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SChoOlS oF thOught SpeCIAl SeCTIon insIde! FREE

Santa Barbara

NOV. 18-24, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 827

our Own

Fo O FoO Fighter

hriS hriS SShIFletT hINDUCTED IFlet IF letT T INTO

Plus

hAOBSh Murder trIAl: Week Four uCSB CSB Presents Chekhov’s Seagull MArgerum rgerum Wine gets verTICal

roCk ’n’ roll ll OF FAMe FAMe hAll By MArkO DeSAnTIs


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THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Make It a Holi-date!

Ring in the season with live music and cheer

She & Him

A Very She & Him Christmas Party Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM / Arlington Theatre Usher in the holiday season with the “old-school studio-pop sensibility” (NPR) of M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

My Bluegrass Heart Béla Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Bryan Sutton

Wed, Dec 15 / 8 PM / Arlington Theatre This unparalleled evening in support of Béla Fleck’s new album My Bluegrass Heart is a veritable Who’s Who of some of the greatest instrumentalists in bluegrass history.

Your One-stop Holiday Shop (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

A&L gift certificates are available online now.

Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


volume 35, # 827, Nov. 18-24, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell

COVER STORY 25 Santa Barbara’s Own Foo Fighter

Chris Shiflett Inducted Into Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame by Marko DeSantis

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 ON THE COVER: Chris Shiflett by Jenn Devereaux. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

MARKO PROFILES SHIFLETT For this week’s cover story, Marko DeSantis (pictured right) put down his guitar and picked up the laptop to profile his longtime friend Chris Shiflett (left), who was just inducted into the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame. DeSantis lives in Los Angeles with his wife and two kids, teaching music business and songwriting while also working on projects related to his former bands Sugarcult, Bad Astronaut, and Popsicko.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

What’s your first memory of Chris? We kinda started out as cross-town rivals. I’d see him at shows and record stores with his long hair and wild outfits and wonder, “Who is this other weirdo kid who likes obscure music like me?” Then we connected through some mutual pals at a party — after a WASP concert! I had a band called illiterate and he asked me if he could steal our bassist for his band Lost Kittenz. I refused, but said I’d switch to bass and join instead! So I did, and we played together for a few years and have been great friends ever since. How did your career paths intertwine? We both share day-isdarkest-before-dawn career stories. In 1999, we both arrived at a similar crossroads after having been in a few smaller bands. He confided in me that he might be hanging up his rock ’n’ roll cleats. I was experiencing a similar existential crisis, after a few years of false dead-end bands. A few months later, I joined up with what would become Sugarcult, and he got the Foo Fighters gig! INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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NEWS of the WEEK

NOV. 11-18, 2021

by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

COURTS & CRIME

Pierre Haobsh’s Web History Paints Dark Picture Behind Triple Murder

P

by Ryan P. Cruz and Tyler Hayden

ierre Haobsh squirmed in Judge Brian Hill’s courtroom as his personal web history was blasted onto the screen, serving as a window into his mind on the days leading up to and following the murders of renowned Santa Barbara herbalist Dr. Henry Han; his wife, Jennie Yu; and their 5-year-old daughter, Emily Han. The information was recovered from a cell phone and laptop found in his possession when he was arrested in 2016. The prosecution has been calling its final witnesses in the trial against Haobsh, who is accused of killing all three victims and attempting to use Han’s personal information to transfer $77,000 to his own bank account. The state’s evidence against Haobsh has been overwhelming thus far — there was the testimony from Haobsh’s friend Thomas “TJ” Direda, who reported Haobsh as a suspect to authorities; there was physical evidence tying his fingerprints to the plastic sheeting and duct tape used to wrap the bodies, as well as surveillance footage of him purchasing the same items at Home Depot; and there was a four-hour interrogation video that showed Haobsh skirting the detectives’ questions and denying his involvement in the crime. On Friday and Monday, investigators Travis Henderson and Jeff Ellis walked prosecutors Hilary Dozer and Benjamin Ladinig through the web history from an iPhone and HP laptop found in Haobsh’s possession, and security footage and receipts showing where he was while he was allegedly planning the crime using his mobile devices. According to witness testimony and text message records, investigators found that Haobsh had signed a “memorandum of understanding” with Han to create a company called Obsidian Teradyne the day before the killings. In it, Haobsh promised to provide $15 million to help create the company, although bank records showed he was worth less than $500 at the time. Haobsh told detectives he didn’t have the money personally but “knew” people who would provide the financial backing. In texts to Han, Haobsh boasts that he was close to being a billionaire, with a lavish lifestyle with gambling, women, Lamborghinis, and private jets.

RYAN P. C RUZ PHOTOS

Prosecution Continues Building Case with Final Witnesses in Han Family Murder Trial

THE DEFENSE: Public Defender Christine Voss leans in to speak with her client, accused triple-murderer Pierre Haobsh. Haobsh’s defense team contends that investigators failed to conduct follow-up interviews and chase leads that may have led to other suspects.

Prosecutors showed that Haobsh installed spyware on his own laptop as a “dry run” before installing the same software on Han’s home computer days before the murders. It serves as a step-by-step retelling of how Haobsh allegedly attempted to transfer $72,000 into his personal bank account, even creating a fake email address to receive verification codes meant for Han. Haobsh’s defense team of Christine Voss and Michael Hanley contend that investigators failed to conduct follow-up interviews and chase leads that may have led to other suspects. Voss objected to any reference to Haobsh as the man beyond the computer, maintaining that the items found in his car could have been planted there. Detective Ellis testified that cell phone records showed Haobsh’s cell phone being used at El Capitán State Beach from 4 p.m. to around 7:30 p.m. on March 21, 2016, the same day he had used the spyware to obtain Han’s information. His web browser history from that time shows searches for a number of topics from “the legal amount of cash you can carry on an international flight” to “what kind of gun used by James Bond.” The cell phone history shows searches about guns and ammunition — first a Walther PPK with .380 ACP bullets, then eventually settling on a Ruger MKII with .22 LR ammo. There is a visit to an online database that shows guns featured in movies and television. Earlier evidence showed Haobsh purchased a Ruger .22 pistol at an JUDGE AND JURY: Judge Brian Hill alone will decide Haobsh’s fate once both sides make closing Arizona gun shop, the same model used in statements, as expected next week. the murders.

In the parking lot at El Capitán, Ellis said, Haobsh watched videos of suppressed pistols before searching for local movie listings: Kung Fu Panda, Allegiant, and 10 Cloverfield Lane. He planned to see a movie at Camino Real Cinemas later that night. The day after the murders, similar evidence shows Haobsh in a Thousand Oaks McDonald’s parking lot where, the prosecution contends, Haobsh used his laptop to gain access to Han’s Chase and Wells Fargo bank accounts and attempted multiple times to transfer money into his own account. Eventually, he was able to transfer $5,000. Web searches showed a range of questions were sought: “How good are fingerprint forensics?” “How long does crime scene analysis take?” “Is a car searched entering Tijuana?” There is even a chat with an online psychic, a “master of cartomancy” by the name of Count Marco who charges $3.95 per minute. The user, using the name “Pierre,” chats with the Count. The computer’s spyware allowed investigators to read every keystroke. “I have done bad things,” “Pierre” types, before changing his mind and deleting the message, instead sending: “I have made bad choices.” “Unforgivable,” he types again before deleting. He asks Count Marco: “Will I get caught for what I did?” In the courtroom, Haobsh rewatched all these moments played out on the large screen in Department 2 of Santa Barbara Superior Court. The defense will lay out its case next week, though it is still undecided whether Haobsh will take the stand. Since both sides agreed to waive a jury trial, Judge Hill alone will decide Haobsh’s fate once both sides n make closing statements, as expected next week.

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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NOV. 11-18, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

San Marcos Students Arrested for Assault on Campus

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CORONAVIRUS

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

Unvaccinated, Untested

2022 SEASON

103rd CONCERT SEASON

COU RTESY

161 Sheriff’s Deputies Fail to Comply with County Order

by Tyler Hayden ompliance with COVID-19 vaccine-or-test mandates at Santa Barbara public agencies varies widely, with high rates reported by many organizations and much lower figures found at others. The Sheriff ’s Office appears particularly out of step with the county policy that was implemented four weeks ago, on OctoRISING THROUGH THE RANKS: Sheriff Bill Brown promotes ber 18. Of the department’s 295 nine deputies in 2017, including Neil Gowing (far left), current patrol deputies, 161 have opted president of the Deputy Sheriff’s Association to receive weekly tests in lieu of being vaccinated. But of those 161, ty’s entire 4,564-member workforce, 81.5 peronly 37 have registered to be tested, and none cent have been vaccine-verified. have actually been swabbed. That’s accordJoseph M. Pisano, an employee relaing to the most recent data available from tions manager with the Human Resources the county’s Human Resources Department. Department, said noncompliance with the “We have some work to do there,” acknowl- order isn’t in of itself illegal, as the mandate came in the form of a “policy” and didn’t edged director Maria Elena De Guevara. De Guevara said her office remains in actually amend the county’s Code of Ordidiscussions with Sheriff’s employees who’ve nances. Nevertheless, he explained, “The “expressed concerns” about the registration County has the ability to address noncompliand testing process. “We’re trying to answer ance by working within the applicable Civil all of their questions,” she said, “but they Service Rules.” Those actions may include also have to start complying with the policy.” suspension, demotion, or termination, the While vaccine hesitancy has been reported rules state. Meanwhile, the City of Santa Barbara, among law enforcement agencies across the country, testing skepticism has not been as slightly behind the county in its mandate timing, is requiring all employees to provide widely documented. Sergeant Neil Gowing, president of the proof of vaccination by December 1. Deputy Sheriff ’s Association (DSA), the Over at the Santa Barbara Unified School employee union leading the negotiations, District, 96 percent of its approximately said the group still feels uncertain about the 1,700 staff are all vaxxed up, said spokestrue “impacts and effects” of COVID-19 test- person Camie Barnwell. The district placed ing, including “how the tests are going to eight employees on leave — two teachers be implemented, which testing platform is and six administrative staff—who didn’t get going to be used, who is going to administer their shots, or apply for exemptions, by the the tests, [and] what are the steps if there is November 1 deadline. Seventy employees have requested religious exemptions, and a positive test.” Gowing took issue with the character- seven have asked for medical exemptions, ization that the 161 patrol deputies without Barnwell said. That group must submit to their shots are simply rejecting their weekly twice-weekly COVID testing, wear an N-95 checkups. “I can assure you though that mask, and practice social distancing. Maria Zate, a representative for Cotnone of our unvaccinated employees are refusing to test,” he said. While the Board tage Health, said 96 percent of their 4,160 of Supervisors passed their order on Sep- employees are vaccinated, with 220 staff tember 1, he explained, “There are a lot of receiving exemptions. “Those who qualdetails that have to be worked out before ify for an exemption will be tested twice implementation.” weekly and must show a negative COVID Gowing hopes to have all of the union’s test result,” she said. “Masking is required lingering questions answered “soon,” throughout the hospitals, by all staff and visidescribing the back-and-forth with officials tors, regardless of vaccination status.” Santa Barbara’s other healthcare powas “vigorous.” “At the end of the day,” he said, “we want to do our part to help keep every- erhouse, Sansum Clinic, appears to have one safe, just as we do every day in our work- one of the highest compliance rates in the ing capacity.” region. Spokesperson Nicole Young said, “99 Supervisor Gregg Hart voiced frustra- percent of our healthcare providers and 98 tion that talks with the DSA have dragged percent of our staff members are fully vacon for weeks with no end in sight. He noted cinated.” A large number of the unvaccinated all other county employee unions — includ- staff “work in a non-clinical setting or work ing those for firefighters, public works staff, remotely from home,” Young explained, “and social service departments, and others—got all of them are required to be tested weekly.” on board with the mandate almost immediDignity Health, which operates the Marately. “I expect all county employees to have ian Regional Medical Center in Santa Maria, public health consequences at the forefront notably declined to provide any data on its n of their minds,” Hart said. Among the coun- workforce.

