Santa Barbara Independent 12/23/21

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THE INDEPENDENT

DECEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


volume 36, # 832, Dec 23-30, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera

COVER STORY 18

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman

Underground Scholars Break the Chains

Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg

Helping Formerly Incarcerated Students Chase Brighter Futures

Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley

by Ryan P. Cruz

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates

NEWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 OPINIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

OBITUARIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 THE WEEK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 LIVING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . . . . . 27 ARTS LIFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

ASTROLOGY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 CLASSIFIEDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

S.B.’S BIRDMAN Hugh Ranson, a Goleta teacher and member of the Santa Barbara Audubon Society, has been writing a regular birding column for the Indy, including an installment this week on page 24. We get to know him a little better here.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

When did you get into birding? Did you have a mentor? I remember well the moment I got into birding. I was 12, and it was a dull, rainy Saturday morning, typical for Cheshire, England, where I spent my first 16 years of life. I was at loose ends and decided I’d try to identify the birds coming to the feeder in the back garden. One of my six older brothers, Roger, was into birds (he collected eggs), and so I found his field guide and was soon naming the birds in the garden. Things snowballed after that, and soon Roger was taking me farther afield in search of birds. By the time I was 14, I was hitchhiking across the country in search of new birds. What have been your most exciting S.B. sightings? Why were they so special? It’s every birder’s dream to find a new bird for the county, and I’ve been lucky enough to find several. I saw the first zone-tailed hawk for the county, which then returned for several successive winters, entertaining scores of birders. Once on my lunch break from teaching, I came across Southern California’s first confirmed black vulture, another bird that was seen by many. Pride of place, though, goes to the LeConte’s sparrow I came across at the Bird Refuge a few Decembers ago. It was a bird I’d dreamed of finding, and to see this lovely bird teed up on a tule stalk right in front of me was literally a dream come true. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

ON THE COVER: Photo by Erick Madrid. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

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With a gii to ASAP Cats, you can help lii up the future for a cat in need. There’s no beeer me to support the cats and kiiens of Santa Barbara County.

Leila Drake, State Street Ballet. Photo: ASAP Cats

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MAKING MIXED MEDIA Tuesdays, January 11 – March 8 3:30 – 5:30 pm | AGES 5 – 12 Combine materials and techniques to create mixed media pieces that include painting, drawing, and printmaking and unexpected additions such as wax and hand-written letters. Works by innovative contemporary artists on view at the Museum will inspire both individual and collaborative creations. $300 SBMA Members $350 Non-Members Location: Ridley-Tree Education Center, 1600 Santa Barbara Street

For more information or to register, call 805.884.6457 or visit www.sbma.net/kidsfamilies. 4

THE INDEPENDENT

DECEMBER 23, 2021

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DEC. 16-23, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COURTS & CRIME

by Tyler Hayden raig A. Case, a Santa Barbara private investigator and television personality, stands accused of defrauding an elderly Montecito resident of nearly $700,000, new court documents show. Case did not challenge or even respond to the lawsuit filed September 7 on behalf of 94-year-old Constance McCormick Fearing, a longtime friend of his and a noted patron of the arts. The court therefore awarded a default judgment on October 13 in Fearing’s favor, explained Jordan Hankey, the attorney for her trust, and a judge will next decide exactly how much Case must pay. The funds he allegedly obtained from Fearing through “willful and deliberate misconduct” between October 2018 and April 2021 totaled $687,500, the complaint states, and her trust will also pursue punitive damages as well as attorney’s fees, Hankey said. Whether Case is criminally prosecuted remains to be seen. The Santa Barbara County District Attorney’s Office declined to comment for this story. Multiple voicemails left with Case Detective Agency, the investigations and private security company Case has operated since the 1970s, went unreturned. His attorney, Josh Lynn, also declined to comment. The civil suit was originally filed against both Case and Nancy Coglizer, a former trustee of Fearing’s estate with power of attorney over her affairs. Coglizer has since lodged her own cross-complaint against Case, alleging he manipulated and used her to obtain dozens of “short-term loans” for himself with Fearing’s funds while Coglizer was in a compromised mental state. According to Coglizer’s complaint, she started working for Fearing back in 1999 by performing basic bookkeeping duties. They would meet regularly in Fearing’s library, and Coglizer soon began assisting Fearing with more involved property management tasks. In 2004, Fearing suffered a serious medical issue that necessitated more direct attention to her personal and financial affairs, and Fearing’s lawyers ultimately named Coglizer as a trustee of her living trust. The arrangement continued uneventfully until March 2018, when Coglizer’s mother, with whom she was extremely close, suddenly died. The death sent her into a tailspin of severe depression and alcoholism, and “she began withdrawing from life,” her crosscomplaint states. Case, who had known Fearing for many years and had periodically provided security for her rural Romero Canyon property, learned of Coglizer’s loss and started inviting her out for drinks to “talk about how she was trying to cope with her

C

extreme sadness,” the filing says. Those conversations, however, would frequently end with Case asking for money, which Coglizer obliged with checks from Fearing’s accounts. “Her mind was weak, foggy, and jumbled,” the court documents claim. “She could barely function.” No clear reason is provided for why Coglizer continually acquiesced. But her complaint emphasized that she “did not benefit in any way, whatsoever, from the loans.” She never received any of the money herself, it states, and always assumed Case would pay her back based on his lengthy friendship with Fearing. Coglizer eventually WHERE’S THE MONEY? Early investigations have been unable to determine entered an addiction treat- what Craig Case did with the $687,500 he took from an elderly friend. ment facility. When she exited, she started pressing Case to make In 2016, Case was forced by a class-action good on the loans. He’d promise “soon” lawsuit to pay $80,000 to two dozen of his forand tout supposed investments in his self- mer security company employees. He’d violated produced television shows, including The labor laws by denying them breaks, not recogInn Crowd, a food- and wine-focused series. nizing overtime, and not reimbursing them for But Case’s callbacks began dwindling. Then business expenses, the settlement agreement they ceased altogether. Panicked and con- shows. In 2017, a judge ordered Case to cut Evertrite, Coglizer notified Fearing’s attorneys of est National Insurance Company a $42,000 the missing money. She was asked to resign check after he failed to pay the premiums on from the trust but continues to cooperate in a worker’s comp policy. Then in 2018, the California Labor Commissioner’s Office demanded its complaint against Case. Meanwhile, Case remains an active mem- he fork over another $25,000 to a separate forber of the Santa Barbara community with a mer employee. Case had reportedly deducted current position on the Santa Barbara Police state, federal, and social security taxes from the Foundation’s Board of Directors. He previ- employee’s paychecks, but rather than pay the ously served on Santa Barbara City College’s government agencies, he would simply pocket board of directors, as president of the United the money himself, court documents show. Boys & Girls Clubs of Santa Barbara County, Legal records also reveal a pattern of Case and as chairman of the City of Santa Barbara borrowing money that he doesn’t return. ProParks and Recreation Commission. His pri- lific Santa Barbara landlord Dario Pini loaned vate investigator’s license is up to date, and he Case $10,000 in 2016, then took him to court was spotted doing business at a State Street when Case only paid him back half. In 2019, Case borrowed $50,000 from winemaker bank earlier this month. Case, it turns out, has a long history of Roger Bower and again found himself on the alleged financial chicanery, going as far court docket when the loan was not repaid. back as 1990 when he was at the center of A source with knowledge of the incident also an investment controversy that ultimately claimed longtime Central Coast wine aficiosank Santa Barbara’s former semi-profes- nado Archie McLaren lent Case $40,000 that sional basketball team, the Islanders. More he never saw again. McLaren had given up tryrecently, he has been sued by no fewer than ing to collect by the time he died in 2018, the six clients who paid him upward of $5,000 source said. each to perform private investigations that A hearing on the Fearing matter is schedwere never conducted. Multiple liens remain uled for January 11, 2022, in Judge Thomas stacked against his name. Anderle’s courtroom. n

The Sheriff’s Office announced 12/21 that 35 additional inmates have tested positive for COVID in the County Jail outbreak that began 12/9, bringing the total number of cases to 59. Five of the 59 inmates have fully recovered. All COVID-positive inmates are continuously monitored by custody staff and Wellpath partners. So far, none of the COVID-positive individuals have required hospitalization, and 50 of them are asymptomatic.

COMMUNITY COU RTESY EI KIMEDIA FOU N DATION

Private Investigator Accused of Conspiracy and Fraud

Jesse Alexander (center), the S.B.-born photographer who captured both the grit and glamor of race car driving in the early 1950s and ‘60s in sumptuous black-and-white photographs, has died. Alexander was born in S.B. in 1929 and was able to combine his two great loves, cars and photography, into a successful career. He didn’t let his international renown get in the way of staying involved, according to Alexander’s many friends, and he collaborated over the years on projects large and small in S.B., including mentoring many photographers.

CARPINTERIA COU RTESY

Cracking the Case?

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

CORONAVIRUS CORONAVIRUS

The Committee to Save Our Downtown & Beach Parking Lot announced that Carpinteria’s Acting City Clerk, Brian Barrett, issued a “Certificate of Sufficiency” on 12/20 regarding the committee’s initiative to save Parking Lot 3, the proposed location for the Surfliner Inn (above). The certification will be presented to the Carpinteria City Council at its regular meeting on 1/10/22. If successful, the initiative will selectively downzone this parking lot parcel from its current “general commercial” zoning to “open space/recreation,” preventing the Surfliner Inn project from moving forward at that site. CONT’D ON PAGE 6 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

DECEMBER 23, 2021

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After scouring 20 years’ worth of data, four UCSBaffiliated researchers discovered that nitrogen, an essential nutrient for giant kelp, had declined by 18 percent in the kelp populating the S.B. Channel. This was concerning because so many species need kelp for food or shelter, both in the ocean and on land. The researchers concluded the decline was directly tied to warming oceans after comparing their analysis of kelp nutrient content with records of changes in water temperature at the university’s Coastal Long-Term Ecological Research sites in the channel. Full story at independent.com/giant-kelp.

n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D JAIL

Inmate’s Suicide Blamed on Repeat Miscommunication

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Although Wellpath has a staff psychiatrist on call, none was ever contacted. Likewise, the company had no professional mentalhealth workers on site per its contract with the county, which does not require such staffing between 11 p.m. and 7 a.m. By 4 a.m., a custody deputy had filled out a written form noting that Remijio had exhibited “signs of psychosis.” The form was addressed to the Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) scheduled to show up at 7 a.m. The note described Remijio as being disheveled, agitated, loud, angry, irritable, and a little delusional. No mention of suicide was made. The note recommended that follow-up mental health attention be provided “as needed.” No additional mental-health care was provided as a result, the Grand Jury reported. At 2:30 p.m.—five hours later—Remijio’s body was found after he had apparently killed himself using a bedsheet fashioned into what law enforcement press releases describe as a “ligature.” The custody deputy on call reported that sight lines to Remijio’s cell were blocked by the staircase. He could see only portions of Remijio’s cell; he could not see Remijio at all. Remijio had called three times at night via the jail’s intercom system, but the audio quality was reportedly poor and garbled. The grand jury would conclude that multiple communication failures led to the inmate’s death. It also noted that nationally, 41 percent of all county inmates have been diagnosed with some form of mental illness. In Santa Barbara County, 60 percent had been clients of the County’s Department of Behavioral Wellness. The report noted that many reforms have been put into effect since Remijio’s death that would ameliorate some of the problems. The new North County Jail, for example, will set aside 32 beds for inmates experiencing serious mental-health challenges. The county would need to amend its contract with Wellpath—the current contract expires next April—to require roundthe-clock mental-health professionals on site. n

2022

hen 30-ye ar-old Michael Anthony Remijio was checked into the County Jail this past February on a misdemeanor failure-to-appear warrant, there had been no shortage of recent warning signs to indicate he was seriously mentally unstable. In S.B. County Jail the few short hours Remijio would be housed at County Jail before apparently hanging himself with his own bedsheets, Sheriff ’s deputies had issued additional warnings. Remijio was agitated, delusional, and paranoid, they cautioned. But no action was taken by Wellpath, the jail’s contracted private medical care provider. Because of these repeated communication failures, the Santa Barbara Grand Jury would conclude in a recent report, Remijio would die at his own hands 18 hours later. Remijio would be the fourth of five suicides to take place at the County Jail since April 2018, the Grand Jury reported. In his case, the warning signs should have been obvious. Two days before his arrest, Sheriff ’s deputies had responded to a 9-1-1 call to conduct a welfare check on Remijio for reasons not specified in the report. They left without incident. The next day, Remijio called 9-1-1, reporting that armed intruders were swarming his backyard. He was detoxing from meth, he told deputies at the time. They described him as frantic, stuttering, fidgety, and sweaty. Because of an outstanding warrant in Ventura County for failure to appear on DUI charges, Remijio was taken into custody and booked into County Jail. The arresting officer was struck by the delusional nature of Remijio’s conversation on the drive to the jail — the deputy thought an ambulance ride would have been warranted, but Remijio refused. The deputy insisted he notified Wellpath’s RN conducting inmate intake screening of Remijio’s state, suggesting that he was hallucinating. Just as adamantly, the RN has insisted the deputy never conveyed this information. Deputies who interviewed Remijio that night shortly after he’d been screened and admitted described him as “uncommunicative and paranoid.” In one of the interviews, Remijio acknowledged having had suicidal ideation but said he was not having any then. Accordingly, he was placed in an isolation cell for which security checks were to occur every 30 minutes.

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Grand Jury Report Reveals New Details Behind Jail Death

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LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC Elim Chan, conductor Igor Levit, piano

Returning to the Granada stage for the first time since the historic CAMA+LA Phil 100th Anniversary concert back on March 6, 2020, the venerated orchestra will be performing two of the great masterpieces of the classical canon: Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No.3 and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No.4.

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DEC. 16-23, 2021

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DECEMBER 23, 2021

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by Nick Welsh s the United States quietly exceeded 500,000 fatal opioid overdoses in the past 20 years — with more than 100,000 last year alone — the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors even more quietly approved a settlement with fentanyl manufacturer Johnson & Johnson and three major opioid distribution companies that will “reimburse” the county for the pain and suffering inflicted by the opioid epidemic to the tune of $9.5 million-$22.6 million. This trickle-down is the county’s share of a $26 billion nationwide settlement with the four companies alleged to have turned a blind eye to destructive and addictive nature of the drugs they so aggressively marketed. Of that $26 billion, $2.2 billion will be distributed to California cities and counties that participated in the litigation. The county’s share — minus 17 percent in attorneys’ fees — will be doled out over an 18-year period and used for drug detox, rehabilitation, and prevention programs. It will also be used to underwrite the cost of programs designed to divert habitual drug users out of the criminal justice system and into rehab. Although this settlement involved far more money, it garnered far less national — and local — attention than did last week’s legal meltdown of the proposed $4.5 billion settlement with Purdue Pharma, the company widely credited for masterminding the explosion of opioid addiction over the past 20 years. Last week, a federal appeals judge overturned a “painstakingly negotiated” bankruptcy settlement worked out between about

INDEPENDENT.COM 11/16/2021 3:54:31 PM

4,000 state and county governments and Purdue Pharma and their owners — members of the now-notorious Sackler family. The county supervisors had joined that litigation as well. Most of the county’s ire was focused on the Sackler family and Purdue Pharma in the body of its 139page complaint filed in 2018. Attorneys for the county — the law firm of Keller Rohrback — termed the opioid crisis “the worst man-made epidemic in modern medical history.” They accused Purdue and the Sacklers — marketing geniuses who patented and sold OxyContin — of masterminding a diabolical campaign to persuade and “bribe” medical professionals throughout the country over the past 20 years to prescribe their highly addictive drugs. In 1995, the county’s lawsuit alleged, Purdue was selling $1 billion worth of OxyContin a year; by 2020, it projected, the number would be $18 billion. By 2007, federal authorities brought criminal charges against Purdue — bought in 1952 by three Sackler brothers who were each psychiatrists — fining them $600 million. Over the next 10 years, the Sacklers would then withdraw more than $10 billion out of the company, squirrelling the money away into offshore bank accounts. Thus drained of its assets, the company was forced to declare bankruptcy in the face of widespread litigation involving no fewer than 800 lawsuits. The bankruptcy settlement, first announced in September 2019, would personally shield the Sacklers from litigation while doling out $4.5 billion of what was left of their company. It would later CONT’D ON PAGE 11 


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D TRANSPORTATION

Some Wheel Good News for S.B. N IC K WELSH F I LE PHOTO

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he City of Santa Barbara finally made it onto the League of American Bicyclists’ officially designated list of 496 “Bicycle Friendly Cities,” winning a silver medal designation along the way. By contrast San Luis Obispo won gold, and Ventura took home a bronze. Last year, Santa Barbara didn’t make the list at all, and this year, 1,900 communities applied. The designation reflects the increased investment City Hall has been putting in new bicycle infrastructure, most notably the new Class III bike lanes—which separate cyclists from cars. The biggest—which cost $20 million—runs from Las Positas Road to the end of Modoc Road with an option to snake across the Arroyo Burro Creek and wind up at Arroyo Burro Beach. In addition, City Hall is creating a new bike “paseo” connecting the city’s Westside with downtown by building a bike boulevard along Sola Street; it’s extending that one from downtown Santa Barbara to the Eastside by Santa Barbara High School. Bike lane buffers or extensions are also slated for Chapala and De la Vina streets as well. By creating these new specifically designated bike lanes, the thinking goes, additional riders will be enticed out of their cars

and onto their bikes. Right now, about 3.9 percent of all Santa Barbarans commute to work via bike; statewide, that number is 5.1 percent. Santa Barbara’s number of crashes—485 per 10,000 commuters—is nearly double the statewide average of 287. But for 2021, Santa Barbara’s number of fatalities per 10,000 miles was zero; statewide, it was 2.2. Also winning recognition from the nationally based bicycle advocacy group was UC Santa Barbara, which has been winning platinum honors for several years running. Likewise, Deckers, Sonos, Telescope Network, Service Objects, and Dr. J’s Bicycle Shop won awards, as did the Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition, which won platinum honors for organizational advocacy.

