting is necessarily prohibitively expensive. Since we have these concerns, we make no recommendations.


etly toiled in the shadows, expanding the ways residents can vote without sacrificing the integrity of the results. During the 2020 COVID shutdown, Holland joined other state election officers in successfully pushing for an all-mail ballot. Even Republican Party apparatchiks — who for decades have been raising fears of voting abuse in Isla Vista — conceded the election results were squeaky clean. Not a small achievement. M AN JAR I SHARM A

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

COU RTESY

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State Assembly: Gregg Hart As 2nd District county supervisor, Gregg Hart has been a forceful but thoughtful advocate for criminal justice reform, for programs for people without homes, and for those suffering from mental-health and addiction issues. As board chair, Hart displayed strong leadership during the COVID crisis. He was always prepared and used his bully pulpit to push better education over more enforcement, a plan that worked well. Hart, a successful career politician and accomplished policy wonk, knows how government actually functions and will provide strong support for his district in solving our massive challenges.

Though Capps is running unopposed, it is important to explain why having Laura Capps as 2nd District supervisor is a very good thing for the county. Born and raised in Santa Barbara, Capps has immersed herself in the nitty-gritty of school-board politics and educational policy. Tireless in trumpeting alarm over the prevalence of child poverty in Santa Barbara County, she has worked to feed hungry kids and their families throughout the year. An independent thinker and a proven courageous politician, she is willing to work constructively and civilly in forwarding good governance in Santa Barbara.

5th District Supervisor: Steve Lavagnino

County Superintendent County Clerk, Recorder, of Schools: Susan Salcido Assessor and Registrar of The County Superintendent of Schools is without a doubt the Voters: Joe Holland most important elected position in Santa Barbara County that most people have never heard of. This office — now capably occupied by Susan Salcido — provides essential support for the 20 public school districts throughout the county and the 70,000

2nd District Supervisor: Laura Capps

PAU L WE LL M A N FI LE PHOTO

COU RTESY

Salud Carbajal deserves to be sent back to Congress for another term representing Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Ventura voters. Carbajal, a Democratic reach-across-the-aisle pragmatist, was first elected to Congress in 2016. He is skilled at bringing opposing groups together and will work effectively on behalf of his district and constituents, finding ways to expand health care and educational opportunities. He has been a leader in promoting environmental issues, most recently, wind energy off Santa Barbara’s coast. And on fundamental issues — such as a woman’s right to choose, now under attack — he has been and will continue to be an unwavering supporter.

students who rely on these schools for their education. Now, for the first time in more than 40 years, there’s a genuine contest for this crucial position. And the choice confronting voters could not be starker. The incumbent, Susan Salcido, is an uncommonly energetic career educator who has worked in education for 26 years — as a former teacher and junior high school principal — and an exceptionally experienced administrator, not to mention a Santa Maria native. Her opponent, Christy Lozano, has a palpable lack of relevant experience. She has worked 18 years as a physical education teacher in the county, most recently at Dos Pueblos High School, where after just three months, she took a leave of absence, having complained about a student discipline case in which she believed administrators had been too lax. She spoke at school board meetings and wrote on the electronic pages of Nextdoor. The County Superintendent of Schools is a complex and challenging job that involves overseeing a staff of 550 people and a $105 million budget. The office must certify all teachers in all 20 districts, review all 20 budgets, administer or oversee the special education programs for 812 students, run 10 preschools for children living in poverty, and administer education programs for migrants and for the children of homeless parents. Plus, it is constitutionally charged with translating state codes more complex than anything Hammurabi ever dreamed up. Now is not the time for on-the-job training for an administratively inexperienced ideologue. The stakes are too high. PAU L WELLM AN FI LE PHOTO

Congress: Salud Carbajal

For the past 20 years, Joe Holland has made the county’s elections train run on time, an amazing feat most voters have never particularly noticed. With his very able staff, Holland has qui-

Given that Steve Lavagnino is running unopposed yet again — for the third time — this endorsement might seem superfluous. But we’re endorsing Lavagnino anyway to make a larger point: The entire county has benefited from the levity, candor, and consideration he unfailingly brings to supervisorial deliberations. He has consistently represented a pragmatic brand of probusiness conservativism without getting doctrinaire, aggrieved, or personal about it. Yes, Lavagnino — along with Supervisor Das Williams — has worked to create a cannabis industry, a little too quickly and with too broad a stroke, but Lavagnino said he pushed it forward because without oil revenues in Santa Barbara, other revenue is needed to expand programs for mental health and those facing homelessness. n

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MAY 12-19, 2022

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

SCIENCE

S.B. Astronomer Bags a Black Hole

CITY

COU RTESY PHOTOS

Joseph Farah, 22, Among Elite Astronomers to Make Massive Discovery

City Council unanimously moved forward on 5/17 with eight drafted Housing Element Goals, the city’s road map to how it will meet the state allocation of 8,001 units by 2031. The city has until July to narrow down a public draft, but there are still many questions to be answered and details to be worked out. The council voted to adopt the revised goals with added language to prioritize affordable housing “by use of deed restrictions and other measures over other types of development.” Full story at independent .com.

COURTS & CRIME S.B. Police and the DA are seeking the public’s help in identifying additional victims or witnesses after arresting and charging S.B. resident Bernardo Rojas Ruiz, 43, with two counts of felony unlawful sexual penetration and one count of misdemeanor sexual battery. The offenses allegedly occurred last year on 6/6 and 10/31 in Rojas Ruiz’s unlicensed massage therapy business operated out of RT Mart party supply story on the 1400 block of San Andres Street. Rojas Ruiz is being held on $325,000 bail in County Jail. Contact Investigator Judi Hall at (805) 568-2360 with any information.

by Tyler Hayden oseph Farah moves fast. He thinks fast, he talks fast, and he even drives fast. On the weekends, the UCSB grad student and internationally recognized wunderkind of radio astronomy likes to drag race. “It distracts me,” he explained. “It keeps me sane.” Instead of burning up the track last week, however, Farah flew to Washington, D.C., to take part in the Thursday press conference that unveiled to the world the first image of a supermassive black hole lurking at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. Afterward, Farah and his fellow scientists attended a party at the Smithsonian Castle, where they were greeted by the institute’s director and basked under a wall-sized photo of their discovery. “It was wild,” he said. Farah was just 17 years old and a freshman at the University of Massachusetts when he joined the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration, an elite team of more than 300 researchers from 80 institutes around the world. Farah was the only undergraduate. The EHT linked together eight existing observatories across the globe to create a single Earth-sized telescope, and for five nights in April 2017, they collected nearly four petabytes (4,000 terabytes) of data, an amount so massive it couldn’t be compiled over the Internet and had to be transported by plane on hard disks. The team spent the following years crunching the data and in 2019 made their first major announcement—they had seen the unsee-

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able and captured the first direct image of a black hole. It lay in the middle of galaxy Messier 87, or M87, some 54.5 million lightyears away. By contrast, the massive body presented at Thursday’s news event—known as Sagittarius A*, or Sgr A*, pronounced “Sadgeay-star”—sits in our own celestial backyard, just 27,000 light-years away. Knowledge of its existence helps prove Einstein’s theory of relativity and offers valuable insights into the workings of such giants, which are thought to exist at the center of most galaxies. In both cases, what we Earthlings actually saw are not the black holes themselves, since they are the very definition of darkness, but the glowing rings of radiation that surround and fall into their open maws. Even spotting those rings, however, was exceptionally difficult, especially in the case of Sgr A*, an obscured spinning object four million times larger than our Sun that the EHT scientists described as “burbling and gurgling” and changing in appearance as often as every five minutes. Trying to capture an image of it was, as one researcher put it, “a bit like trying to take a clear picture of a puppy quickly chasing its tail.” That’s where Farah was able to shine. Using lessons learned from his work on M87, he developed a way to create visuals of Sgr A* using sophisticated algorithms and forward modeling that sifted through the mountains of EHT data and separated strong observations from weak ones. The image of the lumpy

orange donut now recognized the world over is an amalgam of the usable figures the team painstakingly extracted by testing “every possible parameter,” Farah explained. “We looked at different fields of view, different regularized weights—anything you can think of.” The novel approach, officially termed “selective dynamical imaging,” earned Farah the lead author position on a paper recently published by Astrophysical Journal Letters, one of 10 papers associated with the discovery of Sgr A*. Now stationed at Goleta’s Las Cumbres Observatory under the tutelage of Andy Howell, a UCSB professor and astronomy superstar in his own right, Farah is ebullient yet humble when discussing his breakthrough. “Honestly, I devised a pretty simple method,” he said. Howell was more forthright. “I think the fact that an undergraduate could lead one of only a handful of papers to come out of this major international collaboration of hundreds of the world’s top astronomers is astounding,” he said. “The fact that he pioneered at such a young age something no other human has — a new way to sharpen our image of black holes—is really mind-blowing.” Farah didn’t hide his emotions, however, when he first got the news from the Journal. He received a call from his mom on his way home from Ralphs and “started screaming at the top of my lungs,” he said. “My girlfriend was with me in the car. It really freaked her out.” CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. 8

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S.B.CO.FI R E /MI KE ELIASON

FIRE

BLACK HOLE SON: Joseph Farah, a UCSB graduate student and member of Goleta’s Las Cumbres Observatory, developed the imaging method used to observe Sagittarius A*, the black hole dwelling in the middle of our galaxy.

A fire broke out at Tajiguas Landfill in mounds of compost set out on a large deck up by the anaerobic digester on 5/12. To contain the fire, heavy equipment at the dump spread the piles of mulch out while firefighters from the county and the Forest Service poured water on it. The new Firehawk helicopter was also called out to drop 1,000 pounds of water on the fire at a time. The firefighters stayed on scene all night to contain the fire, which spread to around an acre and a half. One person was rescued from a structure fire on the 500 block of West Canon Perdido Street 5/13 after fire crews and emergency personnel responded to the blaze reported at the residence around 11 a.m. No additional victims were reported, and within minutes, firefighters had the blaze under control. Southern California Edison and the SoCal Gas Company responded to ensure no utilities were affected, and no nearby homes were damaged. The cause of the fire is still under investigation by the Fire Prevention Bureau, and damages were estimated at approximately $7,500 dollars, said Kevin Corbett from the S.B. City Fire Department. n


MAY 12-19, 2022

ENVIRONMENT

Not-So-Happy Anniversary

INSPIRING CREATIVITY PAU L WELLM AN

County and Oil Industry Suffer a Bad Case of Seven-Year Itch

STATIONERY + CARDS

REMEMBERING REFUGIO: This week marks the seven-year anniversary of the Refugio Oil Spill, in which 142,000 gallons of oil gushed into the Pacific Ocean from a broken pipeline operated by Plains All American Pipeline. by Nick Welsh he seventh wedding anniversary is typically celebrated with gifts of copper and wool. But the seventh anniversary of Santa Barbara’s late, great 2015 oil spill off the Refugio coast — the secondworst in county history—has been marked by two massive legal developments that demonstrate just how much green there is burbling under all that black gold. After seven years of intense legal warfare, the property owners and fishing businesses that had been damaged by the 142,000 gallons of oil that gushed into the ocean finally agreed to a settlement with Plains All American Pipeline, the owners of that corroded pipeline, for $230 million. At the same time, ExxonMobil sued the Santa Barbara County Supervisors in federal court for denying its request to truck oil from its Santa Ynez Unit, which has been landlocked and shut down since that Plains All American pipeline spill of seven years ago. ExxonMobil contended that the supervisors had abused their discretionary authority—“arbitrary,” “capricious,” “prejudicial,” and “unlawful,” ExxonMobil’s attorneys called it in legal papers—in denying its trucking request. “The Project denial was not based on any purported flaw or safety concern,” ExxonMobil attorneys argued, “but rather on the Board’s unofficial policy to oust oil commerce from Santa Barbara County.” Elsewhere in its legal papers, ExxonMobil charged the supervisors “improperly treated the consideration of the project as a referendum on offshore oil production.” While the lawsuit was totally expected—ExxonMobil had vowed to sue before the supervisors voted 3-2 to deny on March 8—what was surprising was some of the financial information alleged in the lawsuit. For example, ExxonMobil claims to have spent $100 million per year every year since the 2015 spill—just to keep its operation at Las Flores Canyon maintained at a functional level. Perhaps just as striking is that ExxonMobil has not seen fit to sue Plains All American even though the pipeline company’s criminal negligence—a

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Santa Barbara jury found it guilty of one felony and eight misdemeanor charges in connection with the spill—is most directly responsible for ExxonMobil’s massive loss of revenues. At issue legally is whether the supervisors relied upon “substantial evidence” when exercising their discretionary authority to deny the trucking permit. In this case, three of the supervisors found that trucking ExxonMobil’s oil to a refinery in Kern County—15,000 trips per year along the steep and winding two-lane tarmac of Highway 166—posed unacceptable perils to other motorists on what they described as an already hazardous highway. In reaching their conclusion, the supervisors relied on research done by interns with the Environmental Defense Center showing there had been eight oil truck accidents along the route proposed by ExxonMobil in the past 10 years. In addition, they’d heard from residents of New Cuyama, who cautioned that road rage was simmering just below the surface among too many drivers along Highway 166. ExxonMobil dismissed such testimony as both anecdotal and speculative. As such, it did not rise to the level of “substantial evidence.” The traffic engineers who prepared the environmental impact report for the project concluded that the additional truck traffic would increase the risk along Highway 166, but only slightly. The increase, they found, did not rise to the level of being “significant.” Supervisor Joan Hartmann, one of the three to vote against the trucking proposal, countered that if anyone was being “speculative,” it was ExxonMobil. The company, she stated, relied upon traffic studies that looked into the future to estimate spill probability. (The trucking would increase the risk of spill by one every 17 years.) Her conclusions—and that of her fellow supervisors—she stressed, were based on accidents that had actually happened already. “We looked at actual accident records,” she said. n

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Senior Resource Summer Fair Wednesday, June 1

Join the Alzheimer’s Association and our community partners to learn about resources, activities & opportunities available to seniors and families in Santa Barbara County. Carrillo Recreation Center 100 E. Carrillo Street Come by anytime from 9AM-12PM. Free entry for all guests. Entertainment & snacks provided.

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MAY 19, 2022

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he San Marcos High School performance of Little Shop of Horrors, originally set to finish its closing weekend on Sunday, May 8, has been postponed to Thursday, May 19, and Friday, May 20, due to an outbreak of COVID-19 among crew members, with 16 students and one staff member reportedly testing positive. Dr. Analese Alvarez, assistant principal at San Marcos High School, said the first report of infections came before a matinee performance on Sunday, May 8, when four students reported they had tested positive. At this point, Alvarez said, “unfortunately, it meant the cast and crew were exposed.” Students followed the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department’s quarantine guidelines, Alvarez said, and were able to return six days after the positive test result, as long as the student could provide a recent negative test and report improved symptoms. Students could also return 11 days after the positive test without providing a negative test result. The latest COVID-19 data provided by the Santa Barbara Unified School District reports 34 positive COVID tests among

students and 18 positive tests among staff between May 6 and May 12. The previous week, between April 29 and May 5, saw 18 positive student tests and 11 positive staff tests. At the county level, cases have dwindled dramatically since January of this year. The daily case rate among unvaccinated individuals remains higher than the rate of fully vaccinated and boosted individuals, and fully vaccinated individuals without the booster. Between Monday, May 2, and Friday, May 6, the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department reported 199 unvaccinated positive COVID-19 cases. For those fully vaccinated and boosted, there were 106 positive cases, and for those fully vaccinated without the booster, there were 74 positive cases reported. No deaths related to COVID-19 have been reported by Public Health in May. The last deaths reported were during the week of April 24, with two deaths reported. The largest spike in weekly deaths for Santa Barbara County in 2022 was in January, with 19 deaths reported during the week of January 23. —Jun Starkey

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THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 19, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

SA R A H STE PH ENS

S.B. Braces for Formula Shortage ollowing the voluntary recall of certain powdered infant formula products manufactured by Abbott Nutrition, the country has been thrown into an immense formula shortage—and Santa Barbara is not uniquely positioned. While stores in Santa Barbara such as Target and Costco have begun limiting the number of formula cans a customer SLIM PICKINGS: A small selection of powdered infant can buy, supermarkets like Alb- formula ertsons, Vons, Whole Foods, and Bristol Farms have not. However, those kii. There were two reported infant deaths supermarkets report that formula deliver- caused by this bacteria, assumed to be from ies have been much smaller than before contaminated formula from Abbott’s Sturand that what remains on the shelf is the gis plant. only stock they have. Since the recall, parents have been desSusan Liles, director of Nutrition Ser- perately searching for baby formula supvices/Women, Infants, and Children for ply online as in-store supplies dwindle. the Santa Barbara Public Health Depart- According to data analysis from Pattern, ment, said that Santa Barbara is not at a cri- online demand for baby formula was up sis level for now, but that specialty formulas 1,348 percent last week nationwide. The are in short supply. These specialty formu- analysis also determined demand is up las are recommended or even prescribed 3,114 percent compared to the average of to infants who may have allergies, feeding the rest of the year so far. The California Department of Public issues, or special nutritional needs. The nationwide shortage began in Feb- Health/Women, Infants, and Children ruary when Abbott Nutrition, the largest Division (CDPH/WIC) urges families to formula manufacturer in the country, call stores ahead of time to determine the closed its plant in Sturgis, Michigan, and availability of formula on the shelves before voluntarily recalled certain lots of its Simi- going out to try and purchase. Until then, lac, Alimentum, and EleCare powdered WIC is evaluating store shipments and will infant formula due to potential contamina- direct families in need of infant formula to tion with the bacteria Cronobacter sakaza- those retailers. —Sarah Stephens


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

2022 SEASON 103rd CONCERT SEASON

EDUCATION

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COPS ON CAMPUS: Santa Barbara Police responded to a lockdown at Santa Barbara Junior High last Thursday involving a reported parent-student confrontation on campus.

S

anta Barbara Junior High was put under lockdown on Thursday, May 12, around 2 p.m., after an altercation between two students escalated to a parent of one of the students entering the campus and approaching the other student. The Santa Barbara Police Department (SBPD) responded to the notification of the lockdown. The initial report made to SBPD stated that following an altercation between two students, on the same day, a parent of one of the students had approached and threatened the other student. The names of both students have been withheld for privacy reasons. Parents are required to check in before entering a campus, and according to the district’s chief of communications Nick Masuda, “the parent was able to approach the student, as they did not follow checkin protocols.” After police arrived and an investigation began, the police on scene determined that the “juvenile accompanying the parents was the aggressor and the parents did not make the reported threats,” according to a police report provided by SBPD. The student accompanied by his parents was also referred to the Santa Barbara County Juvenile Probation Office, which will investigate the student’s alleged offenses — including threaten-

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ing to commit a crime that would result in death or great bodily injury, making threats near or on school campus, and creating a disruption with the intent to threaten the immediate physical safety of a student — and determine whether the student will be criminally charged. The district has referred the two students to a crisis care specialist team to address their individual needs, though the boys have not begun the restorative process, which often involves an adult overseeing a face-to-face interaction with the students. Masuda said this process cannot be required or forced, and the district must be sensitive to the fact that one of the boys was the victim, not wanting to cause any further trauma. The district would not comment on whether the student alleged to be the aggressor in the incident faces any disciplinary actions from the school, such as suspension or expulsion. Likewise, the district would not comment directly on the actions of the parent in this incident, but Masuda said when a parent’s actions are inappropriate or dangerous, boundaries must be set. “In the most extreme cases, that can include involving law enforcement and banning the parent(s) from the school campus,” he said. “Restorative actions occur when trust is rebuilt over time by the parent.” —Jun Starkey

Violin Sonata No.17 in C Major, K.296 Fantasy in C Major, D.934 Much Ado About Nothing, Suite Op.11 Violin Sonata No.1 in D Minor, Op.75

Canadian James Ehnes has established himself as one of the most sought-after violinists on the international stage, a favorite of many of the world’s most respected conductors and orchestras, acclaimed as “a violinist in a class of his own” (The Times). He made his SB debut in July 2019 at the Granada with the London Symphony Orchestra, presented by the Music Academy of the West, playing his 1715 “Marsick” Stradivarius. Ehnes is joined by gifted pianist Orion Weiss who last appeared in CAMA’s Masterseries with violinist Augustin Hadelich.

Tickets at the Lobero Theatre Box Office (805) 963-0761 ⫽ lobero.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA

camasb.org

BLACK HOLE CONT’D FROM P. 8 Now 22 and working toward his PhD, Farah doesn’t have a lot of extra time to drag race. But he hopes to pick the hobby back up. “Soon,” he said. Farah was 5 years old when the racing bug bit him. Growing up in Medford, Massachusetts, with modest means, his parents were unable to buy him his first car as a teenager but said they would cosign a loan. “What I heard was, if I save up as much as I can, I can get the car I want,” he said. Farah eventually purchased a 2018 Mustang with money he earned through working as well as a cash award in physics he’d recently collected. “It was the coolest

thing I ever owned,” he said. “I started racing it, and I had a ton of fun.” That began what Farah called a “psychotic tradition” of putting subsequent prizes toward his next cars, including a Stingray and then a Z06. He’s now between cars but is keeping an eye out. He says he prefers quarter-mile tracks over eighth-mile because he likes to break the 100-miles-per-hour mark. Of his work on Sgr A*, he said he’s proud but doesn’t like to dwell on past achievements. There’s plenty more to see in the universe. “I’m excited for what’s coming next,” he said. “I’m not looking back.” n INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 19, 2022

THE INDEPENDENT

11


MAY 12-19, 2022

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Since Case had allegedly reproduced the signature of the Sheriff ’s Office official who originally approved his CCW permit—a “P. Libera,” according to the criminal complaint filed last month—he was also charged with felony identity theft. The permit expired in 2018, and P. Libera no longer works for the department. An outsized figure in local law enforcement and food and wine circles—having served on Santa Barbara Police Foundation’s board of directors for many years until last September and hosting a series of self-produced television shows about Santa Barbara viticulture and fine dining—Case has been successfully sued no fewer than 26 times since 1978 by former clients, employees, and lenders. He received his private investigator license from the state in 1979, —Tyler Hayden which remains active.

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D BUSINESS

Latino Business Awards Celebrate the Unsung

AND THE NOMINEES ARE…: Pictured clockwise from top left are a few of the nominees for the inaugural Latino Business Awards: Delgado’s Quality Painting, Chef Stevie B, Mony’s, S.B. Sweets, Dave’s Dogs, and Yona Redz.

by Ryan P. Cruz aturday will mark the inaugural Latino Business Awards, where hundreds of local businesses owners and community movers and shakers will pack The Arlington Theatre for a night of celebration and some well-deserved spotlight for the nominees in more than 50 categories. The awards show was the brainchild of former musician Andy Gálvez, who was born in Guatemala and has lived in Santa Barbara County for more than 20 years. After years of touring and releasing records with some of the most popular reggaeton and Latino artists, Gálvez started Miranda Entertainment less than a year ago, using his connections in the entertainment industry to branch out on his own. After selling out his first event — “La Noche de Risa” or “A Night of Laughs”—in November, Gálvez found that there was a whole untapped demographic on the Central Coast: middle- and upper-middle-class Latinos who wanted to spend money on a good night out at one of Santa Barbara’s premier venues. After two more successful shows, one in January at SOhO and another comedy night at the Arlington in February, Gálvez had the idea for an awards ceremony spotlighting all the local businesses he had come to know and love. As a musician, Gálvez got to experience the glitz and glamour of the Latin Grammys and said he wanted to “pass it on” to those who don’t often get a chance to get dressed to the nines and be celebrated. “I wanted them to know what that feels like,” he said, adding that business owners are usually so entrenched in the day-to-day operations that they deserve a night dedicated to them. “When you own a business, you don’t work eight hours; you work 24 hours.” Gálvez enlisted the help of his 12-person team at Miranda Entertainment, with each member playing their role to help organize every aspect of a large-scale show. Rosie Nguyen handles things on the logistic end, from lining up the venue to working with the city in order to shut down a block of State

S

@MI R A N DA _ENTERTA I N MENT

Inaugural Ceremony to Honor Nominees in More than 50 Categories

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Street for the VIP limo service. She said that it was tough going at first, with Santa Barbara wary of new groups trying to organize events. Once people saw what they were trying to do, she said, it became a “snowball effect” of support. The first edition of the awards will have a total of 51 categories, ranging from “Best Latino-Owned Restaurant” to “Best Nonprofit” to “Community Leader of the Year,” which includes local leaders like councilmembers Oscar Gutierrez and Alejandra Gutierrez, Representative Salud Carbajal, and State Senator Monique Limón. The show will be hosted by Latino celebrities Don Cheto and Maribel Guardia, with special appearances by local activist Michael Montenegro and Youth Makers Market organizers Bella and Aaliyah Rubio. Two scholarships will also be awarded to local high school and college students during the ceremony. The team said it was tough to narrow down the categories, and it illuminated just how deep the Latino roots are in our business community. Street team promoters Jonathan Godinez and Gilbert Sanchez (aka @rrichprince_mc) said that once the voting went live and businesses began sharing via social media, it became a real “community effort,” with owners even starting friendly rivalries in each category. After less than five weeks of voting, some categories have become especially heated. “Best Takeout” received more than 28,000 votes, and “Best Tacos” has received more than 15,000. “We had to hide the vote numbers a week ahead so the winners will still be a surprise,” Gálvez said. Gálvez hopes that the awards will be a success and that each year it will become the premier gathering for the Latino business community on the Central Coast. “I want people to be inspired to start their own businesses so they can be involved,” he said. The event starts at 6 p.m. on Saturday, May 21, at The Arlington Theatre (1317 State St.). Tickets are available at axs.com, and the event will be streaming live on Telemundo.

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RECYCLE YOUR USED OIL and FILTERS! Remember, it’s illegal to dump motor oil in the trash or down the drain. Make sure to recycle oil and filters at a center near you.