C

Elim Chan

Jordi Savall

Igor Levit

Sir John Eliot Gardener

James Ehnes

Isabel Bayrakdarian

Olga Kern

Benjamin Grosvenor

Welcome Back to LIVE Classical Music with CAMA!

SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE NOW Granada Theatre (805) 899-2222, granadasb.org Lobero Theatre (805) 963-0761, lobero.org

Season subscriptions still on sale (805) 966-4324 | camasb.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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Ele P ga rim nt iti an ve, d M Ru id- stic Ce , ntu ry

NOV. 11-18, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

Man Killed by Alleged DUI Driver

R

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All Vendors Will Be Vaccinated or Tested prior to show

N OV 19, 20 & 21 Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Masks Are Required

at the Earl Warren Showgrounds 3400 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, CA

$5 Senior (62+)•Child (Under 12 Free) • Free Parking! (One time purchase applies to all 3 days)

www.calmantiqueshows.com•(805) 687-7023 or (805) 453-6426 •arthede@cox.net

etired UCSB administrator Steve Carlson was killed in a headon car collision on West Carrillo Street Sunday night after an allegedly drunk driver reportedly drifted into oncoming traffic at high speed without his headlights on. The Santa Barbara Police Department received numerous reports of a serious traffic collision WRECKAGE: Sunday’s fatal head-on collision occurred on West Carrillo on West Carrillo Street Street near Miramonte Drive. near Miramonte Drive. Two Both drivers were taken to the hospital vehicles had collided head-on, a red Nissan sedan and a Mercedes sedan. Both drivers to be treated for their injuries, but Carlson were the only occupants of their vehicles, succumbed to his injuries and was proand both needed to be extricated by the nounced dead several hours after the colSanta Barbara City Fire Department. lision occurred. Officers discovered the red Nissan sedan, Officers believe Lopez Jr. was under the driven by 24-year-old Santa Barbara resi- influence of alcohol, according to Sergeant dent Jose Fermin Lopez Jr., was traveling Ethan Ragsdale, public information officer west on West Carrillo Street at a high rate for the Santa Barbara Police Department. of speed and without headlights on. It is Lopez is suspected of being at fault for the believed Lopez’s vehicle drifted into the lane collision, was placed under arrest, and will of oncoming traffic. Carlson was driving the be booked in the Santa Barbara County Jail Mercedes sedan east on West Carrillo Street pending his release from the hospital. Lopez at that time. Lopez’s vehicle collided head- is being charged with DUI causing death and vehicular manslaughter. —Indy Staff on with Carlson’s. SB PD

To Benefit

DOWNTOWN

HUNGRY FOR THE HOLIDAYS? Provide healthy food to our neighbors in need this winter

T

he 15-member State Street Advisory Committee (SSAC) is raring to go and shape the future of Santa Barbara’s downtown, chair Dave Davis told the City Council this Tuesday in an update on the new group’s efforts. “The team is a committee of horses ready to run,” he said. “It’s hard to hold them back and not let them get too far ahead of themselves.” The SSAC has met three times thus far, the council heard from city staff, first to hammer out their guiding objectives — E R I C K M A DR I D

GIVING TUESDAY is November 30

State Street Committee Marches On

(but you can donate today!) Your donation will be DOUBLED thanks to

mainly to reimagine and create a clean and exciting downtown space; bolster the business community and attract both tourists and locals to State Street retail; and take a more holistic approach to evaluating transportation, housing, office space, homelessness, and the COVID-19 pandemic response along the commercial corridor. More recently, the committee studied 10 promenade master plans from communi-

generous matching grants!

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ties around the world, and, based on those examples, expressed an interest in “using a cohesive design vocabulary, providing civic anchors, creating sidewalk uniformity, and designing an environment with unobstructed storefront views,” staff said. The members also commented that the State Street Master Plan should emphasize a safe and inviting pedestrian experience, include a 24-hour district, and be grounded in the uniqueness of the city. While Davis thanked staff for their support through the early process, he resisted suggestions by the council that the committee start digging into smaller details of the promenade, including parklet design, parade routes, and specific block closures. Those decisions will come in time, Davis said, but right now the committee is concentrating on the bigger themes. “We can get bogged down in parklet design and umbrella colors, but if we go that direction, we’re going to lose focus on the big picture,” he said. Theirs is a major effort for the future of the economic vitality of the center of Santa Barbara, he explained. “We need to be focused, focused, focused to make sure we get that done.” The committee will meet again this January and present their continuing progress to the council soon after. Staff provided an admittedly ambitious deadline to complete the State Street Master Plan by the end of —Tyler Hayden 2023.


Funerary Mask. About 100-700 CE. Moche, Peru. Copper alloy, bone, muscovite. SBMA, Gift of Wright S. Ludington, 1960.2.

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D PUBLIC SAFETY

Fire Chiefs Unite to Create Their Own Dispatch Center by Nick Welsh

A

fter a marriage lasting 44 years now, the seven fire chiefs of Santa Barbara County have effectively finalized their divorce decree from the Santa Barbara County Sheriffs’ unified dispatch Sheriff Bill Brown (left) and County Fire Chief Mark Hartwig center, arguing they can provide faster, more efficient dispatch dispatched to the scene, regardless of the services by working as one team. By a vote of agency. 5-0 this Tuesday, the Santa Barbara County Under the current system, many — but not all — calls for service go to the Sheriff ’s Supervisors agreed. Tuesday’s proceedings were dramatic. joint dispatch center. Some go to the CHP Sheriff Bill Brown vehemently opposed the instead, and some go to the one of the other creation of the new Regional Fire Dispatch five dispatch centers currently run by variCenter, insisting the current system worked ous law enforcement agencies. Countywide, exceptionally well and that it would cost the there are now six such dispatch centers. fire agencies $11 million to build the new Not all calls get sent to the right dispatch center and $5 million a year to operate it. center. And sometimes, the “right” agency Worse, he said, it would also delay dispatch doesn’t have the closest engine. Sometimes, times by at least 58 seconds. multiple engines are dispatched to a simple Relations between the five county super- medical call — as well as an ambulance and visors and the sheriff, who is about to run a law enforcement vehicle — when only one for his fifth term, are as rocky as they’ve would suffice. ever been. North County Supervisor Steve On occasion, this can end badly. Two Lavagnino took offense that Brown argued weeks ago, a woman in her nineties reportagainst the cost of a new dispatch center edly suffered a heart attack at a popular reswhen the supervisors had already invested taurant on Coast Village Road; multiple calls $100 million in Brown’s new North County were required before the right responding jail and committed another $25 million agency was notified, and it didn’t help that to fix up the existing South County jail. the reporting party misidentified the locaLavagnino noted that despite some opposi- tion and had language issues. In this case, tion, the supervisors approved it anyway the woman reportedly died. The circumbecause it was necessary. stances of her death, reportedly, are being Supervisor Gregg Hart said — with bitter investigated. irony — that Brown’s deputies had already Montecito Fire Chief Kevin Taylor called gone $1.2 million over budget for overtime the new program “a force multiplier.” Chris costs this year. Supervisors Bob Nelson and Mailes, fire chief for the City of Santa BarDas Williams both noted the fire chiefs had bara, agreed, saying the new borderless expressed concerns about the current dis- approach would transform Santa Barbara patch center four years ago but Brown had from a department with eight fire houses failed to address the issues. Now, Williams to one with 11. Although the new borderless said, seven fire chiefs were sitting in the approach will require an automatic handoff supervisors’ chambers Tuesday who had all from the Sheriff ’s existing dispatch system agreed to assume the pro rata share of the to the new Regional Fire Dispatch Center, additional costs required for the new center. Mailes and Taylor both stated there will be And, Supervisor Hart added, all but one of a net amount of time saved. Though Sheriff the city councils overseeing these fire agen- Brown adamantly disputed this, Mailes estimated it could save as much as two minutes cies had voted in favor of the change. The new center would operate some- and 30 seconds. Brown knew going into the meeting what thing called “borderless” dispatch. That means there would only be one fire and the outcome would be. He was proven corambulance dispatch center that will track rect. The new center is expected to take 30 the whereabouts of every single ambulance months of construction before it’s operaand fire engine in the county, except for tional. For the City of Santa Barbara, the Vandenberg Space Force Base’s fire service. price tag will be $756,00 a year. By contrast, When calls for service come in — about 70 Fire Chief Mailes said, the price tag for a percent being medical in nature and about new fire station is about $3.5 million. “What 40 percent of those being serious to severe, we’re doing here,” Mailes added, “is going to n the closest engine and ambulance would be a 37-station fire department.”

COU RTESY

Claim They Can Be Faster, More Efficient by Splitting from Sheriff

ART MATTERS LECTURE Power and Metals: Regalia of the Moche of ancient Perú Alicia Boswell Assistant Professor, History of Art and Architecture, University of California, Santa Barbara

t h u r s d ay, d e c e m b e r 2 , 5 : 3 0 p m p t Mary Craig Auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art Unlike Old World societies, where metallurgical technology developed in response to the demand for utilitarian goods, in the ancient Andes, gold, silver, and copper alloys were used to create regalia worn by elites. These objects lended authority and power to those that wore them—in life and death. This lecture will discuss the role of regalia in the Moche world, a society that thrived on what today is the north coast of Peru in the first millennium. For this in-person event attendance is limited to 50. Please visit www.sbma.net/visit/planyourtrip for more information about the Museum’s mask and proof of vaccination policies.

Single tickets: $10 SBMA Members/$15 Non-Members Free to students with valid ID & Museum Circle Members Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desk in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters

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NOV. 11-18, 2021

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Ring in the Holiday Season with AWC-SB Wednesday, December 1st 5 - 7:30 p.m. at Villa Wine Bar 618 Anacapa Street #A, Santa Barbara The Association for Women in Communications will be honoring Kristen Schwarz with the Lois Phillips Founder’s Award and Amy Marie Orozco as AWC-SB Member of the Year.

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION: Mayor Cathy Murillo took part in the city’s Ordinance Committee, which is trying to get ahead of the new state housing law that takes effect January 1.

City Planners Wrestle with New Housing Law Planning Division Crafting Ordinance to Meet New Senate Bill 9 Requirements by Jean Yamamura ince Governor Newsom signed Senate Bill 9 a month ago, the City of Santa Barbara’s planning division has been crafting a new ordinance to take the requirement that doubles the housing on a single-residence lot and turn it into something palatable for the city’s geography, environment, and historic districts. And the deadline is January 1, 2022, when SB 9 goes into effect. The bill’s author, State Senator Toni Atkins of San Diego, when she introduced the bill in April, wrote that allowing a homeowner to more easily build a duplex or subdivide their lot gave more options “for families to maintain and build intergenerational wealth—a currency we know is crucial to combatting inequity and creating social mobility.” The goal was “a modest unit on their property so that their aging parent or adult child can have an affordable place to live.” Like the accessory dwelling unit (ADU), or granny flat, ordinance that preceded it, this one would also be ministerial, or a project approved by city staff if it stayed within the rules. The Ordinance Committee met on Tuesday to review those rules, which come under two categories: One would build a second primary residence on a single lot; the other would split a single lot into two. Councilmember Kristen Sneddon, who represents the Riviera neighborhood, wanted to make sure the high-fire-hazard zones among the foothills were exempt in the city’s pending ordinance, which they are due to evacuation issues. The issue then arose whether other high-fire areas, such as along the Mesa, would be exempted. The committee, which was composed of Sneddon, Mayor Cathy Murillo, and Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez, decided to let the council weigh in on it, when the Mesa’s representative, Mike Jordan, would be present. That hearing is set for December 7. Another question had come from the Planning Commission, which was whether