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HOUSING

GROUNDBREAKING: Last Wednesday, 15 high-ranking public officials broke ground on the Vera Cruz Village housing project.

Vera Cruz Village Breaks Ground

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ity Housing Authority director Rob Fredericks was displaying an unusual degree of swagger last Wednesday morning at a ground-breaking ceremony featuring 15 high-ranking public officials—including Santa Barbara Mayor Cathy Murillo—all of whom were wearing white hard hats and wielding golden shovels. The occasion was a grip ’n’ grin event to kick off the construction of a new affordable housing project next door to Vera Cruz Park, right across the street from the Cota Street parking lot where Saturday’s farmers’ market takes place. The property had initially been slated—Fredericks pointedly pointed out to a small crowd of City Hall insiders, assorted news media, and affordable housing players—to be developed into 15 units of highend housing. But when that project failed, the Housing Authority managed to snag the property before any other developers could. As a result, the Housing Authority will be building 28 units of capital-A affordable studio apartments for people so poor that many

of them would otherwise find themselves either homeless or close to it. For Mayor Murillo, the event afforded an opportunity to address an issue near to her heart—housing—in the waning moments of her mayoral term. Murillo did not waste the moment. “Housing is everything,” she proclaimed. She recalled the handful of years she served as council liaison to the Housing Authority board. Speaking of the boardmembers she served with, she said, “When I stood in their company, I felt like I was standing next to a source of light,” she said. “A source of heat.” Making this deal possible was what Fredericks called “a layer cake” of public and private financing partnerships. The total cost is projected around $17 million, with support from City Hall, and $10 million in stateapproved tax credits. The project would also provide a myriad of services to help people succeed in getting off the streets. Fredericks estimated construction will take 18 months —NW to complete. INDEPENDENT.COM

DECEMBER 23, 2021

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

DEC. 16-23, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

COU RTESY TOM MODUG N O / GOLETAH ISTORY.COM

COMMUNITY

Woman Accused of Driving Kids, Senior off 100-Foot Embankment

A

Ellwood Cooper

New Owner to Buy Ellwood Cooper Ranch

woman from West Hills, California, is accused of deliberately driving her Chevy Silverado off the southbound 101 embankment near Evans Avenue and plunging toward the railroad tracks below on December 7. With her in the pickup truck were three juveniles and a 79-yearold woman, and the Santa Barbara County District Attorney has charged Christina Watanabe with assault with a deadly weapon. Watanabe allegedly took the pickup down a 100-foot embankment near the Evans Avenue southbound off-ramp in Summerland, the DA’s press release stated. The car fell over onto its side and came to

a halt five feet from the tracks, where an approaching Amtrak Pacific Surfliner made an emergency stop. The relationship between the individuals in the vehicle was not stated, but the children ranged in age from 12 to 15. The counts included elder or dependent adult abuse and three for child abuse under conditions likely to cause great bodily injury or death. The felony complaint also states plans to introduce evidence of prior elder abuse by Watanabe. Four requests for protective orders were filed with the court, and Watanabe is being held on $2 million bail. A preliminary hearing setting will be held on January 7, 2022. —Indy Staff

Goleta Historian Concerned ‘Ellwood Queen’ Unprotected from the Ax by Jean Yamamura he City of Goleta is the kind of place that when sidewalks were planned for Old Town, the neighborhood asked for the concrete to go around its giant camphor tree rather than having it cut down. And the city takes pride in its Sister Witness Tree, the largest sycamore in California, which was named a “National Champion Tree” by the American Forests conservation group for its height and girth. Equally awe-inspiring is the Ellwood Queen — a lemon-scented gum planted by Ellwood Cooper in 1887 and measuring 142 feet tall, with a trunk 14 feet in diameter. Named a Champion Tree on California’s Big Tree Registry, it towers over Cooper’s ranch, which is being sold off-market, a pending sale that is now in escrow. Goleta historian Tom Modugno is worried. Modugno said he’d heard rumors of a sale from farmers in Ellwood and Winchester canyons, who described conversations with a developer looking to build four “mini-mansions.” Only a few small buildings remain on the property, including a redwood barn that dates back to the 1870s, said Modugno. The land is deeded to the Bradley Family Trust. A family member, who asked not to be named, is familiar with the sale and said the ranch was one of several properties being sold after the death of a relative. He too had been disturbed by rumors that the purchaser asked about taking down the eucalyptus grove along Cathedral Oaks Road, and he was worried that structures, such as the old blacksmith’s shop, might not be valued by the new owner. The purchaser, David Radan of Orange County, however, told the Independent he had no intention of changing anything at the property other than to “clean it up a little bit. There are some things on the other side of the property like junked cars that I’d like to remove,” he said. Though Radan is in construction, he said he didn’t do developments, and his plan for the property was for it to be his vacation home. Neither Radan nor the Bradley family member were willing to name the sale price. The ranch’s original owner, according to Modugno’s GoletaHistory.com website, was

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Ellwood Cooper. He was famous for the thousands of trees he planted on his ranch off Ellwood Ridge Road — walnuts, olives, persimmons, and almonds — as well as the thousands of plants Mrs. Cooper cared for on the grounds, including the majestic lemonscented gum tree. What worries Modugno is that the property currently has no historic status that would protect the tree. The City of Goleta is in the midst of writing its Historic Preservation Ordinance but hadn’t realized Cooper’s ranch was within its borders until Modugno traced out the boundaries. “There’s a huge eucalyptus grove there that may or may not have monarch butterflies in it,” Modugno said, “and a Morton Bay Fig Tree as big as the one in Santa Barbara.” The remnant of what was once a 2,000-acre ranch is historic for the city in many ways. “Half the city is named Ellwood,” exclaimed City Councilmember Stuart Kasdin. “I live in a place called Ellwood!” Any suggestion that non-permitted work could just take place seems unlikely given Radan’s comments and the neighbors’ vigilance. Plus, the city would stop the work immediately if any tree cutting or building demolition were reported, said city spokesperson Kelly Hoover. As for what could be built there, the planning department noted the 24-acre property is zoned for two primary structures on minimum 10-acre lots, though one accessory dwelling unit could be added to each. Structures more than 50 years old add a historic determination, which means permits would go through a discretionary approval process, Hoover said. Also, a second Goleta-centric wrinkle would require any conversion of the zoning from agricultural to any other category to go to a citywide vote, per Measure G, which passed in 2012. Bob Wignot, who was among the people who fought to pass the measure, recalled it gained a 71 percent majority and succeeded in keeping Bishop Ranch in one piece between Cathedral Oaks and the freeway. The measure applies to any parcel of 10 acres or more. “Goletans thought it was a good idea to preserve local agriculture,” Wignot said. n

OPIOID CRISIS CONT’D FROM P. 8 be approved by a judge in White Plains, New York. A few handfuls of attorneys general throughout the nation — including California’s — appealed the settlement deal, arguing that the money was too small, the Sacklers were getting away with murder, and it wasn’t even legal. Last Thursday, an appeals court judge — Colleen McMahon — ruled that these states were correct as to the fundamental illegality of the deal. If the Sacklers themselves were not personally declaring bankruptcy, she concluded, they could not avail themselves of the protection from civil litigation that only bankruptcy offers. With that deal now unraveled, it becomes pending litigation, something County Counsel Rachel Van Mullem says she will not discuss. But legal commentary aside, the county’s own death statistics are stark enough. Since 2014, 639 county residents have died of opioid-related overdoses. When the final stats are tabulated for 2021, the number will be even higher. Of those, at least 140 died from overdoses related to fentanyl — a synthetically made opioid said to be 80-100 times stronger than morphine. Those numbers, likewise, will get higher as the final tabulations roll in. Most striking is the acceleration of opioid-related overdoses. In 2005, the county reported 27 overdose deaths. By 2015, it was 59; in 2018, it was 85; and last year, it was 114. This year, by November, the number was 95. The good news — however perversely so — is that these numbers could have been so much worse. Since 2015, John Doyel — who runs the county’s drug and alcohol programs for the Department of Behavioral Wellness — estimates 1,400 overdoses have been reversed by Narcan kits administered by his department and through Pacific Pride, which contracts INDEPENDENT.COM

with the county to get such kits into the hands of likely drug users. “Most assuredly, the vast majority of those who were administered Narcan would have died,” Doyel stated. Narcan is the product name for naloxone — a chemical developed in 1961 to counter the effects of an overdose — which is administered in the form of a nasal spray. Naloxone can also be administered intramuscularly via a syringe-like apparatus. Nationally, it appears COVID has helped propel an increase in overdose deaths. Locally, Doyel said, “the jury is still out” as to what effect COVID has had on overdose stats. “We’re still tracking it,” he said. One thing’s for certain: Fentanyl is having a much bigger impact. In the first six months of the year, Doyel said, fentanyl was involved with 28 of the first 36 overdose deaths. Last year, fentanyl was implicated in 33 of the county’s 114 fatal overdoses. By contrast, in 2015, it was involved in just nine out of 75 deaths. According to Kristin Flickinger of Pacific Pride, fentanyl is now added not just to heroin but also to cocaine and methamphetamine. Two years ago, she said, it was added only to heroin. Unsuspecting users, she said, could find themselves taking speedballs. “That can be very deadly,” she said, noting as well that fentanyl is so much more potent that morphine and heroin. In response, she said Pacific Pride is now distributing fentanyl test strips so that users have a better idea of what they’re putting in their bodies. “Some people use fentanyl very intentionally. Some are not,” she said. The test strips cost about a buck apiece. “Some users might say, ‘Gosh, I don’t want to use this,’ ” Flickinger said. “Others might say, ‘I’ll use less, slower, and make sure I have some Narcan on hand.’ ” To date, she said, Pacific Pride has passed n out thousands of test strips.

DECEMBER 23, 2021

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Blue Dogs, White Christmas?

NOSTALGIA AIN’T WHAT IT USED TO BE:

Eighty years ago this Christmas, a singer named Bing Crosby stood in front of a mic and first recorded his first take on “White Christmas,” a haunting piece of melancholia that riffed ever-so-secularly on the origin story of all Christianity. Not coincidentally, this song—brimming over with unquenchable wistfulness and longing—happened to be composed by a Jewish immigrant from Russia named Irving Berlin. At the time, Berlin commented that “White Christmas” was not just the best song he ever wrote, but the best song ever written. If anything, history would later prove, Berlin didn’t know the half of it. His song would go on to sell 100 million copies. I mention all this because four years ago, all of us here in Santa Barbara were celebrating a very gray Christmas as the ashes from 440 square miles of trees and homes fluttered magically, beautifully, and oh-so-ominously down to earth, courtesy of a conflagration dubbed the Thomas Fire. We’re told we’re doomed to repeat history if we don’t remember it, but some things—almost everything, I’d say—I need to forget. If you can’t have peace, maybe a little quiet will do. And I mention the Thomas Fire not merely to be the proverbial skunk at the garden party. Last week, the California Public Utilities Commission penalized the

parent company of Southern California Edison —which provides juice to the South Coast — to the tune of $588 million for operational and safety violations that gave rise to the Thomas Fire. To be precise, this penalty covered four other fires that all just happened to blow up at about the same time. The Thomas Fire, however, was the biggest of all of them, leading to more deaths—25 when you include the deadly 1/9 Debris Flow for which it paved the way—and more destruction— 281,000 acres and more than 1,000 homes. The big news about this penalty is that the CPUC is not letting SoCal Edison pass the costs on to its ratepayers. Instead, its shareholders are being forced to eat it. That’s because of the egregiousness of Edison’s conduct. Proper clearances had not been maintained between power lines and conductors. Not only did the utility giant fail to take the necessary steps to keep its power lines from slapping into each other, spewing molten shards onto the dry bush below, but while Santa Ana winds were blowing—winds that had been predicted well in advance and pretty much always happen around this time of year. The Thomas Fire started in two different locations in Ventura County on December 4, 2017 —the Feast of Saint Barbara, by the way — and then converged. All kabloowie ensued.

At its zenith, the Thomas Fire was generating its own weather patterns, qualifying it as a genuine “fire storm” event, not just

a “megafire” or an “omni-fire.” It was swallowing up and spitting out a new acre every second. We had 8,500 firefighters with 1,000 fire engines on it. By the time it was over, 100,000 people had evacuated. Air quality conditions were so heinous and unhealthy we all had to wear masks. Remember that? What I don’t remember, however, is people refusing to wear masks, showing up at county supervisors meetings, and gumming up the works for 30 minutes as they were gently “escorted” from the chambers. At the time, the Thomas Fire was declared the biggest, worst fire in California history. That dubious distinction, however, would hold for only seven months. It now ranks either seventh or eighth. Under the new Climate Change regime, megafires now perform like home-run hitters on a steroid streak. Five of the top 10 biggest fires in state history have occurred in just the past two years. If I remember correctly, 2017 was the hottest, driest year in recorded history. We went 250 straight days without any measurable precipitation. We’ve had hotter, drier years since. Get used to it. Thanks to Joe Manchin III, the senator from West Virginia, the $555 billion in federal

funds proposed to bring our collective carbon footprint back to what it was in 2005 just went down the drain. The hope was to keep the planet from getting even hotter. Maybe it would have helped. Manchin both represents and embodies the coal and oil interests who fear their market share will be threatened by the cleaner energy sources Joe Biden’s Build Back Better bill hopes to conjure into existence with massive tax credits. Get used to it. What really pissed the CPUC off about Edison was not just the utility giant’s failure to anticipate what had already been predicted and take precautionary steps. Instead, it was Edison’s steadfast refusal to turn over to state investigators pertinent documents about the fire’s origins. State fire investigators wanted notes, texts, photos, and reports provided by Edison workers who first responded to the fire. Edison refused on the grounds that such information was qualified as “work product” for the company’s legal department and, as such, was off limits. Only $558 million? It’s worth noting that “White Christmas” was written poolside in a California desert. Its first stanza was, “The sun is shining / the grass is green / the orange and palm trees sway / there’s never been such a day / in Beverly Hills, L.A.” Where’s Irving Berlin when you need him the most? —Nick Welsh

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Rent Control Past Due

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aying the words “rent control” in Santa Barbara seems to be enough to give our local talking heads a stroke. Most opinion pieces concerning this proposal are soaked with existential horror. Every step toward a more just and equitable future is always met with tales of pending doom. Doom, that is, to the owners of capital. During the late 1980s in Berkeley, UC philosophy professor and landlord John Searle gave a hot take that has aged like deviled eggs in the sun: “The treatment of landlords in Berkeley is comparable to the treatment of blacks in the South … our rights have been massively violated and we are here to correct that injustice.” Today’s pearl-clutching in Santa Barbara, although more politically correct, is equally false. We must understand the conversation on rent control as an opening move in an unending conflict between those who generate value and those who merely own value. While the right-wing has criticized Mayor Murillo for advancing this discussion at the end of her term, the real tragedy is that she felt politically unsafe doing so before the recent local election. It is of desperate, paramount importance that leadership fight heroically to push it through. Furthermore, we need to continue the conversation. Is 2 percent a low enough rent hike? (The rent will go up that 2 percent, of course.) What about tying rent increases directly to the local Consumer Price Index? What of a Public Affordable Housing Trust? If you are a tenant or a worker, or if you care about them, your voice in this fight is tremendously valuable. Even the smallest whisper can sway public opinion when there is so much whispering that it turns into wind.

—Charles Perkins, S.B.

Freedom, Safety, and America

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his is in response to the Voices feature “Unmasked at the Athletic Club”: We all share the desire to feel safe during periods of outbreaks, and so everyone has their own way of dealing with their health and immunity by choosing

SPECIALS which authorities and practices to follow in order to maintain wellness. Jana Zimmer portrayed an unpleasant situation where she and her health club couldn’t agree with each other regarding a safety and wellness protocol. I must say that one size does not fit all and that we supposedly live in a free society. If everyone agreed to live only one way, under one rule, then we would be living under totalitarianism. That is not America. In life, there is never an assurance of safety, no matter how much we hope for that. People have different beliefs and practices regarding their health, and I would hope that we would all respect that. So I would say that you are free to choose an exercise facility that conforms to your idea of —Steve Fields, S.B. safety.

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n response to Jana Zimmer’s opinion article titled “Unmasked at the Athletic Club,” I stand in support of her position. I have twice paused my membership at the Santa Barbara Athletic Club due to concerns about contagion with the COVID-19 Delta variant and now the Omicron variant. My husband is immunocompromised, and I am determined to keep him safe by staying true to CDC guidelines. It is frustrating that I have to forego attendance at what is a stellar club in all other regards due to their inability or unwillingness to adhere to state public health mandates. Thank you, Jana, for your determination to hold our community account—Christine Fredericks, Carpinteria able.

For the Record

¶ In the news story regarding unvaccinated deputies last week, the overall county’s increase in daily case rate per 100,000 residents went from 16.6 to 24.1; there is no percentage involved. And in the story about landlords receiving bonuses, they are “signing” bonuses of $5,000. ¶ Our “Dog Days of Miramar” article from August 26 should have stated that the Aussie Rescue Networking Group and Aussie Rescue SoCal are two separate organizations.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries A memorial service is anticipated in the summer of 2022. Donations in her memory can be made to the memorial fund at the First United Methodist Church, 305 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101.