FREE Collection Centers in Goleta Auto Zone at 5799 Hollister Ave., (805) 770-4019 Fast Lane Oil Change at 180 N. Fairview Ave., (805) 683-9640 Jiffy Lube at 6015 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-4100 MarBorg Industries at 20 David Love Place, (805) 964-1498 O’Reilly Auto Parts at 5754 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-1318 Toyota of Santa Barbara at 5611 Hollister Ave., (805) 967-5611 UCSB Campus at Mesa Road, Building 565, (805) 882-3602 Please call ahead for hours of operation. Find additional collection centers and other helpful recycling information at:

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THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 19, 2022

INDEPENDENT.COM

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D POLITICS

School Supe Race Gets Contentious COU RTESY PHOTOS

Changing your own motor oil is low-cost, easy, and can be done right at home.

Susan Salcido

T

he race for Santa Barbara County Superintendent of Schools has quickly become one of the most contentious of the local election cycle, as physical education teacher Christy Lozano takes on incumbent Susan Salcido, and national fears regarding students learning about race and gender become major platforms for voters leaning toward the right. The race has been one of the most dramatic, beginning when Lozano took to Fox News to condemn the Santa Barbara Unified School District for providing resources for teachers on how to discuss topics such as race, sexuality, gender, and autism. Another incident adding fuel to the fire occurred after the League of Women Voters organized and publicized a candidates’ forum that was meant to take place on Thursday, May 12. The event ended up being canceled on Wednesday, May 11, after the league stated Lozano had refused to sign the league’s standard release form. Lozano disagreed with rules such as not addressing a candidate’s character, qualifications, or activities. After the cancelation, the Coalition for Neighborhood Schools (CNS) attempted to hold another forum at the same time. CNS

Christy Lozano reached out to Salcido’s campaign about six hours before their forum was scheduled to take place, but Salcido declined, citing prior engagements and too-short notice. After Salcido declined to attend, CNS made numerous phone calls, voicemails, and emails to Salcido’s campaign manager, Ruth Loomer, who said that “the organizers threatened in writing to tell the media Susan ‘refused to participate.’ ” Loomer then stated that Salcido would not be participating in any forum held by CNS, claiming the group used “unprofessional and inappropriate” calls, including one voicemail Loomer received from Roseanne Crawford, a member of the steering committee for CNS. In the voicemail acquired by the Independent, Crawford is heard saying that she would not vote for a candidate that won’t participate in a nonpartisan forum. “I will turn people against [Salcido], and I have a lot of influential circles in this town,” Crawford says. “So, please, pull up the panties and get with the program.” When questioned about this voicemail, Crawford told the Independent she “was trying to motivate [Salcido] to realize [the forum] was time-sensitive.” —Jun Starkey

POLITICS

HBJ’s Bill Ruled Unconstitutional

I

n 2018, former state senator HannahBeth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) coauthored SB 286, which required gender diversity on corporate boards and, at least on paper, would have penalized companies for non-compliance. At the time of its passage, then-governor Jerry Brown worried that it might be overturned by a court. His fears were realized when last Friday, Los Angeles Judge Maureen Duffy-Lewis ruled that it was unconstitutional. Conservative legal group Judicial Watch had challenged the law, arguing that it violated the California Constitution’s equal-protection clause by enforcing a quota with taxpayer funds. The state contended that the law did not create an alleged quota, as it allowed for boards to make additional seats for women without removing any incumbent men. According to the law, boards with five directors would need to have two women by January 2022; boards with six or more would need three. Supporters of the law said that it was made to reverse a culture of discrimination that favored men. “More women on corporate boards means better decisions

and businesses that outperform the competition,” announced Senate President pro Tempore Toni Atkins (D-San Diego) in a statement following the court ruling. “[SB 826] exemplifies equal access and opportunity and opportunity is the very bedrock of our democracy.” Jackson said that the law has “helped shareholders, retirees, and the state’s economy.” According to the California Partners Project, a six-year global research study by Credit Suisse showed that companies with women directors on their boards outperformed shares of comparable businesses with all-male boards by 26 percent. Although no fines were ever enforced on errant companies, the share of women on the boards of California-based companies doubled from 15 percent to 30 percent in the three years after the bill’s passage. Jackson anticipates the fight to continue. “The legislation and the law meet the requirements of constitutionality, and the court’s ruling was in error,” she said. “I look forward to the appeal process and reinstatement of SB 826.” —Nicholas Liu


NEWS of the WEEK

MAY 12-19, 2022

CONT’D

ENVIRONMENT

MONTEC ITO ASSO C IATION H ISTORY COMMITTEE

COU RTESY

More 1/9 Debris Flows Looming? Montecito Has Been Hit by Four Larger Debris-Charged Events During Past 200 Years, Researchers Say

PENULTIMATE EVENT: Above left, the 1914 debris flows wiped out Old Spanish Town, a small community on the banks of Montecito Creek. Above right, 2018’s 1/9 Debris Flow sent this house crashing into a tree in the area that used to be Old Spanish Town. by Melinda Burns he bulldozers are back at Randall and East Valley roads this month, working on the final phase of Montecito’s newest debris basin — a giant bowl designed to trap boulders and fallen trees and help protect the downstream homeowners on San Ysidro Creek from catastrophic debris flows. When it is finished in late August, the $10 million Randall Road basin will be the fifth on Montecito’s deadly creeks. The older basins on Cold Springs, San Ysidro, and Romero creeks were quickly overwhelmed after the pre-dawn deluge of January 9, 2018, and could not prevent the worst impacts of the raging rivers of mud, boulders, and fallen trees that engulfed whole neighborhoods: 23 fatalities, 500 structures damaged or destroyed, 1,000 rescues in the first 24 hours, closure of Highway 101 for 13 days, and $1 billion in economic losses. Montecito will be somewhat better protected next time. To help get ready, the county has spent $800,000 expanding the Cold Springs basin by 50 percent. Next year, work will begin on a sixth debris basin on Buena Vista Creek, for $3 million. Even against the backdrop of these and other public works, though, much of Montecito remains exposed to dangerous debris-charged flows and floods. According to a $600,000, 168-page study of the historical record titled “Fire, Flood and Landslide Dam History: Community of Montecito and Vicinity,” released this spring by the Project for Resilient Communities (PRC), these events are far from rare. “This was such a rough experience that trying to learn more about it is sometimes the only way you’re going to get better,” Pat McElroy, the PRC’s executive director and a former City of Santa Barbara fire chief, said of the 1/9 catastrophe. The study shows that Montecito and Carpinteria have been hit with four other debris-charged events during the past 200 years that were larger than the 1/9 Debris Flow—the debris flows of 1825, 1861-62, and 1914, and the debris-laden floods of 1995. That’s an average “return interval” of 48 years between massive debris-charged events here. In all, the study shows, the South Coast from Gaviota to Carpinteria has experienced 36 debris flows and debrisladen floods since 1825. Twenty-two of them engulfed large portions of Montecito and Carpinteria—and that tally is likely on the low side because the 19th-century record is sparse, researchers say. “This was astonishing news to me,” said Larry Gurrola, the lead scientist on the PRC’s study and a consulting geologist with 27 years of experience in the tri-counties. “The news reports didn’t call them debris flows, but they referred

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to them as tidal waves of boulders, trees, and water coming down the creeks and banks as a huge wave, destroying everything.” Two-thirds of the time, Gurrola found, these debrischarged events occurred in post-wildfire conditions—the critical five-year period after a fire has devastated the mountainside and heavy rains are most likely to trigger an avalanche of mud. On 1/9, the massive Thomas Fire was still smoldering as the boulders and burned vegetation surged downhill. “The recent past is key to understanding the near future,” Gurrola said. Gurrola scoured newspaper archives; property records; geological survey, topographic, and aerial maps; and county, state, and federal flood reports to determine the size and frequency of debris flows and debris-laden floods in Montecito, and he mapped the paths they took on Montecito Creek and its tributaries, Cold Springs, and Hot Springs creeks. Gurrola’s creek maps are reproduced in color in the study, along with dozens of historical photos in color and in black and white—a remarkable record of a community battered time and time again in many of the same places. The PRC, a nonprofit group, now hopes to raise $2 million to map the debris flow paths for the rest of Montecito’s creeks. The goal is to help the county draw up a master plan for protecting the community, McElroy said. “We’re trying to illuminate the problem and keep it in the public mind,” he said. “I think it makes some people nervous, but there’s no pretending it won’t happen again soon.” The PRC is best known for installing two steel “ring” nets each across Cold Springs, San Ysidro, and Buena Vista creeks to catch debris above the existing basins—a $5 million project that was funded with private donations and completed in 2019.

THE 1914 CATASTROPHE

After 1/9, UCSB geologists identified what they said was the previous debris flow of that magnitude in Montecito, an event at least 1,000 years old. But Gurrola contends that the 1914 debris flow was the “penultimate” event. In both 1914 and 2018, boulders and trees came surging out of the canyons during extreme rains, riding walls of mud 20-30 feet high, permanently altering the topography of Montecito. Ed Keller, a chief author of the UCSB studies and Gurrola’s former PhD geology advisor, declined to comment. Gurrola’s work was reviewed by his mentor and co-author, J. David Rogers, a geological engineer at the Missouri University of Science and Technology and an expert in landslide hazards and levee failures.

There are no easy answers for how or even whether to try to “build out of ” the fire-flood cycle in Montecito, even as it becomes more dire with climate change. In the wake of the damaging debris flows that followed the Coyote and Romero fires of 1964 and 1971, respectively, the county Flood Control director concluded that land near the mouths of creeks and along creek banks in Montecito “should probably not be built on at all.”

‘WAKE-UP CALL’?

To date, records show, the county has approved 111 building permits for Montecito properties that were badly damaged on 1/9, including homes, guest houses, and garages. Many of the new structures must be elevated to comply with post-1/9 federal flood maps; some property owners are stockpiling dirt and rock from the Randall Road debris basin excavation for that purpose. Any plans to construct a series of additional basins high in the canyons above Montecito would likely be controversial, as are the ring nets themselves. Their emergency permits are set to expire at the end of the next year, and Gurrola is recommending that they be renewed. But Kevin Cooper, a consulting fire ecologist with Montecito Fire, contends that the ring nets, which were installed upstream from the debris basins, “haven’t been proven in their ability to help Montecito.” In the event of a debris flow, a helicopter would have to drop in a bulldozer so that the rocks and trees trapped in the nets could be redistributed immediately downstream. This is a difficult and expensive proposition, Cooper said, whereas dump trucks can reach the county basins by road and haul away the piled-up debris. The PRC’s study provides “a good wake-up call” by revealing the frequency of debris flows in Montecito, Cooper said. As a next step, he said, the community should consider creating more public space along its creeks “to break out of the destruction-construction cycle.” “I think people rely too much on the idea that some kind of miraculous engineering is going to save everything,” Cooper said. “One of the most difficult decisions communities must make as climate change worsens flooding is moving part or all of the town away from dangerous areas. “Is someone brave enough to start this conversation here?”

For more information about the Project for Resilient Communities, see tprcsb.org.

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MAY 19, 2022

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Feeding the Hand That Bites You

PASS THE IPECAC: Rats, I have just learned, are gastrointestinally hardwired not to throw up.

Higher primates—of which we are one—managed to evolve to our advanced state of sorrydom only because of a finely tuned hair-trigger collective vomit reflex. If one of us blows, we all blow. If a member of the pack hurls, the presumption is they must have eaten something bad; as a precautionary measure, the rest go violently Vesuvian as well. I mention this because of the intense alimentary shudders I experienced while walking past the new three-story luxury apartment complex sprouting up at 800 Santa Barbara Street. If you thought Swedish architecture was all the rage back in the 1960s, you’ll love this. Very spacious and angular. I suddenly wanted to listen to atonal music composed by some guy with too many umlauts in his name. The red tile, the white stucco, and the granite countertops

were all there. So too were the chopping-board islands in the middle of the kitchen where no one will cook. The gutters, of course, are delectably hand-wrought from the finest artisanal Chilean copper. But nowhere inside the gated complex will there be any additional storage. This development is part of City Hall’s grand and sprawling—if failed—experiment designed to entice developers to build rental housing by allowing them high housing densities previously unheard of in Santa Barbara and major breaks when it comes to parking requirements. In this case, the developer—said to be

a nice guy from Sherman Oaks who has been dating Wheel of Fortune star Vanna White for the past 10 years—was allowed to cram 23 units into less than half an acre of dirt at the corner of Santa Barbara and De la Guerra streets. The developers have taken upon themselves to rechristen this area of town “The Laguna Neighborhood.” If that weren’t obnoxious enough, in their online brochures, they say “Welcome Home.” A lot. Here’s the problem: Based on what Vanna White’s boyfriend is charging for rent, it will never be my home. Neither it will it be most of the people reading this. Studio apartments go for $4,500 to $5,000 a month. (Sizes hover between 528 and 705 square feet.) One-bedrooms start at $5,900 and end up at $7,200. All I can say is please pass the ipecac. So total is the delusion here that anyone who speaks ill of such “progress” is shunned as a NIMBY and an elitist. (Where is Mickey Flacks when you need her?) This housing experiment—known as the Average Unit-Size Density program, or AUD for short—was launched with the accompanying slogan “Affordable by Design.” This became the mantra of choice for all right-thinking architects, planners, and land-use agents attempting to look like they cared about the housing crisis. (Many, to be fair, genuinely did.) The idea was that if you built lots of small little rental units instead of a few Mondo Grande Condos for

the rich and fabulous, society would be better served and young working people might get something called “workforce housing.” Like all theories, this one works well only on paper. To afford the $5,000 a month needed to move into these darling studio apartments, one needs to make about $180,000 a year. That’s far more bacon than most working Santa Barbarans bring home. This residential densification program has not functioned as catnip for the housing market so much as methamphetamine. With added density potentials, land values soared. As land values soared, the rents went with them, thus redefining what landlords could rightfully consider the prevailing market conditions. To “rectify” matters, City Hall adopted an ordinance requiring that a tiny fraction of new units built as a result of this experiment be made “affordable” to upper-middle-income wage earners. As a slice of the pie, this qualifies as crumbs. As City Hall endures the mandatory agonies of updating its Housing Element, I’d suggest they get real specific in a red-hot hurry about tapping new income streams that can be leveraged to sell the bonds necessary to build 100 percent genuine affordable housing. I’d suggest they look seriously at the vacancy tax charged by cities like Vancouver with good effect on properties—residential and commercial—allowed to lie empty for too long. Likewise, I’d suggest they explore what’s known as an elevated transfer tax on higher-end real estate transactions, as

the City of Los Angeles and Santa Monica are now contemplating. This is a special tax levied on the sale of properties that have experienced a stratospheric jump in real estate value. The bigger the jump, the higher the increase. While we’re on the subject of my preferred brand of pie-in-the-sky, I’d strongly suggest people working on the second floor of City Hall get right and tight with their comrades toiling on the fourth floor of the County Administration Building and seize the housing options that will become miraculously available when county administrators execute their grand plan to withdraw—en masse—from their current downtown digs and retreat to the isolated economic efficiency of their Calle Real campuses. Those plans, by the way, are now quietly festering on some strategically sequestered drawing boards. And maybe the council could give serious thought to declaring a permanent housing emergency. This would give the city attorney’s office the authority needed to prosecute rent gougers. Gouging is a legal no-no during times of declared emergencies. No, this is not rent control. It may be much better. Certainly, it’s more surgical and could go a long way to keeping the greed heads, flippers, fractional ownership flimflammers, and institutional investors in check while sparing all the mom-and-pops out there who demonstrated more than a modicum of restraint. Hey, it’s an idea. Paying $5,000 a month for a —Nick Welsh studio apartment? Gag me.

SHERIFF BILL BROWN. EVERYBODY’S SHERIFF. UNCERTAIN TIMES DEMAND A CERTAIN SHERIFF.

ALL SB POLICE CHIEFS

JOYCE DUDLEY SB DISTRICT ATTORNEY

STEVE LAVAGNINO

HELENE SCHNEIDER

5TH DISTRICT SUPERVISOR

FORMER SB MAYOR

ALICE PATINO

ROGER ACEVES

SANTA MARIA MAYOR

FORMER GOLETA MAYOR

CALIFORNIA PEACE OFFICERS ASSOCIATION

BILL CIRONE

SUPERINTENDENT SB SCHOOLS - RET.

CALIFORNIA POLICE CHIEFS ASSOCIATION Vote on or before June 7 to Re-Elect Sheriff Bill Brown.

See Sheriff Brown’s list of over 1,000 endorsements at www.BillBrownforSheriff.com Paid for by the Committee to Re-Elect Sheriff Bill Brown 2022.

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MAY 19, 2022

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Santa Barbara Independent Ad


obituaries TK

OPINIONS CONT’D

Reelect Sheriff Bill Brown

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plan to vote to reelect Sheriff Bill Brown on June 7. Sheriff Brown has the experience, leadership, professionalism, and integrity that we need during these uncertain times. He has served Santa Barbara County with distinction. Due to Sheriff Brown’s expertise and diligence, he was able to obtain an $80 million grant to get the new North County Jail built, which also brought jobs to our county. Whenever there is an emergency in our county, you can find Sheriff Brown there, providing the leadership and experience necessary to address that crisis — he knows what to do. Sheriff Brown is well-respected by his peers both at the state and national level, having been elected president of the California Sheriff’s Association and vice president of the National Major Counties Sheriff’s Association. If reelected, he will become president of that organization in two years; as president, he will be working with Congress and the Senate. Sheriff Brown has been endorsed by more than 1,000 people throughout the county and state. Please join me and vote to reelect Sheriff Bill Brown on June 7.

—Alice Milligan, Retired Assoc. Superintendent, Lompoc Unified School District

Extortion?

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s Santa Barbara Airport so desperate for money that they need to practice extortion on their clients? I went to pick up my granddaughter, who was arriving on a 9 p.m. flight. I was there early and was told I could not wait. Moved on and waited off the airport grounds. Once she texted that they had landed, I returned to the airport and was told again that I could not wait for her. Moved on, and returned when I could see a stream of passengers coming out of the building. She always flies with carry-ons only so is quick to get off. I could see her coming when the man “guarding the curbside” harassed me again. I said that I could see her. Instead, he wrote a ticket, which he finished processing after she was in my car! In fact, he handed the ticket to her, an expensive one. Just days before, I had flown from Paris to LAX, two enormous airports, both of which do have challenges with traffic control, and both of which move thousands of cars in and out efficiently. At LAX, I had to wait more than an hour for the Airbus so was able to observe all the comings and goings of folks trying to pick up their friends and family. Lots of chaos at times, and there were people controlling things, but

DAVE GRANLUND

Letters

at no time was someone given a ticket. The night I received the ticket, there were few cars at the airport. It was the furthest thing from traffic congestion that you can imagine. Is the city so desperate for money that they are willing to harass tax-paying citizens? I am outraged!

—Laurie Guitteau, S.B.

Treasured Wit

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am an old guy who doesn’t want to die before telling Nick Welsh how much I have treasured his wit, brilliant prose, and just plain knowledge and wisdom. He knows politics, is wise politically, and has street smarts. Thanks, Nick, for being there for us to rely on, and writing about it.

—Tom Schrock, S.B.

Conception

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ome faiths admit they don’t know if life begins at conception or not. There are faiths that believe that life begins at conception and others that believe it begins at birth. Science hasn’t proved yet that it begins at conception. Are the Supreme Court justices engraving their religious or unscientific assumptions into our laws? Separation of church and state is in our Constitu—Jerry Reed, S.B. tion. Who is bullying who?

For the Record ¶ We note that Barbara Andersen, whom we reported as a recent hire by the City of Santa Barbara last week, has the official title of Senior Assistant to the City Administrator. ¶ If you missed the lunar eclipse on May 15, another opportunity will be November 8, 2022, not August 2036 as erroneously stated in last week’s Calendar section. ¶ We correct the dates for the Marcus Roberts Trio, who will play Gershwin with the S.B. Symphony at The Granada Theatre on May 21 and 22. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

Jessie Marie Briggs 10/15/1974 - 5/2/2022

With deep regret we must let the world know that we have lost our beautiful Jessie. She passed away on May 2, 2022, in Santa Barbara where she was born and raised. We now must find a way to move forward and honor her effervescent soul. Jessie was born in Santa Barbara on October 15, 1974, at Cottage Hospital. Raised by her parents, Donald Briggs and Catherine Sargent, she lived in a loving and energetic home with her siblings Matthew, Sarah and Jeffrey. Her youth was spent as center of her social circle; a kind, strong beacon of support and kindness to those around her. Attending Cold Spring Elementary, Santa Barbara Junior High and Santa Barbara High School; Jessie was an amazing athlete. She was a middle blocker on the Dons Varsity Girls Volleyball Team and excellent at tennis, golf, skiing or just roller skating around town. During high school, Jessie was what could be described as adventurous. She drove a lifted Toyota 4×4. Her car was the car of choice for she and her friends to take cruising at lunch. Jessie had a horse (Kleeco) which she stabled at home on Mountain Drive. Kleeco was formerly a polo pony and was a handful for Jessie to trail ride on Mountain Drive. Then there was the sign caper. Late one night on her way back from Magic Mountain Jessie and friends stopped in Santa Paula and allegedly heisted the Briggs Road sign. That sign still marks the entrance to her father’s driveway. After high school, Jessie attended Point Loma College on a volleyball scholarship. Jessie left Point Loma after just one year to pursue a modeling career. At age 19 Jessie was exactly 6 feet tall. Her career took off. Locally she modeled for the Jody DeMarcos Agency. In Los Angeles she modeled for both Elite and LA Models Agency. She made frequent appearances on the television show Melrose Place. She appeared on the Oprah Show modeling a line of clothes designed by Cindy Crawford. Her modeling career also took her to London and Milan INDEPENDENT.COM

where she worked for the Black and White Agency. Jessie’s success as a model stemmed from her natural grace and athletic ability. And to her credit, she never developed an overly infected ego based on her modeling successes. Growing up Jessie was active in the Montecito Covenant Church, worshiping with the church and actively participating in community activities and mission trips to Mexico. Jessie was fiercely protective of her friends and family, using her natural charm to protect and nurture them. Equally comfortable visiting her grandparents at the Ojai Valley Inn, swimming at the Coral Casino or hanging with friends at a football game followed by a bonfire at Top of the World or Hammonds at night; Jessie made all of those around her at ease with her beautiful smile and characteristic diastema. Jessie and her husband, Nick, met in San Francisco in 2004. Shortly after meeting Jessie moved from Malibu to San Francisco and she and Nick were together for the next 18 years. Theirs was a storybook love affair. They traveled extensively, including a 7-week adventure to Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil. They married in 2010 and lived in numerous exotic places including Maui, Kauai, Malibu, Puerto Rico, and Florida. Jessie worked alongside Nick in his investment business. Nick describes Jessie as a person who overflowed with kindness and warmth. Graceful, smart, and strongly committed to Jesus and her faith. Jessie and Nick frequently engaged in prayer together. Jessie is survived by her Grandfather Richard Sargent, her parents Donald Briggs and Catherine Sargent, her husband Nick Nagy, brothers Matthew and Jeffrey Briggs, sister Sarah Briggs, her stepmother Elizabeth, stepbrother Lee Shiffman, stepsister Amy Hendel, her aunt Marie Sargent and niece and nephews Jackson, Nolan, August, Bodie and Ryan Briggs. Jessie will be remembered on June 5, 2022. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you make a donation in Jessie’s name to Ocean Hills Covenant Church oceanhills.org

MAY 19, 2022

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obituaries Valerie Powers Allen 8/27/1934 - 3/31/2022

Valerie Powers Allen of Santa Barbara passed away peacefully on March 31, 2022 after a courageous battle with Vascular dementia. Valerie was born August 27, 1934 in Pasadena California to Frank and Frances Powers. Valerie and her family moved to Santa Barbara in 1941 where she attended local schools, and was even crowned Miss Santa Barbara during High school years Valerie graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1952. She married the love of her life Robert S Allen (D.1976) In 1954. Robert and Valerie married in Solvang (Ballard) California after his return from his service in the U.S. Marie corp. Valerie worked at Robinsons for several years, she also worked for her brother- in-law Dr. Arthur Kaslow. Soon after, she volunteered at the dyslexia awareness research center of Santa Barbara. This is just one of many areas she dedicated herself to. Valerie enjoyed traveling especially when those visits involved her grandchildren, she has been to Australia, Colorado and Idaho among other places. She also enjoyed following her favorite sports teams (LA Lakers, Golden State Warriors and the LA Dodgers) and attended games on occasion. Valerie’s laugh was contagious, as she did a lot of it. One of her fondest memories of growing up in Santa Barbara, was riding her horses with her sister Sally and sister- in-law Kathryn along Hendry’s beach. Our mother taught us all unconditional love (caring) her whole life and set a great example for us all to follow. She was a devoted humanitarian. Valerie is proceeded in death by her loving sister Sally Powers Kaslow (D.2021) Valerie is lovingly remembered by her sister in-law Kathryn E Atsatt (Barry Atsatt D. 2019) Her four children, Jennifer (Allen) Hamil18

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ton, husband Thomas Hamilton (D. 2020) her 2 grandsons Matthew and Evan Hamilton. Jeffrey R. Allen, wife Susan (D. 2017) 1 granddaughter Jessica Botha. Sally (Allen) Delgado, husband Steve, 3 grandchildren Christopher Delgado, Lauryn Keithley, Jordin Cramer. Elizabeth (Allen) Schmeekle, husband Theo Schmeekle , 1 grandchild Taylor M Casteel. 10 great grandchildren as well as several nieces and nephews whom she adored and loved a great deal. Valerie loved her family and friends beyond measure. She was passionate about reading, animals and family gatherings. We will always remember her beautiful smile her kind, loving heart and her warm embrace. She will remain in our hearts forever. A Special thank you to the amazing teams at Pacifica Memory Care of Santa Barbara, Assisted Home Health and Hospice of Santa Barbara. In Lieu of flowers, we ask that you donate to either of the facilities named above.