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to make any second home built on one property a moderate-income one in the inland zone. Though Murillo was opposed to a standard that would limit building more housing, she agreed to let the council decide this one, too. The new Santa Barbara rules guide height (24 feet for a two-story) and size—a minimum of 220 square feet for a studio, and between 400 and 1,200 square feet for larger homes, depending on lot size—and adds a creek setback of 35 feet at the top of a bank. Senior planner Renee Brooke explained the city had no explicit waterway setback, except for 25 feet at Mission Creek, although 35-100 feet exists for the coastal zone, and she thought the minimum was logical to apply to the new regulations. For people who understand the coastal zone rules, they remain intact—except no public hearings may take place—and include a requirement that any new lot created by a split may not be smaller than the average size of the 20 closest lots. The city kept SB 9’s requirement that any new unit would be rented for 30 consecutive days, to avoid short-term, or vacation, rentals from springing up, and also the necessity for any applicant for a lot split to live in one of the homes for the next three years. To speed up writing the ordinance, planners also adopted the ADU design criteria, which attempt to match the new building to the old. Sneddon objected to the sameness this would impose, and Brooke said an amendment to the ordinance could always be made once it passed. While the intent of the ordinance is to add rental housing, it is possible to sell the split lots. Brooke also said that staff would keep track of the properties that were split under SB 9 in order to ensure a large one was not split a second time. The city won’t be able to meet the January 1 deadline, because of the 30 days allowed for a referendum for a public vote on the ordinance, so the city plans on an emergency ordinance n to carry the rules across the New Year.

ay Party d i l o


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

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EDUCATION

Childcare: A Necessity of Life

Care for Babies a Scarce but Needed Piece of Infrastructure

SAVIN PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

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by Jean Yamamura

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t took a global pandemic, but the attention given to parents who work and must find caregivers for their children just rose by $390 billion nationally. That’s the sum in President Joe Biden’s social infrastructure bill—even larger than the “roads and bridges” bill that passed on Monday— which appears headed for a reconciliation vote to pass a HEAD START: Lorraine Neenan, pictured in 2017, sits surrounded by children in the Head Start program, one of the longest-running childcare recalcitrant Congress. Add centers in Santa Barbara County. to that the $2 million the County of Santa Barbara pledged to put we would never have made it into childcare,” toward solving the problem from its por- said Gina Fischer, a member of Supervition of the American Rescue Plan, and the sor Joan Hartmann’s staff whose son just money finally seems to be matching the celebrated his first birthday. Countywide, need. The question now might be, what is the 5,500 parents who have children each year are in a similar dilemma. The “keep the best use for all that funding? Goleta Councilmember James Kyri- your distance” pandemic rules lowered the aco has stood out from the political crowd number of children in childcare centers, and because of his advocacy for childcare, some of them closed. The ones who stayed expressed at every forum during his run in open tried to keep all their staff, in part 2018 for City Council. Kyriaco has no chil- because they were essential workers but also dren, and he explained that former Santa because getting trained, certified, educated Barbara councilmember Roger Horton caregivers is essential to good care. And that had introduced him to the local childcare raises the question, what do children need, network. But the main reason he began to especially babies? Consistent caregivers and a warm volunteer with the Children’s Resource and Referral Center and the Community Action response to a baby’s distress, responded Commission is because he knows about the Lorraine Neenan, director of Children’s issue firsthand. His mother was a single par- Services for CommUnify, the new name ent who sometimes had to work two jobs. for the Community Action Commission, He recalled having really nice caregivers and which has run Head Start in the county for also indifferent caregivers who “were kind of 55 years. “Then a baby feels safe, and they mean,” he said matter-of-factly. “Between learn to trust adults to meet their needs,” she my personal lived experience and volun- said. They relax, learn social skills, language, teer work, when I started to run for office, and “stretch their physical boundaries and I knew we needed to make sure cities could become strong.” do more to put children and youth in the Keeping the staff at Head Start, the fedcenter of policy making.” erally funded pre-K program that serves Children younger than age 17 make up 900 children in the county, concerned about 22 percent of the county’s population, Neenan, who expects the federal vaccine and 16,000 of them aren’t in kindergarten mandate at the end of the year to decimate yet. The greatest need for care has always her ranks. The program is already underbeen for infants and toddlers because once staffed, Neenan said, and she estimated that mothers are out of the 14-week maternity as much as 15 percent of her 250-member leave period paid by their disability insur- workforce will want to wait on the shot. ance, most go back to work. As Ildi Palmer Santa Barbara has a couple of options in explained it, one adult may only care for training for childcare. City College offers an three or four infants compared to six to 14 early childhood education degree, UCSB older kids. Her in-home care center, called has programs in education, and both have Under the Orange Tree, experienced the childcare centers. Once childcare employees highs and lows of the pandemic, closing obtain a bachelor’s degree, Neenan said, they several times for what turned out to be the tend to gravitate to school districts, which sniffles. She and her assistant, whom she offer better wages and benefits. “It’s a historidoesn’t want to lose, are taking care of two cally underpaid job,” she said. Families have also reacted to the panvery small children who benefit from all the demic: Parents stayed home with their kids, adult attention to every gurgle and yowp. “If I hadn’t listened to my coworkers and employers created flexible work hours, enrolled on a waitlist when I got pregnant, and health concerns or finances may have

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The New Library Plaza

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CHILD PASSENGER SAFETY TECHNICIAN TRAINING November 16–20, 2021

FREE Seat Check Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

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Schedule: Tuesday through Saturday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. You must attend the entire course. Fee: $95 paid to Safe Kids Worldwide. Class Details: Course materials are included with registration fee. Lunch is not included and is on your own each day. Registrants will receive a refund according to Safe Kids Worldwide Policy. Class is limited to 20 participants.

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Seat Check Saturday • Install child restraint systems (CRS) in

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• Professionals involved with children and their families • Staff members at community organizations working with families and children • Firefighters and law enforcement

multiple types of vehicles Teach others how to install CRS in their vehicles Teach others how to restrain children in motor vehicles, buses and ambulances

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Vehicles will be inspected on a first-come,issues first-served • Pre-hospital providers related basis. to child passenger safety • Daycare providers

• Serve as a resource to the community and For more information, please call Trauma Services at organizations relating to child passenger safety (805) 569-7451 or visit cottagehealth.org/seatcheck.

• Foster care agencies

Successful participants will become Nationally Certified Child Passenger COVID safety precautions will be in place. Masks required. For questions, please contact Safety Technicians. Mike Hennessey at carseat101@hotmail.com. Please be prepared to have your vehicle available to be used during the training. Wear comfortable clothes as you will be working in vehicles as well as the classroom. This course is physically demanding. 14

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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NOV. 11-18, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

CORONAVIRUS

‘No Way Are We at Herd Immunity’

by Jean Yamamura f you look at the pandemic in Santa Barbara County today, the case-rate curve has a shape similar to last summer’s, but it’s staying stubbornly higher in all respects. As for those known to have antibodies that add some level of immunity to this new disease, 276,895 people are fully vaccinated and 44,785 have survived a COVID infection. Dr. Henning Ansorg We asked the county’s health officer, Dr. Henning Ansorg, if we were approaching herd immunity yet Studies show that people with cleared and how to best protect ourselves if we infections have a huge variety of antibody weren’t. His answers are here, edited for responses. Some with mild disease had little antibody response. Age issues make things length. more complicated. Over the age of 65 — Have we reached herd immunity? In no some say 50 — people do not mount such way are we at herd immunity. If we were, strong immune responses after vaccination we would not see the amount of new because their immune system is weaker. infection all the time. Every virus leaves some natural immunity — some for life; So if you’re older, get a booster? Yes, and I some for half a year. That’s why we can recommend to anyone to at least get one get the common cold a couple times a shot. The studies show that even people year, and some of those are caused by who’ve had COVID, after the shot, they a coronavirus. They’re not known for have the most robust response so far. Mixing the shots doesn’t really matter. leaving a lasting immunity. The problem is that the virus — SARS- All three trigger an immune response to CoV-2 — has not been around long block the virus. It might matter for indienough. We don’t know which antibod- viduals, however. Some people have side effects to vaccines, and they should discuss ies confer immunity most reliably. with their doctor which is best on the perCan you explain what you mean? The vac- sonal level. cines produce an antibody against the virus spike protein (anti-S), which the Can we assume a strong immune system is virus uses to attach to the cells in the good protection? It’s best not to get the nose or throat. If someone has a serious virus in the first place. There are treatcase of COVID, it will also trigger anti- ments that work, but it’s not just saving bodies against the nucleocapsid protein your life; it’s saving your lungs. Some now (anti-N), which is inside the virus, not have chronic lung disease; their life has changed. on the surface like the spike protein. There is some fear of the vaccine, and The tests you can buy give a positive or negative; they don’t tell you if it’s a it varies depending on where people get high or low level. Studies are being done their information. When people say they do on this, because it’s very important to their own research on Google, I have to say, have a good answer. Is it maybe the ratio “That is not research.” It’s hard work to do between anti-N and anti-S? Is it a combi- research; to read and understand research nation? We don’t really know yet. requires a degree and tenacity. I’m sorry, To complicate it even more, the but it’s as if they’ve done research on Google immunity that is even more powerful is for a colonoscopy. Do you want them to do cellular antibodies. These are conferred your colonoscopy? from T cells, and they create a whole But there’s a reason people look on the cascade of immune responses driven by internet. Science is slow; the pandemic is cell function that clear the virus from fast, faster than us and faster than research. the body. We are always lagging behind. With viruses that we’ve known for a As a public health officer, I get scolded, long time, such as Hepatitis B, we know “You don’t have any data for these meathe level of antibody titer [concentra- sures.” At the same time, they turn it against tion] that means you need a booster shot, me if I have data — then the data is not though it can vary from person to per- valid. So which one is it? Do you trust scison. This is not yet the case with COVID. ence, or do you not trust science? I can’t It is a more complex virus. make it right for some people. It’s hard. n

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ER IC K M ADR I D

A Conversation with Public Health Officer Dr. Henning Ansorg

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

NOV. 11-18, 2021 INFRASTRUCTURE

CHILDCARE CONT’D FROM P. 13

T

he competition for federal grants just got a big breath of fresh air with President Joe Biden’s signing of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act on Monday. It promises to bring some exciting projects to life in Santa Barbara County, like new fiber technology high-speed broadband from Cuyama to the Chumash reservation that has long been needed, filling in the zero-emission gaps between Ventura and San Luis Obispo, and getting the last two and a half miles of the Highway 101 project funded and completed, described Lauren Bianchi Klemann, spokesperVICTORY LAP: S.B. Congressmember Salud Carbajal son for the Santa Barbara County Association of joined President Biden at Monday’s signing ceremony for Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. Governments.. Joining President Biden at the signing ceremony on Monday for this much-anticipated gram to reduce energy costs. Santa Barbara’s air“roads and bridges” bill was Santa Barbara Con- port is looking forward to the possibilities, said gressmember Salud Carbajal, who called it a once- spokesperson Deanna Zachrisson, as it has elecin-a-generation investment to improve every tric shuttles to transport passengers between the American’s quality of life. Locally, “It will provide economy parking lot on Hollister and the terminal funding the Central Coast needs to expand inter- on its wish list. net connectivity, fix dilapidated roads and bridges, According to the White House, the $1.2 trillion and improve our public transit and clean water in the bill will add about two million jobs per infrastructure,” Carbajal said. year across the coming decade as the projects get Not to be confused with the slightly larger underway. Investments in clean energy transmissocial infrastructure bill — which Democrats are sion and the infrastructure to support electric targeting to pass through the reconciliation pro- vehicles — with resources for more electric school cess — this bill provides $25.3 billion for Califor- and public transportation buses in the package nia’s federal-aid highway programs, $9.45 billion — are part of the monumental bill, not only in its to the state for public transportation over the next size but also in the fact that 13 Republicans in the five years, $1.5 billion to California for airports, House and 19 in the Senate voted for it. MersoLabs-November HLV Indy Print 9.375x6.166.pdf 1 10/29/21 2:33 PM and $8.5 billion in a national weatherization pro—Jean Yamamura

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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caused families to lean away from childcare, considered the next highest cost after housing in the county, the equivalent of college tuition at some private childcare CHILDCARE ADVOCATE: James Kyriaco has advocated for providers. The childcare even before he ran for Goleta City Council, wanting United Way estiother kids to have better experiences than he did when his mates a family mother, Maradee Turnbull, had to work full-time. with two pre-kindergartners must earn $100,000 just Kyriaco observed in West Sacrato make ends meet. mento. His dream is to emulate San “COVID has affected the whole, Antonio, which funded four affordentire childcare industry. We just able, attractive childcare centers don’t know what the need is right with a one-eighth of a cent sales tax, now,” said Michelle Robertson, dep- creating a buzz around the value of uty director of First 5 Santa Barbara good childcare providers. County, which coordinates about $3 “I like to say that the lack of access million in funding for early educa- to affordable quality childcare in tion from California’s Proposition 10 Santa Barbara County is a probtobacco tax. She said First 5 planned lem that has been hiding in plain to follow Goleta and Santa Barbara’s sight,” Kyriaco commented, blamlead in surveying residents to find ing the decades-long problem on a out how the access or lack of access lack of awareness, political will, and resources. The connections were to childcare is affecting their lives. Kyriaco has worked to encourage aligning locally and even federally more childcare options in Goleta. “for the first time that I can recall,” The city has made it simpler to get he said. “I am really excited about childcare permits in more zoning what we may be able to accomplish.” areas, which was a working idea n

COU RTESY PHOTOS

COU RTESY

What Does Infrastructure Bill Mean for S.B.?