Glory Anna South

9/14/1922 - 11/27/2021

Philip S. Wilcox

11/7/1931 - 10/30/2021

Long-time resident of the Santa Barbara community, Glory Anna South passed away on November 27. She was 99 years old. Born in St. Louis, Missouri, Glory Anna was raised by her aunt and uncle, Anna and Charles Huber in Carmi, Illinois after the death of her mother when she was five years old. She met her husband, Victor, in Carmi and joined him in San Francisco where he was stationed during World War II. They were wed at the San Francisco Presidio Chapel and married for 55 years before his passing in 1998. In 1958, the couple moved with their young children to Santa Barbara where Glory Anna resided for the next 63 years, with short stints away in the 1970s in San Jose and Huntsville, Alabama for Victor’s work with the space program. Glory Anna graduated from the Chillicothe Business College in 1941, and after raising her children, she served as a secretary at the First United Methodist Church in Santa Barbara, and later as Deputy Public Administrator-Conservator for the County of Santa Barbara. Glory Anna had a profound wanderlust, traveling to 60 countries in her lifetime as well as more than 45 states. She often recounted her adventures traveling with Victor on military “space available,” hitching rides with Senators and ending up in unexpected destinations. Glory Anna made her final trip at age 96. An active member of the First Methodist Church of Santa Barbara for six decades, Glory Anna also enjoyed being part of the Santa Barbara Women’s Club after her retirement. Glory Anna is survived by her children, Susan Goux (Tom) of Monument Beach, Massachusetts and Bob South of Ocean View, Hawaii. She loved and was loved by her three grandchildren, Carrie (Jonathan Spalter) Goux, Jason Goux, and Randy (Darshan) Goux, as well as her eight great-grandchildren, Kyla, Cassidy, Thomas, and Theo Goux, and Sage, Willa, Lael and Luc Spalter. 14

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Native Santa Barbaran and lifelong resident, PHILIP SCOTT WILCOX, died peacefully at his Montecito home on October 30, 2021, a week shy of his 90th birthday. Born at Cottage Hospital, November 7, 1931, to Dr. Alfred Bulkeley Wilcox and Marguerite Bone Wilcox, he attended Roosevelt School, La Cumbre Junior High and Santa Barbara High School (Class of ’48), where he was editor of The Forge. At age 16 he went to Stanford University, earning both undergraduate (BA 52) and law (LLB 54) degrees, followed by two years in the US ARMY stationed in California and France. Returning to Santa Barbara in 1956, he began his 39 years of legal practice, first with Clarence Rogers in the old Carrillo Adobe and subsequently with close friend Bill Gordon, and the last 23 years with Mullen and Henzell. In 1958 he married the love of his life, Sally Fernamberg, of Wauseon, Ohio, who survives him, as do their 3 children, James Scott Wilcox (Lisa), Sara Anne Wilcox and Charles Philip Wilcox, all of Santa Barbara, with grandchildren; JP (James Philip) Wilcox and Jenna Wilcox. Philip is also survived by his sister Alita Wilcox Rhodes (Don) and brother Jonathan Wilcox – along with many nieces and nephews; Paul Wilcox (Kira), Heather Wilcox, Chris Rhodes, Jesse Rhodes, Marybeth Rhodes Woodruff (Matt), Lauren Wilcox Schmitz (George), Daniel Wilcox-Free (Laura), and Megan WilcoxFree. His brother Douglas Wilcox and wife Yvonne preceded him in death. Phil’s “memorable achievements” include presidencies of the Santa Barbara Foundation, Family Service Agency, Sansum Medical Research Foundation, and other officer/

DECEMBER 23, 2021

director positions with the Cottage Health Institutional Review Board, Montecito Library, Montecito Association and the Montecito Union School Board. He was an active and life-long member of All Saints By The Sea Church. After retirement Phil enjoyed numerous Adult Education classes studying Shakespeare, music and poetry. He also volunteered at Cleveland School in the reading program. Sally and Phil traveled extensively on nearly all continents in their 63 years together, motivated frequently by her devotion to hiking and his to theater and poetry, particularly Shakespeare and WB Yeats. Phil (“I am a poet in my mind”) was an enthusiastic actor from an early age, appearing in some fifteen local productions, notably as the fool, “Feste”, in Twelfth Night and the “Reverend Hale” in The Crucible. As Phil once wrote, “Being blessed with a wonderful family and the chance to spend my life in Santa Barbara has been a gift for which the most profound thanks would not do justice”. What mattered most to him was his love of family and his wide range of friends. Memorial services to be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Hillside House of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Strings, the Grace Fisher Foundation, or VNA/Hospice.

Charles J Turner

7/12/1941 - 11/21/2021

Charles J. Turner was born July 12, 1941 in Alcester, SD. He died November 21, 2021 in Henderson, NV. Shortly after graduation he moved to LA then Santa Barbara where he had a long, successful career with VONS grocery company. He is survived by his children Gregory (Brenda) Turner of Forney, TX and Kathleen (Michael) Magazino of Santa Barbara. Charles was a gentle, joyful man who loved to laugh. He loved his family and friends dearly. He will be missed by many.

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Joan Jacobs 1937 - 2021

Joan Jacobs passed away in July, 2021 after battling pancreatic cancer. True to her nature, she fought valiantly, and kept her positive attitude throughout. Caretakers and medical personnel frequently commented on her hopeful spirit and the kindness she showed, even through extreme pain and discomfort. Her oft-repeated phrase was “Nothing is so bad that it couldn’t be worse.” She spent her final days at Serenity House being cared for by the compassionate hospice staff. Her daughter Rebecca and son-in-law Mark Roling were at her side when she died. Joan was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1937 to John and Della, their second child after older brother Jack. Joan had over 40 first-cousins sprinkled throughout Illinois and Wisconsin. She attended Cornell College in Iowa for two years until meeting Robert (Bob) Jacobs through her brother Jack. As was ordinary back in those early years, she left college to marry Bob in 1957. They had one daughter, Rebecca, in 1962. What was not ordinary was that Joan became the main breadwinner of the family, supporting the family as a librarian while Bob was in medical school. The family moved to Santa Barbara, CA in 1974 where Bob began the first undergraduate pharmacology program in the US at University of California, Santa Barbara. Joan also worked at UCSB in the Marine Sciences Department and Polymer Institute in the Physics Department. Beginning in Illinois, and continuing for several years after moving to Santa Barbara, Joan suffered from agoraphobia, a panic disorder that kept her from driving and caused debilitating fear of public places. After much hard work and finally finding effective medical care, she overcame this condition, which shaped her attitude of never giving up, and staying

active and engaged in the community. She was proud to share her story when it gave hope to others who were suffering from the condition she triumphed over. Joan was an active volunteer and philanthropist. She co-chaired the Planned Parenthood Book Fair in the 1970s, she was active in the Faculty Womens’ Club at UCSB, she served on the board of the Santa Barbara Genealogy Society, and also served on the board of the Santa Barbara Symphony League. She and Bob were passionate patrons of the arts and supported Music Academy of the West and Santa Barbara Symphony. Joan truly found her voice through literature and writing classes she first took through Santa Barbara City College’s Adult Education programs, and continued through Vistas Lifelong Learning. She found a particular passion for poetry, and was published in several anthologies. She also selfpublished a collection of her poems, “Verses and Images.” Joan is survived by her daughter Rebecca Roling and son-in-law Mark Roling, nephews David Rossdeutcher and Gerald Wasson, nieces Pamela Benadiba and Kathleen Hartin. Friends and family of Joan are invited to join her loved ones at a Santa Barbara Symphony concert and reception, Sunday January 16th, with the concert beginning at 3pm at the Granada Theatre in Santa Barbara, followed by a reception in the theater’s Founders Room. Complimentary concert tickets will be provided, please RSVP here: bit.ly/JoanJacobs To remember Joan, please consider a donation to Santa Barbara Symphony or Serenity House (VNA Health).


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Thomas F. Stone 1943 - 2021

Longtime Santa Barbara resident Thomas F. Stone passed away peacefully on Sunday, December 5, 2021. Tom was born to Frank and Louise (Parkhurst) Stone in Keokuk, Iowa, in 1943. He attended the University of Iowa for both undergraduate and law school where he enjoyed hijinks with his brothers in Sigma Chi, was elected senator at-large and, as a side benefit, received an excellent education. Appropriately, his father was a straight-laced professor (and later dean) of education at the University. Tom hated the Iowa winter weather so he set his sights on a more pleasant climate. While driving down the California coast searching for just such a place, he and his thenwife Gayle Lynds, fell in love with Santa Barbara, where they moved in 1969, just in time for that year’s infamous oil spill. In 1974 Tom returned to Iowa for a week to join friends for the second-ever RAGBRI endurance ride. His love of cycling continued throughout his life, including a brief stint as an amateur criterium racer. He also discovered a love for hiking in California’s mountains. The literal highpoint was when he climbed Mount Whitney, the tallest mountain in the lower 48 states. When Tom first arrived in Santa Barbara he joined the Hatch and Parent law firm as an associate and later opened his own practice. Among other clients, he represented the Isla Vista Recreation and Park District, the Santa Barbara Redevelopment Agency, and the Polo Club. He gave of his time freely serving on the Transition House Board, and volunteering for the Legal Aid Foundation, and other charities before his retirement. Tom met, then in 1998 married the love of his life, Alexandra (Sandy) Leslie. Tom had a deep love for music, which was shown by his insistence on using Dave Brubek’s “Take

Five” as his ringtone long after it was fashionable to have customized ringtones. So Tom and Alexandra’s pairing made special sense because Alexandra was an outstanding musician. Together they were active in the effort to preserve the San Marcos foothills and Tom served as Vice President and Director of the Coalition. They also were part of the Santa Barbara Zen Center and practicing Buddhists. They took long walks where Tom continued to explore his love of photography. Tom and Alexandra moved to Des Moines, Iowa, in 2017 to retire and after Alexandra’s passing, Tom moved to Chevy Chase, Maryland, to live two blocks from his family. Tom is survived by his son Paul, his daughter Julia, his daughter-in-law Katrina, his son-in-law Kari Timonen, and his grandchildren Sophia Stone and Finn Thomas Timonen. He is also survived by his step-daughters Jennifer, Susan, Linda, Pam, and by a host of grandchildren and great grandchildren whom Alexandra brought into his life. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be made to the scholarship fund established at the University of Iowa. Checks should be made out to the UI Center for Advancement and note in the memo line the name of the fund “Franklin D. and Louise P. Stone International Scholarship (30-350-027)” and “in memory of Thomas F. Stone.” Checks should be mailed to the attention of Callie Murry at One West Park Road, Iowa City, IA 52242. For online donations go to the University’s “Give to Iowa” site at https://tinyurl.com/ y7tkm684. Search for and select “other” areas to support and click next. Then type in “Franklin D. and Louise P. Stone International Scholarship” in the box asking where the contribution should be directed. A virtual memorial service is being planned, if you would like notification of the service please email tomstonememorial@gmail.com.

WAGNER – D. William 12/7/2021

in his name to the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara (www.lafsbc.org, 301 E. Canon Perdido Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101) or Santa Barbara Human Rights Watch (11500 W. Olympic Blvd. Suite 608, Los Angeles, CA 90064.)

Jesse Alexander

4/15/1929 - 12/14/2021 D. William (Bill) Wagner, 78, passed December 7 th , 2021, at home in Santa Barbara, CA surrounded by his wife and sons. Bill was born to Earl and Lois Wagner in Dixon, IL and raised in Sterling, IL. A lifelong love of language and people led him from consecutive statewide debate championships for Illinois in 1960 and 1961 to Northwestern University to study Political Science and Government, continuing at Northwestern University School of Law where he graduated Cum Laude and was a member of the Law Review. Bill started practicing law in Chicago and moved to Los Angeles in 1981 as a partner at Sidley & Austin, specializing in corporate and commercial real estate law for over forty years. He was a champion of human and legal rights for all. His advocacy began early with work for the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty in Chicago and continued with thirty years of service as a board member for Housing Options for People to Excel (HOPE) transitional housing in Venice, California. After moving to Santa Barbara, he served for eight years as vice chair on the steering committee for Human Rights Watch and as a board member for the Legal Aid Foundation. Bill was preceded in death by his first wife Barbara and survived by his sister Marcia, loving wife Sue Aldrich Wagner, sons Peter and Nicholas, their wives and his four grandchildren. He was a remarkable human being, beloved by family and friends, and will be remembered for many gifts, but perhaps most prominently for always being ready to share a companionable smile and a kindred voice. Those wishing to do so are invited to make a donation

kindness, grateful spirit, and persistent sense of wonder will live on in the hearts of all those who knew him. And the legacy of his empathetic eye will be shared by everyone he reached but never met. Jesse is survived by his wife of 56 years, Nancy Alexander, and their son, Jess. And his first wife, Patricia Beckham, and their daughters, Rori, Heidi, Andi, and Susie. Along with nieces and nephews, his many grandchildren, and most recently, the first great-grandchild.

Larry Hafiz Decker, Ph.D. Jesse Alexander, 92, a photographer who documented the golden age of motorsport, passed away on December 14, 2021, in Santa Barbara. He was comfortable and at home, with his beloved wife, Nancy, by his side, holding his hand. Jesse was born on April 15, 1929, in Santa Barbara to Florence Louise Lyman and Junius Beverly Alexander. Jesse grew up in Montecito where he attended The Howard School, then went to boarding school in Massachusetts at Fessenden, and then Pomfret in Connecticut. Jesse returned to California for college at UCSB, where he studied photography and met his first wife. They moved to Europe with the first of their four daughters, where Jesse would document the international motor racing scene as a photojournalist from the late 1950s to the early 1970s, counting its players as his closest friends. His pictures captured the on-track danger and glamorous spectacle, defining the sport for a generation of fans. Jesse’s ability to feature the human element of motorsport made his images more than just a record of thrilling events and elegant machines but also evocative fine art. His photographs have been published in countless publications and now hang in the homes of collectors, galleries, and museums. After all of his professional success and global acclaim, Jesse most loved being a “Happy Snapper,” documenting the everyday beauty of life in his hometown, Santa Barbara. Jesse’s

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1/8/1941 - 6/19/2021

Larry Hafiz Decker, Ph.D., 80, passed into the light on June 19, 2021. Psychologist, university professor, and author of two books, The Alchemy of Combat and Out from the Inside, and many professional publications, presentations, and workshops. He specialized in Post-Traumatic stress disorder. He was in two documentaries: Gail Osherenko’s, ‘The Birds of Los Banos’, and Josh Aronson’s, ‘To Be of Service’. Husband, father, friend, psychologist, professor, swimmer, surfer, world traveler, longtime member of the Sufi Inayatiyya Order, and so much more. He is survived by his wife of 56 years Beverly, sons, Joshua and Shawn, two grandchildren, Ava and James, daughter in law, Vanessa, his brother Roger, sisters, Gail and Nancy and many friends and relatives. Words can never express how profoundly he is loved and missed. There was an on-line memorial on August 14, 2021.

DECEMBER 23, 2021

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In Memoriam

Nadine Eve Turner 1957-2021

N

Gracious and Generous

admired and loved by so many people in many different walks of life, passed away at Serenity House hospice on September 8, 2021, losing her two-year struggle with ovarian cancer. Long in the hospitality industry — including working with the Santa Barbara International Film Festival at the Hotel Santa Barbara — Nadine earned numerous awards, including manager of the year several times and even a special recognition from the U.S. Congress. Despite all of that, her heart lay in her efforts to help others in need within the community. From babysitting in her teen years to volunteering as a mentor with the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (CADA), where she was voted mentor of the year in 2010, she actively supported numerous charities and causes. Sometimes it was as simple as offering a warm coat to a homeless person in the street. Born in London, Nadine and her family immigrated to the United States shortly after her birth, living for a time in New Orleans and then Los Angeles before settling in Santa Barbara in 1969. After graduation from Santa Barbara High School, Nadine attended Santa Barbara City College and then graduated from University of the Pacific in Stockton in 1979. With a degree in nonprofit leadership and management and a minor in French, she moved right into a position at the Girls Club of Santa Barbara, today the United Boys and Girls Club of Santa Barbara County. Full of adventure and fluent in French, Nadine launched her career by becoming a “GO,” or “Gentil Organisateur,” at Club Med resorts in Cancun, Guadeloupe, Copper Mountain in Colorado, and even Morocco! Following Club Med, Nadine included in her résumé El Encanto Hotel, Santa Barbara; Claremont Resort, Berkeley; Pacifica Hotel Company, based in Santa Barbara; and director of sales and marketing at the Hotel Santa Barbara. Nadine met her husband, Alex Rose, in 2002. Inseparable, they shared many common interests and sentiments, including travel to Europe and Canada to visit and stay connected to family and friends, and always ready for a new adventure. Some of her favorite local activities were walks at Ellwood Preserve, More Mesa, the Douglas Family Preserve, and, of course, the beach. In recent years, she was always caring and present for her parents, Françoise and Robert, in their declining years, as well as her brother Joel as he succumbed to cancer. Nadine had the special gift of a gracious and generous personality, always able to connect to others with sincerity while maintaining multiple circles of friends. She loved life, enriched by gratitude, and fought to survive with a stoic determination until the very end. Soon after she died, Alex found this note she had composed: I thought that during the past year I would reflect on the more spiritual and philosophical aspects of life. I am surrounded by books and serious writings. I wondered if I might

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impart some words of wisdom and deep musings upon my last breath. Instead, I fill my time with sitting in my garden, simply observing and breathing. Hummingbirds, bees, flowers, plants, sunshine. Our two beautiful cats offer so much. We offer them life of routine, security, and freedom, and they shower us with wtheir affection and trust. I reminisce about the past. I’ve always spent a lot of time there, and now I observe instead of getting emotional or regretful. There is so much to be sad about in my family; however, I feel the love and sacrifice of my parents to offer us a life here in a new land. I flit about the condo doing a bit of housework, organizing and running errands. I watch films from the ’30s-’60s to distract from discomfort. I spend special moments with friends, which support and keep me afloat. My main sentiment to you is that this is not a goodbye. I know that when loved ones move on, they are always in your heart. What I feel most strongly is THANK YOU. Thank you for your Friendship. Your generosity, love, and acceptance. The outpouring of attention has been most moving and touching. The visits, flowers, gifts, cards, surprises have been so appreciated. Thank you for our shared memories. The brightest lights in my life, along with Alex, are my friendships. Even if I don’t see you often, I think of you and feel your love and support. I am so lucky, and I know it. Alex is the best husband, friend, partner a gal could have. Please keep him supported.