Ernest (Ernie) Gould, Jr. 1939 - 2022

As friends and family, we are saddened by the loss of our beloved Ernie Gould. His motto for life was “simplicity with quality,” and he lived his life true to his beliefs. He had a child-like enthusiasm and wonderful, fun-loving nature that warmed the hearts of all who were fortunate enough to know him. He was intelligent, articulate and inventive. Ernie loved hiking and biking in nature, rollerblading by the beach, eating delicious and healthy food, seeking self improvement and keeping physically fit. These were some of his goals and his personal achievements. Ernie wanted no fanfare, just recognition of a life well lived, so we lovingly say goodbye to our charismatic friend who gave us all the gift of his wisdom, love and friendship. Ernie, our lives are richer because of your beautiful heart and spirit. Your warm, sparkling blue eyes will stay in our hearts forever.

MAY 19, 2022

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Grahm Williams

7/2/1980 - 4/29/2022

stepdad Joe Miller, Grandmother June Williams, father Steven Williams, step brother Alex, and numerous Aunts, Uncles, and cousins. A celebration of his life will be held at Lake Cachuma on May 22, 2022 from 2-4. All are welcome.

Amelia Contreras Bean 1942 - 2021

Nancy R. (MacLean) McKenzie 7/8/1931 - 12/15/2021 With profound sorrow, the family of Grahm Williams announce his passing. On 4/29/22 he died in his sleep from a previously unknown heart condition. Grahm was 41 and resided in Santa Ynez. Born on July 2, 1980 in Denver, Colorado Grahm shared his birthday with his Grandpa Morris and cousin Iain Morris. He grew up skiing on the slopes of his hometown Leadville, Colorado. The family relocated to Fallon, Nevada where he graduated from Churchill County High School in 1999. He continued his education at Brooks University in Santa Barbara, California where he met the love of his life, Krista with whom he had one son, Jasper. August would have been their 21st anniversary. After graduation, he went to work for Santa Barbara County Parks Department as a ranger. He found a second home at Cachuma Lake where he spent his days surrounded by nature. He had just completed his 19th year with the department. He loved nature and hiking and spent his free time at the beach or wandering in the country with his dog Satchmo. He was an artist, a photographer, an avid reader, loved to travel, tell stories, and cook. He could spend an entire day preparing one meal. Grahm also loved disc golf and cherished his time walking the course. He belonged to the Masons and for a time wrote the newsletter for Northern California. His sense of humor and genuine ways endeared him to everyone. Loved by his family, friends, coworkers, and anyone he stopped to engage. He could make a friend anywhere. He was a master of noticing the subtle qualities of light. His presence will always be felt in those moments throughout the day where the details are illuminated. He is survived by his wife Krista Williams, son Jasper Williams, mother Kathleen Williams-Miller,

In loving memory of our beloved Amelia Contreras Bean, who departed to Heaven on May 19, 2021. Nothing but sorrow, as we miss her so very much. No one sprinkled happiness, compassion and memorable memories in our life more than You. We miss your A Celebration of Life Service and Reception will be held at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 4585 Auhay Dr. at 1pm Sat., May 21st. Nancy McKenzie passed away in December, 2021 at age 90. Born in Flint, MI, and raised in Pontiac, MI the youngest child and only daughter of Elmer and Sadie MacLean, Nancy grew up with 4 older brothers: Bob, Doug, Fraser and Bruce. After graduating from high school, she went on to graduate from Michigan State Normal College with her degree in Occupational Therapy. She enlisted in the US Air Force and was stationed at Lackland AFB followed by Okinawa, Japan as the only USAF O. T. in Japan. She met her husband George McKenzie, an Army helicopter pilot and resigned her commission to become his wife. As an Army wife, they moved to Ft. Sill, OK, Munich, Germany, Ft. Ord, CA, lived in Las Vegas, NV, Schofield Barracks, Oahu, Ft. Wolters, TX, Santa Barbara, CA, Bangkok, Thailand and when George died in a helicopter crash, finally settled in Santa Barbara near her parents and one brother, Bruce MacLean and his family. She was a long time member of St. Andrew’s as well as Gold Star Wives/ Families, American Legion, SB Genealogical Society, and a strong supporter of Wreaths Across America and Women in US Military. She leaves behind 5 children, 2 step-daughters, 7 grandchildren, and 7 great-grandchildren as well as many nieces, nephews and extended family. Please join us on Sat., May 21st, 2022.

sweet voice and the meaningful stories you used to tell. You are remembered every moment in our lives. time flies, and not a moment or single day passes without you in our hearts. Amelia, you are truly loved and missed by your Son, daughters and many grandchildren, and dear friends. Rest In Peace, until we meet again.

Jerry J. Woolf

10/21/1948 - 4/21/2022

Jerry passed away unexpectedly. Admired by all and a mentor to many, Jerry was a talented cosmetic dentist. His passion for all things aviation allowed his family to experience extraordinary adventures. Dentist, Pilot, Teacher and Boss – above all else, Jerry loved his daughters, Claire and Grace. In addition to his daughters, Jerry leaves behind their mother, Ginger, his wife Karyn and grandchildren Charlotte and Patton. There will be a celebration of Jerry’s life at the Santa Barbara Rose Garden on May 25th at 4:30pm6:30pm. Please come and share your memories of Jerry with his daughters. RSVP to gingerwoolf@ gmail.com


obituaries Lolita “Lee” Chase 1/13/1928 - 8/17/2021

At 7:11PM, on the evening of August 17th, 2021, Lolita “Lee” Chase took a sunset flight over her beloved rose-filled home in the Carpinteria foothills. Destination, Heaven. Arrival time, immediate. Born on January 13,1928 in Long Beach, CA, Lee was the youngest daughter of Lida Mary Holden and Frank Wilson. Shortly after her arrival, Lee’s father left the family fold, making her mother a single parent on the eve of the Great Depression. Lee’s fondest memories during this challenging time were visits with her grandfather in Grass Valley, sharing Grandmother Wilson’s perfect sugar cookies with Aunt Bea and Aunt Guida and walking hand in hand with her sister Patsy to Sunday school. She was awarded a Bible for perfect attendance because as she often stated, “I had a heavenly father who never left me.” To support her family, Lee’s resilient mother took a job at Douglas Aircraft. She did the electrical wiring on the C-47 transport plane (aka The Skytrain/ Dakota/”Gooney Bird”) which General Dwight D. Eisenhower described as “the most vital piece of machinery used in winning WWII.” Having a real-life “Rosie the Riveter” as a role model AND mother, inspired Lee to begin her first job at 14, working for a local milliner because she said “Women had to give up their nylons during the war but not their stylish hats.” This experience sparked a lifelong passion for fashion, one of Lee’s many creative pursuits. Upon her graduation in 1946 from Excelsior Union high school, Lee attended modeling school, a gift from her mother, the more affordable option to Pepperdine University, where Lee had been accepted. Shortly afterwards, Lee’s extraordinary beauty and charm was discovered by scouts for Rose

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Marie Reid, Canada’s premier swimsuit designer, who’s swim wear was carried at all the major department stores and who’d just moved her base of operations to downtown Los Angeles’ fashion district. After joining the company, Lee was soon traveling throughout the United States, representing the glamorous line as a runway and print model. Her most exciting experience was standing in for her boss to emcee a fashion show at the Savoy-Plaza in NYC, at age 18! She also worked in the showroom, learning about sales orders and fabrics from the reps. In the atelier, she worked for the designer as a “fit model” while observing the creation of original designs and new technology developed for swim wear that enhanced each woman’s unique shape and led to patents that made her female “boss lady” in 1952, one of the richest fashion designers in the United States (Pre-“Spanx”). In 1948, Lee married her first husband followed by the birth of her first daughter, Cynthia Reed. In 1952, Lee returned to work at the same company, now as a single mom. She worked as a stylist and trained the sales reps, some of whom were making over $100,000 per year. Assessing the situation at hand, Lee chose to take her valuable knowledge of sales and fashion elsewhere, going into business for herself. She secured a loan from an uncle and partnering with a childhood friend, opened the first of two successful clothing stores in Belmont Shores and Newport Beach, CA. Lee’s natural creative vision and business savvy took off as she hand selected designers whose clothes she carried in her stores. One of whom flew out to California to “meet the lady who was outselling Saks Fifth Avenue” (also carrying his line). Lee procured antiques for her window displays which sparked another passion, interior design and antiquing. At this time she learned to ski by joining the LA ski club, learning in Mammoth, with trips to St. Moritz and Cortina, Italy where she sourced sweaters for her two shops. She then met the love of her life, H. Morley Chase, not on the slopes but on a blind date in Los Feliz.

Their courtship spanned 7 years as they built their respective careers, Morley working for a Long Beach based oil company at the time. Date nights in Los Angeles were glamorous scenes in the ’50s and ’60s. Morley and Lee would meet for dinner at Chasen’s or Perino’s, attend live shows at the Coconut Grove at the Ambassador hotel to see Bing Crosby or Sammy Davis Jr. They built lifelong friendships in Newport Beach where they went on sailing “dates” with Morley’s friends and cousins. In 1963, Lee and Morley eloped to Las Vegas, then settled in Camarillo, CA near Morley’s family business, Chase Bros. Dairy. Lee gave birth to two more daughters, Carrie and Julie, then shuttered her businesses to become a full time wife and mother. She also took up tennis which she loved playing for many years with her dear friends and neighbors she established courtside. Weekends spent cruising the Channel Islands or Catalina island aboard their boat, aptly named the “Joy” were fun family outings as well as visits with her sister and brother-in-law Bob O’dell in Palm Desert. After selling a “spec” house they’d built, Lee and Morley moved the family to Carpinteria and into the home of their dreams. Lee’s natural energy was a perfect match for the house. She delighted in designing each room, wallpapering some herself, planning her English garden and indulging her love of baking. She always had a fresh batch of scones ready for visitors. Nurturing family and friends was always her top priority. She rallied with her new neighbors in the “Breakfast Club” and “The Walkers” during their daily, 6 AM, 3-mile walks. She also advocated supporting local business owners long before it was ‘in”, not just as a loyal customer but considered them friends. Both Lee and Morley loved entertaining visitors and throwing their annual Christmas party (kids included) which was legend. Lee would start planning and baking months in advance. Lee also had a heart for service and now the time to do so with her youngest daughters settled in school. She loved to volunteer with the other mothers at Our

Lady of Mt. Carmel and delivering food for Meals on Wheels. She continued this work with her daughters through the National Charity League, focusing on service at Valle Verde as Lee had a heart for the elderly which she hoped to pass on. When the girls headed off to college, Lee continued volunteering for the Music Academy of the West managing The Treasure House for two years and organizing a sold-out speaking engagement and book signing for Martha Stewart in 1987, which raised funds for the students of the Academy. The Braille Institute was another important nonprofit that Lee felt deserved greater recognition in the local community. She was committed to working alongside the other auxiliary members, whom she adored, on the annual Polo benefit, pulling off a successful and fun event each year, to support the students of Braille. When not volunteering, Lee was engaged in an in-depth bible study course, ‘Bible Study Fellowship.” Her Christian faith was as deep as it was closely held. She loved attending church, worshiping God and reading His word. It was her faith that sustained her through the biggest challenge in her life, Parkinson’s disease which was diagnosed in 2006. “I can do ALL things through Christ who strengthens me” was the scripture/go to prayer Lee said each day, as well as thanking God for her many blessings. Though Lee and Morley were fortunate to enjoy many travels with dear friends, they now spent their weekends on their beautiful patio pouring over the newspaper, debating politics as usual – neither took for granted the freedom to cast a vote – or playing a mean game of dominoes which Lee usually won. Ever the model, she never complained about her suffering but instead, focused on others and their needs. A generous listener and friend, Lee also continued one of her favorite pastimes as her body slowed its paces, floral design; pulling from the many fragrant roses in her garden, to give as gifts for friends. She was a generous gift giver never missing a birthday and especially INDEPENDENT.COM

enjoyed shopping and sending care packages to friends, grandchildren and great-grandchildren who were her greatest joy. When Morley passed in 2013 on the heels of their 50th anniversary party, a labor of love Lee planned down to the last detail, she donated Morley’s vintage Navion to the Camarillo airports WWII museum, her last act of devotion to the love of her life. Even in Lee’s final years she was ever fashionable, putting together perfect ensembles for herself or others. She enjoyed time in her garden; the scent of her roses, feeding the birds, visits from the grand- and great-grandkids, “See’s” candy, hazelnut lattes, putting “pouf ” on everything (Canned whipped cream), playing with “Herbie” her beloved border collie, watching Downton Abbey and her favorite PBS show, Doc Martin. Lee’s life was made joyful to the end by her amazing caregivers/friends Tammy Graham, Veronica Aguirre, Angie Pepe, Delisay Aquino, Abigail Rodriguez, Donna Severy and Alma Sirin. A special mention to Jose Guitierrez, whom Lee often described as “The son I never had.” Her family is eternally grateful to each and every one of you. Lee’s beautiful spirit, smile and huge heart will be missed by everyone, especially her daughters Cynthia (Bob) Blackman, Carrie Chase, Julie (Patrick) McCaslin, grandchildren Kirk (Wendy) Blackman, Stacey Blackman Sternberg, Trevor (Jamie) Blackman, Liam McCaslin, greatgrandchildren Troy, Kyle, David, Corey, Klari, Bennett and Anna Lee. A private service was held for family. Donations in honor of Lee’s memory may be made to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, the American Parkinson’s Disease Association or the charity of your choosing.

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ICONIC GARDENS 21ST-CENTURY HOMES Loving Lotusland, Electrifying Housing, New Design Collective, and More ⬘ BY LESLIE DINABERG ⬘

W

elcome to our annual Home & Garden special issue, the edition run each spring where we explore

ideas and designs for indoors and out. In this year’s collection, we feature a new book all about that most iconic of Montecito gardens, Lotusland, and explain how you can create your own sustainable garden in the backyard. Then we turn to a new Home & Design Collective in the downtown Arts District, head to the library to find free decor resources, and take a look at what it takes, and why, to electrify your house. Happy designing!

⬘ BOOKS ⬘

THE LOWDOWN ON how business ran deep through

the veins of Madame Ganna Walska, so when the time finally came to showcase her legendary garden in book form, the pressure was on. And like the creation of Montecito’s extraordinary 37-acre public garden extravaganza, it took a whole cast of characters to bring the new, 288-page coffee-table book Lotusland: Eccentric Garden Paradise (Rizzoli, 2022) — stunningly photographed by Lisa Romerein — to life. It’s always been a desire to share Lotusland with as many people as possible, a challenge because the county permit limits the number of visitors to the garden to just 15,000 people a year. Architect Marc Appleton, a longtime supporter and former trustee of Ganna Walska Lotusland, had unsuccessfully tried to drum up support for a book project for years. But the stars never quite aligned until 2019,

©LOTUSLAND, RIZZOLI NEW YORK, 2022. IMAGE ©LISA ROMEREIN

LOTUSLAND S Underneath the canopy of towering dragon trees (Dracaena draco) is a large, candelabrum-shaped Isolatocereus dumortieri as well as eye-catching clusters of golden barrels (Echinocactus grusonii), which were some of Madame Ganna Walska’s favorite cacti.

Morse joining Appleton. “We raised independent funds from subscribers to establish a publication budget, and we were off and running,” said Appleton. Curator Paul Mills, historian Rose Thomas, Jeff Chemnick, Mike Furner, Corey Welles, founding trustee Arthur Gaudi, Eric Nagelmann (who designed the cactus garden), and Madame Walska’s niece Hania Tallmadge (who recently passed away) were but a few of the many people involved in this team effort.

Montecito’s Eccentric Garden Paradise Comes to Life in New Book when the “Book Committee” was formed, with current trustee Dorothy Gardner and former trustees Suzanne Mathews and Alex

“Everyone said yes, which is kind of remarkable and a testament to their relationships,” said executive director Rebecca Anderson. “It really was volunteer-driven, and that’s important to appreciate and highlight, particularly in this town where so many volunteers do so much.” The book has a lot of ground to cover — and it does. “While it’s meant to focus on the garden today and our future, it’s meant to be a garden book,” said Anderson. “It’s not meant to be a retrospective of how the garden began. But I really appreciate that we were able to get in there the people who created this place, because without a little bit of that, it’s not a complete story.” INDEPENDENT.COM

Indeed, the dramatic flair and inimitable spirit of Madame Walska is woven throughout the book while exploring her world-renowned horticultural showplace, home to more than 3,400 types of plants, including at least 35,000 individual specimens. Another important factor Anderson emphasized is “making sure that people not only have takeaways about inspiration and ideas for design or knowledge of particular plants in that index in the back, but also that they understand that this is all done with organic materials and sustainable practices.” With such a large scope of the gardens to be documented, Mills worked with Romerein MAY 19, 2022

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lotusland Madame Ganna Walska picks fruit from the lemon arbor, c. 1958

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and her photography assistant, Dean Courtois, to shoot over the span of a year, “to try to catch as many moods and happenings in the garden as possible,” said Mills. “Lotusland really is not a ‘flowery’ garden; it’s more about bold and dramatic presentation of plants. But each season does present different opportunities to capture, and I would help guide them to these.” He continued, “Every plant on the property has a story, but I would try to lead them to the ones that are more intriguing for one reason or another: a cycad that is now extinct in the wild and only exists in gardens like Lotusland; a dragon tree that dates back to the 1880s, when Kinton Stevens had his nursery on the property; a cactus that is endemic to the Galapagos Islands and rarely seen in botanical collections.” Since the first shoot was in the summer, they had to capture the namesake plant, the sacred lotus, “in all its glory,” explained Mills. “Winter had to focus on the aloe garden, because that is when those plants light up with their torch-like inflorescences, and also on the Japanese garden, which really shows that season with the golden carpet of ginkgo leaves and shapely, dormant maples. I would scout the garden before their arrival, but so many times, we would just happen across things: a flowering bromeliad, a fern

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leaf unfurling, or the perfect lighting for an overall shot.” With 19 distinct gardens to spotlight, choosing a favorite is like choosing a favorite child. But when asked which section of the book he’s most proud of, Mills confided, “I would have to say the chapter on the Dunlap cactus garden. It’s my favorite garden on the property, not only because I was so involved in moving the collection to Lotusland and helping to oversee its installation, but because of the story behind it. Lisa was also very drawn to this garden, so it got a lot of attention and amazing photos in the book.” He continued, “We’d often be on the cart heading to a different garden, passing by the Dunlap garden, and Lisa would shout ‘Stop!’ because she saw something looking just right.” That garden was installed after Madame Walska passed away, but it

©LOTUS LAN D,

THE FLOWER THAT HELPS YOU BLOSSOM

J. R. EYERMAN, GANNA WALSKA LOTUSLAND ARCHIVES

Cont'd from p. 21

Lotusland: Eccentric Garden Paradise is available at local retailers as well as through the onsite gift shop and online at lotuslandshop.org. Limited spots are available for a Luncheon on the Lawn to celebrate the book on Saturday, May 21, at 11:30 a.m. In addition, Lotusland’s 2022 season is now open to reservations through August. Admission is $50 for adults and $25 for children ages 3-17. For more information and reservations, visit lotusland.org.


HOME & GARDEN ©LOTUSLAND, RIZZOLI NEW YORK, 2022. IMAGE ©LISA ROMEREIN

The zodiac clock is 25 feet in diameter and features low-growing succulents and copper zodiac signs that were crafted to replicate earlier schemes. It’s bordered by a ring of blue chalk sticks (Senecio mandraliscae).

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Appleton, who worked on a somewhat similar project with Rizzoli for Casa del Herrero in 2009, wrote the introduction to Lotusland. “Making the book happen in the right way was challenging, and there were ultimately a lot of interests to entertain along the way,” he said. “But I think the book will have a long life as a fairly comprehensive presentation of Lotusland and why it is such a special garden. Lisa’s photos are amazing and capture its magic.”

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began in 1966, when Merritt “Sigs” Dunlap bequeathed his cactus collection to Lotusland. “She saw this as something great and accepted,” said Mills. The collection was donated in 2001, and the garden built in 2003, just in time for Dunlap to celebrate his 97th birthday. “We know Madame Ganna Walska would approve of this garden,” said Mills. “She loved cacti and dramatic landscapes, and its completion signified the fulfillment of her and Dunlap’s wish.”

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HOME & GARDEN ⬘ SUSTAINABILITY ⬘

Gardening for the Greater Good

T

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INTERIOR PLANTSCAPES & SERVICE

he benefits of sus-

tainable gardening and regenerative agriculture took the spotlight at a recent sustainability salon featuring Community Environmental Council (CEC) climate resilience program director Sharyn Main and Lotusland sustainability manager Corey Welles. Here are some of the nuggets they shared at the gathering in Belle Hahn’s beautiful garden on the Upper Eastside.

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1) CHANGE CAN HAPPEN: After 32 years at Lotusland, Welles certainly has the dirt on the esteemed garden’s best practices in plant healthcare. “Lotusland wasn’t always a perfectly organic operation,” he admitted. “In the very beginning, it was completely conventional, and they used pesticides. If you were an organic farmer walking in, you would have been horrified.” But the will to become more environmentally sound was there, and they worked to find the way. “We literally cracked the code; we stopped listening to the conventional minds and started listening to biologists,” he said. “Fertilizers caused 80 percent of the diseases at Lotusland. Once we got the pesticides and chemical fertilizers out of there, we never went back. It was a moment of taking responsibility — if something’s wrong, you take responsibility for it.” And it worked. The first year, they had a 70 percent reduction in pests, and it increased from there. 2) MORE THAN NO PESTICIDES: A sustainable garden involves more than just getting rid of chemical pesticides. Other key principles include using natural materials such as alfalfa meal, sea kelps, and organic nitrogen sources to feed plants and the soil.

Building up insect ecology is also important. While it may seem counterintuitive, Welles shared that increasing the number and variety of insects in the landscape and providing a habitat for beneficial insects helps control invasions of plant pests. Native plants are especially good for this. The other key sustainable practice at Lotusland is recycling all of the plant material removed from the garden back in the form of compost teas and mulches that are reused in the garden.

3) DEMONSTRATE THE WAY: Lotusland wasn’t yet open to the public when Main was a teenager in the 1970s, but she confided that it didn’t stop her from sneaking in to explore. As one of the first wave of environmentalists working for CEC, Main and her colleagues had an organic demonstration garden at the organization’s first offices on the Mesa in one of the earliest green buildings in the country. They had composting toilets (“the cutting edge for energy efficiency”) and a green rooftop with plantings to help cool the building, and they taught people about organic agriculture and gardening while discouraging the use of pesticides. She even co-wrote a book called BUGS (“Beneficial Urban Garden Strategies”), which was published in both English and Spanish. “That garden was super important to our program,” said Main. “We talked a lot about the value of using native plants to protect biodiversity and improve soil health as part of an organic food garden.”

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4) REGENERATIVE AG: One of the ways CEC is working to reverse the climate threat today is by encouraging regenerative, climate-smart agriculture. “These practices — like applying compost on working lands and planting native plants along edges of fields — can actually help sequester carbon from the atmosphere. By restoring a natural balance in this way, plants respond by pulling more carbon from the air (through photosynthesis) into the ground, where it’s beneficial to the soil and plants,” said Main. Carbon farming, a land-based, natural solution to climate change, is a way to transfer excess carbon out of the atmosphere — where it is causing a lot of harm — and store it in the soil, where it does a lot of good. CEC is actively working with ranchers and large landowners, said Main. “If we can apply compost to just 10 percent of our agricultural lands, we could offset the emissions of the entire agriculture sector in Santa Barbara County. So this is doable. This is actually a reasonable thing we can achieve.”

5) EVERYONE CAN COMPOST: One of the simplest ways for people to help at home is by making and using compost, said Main. Mow or trim weeds instead of pulling them out at their roots, and compost instead of landfilling yard waste and food scraps. 6) WATCH YOUR WATER: Last but not least on the path to sustainable gardening is the importance of carefully managing water use, a key factor that was mentioned by both Welles and Main. Water conservation is made much easier when pests are under control through the promotion of pollinators and beneficial insects, natural materials are used to feed plants and soil, plant materials removed from the garden are recycled into compost or mulch, and native species are primarily what is planted. Following sustainable practices includes avoiding polluting chemicals, preserving natural resources, and reducing waste whenever possible. Sustainable gardening is not just about growing plants and maintaining a garden; it’s also about growing a greener future. As Welles said, “You don’t have to sacrifice beautiful, breathtaking gardens to be responsible.” n

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HOME & GARDEN ⬘ RESOURCES ⬘

Free Design Inspiration— at Your Library

L

ooking for some inspiration for

your next home improvement project? For when Pinterest isn’t quite cutting it, our librarians Lisa Neubert (Santa Barbara) and Kimberly Crail (Montecito) have curated this list of books to check out. See an even longer list online at independent.com/hg22.

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Feels Like Home: Relaxed Interiors for a Meaningful Life by Lauren Liess: Explore the emotional connection between home decoration and one’s daily life through the lens of a popular social media and TV star. House to Home: Designing Your Space for the Way You Live by Devi DuttaChoudhury: A modern guide to home improvement that will help you create a dynamic, comfortable space that supports your life and the way you want to live. Hygge & West Home: Design for a Cozy Life by Christiana Coop and Aimee Lagos: These notable tastemakers have curated a look into 20 covetable homes designed to promote feelings of coziness, companionship, and comfort.

SMALL SPACES Small Space Style: Because You Don’t Have to Live Large to Live Beautifully by Whitney Leigh Morris: Interior design maven Morris shares her ideas and practices for making any tiny space efficient and stylish — whether it’s a rustic A-frame in the woods or a chic micro apartment in the city.

Design the Home You Love: Practical Styling Advice to Make the Most of Your Space by Lee Mayer: A fresh and accessible guidebook to the complicated world of interior design. Made for Living: Collected Interiors for All Sorts of Styles by Amber Lewis: Tricks of the trade from a trendsetting designer known for creating effortlessly layered looks and modern eclectic styles. Home Stories: Design Ideas for Making a House a Home by Kim Leggett: Everyone has a story worth telling, and every room

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HOME & GARDEN

books

Cont'd from p. 29 Wonder Walls: How to Transform Your Space with Colorful Geometrics, Graphic Lettering, and Other Fabulous Paint Techniques by Phoebe Cornog and Roxy Prima: Learn DIY wall-painting techniques to help discover the possibilities of paint and see walls as a canvas. This book covers wall preparation and paint selection, as well as step-by-step instructions. Living in Color: Color in Contemporary Interior Design by Stella Paul and India Mahdavi: An inspirational visual journey along the color spectrum, brought to life via the best contemporary residential interior design.