OPINIONS CONT’D

DAVE WHAMOND

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Ducking the Test

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t is outrageous that any deputy sheriff is acting as if they are above the vaccination ordinance, which is a law. Which other rules do they believe don’t apply to them? Until they can comply, they should not be on the streets putting the public at risk. Put them all on unpaid leave; we can do without guntoting scofflaws. —Martha Peyton, S.B.

End of the Road?

A

pparently, there is a contest between the Santa Barbara and Goleta city governments to see whether Santa Barbara can refuse to repair East Gutierrez Street and their part of the Fairview overpass longer than Goleta can refuse to repair South Kellogg Avenue and Hollister Avenue from Kinman to Ward Drive. (Santa Barbara apparently controls that part of Fairview along with the airport property north of Hollister.) The explanation I’ve heard is that those streets are part of larger repair projects to be done in the future, so it would be more expensive to repair them separately now, meaning, I assume, more expensive to the city budget. But our councilmembers seem to have forgotten that the actual money is provided by the people, not the budget. And having the streets in this condition for another year or two costs the people more, in the form of damage to the tens of thousands of cars that pass over those streets every day. Maybe they didn’t have time to think of this because they were busy “fixing” many streets that weren’t in as poor condition. Oh, wait, I just realized it might be a scientific experiment to see which of those streets will be the first to deteriorate into being just a gravel road. That’s it, a science experiment. I should have thought of that before. Sorry to —Paul Rubin, Goleta have taken your time.

Schools Chagrin

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t is shameful to me, as a proud member of the Santa Barbara community, to know there are members of our community who feel emboldened to behave in an aggressive and threatening manner at local school board meetings. After more than 30 years’ experience working closely with every school district in the area, to hear of the personal attacks made against duly elected members of a school district requires expressing my voice. I know these board members, in various contexts over time. I have come before them to express my ideas, not always successfully. I have been disappointed on a few occasions due to decisions they made, but I respect their sincere efforts to serve Santa Barbara students’ best interests. I am appalled at the lack of respect given to them as elected officials serving the children and families of Santa Barbara and the breakdown of civility on the part of angry citizens. Members of the public have every right to express ideas that counter the decisions made by the board in a thoughtful, respectful manner. No one has the right to harass or threaten the personal lives of the legitimate, duly elected officers of the board. We are an extraordinarily fortunate community to have dedicated educators among our elected board members. I am grateful for their service, as we should all be, whether we agree with them or not.

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Too Low

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t is about time a social worker is employed to help the homeless people at the Central Library. The salary of $56,000 is vastly underfunded, however. Considering the schooling, licensing, and costs of living in Santa Barbara, I would expect that the social worker salary with benefits would exceed at least $80,000 to start. We need to put our money where our values are. —Betsy Gallery, S.B.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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obituaries Michael Harvey Peter Friedman 1/27/1945 - 10/18/2021

Michael Harvey Peter Friedman was born in Blackpool, England, to Jewish parents who fled Austria to escape the Holocaust. The fact that his parents had survived the Nazis informed Michael’s whole life. Michael’s family emigrated to America and settled in New York City. Six years later, his father, who was a photographer and dreamer, died from MS when Michael was nine. His memories of his father were few, but the two adored each other. His mother, Regina Birenbaum, remarried when Michael was 12, and his stepfather, Theodor Schneider, worked for TWA, enabling the family to travel the world for free. A geeky kid with big, wild hair, Michael did not share the orthodox leanings of his family. Later, when he moved to Santa Barbara, he was very involved with a Jewish singles group, and when he married Karen Krulevitch, they enjoyed celebrating the Jewish holidays together. In his 20s, Michael held a number of odd jobs, including working at a steak and brew house in NYC. He admits he was a terrible waiter, but he loved the camaraderie with the young staff and had fond memories of going out dancing till the wee hours after work. Michael earned an MFA in creative writing at Brooklyn College, during which time he and a few friends formed Zone Press, influential in the Lower East Side literary movement. He was also managing editor of Zone magazine. Taking a break from college, he traveled to Europe to study Transcendental Meditation with Maharishi Mahesh. Back in the States, he co-wrote a screenplay in Santa Barbara, then went to Berkeley to live the political upheavals, social experiments and music of the times. A budding hippie, he sold hot pretzels from a cart on Telegraph Avenue and split the rent of $175/month with friends. Ah, the sixties! Fascinated by computers, Michael became one of the first 18

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technical writers. At the height of his career he managed a team of tech writers, but when the small company was sold, the workplace climate changed and he was no longer happy. He had planned to stay till his retirement but was in some ways relieved when he was laid off in his mid-sixties. Overqualified and over age for most jobs in his field, Michael decided to focus on his photography and began writing a second novel. The Upstairs Girls, a two-volume, erotic fantasy set in both San Francisco and Ausonia (an alternative universe of sexy, cunning, Dryads) took seven years to complete and emerged as the crowning artistic achievement of his life. Michael met his future wife, Karen, in the late nineties. They were married in 2002 on what he called “the happiest day of my life.” About ten years ago Michael began to experience debilitating symptoms, eventually diagnosed as Parkinson’s Disease. His health continued to decline, and he finally succumbed to an undiagnosed kidney infection that went septic. He was too weak to fight the systemic breakdown and was moved from Cottage Hospital to Serenity House, where he passed away. Michael was a sweet, kind man, a good listener, a loving husband, a great friend. He was an avid reader, a soul searcher, who engaged in longterm therapy and participated in numerous men’s groups and drum circles. He loved cats, good food, wine, the Yankees, and most especially, his wife Karen and their life together. He died at age 76, much sooner than Karen expected him to go, but significantly longer than he himself always imagined he would live. Because they spent their life savings on private caregivers to keep Michael at home, he is leaving behind a large amount of debt. If you wish to donate to help with these costs, there is a Go Fund Me account online. There will also be a celebration of Michael’s life around his birthday on January 27th, which Karen invites all friends to attend. Please call 805-9677419 for information. Karen, their cat Willie, and all his friends miss Michael so much. Dear Michael, we hope your long and quiet suffering has ended. May your memory be a blessing.

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

Michael V. Wood

9/15/1966 - 10/27/2021

On Wednesday, October 27, 2021. Michael Wood, son of Vincent and Judy Wood passed away at the age of 55. Michael was born September 15, 1966 in Newport Beach, CA and lived there with his parents and siblings until 1971. That year he moved with his family to Santa Barbara, CA. Mike attended Cleveland School, Santa Barbara Jr. High and Santa Barbara High School. Motorcycle riding in the backcountry of Santa Barbara was always his favorite activity. On May 12, 1985 he was riding with friends near Pendola Ranger Station (Santa Barbara backcountry), where he was involved in a horrific accident with another motorcyclist. Mike suffered a traumatic brain injury that changed his life forever. After many years in and out of hospitals and rehabilitation centers he lived with his parents. In September 2006 Mike was transferred to Casa Colina Residential Facility in Apple Valley, CA. He remained living there until his death. Mike is survived by sisters Debbie Furnari (Mario), Santa Clarita and Kelly Silva, Goleta and brother Christopher Wood (Heather Danely) of Santa Ynez. Also surviving are nieces Alexandra Rodriguez (Scott), Michelle Rifkin (Garrett), Chloe Wood and nephew Brody Wood. Great-nieces Autumn and Ella Rodriguez as well as several aunts, uncles and cousins survive. Internment will take place at the SB Cemetery at a future date. The Wood Family would like to thank the staff at Casa Colina, Apple Valley for their outstanding care and making Mike’s life meaningful as possible. Donations in his memory may be sent to Jody House, 625 Chapala St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101.

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Leland McCormack Crawford, Jr. 7/10/1929 - 9/23/2021

On September 23, 2021, Leland McCormack Crawford, Jr. passed peacefully at home in Montecito. Family and caregivers were by his side. Leland, the youngest of three children, was born at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital on July 10, 1929. He spent his childhood riding bikes with his two sisters from the Santa Barbara Mission to the Montecito Country Club, the Coral Casino, Miramar Beach and the muni tennis courts. He later graduated from Santa Barbara High School and UC Berkeley, where he met his wife Francesca Jensen. He was an active Chi Phi fraternity brother and finished his law degree at UC Hastings. After serving in the U.S. Army, Leland practiced law for 52 years in Santa Barbara, 7 of those years in partnership with his father. Always civic minded, Leland served frequently as President of the board – – sometimes more than twice — for the following organizations: Rotary Club of Santa Barbara, The State Bar Associations of both Santa Barbara and CA, Casa Dorinda, Lobero Theatre, Montecito Retirement Association, Santa Barbara Mental Health Association, and the State of CA Mental Health Association. He served as a board member for the Boy Scouts of America, Kiwanis Club, Montecito YMCA, Santa Barbara Historical Society, and Valley Club, the latter his pride and joy for being one of its longest-term members. During their active and loving 63 years of marriage, Leland and Frani volunteered for Montecito’s Beautification Day and many other charities, played tennis and golf, danced, socialized with friends, family and organized golf trips all over the world. Leland read volumes of historical novels and books on US and world history, rarely missing the chance to debate history or current affairs. Never a dull moment be had when in his company. He shall be missed. Leland was predeceased by his mother Mae McCormack and his father Leland Morris Crawford;

his sisters Eleanor Cassedy and Elizabeth Fee; and his adoring, beloved wife Francesca Jensen Crawford, whom he finally joins to continue their eternity of love and friendship. Leland is survived by his devoted daughter Paula Emmens and her husband Bruce; son Leland M. Crawford III and his wife Stacey; granddaughter Sophia and her husband Dan Hennigan; grandson Robert Emmens. Services will be held at All Saints by the Sea Episcopal Church in Montecito on Tuesday, November 23 rd at 2pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Santa Barbara Mental Health Association and Santa Barbara Historical Society.

Shelby Catherine Brady 5/19/1972 - 11/4/2021

Shelby Catherine Brady was born at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital on May 19, 1972 to parents David C Brady and Helen Petrea Hammond. She is survived by her mother Helen Petrea Hammond and her stepfather Joe Pinero both of Santa Barbara, CA, her brother Zane C Brady, his wife Dawn M Brady and their children Ever and Holt of Santa Barbara, CA, her 1/2 brother on her fathers side Ty Brady of Houston, TX and her Aunt JoAnn Hammond and family of Salinas, CA. Shelby died November 4, 2021, after being struck by a vehicle while crossing the street in front of her home. Shelby attended Santa Barbara High School and graduated with the Class of 1992. She loved anything vintage and worked for years in vintage clothing and antique stores in Santa Barbara. She was very knowledgeable in both areas. She was quite artistic and did window decorating for businesses in Santa Barbara as well. Shelby was best known for her bubbly and generous personality and had many friends throughout her lifetime. She was very loved and will be greatly missed by us all. The family has chosen to postpone a celebration of life until after the new year.