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Nadine is survived by her husband, cousins Cathleen Chevron-Dixon and Pamela Brown in California, aunt Marie-Paule Michel in Switzerland, aunt Sr. Monique Chevron in France, and cousins in England, France, and Switzerland. A celebration of Nadine’s life is planned for March 18, 2022, her 65th birthday. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to United Boys and Girls Clubs of Santa Barbara County (unitedbg.org), Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (cadasb.org) or Visiting Nurses Association (vna.health).

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BREAKING the CHAINS

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n 2013, while serving a seven-year prison sentence in New Folsom State Prison, Ryan “Flaco” Rising joined other inmates on a 33-day hunger strike to demand, among other resources, access to college-level courses. Their protest succeeded, and many lives were changed. Once college courses became available, “we started study-

first-ever program tailored to help formerly incarcerated and system-impacted students succeed in the higher education culture. Underground Scholars provides wraparound resources, including a “warm handoff system,” which helps these students adjust and succeed at the university level. This includes assistance with enrollment, housing, finances, career counseling, mental and physical health, and academic tutoring. It is one of three similar programs in the county. Santa Barbara City College has the Transitions program, and Allan Hancock College has the Beyond Incarceration Greater Education (BIGE) Club. In its third year, the UCSB initiative now has more than 20 members, eight of whom will be graduating this May.

Santa Barbara Students Overcome the Past to Chase Their Future by Ryan P. Cruz • Photos by Erick Madrid ing,” Rising said, “and we were no longer talking about the dirt we did in the hood; we were sharing our papers and supporting each other. The whole mentality shifted from breaking each other down to ‘Hey, can you help me with this algebraic expression? Can you help me write this research paper?’” It stopped being “Who’s the hardest?” and became “Who’s the smartest?” “We became ‘gangsta’ nerds,” Rising said. Eight years later, Rising has become the program coordinator for UC Santa Barbara’s Underground Scholars Initiative — which he started building from the ground up in September 2019. Underground Scholars is the university’s

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ALIVE AND THRIVING

Underground Scholars recently held its third annual Formerly Incarcerated Student Day & Resource Fair, where 60 members from all three programs gathered to get to know one another. It also gave the community college students a chance to learn about the UCSB program. After a few welcoming speeches, the visitors were taken on a “campus activism” tour, during which they were given a quick history

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of how Black and Brown student activists had pushed the university closer to achieving its ideals of equity, diversity, and inclusion over the decades. The community college students — mostly older, some heavily tattooed, and many Latino — seemed eager to learn about the campus. A number of them had already applied for admission and found the event encouraging. Discovering the Underground Scholars program gave them a sense that, even though they were not the usual UCSB demographic, they would find a supportive group of students welcoming them to the campus with open arms — even if the university itself was not always so welcoming. Rising himself could relate to the feeling of being an outsider. “It’s been a struggle,” he said. “Sometimes I think they still look at us like we’re lowlifes and criminals. Sometimes I feel treated like a liability instead of an asset.” But he is certain this program plays an important part in the campus’s long history of progressive activism, which he believes has been a slow but continual movement forward.


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BUILDING A PRISON-TO-SCHOOL PIPELINE: The Underground Scholars program at UCSB provides wraparound resources to students who have been affected by the criminal justice system. Top row, from left: Gilberto Murillo, Luis Muñoz, and Ryan “Flaco” Rising. Bottom row, from left: Juan Bran-Gudiel, Lisandra Barrera-Rising, and Melissa Ortiz. The event also marked the launch of Thrive SBC, a new app intended to be a one-stop shop for anybody in the county who has been impacted by the criminal justice system. The website will now make it easier to connect to resources for food, housing, legal advice, mental and physical health, transportation, and substance abuse counseling. One of the engineers who created the app, Victor Sauceda, learned to code in prison through Code for America. The new online resource directory, he said, is much more accessible. The traditional method to find helpful information was cumbersome and difficult to navigate. Often, the only option was to wade through flyers tacked to the probation office’s bulletin board, most of which were outdated or scribbled over with indiscernible penciled notes. “Now you don’t have to know five handshakes and a password to reach resources,” Sauceda said. Lisandra Barrera-Rising, the Underground Scholars student ambassador at SBCC, was thrilled at the launching of the new app. “You could be on the phone for three hours before reaching someone,” she said. “If I had that back when I was going through my stuff, that would’ve saved my life.” Barrera-Rising is hoping to join her partner, Flaco Rising, at UCSB this fall. Another important milestone will be on January 19, 2022, when an art exhibit, Beyond the Wall, featuring work by formerly incarcerated and system-impacted students, will open at UCSB’s Davidson Library. It will be the first exhibit of its type on campus.

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MICKEY FLACKS JOURNALISM FUND FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE A fund that directly supports the Santa Barbara Independent’s coverage of social justice and environmental issues.

DISMANTLING TRAUMA

For many of the students returning to college after serving time behind bars or coming out of the other side of drug and alcohol addiction, many barriers can be more than just a pebble in the road. Most times, their experiences come with trauma and emotional baggage that make it difficult to jump through the hoops of red tape common at higher-level institutions. Juan Bran-Gudiel is a fourth-year Chicano Studies student at UCSB, serving as the Gaucho Underground Scholars Recruitment Coordinator. When he first transferred from Los Angeles Valley College, he didn’t know about the program and felt like a fish out of water from the first day he arrived on campus. Just trying to navigate the financial aid offices was discouraging. “Every day, I was ready to leave school. I felt out of place,” he said. These feelings, known as imposter syndrome, are common among these transferring students. Rising sees the syndrome everywhere. “I see severe depression; I see feeling isolated and alone, feeling like you don’t belong in these spaces,” he said. Sociology major and Underground Scholar Melissa Ortiz agreed. When she transferred from SBCC, she felt like she was in over her head. “Finding out there was a program, I felt more at ease going to UCSB,” she said.

In 2020, the Mickey Flacks Fund supported the in-depth coverage of the Lompoc Prison COVID Outbreak, the Force Files, a look into police use-of-force incidents, and many other issues. To make a contribution visit sbcan.org/journalism_fund To read articles supported by the Flacks Fund go to independent.com/mickeyflacks

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COVER STORY

LAST CHANCE TO GIVE

The Santa Barbara Independent is encouraging our readers to participate in end-of-year giving by highlighting area nonprofits and their great work. Visit independent.com /givingtuesday to find a sliver of the nonprofits doing good work in the Santa Barbara community.

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Ortiz said that now whenever she starts to feel out of place, she remembers that she earned her spot. “I just power through it,” she said. “I’m here because I belong here. I got accepted because I belong here.” Luis Muñoz is the Underground Scholars’ coordinator for its Health is Wealth exercise and nutritional program. Muñoz is a firm believer that mental and physical wellness helped him overcome his struggles with addiction and helped him process years of childhood trauma. “It was empowering. I started believing in myself,” he said. Muñoz leads the Underground Scholars in weekly workouts that Rising and his family have found to be a critical part of the healing process. Like many in the program, Rising was raised in an environment of violence, drugs, and physical and mental abuse. “I went through drug addiction, physical and mental abuse, and incarceration as a juvenile. I don’t want any 12-year-old kid to go through what I did at that age in juvenile WE BELONG: Members of the Underground Scholars feeling hall: spirit broken, dehumanized, treated like I right at home at UCSB’s campus didn’t belong. All this hate that was inside of me is because of how I was treated in juvenile hall.” Later, when he was in prison, he found himself on the curb and answered what he called the usual processing the trauma of his youth through writing questions: What’s your name? Where are you going? and learning. He said the pain, anger, and resent- Who are you with? ment took years to overcome, but it was programs By the time the cops let him go, he was late for his like Underground Scholars that were able to teach appointment with his professor and mentor Rick Benjamin. When he finally got to the office, he was him the skills necessary to succeed. determined to get out of UCSB. But Benjamin suggested a different response, which changed his perPRISON-TO-SCHOOL spective: Reach out to your professors, he told Rising, PIPELINE and always be honest with your past. Building programs catering to a group that is often “The only way we can erase that stigma is to own overlooked is no easy task. The first one in Santa it,” Rising said. “Announcing: ‘Hey, I’ve made some Barbara County was at SBCC. Noel Gomez and mistakes in my past, but here I am. I’ve got a 3.97 grade Martin Leyva created Transitions, as an eight-week point average, and I’ve overcome all those mistakes.’ ” At first, Rising said the university was hesitant to summer bridge program to prepare students comoffer full support to the program, or at least that’s ing from jail or rehab. It took a lot of effort to get it off the ground—at how it seemed. “Where’s the scholarships for forthe time, there were only three such programs across merly incarcerated students? There is none. Why is the state—but over the past 13 years, such programs that? Why can’t we have these things?” have grown into a year-long all-encompassing pathBut once they saw that the program was modway toward a college, including specialized tutors eled after ones on other UC campuses such as and instructors to help every step of the way. Berkeley and Los Angeles, he was able to gain supGomez has also started teaching college-credit port from the university.“If we don’t do it, nobody courses at Santa Barbara’s Main Jail in 2015, which else is gonna do it for us,” Rising said. “If they were included an eight-week personal development pro- gonna build this program, they would’ve built it.” gram. This November a cohort of 22 students passed, Nine UCs now offer such programs: Berkeley, for a 100 percent completion rate. A handful of SBCC Davis, Irvine, Los Angeles, Merced, Riverside, San administrators and Transitions staff were invited to Diego, Santa Barbara, and Santa Cruz. Almost all attend the ceremony. In an intimate gathering held have been started by those who have been affected in one of the jail’s concrete recreational yards, each by the criminal justice system. Rising hopes that these programs will gain support for these students, student received a certificate and college credits. At UCSB, Rising faced a similar uphill battle reverse generations of conditioning, and flip the starting Underground Scholars. “It’s been digging school-to-prison pipeline. in the weeds,” he said. “This is a campus that’s never Building a prison-to-school pipeline relies on had any type of program for formerly incarcerated transferring skills from students’ past lives to succeed people. Sometimes they really seemed about it, and in their new environments, Rising said. “We’ve been bringing these transferable skills from the streets into other times it felt like I was getting lip service.” When he arrived on campus, he wondered if he’d the university, and we’ve been reclaiming our stories.” made the right choice. He felt like an outcast. “You go to prison; you serve your debt to society. When you CREDIBLE MESSENGERS go home, you find out you’re serving a life sentence In all the programs geared toward formerly incarcerated and system-impacted students, there is a to your community,” he said. The lowest point for him came one day when he common thread of using tough experiences to help was walking on his way to campus and was stopped those who are struggling with the same problems. by the Isla Vista Foot Patrol. He was forced to sit Simply put, when it comes to counseling others

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FREE FREE FREE Christmas Christmas Christmas Tree Tree Tree Recycling Recycling Recycling ✵ ✵✵ FREE CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING ✵ through addiction, nobody is more knowledgeable and credible than a former addict. Rising became fascinated with this idea once he began his education journey. He wrote papers detailing the effects of drugs and made a decision to study sociology because he thought that if somebody was going to study gang members, it should be somebody who has lived through it. Underground Scholars Advocacy Coordinator Gilberto Murillo is a fourth-year sociology and political science student at UCSB who grew up in the historically over-policed and gang-affected area of Norwalk, in Los Angeles County. After being arrested for being in a vehicle with a firearm, he was charged with homicide and a gang enhancement, which was eventually reduced to a stolen property charge. This experience set Murillo on a path to pursue his education and dissect the origin of American policing laws and the effects on those who live in these heavily policed areas. Murillo plans to travel to Palestine in the summer, where he will start working on a study comparing military occupation and marginalization of Palestinians to police actions and treatment of gang members in California. He hopes that research like this will make policy-making more resource-oriented. “How can we allocate resources into this community?” He also spoke of the challenge facing those who grew up in neighborhoods with many gangs: There can be those from your old life who don’t want to see you succeed. “They’re concentrated in despair,” he said. “We see somebody excel and wanna grab them by the ankles.” He hopes to create something tangible for these communities and give back to help the next generation. Arturo “Cheech” Raygoza is the president of the BIGE Club at Allan Hancock, and the Underground Scholars’ ambassador there. He hopes to transfer to either UC Santa Barbara or Berkeley. Raygoza recently spoke to members of Santa Barbara County’s probation department, sharing his experiences in the juvenile justice system and offering suggestions for rethinking how youth offenders are treated. “I was 13 years old at Los Prietos; all they taught me was how to be a gangster,” he said. “There was no rehabilitation.” It’s something they all have in common and something Rising tries to cultivate along their journey. “What makes them credible is that they went through it, and then they overcame it and built their own blueprint to success,” he said. “Share your story. Your narrative makes you credible. It empowers you to make an impact to create change. Use your story, broadcast your story, and don’t walk around with any type of shame.”

CELEBRATING PROGRESS

President of the SBCC Foundation Geoff Green was in attendance at the Transitions ceremony at the Main Jail. After the event, Green sent an email calling the experience “one of the most meaningful I’ve had in a long time.” “After all these years, I’d never had a chance to see firsthand the power of it,” he wrote. “It was remarkable to meet some of the students and hear the stories.” In May, the Gaucho Underground Scholars will host its first-ever “graduation gala” for the eight students set to graduate this year. Local community college and high school graduates from similar programs will also be invited to attend. “Instead of these students carrying on life sentences, it’s time to celebrate their successes and give them the confidence,” Rising said, “so they can go out and become leaders in their communities.” And the students aren’t just passing; they’re excelling. Bran-Gudiel and Murillo are at 3.8 and 3.9 GPAs, respectively. Rising himself holds a 3.97 GPA and is planning on earning his PhD in sociology. “One day, they’re gonna call me Dr. Flaco,” he said with a smile. The Underground Scholars program just received a $1.75 million grant, which Rising hopes will be used to expand the current resources even more. “It’s not about us today; it’s about that next person that’s gonna come tomorrow, so everything we do today, we’re setting it up for all the formerly incarcerated and system-impacted students that are going to come tomorrow.” “We have a whole network of formerly incarcerated students across the state earning bachelors, masters, and more,” he said. “If you sat in a prison cell, you best believe you can do anything in your life. If you n survive that, you can go through any of it.”

DROPOFF DROPOFF DROPOFF LOCATIONS: LOCATIONS: LOCATIONS: ON-SITE ON-SITE ON-SITE PICKUP: PICKUP: PICKUP: RESIDENTIAL PICKUP: DROP-OFF LOCATIONS: South South South County: County: County:

MarBorg customers should Trees can be picked up on Trees Trees Trees may may be may be picked be picked picked upup onup on on MarBorg MarBorg MarBorg customers customers may place may place place trees trees trees trees atcustomers leastmay three feet designated days or dropped place in or in or near in near or their near their green their green green waste waste waste containers containers containers designated designated designated days days days or or dropped dropped or dropped away from their trash off at the following locations: or or next next or to next to their their to trash their trash trash containers containers containers onon on offoff foroff for free for free at: free at: at: their their regular their regular regular collection collection days. days. days. containers oncollection their regular collection days. South Coast Recycling & Carpinteria: Carpinteria: Carpinteria:

South South South Coast Coast Coast Recycling Recycling Recycling &&& Owners/Managers Transfer Station E.J. E.J. Harrison E.J. Harrison Harrison & & & Transfer Transfer Transfer Station Station Station

Sons Sons residential residential residential ofSons multi-unit complexes customers customers customers may may should callmay their haulers place place place trees trees trees in or in or in or fornear Christmas tree near their near their green their green green (Until (Until (Until January January January 12th, 12th, 2019) 12th, 2019) 2019) waste waste waste carts carts carts or or next next or next recycling details. to to their their to trash their trash trash carts carts carts MarBorg Industries on on January on January January 9th. 9th.9th. CUT TREES OVER

4430 Calle Real, 4430 4430 4430 Calle Calle Calle Real Real Real Santa Barabra Santa Santa Santa Barbara Barbara Barbara (Free until January 15, 2022)

MarBorg MarBorg Industries Industries Industries 119 N.MarBorg Quarantina Street

SIX FEET IN HALF Owners/ Owners/ Owners/ 119 119 N. 119 N. Quarantina N. Quarantina Quarantina Street Street Street Santa Barbara AND REMOVE Managers Managers Managers Santa Santa Santa Barbara Barbara Barbara

of of multi-unit multi-unit of multi-unit ALL ORNAMENTS, dwellings dwellings should should should For more information, call: dwellings TINSEL, AND STANDS. callcall their call their haulers their haulers haulers forfor for (805) 882-3600 TREES WITH STANDS For For more For more more information, information, information, callcallcallChristmas Christmas Christmas treetree recycling tree recycling recycling details. details. details.

or(805) visit us online at AND FLOCKED TREES CANNOT (805) (805) 882-3616 882-3616 882-3616 Please Please Please cutcut trees cut trees trees over over six over six feet six feet in feet half in half in half and and remove and remove remove all all ornaments, all ornaments, ornaments, tinsel tinsel tinsel BE RECYCLED. orwww.LessIsMore.org or visit visit or us visit us online us online online at at at and and stands. and stands. stands. Trees Trees Trees with with stands with stands stands and and and www.LessIsMore.org www.LessIsMore.org www.LessIsMore.org flocked flocked trees trees trees cannot cannot cannot bebe recycled. be recycled. recycled. TREES CAN ALSO BE PLACED IN flocked RESIDENTIAL GREENWASTE CONTAINERS. Once collected, trees are mixed with residential green waste material and turned into mulch for local reuse in backyards, TheThe trees The trees trees collected collected collected aremore. are mixed are mixed mixed with with residential with residential residential green green green waste waste waste material material parks and For more information on free ormaterial andand turned and turned turned intointo mulch into mulch mulch for for local for local beneficial local beneficial beneficial reuse reuse reuse in backyards, in backyards, in backyards, orchards, orchards, orchards, low cost mulch, visit www.LessisMore.org. parks parks parks andand more. and more. more. ForFor more For more more information information information on on free on free orfree or lowlow orcost low cost mulch, cost mulch, mulch, visit visit visit www.LessisMore.org www.LessisMore.org www.LessisMore.org

Full Belly Files

Matt Kettmann’s Full Belly Files serves up multiple courses of food & drink coverage every Friday, going off-menu from our regularly published content to deliver tasty nuggets of restaurant, recipe, and refreshment wisdom to your inbox.