805-965-5122

Info@wicksroofingandsolar.com

HISTORICAL INFLUENCES Making Midcentury Modern by Christopher Kennedy: This book features 100 tips for bringing the principles of midcentury modern style to any home, from the acclaimed interior designer.

805-965-5122

Info@wicksroofingandsolar.com

American Bungalow Style by Robert Winter: Showcasing two dozen American houses that capture the bungalow spirit that enticed thousands of buyers during the form’s heyday from 1880 to 1930.

A SENSE OF PLACE At Home in Joshua Tree: A Field Guide to Desert Living by Sara Combs and Rich Combs: This beautifully illustrated lifestyle guide from the creators of The Joshua Tree House shows you how to infuse your life with desert vibes, from home designs and entertaining plans to wellness rituals. Home Sweet Maison: The French Art of Making a Home by Danielle PostelVinay: A lively, sophisticated, and practical illustrated lifestyle guide that shows how to live like the French every day, transforming your house into a home defined by beauty, family, and accessible elegance. The California Casaby Douglas Woods: A sumptuous and comprehensive look at Spanish Colonial Revival design, presenting a lavish portrait of the style through more than 300 color photographs. Living in Mexico by Barbara & René Stoeltie: A breathtaking look at some of Mexico’s most remarkable abodes. The authors have traveled far and wide, from Costa Careyes to the Yucatán Peninsula, seeking out homes to surprise, delight, and inspire.

Spanish Colonial Style: Santa Barbara and the Architecture of James Osborne Craig and Mary McLaughlin Craig by Pamela Skewes-Cox and Robert Sweeney: An ode to these influential architects, whose designs included the historic Casa de la Guerra and the Plaza Rubio complex across from the Mission Rose Garden. In addition to a wide selection of books, the Santa Barbara Public Library’s Databases & Resources page has information on how people can get signed up for free with LinkedIn Learning, which offers a number of courses on interior design and related skills. It also has information about accessing Skillshare (provided courtesy of the California State Library’s Career Pathways initiative), which has a great offering of interior design n courses as well.

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INQUIRE ABOUT UPCOMING ADULT AND PROFESSIONAL WORKSHOP SERIES • The Building Process - Basics from foundation to finish • How an Interior Designer Thinks - Composing a space with function and aesthetics • Ideal for Homeowners, Realtors, Developers, Property management team members Interior Designing Santa Barbara for over 30 years HGTV Designer’s Challenge Winner/Published Interior Designer

805- 448-8896 • susanspieler@gmail.com www.spielerdesign.com INDEPENDENT.COM

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31


We’re Back!

SANTA BARBARA ⬘ SHOPPING ⬘ HOME & GARDEN New Home & Design June 11 & 12

Saturday: 10am-5pm Sunday: 10am-4pm

SHOW DISCOUNTS & DEMONSTRATIONS

PLUS

100’s of Products and Services

Earl Warren Showgrounds 3400 Calle Real Santa Barbara (101 freeway at Las Positas exit)

Free Admission · Free Parking For more information: 805-252-5227 · ChargoProductions.com

D

owntown Santa Barbara has

cemented its place as a design destination, and several businesses have banded together to form the new Santa Barbara Arts District Home & Design Collective. The cooperative marketing efforts by six businesses within walking distance of each other — all located on the 1200 and 1300 blocks of State Street — is quickly making an impact. “You can park once and shop easily,” said Michelle Beamer, owner of Lonetree. “The community is very supportive. We’re always talking each other up. Stephanie Payne-Campbell at Domecíl sends people over here all the time. We’re really reaching out to designers too, and they’re sending people over. Even people from out of town. We’ve given maps to people from hotels and things like that, too.” This appealingly illustrated map (by graphic designer Irene Ramirez; orange ladybird.com) guides shoppers to visit:

Domecíl: This shop showcases items for the home that highlight both traditional and contemporary craft, including fiber arts, ceramics, woodwork, fine art, and original bespoke, small-batch clothing. (Victoria Court #7, 1221 State St.; domecil.com) Lonetree: This showroom for interior designer Michelle Beamer of MB Interiors features furniture, art, and new and vintage home decor items. (Victoria Court #24, 1221 State St.; lonetreesb.com) Sofa U Love: Choose from more than 1,000 fabrics and dozens of sofa styles to customize or reupholster couches, chairs, ottomans, and other furniture. (1227 State St.; sofaulove.com)

Celadon House: This full-service interior design studio and furniture/decor showroom serves residential, hospitality, and commercial design needs. (1224 State St.; celadonhouse.com) IRE NE RA MIR EZ

LIFESTYLE EXPO

Collective Downtown

Indian Pink: This home and lifestyle boutique features reimagined vintage furniture, tabletop accessories, lighting, art, handmade pajamas, robes and bathrobes, and a gorgeous assortment of pillows. (1307 State St.; indianpinkpillows.com) Maune Contemporary: This new gallery specializes in limited-edition fine art prints and unique works by renowned international artists whose work has been exhibited and is in the collections of museums worldwide. (1309 State St.; maune .com) n

Lonetree’s Divine Design

B

eing in the right place at the right

The Home Page

Sarah Sinclair gives you the inside scoop on real estate in The Home Page, going behind the scenes each Sunday to visit our region’s casitas, cottages, and castles.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters independent.com/news

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MAY 19, 2022

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time is often the key to success. As the principal designer at MB Interiors and a faculty member of the interior design department at Santa Barbara City College, Michelle Beamer had long toyed with the idea of opening a retail showroom. Lonetree (lonetreesb.com), her stunning new space stocked with upscale yet comfortable home furnishings, lighting, art, and accessories, comes on the scene just as the downtown Arts District is seeing a renaissance in home design shops and services. Cleverly merchandised as a series of vignettes and “rooms” combined with a spacious, courtyard-facing design studio,

Lonetree is actually based on Beamer’s master’s thesis at the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design in Washington, D.C. The plan included having ever-changing curated vignettes where clients could sit on furniture and touch fabrics and envision what it would be like to live with them. Check. She also envisioned storytelling design opportunities such as the Santa Barbara Museum of Art–inspired Van Gogh desk display now on view. Check. And she wanted to be able to provide a space for community engagement such as 1st Thursday parties — featuring a recent raffle to benefit CALM (Child Abuse Listening Mediation) — and collaborations with community groups like Jane Chapman’s Communal Table


LESLIE DINABERG

HOME & GARDEN

Santa Barbara’s Indoor Plant Shop

Vintage Vogue at Indian Pink

Tamara and JP Cajuste’s colorful new Indian Pink store (indian pinkpillows.com), a home furnishing haven stocked to the rafters with an inventive assortment of goods. Pillows made from exotic textiles from around the world are the mothership that launched the couple’s wholesale enterprise in 2007, and there is certainly a vibrant collection of these one-of-akind creations. But with the new store (their first) comes a plethora of new merchandise, including tablecloths, napkins, upcycled lampshades, throw rugs, and a variety of vintage furniture covered in the same gorgeous fabrics that first inspired Tamara when she traveled the world as an American Airlines flight attendant. “We take 19th-century old-fashioned chairs and couches from France and England, so they’re really well-made, and

gatherings (communaltablesb .com). Check. Not to mention, a beautiful space for her to create, work with her team, and meet clients. Checkmate. A Nebraska native, Beamer says the name Lonetree is a nod to her hometown. “When I was doing research, I found out about traders in the 1800s traveling by boat along the Missouri River to bring their goods to market,” she said. “The trader was told that once he glimpsed the lone tree on the hill — there weren’t a lot of trees in Nebraska — he knew they were close to the right place to sell their goods.” n

plants. art. community.

then have them reupholstered in a pretty fabric,” says Tamara. With supply chains still a mess from the pandemic, “the fact that you can get something that is repurposed and beautiful and available is a big asset,” she explains. During lockdown, she even created a new line of super-comfortable yet still fashion-forward dresses (with pockets!), pajamas, and reversible robes — all of which are on colorful display at the store. “I wanted to have something cute to match my house to put on,” she laughs. “I had no idea they would be so popular.” These days, Tamara sources her fabrics from four different vendors in Rajasthan and Shahpur, India. She relies primarily on instinct to make her selections. “I just fall in love with certain things when I see them,” she laughed. “I could never be an interior designer, because I can’t do modern things. I can only do what I do n and what I like.”

Hours: Tuesday-Sunday 11-5 703 Chapala St. Santa Barbara www.idyllmercantile.com

The Art of Consignment CONSIGN AND FIND FINE FURNITURE, DISHES, ARTWORK AND GIFTS.

LESLIE DINABERG

B

oho chic meets vintage flair at

The Art of Consignment is the leading Consignment store in Santa Barbara specializing in hand-selected, top-quality, previously owned Furniture, Home Goods, and Decor. Our inventory features designer quality pieces from well-known brands such as Henredon, Baker, Palecek, and others. Please check in with us frequently as our inventory is always being updated. Store Hours: Tue - Sun 11am - 4pm FB: @theartofconsignment | IG: @theartofconsignmentsb 805.755.9115 | 617 E. Gutierrez St, Santa Barbara shop@theartofconsignment.com | theartofconsignment.com INDEPENDENT.COM

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MAY 19, 2022

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s d a r gare ! d ra

Let’s celebrate the class of 2022 and give them the special recognition they deserve! Share a photo of a graduate in your life on our online photo gallery.

INDEPENDENT.COM/CLASSOF2022

r


HOME & GARDEN

PRESERVE THE INNATE BEAUTY OF YOUR MARBLE SURFACES WITH

⬘ ENERGY ⬘

Electrifying Your Home

T

he road to zero carbon is being paved by elected officials, builders, and activists. And an increasingly important part of the journey is getting rid of gas furnaces, water heaters, ranges, and other appliances and replacing them with electric alternatives that make buildings safer, more efficient, and more environmentally friendly — especially as more renewable power is added to the grid. Last summer, the Santa Barbara City Council voted unanimously to enact a new building ordinance (known as a “reach code”) prohibiting natural gas infrastructure in newly constructed buildings (with the exception of restaurants and applications where there isn’t yet a viable electric alternative to gas). There are also many rebates and incentives available for existing homes to make the switch to electric. Heat pumps, which control household climates by extracting and moving the heat in the air, are extremely energy-efficient. According to the Department of Energy, installing an air-source heat pump can cut your electric bill in half, and heat pumps are generally considered more comfortable than traditional heating and cooling. “The other big advantage that heat pumps offer in our warming climate is that they can provide both heating and cooling in your home, so they can essentially be used to replace both a furnace and an air conditioner,” said Michael Chiacos, energy and climate program director at CEC. If you’re considering a new furnace or installing air conditioning in your home, TECH Clean California is currently offering up to $3,000 per unit rebate on central heat pumps or mini-split heat pumps. That same group also has a $1,000-$3,100-perunit rebate on heat-pump water heaters. Other vendors offer incentives for air sealing, insulation and ductwork, whole house fans, smart thermostats, and electric backup power units (see switchison.org/incentives for more information). Heat induction cooktops are another innovation that has come a long way in recent years. Unlike traditional electric stoves that heat with coils, induction cooktops use magnets to transfer heat directly to the pan through the process of induction. These ranges heat up faster (they can bring water to a boil in half the time of gas), allow you to cook at very specific tempera-

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• Stains tures, and are safer. Induction burners only heat the pan and not the cooktop surface, which means the rest of the stove remains cool when it’s on. Without an open flame, people are less likely to burn themselves or accidentally start kitchen fires. “I am a total covert,” said Dennis Allen, founder of Allen Construction. He’s been cooking on a five-element magnetic induction cooktop for more than a decade. “It is fabulous,” he said. “It’s so responsive, and it is so good for the environment because it’s about double the efficiency of natural gas, because natural gas is heating all of the air around the pot and this power only heats the pot.” He also likes that it’s safer to cook with his granddaughter because she won’t get burned by the cooktop. If you’re interested in trying before buying, many vendors offer portable models to take home and test. The Santa Barbara Public Library’s Library of Things also has an induction cooktop you can check out. As more and more information comes out that electric homes are safer and healthier to live in, they are also becoming more practical and affordable, especially with the various incentives. There are some federal incentives for solar installation that are expiring soon, so the time to act is now, said Chiacos. “Having an all-electric home with solar is definitely the way to go, because then you are using your locally generated sunshine to run your house, and hopefully power your n car, too,” he said.

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OLIVIA RODRIGO W/HOLLY HUMBERSTONE . . .MAY 21 RAINBOW KITTEN SURPRISE W/99 NEIGHBORS . .MAY 27 REX ORANGE COUNTY. . . . . . . . . . .JUN 01 STEVE MARTIN & MARTIN SHORT . . . .JUN 17 ROD STEWART W/CHEAP TRICK . . . . . . . .JUN 18 LYLE LOVETT AND HIS LARGE BAND & CHRIS ISAAK . .JUN 19 BRANDI CARLILE W/BRITTNEY SPENCER . . . .JUN 21 CAAMP W/HEARTLESS BASTARDS . . . . . . . .JUL 08 FLEET FOXES. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .JUL 09 RISE AGAINST W/THE USED, SENSES FAIL . . . .JUL 16 SLIGHTLY STOOPID W/PEPPER, COMMON KINGS . .JUL 17 THE BLACK CROWES . . . . . . . . . . .JUL 24 THE CHICKS W/JENNY LEWIS . . . . . . . . .JUL 29 JOSH GROBAN W/PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND . .JUL 30 JON PARDI W/LAINEY WILSON, HAILEY WHITTERS . .AUG 05 REBELUTION W/STEEL PULSE, DENM, DJ MACKLE . .AUG 07 TROMBONE SHORTY’S VOODOO THREAUXDOWN . .AUG 13 MY MORNING JACKET W/JOY OLADOKUN . . .AUG 16 ROBERT PLANT & ALISON KRAUSS . . . .AUG 17 THE HEAD AND THE HEART W/DAWES . . .AUG 18 IRATION & ATMOSPHERE . . . . . . . . .AUG 25 FLUME W/TSHA, SEGA BODEGA . . . . . . . . .SEP 01 GOO GOO DOLLS W/BLUE OCTOBER . . . . . .SEP 03 JACKSON BROWNE . . . . . . . . . . . .SEP 07 LEON BRIDGES W/LITTLE DRAGON . . . . . . .SEP 08 MAREN MORRIS W/THE LONE BELLOW . . . . . . SEP 15 BONNIE RAITT W/MAVIS STAPLES . . . . . . . . SEP 22 OLIVER TREE . . . . . . . . . . SEP 30 ON SALE FRI JACK JOHNSON W/ RON ARTIS II . . . . . . OCT 04 & 05 RÜFÜS DU SOL W/ PARALEVEN . . . . . . . . . OCT 08 DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE W/YO LA TENGO OCT 19 ON SALE FRI

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5/16/22 4:48 PM


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

MAY

19-25

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

the first feature documentary to chronicle the fascinating tale of 19th-century photographer Eadweard Muybridge, whose work fast-tracked the development of early motion pictures. Writer/ director Marc Shaffer will join Cristina Venegas (Film and Media Studies, UCSB) for a post-screening discussion. 7-9:15pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-4637. carseywolf

.ucsb.edu/ events

5/19-5/22, 5/25: UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Presents The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee This Tony Award–winning musical, complete with audience participation, follows an eclectic group of 6th-graders who are participating in a spelling bee, and each is eager to win for very different reasons. The musical shows through May 28. Thu.-Sat., Wed.: 7pm; Sat.: 1 and 7pm; Sun.: 1pm. UCSB Ballet Studio. $13-$19. theaterdance.ucsb.edu

5/19: 2022 Live Art & Wine Tour The Downtown S.B. Live Art and Wine Tour invites you to visit various venues for bites, sips, entertainment, and a silent auction, ending with a final party at the Arlington Theatre from 7:30-9pm, with proceeds to benefit the Downtown Public Art Activations and Events Fund. 5:30-9pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $95. Ages 21+.

downtownsb.org/events

won Live Dakota/Boricua hip hop artist

from Minneapolis, Minnesota, Tufawon (2 for 1), whose name is a representation of his mixed identity, will perform his music that is a reflection of his life experiences and personal struggles, his hopes and dreams, spirituality, and connectedness to the land, love, and the realities of the world we live in. Registration is required. 6-8pm. Multicultural Center, UCSB. Free.

tinyurl.com/TufawonLive

FRIDAY 5/20 5/20: National Bike to Work Day Did you know the third Friday in May is National Bike to Work Day? There aren’t any specific events or rides, just the opportunity to ride your bike to work. cyclemaynia.org/events/btwd

SATURDAY 5/21 5/21: Sing! Spring Concert Reserve your free tickets online for a fun concert performed by the Sing! Children’s Chorus with more than 30 S.B. elementary schools. All attendees are welcome to join the choristers for a post-concert reception on Towbes Court. 4pm. Music Academy of The West, 1070 Fairway Rd. Free. Call (805) 969-4726.

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

ticketing.granadasb.org/events

5/21: Santa Ynez Chumash Earth Day Join for goods from environmental vendors, activities for the kids, and great food!

Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events 5/22: Eos Lounge SonicBass Society: X&G, 9pm. 500 Anacapa St. $12.36. Call (805) 564-2410. eoslounge.com

event-calendar/

The first 150 people to sign in at the event will receive a free swag bag. Park at the Chumash Tribal Hall or in the lower lot and take the shuttle. 10am-2pm. Kitiyepumu’ Park, Chumash Reservation, 100 Via Jauna Rd., Santa Ynez. Free. Email mmercer@santaynezchumash.org.

syceo.org/equinox-spring-2022

5/20-5/21: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Fabulous Stoobadors. Sat.: The Shades. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 9686500. mspecialbrewco.com

SUNDAY 5/22

5/21: State Street Ballet Academy Presents Madeline: Lost in Central Park Through ballet, students ages 3-18 will

5/22: Topa Topa Brewing Co. (S.B) Hibbity Dibbity, 5-6pm. 120 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call (805) 324-4150. topatopa.beer/pages/happenings 5/23: The Red Piano Church on Monday: Robert Thomas, 7pm. 519 State Street. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 3581439. theredpiano.com/schedule

Kerrie Smith, Portals & Pathways

5/22: C.A.R.E.4Paws Happy Tails Fundraiser

tell the story of a young girl visiting New York City with her friends and her journey to find her friends after she gets lost. 2 and 6:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. Students: $15; reserved: $25. Call (805) 963-0761.

lobero.org/whats-on

Learn about the important work being done in the community and listen to heartfelt “Happy Tails” from many pet owners helped daily. There will be great food, wine, “meowgaritas,” and acoustic guitar music with a live auction all to raise funds for C.A.R.E.4Paws. In-person: 4-8pm; virtual: 6-7pm (free). Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. $100. care4paws.org/happytails

5/22: The S.B. Museum of Art and Opera S.B. Present Parallel Stories: The Sound of Stars

tinyurl.com/SBNauticalSwapMeet

5/20: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free.

The Molly Ringwald Project, 8:30pmmidnight. Sat.: Adrian Galysh, 1-5pm; Flannel 101, 9pm-midnight. Sun.: Sam Mitchell, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/

cfsb.info/sat

Meet Calling all treasure hunters to shop from dozens of vendors with nautical items for sale such as boat rigging, surfboards, fishing gear, inflatable boats, pumps, winches, motors, and more. 8am-noon. Main Harbor Parking Lot. Free. Call (805) 564-5531.

mspecialbrewco.com

5/20-5/22: Maverick Saloon Fri.:

SATURDAY

11th Annual Harbor Nautical Swap

Call (805) 968-6500.

and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 9670066. coldspringtavern.com

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476.

5/21:

5/20-5/22: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: Layovr, 7-10pm. Sat.: DJ Nathan Ocon, 7-10pm. Sun.: Arroyo Boyz + Girl, 3-5pm. 634 State St. Free.

5/20-5/22: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Paradise Road, 6-9pm. Sat.: Salt Martians, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

5/21-5/22: Jazz at the Lobero and the S.B. Symphony Present Riffing on Gershwin This performance will pair the

Echoswitch

sohosb.com/events

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

musicacademy.org/calendar

Symphony with jazz royalty and will feature a work by Florence Price, the first African American woman recognized as a symphonic composer. Nir Kabaretti will conduct with guest artists Marcus Roberts (piano), Jason Marsalis (drums), and Rodney Jordan (contrabass). Sat: 7:30pm; Sun.: 3pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $31-$156. Call (805) 899-2222.

House, 6-7:30pm. $20-$22. Fri.: Echoswitch, 9pm. $8. Ages 21+. Tue.: The Suffers, Fat Tony, 8:30pm. $15-$18. Ages 21+. Wed: Django Cats, 7:30pm. $20. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

COURTESY

5/19: Screening and Discussion: Exposing Muybridge This is

5/19:

Multicultural Music Performance: Tufa-

5/19-5/20, 5/24-5/25: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Griffin

SUNDAY

FRIDAY

COURTESY

5/19: In-Person Presentation: ‘Dearest Minnie: A Sailor’s Story’ Tales of the Great White Fleet with Leslie Compton Author Leslie Compton will discuss her book that chronicles Teddy Roosevelt’s Great White Fleet through more than 200 picture postcards and letters from a sailor on the USS Virginia to his sweetheart. There will be a prelecture reception for members from 6:15-6:45pm. 7-9pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy. $10-$20. Call (805) 962-8404. sbmm.org

THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

COURTESY

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated patrons before attending an event.

THURSDAY 5/19

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

Composer, pianist, Grammy nominee, and Guggenheim Fellow Jake Heggie will discuss the coming together of “The Starry Night,” a song cycle inspired by the art of Vincent van Gogh with text taken from his letters and poetry by Anne Sexton and Emily Dickinson and performed by mezzo-soprano Erin Alford. 3-4pm. The New Vic Theater, 33 W. Victoria St. $25-$30. tinyurl.com/

JakeHeggieSoundOfStars

The Wildling Museum of Art and Nature Artist Talk: Kerrie Smith S.B.-

based artist Kerrie Smith will talk about her multisensory installation, Portals & Pathways, which features flowing banners printed with Smith’s vivid abstract paintings and more along with ambient sounds of waves and animal life inspired by walks along More Mesa. Walk the installation and ask questions after the talk. The exhibit will be on view through February 2023. 4-6pm. Michele Kuelbs Tower Gallery, The Wildling Museum of Nature & Art, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call (805) 688-1082. RSVP to lauren@wildlingmuseum.org.

wildlingmuseum.org/exhibitions

EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

5/22:

Volunteer Opportunity

MAY 19, 2022

Fundraiser

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37


BONSAI EXHIBITION FREE!

Show • Sale • Demonstrations

ENVIR

NMENTAL

ALLIANCE

Saturday & Sunday May 21 - 22

Santa Barbara County Museums

Presented by

Bonsai Club of Santa Barbara www.santabarbarabonsai.org

Fellowship Hall at Trinity Lutheran Church 909 La Cumbre Road, corner of Foothill Road 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Sunday Plant Sale, Variety of Sizes and Species Bonsai Demonstrations at 1:00 p.m. both days Upcoming Beginners’ Workshop Info Free Bonsai Problem Clinic - Bring your tree

A TALK IN SPANISH!

Parkinson’s Disease: How it’s evaluated; How it’s treated MAY 25 4:30 – 5:30 pm

A TALK IN St. George Community Church Parkinson 1032 E. Mason St., SB SERGIO RUBIO, MD

How it’s e it’s

mypasb@gmail.com How www.mypasb.org

Sergio Rubio, MD

St. George Com 1032 E. Mason MAY 25 Let us pay for your 4:30 – 5:30 pm mypasb@gmail.com

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We’re giving away up to 10 local summer camps in the community. It’s easy to enter and 100% Free! Email, “Send Me to Summer Camp” with your name, phone # and how many children you have to JustinEtherton@ethertonrealestate.com

Deadline is May 31st • Raffle is June 1st


T HE

ALWAYS

Support for Ukraine

AMAZING.

5/21: Bake Sale & Dancing for Ukraine Every Saturday through June 18, the Ukrainian women of S.B. will sell handmade treats and sweets, and World Dance for Humanity will perform Ukrainian dances with all donations going to their families and others suffering in Ukraine. Noon-3pm. State and Cota sts. Free. tinyurl.com/SaleUkraine

5/21: Music for Ukraine: Benefit Concert Series Area music professionals, organized by flutist Caitlin Boruch, have joined together to channel their talent and passion for performing into Music for Ukraine: Benefit Concert Series for Humanitarian Aid, a fundraising concert series where 100 percent of donations benefit UNICEF’s coordinated response to the crisis in Ukraine. 3-4:15pm. Deane Chapel, Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Free/donations accepted. tinyurl.com/UkraineMusicBenefit

5/22: Friends of the Library Presents An Evening with Authors Authors Jeffrey C. Stewart, Melodie Johnson Howe, Andy Warner, Mary Penney Hershey, and Cheri Steinkellner will come together to speak about their books, inspirations, and processes. Enjoy a wine and appetizer reception, book-signing, and a silent auction to raise funds for the S.B. Central Public Library by Friends of the Library. 5-7pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. $50. friends-sblibrary.org

NE VER

ROUTINE.