In Memoriam

Esther Lau Gilbert 1957-2021

E

Generous Spirit, Much-Loved Soul

of the street. Even during her final battle with cancer, she focused on how fortunate she was, how much she loved her doctors, her treatment team, her family, her friends, her coworkers, and her husband, Willy. Willy was firmly entrenched at the top of that list. Esther Lau was born on April 18, 1957, in Hong Kong. She was the third of four children: Louisa, Lillian, Esther, and Luther. Their family of six lived in a 400-square-foot, one-bedroom apartment and shared a love of reading, music, and — big surprise — food. At the ripe old age of 14, Esther moved to Santa Barbara to live with her aunt and uncle’s family, who were Louisa’s godparents, and attend Dos Pueblos High School. She went on to major in French literature at UCSB with a minor in business administration. At this point, she spoke Cantonese, Mandarin, English, and French fluently. Later she would add “kitchen” Spanish and a healthy dose of Korean to the mix. Near the end of college, she was introduced to Tommy Chung by her sister Louisa and began working as a waitress at Jimmy’s Oriental Gardens. Here

COURTESY PHOTOS

BY N A N C Y N U F E R sther Lau Gilbert lived on the sunny side

Esther Lau Gilbert

to start her day. Esther adored Korean dramas, food shopping, the Minions (hers is a hearty collection of memorabilia), Cesar Milan, the color purple, dim sum, and her beloved cats. She had a series of schoolgirl “crushes” on Dennis Quaid, Harry Connick Jr., Robert Pattinson, and Cha Seung-won, her oppa. These were always sanctioned by Willy — for he knew they were merely poseurs. Esther and Willy traveled extensively, including trips to Santa Anita racetrack, Monterey Park, K-Town for barbecue, Maine (she had lobster every single day), Vegas, Ohio, Atlanta, Alaskan cruises (twice), the Mexican Riviera, Hong Kong, Korea, Australia, and Disneyland. Generosity was a guiding principle in Esther’s life. She loved buying gifts for family and friends—giving us a sense we were all part of her extended family—as WILLY NESTOR: Willy Gilbert and Esther Lau met at Jimmy’s Oriental presents were bestowed based on clues she Gardens, and the rest is history. picked up during conversation. Esther was she met William “Willy” Gilbert and the rest—as they an astute listener and magnanimous giver. say—is history. Before meeting the couple, one often This was particularly true when it came to food, heard happy stories associated with the phrase “Willy for Mrs. G. ranked among the finest chefs this world and Esther,” leading many to a common misconcep- has ever known. She cooked a banquet every Sunday tion that “Willy Nestor” must be the best darn human evening—a lavish spread that rivaled “Babette’s Feast” on the planet. And they would be right. —and would then pack up a bevy of to-go containers There are those who would depict Esther as a to be shared with her coworkers, Willy’s cohorts, and waitress and Willy as a bartender. But to reduce their a myriad of friends. impact to this description is akin to saying the Taj We commoners would be proud to pull off one of Mahal is a building. They were a universe unto them- those amazing dishes, but Esther never placed fewer than four photo-worthy food offerings on a table. Her selves, and we all wanted to be in their orbit. The summer of 1989, Esther began work at West- “dinner for four” would generally feed 16. mont College in the payroll department while conThere’s a cliché about a smile lighting up a room, tinuing to work evenings at Jimmy’s. A common and its genesis was Esther Gilbert. She was always declaration at Westmont was: If you have a question, generous with her smile and no-holds-barred laughEsther has the answer. Although her work was often ter, and it’s almost impossible to find a photo where demanding, she excelled at every task and loved— Esther doesn’t have her high-beam grin dazzling us. and was loved in return by—her coworkers. Although we know she’s in a better place, Esther Having two jobs spread across seven days meant has left behind a stadium of broken hearts. We will Esther didn’t have a full day off for many years. But look at her tractor-beam smile in pictures when our she continued at Jimmy’s until it closed its doors in late spirits flag and find comfort. And we shall honor her July 2006 because she was part of that “family,” and memory by trying to live a better life, based on the many of her customers became, and would remain, example she set for us. A memorial for a future date is being planned, and her dear friends. Esther’s life was guided by her faith, but she was in lieu of flowers, her family asks that donations be also a woman of many passions. She walked every made in her honor to the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, morning before work—rising when it was still dark cfsb.org. n

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Crispina Briones Irabon

Vincent Herrera

Crispina Briones Irabon was born on December 5, 1916, in Numancia, Aklan, Philippines. She was the eldest child who helped raise her eleven siblings, all born to Father, Luciano Briones Sr. and her Mother, Maria Leyson Briones. She passed peacefully on November 6th, 2021 at the age of 104 years and eleven months in Santa Barbara, California. She was surrounded by loving members of her family. Known to many as “Mama,” she would have reached her 105th birthday on December 5, 2021. Crispina married Jesus Ibardolaza Irabon in 1936 and they were blessed with six children, Edison, Rose, Winston, Beethoven (deceased), Racel, and Daisy. Throughout their 60-year marriage, she was blessed with 17 grandchildren and 35 great grandchildren. She was a scholar in college and a brilliant school teacher. After retiring in 1976, she immigrated to California and her husband followed two years later. Crispina and her husband first settled in Fremont, California. They eventually moved to Santa Barbara in 1983 to live with her youngest daughter, son-in-law, and their three children. Crispina was known for her gentle and quiet spirit, loving kindness, compassion, patience, and humility. She was very supportive of her children’s dreams and ambitions. She had a sincere, caring spirit, and her unconditional love was a constant source of support and inspiration to all her children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. A viewing and rosary will be held on Thursday, November 18 at 5pm at Welch Ryce Haider Chapel, 15 East Sola Street, Santa Barbara. A funeral mass will be held on Friday, November 19 at 10 am at St. Raphael Church, 5444 Hollister Avenue, Santa Barbara. She will be missed by all who knew her.

Beloved son, brother, godfather (Nino), uncle, and friend to many, Vincent “Vince” Herrera died after a brief illness on October 15, 2021. Vince was 59 years old and was born March 1, 1962 in Santa Barbara, CA. Vince had a generous heart filled with love and laughter. He had a fierce love for his family and would always protect those he loved. He enjoyed spending time with his family, especially his godchildren, nephews and nieces. He had many long-lasting friendships and considered many of his friends as his extended family. Vince was always at the center of family gatherings and always found a reason to get together. He was a fabulous cook and BBQ expert with a voracious appetite and sweet tooth. Vince could light up a room with his witty personality and infectious sense of humor. He always had a story to tell or a funny saying from a movie or cartoon to lighten the conversation. His memory will live on through his witty “Vince-isms” he shared with us. He was always accepting of others, giving words of wisdom, comforting advice without passing judgement. He loved being outdoors, going to the lake, fishing, camping, coaching his nieces sports teams, playing soccer, softball, and working out. Vince graduated from Carpinteria High School in 1980 and began his career as a machinist after high school. He was a talented manual machinist and held jobs in the Santa Barbara and Ventura communities. He met many people through work who often became life-long friends. He will be deeply missed by the many people whose lives he touched. Vince is survived by his parents Vicente and Maria Herrera; his sisters Betty and Rose (Mike); brothers Manuel (Michele) and Gerardo (Rosa); nieces Alix (Ryan), Briana, Amanda, Belen and Alina; nephews Adam (Rosana), Bryan (Cecilia) and Adriel; as well as a grand-niece and grand-nephews. Vince was preceded in death by his grandparents Manuel and

12/5/1916 - 11/6/2021

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3/1/1962 - 10/15/2021

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

Esperanza Murillo and Vicente and Luz Herrera. A funeral mass will be held on November 19 at 10 a.m., at Saint Joseph Catholic Church, 1532 Linden Avenue, followed by interment at Carpinteria Cemetery, 1501 Cravens Lane, and a Celebration of Life at Lions Park, 6197 Casitas Pass Road in Carpinteria. Broken Chain We little knew that day, God was going to call your name. In life we loved you dearly, In death, we do the same. It broke our hearts to lose you. You did not go alone. For part of us went with you, The day God called you home. You left us beautiful memories, Your love is still our guide. And although we cannot see you, You are always at our side. Our family chain is broken, And nothing seems the same, But as God calls us one by one, The chain will link again. Author: Ron Tranmer

Frank Osborne Sieh 6/5/1944- 11/1/2021

Frank Osborne Sieh was born June 5, 1944, to Rosemary and Edwin Sieh in Flushing, New York. The family relocated in his youth and Frank grew up in Torrance and Redondo Beach, CA. He passed away peacefully at home on November 1, 2021, in Ventura, California, surrounded by his family. Frank leaves behind his best friend, witty repartee partner, and devoted wife of nearly 50 years, Nancy. It didn’t matter how long they had been married, new acquaintances they met while traveling often assumed Frank and Nancy were newlyweds. Frank is additionally survived by his daughters Kathleen Sieh-Pirtle and Nicole Sieh, his sister Rosemary, his four grandchildren Christopher Pirtle (28), Kaelie Spencer (28), Tyler Pirtle (25), Keenan Duncan (14) and his loving dog Boo Bear. Frank attended the University of California at Berkeley earning first a bachelor’s degree in economics and then

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a Juris Doctor degree, three years later, from the Berkeley School of Law. His first position was as a Deputy District Attorney in the Ventura County District Attorney’s Office, the place where he was to meet Nancy. Frank left the DA’s office for private practice in civil law where his colleagues would remark “he is scrupulously honest and fair”, and “he conducts himself graciously, ethically and with wit and humor”. Frank served and gave generously of his time to many of the legal organizations in the County including the Ventura County Bar Association (secretary/treasurer, president), the Ventura County Trial Lawyers Association, California Trial Lawyers Association, Ventura County Family Law Bar Association, Ventura County Law Library, and County Counsels’ Association of California. He was also a member of the Board of Trustees of the Ventura and Santa Barbara Colleges of Law. Early in his career he also volunteered at the Ventura County Free Law Clinic. The latter part of his career was spent back in public service at the Ventura County Counsels’ Office where he joined as an Assistant County Counsel, two years later becoming Litigation Supervisor, then, after five years serving as Chief Assistant County Counsel, he assumed the responsibilities of County Counsel in 2001. He enjoyed the complexity and breadth of his work for the County. Throughout his professional career he was known for his “unquestioned integrity, high standards of fairness, respect for both colleagues and opponents, and commitment to the public interest”. In retirement Frank divided his time between volunteer work (Meals on Wheels, Docent for Channel Islands Marine Sanctuary, Volunteers in Policing), recreation (sailing, hiking, biking, and gym training), traveling with Nancy, and visiting his grandchildren. Frank was a longstanding member of the Ventura Yacht Club and subscribed to the view that the two happiest days in life are the day you buy a boat and the day you sell it. When sailing the Channel Islands waters amongst whales, sea lions, and dolphins, exploring the Rogue River with eagles and otter, or walking the grounds of the Living Desert Zoo and Gardens, Frank was in his element surrounded by

nature and wildlife, so long as there were no snakes nearby. Frank touched the lives of so many, and his departure is all too soon given the zest for life he demonstrated daily. Services are pending. When you have reached the mountain top, then you shall begin to climb. And when the earth shall claim your limbs, then shall you truly dance. -Gibran