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INDEPENDENT.COM

DECEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

21


DEC.

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

23-29

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

NEW YEAR’S EVE

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

12/31: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar New Year’s Eve Party! Enjoy

COURTESY

tinyurl.com/AnthemEveEve

FRIDAY 12/24 12/24: Christmas Eve Lessons & Carols Service There will be Scripture

tinyurl.com/ArrowsmithsNYE

readings and carol singing at this Christmas Eve service . 6-7pm. El Camino Presbyterian Church, 7526 Calle Real, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-0113.

“Crater Lake” by Michael Ferguson

12/23-12/26: Marcia Burtt Gallery Holiday Exhibition

tinyurl.com/ElCaminoPresbyterian

COURTESY

SATURDAY 12/25

12/23: Lobero Live Presents Men at Work Listen to all of your favorite Men at Work songs from founding member Colin Hay and his L.A.-based group of musicians. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido. GA: $60-$75; VIP: $121. Call (805) 9630761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org.

lobero.org/whats-on

12/25: Holiday Zoo Make your

12/31: New Year’s Eve with the S.B. Symphony Guest conductor Bob Ber-

nhardt will host an evening of Gershwin and other symphonic celebration favorites. Join baritone Cedric Berry, pianist Natasha Kislenko, and the full orchestra to ring in the New Year. 8:30-10pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $56-$256. Call (805) 898-9386.

tinyurl.com/ChristmasDayZoo

ticketing.granadasb.org

12/26: Zaca Mesa Winery Live Music Listen to the live melodies of

12/31: Belmond El Encanto’s New Year’s Eve Celebration Welcome in the

L.A.-based guitarist Adrian Galysh while delighting in a flight of highly rated, handcrafted wines. Reservations are recommended. Noon-3pm. Zaca Mesa, 6905 TIM HUMPHREYS

Christmas music, listen to the Anthem Kids Christmas Choir, hear the message of the season, and enjoy festive treats and fun. 6-8pm. Anthem Chapel, 6595

12/24: Candle Light Christmas Eve Service Join Rev.

Heidi Alfrey in person or online for beautiful music and the spirituality of the season with the Unity Singers, Nathalie Nesh, and Kenneith Perrin, as well as featured musicians Noreen Brokke, Randy Tico, and Rene Martinez. 5-6pm. Unity of S.B., 227 E. Arrellaga St. Free.

New Year with Champagne, live jazz, and a three-course fine-dining experience in the dining room or terrace. 5-9:30pm. Belmond El Encanto S.B., 800 Alvarado Pl. $155/adult; $60/child (ages 12 and younger). Call (805) 845-5800.

tinyurl.com/BelmondNYE2021

12/31: New Year’s Eve 2022 S.B. Bar Crawl Bounce from bar to bar and cel-

ebrate NYE at multiple venues, each with exclusive drink specials. Register to receive a map of all eight participating downtown bars. 8pm-2am. Downtown S.B. $19-$39. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/ChristmasEve CandleLight

tinyurl.com/SBBarCrawl2021

Continued > Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. THE INDEPENDENT

Cedric Berry

reservation to enjoy holiday decor and photo ops while visiting your favorite animals on Christmas Day. 9:30am-3:30pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free-$19.95. Call (805) 962-5339 or email info@sbzoo.org.

SUNDAY 12/26

12/23: Christmas Eve, Eve Service All are welcome to sing beautiful

healthy world with a shift in the way you think and perceive through contemplation, guided meditation, and prayers to Avalokiteshvara, Buddha of Compassion. 6:30-7:45pm. Mahakankala Buddhist Ctr., 508 Brinkerhoff Ave. Free; donations welcome. tinyurl.com/MeditationNYE

Con Brio

12/31: New Year’s Eve Bash with Con Brio Dance to the energetic soul, psych-

COURTESY

Celebrate the holidays with breathtaking and engaging art by gallery artists such as Dana Hooper, Michael Ferguson, Marcia Burtt, and more. The exhibit shows through February 6, 2022. Thu.Sun: 1-5pm. Marcia Burtt Gallery, 517 Laguna St. Free. Call (805) 9625588. artlacuna.com

22

12/31: NYE Meditation Come create a

COURTESY

wine, beer, cheese plates, and raffles all in support of Animals Asia, which is devoted to ending bear bile farming and improving the welfare of animals across Asia. 7-10pm. Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar, 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. $25. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126 or email anna@arrowsmithwine.com.

Covington Wy., Goleta. Free.

THURSDAY 12/23

dance floor, music by DJ Hecktik, and an outdoor patio with an ocean view. Roundtrip rides to and from the venue are available from three locations ($15). Proceeds go toward the Kiwanis Club of S.B. 8pm-1:30am. Veterans’ Memorial Bldg., 112 W. Cabrillo Blvd. $90. Ages 21+. Call (805) 448-7070. brewyearsevesb.com

DECEMBER 23, 2021

Fundraiser

12/31: Brew Year’s Eve Santa Barbara Check out beer from 10+ craft breweries, wine, and cocktails, along with a giant

INDEPENDENT.COM

rock, and R&B sounds of Con Brio. 9pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. GA: $35-$40; dinner package: $110. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776.

tinyurl.com/ConBrioNYE

12/31: Noon Year’s Eve at MOXI Enjoy festive activities, dance workshops and rooftop dance party with DJ Gavin Roy, and a MOXI-wide countdown to 2022 across all three floors with confetti, noisemakers, and more. 9:30am-12:30pm. MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, 125 State St. Free-$19. Call (805) 770-5000.

tinyurl.com/MoxiNYE

12/31: NYE Back to the ’80s Join the most bodacious party of the night with an appetizer and candy bars and all the music you love from the ’80s. 8pm-12:30am. Roof Top Bistro & Bar, 6878 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $75. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/RooftopNYE

12/31: New Year’s Eve at the Maverick Ring in the New Year with LiveWire live! 9pm-midnight. The Maverick Saloon, 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Call (805) 686-4785.

tinyurl.com/MaverickNYE

12/31: Studio 500 New Year’s Eve at EOS Lounge Get ready for a silent disco,

food trucks, champagne toast, balloon drop, four bars, four rooms of music from Curly, Calvin, Chadillac, Teej, Kaution, and Jackie Chanel. 8pm-2am. EOS Lounge, 500 Anacapa St. $20. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/NYEEosLounge

12/31: New Year’s Eve at Rosewood Miramar Beach This black-

tie evening will be inspired by a

one-of-a-kind speakeasy with libations, performers, one of L.A.’s top dance bands, Champagne toasts, and more. 8:30pm1:30am. Chandelier Ballroom, Rosewood Miramar Beach, 1759 S. Jameson Ln., Montecito. $200+. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/RosewoodNYE

12/31: New Year’s Eve at High Roller Tiki Lounge The evening will include

James Intveld and Dave Stuckey accompanied by Brent Harding of Social Distortion and Burlesque performances by Alaina Rose Lee and Gitana Rose throughout the night. 7-10pm. High Roller Tiki Lounge, 433 Alisal Rd., Solvang, $25. Ages 21+. Call (805) 691-9224.

tinyurl.com/HighRollerNYE

12/31: New Year’s Eve at Community Craft Bring the glam and dress to impress

to enjoy one last event at Community Craft with beer and wine, all-you-can-eat tacos, and music provided by DJ Sparx. 6-10pm. Community Craft, 2446 Alamo Pintado Ave., Ste. C, Los Olivos. $65-$75. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/CommunityCraftNYE

12/31: NYE 2022 at Wildcat Lounge

Wander between three rooms, three deejays, go-go dancers, aerial performers, balloon drops, and more. Black-and-white attire is requested. 9pm-2am. Wildcat Lounge, 15 W. Ortega St. Visit the website for VIP packages. $15. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/WildcatNYE

12/31: Ritz-Carlton Bacara New Year’s Eve After-Party This late-night celebra-

tion will feature cocktails and music that includes an open bar, dancing, and party favors. 10pm-1am. The Ritz-Carlton Bacara, S.B., 8301 Hollister Ave. $150.

tinyurl.com/BacaraNYE

12/31: Zodo’s New Year’s Eve Book your time slot for the NYE Family Package or NYE Ball Drop Package, which include food offerings from the signature menu with a Champagne toast on New Year’s Eve and your shoe rental. Family Package: $33.99/ person; NYE Package: $44.99/person.

tinyurl.com/ZodosNYE2021

12/31: S.B. Sharkeez NYE Open Bar 2022 Your evening will include a two-hour

open bar (8:30-10:30pm), deejay, balloon drop, midnight Champagne, and party favors. 8:30pm. Baja Sharkeez, 525 State St. $40. Ages 21+. Call (805) 845-9572.

tinyurl.com/BajaSharkeezNYE


T HE

Semele

COURTESY

HANDEL GOES TO HOLLYWOOD

12/26: S.B. Arts & Crafts Show Stroll the waterfront

and peruse the fine and contemporary arts and crafts from S.B. County artists and artisans. 10am-6pm. Between Cabrillo Boulevard from Stearns Wharf to Calle Cesar Chavez. Free. Call (805) 560-7557.

A 90-minute opera

tinyurl.com/Arts-CraftsDec26

JADE STEPHENS

Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 688-9339 or email info@zacamesa.com.

zacamesa.com/upcoming-events

MONDAY 12/27 12/27: Motown Monday Come listen and dance to the Motown sound provided by DJ Gavin Roy. 6pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $8. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events/motown-monday

TUESDAY 12/28

WEDNESDAY 12/29

12/28: Blood Drive There is currently an urgent

COURTESY

need for blood donors to give now to prevent delays in lifesaving medical care for patients. Your donation can help those currently battling life-threatening emergencies. Book your appointment online. 12:304:15pm; Bloodmobile, La Cumbre Plaza, 140 S. Hope St. 10am-5pm; S.B. Vitalant Donation Ctr., 4213 State St. Free. donors.vitalant.org

12/29: Yoga + Beer with S.B. Yoga Collective Rejuvenate and restart with one

hour of yoga followed by a refreshing beer. No experience is necessary. Dress for an outdoor class and bring your own mat. 5:30-6:30pm. Draughtsmen Aleworks, 53 Santa Felicia Dr., Goleta. $15. tinyurl.com/Yoga-Beer

Shows on Tap

JAN 14 & 16 • LOBERO THEATRE

lobero.org • 805-963-0761

Jana McIntyre as Semele | Photo by Zach Mendez

12/24, 12/26: Maverick Saloon Fri.: DJ, 9pm-1:30am; Colonel Angus, 9pmmidnight. Sun.: About Time, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

CLICK

12/26: Cold Spring Tavern Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com

CONNECT

12/26-12/28: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Sun.: Sandy Cummings & Jazz Du Jour, 12:30-3:30pm. $10. Mon.: Motown Monday, 6-9pm. $8. Tue.: The Lil Jazz Quintet, 7:30pm. $10. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

TUESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6pm

SUNDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

WEDNESDAY

CARE for your skin

Cottage CottageVirtual VirtualCare Care Skin treatment in minutes—from the comfort of…Anywhere. 24/7.

1 DIAGNOSIS 1

22 TREATMENT PLAN 3

3 PEACE OF MIND

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org •

FISHERMAN’S MARKET COURTESY

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

Receive care right now for most common conditions, including ECZEMA, RASHES & ACNE

cottagehealth.org/virtualcare INDEPENDENT.COM

DECEMBER 23, 2021

Virr tual Care Vi THE INDEPENDENT

23


S.B. Birding

The Arlington Theatre

HUGH RANSON PHOTOS

living

­

Give the Gift of Movies e-gift cards available!

ENTERTAINMENT GIFT CARD

MetroTheatres.com/gift-cards

The painted redstart recently found at Rocky Nook Park is a jewel of a bird.

Adult male summer tanagers have an all-red plumage.

Festive Birding

Fiesta 5 • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairveiw

Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Dec 24 - 30, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Sing 2* (PG): Fri-Thu: 12:00, 1:20, 2:35, 3:55, 5:10, 6:30, 7:45. West Side Story (PG13) Fri-Thu: 1 2:20, 3:40, 7:00. PRIVATE RENTALS: BOOK ONLINE: Wed 11:00.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Licorice Pizza* (R): Fri: 4:30, 7:30. Sat-Thu: 12:00, 3:00, 6:20, 9:20. The King’s Man* (R): Fri: 1:10, 4:05, 7:00. Sat-Thu: 1:10, 4:05, 7:00, 9:55. The Matrix Resurrection* (R): Fri: 12:15, 1:45, 3:30, 5:00, 6:45, 8:15. Sat-Thu: 11:45, 1:30, 3:15, 4:45, 6:30, 8:00, 9:45. Spider-Man: No Way Home* (PG13): Fri: 11:45, 12:45, 1:30, 3:15, 4:45, 6:30, 8:00. Sat-Thu: 12:15, 1:45, 3:30, 5:00, 6:45, 8:15, 10:00.

HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

A Journal for Jordan* (PG-13): Fri: 3:45, 6:45. Sat-Thu: 1:00, 3:45, 6:45, 9:40. American Underdog* (PG): Fri: 3:55, 6:30. Sat-Thu: 1:10, 3:55, 6:30, 9:05. Spider-Man: No Way Home* (PG13): Fri: 1:30(LP), 2:45, 5:00(LP), 6:15. Sat, Mon-Thu: 1:30(LP), 2:45, 5:00(LP), 6:15, 8:30(LP), 9:30. Sun: 11:30, 1:30(LP), 2:45, 5:00(LP), 6:15, 8:30(LP), 9:30. PRIVATE RENTALS: BOOK ONLINE: Fri: 1:20.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

The King’s Man* (R): Fri: 11:40, 1:00, 4:00, 5:30, 7:00. Sat-Thu: 11:40, 1:00, 4:00, 5:30, 7:00, 8:30. Sing 2* (PG13): Fri: 11:30, 12:30, 2:10, 3:10, 4:45, 5:45, 7:20 Sat-Thu: 11:30, 12:30, 2:10, 3:10, 4:45, 5:45, 7:20, 8:20.. Nightmare Alley (R): Fri-Thu: 5:00, 8:05. Encanto (PG): Fri-Thu: 11:50, 2:25. PRIVATE RENTALS: BOOK ONLINE: Fri-Thu: 2:40.

PA S E O N U E V O

Red Rocket (R): Fri-Sun: 2:05, 4:45, 7:45. Mon-Thu: 4:45, 7:45. The Tender Bar (R): Fri-Sun: 2:15, 5:00, 7:30. Mon-Thu: 5:00, 7:30.

8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Licorice Pizza* (R): Fri: 4:30, 7:45. Sat-Thu: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30. The Matrix Resurrection* (R): 1:30, 3:00, ARLINGTON 4:45, 6:15, 8:00. Sat: 1:30, 3:00, 4:45, 6:15, 1317 STATE STREET 8:00, 9:40. Sun-Thu: 11:45, 1:30, 3:00, 4:45, SANTA BARBARA 6:15, 8:00, 9:40. 805-963-9580 West Side Story (PG13): Fri-Thu: 12:40, Spider-Man: No Way Home* (PG13): 4:00, 7:30. Fri-Thur: 12:30, 4:00, 7:30.