MONDAY 5/23 5/23: No Indoor Voices Presents Comedy Night Take in the funny from Chris “Jonesy” Jones, Matt Kirshen (Last Comic Standing, Jim Jeffries), and your host, Kimmie Dee. There will be adult beverages and bites for purchase. 7pm. The Courthouse Tavern, 129 E. Anapamu St. $15/online; $20/door. Ages 21+. Call (805) 722-5856 or email noindoorvoices@gmail.com. tinyurl.com/May23ComedyNight

WAR JUNE 11 | SATURDAY | 8PM

5/23: S.B. Gay Men’s Chorus Presents Tomorrows: Songs for a Brighter Future Join this spring concert for an evening of celebrating diversity, unity, and freedom! 7:30pm. First United Methodist Church, 305 E. Anapamu St. $15/online; $20/door. Email info@sbgmc.org. sbgmc.org

5/23: Shakey Zimmerman Bob Dylan Tribute Concert The Bay Area collective known as Shakey Zimmerman will celebrate Bob Dylan’s 81st birthday with two full sets of classic and deep-cut Dylan songs that will showcase the musicianship and harmonies in their interpretation. 7:30pm. Alcazar Theatre, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. Advance: $20-$35; door: $25-$40. Call (805) 684-6380. thealcazar.org

LUIS R CONRIQUEZ JUNE 24 | FRIDAY | 8PM

TUESDAY 5/24 5/24: Community Arts Music Association Presents James Ehnes with Orion Weiss One of the most treasured violinists on international stages, James Ehnes, will be joined by the gifted and collaborative Orion Weiss on piano for a program that will include Mozart, Schubert, Korngold, and Saint-Saëns. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $38-$48. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on

HOTEL CALIFORNIA AUGUST 6 | SATURDAY | 8PM

WEDNESDAY 5/25 5/25: Death Café Santa Barbara You are invited to bring a beverage (and your own cup) to come together in a relaxed and safe setting to discuss death. Death Café S.B. is in conjunction with The Center for Successful Aging with Liz Bauer, Lynn Holzman, and Peggy Levine. 3:30-5pm. Hill-Carillo Adobe, 11 E. Carrillo St. Free. Call (805) 729-6172 or cominghomesb@gmail.com. tinyurl.com/DeathCafeMay25

GABRIEL IGLESIAS

5/25-5/26: Cold Spring School 6th-Grade Play: Madagascar: A Musical Adventure Jr. Based on the DreamWorks Animation motion picture, this show follows a group of Central Park Zoo animals, played by 6thgrade students, who are unexpectedly shipped to Africa. 6pm. Cold Spring School Auditorium, 2243 Sycamore Canyon Rd. Free. tinyurl.com/ColdSpringsMadagascar

KITP Virtual Book Talk and Q&A: Nicole Yunger Halpern

Author of Quantum Steampunk: The Physics of Yesterday’s Tomorrowand award-winning theoretical physicist Nicole Yunger Halpern will discuss the genre of science fiction and fantasy coming to life at the intersection of quantum physics, information science, and energy science. Learn about the movement of steampunk (futuristic technologies in a Victorian setting) in literature, art, and film. A Q&A will follow the talk. 5pm. Free. Call (805) 893-4111 or email events@kitp.ucsb.edu. tinyurl.com/QuantamSteampunk

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events. Chumash Casino Resort supports responsible gaming. For information about problem gambling, call the Problem Gambling Helpline at 1-800-522-4700.

COURTESY

5/25:

AUG 26 + 27 | TWO NIGHTS | 8PM

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PeriPheral Neuropathy aNd diabetes WarNiNG! Santa Barbara, CA - Diabetes along with age, smoking, exposure to chemotherapy, post surgical and motor vehicle accidents are all risk factors for peripheral neuropathy. Diabetes is the largest cohort, making up nearly 60% of all peripheral neuropathy cases. Among diabetics, up to 50% have measurable evidence of peripheral neuropathy but no symptoms. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy is the most common long term complication of Diabetes. This can progress from sensory complications to leg/foot ulcers and ultimately gangrene and amputation. Nerve fibers affected with neuropathy include large nerve fibers which are principally associated with numbness and small nerve fibers seen with pain and burning symptoms.

In order to effectively treat your neuropathy, three factors must be determined. 1. What is the underlying cause? 2. How much nerve damage has been sustained?* 3. How much treatment will your condition require? Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

The main problem is that your doctor has told you to just live with the problem or try the drugs which you don’t like taking because they make you feel uncomfortable. There is now a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you new hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity consultation at the end of this article).

Nearly 60% of Peripheral Neuropahty patients are Diabetics. ref: The foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy. June 2018

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating balance problems.

The treatment to increase blood flow utilizes electronic cell signaling delivering modulating energy wavelengths at both low and middle frequencies. The signaling improves cell-to-cell communication among small nerve fibers.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

The cell signaling therapy is like watering a tree. The treatment will allow the blood vessels to grow back around the peripheral nerves and provide them with the proper nutrients to heal and repair. It’s like adding water to a tree and seeing the roots grow deeper and deeper.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive. When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numbness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation. Large nerve fiber = numbness • Small nerve fiber = pain

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street, Suite 302 Santa Barbara CA. I Call 805-450-2891 “Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care.”

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Figure 2: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with Dr. Teri Bilhartz, DO at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs. Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until July 30, 2022. Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic


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S.B. Birding

HUGH RANSON PHOTOS

The Galapagos of the North

BOATFUL OF BIRDS: A recent boat trip to the Channel Islands included sightings of the island scrub jay (top left) — which is only found on Santa Cruz Island — as well as the Scripps’s murrelet (bottom image), the northern fulmar (directly below), and brown pelicans watching a humpback breach.

F

ew non-birders are aware that just off our coast, on Santa Cruz Island in the Channel Islands National Park, is a bird species found nowhere else on earth. It’s the island scrub jay, and it has the smallest range of any North American bird species. The island jay is most closely related to our familiar California scrub jay, and at a cursory glance, you might not be able to tell the difference. However, the island dweller’s measurements are 15 percent larger and the weight 40 percent greater, the blues of the plumage are much deeper, it has blue feathering under the tail that the mainland bird lacks, and the bill is proportionally larger. The voice is also different, the island bird’s calls being lower-pitched and quieter than those of its noisy mainland cousins. Genetic analysis shows that the island jays diverged from the California scrub jay about 150,000 years ago.

Unique Species Are to Be Found on the Channel Islands by Hugh Ranson, Member of the Santa Barbara Audubon Society Because many birders love to keep lists, Santa Cruz Island is a popular destination for birders wanting to add the island scrub jay to their life or year lists. Every spring, Island Packers offers a dedicated trip to look for the bird, and these excursions usually sell out quickly. On April 30, I was one of the leaders aboard the Vanguard out of Oxnard with a boatful of hopeful birders. We spent most of the day plying the waters of the channel in search of seabirds. The plan was to go ashore at Prisoners Harbor to find the target bird. The journey to Prisoners was eventful. Common dolphins were with us most of the way, and humpback whales were much in evidence, with perhaps a dozen animals seen. One even obliged by breaching three times not far off the boat’s bow. Birds, too, were numerous. Sooty shearwaters have just

returned to the channel after their breeding season at the tip of South America. These stiff-winged masters of the air flew in strings across the bow, alternately flapping and gliding so close to the ocean’s surface that the tips of the wings brush against the waves, hence the name “shearwater.” There were also a few pink-footed shearwaters mixed in. Like the sooties, they breed during our winter off the coast of Chile and spend their winter, our summer, in the North Pacific. These two species are in the tubenose family, so named for having tubes on the top of the bill, the function of which is thought to expel salts that concentrate in the bird. Another tubenose that delighted those on board was the northern fulmar, one of which landed close to the boat, affording excellent views. A friend described the beak as “though someone broke it and did a poor job reassembling it.” A hoped-for species that did not disappoint was the Scripps’s murrelet. This small, black-and-white, fish-eating seabird, a little smaller than a robin, has a tiny and localized population, with more than 80 percent of U.S. birds nesting on the Channel Islands. We were fortunate enough to come across several pairs throughout the day. It is a species that is rarely seen close to the mainland, so it is another prized sighting for those visiting Southern California. A few years ago, I watched a peregrine falcon plucking a murrelet high in a eucalyptus on the bluffs above Hendry’s Beach, and I have often wondered how a terrestrial bird like the peregrine came to have captured such a far-offshore bird. Peregrines usually take their prey in a steep dive called a stoop, a strategy that surely wouldn’t work on an ocean-dwelling bird like the murrelet. We pulled into Prisoners around noon, and within a few minutes of being on land, all participants had satisfying views of the island scrub jay, several of the birds sporting colored bands on their legs to help the island biologists keep track of them. We saw other species of birds that had diverged from mainland species, such as the orange-crowned warbler, which have been given subspecies status by biologists. Indeed, the Channel Islands have been called the “Galapagos of the North” because of their unique flora and fauna.

After a tour of Anacapa Island, it was time to head back to civilization. When we were a few miles distant from Anacapa, I spotted a dark bird flying quickly low over the waves. I expected it to be a shearwater, but when I got my binoculars on it, I realized it wasn’t a tubenose at all. Perhaps a shorebird? No, it was the wrong shape and color. Then the penny dropped: It was a peregrine falcon, far offshore, and hugging the waves as it winged toward the islands. Now it all made sense: How else could a peregrine take a murrelet off the water other than by stealth? The bird was flying so low that any bird sitting on the water wouldn’t see the danger coming until it was too late. n

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UNITE IN SOLIDARITY WITH IN RECOGNITION OF DEDICATION AND SERVICE TO OUR COMMUNITY

Congratulations to our 2022 Honorees! Elizabeth Ceballos

Juan Pablo "JP" Herrada

Feliciano Aguilar

Alejandra Cortes

Leader of the Year Student

Leader of the Year North County

Leader of the Year Mid-County

Leader of the Year South County

UKRAINE A Garden Gathering Fundraiser: Partnering with Direct Relief to provide urgently needed aid to Ukraine University Club 1332 Santa Barbara St. May 24 | 2 pm - 5 pm Program and Ukrainian Piano Recital | 3:30 pm

Tickets: $350/person Thursday, June 2, 2022 4:30pm -6:30pm Hotel Corque Fountain Courtyard 400 Alisal Rd, Solvang Purchase tickets: tinyurl.com/2022LLA

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RSVP is required as space is limited. To RSVP or DONATE any amount, visit:

www.solidaritywithukrainesb.info

Organizers: UNITED WOMEN FOR UKRAINE


l H a t ea lth M n e M s i ont ay h M

ARTWORK BY

Chris Potter

For 75 years, the Mental Wellness Center has been a community leader in building hope for individuals and families, providing support in recovery and raising awareness of mental health. INSIDE: COMMUNITY WELLNESS PROGRAM

SALUTE TO EDUCATION HEROES

UPCOMING EVENTS


MENTAL WELLNESS CENTER’S

Community Wellness P rogram May is Mental Health Month, ...but every day of the year is Important for Mental Health!

Addressing mental health symptoms early is critically important to overall health. While 1 in 5 people will experience a mental illness during their lifetime, everyone faces challenges in life that can impact their mental health. There’s often no one single cause for a mental health condition. Instead, there are many possible risk factors that can influence how likely a person is to experience a mental health condition or how serious the symptoms may be. We find the average delay between symptom onset and treatments is 11 years, meaning a lot of people spend months or years facing mental health challenges before getting a diagnosis. It is never too early to seek treatment for your mental health. Intervening effectively during early stages can save lives and is critically important for people living with a mental health condition. We are here for you when you or a loved-one are facing a mental health concern or living with a mental health condition. It is common to feel like no one understands what you’re going through. You are not alone – help is available, and recovery is possible. Many people are learning about mental health topics for the first time. Having a widespread understanding of the topic can help you be more informed if you or someone you know is experiencing a mental health condition or crisis. While our society focuses much more on physical health than mental health, both are equally important. If you are concerned about your mental health, there are several options available. It may be hard to talk about your concerns, but simply acknowledging to yourself that you or a loved-one is struggling is a big first step.

When you are ready, we are here. Annmarie Cameron, CEO

The vision of the Community Wellness Program (CWP) is to offer a variety of mental wellness and recovery programs free of charge to our community; to create community, provide social support and reduce stigma in a safe space without judgement. All community members are welcome and are welcome to bring a friend or family member. Please join us for any of the following groups: u The Native Drum – (English/Spanish) A drum circle for all ages. This group uses native-indigenous instruments to practice mindfulness and well-being. Come and find a rhythm that works for you! Mondays 5:30 - 7:00pm. u La Cultura Cura – (English/Spanish) An art workshop. Use art and expression for wellness. Únase al grupo de arte y expresión. Cada Viernes/On Fridays from 5:30 – 7:30pm. u Grupo Colibrí – A Family Support Group in Spanish. Un grupo educativo para apoyar a familias y personas quienes hayan tenido dificultad con la salud mental. No estamos solos. Cada Martes de 5:30-7:00pm empezando. Persona de contacto: Vicente (805) 845-3186. u Stronger Together Depression/Bipolar Group – Family members and friends welcome too! Thursdays, 6-7:30pm. u SPOT Supporting Parents of Teens – We offer a virtual group for English speaking parents and a virtual group for Spanish speaking parents. u Keeping Connected – A virtual group for youth. For more information contact cwp@mentalwellnesscenter.org

Dynamic Trio Leads Community Wellness

The dynamic trio includes Gabriela Dodson as the new Director of Wellness and Recovery Programs, a position that pairs well with her previous experience working in holistic programming. As a licensed clinical social worker, Dodson previously worked with public defenders to help people experiencing homelessness or mental illness. Next in the dynamic trio is the new Assistant Director of Wellness and Recovery Programs, Vicente Garcia Jr., a Santa Barbara native who comes from a career in youth justice programming. He recently completed his master’s degree in counseling and has a passion for helping people. Alexis Freeborn rounds out the dynamic trio with her promotion to Assistant Director of Wellness and Recovery Programs. Prior to the promotion, as the manager of the MWC Education Programs, Alexis led the Wellness Connection Council, a youth program of the MWC, as well as other educational programs. She is completing her master’s degree in counseling.


Salute to Education Heroes

Mental Health Matters Local Youth Lead by Example as They Advocate for Change Youth Mental Wellness Council

What an incredible year it has been for the council! We were so grateful to meet in person again and be able to learn, laugh, and connect over the important topic of mental health and how it impacts us and our community. We focused on advocating for more mental health resources in the schools, understanding the importance of self-care and how to support others who may be experiencing a mental health challenge.

2021/2022 Council:

DOS PUEBLOS HIGH SCHOOL: Audrey Brecher,

Donna Entezari, Ella Benson, Evelyn “Evie” Pazan, Gabi Wilcox, Hannah Godlis, Isabella Valentine, Natalie Murray, Sophie Suh, Paulina Avina, Georgia Miller, and Leela Rao.

SAN MARCOS HIGH SCHOOL: Addison Headley, Angie Cummings, Charlotte Kelly, Dawson Kelly, Gabe Munoz, Kathryn Chenoweth, Lilian “Lily” Poehler, Mackenzie Young, Madi Ford, Madi Sparre, Maya Klanfer, Mia Amberger, Nikki Polito, Patrick Kelly, Ellie Naftaly, and Shaina King.

The Mental Wellness Center wishes to thank the dedicated volunteers of the Mental Health Matters teaching team who adapted to virtual teaching, persevered through the past two years of the pandemic and innovated to deliver the MHM curriculum to local youth! Mental Health Matters (MHM) is a program of the Mental Wellness Center. Originally created in 2000, it is designed to introduce basic facts about mental health to elementary, middle and high school students. The MHM course addresses three primary areas: signs and symptoms of major mental health disorders, stigma and how it affects our perceptions of mental illness and wellness activities and practices. The underlying premise of MHM is that with understanding, youth will know to seek help should they or someone they know experience symptoms of a possible mental health disorder, knowing that early treatment tends to lead to Wbetter outcomes. A special Sea Star thank you to our Education Committee Chair, Ann Lippincott. Volunteers: Ann Lippincott PhD, Bev Abrams, Beverly Lochridge, Christy Morse, Cynthia Manigault RN, Doug Sisk PhD, Dyan Colven PsyD, Jane Brody MA, Janis Spracher, Julie Kessler Solomon, Karen Feuer, Karen Merrill MSSW LCSW, Kathy Culbertson, Kathy Marden MFT, Kathy Fayram, MK Littman, Nancy Chase, Pat Bower Cooley PhD, and Terri Bailey.

SANTA BARBARA HIGH SCHOOL: Charlotte

Caesar, Kayla Cherry, Chloe Burrow, Matthew Rogers, and Dylan Root.

Thank you!


e h D t a te! e v a S 26th Annual Mental Health Arts Festival Saturday, July 16, 2022 11:00am - 3:00pm

De La Guerra Plaza, Downtown Santa Barbara Paintings, Crafts, Jewelry, Drawings, Poetry, and Sculpture. For more information, visit: mentalwellnesscenter.org

3rd Annual Alma Rosa Winery

Alma Rosa Winery to Host Annual Walk Supporting Mental Wellness Center Saturday, July 23, 2022 Walk Registration: $55 per Participant For the third year, Alma Rosa Winery will host its annual Peace of Mind—10,000 Steps in the Right Direction fundraising walk. It will take place on Saturday, July 23, 2022 on the grounds of Alma Rosa’s 628-acre estate located just north of Santa Barbara near the town of Buellton, CA. The 10,000 step walk offers a tour the property, taking walkers on a 4.3-mile there-and-back ramble through verdant wine country where Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Syrah and Grenache vines grow thick with the plump fruit that has made that region so famous. For more information, visit: mentalwellnesscenter.org

Mental Health First Aid Classes CAMP COUNSELORS EDITION Youth Mental Health First Aid Training May 21, 2022 9:00am - 2:00pm IN-PERSON Youth Mental Health First Aid Training June 16 & 17, 2022 5:00pm - 7:30pm IN-PERSON Youth Mental Health First Aid Training July 27 & 28, 2022 5:00pm - 7:30pm For more information, visit: bethedifference.org

Providing emotional support, educational resources and advocacy for individuals and families affected by mental illness, and fighting the stigma associated with mental illness in our community. To learn more about NAMI, visit: namisantabarbara.org

LEARN MORE AT MENTALWELLNESSCENTER.ORG 805-884-8440 • 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101


RYAN P. CRUZ

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group of about five car enthusiasts looking to keep the car scene flourishing through the next generation. Now with up to 80 members, the group hosts a “Cars and Coffee” meetup every Sunday at Lower Manning Park in Montecito, along with a bi-weekly “Coffee and Classics” gathering at South Coast Church in Goleta. Haeberle hopes to open a state-of-the-art facility here in town that will be the “epicenter for car culture and learning in Southern California,” which would include an all-ages training program, a museum dedicated to local car history and a space for shows and gatherings. “We want to connect the community through cars,” he said. The group hosted a smaller car show and tool drive in April 2021 and decided to expand to the Glen Annie Golf Club for this year’s fundraising event. Dolores Johnson, founder of the Montecito Motor Classic, met Haeberle through the show she runs each October. When he reached out to her about this event, she said she wanted to help any way she could. “It’s a wonderful project,” she said. “All the car people support it.” A few thousand people came out to the event, which was free to the public and featured enough variety to impress car enthusiasts of all generations: vintage hot rods, ’70s era muscle cars, lowriders, and high-horsepower customs sat next to cafe racer motorcycles and World War II–era military vehicles. Michael Kotowski brought along his “pride and joy”: a 1968 Morris Mini affec-

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by Ryan P. Cruz

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Goleta Show Raises Money for Community Hot Rod Project

tionately named “Rosebud” after the name of newspaper magnate Charles Foster Kane’s childhood sled in the Orson Welles classic Citizen Kane. “It’s the only thing I ever wanted,” Kotowski said of his candy-red classic Mini. He bought the car as a pet project, saying that when he first brought it home 12 years ago, it was in “terrible” condition. Since then, he’s put in countless hours of work and thousands of dollars to turn it into his dream rally car. Like many other gearheads, Kotowski was introduced to car culture by his father. It’s a timeless tradition, he said, passed on from father to son as a way to spend time together and connect over shared interests. But it’s no longer just a boys’ club. Christina Jimenez, founder of Instagram account and podcast @MsMotorhead, brought her souped-up 2005 Subaru Legacy GT Wagon to the show and shared her experiences navigating a heavily male-focused industry. She is part of a few local car clubs and recently started her own clothing line, Lanedrifters Apparel (lanedrifters.com). “We wanted to bring more women out,” Jimenez told the Independent. “A lot of them can be intimidated.” Through her podcast — which features female race car drivers, mechanics, and designers — she hopes to continue fostering a “lady-driven” movement that can be passed onto the next generation of women in the car scene. Nineteen-year-old Alma Garcia is part of that next generation of car girls. She found her 1990 Nissan 300ZX at an impound lot, teaching herself the ins and outs of auto repair the way most teenagers learn new things: through YouTube tutorials. “Surprisingly, there’s a lot of women who are into cars,” she said. She says that women often have to fight to earn respect at car meets and track days, where some men still expect her car to belong to a brother or a boyfriend. “Even if I’m wearing a racing suit and a helmet,” she said. “We just want to feel comfortable. It used to bother me more.” Garcia is more comfortable and confident around the car shows now and says she enjoys sharing her knowledge with others who are just dipping their toes into the car game.

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housands of car lovers packed the greens at Glen Annie Golf Club on Sunday for the 2022 Santa Barbara County Auto Expo, where more than 300 car owners showed off their vintage, modified, and restored automobiles as part of a fundraiser for the Community Hot Rod Project. Local gearhead Kevin Haeberle is the founder of the all-ages program that aims to “teach youth and the young at heart how to build, restore, and fabricate classic cars and off-road race vehicles.” The idea started last February with a

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Forrest Stiles, of local car club Style Unlimited, with his Sky Blue 1964 Ford Galaxy

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For more information on the Community Hot Rod Project, visit thecommunityhotrodproject .com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Nature

Rookery on the Rise

living CHUCK GRAHAM

T

he two girthy northern elephant seal bulls battled in the frothy shallows along a Central California beach, hacking at each other’s necks. Supremacy, coastal territory, and a fruitful harem were all that was at stake. As they fought on, females with pups scooched away from the fray, giving the bulls all the beach they needed for their colossal standoff. The larger bull, known as a beachmaster, was 15 feet long and nearly 5,000 pounds and had his flippers full with the younger and smaller but aggressive upstart. As soon as they faced off, other males tried to move in on the beachmaster’s turf. However, it seemed they weren’t as ambitious as the youthful, rotund pinniped charging the beachmaster. They battled mightily in the surf and on the beach. After 20 minutes of fighting, the beachmaster was finally successful. After chasing the young bull into the cobalt blue waters, there was calm over the rookery, albeit briefly, and finally the beachmaster rested.

Pinnipeds Proliferate at San Simeon’s Northern Elephant Seal Colony by Chuck Graham “During the breeding season, territorial males are extremely busy fighting for a group of females, defending against conspecifics, breeding, etc.,” said Tony Orr, research fisheries biologist for the National Oceanic Atmospheric Association (NOAA). “Inferior males are frequently sneaking around, trying to get an opportunity to breed.”

Go Long, Go Deep Although they may not look it, the thousands of pinnipeds wallowing away on windblown beaches north and south of the Piedras Blancas Light Station in San Simeon are one of the most amazing animals on the planet. Northern elephant seals are the second-largest seal in the world and can hold their breath for long periods of time, but it is their mind-boggling migration that sets them apart from most other animals. It’s estimated that northern elephant seals migrating south from the Bering Strait in Alaska spend 80 percent of that time underwater foraging for food at unfathomable depths. They’re able to do this by shutting off a third of their brain and slowing their heart rate down to three beats per minute. This allows them to stay down for up to 90 minutes and dive deep to at least 5,000 feet. Those dark depths are where they forage for food such as squid and sea cucumbers to sustain themselves on their pelagic journey. “These physiological attributes are correlated with size,” continued Orr, who has studied elephant seals and other pinnipeds at San Miguel Island for more than 20 years. “Elephant seals have even more enhanced physiological capabilities compared to

other marine mammals (including their size among pinnipeds), resulting in them [being able] to dive deeper and longer. Shutting down parts of their brain is not unique in elephant seals. Several marine mammals do this. But it is pretty cool, and it allows them to rest while at sea, where they are most of the year.”

Prolific Pinnipeds It’s been 30 years since the first northern elephant seal pups (also known as weaners) were born south of the Piedras Blancas Light Station. The rookery has evolved from just a few animals in 1990 to now being the second-largest northern elephant seal colony in the world, second only to San Miguel Island. Approximately 17,000 animals use the surrounding beaches north and south of the lighthouse. In 2020, 6,000 pups were born at the rookery. And to think that all northern elephant seals today proliferated from just a few animals hidden away on Guadalupe Island off Mexico in the late 1800s. Once hunted to near-extinction for the oil extracted from their blubber, they’ve benefited from protections from Mexican and U.S. governments, but especially from the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972. Despite their colossal proliferation, the topic of inbreeding occasionally arises. “I would assume it’s an issue, as their genetic variability would be low,” said Orr. “If something (e.g., disease) attacked them, I would assume that their population would decrease significantly due to the bottleneck effect.” Nevertheless, for those observing the behavior of thousands of elephant seals on a daily basis, one wouldn’t know such a threat could occur, especially for a species that has fully recovered and continues to establish new rookeries between Central and Northern California. n

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SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series Today! Join Leslie Dinaberg in conversation with

Visit sbce.events for details

Julia Screening with the Directors Fri, May 20th, 7-9PM at Garvin Theatre Don't miss your chance to get up close and personal with Julie Cohen & Betsy West, the Oscar-nominated directors of JULIA, as they talk about how they make movies about trailblazing women and the men who support them at Santa Barbara City College.

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Thursday, May 19 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

*Tickets are $20

Rebuilding Our Food System

Sat, May 21st, 3-5PM at Garvin Theatre Hear directly from local and national changemakers on the cutting-edge of the sustainability and regenerative agriculture movements. They'll discuss how Santa Barbara is fighting for a better food system.

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*Tickets are $25 and includes light bites & drinks

Taste of Santa Barbara Wines Sun, May 22nd, 1-4 PM at El Presidio de Santa Bárbara State Historic Park

Taste wines from all of Santa Barbara County’s award-winning AVA’s in one historic setting at El Presidio. While you’re tasting, hear from some of Santa Barbara County’s top winemakers in conversation. *Tickets are $50 and includes cheese & wines

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ives

alternat

FOOD &DRINK

p. 47

Hungry Planet Taking Over Plant-Based Meat World COURTESY

E

arly mass-market attempts at plant-based

meats — those mealy, easy-to-burn Gardenburgers and cartoonish, oddly bendy Morningstar bacon strips quickly come to mind — made it easy for meat-eaters to continue making fun of their vegetarian friends. “Those were made for vegetarians,” explains Jody Boyman, cofounder of the fast-growing plant-based meat empire Hungry Planet. “We didn’t care about vegans and vegetarians,” said the Santa Barbara resident of that persistently small subsect of eaters. “We decided we needed to make meat directly from plants that would satisfy even the most carnivorous meateating guy.”