Vojislav Srdanov 11/9/2021

Vojislav Srdanov, better known to his family as “Giga,” passed away on Tuesday, November 9th in Santa Barbara. His last days were filled with love, surrounded by his immediate family, sharing stories and listening to his favorite music. Giga lived his life unapologetically, without fear, and with deep compassion for everyone around him. He saw the world as it should be, and lived everyday as an example of that ideal. He had a deep love for literature, science, chess, the arts, travel, good wine, fishing, cooking for his family, and gardening. His most profound love, however, was for his beloved wife of 48 years, their three children and his three grandchildren. He was the most amazing grandfather, and spent as much time as he could showing them the creativity and beauty this world has to offer. Giga was born in Belgrade, Serbia and was a PhD of Physical Chemistry at the University of California Santa Barbara. He left his home country to pursue higher education in the US, but his heart always remained in Serbia. He travelled back frequently, and instilled a meaningful love for his culture within his children as well. Giga is survived by his wife, two children, three grandchildren, and countless friends from around the world. He will be missed for his zest for life, generosity, and his endless optimism. Volimo te Gigo.


obituaries Richard Robert Lopez 10/23/1937 - 11/7/2021

“Red”, born Richard Robert Lopez passed away peacefully, with his daughters by his side on November 7, 2021, after a short and sudden illness. Red was the first child born to Emma (Grand) and Robert Lopez, here in Santa Barbara on October 23, 1937. Growing up in Montecito and Santa Barbara with his four siblings, Red (nicknamed for his red hair) liked being outdoors and spending time with family. He attended local schools and after high school joined the U.S. Marine Corps. He played in the Marine Corps marching band (clarinet) and was their instrument mechanic and maintenance person. Once home from the Marine Corps, he began his 40 year career with the U.S. Post Office. He loved his job, and always went the extra mile, especially with the elderly. He would take time to read their mail to them, carry packages or help with unrelated needs. Red met his forever love, Barbara in 1964. Barbara was a single mom with three young daughters, all under the age of 5. Red quickly embraced the challenge of a ready made family, and loved those girls as if they were his own. Red had many hobbies through the years. He loved hunting with his dad and other relatives. We always knew when it was deer season! Best jerky ever!! Bartending at Toscan’s bar was a little side job he had, though we’re guessing it wasn’t like a job. He loved the atmosphere, joking around and seeing friends and family out, having a good time. Later he coached baseball for Goleta Valley South Little League. He met life long friends while coaching and was loved by all. As time went on he picked up the barbecuing bug, and did that for several years, on and off with a few close friends and family. The team of BBQers would change, but the catering remained the same. Have fun

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

while putting out a good meal for others to enjoy. He would boast about catering for the many different entertainers that came to town, and having backstage passes. Red liked to be where the action was. Red was always willing to help whenever needed, no questions asked. Red really shined as a caregiver. When Barbara started to show signs of dementia, Red was there, 24/7, anything she needed. Though being a caregiver is thankless and exhausting, Red never once complained. Red was by Barbara’s side every step of the way until her passing, in 2012. When Barbara died, Red was on his own, and determined to do life his way and by himself. Now with extra time on his hands he began to pitch in and help with his mom, which as time went on, turned into his daily routine until she passed earlier this year at the age of 103. Richard, very loved by his family, is survived by his three daughters, Cynthia Menegon (Cookie), Lisa De St Jean (Ken), Janice Placencia (David), Nine grandchildren, Robert, Rhea, Cassandra, Christopher, Steven, Jenna, Joseph, Hillary and Rebecca. He also had eleven great-grandchildren. Three siblings, Mary, Mike and Ron and their spouses, along with many nieces, nephews, cousins and inlaws. Richard was preceded in death by his wife Barbara Lopez, his father Robert Lopez, his mother Emma Lopez, his sister Bernice Romero and his nephew Robert Lopez. Red was one in a million, and will truly be missed. He always made light of a situation, looking for the bright side of things. Always had a joke and some sort of inwwformation he thought you should know. He always had a nickname for those closest to him, and loved wearing a good baseball cap. Mama hit the jackpot when she met Papa. He was the best father anyone could ever ask for. We were very blessed and knew it. The way in which he lived his life, with zest, dignity, grace, strength and courage is something to emulate. We love you Papa, you are our hero, may you rest peacefully. Say hi to Mama and please, always watch over us.

We’d like to thank Cottage MICU for accommodating us and caring for our dad. In lieu of flowers please donate to your favorite charity. Graveside services will be held Monday at 11:30 am, November 22, 2021 at Calvary Cemetery, 199 N. Hope Ave. Santa Barbara, Ca. 93110. This will be a casual dress service.

Cullen Thomas Griffin 7/31/1976 - 10/26/2021

Cullen Griffin passed away suddenly as the result of a car accident in Ramona, California, on October 26, 2021. Losing Cullen at the age of 45 is tragic and bewildering; he was very special to many people and will not be forgotten by those who knew and loved him. Those memories will surely inspire us to overcome our immense grief. Self-effacing and humble, Cullen would always downplay any achievements made or compliments paid to him. He probably would shrug off his own obituary, but words cannot begin to describe what a wonderful person he was. A more honest, forthright, and trustworthy man cannot be found. He was the ultimate team player, and we are blessed to have had him on our team! Cullen Thomas Griffin was born on July 31, 1976, at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, CA, to Thomas and Margaret (Marini) Griffin. Cullen attended Monroe Elementary School, La Cumbre JHS, and Bishop Diego HS, graduating in 1995. As a kid, he did all the wonderful things that Santa Barbara has to offer (except for cotillion, which his mother was always threatening to enroll him in). He was blessed with several close-knit friend groups from his time on the Mesa through high school. He loved the outdoors, beginning with annual camping trips to Kings Canyon, where his father taught him how to fish. This ultimately led to numerous backpacking

trips across the Sierra Nevada with his brother and friends. While in high school, Cullen played football and basketball, earning Santa Barbara News Press first team all-County honors his senior year in football. After high school, he attended Cal State Northridge and played football there, returning to Santa Barbara City College after one year. Being big, strong, and athletic, Cullen continued to play football at Santa Barbara City College and made the fateful decision to also join the track and field team. While on the track team, Cullen met the love of his life and future wife, Phoebe Pedersen. He still holds the all-time best hammer throw record at SBCC (the running joke being that there aren’t many people that throw the hammer for the SBCC track team). After Santa Barbara City College, Cullen attended Chapman University but decided his passions lay elsewhere and enlisted in the Navy in 2001. He faithfully served, both active duty and as a reservist, for over 20 years, including a tour in Afghanistan in 2011 as a Corpsman (medic) with the Marines. Phoebe joined Cullen while he was stationed in Guam. They lived in a staff apartment at the Alupang hotel where they could literally fish the ocean from their kitchen window. They were married on the beach in Guam, in a small ceremony attended by family, on July 31, 2005. While in the reserves, Cullen and Phoebe relocated to Houston, Texas. Cullen worked as a paramedic fireman for the City of Houston for seven years. Their sons Thor and Titus were born during this time. Though he was busy as a paramedic, Cullen could not refuse to accept a side job to be one of the primary caregivers for George Herbert Walker Bush. (Actually, he did refuse at first, thankfully Phoebe talked some sense into him). He described his job duties as ‘making the President his 5:00 Martini and swapping war stories.’ Still, he ended up becoming a trusted and integral part of the President’s support team for two

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and a half years, leaving his positions only when they as a family decided to relocate to Kodiak, Alaska. Kodiak offered them and their boys the great outdoors, and Phoebe worked as a speech pathologist for the local school district while Cullen cared for kids and was part of the volunteer Fire Department and picked up hunting. He returned to active military duty when he was called up from the Reserves as part of the Navy’s medical screening response to the Covid-19 Pandemic and was on active duty at the time of his passing. Cullen was pre-deceased by his mother Margaret and is survived by his wife Phoebe Griffin, sons Thor and Titus, father Tom, brother Matt (Jennifer), and numerous cousins, aunts, uncles, nieces, and nephews. A burial service will be held Monday, December 13, 1:00 PM, at the Santa Barbara Cemetery Association, followed by a 3:00 PM celebration of life at the Palm Park Beach House, 236 E. Cabrillo Blvd.

Deborah H Winant (De’) 6/15/1919 - 11/5/2021

De’ was born in Amsterdam, arriving in the US as a Jewish refugee in 1939. She met and married Karl Weininger (later Charles Winant) in 1943 at the University of Minnesota. She is survived by two children: Howard (a retired UCSB professor) and Terry (professor at CSU Fresno). She has three grandchildren and four grewat-grandchildren. A long life well-lived! Thank you De’!

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Opinions

‘I Told You So’ Dispelling the Myths CONT’D

voices

Surrounding Medical Cannabis

F

BY DR. DAVID BEARMAN

or most of my adult life, I’ve been

among the minority of medical professionals who claimed cannabis had a healthful and therapeutic use for our society. Most of my generation’s health professionals disagreed; some demonized the plant, and some believed outrageous propaganda and misinformation. But over the last 20 years, at least 100 South Coast physicians have referred patients to me for medical cannabis assessment and education. Thank you. Today, medical cannabis has been legalized throughout the world. We cannabinologists deserve a victory lap for helping dispel many cannabis myths. We live in a scientific age, and the therapeutic effects of the plant have been tested. They show why cannabis has been an accepted medicine for more than 4,000 years. It’s only relatively recently that petrochemical companies, religious zealots, and “the establishment” created myths to discourage the public from even trying cannabis. Myth #1: Cannabis medicine is brand new.

No, cannabis was not discovered in the ’60s by hippies or in the ’20s by jazz musicians. Cannabis has been a known medicine for millennia. It was the third most common ingredient in patent medicines and prescriptions at the turn of 19th century. In the 1920s, American doctors wrote two million to three million prescriptions containing cannabis per year. Significantly, in 1937, the American Medical Association testified against the Marijuana Tax Act, saying, “AMA knows of no dangers from the medical use of cannabis.” Myth #2: Cannabis is not safe. Cannabis is

very safe. Every major governmental study ever run has recommended legalization. In 1988, the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Chief Administrative Law Judge Francis Young, in his “Finding of Fact,” said cannabis was “one of the safest therapeutic agents known to man.” Myth #3: The bogus claim of brain damage.

Cannabis does not cause brain damage. It is neuroprotective. Numerous animal studies, especially those by Dr. Raphael Mechoulam and his lab at Hebrew University, demonstrate that the presence of cannabis in brain cells limits brain damage from stroke and traumatic brain injury. This myth likely resulted from some incredibly bad 1970s junk science. In one study, a researcher exposed monkeys to cannabis smoke in a small area and found no brain damage. The researcher then fitted the monkeys with gas masks and pumped in cannabis smoke. This dramatically limited the amount of oxygen available to the monkeys’ brains, which, of course, caused brain damage. This spurious research spread the myth that smoking cannabis led to irrevocable brain damage.

Myth #4: Cannabis is harmful to the fetus.

This is not even close to being true. A doctoral thesis by Ciara Torres Vargas, PhD, Columbia University, reviewed more than 30 studies of maternal cannabis use, which found the “totality of evidence suggests prenatal exposure to cannabis does not cause cognitive impairment.” A study done by Dr. Melanie Dreher, former Dean of the School of Nursing at Rush Medical School, documented that such children did better in school and reached their developmental landmarks sooner than children of non-smokers. Didn’t matter; anticannabis zealots continued to spread the lie that “pot” would hurt a mother’s baby.

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Myth #5: IQ. One of the most common arguments is that cannabis makes you stupid and lowers your IQ. Not true. Many variables affect IQ, among them home environment, illness, accident, diet, intellectual situation, use of alcohol, tobacco, and a host of other factors. One particularly interesting study was done by UCLA and University of Minnesota with several pairs of twins; one of whom used cannabis while the other did not — both ended up with the same IQ.