24

THE INDEPENDENT

DECEMBER 23, 2021

Two Treats Spotted at Rocky Nook Park

Metro 4

by Hugh Ranson, Member of the Santa Barbara Audubon Society

T

he birding event that I look forward to most, and I suspect many other birders feel the same way, is the annual Christmas Bird Count. Saturday afternoon found me scouting for the count at one of the many under-birded local habitats, namely the new Arroyo Burro Open Space. I hadn’t gone too far along the trail when a text came through from local birder Libby Patten. She was at Rocky Nook Park and had found a painted redstart, a stunner of a bird that is usually found no closer to us than southeast Arizona. They are found in our county perhaps once every three years. Should I make a beeline for Rocky Nook or finish my census of the reserve? Dutifully, I chose the latter option, but perhaps with more of a spring in my step than had been there earlier. I arrived at Rocky Nook to find Libby still on-site, and we were soon enjoying terrific views of this little warbler as it pirouetted and darted about after insects in the coast live oaks at the top end of the park. It was lovely enough to be a tree ornament. It is predominantly black with white in the wings and tail, and there is a delicate silvery-white crescent under each eye. The outstanding feature, however, is a red chest that appears fluorescent when the bird moves into the sun. Unlike many warbler species, the sexes are similar, so this one has to remain an “it.” Because of its constant movement, it was a very difficult bird to photograph. The name redstart is a misnomer. There is a European species, the common redstart, that our bird is named after. Steort, changed to “start,” is a word from Middle English that means “tail,” and the European bird does indeed have a flashy red tail. The painted redstart has a black-and-white tail, so there is a move afoot to change the name to painted whitestart. Libby and I were soon joined by other appreciative birders. As if the redstart weren’t enough, a brilliant

INDEPENDENT.COM

all-red male summer tanager—another locally rare bird—flew into the same tree as the warbler and began to feast on large spiders. If the redstart were an ornament, the tanager would be the tree topper. Our experience with the birds at Rocky Nook is one of the delights of scouting for the bird count—you never know just what you’ll find. Counts are held all across the Americas during the festive season. One of the benefits of the counts is census taking: With data now stretching back over a hundred years—the first counts were conducted in the early 1900s—we can get a clear picture of which birds are doing well and which are in decline. Sadly, the latter list grows longer every year. Over the years, friendly rivalries have arisen over which count circle — each count is restricted by a diameter of 15 miles—can see the most species in a 24-hour period. Santa Barbara County has five counts: Guadalupe-Santa Maria, La Purisima, Cachuma, Santa Barbara, and Carpinteria. The Santa Barbara count does particularly well, often coming in with more than 200 species, which usually places us in the top three in the state. The count has even come in first for the number of species seen in the whole nation, though in recent years, a couple of circles in Texas have left us in the dust. What constitutes a circle that is particularly productive? A good variety of habitats is key. The Santa Barbara circle includes sloughs, woodland, mountains, reservoirs, chaparral, beaches, and the circle even extends into the ocean so that a group on a boat will often add a good number of extra species that cannot be seen from shore. This year the Santa Barbara Audubon Society’s Christmas Bird Count will be held on January 1. In my next article, I’ll let you know how we did this year. For much more information on the count, visit santabarbaraaudubon.org. n


living

ERICK MADRID

Shopping

1st THURSDAY JAN 6, 5-8 PM 1st Thursday is an evening of art and culture downtown. On the first Thursday of each month, participating galleries and cultural art venues are open from 5-8pm offering the public free access to art in a fun and social environment. In addition, State Street comes alive with performances and interactive exhibits.

PARTICIPATING VENUES 1 SBIFF’S SANTA BARBARA FILMMAKER 2 3 4 5 6 7

Lynn Adams has been operating Santa Barbara Arts out of La Arcada for 14 years.

8

Finding the Perfect Gift

9 10

Santa Barbara Arts Has Something for Everyone

11

by Tyler Hayden

13

was on the hunt for that special gift for that special someone and kept coming up short. I was looking for a piece of jewelry set with an aquamarine gem, March’s birthstone, and was on a budget. I eventually found my way to Santa Barbara Arts next to the turtle fountain in La Arcada. Not only did it have exactly what I was searching for, I saw that the shop was chock-full of pretty things—clothing, purses, pottery, cards, candles, glassware, paintings, books, and lots of jewelry. Every item handmade, each piece one-of-a-kind, most crafted by local artists. Accessible and affordable. Literally something for everyone. Even if the merchant isn’t strictly local, explained owner Lynn Adams, a true-blue patriot who grew up in a family of artists and whose late husband was a union electrician, they live somewhere in America. “Everything in the store is made in the United States,” said Adams, the stars and stripes draped behind her. “Nothing is imported. That’s very important to me.” Adams was 17 when she moved from Connecticut to attend the Brooks Institute of Photography. After graduating, she taught for a while and sold prints at the weekly Cabrillo art walk before managing the seasonal Yes Store. It was from there that she ventured forth to create a year-round home base for dozens of artisans to sell their wares, the only remaining shop of its kind in Santa Barbara. “We have such a good local following,” said Adams. “I’m just so proud.” Adams forges and maintains one-on-one relationships with the artists she represents, finding them at markets or meeting them through her network of artsy friends. “That’s part of my joy,” she said. “There are plenty of high-end, chichi stores around, and they carry beautiful things, but that’s not where my heart is.” Each purchase from Santa Barbara Arts comes with printed information about the maker and the satisfaction of knowing you’ve supported someone’s passion, she said. Many of the names and works are recognizable—Nell Campbell and her photography, Nina Ward and her ceramic singing pigs, and so on. The aquamarine necklace I settled on was made by longtime Santa Barbara jewelry designer Tom Rhodes. Through an email to Adams, he said he’d been holding onto the hand-carved bead for 45 years and that it was “special.” I know the person I give it to will feel special, too. Adams has weathered what she hopes is the worst of the COVID storm, but like all business owners these days, she’s unsure what the future holds. The closure of State Street has not treated all retailers equally, she noted. But she’s determined to keep going, one way or another. “We want to continue,” she said. “It brings a lot of happiness to so many.” n

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Take a Walk on the Wild Side

UC Santa Barbara’s Steward of Natural History


Natural History in the Making

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Come explore campus’s natural wonders!

North Campus Open Space

Ocean Walk Housing Devereux Creek Trailhead

Coastal Ranches Conservancy Overlook

Phelps Creek Trailhead Putnam Overlook

Ellwood Trailhead

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Audobon Overlook

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CCBER Overlook

Mesa Trailhead

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CA Coastal Trail

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The UC Santa Barbara Cheadle Center for Biodiversity & Ecological Restoration protects the university’s natural history by managing its scientifically significant natural history collections and the restoration and conservation of the campus’s natural areas. The Cheadle Center fulfills the University of California’s mission of education, research, and public service through programs that avail the collections and natural areas to researchers, students of all ages, and the public. Sites such as North Campus Open Space, Campus Point, and the Campus Lagoon serve as living laboratories and models of coastal habitat restoration within our world-class research institution — all here in your backyard. We invite you to explore, find respite, and enjoy these picturesque successes of restoration and conservation.

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North Campus Open Space Trails

The Power of Restoration Research and fieldwork are ways to deepen our relationship with nature – restorative for humans and the environment alike. This power is on full display every day at UC Santa Barbara, where you can spot secretive wetland birds at the Campus Lagoon, hawks swooping over your head at Campus Point, and endangered milkvetch attracting endangered bees and butterflies at North Campus Open Space. Rehabilitating nature’s complexity is a long-term project that takes persistence and an intimate knowledge of natural history. The outcome is a resilient and diverse ecosystem. We hope you feel inspired and uplifted by our work providing opportunities for everyone to connect meaningfully with nature.

Natural History The UCSB Natural History Collections hold a record of our unique biodiversity dating to the 1800s. Collections help us understand threats to our local environment, such as declining bee populations or the role of invasive marine species. With new methods in genetics and data science, we gain insight into these dynamics, recognize global patterns, and train the next generation to better understand our changing world.


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Campus Lagoon

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Endangered Species

Living Laboratory

Community Education

The Cheadle Center manages the largest self-sustaining population of the federally endangered Ventura Marsh Milkvetch. When this native plant was established, the federally endangered Crotch’s Bumblebee rebounded. Across campus, endangered and threatened wildlife species thrive thanks to the ongoing efforts of the Cheadle Center.

At the Campus Lagoon, students discovered through applied research that prescribed burns clear the way for diverse wildflowers. The Cheadle Center continues to model these and other innovative restoration strategies, such as creating vernal pools and shelters for rare animals on campus natural areas, bringing nature to life.

The Kids in Nature (KIN) program is just one example of the many Cheadle Center programs teaching the public about the importance of our natural history. Through KIN, undergraduates help teach local elementary school students through handson activities, classes, tours, and field trips. Children engage with scientists while fostering personal connections to the natural world.

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Pathways for Healing the Planet A lifelong love of nature begins with just one step. Curious minds of all ages are welcome to join our community of nature lovers and environmental protectors. Explore our trails, encounter wildlife, connect with nature and with our work. You play an essential role in our shared future.

Ways to Engage 1. Experience UC Santa Barbara’s coastal natural areas by visiting North Campus Open Space, North Bluff, Campus Lagoon, or Campus Point. 2. Join one of our community programs, such as Kids in Nature, Second Saturday volunteer restoration events, or Third Saturday guided tours of North Campus Open Space. For more information, email ncos@ccber.ucsb.edu. 3. Add to our understanding of the natural world by contributing your observations of plant and animal life on campus and surrounding areas through iNaturalist.org. Find our project by searching for “UCSB” on their “projects” page.

4. Go to ccber.ucsb.edu to sign up for NCOS News or join our mailing list to learn about upcoming natural history workshops and receive updates from the Cheadle Center. 5. Give — every donation makes a difference! To give online, go to giving.ucsb.edu/to/CCBER. North Campus Open Space is offering special recognition opportunities through naming various features, such as overlooks

and bridges, or naming the entire site. Naming opportunities range from $50,000 to $5M. Your contribution will leave a lasting legacy that connects you with this landmark achievement. For more information contact Matt Fratus at (805) 893-4050 or matt.fratus@ucsb.edu.

Poem from Kids in Nature participant Lauren, 5th grade


FOOD&DRINK Chefs Love Ojai’s Messermeister Knives

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Meet the Sisters Who Run This Family Cutlery Company BY MATT KETTMANN

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f you’re not a chef, culinary school student, or avid home

ASHLEY RANDALL PHOTOGRAPHY

SHARP SISTERS: Based in Ojai, the knife company Messermeister is run by sisters Chelcea Dressler-Crowley (below left) and Kirsten Dressler Wilson (below right). They’re expanding the company into creative lines like the Adventure Chef series (above), which includes the world’s first full-size folding chef’s knife, and the Kawashima line of Japanese knives (below).

Los Angeles, he was hired to sell Henckels knives because he could speak German and soon realized that he could be working directly with factories himself. “When my father was a sales rep, he was hearing ideas from chefs and customers about things that they didn’t like about traditional German knives,” said Chelcea. For instance, the traditional bolster—which is the thick neck at the bottom of certain blades—was getting in the way of sharpening the heel. Meanwhile, Japanese knives were coming into vogue, and chefs wanted edge guards and special luggage to carry their steel as well. “The big German knife companies weren’t interested in going in those directions,” said Chelcea. “They were very firm on their beliefs and ideas on what a German knife should be. That gave my father the opportunity to explore different ideas.” So with his wife (and their mom), Debra Dressler, Bernd began importing knives from Germany and Japan in 1981, and then evolved into Messermeister in 1985 when their own designs hit the market. They moved to Ojai the next year, when the girls were about kindergarten age, and grew the business over the years, finding particular fans among mom ’n’ pop cutlery stores and culinary schools. In 2002, while the sisters were in college, Bernd died of a heart attack at age 62. When they graduated, they joined Messermeister to help their mom, who was running day-to-day operations. (Debra is still very involved as the company’s president.) Kirsten took on marketing, and Chelcea worked in sales, first in Northern California and then national. About three years ago, they became vice presidents and started moving the company into a brighter, more public future. “We’re proud of our German heritage and how the company started, but now we make knives all over the world,” said Kirsten, explaining that China is now a major producer in addition to the traditional countries. “It just depends on where we can get the best knives made. Not all knife factories can do everything.” Celebrity chefs are major fans, including Rick Bayless, who has Messermeister in his home kitchen block, and Gordon Ramsay, who’s used Messermeister on his cooking show, unbeknownst to the sisters until they were tipped off. They also have chefs as brand ambassadors—watch for more prominent partnerships in 2022—but not in the typical pay-to-say sense.

“Those relationships are more organic,” said Chelcea. “We’re not interested in paying chefs. It’s more of a family relationship, where both parties are contributing ideas and going from there.” Added Kirsten, “We’re not just handing knives to chefs and putting their names on it. They’re very involved in the design process.” How did we miss them for so long? “We like to fly under the radar,” admitted Chelcea. But they’re finally ready to break that tradition by opening a showroom in Ojai next year, where they’ll host cooking classes and launch parties while further engaging with the greater community.

FOOD & DRINK

cook, Messermeister might be new to you. Translating from German to “knife master,” the company produces traditionally crafted yet innovatively designed knives from forging factories around the world: beefy German and sleek Japanese classics; wood-handled beauties from Italian olive and California walnut burl; and, just two years ago, the world’s first-ever, full-size folding chef’s knife. If you fancy yourself competent in the kitchen, it’s okay to feel a little embarrassed for not having heard of Messermeister until now—I certainly did. But prepare for more self-reflection about how this brand slid beneath your scope for so long: The company is 40 years old, headquartered in Ojai, and run by two sisters, Chelcea DresslerCrowley and Kirsten Dressler Wilson, who are carrying on the tradition launched by their parents back in 1981. “It’s very rare,” confirmed Kirsten when I asked whether there are many other family-owned, globally sourcing kitchen knife companies out there, as that market seems dominated by massive companies like Cuisinart and Zwilling J.A. Henckels. “And for two women to be in this business?” she asked. “For sure. It’s a very male-dominated industry.” Messermeister was started by their dad, Bernd Dressler, who was born in Germany, raised in Australia, and moved to California in his twenties. While working as a waiter in

Today, Messermeister sells more than 500 different products—mostly knives, but also sharpening tools, carrying cases, cutting boards, cool clothing, and much more. They recommend starting with one of their top-selling chef’s knives, like the eight-inch Oliva, but explained that the folding versions and large cleavers are also hot this season. “A lot of masculine butcher knives are popular right now because barbecuing is so hot,” said Kirsten. But the choice is really up to each individual cook. “Everybody’s technique is so different,” said Chelcea. “People gravitate toward different sizes and what’s in their comfort level. Sharp knives intimidate a lot of people.” As to whether the sisters themselves ever plan to fire up a forge and handcraft their own knives, they’re reactions are mixed. “I have the bug,” said Kirsten, who recently read about a rental house where they teach you to make a knife. Chelcea is less interested. “I have too many other things to do,” she laughed, before adding a caveat. “We aren’t pounding them out, but knowing the metals and the handle materials, I feel like we are making knives.” n See messermeister.com.

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DECEMBER 23, 2021

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM COURTESY PHOTOS

ELEMENTS OF STYLE Michael Haber Photography

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apturing moments of beauty, intrigue, glamor, and natural wonder has kept photographer Michael Haber traveling the globe, camera in hand—and often with a surfboard tucked under the other. Though the New York City native’s decades-long career has proved his success in the competitive world of professional photography, Haber delights in the simplicity of home right here in Santa Barbara. The father of three (mostly grown) kids balances time between celebrity shoots, glossies, and brands like Target and Olay with low-key beach days at his Rincon Point home, leisurely brunches with friends at Lucky’s, crewing for the win on the racing yacht Taxi Dancer, and treks up Hot Springs trail. He has an uncanny ability to spot the artsy side in all things, appreciating the aesthetic of classic collectible cars just as much as the design subtleties of modern architecture, and can turn mundane moments into frameworthy portraits. Haber now shares his eye for refinement and talent behind the lens through his latest project, The Elements (haberfineart.com/theelements-book). On Saturday, December 11, he celebrated the publication with a release party at Summerland’s Field + Fort garden café. We caught up with Haber and had a chance to get to know him a bit better. Here’s what he said:

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CASE STUDY: Michael Haber at work in Los Angeles

Where do you find inspiration in Santa Barbara? I have been one with Mother Ocean since I was a child. I’ve been lucky to capture moments—including urchins found near Santa Cruz Island, a stunning bow of a ship anchored off the Santa Barbara coast, a girl diving into the ocean at Loon Point, as well as my very popular “Bikini Brunch,” which depicts an afternoon at a beach house. Frankly, there’s beauty everywhere. What are you most proud of in your vast body of work? All of the most spontaneous moments I have captured throughout my travels. I love photographing the human figure in a timeless way. I’ve been blessed to have photographed some of the biggest campaigns in the world from the Target Bullseye, Gap, Neiman Marcus, and many more. Where or from whom do you draw your inspiration and guidance? Some of my biggest heroes and mentors have always been Henri Cartier-Bresson, Richard Avedon, Irving Penn, Helmut Newton, and Peter Lindberg—just to name a few.

Haber in the gallery with his work

How did you get into photography initially? In 6th grade, my English teacher introduced me to the darkroom and opened my world. It was simply magic. From that point on, I started photographing [what I saw] in the streets. This [experience] led to an opportunity to apprentice under Gideon Lewin, one of the top photographers in New York.

You recently had a book launch at Field + Fort… Kyle Irwin and his incredible team were first-class, displaying my work and curating a simply magical afternoon event. We had over 200 guests, and Artiste winery branded bottles of their delicious wines with my photography—I couldn’t have asked for more!

How did the concept for The Elements emerge? Many creative visionaries have looked at my work and felt that it was a culmination of all of the elements in my life. It wasn’t just one chapter of travel or beauty; rather, it is a unique cohesion of all the elements.

‘SHE’S CHRISTMAS EVE’ “Destined to be a holiday classic” is a praise phrase that gets thrown around too often — by me, ironically. Yet once in a great while, something comes along that justifies using it sincerely, and this season, that’s “She’s Christmas Eve,” the new holiday single by Santa Barbara musician Zach Madden and his songwriting partner Brad Nack. The duo has contributed this heartfelt love song to a new anthology called Next Christmas Classics Vol. 1 from the U.K.-based independent record label Kringle & Co. The full album is available along with a great video at the label’s website, kringleandcouk.com. —CD

At home in Rincon

What’s next? More timeless imagery. I already have six new images to introduce to my fine art collection, with many more to come. —Mara Pyzel

Keep up with Michael Haber at michaelhaberphotography.com.