Cofounder Jody Boyman Targets Flexitarians BY MATT KETTMANN

BETTER THAN MEAT? My diet, I’ve learned, is full flexitarian: dominated by veggies, fruits, grains, and soy at most meals, but typically involving a daily dalliance with some sort of fish or meat. I’ve always been open to trying out alternative meats and am a fan of Impossible Meat, using it for burgers, sauces, and so forth with regularity. But after trying just four Hungry Planet meats — I put grilled chicken strips on a Caesar salad; slapped crisp and fried chicken patties on sweet rolls with spicy barbecue sauce; tossed Italian sausage crumble into eggs; and dipped pork gyoza in a soy-ginger sauce — I could quickly see why the company is well-positioned to tackle the world. We’ve already bought more of the fried chicken. “When it’s easy and affordable, you will choose something plant-based if it tastes great, reminds you of meat, is pretty healthy, and feels good in your stomach,” said Boyman, describing me exactly. Her own plant-based diet started 45 years ago as

MAKING MEAT BETTER: Siblings Jody and Todd Boyman founded the plant-based-meat company Hungry Planet to help reduce the impacts that the meat industry has on the environment while providing a wide range of delicious alternatives.

a grammar school student in St. Louis, Missouri. “I didn’t know anyone else who was. I didn’t know there was a term for it,” she recalled. “I was one of those kids that rescued dogs dumped on county roads or the bird that fell out of its nest or earthworms on the pavement after a rainstorm. I was that kid who was very, very connected to the natural world.” It was a “wildly unpopular” stance in the 1970s. “I just decided that animals didn’t need to be part of my diet,” she said. “Of course, everyone thought I was gonna die.” Her sister, now an OB-GYN in Vermont, also went plant-based at a young age. Over the years, they pestered their brother, the other Hungry Planet cofounder, Todd Boyman, with data and science about the environmental and health benefits until he, too, saw the wisdom. “We’re slaughtering 80 billion animals per year and we’re struggling to feed seven billion humans — there’s something drastically wrong with that equation,” said Boyman. “We need to be feeding plants to people and not running them through animals first.”

MAKING CHANGE Life went on, with Jody working as a wildlife photographer, clinical psychologist, and small business owner. She married the Pulitzer Prize–winning cartoonist Berkeley Breathed, and they moved to Santa Barbara in 1997 to raise a family. As parents, Jody and Todd became more concerned about the world’s trajectory, especially since many of the plant-based diet lessons they’d learned predicted so much of today’s environmental tumult. “They are inheriting this incredibly damaged earth that we are

FOOD & DRINK

With 18 items for sale in restaurants and 17 products on retail shelves across the country, Hungry Planet is targeting the much larger category of flexitarians, those folks who aim to eat healthy and conscientiously but still love a good chunk of meat on occasion. With textured soy protein as a common base, the company’s line includes nine different meats — beef, chicken, pork, lamb, turkey, crab, chorizo, Italian sausage, and breakfast sausage — that come in an array of forms, from ground to cutlets to entire meals, like chicken piccata, Salisbury steak, and penne pasta with sausage. “We have the most complete range of plant-based meat on the market,” said Boyman, who was recently asked to develop plant-based camel meat while visiting the Middle East. “We’re constantly trying to demystify plant-based meats for people who clearly want to be in the category but are just a little confused by it. For us, it was much more than a beef and burger play, which is what our competition was doing.”

bequeathing to them,” said Jody of the next generation. “It’s heartbreaking to me.” So the siblings decided to work on a project together that could bring forth meaningful results. “Other than feeling powerless, we looked at the single biggest lever we have as individuals to affect change, and it comes down to food choice,” she said, noting that even just one plant-based meal a day can save 200,000 gallons of water annually. “Any way you dig into the data, you find it to be very, very compelling.” They hired chefs and food scientists to work on recipes that were nutritious, loaded with protein and fiber, and only composed of 10 or so ingredients — not the dozens that are in so many other alternatives. As a long-distance trail runner, Boyman needed Hungry Planet products to be as healthy as possible. “We have about half the calories and no saturated fat,” said Boyman, comparing competitors to Hungry Planet, which also tends to be lower in sodium and higher in fiber. “We’re fiber-deficient in our culture. It doesn’t have anything to do with protein. But our food is loaded with both, so take your pick.” She’s also proud of the environmental benefits, which a third-party firm determined includes a 90 percent savings on both CO2 and water and a 70 percent reduction in land use. Then they sat on the idea for a while, waiting for the right timing to launch. That came in 2017, and they stepped hard on the gas. Within a couple of years, Hungry Planet launched as a restaurant-focused company, teamed with the largest distributor in North America. “We were sitting back and giving each other high fives,” said Boyman. “Literally three weeks later, COVID hit.” They had to throw their two-year plan for retail products onto the fastest track ever. “People are still hungry,” Jody recalled thinking. “They’re just hungry at home.” Very quickly, they had nearly 20 retail products to sell, and they caught on quickly.

FAST COMPANY Now, Hungry Planet products are sold in grocery stores from Hawai‘i to the East Coast, appearing on the frozen shelves of Sprouts, Lazy Acres, Albertsons, and many other chains, with Costco on the near horizon. There are more than 100 recipes on the Hungry Planet website, usually providing 1:1 replacement formulas for using these meats in everyday dishes. Restaurants are also back as a big customer, including Shoreline Beach Café, Chase Restaurant, Mesa Burger, Natural Café, and many more in Santa Barbara alone. The first funding round raised about $30 million, and another one is being planned. Though they’re up to more than 40 employees, they’ll need many more — and more strategically located facilities across the world — to accomplish their goals. “Our name is Hungry Planet. It’s not Hungry Santa Barbara. It’s not Hungry U.S.A.,” said Boyman. “Our vision from the very beginning was to be ubiquitous globally over time.”

See hungryplanetfoods.com.

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FOOD & DRINK

MATT KETTMANN

F

or about 15 years, some of the most expensive and critically beloved wines in Santa Barbara County were made inside of cramped warehouses on the outskirts of Buellton. A chip shot away from the buzzing freeway, these nondescript, nearly windowless buildings were home to Jonata and The Hilt, some bottlings of which commanded $100-plus prices upon release. It was far from a bucolic wine country spread, and rather modest, given that the proprietor is billionaire Stanley Kroenke, who also owns the cult Napa winery Screaming Eagle as well as the Los Angeles Rams, Denver Nuggets, Colorado DEES DIALS IT IN: Winemaker Matt Dees started at Jonata Avalanche, and Arsenal teams, among others. in 2004, started The Hilt in 2008, and moved into his estate The original estate vineyard nearby in Ballard winery in 2019. The brands’ hospitality center opened last Canyon is perfectly pretty, but building a visitorAugust near Lompoc. serving winery there wasn’t really in the political cards. So in 2014, the winery — under the direction bottlings of the past, such as Vanguard and Old of longtime winemaker Matt Dees — purchased Guard, they are showcasing single vineyards on Rancho Salsipuedes on the extreme southwest- the labels now, namely Radian and Bentrock, ern edge of the Sta. Rita Hills, just outside of though they do still use some old-vine Sanford Lompoc. The ranch’s increasingly celebrated & Benedict in blends. Radian, Bentrock, and Puerta del Mar vineyards They’ve learned a lot about Radian, which is would support the pinot noir and chardonnay shaped like a huge, steep ski-mountain bowl, focus of The Hilt, which Dees started in 2008 and Bentrock, which cruises across the lower as a Burgundian brother to pair with the Rhône benches on more graceful slopes. “Preconceived and Bordeaux grapes of Jonata. But the 3,600- notions are full of shit,” said Dees, referring to the acre Salsipuedes also included space for an estate old notion that Bentrock was best for chardonwinery and hospitality complex. nay and Radian was made for pinot. Bentrock By the harvest of 2019, Dees and his right- pinot is quite good, it turns out, and Radian hand man, Drew Pickering, were happily out of chardonnay is downright great, as evidenced by the Buellton warehouses and making wine in a a very crisp vintage in our glass. “It’s just an icy large, modern facility that they helped design, place,” said Dees, “and the wine tends to be icy.” nothing short of a winemaker’s dream. Protected from the wind a bit more, Bentrock “This place has changed our wines com- shows a broader style, at least initially. “Bentrock pletely,” explained Dees earlier this year over tightens up at the end of the sip,” opined Pickersome recent vintages. “I used to think that 98 ing. “Radian starts tight up and then opens up.” percent of terroir was the vineyard, and 2 percent Though most consumers still fawn was human. Then it became 55 percent over pinot, Dees remains as bullish as human and 45 percent vineyard. any winemaker in the region on how But now I think that the facility distinctive chardonnay can be from the Sta. Rita Hills — even better than is a critical part of that formula Burgundy, he acknowledges with too. It makes a big difference.” We were tasting inside of the an invisible wink. “Salsipuedes winery’s latest unveiling: a brandwas really a pinot vineyard when new, Howard Backen–designed we bought it,” said Dees, who’s NN hospitality center in an upscale barn increased chardonnay from A M T T T KE T A M about 5 percent to more than 15 persetting next to the winery, where visiY B cent of vineyards today. “I don’t know if tors can enjoy flights in the comfort of there will ever be parity, but it really should be farmhouse chic decor while overlooking the extremely chalky cliffs on this windswept much closer.” corner of the Sta. Rita Hills. Opened last August, We then tasted some of the pinots — Bentrock “The Barn at The Hilt Estate,” as it’s officially being a bit softer, the estate blend right down known, serves both Jonata and The Hilt wines in the middle, and the Radian quite dark and full flights that range from $50 to $85 in price. of familiar black cherry. Then we got into the “We are vintage-happy here — we constantly Jonata, including the merlot-based Fenix, syrahchange what we’re pouring,” said the center’s meets-cabernet sauvignon Todos, Sangre syrah, manager Christine Doran, who plans to use the and the cab-based Desafio, of which we tried the on-site commercial kitchen and the rest of the 2015 vintage to see how well the wine ages. “The beauty of Jonata wines is that they are property as time goes on. “We have every intention of not only developing a food program but a so layered that they require checking in all the tasting that walks through the vineyard.” time,” said Dees. Now that The Barn exists, The Barn is really the only way to see how everyone can do just that. Dees and Pickering are moving The Hilt in new directions. Instead of focusing on style-driven See thehiltestate.com.

ES BOTTLARRELS &B


C

arp Moon Café is now open at 4991 Carpinteria Avenue in Carpinteria, the former home of Juice N Things and Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. “We refuse to compromise on quality in our coffee shop,” says owner Laura Samperio. “That’s why we source our fresh ingredients from local farmers’ markets. No matter what time of year, you can be sure you’re eating the best of the season.” Carp Moon Café is available for dine-in or takeout. “We have worked to package our meals in a way that lets you bring the quality of our meals into your home,” said Samperio. “We always love to see you in person, but even when we can’t, we ensure that your dining experience is top-notch. With many years of experience serving in the finest restaurants, our staff is excited to present their vision to you and all our guests.” Carp Moon Café is open 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.

Santa Barbara

EATS & DRINKS

COURTESY PHOTOS

Carp Moon Café Opens

Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian coffee ceremony every Monday from 10am to 12pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm

PASCUCCI SOLSTICE FUNDRAISER: Summer Sol-

NO CHAINS IN CARP? Reader Primetime says

SEASONAL CUISINE: The new Carp Moon Café focuses on farmers’ market shopping to serve fresh food both for dining in or taking home.

that the Carpinteria City Council is asking for an ordinance that could restrict future chain or franchise businesses to keep the small town feel. That could mean all fast-food chains, or a limited number of franchise operations, or a certain geographic exception area. I am told that Ojai has a similar ordinance, along with several other California small towns. MCDONALD’S DONE: McDonald’s Corporation

publicly announced that they are closing all 850 locations in Russia, yet, with little fanfare, their downtown Santa Barbara spot at 1221 State Street is also getting the axe in July. I don’t believe the two events are related. RED PEPPER CHANGES: Readers Brendan, Laura,

Dianne, and Richard tell me that it looks like plans for a Red Pepper location on De la Vina Street, breathlessly reported in this column in June 2021, may have been scrapped. I am told that the alcohol license notice is gone from the window and the banner that said “Coming Soon” has been flipped around with “For Sale” written on it. Last summer, a Red Pepper rep at their 282 Orange Avenue headquarters in Goleta confirmed the opening of a second location 2840 De la Vina Street, the former home of New Si Chuan Garden, Yen Ching Restaurant, and Andy’s Chuck Wagon. Instead, Red Pepper opened a second restaurant last December at 966 Embarcadero

Del Mar, Suite. C, in Isla Vista, the former home of Dumpling King. CANDY FOR CALLE REAL: Reader Sande reports that

See’s Candies is opening a new shop in the Calle Real shopping place. “My neighbor’s house is a vacation rental, and yesterday, two See’s construction crews arrived and will stay there ’til July, while they work on the new store,” said Sande. I stopped by Calle Real in Goleta to take a look and found about a dozen empty storefronts, all but one sporting a for-lease sign on the front. The one without a sign is at 5731 Calle Real, immediately to the right of Kyle’s Kitchen, and the windows are papered over. Boxes of supplies and a ladder, ready for action, are the lonely occupants in an otherwise empty room. The confectionery has stores locally in La Cumbre Plaza and Paseo Nuevo Mall, and, if the rumor is true, this would mark See’s Candies’ return to Goleta. Reader Suzanne says that the dessert destination briefly had a storefront on the north side of Calle Real a few years ago. There are 297 See’s Candies locations in the United States, with 202 in California. It was founded by Charles See; his wife, Florence; and his mother, Mary, in Los Angeles in 1921. It’s been owned by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Corporation since 1972.

FOOD & DRINK

stice is back, and one of the beloved preparade events is the “Dine-Out” fundraiser, in which fun-loving, costume-clad volunteers act as hosts, servers, bartenders, and drink runners. This year’s event is on May 25, 5-10 p.m., at Pascucci, where owner Laura Knight will turn over her Italian establishment at 509 State Street to Solstice volunteers for an entire evening—with the wise exception of the kitchen staff. Guests are encouraged to come in costume—the theme this year is “Shine”—and all sales go directly to support this year’s parade on June 25 and the festival in Alameda Park on June 24 and 25.

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The

Angry Poodle Start your weekend off right with the Angry Poodle in your inbox on Saturday mornings.

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John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

A SERIES OF LOOPS GEOFF DYER ON TENNIS AND TENNYSON

Among many other things, this book dwells on the infirmities of aging. When did that become a preoccupation for you? I noticed that things started going wrong almost exactly from my 60th birthday. Since then, I have warned all my friends in their late fifties. Now, I always say to them, “Enjoy your youth.” The book has an unusual structure. Can you explain what it is and how you arrived at it? Nietzsche is probably the single most important figure in it, particularly his notion of the eternal recurrence. That concept started me thinking about some kind of loop or circularity thing. You divide each of the three sections into 60 chapters. Did you have the number of seconds in a minute in mind? Or the number of minutes in an hour? Both. Sixty seconds in a minute times 60 minutes in an hour gives you

COURTESY

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JOHN CLEESE: STILL SILLY

Geoff Dyer

3,600. Multiply that by 24 hours in a day, and you get 86,400 seconds. At the end of the book, as a sort of little treat, I point out that the book itself has 86,400 words. Can I say that’s not a coincidence? The book exhibits a tightly woven fabric of reference. How do you understand the way that you mix disparate references? I’ve always been at odds with any kind of specialization. And also, I’ve always been very resistant to this idea of some sort of separation between that which is studied and that which is lived. You can’t make sense of the things that are happening in your life properly without the support of literature. How do you make that resistance to specialization work on the page? I employ tonal elasticity. I go from one sentence making a knock-about kind of joke to a serious point and then back again. And ideally, that kind of switcheroo might even be contained within the same sentence. As a result, some

of the things are both serious and jokes at the same time. Nietzsche exemplifies this. For him, a joke is always an idea in extreme and miniature. How do you explain your success in this very personal idiom? With my books, part of the excitement of reading them is trying to work out, “What is this? Exactly what am I reading? How is it meant to be read?” What can we expect from your upcoming conversation with Sameer Pandya? It’ll be a mixture of me reading certain bits and conversation with Sameer, who, of course, is a very, very accomplished tennis player as well as being a novelist. –Charles Donelan Parallel Stories: The Last Days of Roger Federer: Considering Creativity and Aging with Geoff Dyer will take place in the SBMA’s Mary Craig Auditorium on Thursday, May 26, at 5:30 p.m. For information and to make reservations, visit sbma.net.

COUR TESY

THE WAR SHIRT Michael Downey’s remarkable courage and resiliency are fully on display in this intimate one-person show directed by Rod Lathim. As a gay Black man coming of age in California in the 1970s, Downey often felt out of step and ahead of his time. The “war shirt” of the show’s title refers to a Native American tradition that Downey’s father shares with him in a moment of cross-generational connection. Downey’s warm and animated delivery renders his story with great pathos and considerable humor. This virtual performance, filmed at the Marjorie Luke Theatre, can be viewed at luketheatre.org. —CD

L I F E

COUR TESY

n his essay “The Critic as Artist,” Oscar Wilde famously declared that “the highest criticism is really the record of one’s own soul.” More delightful than history and more concrete than philosophy, for Wilde, the best kind of non-fiction writing deals with “the spiritual moods and imaginative passions of the mind.” No 21stcentury writer has taken this advice more to heart than Geoff Dyer, the author most recently of a charming and highly idiosyncratic work of “highest criticism,” titled The Last Days of Roger Federer and Other Endings. Dyer will appear in the Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s (SBMA) Parallel Stories series on Thursday, May 26, conversing with novelist and UCSB professor Sameer Pandya. I spoke with Dyer recently by phone from his home in Venice Beach. The following interview has been edited for length and clarity.

John Cleese

John Cleese will always enjoy an exalted position in our city’s pantheon of current and former residents. In addition to making substantial contributions to the residential real estate sector, Cleese graced our society with then-wife Alyce Faye and raised his daughter Camilla here. Camilla Cleese writes and performs comedy like her father, and she will join him on Wednesday, May 25, for a performance at The Granada Theatre called An Evening of “Exceptional Silliness” with John Cleese. Monty Python’s Flying Circus, the absurdist sketch comedy program Cleese created with Graham Chapman, Eric Idle, Terry Jones, Michael Palin, and Terry Gilliam for the BBC between 1969 and 1974, ranks among the most influential television programs of all time. Saturday Night Live, for example, is unimaginable without the Python precedent. Three additional films and many individual side projects secured lasting fame for all the group members, and none more so than Cleese. In addition to the long-awaited stage musical version of A Fish Called Wanda, Cleese told me he has started writing a stage comedy adaptation of Monty Python’s Life of Brian. Cleese considers the 1979 hit comedy about Brian Cohen, a Jewish-Roman man who must bear with being mistaken for Jesus, to be “the most important thing we ever did.” At 82, Cleese generates ideas as rapidly as he tweets. One such project, a news documentary on cancel culture, was announced by Channel 4 television last year. Cleese has been offended by how easily other people take offense at comedy in recent years. Here’s hoping that this Granada evening keeps the promise of “exceptional silliness.”For tickets and information, visit granadasb.com or call (805) 899-2222. –CD

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REVIEWS

TOM LONG PHOTOS

THE SMASHING PUMPKINS

& ENTERTAINMENT 

POP, ROCK & JAZZ

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5/21: MET OPERA

PUMPKINHEADS: The Smashing Pumpkins never shied away from blending the soft and the heavy into a seamless mish-mash. PUMPKINHEADS

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Downton Abbey: A New Era* (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 2:30, 3:55, 5:20, 6:45, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 11:40, 1:05, 2:30, 3:55, 5:20, 6:45, 8:15. Thur: 2:30, 3:55, 5:20, 8:15. The Bad Guys (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 2:40, 5:05, 7:30.Sat/Sun: 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:30. Thur: 2:40, 7:30. Bob’s Burgers* (PG13): Thur: 5:05, 7:45.

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Men (R): Fri: 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45. Sat/Sun: 12:05, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45. Mon-Wed: 2:30, 4:55, 7:20. Thur: 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45. Firestarter (R): Fri: 2:10, 4:40, 10:00. Sat/Sun: 11:45, 2:10, 4:40, 10:00. Mon: 2:10, 4:50. Thur: 2:10. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri: 1:30, 2:20, 3:20, 4:20, 5:10, 6:15, 7:10, 8:00, 9:05, 10:05. Sat/Sun: 11:30, 12:35, 1:30, 2:20, 3:20, 4:20, 5:10, 6:15, 7:10, 8:00, 9:05, 10:05. Mon-Wed:1:30, 2:20, 3:20, 4:20, 5:10, 6:15, 7:10, 8:00. Thur: 2:20, 5:10, 8:00. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): Fri: 3:40, 6:45, 9:55. Sat/Sun: 12:25, 3:40, 6:45, 9:55. Mon-Wed: 1:55, 5:00, 8:15. Thur: 1:55. The Northman (R): Fri-Wed: 7:00. Top Gun: Maverick* (PG13): Thur: 3:15, 4:00, 4:45, 5:30, 6:15, 7:00, 7:45, 8:30, 9:15, 10:00, 10:45.

HITCHCOCK Downton Abbey A New Era*: (PG): Fri Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:30, 7:05. The Duke (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20.

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Men (R): Fri/Sat: 2:20, 4:45, 7:10, 9:35. Sun: 2:20, 4:45, 7:10. Mon-Thur: 3:20, 5:50, 8:15. Doctor Strange 2 (PG13): Fri/Sat: 1:00, 2:45, 3:45, 5:40, 6:45, 8:30, 9:45. Sun: 12:20, 2:45, 5:40, 8:30. Mon: 2:45, 3:45, 5:40, 8:30. Tue: 2:45, 3:45, 5:40, 6:45, 8:30. Wed: 2:45, 3:45, 5:40, 8:30. Thur: 2:45, 5:40, 8:30. The Northman (R): Fri-Wed: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00. Thur: 2:00. MET Opera: Lucia Di Lammermoor* (PG): Sat: 9:55. Star Trek* (PG): Sun: 3:00, 7:00. Mon, Wed: 7:00. Top Gun: Maverick* (PG13): Thur: 3:15, 5:30, 6:30, 8:45, 9:45, 10:45.

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inimitably nasal snarl reverberated in pristine form. In perhaps the most delightful moment amid this album-hopping set list, it takes a moment to clock that the menacing dirge in the mid-section is a cover of none other than Talking Heads’ “Once in a Lifetime.” The alt titans ripped the guts out of the original’s composition and stitched back together a bloody rendering in its wake. Pinned to the back-and-forth of Corgan and Iha’s confrontational delivery, the pop masterwork was wholly transmogrified by the group’s menacing approach to angst—with enough self-awareness to pull it off with a wink. That doesn’t mean the show didn’t have its softer moments. While faithful renditions of crowdpleasing anthems dotted the set, the grandiose opus known as “Tonight, Tonight” shrank into an acoustic rendition with just Corgan and Iha onstage, and it turned into an amphitheater-wide singalong. Meanwhile, “Disarm” compartmentalized its orchestral opulence into synth form. With three-quarters of the original lineup intact, the Pumpkins’ post-reunion showcase proved to be not so much a return to form as an update to it. —Caitlin Kelley At the Santa Barbara Bowl, Fri., May 13.

Firestarter (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:40, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 3:20, 5:40, 8:00. Thur: 8:00. Family Camp (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:05. Sat: 2:20. Sonic the Hedgehog 2 (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:45, 7:30. The Bad Guys (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:30, 7:00. Sat/Sun: 2:05, 4:30, 7:00. Thur: 4:30. Lost City (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 7:40. Sat/Sun: 4:55, 7:40. Massive Talent (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:20, 7:50. Sat/Sun: 2:45, 5:20, 7:50. Bob’s Burgers* (PG13): Thur: 5:30, 8:15.

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here we were on Friday the 13th at the Santa Barbara Bowl, as the Smashing Pumpkins’ selfdescribed “creepy vampire,” William Patrick Corgan, emerged onstage to Kubrickian flourishes. While founding guitarist James Iha crafted a running joke about the town’s “moderate temperatures” feeling too nice for rock ’n’ roll, there were some environmental cues that the devil’s music would reign alongside the “Cherub Rock” on this superstitious date. After all, a near-full moon—waxing gibbous at 92.2 percent—hovered over the outdoor amphitheater filled to the brim with SP merch. Long before the mix and match of aesthetics like pastel goth or dark fairycore, there were the Smashing Pumpkins, who never shied away from blending the soft and the heavy into a seamless mish-mash. Yet, amid the band’s prismatic relationship to genre agnosticism, the, well, heaviest emphasis was on metal at the Bowl. Between a pre-show soundtrack spinning bands like Mercyful Fate and, later, Corgan’s cheeky direction to emulate Eddie Van Halen during “Ava Adore,” the shred was strong in “Riffland” on this night. Rumors of the front man’s voice being shot were given the metaphorical middle finger as his

Downton Abbey A New Era* (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 1:40, 3;05, 4:30, 5:55, 7:30, 8:45. Sat/Sun: 12:15, 1:40, 3;05, 4:30, 5:55, 7:30, 8:45. Everything Everywhere All at Once (R): Fri-Thur: 1:55, 5:00, 8:05. Fantastic Beast: The Secret of Dumbledore (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45.

Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:45, 7:45. Sun: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Top Gun: Maverick* (PG13): Thur: 4:30, 7:45.

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GUITAR HERO: Three-quarters of the original lineup were in tow after founding guitarist James Iha rejoined in 2018.