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Myth #6: Cannabis causes cancer. This is one

of the biggest false myths. We have known from both human and animal studies, starting with a 1974 study at the Medical College of Virginia, that cannabis kills cancer cells and drives many different cancers into remission. Myth #7: Cannabis is a gateway drug. No,

actually, cannabis is an exit drug and is an effective antidote to the opioid epidemic. Several states have approved cannabis for treatment of opiate use disorder, and numerous studies show its effectiveness. My patients who are alcoholic, one an AA member for more 30 years, have used cannabis to stay sober. For most of my professional medical life, I have looked at cannabis from a historical and medical point of view. My father was a pharmacist in a small town in Wisconsin and had attended the University of Minnesota School of Pharmacy. In 1928, when he was a freshman, he told me, they had an assignment to make tincture of cannabis. The irony was that he had to be very careful because the alcohol was illegal. I was told that my professional standing would be damaged if I continued to tell the truth about cannabis. This has been true of almost all doctors who have tried to use science to conquer prejudice. They have all used reason to overcome ignorance and fear. Today, we know the scientific reality about the health and therapeutic benefits of the plant. This new appreciation of the benefits of cannabis is widely understood by readers of the Independent. This acceptance gives me great pleasure and satisfaction. It’s nice after all these years to join so many of my medical and scientific colleges to say, “I told you so.” n

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C O V E R

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J E N N D E V E R E AU X

YOUNG ROCKER: Now a member of the world-famous Foo Fighters, Chris Shiflett loved heavy metal from a young age, as seen here wearing his legendary Randy Rhoads T-shirt.

SANTa BARbara’S Own FOo FIghtER T he extraordinary rock ’n’ roll journey of Chris Shiflett begins with a starry-eyed small-town boy who grew up to become the lead guitarist for one of the greatest bands of all time. That town is Santa Barbara, that band is the Foo Fighters, and their greatness was confirmed on October 30, when the band was inducted into the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame on the first year of their eligibility. As one of his closest and oldest friends, I’m here to tell you Shiflett’s story. It traces back to 1982, when an 11-year-old heavy-metal fan walked into Jensen Guitar & Music Co. on De la Vina Street for his first day of guitar lessons. Shiflett wanted to learn songs by such idols as Kiss and Ozzy Osbourne, but his teacher that day, Michael Frye, insisted on starting with the Beatles. So “Hey Jude” became the first song in Shiflett’s repertoire. Fast-forward nearly 40 years, and Shiflett is onstage next to the guy who wrote “Hey Jude,” watching Sir Paul McCartney induct him and his bandmates into the hallowed Rock ’n’ Roll Hall. McCartney’s speech drew parallels between his own career and that of Dave Grohl, who founded the Foo Fighters in 1994 following the suicide of his Nirvana bandmate Kurt Cobain. “Me, a teenage kid in Liverpool, just an ordinary kid in school like everybody else—one day, I fell into rock ’n’ roll, and suddenly the world changed. I joined a group, the Beatles,” said McCartney. “Dave did a similar kind of thing.

He joined a group: Nirvana.” And then Shiflett did the same, joining the Foo Fighters in 1999 at a time when the Santa Barbara native was considering leaving music altogether. Instead, he cemented his own place in rock history, joining the ranks of a band that’s sold more than 30 million copies of 10 albums (nine of which hit the Billboard Top 10, three of which were number one), and won 12 Grammy Awards. And the Foo Fighters are still punching, occupying a rarified air where, even a quarter century in, they remain a vital and ubiquitous force in pop culture, regularly selling out stadium shows worldwide. “There hasn’t been a day in the past 25 years that we haven’t had the Foo Fighters in regular rotation on KJEE,” said the Santa Barbara rock station’s music director Dave Hanacek, also a longtime friend of Shiflett. “Every flash-inthe-pan genre has come and gone, but the Foos have been mainstays despite never modifying their style to fit in.” Where does Shiflett fit into that mix, which also includes bassist Nate Mendel, drummer Taylor Hawkins, guitarist Pat Smear, and keyboardist Rami Jaffee? Take it from Grohl himself. “Chris is, without a doubt, the most accomplished musician in the band,” the Foo founder recently told Entertainment Weekly. “I don’t know what would have happened if he hadn’t joined.” When Shiflett got to the microphone in Cleveland’s Rocket Mortgage Fieldhouse Arena to deliver his acceptance speech last month, he first thanked his family and then turned attention to his Santa Barbara upbringing.

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ROCk ’n’ ROLl HALl OF FAME BY MA R KO D E S AN T I S

“I’ve got to say a big thanks to every single person I ever played in a band with at keg parties and dive bars,” said Shiflett, who cut his musical teeth at shows in Isla Vista driveways, Montecito backyards, and beer-soaked clubs on State Street. “If it wasn’t for you guys, I’d have never been ready in 1999, when I got the chance to try out for my favorite band, the Foo Fighters… . [That] turned into the last 22 years and this life that I never could have imagined.”

SALINAS STREET MEMORIES Chris Shiflett’s parents met while attending UCSB, and, like his two older brothers, Mike and Scott, he was born at Cottage Hospital. After moving around a bit, they settled on the Eastside of Santa Barbara in the summer of 1977, living in a house on Salinas Street and attending Cleveland Elementary. When their parents split, Dad moved north, Mom remarried, and the blended family— including stepbrother Steve “Stevo” Watson— moved to a small house on Castillo Street near Mission. The brothers recall music being the center of youth culture during that era. “Poring over records was a constant in our house for the three of us, each with our own areas of interest but all spilling together to form a well-balanced canvas of music,” said Scott, who plays bass in the punk band Face to Face. “Chris, being five years younger, took a little while to come around to playing an instrument, but rock ’n’ roll had firmly gripped us, so it was inevitable that he would follow suit. Once he did, we would show him our guitar licks and the techniques behind them.” Lessons from his brothers and Jensen gave Shiflett a strong base, impressing everyone from 5th-grade peers like Misha Feldmann— “When I first heard him play guitar,” recalled the Summercamp bassist, “I was already amazed

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PUNK UPSTARTS: The Lost Kittenz play Club Iguana back in the late 1980s, featuring, from left, Shiflett, Steve Sherlock, Luke Tierney, and this article’s author, Marko DeSantis. And below, the Rat Pack plays to a rowdy mosh pit at a driveway show in Isla Vista. Shiflett is playing bass in the upper right corner. at what this kid could do”— to Scott’s friends like Bill Armstrong, today the co-owner of SideOneDummy Records. “I visited their house, and in walks this long-haired kid,” he recalled. “He picked up a guitar and started playing some riffs. I thought to myself, ‘Does the talent ever end in this family?’” One of Shiflett’s first public performances was at Santa Barbara High School during a talent show, when his band— some of whom would eventually become Lost Kittenz— played two Kiss songs, “Strutter” and “Rock ’n’ Roll All Night.” Scott was “very impressed,” explaining, “He came out looking like a full-blown rock star, even holding his guitar behind his head to play the solo!” His friend Jeff Kirchmaier, who played drums in that seminal performance, still recalls it vividly. “That gig was the first one either of us had ever done, but it was in his blood, and you could see it,” he said. “It’s easy to say now that his life started that night.” By 1986, he was in a punk band called Legion of Doom, which was started by Mark Pananides, who first met Shiflett at Santa Barbara Junior High. “I considered him my arch-rival, but soon after that, we ran into each other at Jensen’s Music, where we were both taking guitar lessons, and we became friends,” said Pananides, who remembers opening for Excel, NOFX, and Rat Pack at the Golden Eagle Pool Hall on State Street, where Urban Outfitters is today. “It wasn’t too long after his own band Lost Kittenz began to play that his ‘it factor’ really began to reveal itself.”

He became a big part of the town’s burgeoning underground music scene, where people would play around town for free. “I went to shows at places like the Red Barn because those were the only places you could go with your friends and hang out,” said Shiflett. “Once my own bands started to play these events, it was the local approximation of making it big.” Looking back now, Shiflett recognizes how important it was to be soaked in the musical culture that Santa Barbara offered back then. His first concert was Dio at the Arlington in 1983, and he recalls other performances by Motörhead and WASP. Then older friends would drive him to Los Angeles to see bands like Poison, Faster Pussycat, and Guns N’ Roses playing clubs before they got record deals. “We would get there early in the day and soak up every detail, studying their gear, their sound check, their outfits, their work ethic,” said Shiflett, who grew his blond hair long and started wearing crazy clothes. “They made a real impression on me about what was possible.” Eventually, Lost Kittenz gained its own following and found its way into now-defunct State Street venues like Club Iguana, Carnival, The Savoy, and Noise Chamber, not to mention a couple of gigs in L.A. “We were lucky to live in a town that was just big enough to have places to play, but close enough to the music industry in Los Angeles to make it seem attainable,” said Shiflett. “I never felt like I had something special per se— we were part of a whole bunch of young musicians. But I knew from a pretty young age that playing music was the life path I wanted to commit to. Considering I flunked out of high school, my mom wasn’t happy that I was so tunnel-visioned on music, but in the long run, she understood.” “Chris was a unicorn when we were kids,” said Hanacek. “He already looked like a rock star, larger than life with long, bleached-blond hair and crazy clothes.” One of his earliest girlfriends, Melanie Garst, thought so too. “I keep going back to Chris and all you guys sitting at Carrows back in the ’80s, practicing your autographs!” she told me. “I knew it was not going to be in vain!”


FINding thE FOo In 1989, Shiflett moved to Hollywood with Lost Kittenz bandmate Luke Tierney, intent on taking their band to the big time. That didn’t happen, so Shiflett moved to San Francisco with Joey Cape, another Santa Barbara native who was the frontman for the popular punk band Lagwagon. Cape got Shiflett an office job with Lagwagon’s label, Fat Wreck Chords, which was owned by Fat Mike of NOFX. Soon after, another band on their roster, No Use for a Name, needed a guitarist, and Shiflett was in, learning 25 songs in three days. He played with No Use for almost five years at the peak of the 1990s punk-rock movement. He also joined Cape and Fat Mike as part of Me First and the Gimme Gimmes, a punk-rock supergroup cover band. “I can’t credit Mike and Joey enough for how much I learned about the process of making records by observing them in the studio,” he said. But Shiflett was approaching his late twenties, and the punkrock life was grueling. “I had a great run, but I could feel the air running out,” he explained. By 1999, Shiflett was signing up for junior college classes that didn’t involve music, figuring he needed a new career path. Meanwhile, his friend Bill Armstrong was working in the music business in Los Angeles and heard that Guns N’ Roses needed a guitarist. Shiflett declined the audition, but he mentioned to Armstrong that the Foo Fighters might be looking for a new guitarist as well. Armstrong agreed to reach out, but nothing came of it until a few months later. That’s when the Foo Fighters’ tour manager, Gus Brandt, reached out. “I met Chris on the very first Warped Tour in 1995,” said Brandt. “I remembered that he was nice and good at his craft. When I was asked to handle the auditions, he stuck out as someone who might fit into the Foo Fighter ecosystem. I slid his name into the mix.” Shiflett was hanging with friends in New York when he got the call from Brandt, and he immediately took a flight back to California. “I didn’t know what to expect, so I sat there in my bedroom and played along with the songs and learned them as best I could,” he said. “I had been a fan, their records frequently played in No Use’s tour van, and I saw them live a few times, including their 1996 show at the S.B. Bowl.” He drove down to L.A. for the audition on day two of a week’s worth of auditions. Arriving early, he could hear someone else in the studio, followed by what felt like an eternal silence. “I’m just psyching myself out, going, ‘Oh, fuck! They’re in there just vibing with whoever must’ve totally killed it.’ ” But when he walked in for his audition, Grohl’s first words were, “Oh my god, Chris, you saved us! That guy wouldn’t leave.” In addition to memorizing the four songs that he’d been sent, Shiflett learned the first two Foo Fighter records, including the backing vocals. They were impressed that he was the first one to sing during the audition. As they chatted, Grohl realized that he’d met Shiflett many years earlier at a punk show inside a Chinese restaurant on State Street in Santa Barbara. Grohl was playing with Scream, his band before Nirvana, and Shiflett was playing bass for the Santa Barbara punk band Rat Pack. “Dave has never confirmed this, but I think that random show we played together on State Street in the late ’80s was what distinguished me and sealed the deal,” said Shiflett. “We all come from similar socio-economic backgrounds, and most of us spent some time in punk bands, so it’s just kind of central to the character