EDWARD BOREIN: ETCHED BY THE WEST With its many splendid illustrations, this beautiful volume is a significant scholarly biography in coffee table book format. B. Byron Price has poured decades of research into this narrative of Edward Borein’s eventful life. As an American artist, an irrepressible booster of all things Western, and a Santa Barbara local with firm ideas about what this city represents, Borein offers a unique opportunity to reimagine the roots of our civic culture. For example, when Borein and his wife, Lucile, began looking for a home site in 1923, they decided against Santa Barbara, Montecito, and Mission Canyon in favor of the Mesa. For miles, their only neighbors were the artist Carl Oscar Borg and his wife, Madeline. Unlike the Borgs, who lived in a house based on a historic Spanish church in Zuni, New Mexico, the Boreins rejected the Spanish Colonial revival as inauthentic. Instead, they built La Barranca, a single-story home and studio complex based on the indigenous Hopi dwellings that Borein had sketched for years. The Boreins hired Hopi artisans to construct the adobe to confer further legitimacy to their aesthetic. At one point, Borein suggested to Lucile that they should abandon standard door frames and enter and exit the house on ladders, in full Hopi style. Although this was a joke, Borein was sincere in his complex and heartfelt Western sensibility, even to the point of drawing distinctions between Native American and Spanish Colonial versions of authenticity. Reading Borein’s story in Price’s fine-grained and lavishly illustrated account, one encounters some early indications of the peculiar blend of hedonism and asceticism that would come to characterize life in Santa Barbara. As a pendant to the Historical Museum’s permanent gallery of Borein art and memorabilia, Edward Borein: Etched by the West is a beautiful object. It also stands as a window on a world at once exotic and intimately familiar. —Charles Donelan

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 28

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ESPRESSO SHOT: Saori Yamashita and Zhan Mishel Panchuk’s performance of the Arabian Dance was a crowd favorite in State Street Ballet’s The Nutcracker.

THE NUTCRACKER

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THE CHRISTMAS REVELS: AN EARLY CALIFORNIA CELEBRATION OF THE WINTER SOLSTICE

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oliday revelers turned out in force for this matinee performance of The Christmas Revels, a community celebration of the winter solstice and California history. Revels Artistic Director Susan Keller and a team of Santa Barbara experts hailing from the disciplines of music, history, and the performing arts came together in 2017 to create an early California celebration of the winter solstice. The show takes inspiration from Richard Henry Dana’s account of the De Presented by Santa la Guerra wedding party in Two Years Before the Mast and braids Barbara Revels. At the Lobero Theatre, that material into a lively medSun., Dec. 19. ley. The program also includes several classic Christmas routines, including an audience participation version of “The 12 Days of Christmas,” a singalong of the round “Dona Nobis Pacem,” and the traditional Revels finale of the “Sussex Mummers Carol.” Joseph Velasco took on the role of narrator this year. Tyler X Koontz played Richard Henry

Dana, Bill Egan was Captain Thompson, Luis Moreno was El Tecolero, and Kai Convery was Alfred Robinson, the groom. Isabelle Marchand was a charming bride as Anita de la Guerra, and Paula Lopez Ochoa was on hand to play Maria de la Guerra. Many historically accurate Spanishlanguage songs reflected the play’s setting in the Californio era. No performance of Revels would be complete without the appearance of enthusiastic young people. The Yuletide Youth and Children’s Christmas Chorus sang wonderful old songs and performed El Zapatero, a traditional dance. At the end of Act I, Bill Egan and dancers Sara and Matthew Weitzel led the cast and the audience in another staple of the national Revels movement, the traditional English Morris dance known as “Lord of the Dance.” As audience and cast alike emerged from the theater onto the grand front plaza of the Lobero, all experienced a welcome moment of relief within the round of holiday celebrations. —CD

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lithe and compelling Clara, and Sergei Domrachev provided vital support in the roles of Herr Drosselmeyer and Mother Ginger. Newcomer Nathaniel Tyson showed his talent for comedy as the Grandmother in the opening party sequence. Act One concludes with the great and magical Waltz of the Snowflakes, and it was a great pleasure to see 21 dancers bring this classic number to life once again. Highlights of Act Two included Amber Hirschfield, Anna Nader, and Eliana Swanberg as the Mirlitons and Deise Mendonça in multiple roles. The epic Waltz of the Flowers gave the company and the Gustafson students another opportunity to demonstrate their skills and revive the great community spirit at the heart of every excellent Nutcracker performance. —Charles Donelan

publichealthsbc.org/vaccine

e’s got loads of competition, but the greatest composer of Christmas music is Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Each year, dance companies worldwide spin vivid webs of delightful fantasy to the sounds of his evergreen score to The Nutcracker ballet. It’s got Presented by State Street Ballet. At The it all — light and dark moments, Granada Theatre, romance, and enough variety to Sat., Dec. 18. populate a whole dancing village. For their return to the Granada, State Street Ballet and its affiliated school, Gustafson Dance, brought in the Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra under the baton of Maestro Brian Asher Alhadeff. Their playing was excellent, and a live orchestra added enormously to the event’s energy. Company dancer Amara Galloway made a

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF DECEMBER 23

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(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): You may become a more audacious storyteller in 2022. You could ripen your ability to express the core truths about your life with entertaining narratives. Bonus: The experiences that come your way will provide raw material for you to become even more interesting than you already are. Now study these words by storyteller Ruth Sawyer: “To be a good storyteller, one must be gloriously alive. It is not possible to kindle fresh fires from burned-out embers. The best of the traditional storytellers are those who live close to the heart of things—to the earth, sea, wind, and weather. They have known solitude, silence. They have been given unbroken time in which to feel deeply, to reach constantly for understanding.”

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Taurus author May Sarton wrote a poem celebrating her maturation into the person she had always dreamed she would be. “Now I become myself,” she exulted. “It’s taken time, many years and places; I have been dissolved and shaken, have worn other people’s faces.” But at last, she said, “All fuses together now, falls into place from wish to action, word to silence. My work, my love, my time, my face: gathered into one intense gesture of growing like a plant.” I invite you to adopt Sarton’s poem as a primary source of inspiration in 2022. Make it your guide as you, too, become fully and richly yourself.

GEMINI

Wishing you a wonderful and safe holiday season.

in the coming months. Do you have ideas about how to take full advantage of this lucky opportunity? Here’s a tip: Whenever you have a decision to make, tune in to what your body and heart tell you as well as to what your mind advises.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl said that a sense of meaning is crucial. It’s the key gratification that sustains people through the years: the feeling that their life has a meaning and that particular experiences have meaning. I suggest you make this your theme for 2022. The question “Are you happy?” will be a subset of the more inclusive question, “Are you pursuing a destiny that feels meaningful to you?” Here’s the other big question: “If what you’re doing doesn’t feel meaningful, what are you going to do about it?”

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio guitarist Rowland S. Howard spoke of “the grand occasions when love really does turn into something far greater than you had ever dreamed of, something auto-luminescent.” Judging from the astrological configurations in 2022, I have strong hopes and expectations that you will experience prolonged periods when love will fit that description. For best results, resolve to become more generous and ingenious in expressing love than you have ever been.

(May 21-June 20): In 2012, the writer Gore Vidal died the day after Gemini writer Maeve Binchy passed away. They were both famous, though Binchy sold more books than Vidal. Vidal was interesting but problematic for me. He was fond of saying that it wasn’t enough for him to succeed; he wanted others to fail. The misery of his fellow humans intensified his satisfaction about his own accomplishments. On the other hand, Binchy had a generous wish that everyone would be a success. She felt her magnificence was magnified by others’ magnificence. In 2022, it will be vital for your physical and mental health to cultivate Binchy’s perspective, not Vidal’s. To the degree that you celebrate and enhance the fortunes of others, your own fortunes will thrive.

SAGITTARIUS

CANCER

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): To ensure that 2022 will bring you the most interesting and useful kind of progress, take good care of your key friendships and alliances, even as you seek out excellent new friendships and alliances. For best results, heed these thoughts from author Hanya Yanagihara: “Find people who are better than you are—not smarter, not cooler, but kinder, and more generous, and more forgiving—and then appreciate them for what they can teach you, and listen to them when they tell you something about yourself, no matter how bad—or good—it might be.”

(June 21-July 22): Cancerian political leader Nelson Mandela was wrongly incarcerated for 27 years. After his release, he became President of South Africa and won the Nobel Peace Prize. About leaving jail in 1990, he wrote, “As I walked out the door toward the gate that would lead to my freedom, I knew if I didn’t leave my bitterness and hatred behind, I’d still be in prison.” Although you haven’t suffered deprivation anywhere close to what Mandela did, I’m happy to report that 2022 will bring you liberations from limiting situations. Please adopt Mandela’s approach as you make creative use of your new freedom.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): French poet André Breton wrote, “Je vous souhaite d’être follement aimée.” In English, those words can be rendered as “My wish is that you may be loved to the point of madness” or “I wish you to be loved madly.” That’s got a romantic ring to it, but it’s actually a curse. Why would we want to be loved to the point of madness? A person who “loved” you like that might be fun for a while, but would ultimately become a terrible inconvenience and ongoing disruption. So, dear Leo, I won’t wish that you will be loved to the point of madness in 2022—even though I think the coming months will be an interesting and educational time for amour. Instead, I will wish you something more manageable and enjoyable: that you will be loved with respect, sensitivity, care, and intelligence.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Many people in our culture are smart intellectually, but not very smart emotionally. The wisdom of feelings is undervalued. I protest! One of my great crusades is to champion this neglected source of insight. I am counting on you to be my ally in 2022. Why? Because according to my reading of the astrological omens, you have the potential to ripen your emotional intelligence

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’ve been trying to go home my whole life,” writes poet Chelsea Dingman. I know some of you Sagittarians resist the urge to do that. It’s possible you avoid seeking a true and complete home. You may think of the whole world as your home, or you may regard a lot of different places as your homes. And you’d prefer not to narrow down the feeling and concept of “home” to one location or building or community. Whether or not you are one of those kinds of Centaurs, I suspect that 2022 will bring you unexpected new understandings of home—and maybe even give you the sense that you have finally arrived in your ultimate sanctuary.

CAPRICORN

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Sometime during the Northern Song Dynasty that ruled China from 960 to 1127, an artisan made a white ceramic bowl five inches in diameter. About a thousand years later, a family in New York bought it at a garage sale for $3. It sat on a mantel in their home for a few years until they got a hunch to have it evaluated by an art collector. A short time later, the bowl was sold at an auction for $2.2 million. I’m not saying that 2022 will bring a financial event as dramatic as that one. But I do expect that your luck with money will be at a peak.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): In the Quechuan language spoken in parts of Peru, the word takanakuy means “when the blood is boiling.” Every year at this time, the community of Chumbivilcas stages a holiday called Takanakuy. People gather at the town center to fight each other, settling their differences so they can forget about them and start over fresh. If my friend and I have had a personal conflict during the previous year, we would punch and kick each other—but not too hard—until we had purged our spite and resentment. The slate between us would be clean. Is there some humorous version of this ritual you could enact that wouldn’t involve even mild punching and kicking? I recommend you dream one up!

HOMEWORK: A year from today, what do you want to be congratulating yourself for? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 30

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JUDICIAL Assistant III‑ Courtroom Clerk position. A courtroom clerk accurately prepares the official record of the hearing’s events, assists the judicial officer, manages exhibits, coordinates juries, performs data entry, works directly with the public, and performs other important courtroom duties. Employment standards: One year of experience performing the full range of duties of a classification equivalent to Judicial Assistant II with Santa Barbara County; OR, Successful completion of college‑level courses or equivalent specialized training in legal terminology, legal procedure, and court procedures; OR, Any combination of training, education, and experience that would provide the required knowledge and abilities. Screening of applications will be on Tuesday, January 4, 2022.Current vacancies in Santa Barbara and Santa Maria. Please indicate on the application your area of interest. Apply at https://www.governmentjobs.com/ careers/sbcourts

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OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Primarily focuses on giving from individuals and foundations to promote fundraising priorities in support of the overall school‑fundraising strategy. Fundraising efforts, as defined by the Dean and the GGSE Assistant Dean of Development (DD), are devoted primarily to the Gevirtz School, with an emphasis on fundraising priorities connected to Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Social Justice, and GGSE’s role in furthering UCSB’s campus efforts as a Minority Serving Institution and a Hispanic Serving Institution ADD will raise money for priorities as set annually by the Dean and DD. ADD will identify, cultivate, solicit, and steward individual prospects and associated family foundations, with a focus on major gifts of $25,000+ including targeted solicitations to foundations and corporate sponsors. Additional focus will be on annual strategy to close new and renewing annual gifts up to $25,000, and to build a major gift and estate gift pipeline. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated interpersonal skills to establish and maintain good working relationships with diverse groups, including colleagues, faculty, staff, donors, and students.Strong organizational and time management skills and meticulous attention to detail, the ability to set, negotiate, and meet priorities and produce high‑quality work under multiple deadlines and priorities. Proven success in leading a creative venture or program. Experience with social media. Proven success in managing events at various scales and generating positive outcomes.Broad knowledge of the principles and practices of university fundraising and stewardship best practice. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record. Satisfactory conviction history background check. May be required to

work some evenings and weekends. 67,500 ‑ 75,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/5/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 28174

BUSINESS OFFICER

GLOBAL & INTERNATIONAL STUDIES Responsible for the full range of management functions for the Global Studies Department encompassing administration, financial management, contract and grant administration, staff and academic personnel, academic and student support services, technical support services, purchasing, facilities maintenance and renovation, instructional resources and safety programs. Develops and implements operating policies and procedures as they relate to overall department goals and objectives. In this capacity, independently solves problems requiring interpretation of a wide variety of federal, state, and campus policies. These responsibilities require thorough knowledge of University, state, and federal regulations, policies, guidelines, and procedures, as well as the use of considerable judgment and tact in problem‑solving and decision making. Handles confidential faculty and staff matters for the department and ensures compliance with the implementation of diversity guidelines and procedures. Provides continuity with regard to department policies and long‑range goals and develops

strategies for implementation. Interprets, implements and ensures compliance with staff personnel policies and collective bargaining contracts. Serves as the liaison between the department and external agencies by responding to and recommending a course of action with respect to various inquiries and problems as they may arise. Req: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $61,200 ‑ $70,920/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/5/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 28080

and responds to emergencies as needed. Liaisons with various campus and departmental offices to provide outstanding service to residents. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree required.Candidates should have demonstrated effective managerial experience in residence halls, including staff supervision and

training, counseling, advising, and programming for a diverse college student body. Notes: Satisfactory completion of a criminal history background check.Contract position with the possibility of renewal for a maximum of three additional terms. This position will require night and

weekend hours as needed. Position also includes a furnished apartment. $54,900/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive

Continued on p. 32

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MARKETING AND PROMOTIONS ADMINISTRATOR The Santa Barbara Independent is looking for a Marketing and Promotions Administrator to join its team. This position is a parttime, temporary role with a potential to become permanent. This position will work closely with the sales and business departments to assist with promotional campaigns, events, and more. This role requires excellent attention to detail, time management skills, and the ability to work both with supervision and autonomously as varying situations require. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

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COMPLEX COORDINATOR

DEAN STUDENT RESIDENTS Responsible for community development/student engagement, safety, supervision and administration of 1 Assistant Complex Coordinator and up to 20 student staff positions including (Resident Assistants, Community Council and other varied student staff). The Complex Coordinator is a member of the Residential and Community Living Lead Staff team responsible for a comprehensive living learning program for the 10,000+ residents in Housing. Responds to all resident issues, co‑create neighborhood programs, training and supervision of staff, provides on‑call assistance

VCA Care Specialty and Emergency Animal Hospital IMAGINE A PLACE WHERE YOUR CAREER CHANGES LIVESESPECIALLY YOUR OWN. VCA Care Specialty and Emergency Animal Hospital, our work has a purpose, protect the health and well-being of animals. Our Emergency department thrives in the fastpaced environment, and handles the most critical patients with competency and compassion. Our team of talented veterinarians, technicians, and support staff work hard to ensure that our love of animals translates into the care and respect for our patients that you can see, feel and trust. We are committed to the highest quality standards, supported by VCA’s mission to deliver world class veterinary medicine.