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nder the artistic direction of Presented by UCSB Arts & Ashley Wheater, the Joffrey Bal- Lectures. At The Granada let has developed one of the most Theatre, Thu., May 12. exciting programs for contemporary choreography in the world. Thursday evening’s program at The Granada Theatre featured dances old and new, including Birthday Variations, a traditional piece by company cofounder Gerald Arpino from 1986, and Under the Trees’ Voices by Nicolas Blanc, which premiered in 2021. A shorter comic piece, The Sofa by Itzik Galili, followed, preparing the way for a spectacular finale featuring Justin Peck’s 2017 work The Times Are Racing. Birthday Variations, set to music by Giuseppe Verdi, was a treat for the tutu and pointe-shoe fans. The work’s symmetrical BIG AIR: A grand jeté from the Joffrey Ballet’s Birthday Variations. Variations. plan offered three variations for solo dancers on either side of a central pas de deux performed ing compositions for groups, with Miranda Silveira by dancers Yumi Kanazawa and José Pablo Castro as the third-movement soloist. This work was one of Cuevas. For the rest of the evening, Birthday Varia- the most thrilling performances on the Granada stage tions functioned as a reminder and, for newcomers, this season, with Blanc demonstrating an abundance a primer in proper ballet construction and technique. of ideas and a profound feeling for Ezio Bosso’s score. The works that followed made for a striking The other big piece of the night, The Times Are Racing, contrast. While the technical accomplishments of showed just how brilliantly the company responds the dancers remained first-rate, the choreography to the considerable demands of Justin Peck’s equally stretched and transformed into a kaleidoscopic show-stopping choreography. Thanks to UCSB Arts vision of 21st-century dance forms. In Under the Trees’ & Lectures for bringing the best in contemporary Voices, the emphasis fell on complex and rapidly shift- dance to Santa Barbara. —Charles Donelan

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sanctuary through stained-glass windows as the ensemble, with Latvian baritone Valdis Jansons as soloist, unveiled the Duruflé opus. Based on Gregorian chant sources but with a clearly modern touch, the music itself possesses a relative light atmosphere compared to heavier early models by Mozart, Verdi, and Brahms, flecked with post-impressionist qualities and harmonies. The religious/spiritual palette shifts with Williams’s pleasant enough Five Mystical Songs, a rich showcase for Jansons’s supple vocal gifts here. The English composer was agnostic but based this work on texts by priest/poet George Herbert — work which, incidentally, was referenced in Sunday morning’s sermon by the church’s new pastor, Ann Conklin. For encores, Wasserman called on the timely hymn “Prayer for Ukraine” and Mozart’s brief, entrancing “Ave Verum Corpus,” leaving a lingering contemplative beauty in the mind/heart. —Josef Woodard

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SANTA BARBARA CHORAL SOCIETY s a literal expression and example of a mass of voices projecting a singular musical vision, live choral music seems especially cathartic as we make our hopeful-if-wary way out of the worst of the pandemic. Santa Barbara is lucky to have a bold proponent of the form in the Santa Barbara Choral Society (SBCS), whose spring concert last weekend at the First Presbyterian Church, with full orchestra in tow, conAt First Presbyterian veyed healing power, sonoChurch, Sat., May 14. rous glory, and multi-layered poetry. Bearing the title Pax + Amare / Peace + Love, the concert served up a refreshingly distinctive French/ British program of Maurice Duruflé’s masterful mid-20th-century Requiem and Ralph Vaughan Williams’s Five Mystical Songs. Overall, the concert imbued qualities of vernal renewal and reverential requiem, in the time of COVID and the ongoing Ukrainian tragedy. An impressive and dedicated choral ensemble, SBCS has been led by JoAnne Wasserman for a good three decades now and is on the brink of next year’s 75th anniversary (seemingly a magic number in the 805, given the Music Academy of the West’s 75th b-day this summer, and the Ojai Music Festival’s 75th last year). The Presbyterian Church was a more-than-fitting setting for one of the finest 20th-century requiems, in this magnificent and recently renovated Santa Barbara 20th-century church landmark. At dusk on Saturday evening, the light filtered into the

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF MAY 19

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): “The only way to the truth is through blasphemy,” declared Aries author Flannery O’Connor. I appreciate the cheeky sentiment, but I don’t believe that all truth requires blasphemy. In many cases, rebellion, irreverence, and skepticism may be enough to pry loose hidden and buried information. Outright blasphemy isn’t necessary. What does this have to do with you? Well, I’m hoping you will be feisty and audacious in your quest for interesting truths. As you dig, I invite you to be less than perfectly polite. Don’t be rude or unkind, of course. Just be charmingly bold.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): “I am so beautiful, sometimes people weep when they see me,” declares comedian Margaret Cho. I would love for you to summon her level of self-esteem and bravado in the coming weeks. According to my interpretation of the astrological omens, you now have the right and duty to boost your self-worth. All of creation is conspiring with you to develop more faith in yourself. And if you do the work to deepen your confidence and self-esteem, there will be an added bonus: a health breakthrough. As spiritual author Caroline Myss says, “Belief in oneself is required for healing.” My prediction: You will rouse an enhanced power to get the soul medicine you need.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): According to the blogger Artemisiasea, “The grandeur of life is the attempt, not the solution. It’s about behaving as beautifully as one can under completely impossible circumstances; making room for what breathes in the presence of the attempt—in the coming-to-be.” I invite you to embrace that wisdom in the coming weeks, Gemini. You won’t be dealing with impossible circumstances, but you may have to navigate your way through fascinating brainteasers and heart riddles. Whatever your destination might turn out to be, enjoy the ride with all the verve you can summon. At least for now, put aside your longing for particular results and instead simply live your life as if it were a magnificent work of art.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): It will be in your interest to change more than usual in the coming weeks. I suppose you could wait around passively and scramble to adjust as life flings challenges your way. But the better approach would be to make conscious decisions about how you want to transform. Identify the situations that would most benefit from modification and then initiate the transitions. Rather than depending on fate to provide you with random wake-up calls, choose constructive wake-up calls that are fun and invigorating.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): “If everyone likes you, it probably means you aren’t saying much,” declared politician Donna Brazile. I suspect you will disprove her theory in the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will have a lot to say; your communications will be even more interesting than usual. And yet, I also expect you will receive extra respect and appreciation from others. While you may articulate ideas that are challenging to some, you will do so with enough charisma to disarm agitated reactions. A winning combination: expressiveness and approval.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Have you heard of Virgo adventurer Reinhold Messner? The man is a marvel, and not just because he’s a passionate environmental activist. He was the first mountaineer to reach the top of Mt. Everest alone, as well as the first to ascend Everest without supplemental oxygen. No one before him had ever climbed all 14 of the world’s peaks higher than 26,000 feet. He has transited Greenland and Antarctica without the aid of dog sleds or snowmobiles. He also completed a solo trip across the Gobi Desert. I propose we make Messner your inspirational role model for the next four weeks. You may not achieve history-making triumphs like him, but you could surpass what you assumed were your limits. I trust that you will break at least one of your personal records.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The world is a very puzzling place. If you’re not willing to be puzzled, you just become a replica of someone else’s mind.” Author Noam Chomsky said that. It’s useful counsel for you right now. I’ll go even further. I will advise you to relish the healthy pleasures of being both mysterious and mystified. Seek out fertile enigmas and be a fertile enigma yourself. Explore the rejuvenating wisdom of being indefinable and uncategorizable. Exult in the quizzical joys of Eternal Paradox.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Have you ever contemplated the beauty of the people and animals you care for and thought, “I would love to give them the strongest blessings I have to give, the smartest love I can express, and the best listening I’m able to provide.” If so, Scorpio, the coming days will be an excellent time to do that. You will have an extra capacity to offer exceptional gifts that are useful and inspirational. You will be at the peak of your ability to home in on what your beloveds need.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian author Madeleine L’Engle told us, “The discoveries don’t come when you’re looking for them. They come when for some reason you’ve let go of conscious control.” That approach isn’t absolutely true, but it may be useful for you to deploy in the coming weeks. I invite you to relinquish at least a modicum of your conscious control. And if zesty discoveries start flowing in, consider relinquishing even a bit more conscious control.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Is it a legend or a true story? Scholars disagree about whether Capricorn scientist Isaac Newton really was spurred to formulate the theory of gravity when an apple fell from the tree he was sitting beneath. This much is certain: Newton lived in the home near the famous apple tree. And that tree is alive today, 380 years after his birth. Ripe apples still fall from it. Is there an equivalent landmark or keystone from your own past, Capricorn—where an important insight arose or pivotal event happened? The coming weeks would be a good time to revisit that power spot, at least in your imagination, in quest of fresh inspiration.

Join us in reading May’s book of the month! MAY’S THEME:

LITERARY FICTION

BO OK OF T HE MONT H :

Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera independent.com/indybookclub

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian poet Jack Gilbert devoted himself to soulful beauty. I swooned when I first read his line, “We must unlearn the constellations to see the stars.” I cried for joy when he said, “We must have the stubbornness to accept our gladness in the ruthless furnace of this world.” On the other hand, I suspect Jack may have been overly consumed with his pursuit of lyrical moments. His girlfriend Linda Gregg said, “All Jack ever wanted to know was that he was awake—that the trees in bloom were almond trees—and to walk down the road to get breakfast. He never cared if he was poor or had to sleep on a park bench.” I bring this up, dear Aquarius, hoping you will avoid Gilbert’s lack of attention to practical matters. In the coming weeks, I invite you to be your extravagant, idiosyncratic, interesting self to the max. But also be sure to eat healthy food, engage in pleasurable exercise, and get plenty of rejuvenating sleep —preferably in a comfortable bed rather than on a park bench.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): The @UberFacts Twitter account informs me that if you were to consume the amount of food equivalent to what a hummingbird eats, you would eat 300 hamburgers or 7,800 cabbages per day. To match the amount of exercise a hummingbird gets while burning all those calories, you’d have to do approximately 37 bazillion jumping jacks. You will never do this, of course. But in the coming weeks, you may be more metaphorically hungry than usual. I predict you will be voracious for new information and novel experiences and fresh ideas. Not 300 hamburgers or 7,800 cabbages’ worth—but still, a lot. My advice: Have fun being insatiably curious and greedy for stimulation.

Homework: Is there a situation you’re being lazy about? Should you be more discerning? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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NONPROFIT SANTA BARBARA New House Seeks Executive Director Founded on 12‑step principles, Santa Barbara New House is a California nonprofit public benefit corporation that provides 3 clean and sober residences for men in recovery, with a capacity of approximately 98 beds. We are seeking a full‑time Executive Director with excellent management and financial skills, networking and fundraising abilities, who is knowledgeable and passionate about recovery.

ADMINISTRATIVE & SPECIAL PROJECTS ANALYST

CALIFORNIA NANOSYSTEMS INSTITUTE (CNSI) Performs a wide range of project‑based duties. Duties include: Serving as administrative lead for assigned strategic programming and projects including internship and workforce development programs and internal grant programs which includes developing promotional materials for CNSI website and social media for assigned programs, managing calls for applications and proposals, developing procedures and overseeing application management and review and ensuring active project communications; managing events and meetings for CNSI, coordinating all aspects of the events and meetings including public events, workshops, program reviews, information sessions and meetings; Serving as the subject matter expert, and processing travel, business meeting, exceptional and miscellaneous reimbursements, using UC Concur system for CNSI employees, ensuring all applicable policies are followed, assuring travel and entertainment reimbursement policies and practices for CNSI that both adhere to applicable UC policy and promote efficiency and streamlining; and assuring visitors to CNSI, including visitors to research facilities, have appropriate appointments, if needed, have executed appropriate paperwork and participated in any necessary training and have appropriate levels of access to CNSI facilities. Reqs: 1‑3 years of experience managing complex projects, including identifying/tracking performance metrics; Professional writing skills to correspond on behalf of the Institute. Demonstrated competence in the use of spreadsheet and database software. Notes: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. $26.00‑ 30.91/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/23/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34974

ADMINISTRATIVE NURSE SUPERVISOR

STUDENT HEALTH Responsible for the direct supervision of the Registered Nurses, Licensed Vocational Nurses, and Medical Assistants in accordance with the strategic direction, mission, vision and policies set by UCSB student health executive director, campus, and UCOP. This position facilitates teamwork among the multidisciplinary staff and coordinates with the Nursing Director in regards to staffing, strategic planning and general administrative duties. Functions as advisor to unit and administration. Analyzes and resolves problems, interprets policies and demonstrates solid subject matter knowledge. Exercises judgment within defined procedures and policies to determine appropriate action. Supervises staff to assure accountability and stewardship of department resources in compliance with departmental goals and objectives. Additionally, the Nursing Supervisor position involves providing basic and complex health care for actual or potential health problems with interventions including but not limited to observation, assessment, therapeutic treatment, prevention, physical and mental care and comfort, screenings, education and research within the nursing scope of practice. The Nursing Supervisor is required to comply with operational mandates from UCOP for system‑wide compliance required of Student Health Centers. The Nursing Supervisor is also required to comply with all regulations mandated by AAAHC (Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care) and the SHS governing body to maintain AAAHC Accreditation. Reqs:Must have a current and valid CA State RN license at all times during employment. Must be CPR and Basic Life Support (BLS) certification at all times during employment. Must have a minimum of 3 years of experience in a supervisory position. Notes: Satisfactory completion of background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of COVID‑19 vaccination and annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 30868

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DEVELOPMENT Oversees gift acknowledgements and recognition, and manages donor recognition societies. Provides expert analytical, strategic planning, project management and proactive department support for DRS. Works closely with the Senior Director, implementing strategic approaches to donor relations, including the development of donor retention programs that appreciates donor giving behavior and trends. Exercises strong and effective leadership and will be responsible for the development of new tools, protocols, criteria and best practices around donor acknowledgements and recognition, including for building naming and signage. This position must be staffed by an individual who demonstrates extraordinary professional writing skills, strong analytic and project management skills, as well as excellent interpersonal skills. Must communicate exceptionally well through verbal and written mediums, and must pay close attention to detail, ensuring accuracy in reporting as well as management of key processes. Must also possess the ability to work under pressure with tight timelines and handle frequent re‑prioritization of projects as necessary. Must sustain positive and mutually‑rewarding relations between the university and its donors and with campus stakeholders. Reqs: Outstanding professional writing, editing and proof‑reading skills, with a strong attention to detail. Strong communication and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively, both verbally and in writing. Comfortable working with complex policies, programs and proposals with the ability to develop new programs or procedures for implementation. Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Knowledge of common organization‑ or research‑specific computer applications preferred. Notes: Satisfactory completion of conviction history background check. Must be able to work occasional evenings and weekends in order to meet deadlines. $60,000 ‑ $70,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/31/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #35690

ASSOCIATE EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

OFFICE OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS Responsible for a wide range of functions and tasks related to the presentation of the UC Santa Barbara story and image to the local national and international media, as well as to the general public and the campus community, through a variety of print and electronic means. Manages the day‑to‑day activity of the team of writers, including freelancers, who prepare news releases and media advisories about campus events, activities and accomplishments. Drawing on critical in‑depth understanding of the professional field, searches out and develops ideas for news releases and long‑form feature articles and assigns them to the appropriate writer and provides coaching, as needed, on story development. Reqs: 4‑6 years of related experience, including in a supervisory role. 10+ years of broad experience in public relations, communications and/or journalism. 10+ years of excellent written, verbal, interpersonal communications, active listening and political acumen skills. 4‑6 years of expert management skills to select, train, evaluate, lead, direct, guide and motivate subordinate staff to produce high quality work; skill to take corrective action. Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism, Public Relations, and / or related field. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability to work some weekends and evenings in order to meet deadlines. $75,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for

employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/26/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #35625

BUSINESS & FINANCE MANAGER

CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE Responsible for the financial and business operations of the Office of the Chancellor, and provides high‑level management support for the Chancellor’s Division. Position requires comprehensive knowledge of University of California policies and procedures, excellent communication skills, a high level of initiative and self‑direction, and the ability to work under pressure of deadlines. The Business and Finance Manager is responsive, efficient, and organized, with flexibility to adapt to changing priorities. Demonstrates critical thinking, problem solving, and

decision making skills. Reqs: 1‑3 years Prior administrative, financial and/ or office management experience. Bachelor’s Degree BA/BS degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Ability to form a solid foundation regarding knowledge of UC policies and procedures. Knowledge of accounting and financial procedures. Strong verbal and written communications skills. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $70,000 ‑ 85,000yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/19/2022. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35066

Continued on p. 58

Isla Vista Recreation & Park District TWO FULL TIME GROUNDS WORKER POSITIONS AVAILABLE. Duties include digging, weeding, mowing, irrigation, and park maintenance. Health insurance and benefits included. Open until filled. Please submit job application and resume to ivrpd@ivparks.org or dial (805) 968-2017.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Fri 20

12:38 am 5.9

7:24 am -1.2

2:40 pm 3.4

6:06 pm 2.9

8:27 am -0.9

4:00 pm 3.6

Sat 21

1:45 am 5.4

7:27 pm 3.1

9:33 am -0.6

5:08 pm 3.9

9:24 pm 3.1

Sun 22 Mon 23

3:06 am 4.8

10:38 am -0.3

6:00 pm 4.2

11:17 pm 2.7

4:36 am 4.4

11:35 am 0.1

6:40 pm 4.6

Thu 19

Sunrise 5:50 Sunset 7:59

High

Tue 24

12:36 am 2.0

6:00 am 4.1

12:24 pm 0.4

7:14 pm 5.0

Wed 25

1:34 am 1.3

7:12 am 3.9

1:04 pm 0.8

7:44 pm 5.3

Thu 26

2:21 am 0.7

8:15 am 3.8

1:40 pm 1.2

8:12pm 5.6

30 D

22

7H

14 D source: tides.net

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“PR Stunts” -- it sounds almost the same.

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WANT TO BUY WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

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57. Pablo Picasso’s designer daughter 59. Musical Myra 1. Venus’s sister 60. “Fight of the Century” 7. Have a copy of contender 10. Adult ed. course, often 13. 1950 Isaac Asimov novel 61. “Baba ___” (The Who classic) 14. Hanoi bowlful 62. Prefix with -phyte or -lithic 15. Pad kee mao cuisine 63. “___-haw!” 17. Melon liqueur 18. Heavily promote the top of 64. Edges (along) the house? 20. Inhabitants of a necklace 1. Kind of card in a smartphone fastener? 2. Actor Bana 22. Had food 3. Tennis’s Australian “Rocket” 23. Soothing plants 4. German torpedo craft of 24. “___ Beso” WWII 25. 1055, to ... someone who knows Roman numerals 5. Ancient Scandinavians 6. “Let me give you ___” 27. Campus in Troy, NY 7. Daughter of Polonius in 28. Top-left square “Hamlet” 29. Smoke detector chirp, 8. “___ serious?” (“The Dark after getting fixed? Knight” quote) 35. Verizon’s onetime in-flight 9. Three Little Kittens’ calling system punishment (I mean, that 36. Trademarked Intel chip sounds pretty dire if you 40. Transportation for when really wanted it!) you have to jump to avoid 10. Raison d’___ burning your burger? 11. “___ Jump” (manga 42. ___ Moines, Iowa magazine since 1968) 44. 1991 Naughty by Nature 12. “Tao Te Ching” philosopher hit 16. “Based on that ...” 45. 2.0 GPA 19. Rolling Stone staffers, for 46. It’s often served with rice short 47. ___ New Guinea 21. Wu Tang member, e.g. 50. Pose questions 25. CEO’s degree, possibly 52. Users who post about a 26. Fragrant garland group of Boy Scouts, then 27. “General Hospital” Emmy upvote it? winner Sofer 56. Delicacy in the cookbook 28. It forms part of the Poland“Fried Food for Felines”? Germany border

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

30. Cpl.’s inferiors 31. “Ruh-___!” 32. Gel pack kin 33. Take a sickle to 34. ‘70s prog rock supergroup, for short 37. Prank that’s never gonna give you up? 38. Honorary poem 39. “Born,” in some notices 41. It stands out against a standard dress shirt 42. English illusionist/mentalist Brown 43. Plaza Hotel girl of fiction 46. Do art on glass 47. Barely audible, in music notation 48. Assortment 49. “Positive thinking” advocate Norman Vincent ___ 50. Pong maker 51. Tried-and-true 53. ___ buco (Italian dish) 54. NASDAQ debuts 55. “Hook” sidekick 58. Cries heard in Tejano music ©2022 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1084

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

MAY 19, 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT MAY 19, 2022

57 57


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT CARPENTER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the supervision of a supervisor or lead personnel, performs skilled cabinetry making for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining commons and related buildings as outlined below to accomplish the operational needs of the department. Duties: light framing to finish carpentry for the repair and maintenance of University owned properties, including structural repair, back priming, installation and repair of doors and trim, weatherproofing and sealing of exterior openings. Installation and repair of drywall and stucco. Repair to cabinetry. Preparation and installation of various types of counter tops. Formica repair and installation. Reqs: 5+ years demonstrated work experience in the carpentry trade, showing multiple skills within the trade. Ability to safely erect, work on and operate scaffolding, high ladders and various lifts. Demonstrated ability to work in a diverse work environment. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Knowledge and ability to correctly and safely perform work in other trade disciplines such as plumbing, locksmithing, and light electrical. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $39.34/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/26/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu. Job #35663

CONTRACTS & GRANTS MANAGER

GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT This position serves as the secondary Chief Staff Administrator and Business Operations Manager in the Department of Geography. Serves as the department’s contract and grant, budget, human resources/relations manager, the staff spokesperson, and the consultant on University policy and procedures. Assumes direct responsibility for management of contracts and grant administration, academic and staff personnel, financial, space, and purchasing/ travel functions in the department. Coordinates closely with Principal Investigators on proposals and awards. Handles problems/issues for the Business Officer utilizing initiative, creativity, and extensive background in UC management. Independently solves problems requiring interpretation of a wide variety of federal, state and campus policies. Ensures compliance with campus and federal ADA and health and safety requirements, as well as ensuring compliance with campus and federal procedures with respect to the use of human subjects in instruction and laboratory research. Identifies and analyzes critical factors and variables in the projection of facility, program, and staff development based on changing needs in research and instruction. Develops and implements operating policies and procedures as they relate to departmental overall goals and objectives; interprets policy for departmental committee members; serves as Chair’s liaison to other campus academic and administrative units. Reqs: 1‑3 years experience with financial administration. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,600‑$77,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive

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(CONT.)

consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35197.

FINANCIAL AFFAIRS MANAGER

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING Serves as the Financial Affairs Manager for the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The Electrical & Computer Engineering Department was established in 1962 and is the largest of the five academic departments in the College of Engineering. Research in the Department is categorized into the following areas: Communications & Signal Processing, Computer Engineering, Control Systems, and Electronics & Photonics. The Electrical & Computer Engineering Department consists of over 45 faculty, 50 staff, and over 350 graduate students and researchers. The Financial Affairs Manager directs and supervises the financial affairs unit and departmental research centers. Oversees the administration of activities related to contract and grant administration, accounting, purchasing, and employment. Develops short and long range financial plans in association with the Business Officer. Reqs: High School diploma and Bachelor’s Degree in related area and/ or equivalent experience/training. 4‑6 years experience working in higher education finance and/or administration. Strong interpersonal skills, service orientation, ability to multi‑task effectively in a varied, high volume environment, judgment and decision‑making, reasoning, ability to develop original ideas to solve problems, and effective verbal and written communication skills. Ability to manage changing priorities, and manage staff time and efforts accordingly. Note: Satisfactory completion of a conviction history background check. $67,500 ‑ $86,050/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/26/22. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 35629.

HVAC MECHANIC

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Working on a zone maintenance team composed of all trades, incumbent performs HVAC maintenance work. Installs, repairs, maintains, and inspects heating, ventilating, air conditioning and pneumatic systems and equipment. Installs, repairs and maintains pumps, air compressors, steam and hot water boilers, heating and boiler tubes, heat exchangers, fans, dampers, hydraulic units, control and monitoring systems. Makes working drawings and control diagrams for heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment. Work with others as part of a team. Provide direct customer service to campus community. Reqs: Knowledge of methods, materials, tools and equipment used in the installation, repair and maintenance of refrigeration, chilling, air‑conditioning and heating equipment up to 550 tons in capacity, including absorption chillers, pumps, condensers, heat exchangers, cooling towers, reciprocating, centrifugal and screw type compressors, thermostats, electrical, pneumatic and PLC and micro‑processor based controls. Skilled in installing, repairing and

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MAY 19, 2022

maintaining a wide variety of air conditioning, refrigeration, absorption chillers, heating and related systems and equipment. 3‑5 years experience repairing and servicing commercial or institutional HVAC mechanical equipment. Required Universal EPA Certification. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. EPA Universal Technician Certificate. Must be able to take night and weekend call‑backs. Hours and days may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. $39.81/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/25/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #35564

LEAD LABORER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS The Lead Laborer serves as working lead for team of Sr. Custodians, Sr. Building Maintenance Worker, student employees and seasonal workers, working various assignments. Responsible for work assignment and quality, safety, employee training, building security, oversight of special projects and maintenance tasks, emergency response and customer service. Orders and distributes supplies. Also responsible for employee time cards and equipment maintenance for building. In compliance with HDAE goals and objectives, affirms and implements the department Educational Equity Plan comprised of short and long term objectives that reflect a systematic approach to preparing both students and staff for a success in a multi‑cultural society. Works in an environment which is ethnically diverse and culturally pluralistic. Reqs: Minimum 3 years of custodial or maintenance work experience in an institution and/or commercial setting. Example: College Residence Hall, hotel, resort, or school. Some computer experience, including Microsoft Office programs. Ability to motivate staff and maintain positive morale. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Experience in a customer service environment. Ability to communicate effectively with a diverse work force. Ability to communicate and work effectively with staff and others such as, employees from other departments, students, parents, project managers, conference organizers, etc. Organizational experience. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $21.33‑ $29.89/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #34594

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE (LVN)

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurses. Assists with exams and procedures, taking vitals,

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checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Acts as a resource for non‑licensed staff. Utilizes nursing knowledge in these tasks as well as but not limited to providing patient education, administering immunizations, and functioning within the scope of practice. Reqs: Licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Must be organized, detailed oriented, confidential and dependable. Strong oral/written communication, organizational and customer service skills. Proficient in Microsoft and Google suite. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must be licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must have current license at all times during employment. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11month position, M‑F 7:30am – 4:30pm. 4 weeks of furlough is taken during quarter breaks and summer months. May include Thurs. evenings from 10am‑7pm. $30.42‑ $37.83/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21751

will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25239

MEDICAL ASSISTANT‑LIMITED

OPERATIONS SUPPORT COORDINATOR

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/ out patients, filling out the necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians, as well as scheduling appointments. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), American Medical Technologists (AMT), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA), Note: Those who have graduated from an EMT program may also be considered, although the MA program is preferable. Applicants without proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/ Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at time of hire is required and non‑negotiable. Notes: This is a limited position at 40%. Mon.‑Fri. 7:45am‑4:30pm (may include Thursday evenings until 7pm). Student Health requires all clinical staff to successfully pass the background check and complete the credentialing process before the employment date. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $23.27/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants

MEDICAL ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians, as well as scheduling appointments. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA). Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required at time of hire is required and non‑negotiable. This is an 11‑month per year career position. Four weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Notes: Student Health requires all clinical staff to successfully pass the background check and complete the credentialing process before the employment date. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $23.27/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #34192

STUDENT HEALTH Responsible for maintaining a clean and safe environment for our patients and staff. Provide the following support to meet the clinic needs such as: Receiving goods, stocking the supply room, delivering supplies and other items to the departments and individuals. Ordering maintenance, repairs, furniture move. Phone service. Autoclave and infection control needs of the clinics. Works independently and as part of the Operation Support team and with campus and external partners and vendors. Reqs: Proficiency with email and MS Office, effectively communicate and work with a diverse clientele and workgroup, excellent organizational skills and to work effectively in a service‑oriented environment subject to frequently changing priorities. Experience working in a healthcare setting preferred. Notes: Must successfully complete and pass a background check before employment. Working in a healthcare setting is preferred. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. $18.72/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 34741

PAYROLL ANALYST

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Uses critical thinking, analytical, and problem solving skills to research, analyze and develop solutions to a wide range of complex campus payroll and general ledger questions, issues, and concerns. Researches and troubleshoots business processes and system issues and demonstrates good judgment in selecting methods and techniques for obtaining resolution within tight deadlines. Uses critical thinking, analytical, and problem solving skills to administer the campus wide work authorization program and processes required by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Reviews and analyzes all documents submitted by employees to support their citizenship status and makes decisions on the acceptability and validity of the documents in accordance with guidelines set forth by USCIS. Timing is essential and the Analyst must work closely with campus departments to track and ensure employees complete work authorization documentation by strict deadlines. Consequences of error or non‑compliance could result in civil fines and/or criminal penalties and/or debarment from government contracts. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. In depth knowledge of payroll policies and regulations related to work authorization, leaves of absences, termination, retirement, compensation, taxes, deductions, and other areas of payroll processing. Strong analytical and problem recognition/problem solving skills. Strong judgement and decision‑making skills with ability to work independently, pay close attention to detail, meet deadlines, and set priorities. Understanding of financial processes, policies and procedures Strong and effective customer service skills and experience in dealing with a wide variety of clientele. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.62‑ $28.80/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 34951

PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING Coordinates all academic and staff employment activities for the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Provides guidance to department management and employees on University policies and procedures regarding recruitment, hiring, academic merits and promotions, payroll, benefits eligibility, dual employment, overtime compensation, merit and range adjustments, and classification levels. Using careful analysis, tracks and monitors reports regarding salary and benefits, tuition and fees, merits, promotions, and cost of living adjustments. Develops payroll reports. Coordinates all visa related paperwork and issues. Coordinates all aspects of student employment. Prepares UCPath and time reporting for all academic, staff and student employees in the department. Electronically modifies employee appointments and distributions, monitors monthly and hourly payroll, manages timekeeping system, processes late payments and payroll adjustments, maintains personnel files, etc. Responsible for coordination of summer salary and the campus Effort Reporting system. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent

experience and/or training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$27.59/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 32552.

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Exciting career opportunity working in a multidisciplinary, comprehensive University Student Health Service. Works under UCSB Standardized Procedures in a collaborative and collegial relationship with physicians, Advanced Practice Providers and other clinical staff at UCSB Student Health. Responsibilities include evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of acute illnesses and injuries, common chronic health conditions; assessment, management and/or referral of primary mental health conditions, routine gynecologic care, physical examinations, prescribing medications under the legal scope of practice and arranging follow up care and referrals as indicated. Reqs: Must have a current California Physician Assistant License and DEA registration schedules 2‑5 at all times during employment in order to practice and function in their clinical role. Notes: Student Health requires that clinical staff must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment start date. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month partial‑year career 100% position; 4 weeks of furlough must be taken during quarter breaks. Works hours as assigned, which may include occasional evening hours.Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #33985

PLUMBER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Design, redesign and assembles from working drawings and blueprints various systems including water, steam, sanitary and storm drains, irrigation and sprinkler systems and compressed airlines. These installations require a thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes, the ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings, and the ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow; perform welding, soldering and brazing as required; install and repair plumbing fixtures, air compressors, pumps, steam and hot water boilers. Reqs: Minimum of 5 years of experience as a journeyman level plumber. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $39.81/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or


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EMPLOYMENT any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/31/22 Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu. Job #35661

PROGRAM COORDINATOR

DEAN, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Provides administrative and academic support to TEP faculty and students. The Teacher Education Program consists of approximately 5 Academic Senate Faculty, 20 Lecturers, 15 Supervisors of Teacher Education, 10 Academic Coordinators and 90 credential and Masters students. The Program Coordinator is responsible for maintaining smooth operations of the program office while ensuring the completion of work in a professional and efficient manner. Responsibilities include application processing, interview weekend planning and preparations, quarterly course coordination, course evaluation coordinating and processing, department webpage maintenance, aiding faculty with the preparation of instructional materials, advising prospective students through the application process, enrolled student advising and purchasing of program supplies.Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated experience in an administrative environment.Must possess excellent and professional communication skills. Must be able to work with a variety of customers with frequent interruptions and be service‑oriented. Must work well in a team environment. Must have good attention to detail, be accurate, and possess strong organizational skills. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/31/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35812

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MS Office Suite.$58,380‑ $72,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 5/31/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 35831

SR. ELECTRONICS TECHNICIAN

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Works independently to perform periodic maintenance and repair work on fire alarm systems, sprinkler systems, emergency eyewash stations, wide‑area mass notification systems, and fire extinguishers. Maintains detailed maintenance records of all equipment covered under NFPA 72, NFPA 25, NFPA 10, and NFPA 70 NEC. Assists other trades in their LSS maintenance work as needed. Reqs: Knowledge of programing of Notifier and FCI fire alarm systems. Knowledge of access control preferably Lenel OnGuard Demonstrated computer skills. Ability to read and interpret blueprints. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check. Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Employee must be able to read, write and understand the English language and use a handheld, two‑way portable radio. Pre‑employment physical exam is required. UCSB is a Tobacco‑Free environment. $30.41‑ $33.39/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job #34838

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COMPUTER SCIENCE Supports all aspects of the Computer Science undergraduate programs. Serves as one of the initial sources of information and advises major students, prospective major students, and non‑major students regarding general department requirements. Monitors every aspect of progress towards degree and counsels students as appropriate. Initiates, maintains, and evaluates students’ academic records, processes petitions, checks prerequisites, and performs other administrative tasks. Ensures grades are reported for undergraduate students and updates the Schedule of Classes and other publications. Requires knowledge of policy and procedures for the College of Engineering, College of Letters and Science, and the College of Creative Studies. Serves as one of the departmental liaisons with the Office of the Registrar on matters pertaining to departmental courses, grades and undergraduate records. Works within a team environment within the Student Affairs area and department, and assists with the ongoing workload. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience and/or training. 1‑3 years working in a diverse college‑level academic advising setting. Notes: This position is funded through January 2023 pending further funding. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.84/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 34628.

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OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE EDUCATION The Testing Center Coordinator coordinates the implementation, administration, and operations of the Testing Center. The Coordinator informs students, proctors, staff, and other stakeholders regarding software, hardware, and testing procedures. Coordinates the test scheduling process and test materials. Provides supervision and assists ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning with training and dissemination forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced of information to Testing Center debris‑blocking gutter protection. student staff. Partners with Letters Schedule free LeafFilter estimate & Sciences IT, the Disabled Students today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Program, academic departments, and Senior & Military Discounts. Call other campus agencies on testing 1‑855‑995‑2490 and accommodations. Coordinates efforts to improve and refine space MEDICAL SERVICES and usage of the Testing Center. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable training and/or SLEEPING experience. Note: BEAUTY Satisfactory conviction history of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 background check. $26.00 ‑ $26.65/ pounds. FREE information kit. Call hr. The University of California is an 877‑929‑9587 Anniversary Season 2019 /2020 Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action ATTENTION: VIAGRA and thCIALIS Employer, and allStreet qualified applicants State Ballet 25th Anniversary of performances & events l a sterling year USERS! A cheaper alternative to high will receive consideration for drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special ‑ Only employment without regard to race, $99! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW: The GranadaTheatre color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, 888‑531‑1192 (AAN CAN) gender identity, national origin, DENTAL INSURANCE ‑ Physicians disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic Mutual Insurance Company. Covers protected by law. Application review 350 procedures. Real insurance ‑ not a begins 5/19/22. Apply online at discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1‑888‑623‑3036 https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #35275 www.dental50plus.com/58 #6258 State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

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On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Ba Continue reading for details

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique INSPIRING ALL GIRLS TO BE STRONG, SMART, BOLD to the opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread theirAND message th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020 greater Santa Barbara community.

Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

DAVID BAZEMORE

Jodi House is the only nonprofit organization in Santa Barbara County that is solely to supporting brain injury survivors in their continued Join dedicated us for a gala evening recovery and ongoing rehabilitation. honoring Sara Miller McCune

25

AMERICAN MASTERS

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SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Choreography by William Soleau

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up healthy,

Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group&is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency’s needs. The insert is published and Casa del distributed in the Santa Barbara Independent, with theHerrero cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation.

and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

For reservations, call 805 845 1432 statestreetballet.com

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RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children

Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization’s marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience.

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

DAVID BAZEMORE

25

Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.” Rachel, Age 17

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Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

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Plus

statestreetballet.com

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DAVID BAZEMORE

Good Work Lives On

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

ROSE EICHENBAUM

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

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ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION OF SANTA BARBARA

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DENIS JAMES NORTON Case No.: 22PR00195 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of DENIS JAMES NORTON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SANDRA HOWARD in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: SANDRA HOWARD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/02/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 04/12/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Margaret V Barnes, Barnes & Barnes 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published May 05, 12, 19, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: CONSTANCE MARJORIE HOPE SMITH Case No.: 22PR00213 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: CONSTANCE MARJORIE HOPE SMITH A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: NICHOLAS J. SCHNEIDER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: NICHOLAS J. SCHNEIDER be appointed as personal representative

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to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/30/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 04/25/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published May 05, 12, 19, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RICHARD M. HERNANDEZ Case No.: 22PR00199 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: RICHARD M. HERNANDEZ A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: JAMES V. DORGAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: JAMES V. DORGAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/07/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: SM2 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 312‑C East Cook Street Santa Maria, CA 93454, Cook Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined

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in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 04/28/2022 By: Jazmine Killian, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: James P. Griffith, Esq. Howell Moore & Gough, LLP 812 Presidio Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑962‑0524 x 6 Published May 05, 12, 19, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DONNA DELIBRO Case No.: 22PR00218 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: DONNA DELIBRO, DONNA MARIE DELIBRO A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: THOMAS WIDDERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: THOMAS WIDDERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/30/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 04/27/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: ROSALEEN WYNNE 222 East Carrillo,

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Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑1204. Published May 12, 19, 26, 2022. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PETER ANTHONY REMEDIOS Case No.: 22PR00231 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: PETER ANTHONY REMEDIOS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: JOY ETIENNE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that: JOY ETIENNE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/30/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 05/03/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Cristi Michelon Vasquez, 132 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 882‑2226. Published May 12, 19, 26, 2022

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MARK C. OSTROMECKI Case No.: 22PR00209 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MARK C. OSTROMECKI A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: MARK MICHAL PAYKART in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: COURTNEY DeSOTO, A PRIVATE FIDUCIARY, be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before

taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/23/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 South County ‑ Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 04/19/2022 By: April Garcia, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Kenneth W. Kossoff 5743 Corsa Avenue, Suite 208 Westlake Village, CA 91362 (818) 865‑0766 Published May 05, 12, 19, 2022.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: OTTER ROCK PROPERTIES at 4874 8th Street, Unit B, Carpinteria, CA 93013. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 11/07/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original File no. 2019‑0002790. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Elizabeth Loomis (same address), William III Loomis (same address), Christine Reynolds, 5295 Calle Barquero, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. The business was conducted as a Joint Venture signed by ELIZABETH LOOMIS, GENERAL PARTNER. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 5/06/22. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001208. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CASA ANTICA STUDIO at 2901 State Street, Studio 7 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Christopher J De Rose (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: CHRISTOPHER DE ROSE with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E4. FBN Number: 2022‑0001034. Published: Apr 28, May 05, 12, 19 2022. FICTITIOUS

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STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY PRIDE at 3326 Pine St Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Santa Ynez Valley Pride (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Corporation Filed by: GOLZAR MEAMAR, CEO/ EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 07, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E4. FBN Number: 2022‑000924. Published: Apr 28, May 05, 12, 19 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COLORFUL GLUONS at 1452 W Beacon Way Santa Maria, CA 93458; Eric D. Martin (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Filed by: ERIC MARTIN with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001027. Published: Apr 28, May 05, 12, 19 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LICK CLOTHING at 1736 Calle Poniente Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Miles C Hagin (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: CHRISTOPHER DE ROSE with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001008. Published: Apr 28, May 05, 12, 19 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOLLYWOOD BLVD. APARTMENTS at 1379 Camino Meleno Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Markin Family Properties LLC (same address) This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company Filed by: OLIVIA LOEWY, MANAGER/TRUSTEE with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001028. Published: Apr 28, May 05, 12, 19 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CYPRESS PSYCHOLOGY at 3463 State Street, Suite 160 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Rebecca D Sandhu 2858 Ben Lomond Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: REBECCA SANDHU, FOUNDER & CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 27, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001141. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SPS PROPERTIES at 3820 State Street Suite B Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Shannon P Sorensen (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: SHANNON P SORENSEN with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2022‑0001063. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA FINANCIAL SERVICES at 555 Corporate Dr, Ste 100 Ladera Ranch, CA 92694; C Financial Investment Inc (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Corporation Filed by: CEJAY HELMER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the

Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001116. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STEPHENS FARM at 200 Calle Ecuestre Goleta, CA 93117; Eunice Stephens (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: EUNICE STEPHENS, INDIVIDUAL with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 11, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2022‑000953. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THYMELESS MY CHEF at 1626 Garden St #A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Thymeless Santa Barbara LLC (same address) This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company Filed by: BOB PEEBLER, MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 25, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2022‑0001106. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: COACH B SPORTS at 5288 University Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Bryan Hergenroether (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: BRYAN HERGENROETHER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001048. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ONE. SOCCER SCHOOLS at 315 Meigs Rd, Suite A‑431 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; One.Skill Factory (same address) This business is conducted by A Corporation Filed by: JEFFERY K. JOHNSON with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E955. FBN Number: 2022‑0001032. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB Animal Things at 3047 Samarkand Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Athena G.A. Veatch (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: ATHENA VEATCH with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2022‑0000989. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LORETO PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER at 3311 B State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93130; James M DeLoreto, 1243 Camino Rio Verde, Santa Barbara 93111; Edward S DeLoreto, 1361 Mission Ridge Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Trust, Filed by: JAMES M. DELORETO, TRUSTEE with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E4. FBN Number: 2022‑0001030. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: XANADU SKATE BOUTIQUE at 1436 Santa Fe Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Valerie A. Selvaggio (Same Address) This business is conducted


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by A Individual Filed by: VALERIE SELVAGGIO, PROPRIETOR with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 2, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001174. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA GIFTS&MORE at 4010 Calle Real, Ste #3, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Ziyad Abdulhai 4515 Chapparral Drive, Carpinteria, CA 93013. This business is conducted by A Individual Filed by: ZIYAD ABDULHAI,OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 5, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001202. Published: May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SZABO FINISH CARPENTRY AND WOODWORKS at 210 W. Micheltorena St, Unit E, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Andrew J. Szabo (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, filed by ANDREW SZABO, OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 06, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E20. FBN Number: 2022‑0001207. Published May 12, 19, 26, June 8, 2022 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ABSTRAX TITLE SERVICES at 315A Meigs Road #178, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Patricia L O’Connell (same address); Ralph P. Folson 12348 A Cactus Drive Desert Hot Springs, CA 92240. This business is conducted by copartners. Signed by: PATRICIA L. O’CONNELL, MANAGING PARTNER Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E40 FBN Number: 2022‑0001213. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022

1.OWNER: Montecito Union School District 2.PROJECT IDENTIFICATION NAME: 2122‑5 Outdoor Learning Pavilion Increment 01 3.PROJECT LOCATION: Nature Lab, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108 4.PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Increment 01: Site accessible path of travel work, site utility work, and outdoor countertops and sinks. This project is anticipated to start approximately June 10, 2022, and is anticipated to be completed by August 18, 2022. Outdoor Learning Pavilion Summary: Site accessible path of travel work, site utility work, and outdoor countertops and sinks as indicated in drawings. Concrete pad and minor site grading. Connection of new sewer and water line to R.O.W. Electrical and data conduits. 5.BID DEADLINE: Bids are due on June 3, 2022, not later than 2:00 p.m. (per the School Office clock) 6.PLACE AND METHOD OF BID RECEIPT: All Bids must be on the District provided bid forms and sealed. Personal delivery, courier, or mailed via United States Postal Service and addressed to Montecito Union School District, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. ATTN: Virginia Alvarez 7.PLACE PLANS ARE ON FILE: Montecito Union School District, Business Department, Second Floor, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, www.tricoblue.com 8. ALTERNATES: If alternate bids are called for, the contract will be awarded to the lowest bid price on the base contract without consideration of the prices on the additive or deductive items. 9. MANDATORY JOB WALK: Meet at Montecito Union School Office on Monday, May 23, 2022, at 9:00 a.m. Attendance at the entire job walk is mandatory and failure to attend the entire job walk results in your bid being rejected as non‑responsive. Contact OWNER for details on required job walks and related documentation. 10. This is a prevailing wage project. OWNER has ascertained the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which this work is to be performed for each craft or type of worker needed to execute this contract. These rates are on file at OWNER’s office, and a copy may be obtained upon request, or at www. dir.ca.gov. The contractor shall post a copy of these rates at the job site. ALL PROJECTS OVER $1,000 ARE SUBJECT TO PREVAILING WAGE MONITORING AND ENFORCEMENT BY THE LABOR COMMISSIONER.

11. A Payment Bond for contracts over $25,000 and a Performance Bond for all contracts will be required prior to commencement of work. These bonds shall be in the amounts and form called for in the Contract Documents. 12. Pursuant to the provisions of Public Contract Code Section 22300, the CONTRACTOR may substitute certain securities for any funds withheld by OWNER to ensure CONTRACTOR’s performance under the contract. At the request and expense of CONTRACTOR, securities

13. To bid on or perform the work stated in this Notice, CONTRACTOR must possess a valid and active contractor’s license of the following classification(s) B No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor shall be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of § 4104 of the Public Contract Code, for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless currently registered with the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5. No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project (awarded after April 1, 2015) unless registered with the DIR. DIR’s web registration portal is: w w w. d i r. c a . g o v / P u b l i c ‑ Wo r k s / Contractors.html 14. CONTRACTOR and all subcontractors must furnish electronically certified payroll records (eCPR) to the Labor Commissioner monthly in PDF format. Registration at www.dir.ca.gov/Public‑Works/ Certified‑Payroll‑Reporting.html is required to use the eCPR system. The following notice is given as required by Labor Code Section 1771.5(b)(1): CONTRACTOR and any subcontractors are required to review and comply with the provisions of the California Labor Code, Part 7, Chapter 1, beginning with Section 1720, as more fully discussed in the Contract Documents. These sections contain specific requirements concerning, for example, determination and payment of prevailing wages, retention, inspection, and auditing payroll records, use of apprentices, payment of overtime compensation, securing workers’ compensation insurance, and various criminal penalties or fines which may be imposed for violations of the requirements of the chapter. Submission of a bid constitutes CONTRACTOR’s representation that CONTRACTOR has thoroughly reviewed these requirements. 15. OWNER will retain 5% of the amount of any progress payments. 16. This Project does not require prequalification pursuant to AB 1565 of all general contractors and all mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontractors 17. BID PACKET and Bid Forms will be provided at the job walk to attendees. Advertisement Dates: May 09 – May 22, 2022 (print publication dates May 12 and 19) Virginia Alvarez 805‑969‑3249 x 420

EL CARRO PARK MONITORING WELL PROJECT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that sealed bids will be received at the office of the Carpinteria Groundwater Sustainability Agency, 1301 Santa Ynez Ave., Carpinteria, California 93013, until 3:00 p.m. on Friday, June 17, 2022, at which time they shall be publicly opened and read. Any bids received after the deadline for bid submittal shall be returned unopened. A mandatory pre‑bid meeting will be held on Monday, May 23, 2022 at 10:30 am at El Carro Park, in the City of Carpinteria. Every contractor intending to bid on the project (or his designated representative) must attend the pre‑bid meeting. Bids submitted by contractors not attending the pre‑bid meeting will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened Drilling shall be performed using a direct‑rotary drilling rig equipped with portable fluid pits and mechanical solids separating equipment. Drill fluids shall be bentonite based with appropriate drilling fluid additives, as needed. Drilling equipment must be capable of reaching a maximum depth of 2,000 feet. This work shall be done in accordance with the Specifications therefore adopted, to which special reference is hereby made. The Contractor shall furnish all labor, supplies, equipment, and services required to perform the work, except as expressly stated in the Construction Specifications. The Contractor shall hold a valid C‑57 drilling contractor license issued by the State of California. Specifications and bid forms may be secured at no charge from the District office located at 1301 Santa Ynez Avenue, Carpinteria, California, 93013. For further information, please contact Brian King, District Senior Engineer, at (805) 684‑2816, extension 107. The District reserves the right to reject any and all bids or to waive any irregularities or informalities in any bid or in the bidding. No bidder shall withdraw his/her bid for a period of sixty (60) calendar days after the date set by the District for the opening thereof. Work will not begin until the District Board of Directors has authorized a contract for this work. Notice of Contract Award is tentatively planned to be issued on Friday, June 24, 2022. The successful bidder must submit all required contract and insurance paperwork within seven (7) consecutive calendar days from the Notice of Contract Award. The project’s construction period shall be forty five (45) calendar days. The District expects to issue a Notice‑to‑Proceed on or about Friday, July 8, 2022. The Notice‑to‑Proceed will identify an “effective start date”, which shall be the date the Contractor is authorized to begin work and shall be the start of the six (6) week period. The effective start date is anticipated to be on or about Monday, July 18, 2022. Published: May 19, 2022

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF WENDY TAN MAPEL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 22CV01320 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: WENDY TAN MAPEL TO: WENIFREDA TAN MALIJAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KAREN TRACEY WILLIAMS TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01129 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KARENS TRACEY WILLIAMS TO: KAREN TRACEY AVALON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 3, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated April 18, 2022. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. April 28, May 05, 12, 19 2022. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SCOTT CRAIG VANSANFORD TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV00713 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SCOTT CRAIG VANSANFORD TO: SCOTT CRAIG VAN SANFORD THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 15, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated April 27, 2022. by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): NIKKI TYLER FAITELL YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): ALICIA GONZALEZ, NOE OBISPO, DOES 1‑10 NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta

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citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 22CV00805 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): John Hunter SBN 71301 625 Mulberry St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑962‑5441 DATE 02/28/2022 Deputy Clerk; Leili Hejzai. Published. Apr 28, May 05, 12, 19, 2022.

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It shall be mandatory upon the contractor to whom the contract is awarded (CONTRACTOR), and upon any SUBCONTRACTOR, to pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the contract.

Securities eligible for investment shall include those listed in Government Code Section 16430, bank and savings and loan certificates of deposit, interest‑bearing demand deposit accounts, standby letters of credit, or any other security mutually agreed to by CONTRACTOR and OWNER. CONTRACTOR shall be the beneficial owner of any securities substituted for funds withheld and shall receive any interest on them. The escrow agreement shall be in the form indicated in the Contract Documents.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KATHERINE ANN BRUNE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 22CV01347 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KATHERINE ANN BRUNE TO: KATHERINE ANN DOBBS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 17, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121, Anacapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated April 22, 2022 by, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published May 12, 19, 26, June 2, 2022.

INSTAGRAM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BARNES & BARNES at 1900 State St Ste M Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Margaret V Barnes 4635 Sierra Madre Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by An Individual Filed by: MARGARET V BARNES with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County

01‑NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS

any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing June 10, 2022 10:00 am, Dept 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101.Ancapa Division. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated April 20, 2022. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. April 28, May 05, 12, 19, 2022.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAMMERHEAD CONSTRUCTION, 6070 Ashley Place, Goleta, CA 93117; Brandon Montano Construction Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation, signed by BRANDON MONTANO, CEO with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 26, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001119. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 9 2022.

INVITATION FOR BIDS

equivalent to any amount withheld shall be deposited, at the discretion of OWNER, with either OWNER or a state or federally chartered bank as the escrow agent, who shall then pay any funds otherwise subject to retention to CONTRACTOR. Upon satisfactory completion of the contract, the securities shall be returned to CONTRACTOR.

STAY CONNECTED

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GAMISODES at 40 Oceano Avenue, #10, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Kids Media, Inc (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation. Signed by: DAVIS BRIMIR, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 09, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0001218. Published May 19, 26, June 2, 09 2022.

Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2022‑0001031. Published: May 05, 12, 19, 26, 2022.

MAY 19, 2022 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT MAY 19, 2022

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