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holidays. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 28698

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FINANCIAL & PAYROLL ASSISTANT

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Assists the Business Officer in the preparation of all financial and payroll forms and transactions. Serves as Department Preparer and Timekeeper to ensure proper set‑up and payment of employees. Assists the Business Officer with reconciling timecards and serves as the Kronos contact

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FINANCIAL & PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

PHELPS ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Manages all departmental fiscal activities and accounting systems for the Departments of French & Italian and German & Slavic Studies, and the Program in Comparative Literature. Prepares all documents for financial transactions. Interprets policy and advises faculty, staff and students of proper university guidelines regarding policies for personnel, purchasing, entertainment and travel. Analyzes expenditures and spending patterns, resolving discrepancies. Reconciles financial transactions with the general and payroll ledgers. Produces accurate monthly cost projections and financial reports for management review. Participates in fiscal closing, budget projections and financial planning. Administers and coordinates employment activities and processes personnel actions for faculty, staff and students via the UCPath System. Ensures data integrity and compliance with University, Federal, agency and union policies. Maintains current knowledge of University policies and procedures of Accounting, Travel, Human Resources, Academic Personnel, Graduate Division, Purchasing and Business Services on all fund sources. Demonstrates flexibility in learning, interpreting, and adapting new policies and procedures. Demonstrates effective organizational skills. Works collaboratively with others in a team environment and maintains effective communication with faculty, staff, students and other campus personnel. Reqs: BA/BS degree or equivalent work experience. 1‑3 years bookkeeping/financial work experience in an academic higher education institution or similar. Skilled in using Excel and working with Excel spreadsheets. Strong verbal and written communication skills. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The position is funded at 100% time until 6/2024, after which it may become a 50%‑time position. $24.61‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants

will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/6/22. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27987

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE (LVN)

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurses. Assists with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Acts as a resource for non‑licensed staff. Utilizes nursing knowledge in these tasks as well as but not limited to providing patient education, administering immunizations, and functioning within the scope of practice. Reqs: Licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Must be organized, detailed oriented, confidential and dependable. Strong oral/written communication, organizational and customer service skills. Proficient in Microsoft and Google suite. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must be licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must have current license at all times during employment. Must be CPR certified/ Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11month position, M‑F 7:30am – 4:30pm. 4 weeks of furlough is taken during quarter beaks and summer months. May include Thurs. evenings from 10am‑7pm. $30.42‑ $37.83/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21751

PROJECT MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Responsible for the administration of capital projects for Housing, Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises of various sizes up to $750,000, and Job Order Contracts with no dollar limit. Has broad authority to interpret contracts, agreements, and negotiate changes in the work within the constraints of UC policy and in strict conformance with the UC Facilities Manual, Design & Construction Services policies and applicable state laws. The work includes managing consultants, coordinating with client and user groups, coordinating with Residential Operations. Maintenance trades staff, coordinating with EH&S and D&CS staff and other UCSB staff and faculty. Review construction cost estimates

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and bidding documents, and participate in onsite inspection before final acceptance of projects. Generates original work including reports and design works and employs outside consultants when it is in the best interest of the University. Has primary responsibility for claims avoidance and risk mitigation and provides technical expertise to the General Counsel should claims arise. Reqs: Minimum of three years of experience in project management in the construction industry with emphasis on commercial or University projects. Ability to read and interpret construction documents. Ability to problem solve and arrive at equitable solutions. Ability to analyze construction documents as to content and compliance with Housing Requirements. Ability to formulate construction cost estimates for long term planning. Working knowledge of California building and fire codes. Working knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMVEmployee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $67,500 ‑ $96,780/yr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job 28721

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RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

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DOMESTIC CARS DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT OR RV TO HELP HOMELESS PETS. PETS ALIVE IS A CALIFORNIA, 501‑C‑3 NONPROFIT. GUARANTEED TAX DEDUCTIONS. PAPERWORK EXPERTS, FREE QUOTE AND PICK UP. ASK ABOUT FREE 7 DAY VACATION OR $200 VISA GIFT CARD. LAPETSALIVE. ORG 1‑833‑772‑2632 (Cal‑SCAN)

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SR. CUSTODIAN

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. The Sr. Custodian promotes a customer service environment to residents and clients. Completes custodial tasks within an assigned area such as, cleans and sanitizing restrooms, hallways, stairways, lounges, public areas, office spaces and building entrances. Replenish restroom supplies. Disposes of trash, may be required to drive a motorized vehicle with trailer to move trash. Utilizes cleaning equipment to perform cleaning duties such as squirt bottles, dusters, mops, vacuums, broom, power floor buffers, mop buck/ringer, hot water carpet extractor, steam cleaner, wet/dry vacuum, doodle bugs, powered wall cleaning machine. May work on a ladder. Works effectively as a team member. Cleans all surfaces inside/out of buildings maintained and operated by HDAE. During Summer Conference season will provide daily linen change and room service to conferees. Supply amenities to conferees. Maintain stock of all supplies to perform job duties. Reqs: working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable. Will train on all equipment and chemicals used. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multicultural work environment. Thur ‑ Mon 7:30am ‑ 4:00pm. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check.$20.74‑$22.44/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.Application review begins 01/06/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu.Job # 28317.

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BUDGET & PLANNING OFFICE UCSB is seeking a creative and forward‑looking Director of Financial Planning & Analysis, who will serve as an integral member of the Office of Budget & Planning. In this highly visible role, the Director of Financial Planning & Analysis (Director, FP&A) will provide critical leadership and support for the University’s financial planning, forecasting, and decision‑making processes. The Director, FP&A will serve as an integral member in the development, interpretation, analysis, and decision‑making methods for UCSB’s financial planning and resource allocations. In addition, the position provides support to the Chancellor, Senior Officers, Colleges, and campus departments regarding allocation and management of resources. This position applies principles of public finance to conceptualize, develop, and implement cross‑functional funding models in support of critical campus programs. The incumbent is responsible for preparing in‑depth financial analysis and reporting, development of business models, and evaluation of funding streams for various campus‑wide programs. This position will also play a key role in transforming the financial reporting processes to best serve the needs of the campus community. Reqs: 10+ years’ Experience in the financial field analyzing data and designing and delivering reporting at an advanced level using Hyperion, SQL and MS Access databases, Tableau, Microsoft, Excel, and/or other reporting software. Advanced knowledge of and experience in strategic financial and budget management using advanced financial concepts for planning. Advanced knowledge concerning preparation and interpretation of financial statements such as Statements of Net Income and Change in Net Position, Balance Sheet and Cash Flow Statements. Notes: Completion of a criminal history background check. Must maintain valid CA DL, a clean DMV record and enrollment in DMV Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 01/04/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 27939

person. Responsible for the design, coordination, implementation and management of the administrative and financial operations facet of the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP) for the following functions: Summer Transitional Enrichment Program (STEP), Summer Orientation Program and Open House. Responsible for the collection and organization of budgetary information from various sources and designs and prepares the annual budget for STEP, Spring Open House (formerly Spring Insight) and Summer Orientation. Monitors budget expenditures for programs using ledger Cost Centers; prepares accounting, financial and payroll forms and transactions utilizing multiple campus online systems. Reqs: High school diploma or equivalent experience. Basic judgment and decision‑making skills; verbal, written and active listening communication skills. Uses interpersonal skills and service orientation skills in interactions with students and colleagues. Basic organizational skills and ability to multitask. Competent in Microsoft Office Excel, Word, Google Suite applications such as Gmail, Sheets, Doc, Slides. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. May work occasional weekends. $24.61 to $26.98/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/7/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 28426

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STUDENT HEALTH A limited dentist provides primary dentistry and performs complex dental procedures for UCSB students as allowed by their scope of dental practice licensure. Performs peer reviews for quality improvement as needed and supervises other dental personnel as needed to maintain the dental practice. Reqs: Must have a current DEA and CA Doctor of Dental Surgery license as determined by the CA Board of Dental Examiners at all times during employment in order to practice and function in the clinical role. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory completion of background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a 40% time limited appointment. Scheduling varies during quarter breaks. Student Health is closed between the Christmas and New Year’s Day

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DATA SERVICES ANALYST

ADMINISTRATIVE & RESIDENTIAL IT Provide support with regard to data analytics and reporting, primarily with Power BI. Serves as a key support resource for the creation and distribution of Power BI solutions for departmental KPIs and business analytics. This position requires analytical and organizational skills to maintain a regular schedule of data feeds and associated reporting. Will be trained to adopt the technical acumen for planning, designing, developing, implementing and administering data‑based systems that acquire, prepare, store and provide access to data and metadata. Will be trained to ensure the integrity and completeness of data, dataflows, KPIs and dashboards, primarily in Power BI. This is an entry‑level Data Services Analyst 1 training position with an Individual Development Program designed to train the incumbent to perform duties at the Data Services Analyst 2 level within 6‑12 months from hire. The ARIT organization is responsible for the planning, development, implementation, and overall administration for information systems and related technologies for all departments of the UCSB Division of Administrative Services. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Demonstrated ability to communicate technical information to technical and non‑technical personnel at various levels in the organization. Self‑motivated and works independently and as part of a team. Demonstrated problem‑solving skills. Able to learn effectively and meet deadlines. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $36.30/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/13/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 28714

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Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Thu 23

1:28 am 3.3

4:49 am 2.9

11:08 am 5.0

6:48 pm -0.2

Fri 24

2:16 am 3.4

5:55 am 2.9

11:54 am 4.6

7:31 pm 0.0

Sat 25

3:01 am 3.7

7:27 am 2.9

12:54 pm 4.1

8:16 pm 0.3

High

Sun 26

3:40 am 4.0

9:12 am 2.6

2:14 pm 3.6

9:04 pm 0.6

Mon 27

4:17 am 4.4

10:39 am 1.9

3:50 pm 3.3

9:54 pm 0.9

Tue 28

4:53 am 4.9

11:44 am 1.0

5:25 pm 3.1

10:43 pm 1.3

Wed 29

5:30 am 5.5

12:36 pm 0.1

6:45 pm 3.2

11:32 pm 1.6

Thu 30

6:09 am 6.0

1:25 pm -0.7

7:52 pm 3.3

26

2D

9H

Sunrise 7:03 Sunset 4:56

17 D source: tides.net

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32 Chuck D’s Public Enemy partner, for short 33 Zero, for Nadal 34 Dumpster emanation 36 ___ diagram (logic illustration) 37 Order for humans 39 “En ___!” (fencing command) 40 Runny cheese 41 Longs (for) 42 Keep an ___ the ground 43 Until now 44 Cooking appliance 45 Squares up 48 Yangs’ counterparts 49 Waffle brand that somehow has a cereal version 50 Propose a romantic connection, in fanfic 51 Like some bloomers 52 Constellation named for a stringed instrument 53 Chuck as far away as possible, in modern slang 55 Toyota ___4 (SUV model) ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1063

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

DECEMBER 23, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 23, 2021

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO A D M I N I S T E R E S TAT E O F : EAMON P. MALONE NO: 21PR00562 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of EAMON P. MALONE A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: SUSAN K. STRICK in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): SUSAN K. STRICK be appointed as p e r s o n a l re p re s e n t a t i v e t o administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal

representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 1/27/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the Califor nia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes

and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attor ney for Petitioner: Lori A. Lewis, Esq.112 E. Victoria Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1501. Published Dec 16, 23, 30 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO A D M I N I S T E R E S TAT E O F : H A R RY FELDER III NO: 21PR00464 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of HARRY FELDER III A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: SINTIJA FELDER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): SINTIJA FELDER be appointed as p e r s o n a l re p re s e n t a t i v e t o administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s and codicils, if any,

be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 1/06/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with

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34

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DECEMBER 23, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: ACE FLOOR COVERING at 7409 San Bergamo Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Daniel J Condron (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Daniel J. Condron Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0003265. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: SUN SHUTTLE & TRANSIT at 359 Central Ave. Fillmore, CA 93015; Fillmore Area Transit Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: William L. Morris III, President with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0003381. Published: Dec 23, 30 2021. Jan 6, 13 2022.

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the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the Califor nia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Bruce A. Pence 112 E. Victoria Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1501. Published Dec 16, 23, 30 2021.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: SPRAGUE PEST SOLUTIONS at 3003 Petrol Road Bakersfield, CA 93308; TMC Pest Management (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Ross A. Treleven, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0003197. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: FAIRVIEW GARDENS FARM at 598 N Fairview Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Center For Urban Agriculture At Fairview Gardens (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Chris Melancon, Executive Director Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 17, 2021. This statement

expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003189. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: BELOW MAGID C O N S T R U C T I O N C O M PA N Y at 823 Jennigs Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Below Magid Construction Company (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mark Magid, Owner/ CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003240. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: RLT PICTURES at 1612 Juniper Ave Solvang, CA 93463; C h r i s t o p h e r S Ya h n 8 8 3 5 Tiber St. Ventura, CA 93004; Isaac R Meeks 1612 Juniper Ave Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Christopher Sandon Yahn, Co‑Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003148. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business a s : C A R P I N T E R I A VA L L E Y ROOFING INC., CARPINTERIA VALLEY ROOFING, VALLEY ROOFING, CARPINTERIA ROOFING, CARP ROOFING, JIMENEZ ROOFING at 4791 8th St, #3 Carpinteria, CA 93013; Carpinteria Valley Roofing Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Julie Jimenez, S e c re t a r y F i l e d w i t h t h e County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003147. Published: Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: THE SANDBOX COLLABORATIVE LLC, THE SANDBOX GOLETA, GATHER GOLETA at 69 Santa Felicia Drive Goleta, CA 93117; The Sandbox Collaborative LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Kyle Ashby, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003216. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: THE SANDBOX SANTA BARBARA LLC at 414 Olive Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Sandbox Santa Barbara LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Kyle Ashby, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County

Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003215. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: BREAKTHROUGHS I N T E R N AT I O N A L at 486 Vaquero Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Educational Kinesiology F o u n d a t i o n ( s a m e a d d re s s ) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: Julie Newendorp, Finance Director with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021‑0003294. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: ARCHITECH D E N TA L LABORATORY at 322 North F St. Ste E Lompoc, CA 93436; Derek K. Walker 3979 Agena Way Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Derek K. Walker with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003267. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: TOM H A S E LW O D E , TREKKIELIFE at 237 Town Center W Ste 111 Santa Maria CA 93458; Thomas C Heslop Jr 3210 Santa Maria Way Spc 132 Santa Maria, CA 93455 This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Thomas C Heslop Jr with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003281. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: THE POPES NEW CASTLE at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Industrial Way LLC 2060 Huntington Dr. Ste 1 San Marino, CA 91108 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: Robert Tweed, Managing Member with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003284. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: ALEX RASMUSSEN STUDIO at 133 S La Patera Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Neal Feay Company (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Alex Rasmussen, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003255. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: ABOVE & BEYOND BODY


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

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PHONE 805-965-5205

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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(CONT.)

ARTS at 407 State St, Fl #2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Parkhurst Enterprises Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Joshua N Parkhurst, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003219. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: SOL SANTA BARBARA at 1822 Loma St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jennifer A. Panchal (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jennifer Panchal Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0003221. Published: Dec 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: ELUDE at 413 Cannon Green Drive, Apt. H Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Jordan L. Barbieri‑Low (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Jordan Barbieri‑Low with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0003304. Published: Dec 16, 23, 30 2021. Jan 6 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: AESTHETIC CENTER FOR

PLASTIC SURERY at 5333 Hollister Avenue, Suite 195 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Soares Medical Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: Marc Soares, Officer with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003253. Published: Dec 16, 23, 30 2021. Jan 6 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: VP3 LANDSCAPING at 1924 San Pascual St #8 Santa Barbara, C A 9 3 1 0 1 ; V i c e n t e P e re z (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Vicente Perez with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E955. FBN Number: 2021‑0003310. Published: Dec 16, 23, 30 2021. Jan 6 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: COAST CARPET CLEANING at 527 W Pueblo St. Apt 4 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Coast Carpet Cleaning LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: Matthew Scott SimuiniManager/ Owner/Operator with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0003305. Published: Dec 16, 23, 30 2021. Jan 6 2022.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: CHALLENGE DESIGN at 1813 Clearview Road Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Matthew W. A r f ( s a m e a d d re s s ) T h i s business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Matthew Arf, Owner with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 8, 2021. This statement e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0003305. Published: Dec 16, 23, 30 2021. Jan 6 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: PERFORMANCE ELECTRIC at 185 Lassen Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Ken V Chalfant (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: Ken Chalfant, Owner with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 15, 2021. This s t a t e m e n t e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0003348. Published: Dec 23, 30 2021. Jan 6, 13 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: EMBRA, EMBRA CANNABIS at 1400 Cravens Lane Carpinteria, CA 93013; Farmlane (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: David Van Wingerden, CFO with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 8, 2021. This s t a t e m e n t e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953.

FBN Number: 2021‑0003302. Published: Dec 23, 30 2021. Jan 6, 13 2022. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business a s : H O C H H A U S E R B L AT T E R ARCHITECTURE & PLANNING at 122 East Arrellaga Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Architecture Blatter Architects, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: Jay I. Blatter, V ice President with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 15, 2021. This statement expires f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e o f the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0003350. Published: Dec 23, 30 2021. Jan 6, 13 2022.

NAME CHANGE I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F G L E N D Y J U D I T H AYA L A & C E S A R AUGUSTO ARRIAZA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV04141 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara S u p e r i o r c o u r t p ro p o s i n g a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SHEYLA JUDITH AYALA TO: SHEYLA JUDITH ARRIAZA AYALA T H E C O U RT O R D E R S t h a t all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted.

Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, S A N TA B A R B A R A S U P E R I O R COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of g e n e r a l c i rc u l a t i o n , p r i n t e d in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated

Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Ster ne. of the Superior Court. Published. Dec 2, 9, 16, 23 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES ISLA VISTA SPRING FESTIVAL RFP The Isla Vista Community Services District is seeking p ro p o s a l s f o r a n I s l a V i s t a Spring Festival. Requests & Clarifications Deadline: Monday, January 3 2022, at 10:00 AM (PDT) Submittal Due Date/Time: Monday, January 10, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT). (see below) Event Date: April 2, 2022

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE CITY WIDE ANNUAL REPLACEMENT OF TRAFFIC STRIPING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., January 13, 2022, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available on the CITY website at http://www.cityofgoleta.org/iwant-to/view/city-bid-opportunities. The work to be done consists of furnishing all materials, equipment, tools labor, and incidentals as required by the specifications, and contract documents. The general items of work include painting and repainting of traffic striping and pavement markings, replacement of missing markers, the installation of new reflective pavement markers/markers, and the removal of obsolete and/or unnecessary striping and pavement markings. All work shall include the cleaning of soil and debris from areas to be striped prior to actual striping for CITY WIDE ANNUAL REPLACEMENT OF TRAFFIC STRIPING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS. The services shall be performed in accordance with the Contract Documents, which includes provisions that the work shall be performed without the use of pesticides or commercial fertilizers. The term of the contract shall be thru June 30, 2026; however, it will be subject to annual approval of the budget on July 1st of each year within the contract term. A non-mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled on December 22, 2021, at 10 A.M at 130 Cremona Dr. Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 for this project. Meet outside of Suite B. No relief will be granted to contractors for any conditions or restrictions that would have been discovered if they had attended the pre-bid meeting. Please RSVP via PlanetBids no later than close-of-business the day prior to the scheduled bid walk. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received within three (3) City business days of the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR CITY WIDE ANNUAL REPLACEMENT OF TRAFFIC STRIPING AND PAVEMENT MARKINGS.”

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The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted, nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 9617505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact J. Paul Medel in writing at pmedel@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

DECEMBER 23, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT DECEMBER 23, 2021

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