‘ChRIS IS, wiTHOuT A douBT, THE moSt ACcompliSHEd muSiciAN IN THE band.’ —Dave Grohl

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of the band.” On the Foo documentary Back and Forth, Grohl agrees, explaining, “The fact that he was part of the underground punk scene was really important to me. Like, he’s gonna ‘get it’ … and he won’t take this shit for granted.” When Shiflett returned for a rigorous round of auditions, involving new songs and covers that he had to learn on the spot. After another day of auditioning, the band invited him to the bar in the lobby of the Sunset Marquis. After a few drinks, Shiflett was bold enough to ask whether this meant he got the job. “We’ll call you tomorrow,” they replied.

had never had my own hotel room ever in my life!”— and then Grohl took him guitar shopping the next day, buying two of every guitar that he wanted. Shiflett only had two to his name at that time; one was broken, and the other was the same Gibson Les Paul “Black Beauty” that he’d bought off a classmate for $450 on his 15th birthday. (That one is now in the Hall of Fame, displayed alongside the guitar of Shiflett’s hero Randy Rhoads, the heavy-metal legend who was also inducted this year.) Shiflett’s list of onstage highlights is a mile high, from selling out Wembley Stadium’s 86,000 seats two nights in a row to playing “Get Back” with McCartney at the Hall of Fame show last month. But he most fondly recalls playing “Detroit Rock City” with his Kiss idol Paul Stanley to record Alive II — “That was mental!”— and serving as a backup band for Mick Jagger on Saturday Night Live. Despite the Rolling Stones frontman saying he was gonna take it easy that night, Jagger went all out. “He would just be bouncing off the fucking walls,” said Shiflett. “He couldn’t not be Mick Jagger!” He’s proud of the Foo Fighters, but he hopes there are still generations of kids coming up that will carry the rock torch. “We always get tagged with being the last rock and roll band standing or whatever,” he said. “I think there’s some truth to that, but hopefully that’ll change.”

‘wE wErE lucky To livE INATowN THAt waS juSt big ENOugHTo havE pLACESTo pLAy, buT cLOSE ENOugHTo THE muSic INduStry IN LOSangELES To makE It SEEMAtTaINABlE.’ —Chris Shiflett He’d been sleeping on Armstrong’s couch, and he spent most of that Sunday sitting by the phone. Around 7 p.m., it rang, with Grohl and Hawkins both on the line. “You got the gig!” they said. “Get ready to say goodbye to your friends for a while.” Rehearsals started the next day, and their worldwide tour launched in a week. A proper rock-star treatment ensued. He moved into the Sunset Marquis— “I


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One Heart Center KITTENZ CREW: The Lost Kittenz circa 1986 featured, from left, Shiflett, Jeff Kirchmaier, Luke Tierney, and Misha Feldmann.

thE FIghtERS’ FutuRE These days, Shiflett lives with his Santa Barbara–raised wife, Cara Shiflett, and their three teenage sons in Los Angeles. But they keep a second house in their hometown, where they enjoy beach days and stay connected to close friends and family. “My kids help keep it real— at home, I’m just Dad,” said Shiflett, remembering with a laugh when he told his youngest son that he was going to be in the Hall of Fame. “That’s cool!” his son responded. “Hey, can you make me some eggs?” Between his family man and Foo Fighter obligations, Chris hosts a podcast called Walking the Floor, where he interviews musicians, writers, athletes, and artists. He also continues to make his own music, releasing several records over the years, including his 2017 release West Coast Town, whose title track is an ode to his halcyon days on Salinas Street and Leadbetter Beach on the Fourth of July, among other Santa Barbara nods. And he hasn’t forgotten where he learned to play guitar. During the pandemic, the Foo Fighters did an apparel fundraiser through Vans’ Foot the Bill small business relief program, donating all proceeds to a music store of the band’s choice. Shiflett got them to choose Jensen Guitar & Music Co., where his eldest brother, Mike Shiflett, still teaches guitar. “The entire run of shoes and shirts sold out, and we raised nearly $50,000 for Jensen’s,” said Shiflett. “I love that store.” Despite not being able to tour much, 2021 already features a number of Foo Fighter highlights: playing at President Joe Biden’s inauguration; releasing their 10th album, Medicine at Midnight; receiving the first-ever Global Icon Award at the MTV Awards; and headlining soldout post-lockdown shows at Madison Square Garden in New York City and the Forum in Los Angeles. And then, of course, the Hall of Fame. Up next is international touring, another solo album for Shiflett, and a new Foo project called Studio 666, a feature-length comedy horror movie, slated for a theatrical release in February.

The enthusiasm for Shiflett’s success is unbridled among those who rocked the Santa Barbara scene back in the 1980s and ’90s. “It feels like Chris brought the Santa Barbara music community along with him, as if we’ve all kinda been inducted into the Rock ’n’ Roll Hall of Fame,” said Nerf Herder’s Steve Sherlock, who also played in Lost Kittenz. Tierney, who went on to his own composing

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HOw tO kEEp ROCkin’ HALL OF FAME SHOW: The 2021 Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony, which occurred on October 30, will air on Saturday, November 20, 8 p.m., on HBO and be simulcast on SiriusXM Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Radio. It will be available on demand via HBO starting November 21.

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CHRIS SHIFLETT LIVE: Chris Shiflett will perform with his own band on December 30 at SOhO. See sohosb.com for tickets. MORE INFO: See chrisshiflettmusic.com and foofighters.com. career after the Lost Kittenz faded, is also fired up. “Chris took the ball all the way to the end zone,” he said. “I am so proud and a bit righteous about the fact that one of our own got to spike said ball and do a much-earned touchdown dance.” Mike Shiflett couldn’t be more excited for his younger brother’s success. “The whole family is so proud and amazed at his accomplishments,” he said. “He has always been blessed with great ability, courage, and a generous and giving heart. If I had anything to do with what he’s done, I’m extremely honored!” Shiflett gives strong credit to his Santa Barbara upbringing for setting him on this amazing trajectory, explaining, “I’m proud of where I come from and never wanted to forget it.”

sbhra.org/events

Marko DeSantis is a music professional and member of the bands Sugarcult and Bad Astronaut. He also played in Popsicko and the Ataris, and together with Chris Shiflett in Lost Kittenz from 1988 to 1991. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 TONIGHT

DEC 3

Brett Dennen See the World Tour with Sophia Boro

With a successful string of albums and four Top Ten AAA singles, Dennen has cemented himself as a fixture in American folk music. The singer/songwriter is intent on exploring the world and examining himself in the process. Hence, See The World.

TOMORROW

John Craigie

ONES TO WATCH PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

Paul Thorn & Band

#KeepItWarm2021 Tour with special guest Chris Pureka

NOV 18

NOV 19

NOV 20

NOV 23

DEC 7 “Few modern voices are as powerful as Marc Broussard’s soulful bayou-bred baritone.” – The Washington Times

An Evening with

Marc Broussard

KERRY IRISH PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

with Jamie McLean Band

Blessed with both a rarefied talent and an innate stylistic and emotional authenticity, Marc has become one of the most indelible artists of his generation. Martin Media Presents

Whose Live Anyway?

DEC 14

NOV 24

Starring World Champion Dancers: Tyler Schwartz and Emily MacConnell

DEC 5

The Robert Cray Band

The five-time GRAMMY® Award winner has created a sound that rises from American roots and arrives today both fresh and familiar. “After nearly 40 years, Robert Cray remains as viable as ever. In a world turned upside down, his music continues to serve as comfort food for the soul.” - Something Else!

DEC 23

Smart Alec presents

Adrianne Lenker DEC 8

with Ellen Kempner

DEC 11 Scan & Download the Lobero App Today! • Digital ticketing • Calendar of Events

Men At Work

GRAMMY® Award winning, multi-platinum selling act, with numerous dearly loved songs, such as “Down Under,” “Who Can It Be Now,” and “Overkill.”

30

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LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC INDEPENDENT.COM

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DEC 18/19 The Bentson Foundation

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NOV.

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

18-23

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit. groundbreaking film starring Simu Liu as Shang-Chi. You can stream the film on Disney+.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

tinyurl.com/Shang-ChiDiscussion COURTESY

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

BEN CROP

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6pm

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org •

11/18-11/20:

SBCC Theatre Arts Department Presents Laughing with Durang — A Night of Christopher Durang Short Plays Talented SBCC students will perform short plays from the much-celebrated playwright such as For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls, a parody of The Glass Menagerie; Medea, about Medea and a chorus of three women who try to figure out if it’s appropriate to kill your children to punish your husband; and three more short plays (contains adult language and content). Thu.-Fri.: 7:30-9:30pm; Sat.: 2 and 7:30pm. Jurkowitz Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 969 Cliff Dr. $10-$18. Call (805) 965-5935 or email sbcctg@sbcc.edu. theatregroupsbcc.com/shows music, stories, and holiday cheer that raises funds for those experiencing homelessness, substance-use disorders, and veterans who need assistance with housing. Noon. Free. Call (805) 636-0475 or email sharonevolving@gmail.com.

THURSDAY 11/18 11/18: Virtual Trail Talks: Tima Link Lotah Member of The Owl Clan Join this discussion with Tima Link Lotah, member of The Owl Clan and Coastal Band of the Chumash Nation for her talk, The Beauty of Basketry and Tending the Land. 5:306:45pm. Free. Call (805) 963-3727 or email amerza@santabarbaraca.gov.

tinyurl.com/SalvationFriendraiser 11/18: Virtual Script to Screen: Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings Co-writer/director of this 2021 Marvel Studio film Destin Daniel Cretton will join Pollock Theater director Matt Ryan for a virtual conversation about this

tinyurl.com/TimaLink sippi-native songwriter, singer, and guitar slinger Paul Thorn will bring his muscular brand of roots music and folksy humor with songs that will make you laugh and ballads that will bring you to tears. Area singer/songwriter and guitar player Will Breman will open the show. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $46-$66. Call (805) 963-0761.

11/19-11/21: CALM Antique & Vintage Show and Sale Find unique and eclectic decorative treasures from rustic to refurbished furniture, 18th-century to modern midcentury collectibles, as well as handcrafted native, fine, and costume jewelry with proceeds benefiting CALM (Child Abuse Listening Mediation). Fri.-Sat.: 11am-6pm; Sun.: 11am-4pm. Earl Warren

Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free-$6. calmantiqueshows.com

11/18: Island Visions: A 7-Year Labor of Love by Local Brothers +40 More The S.B. Maritime Museum (SBMM) presents Island Visions, a webinar with brothers Jacob Seigel Brielle and Isaac Seigel-Boettner about their “un-textbook” and beautifully illustrated tome of knowledge and tales about the Channel Islands. Registration is required. 7pm. Free. Call (805) 962-8404 or email info@

SHARON MCCUTCHEON

11/18: Paul Thorn Band Missis-

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

lobero.org/events

11/18: 5th Annual Salvation Army Kettle Virtual Kickoff Friendraiser Join the S.B. Salvation Army and Advisory Board for

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

sbmm.org.

tinyurl.com/IslandVisionsSBMM

FRIDAY 11/19 11/19: First FriYAY Thanksgiving Sign-Making Workshop! Create a customized framed “Happy Thanksgiving” sign in preparation for the holiday. Materials and step-by-step instruction included. Beer and wine will be available for purchase. Registration is required. Use promo code “firstfriyay” for discount. 6-8pm. Board & Brush S.B., 31 E. Canon Perdido St. $40 ($30 with promo code). Ages 21+. Call (805)-792-9603 or email santabarbara@boardandbrush.com.

boardandbrush.com/santabarbara

SATURDAY 11/20 11/20: Sea Glass and Ocean Arts Holiday Pop-up Marketplace The

invites you to shop for one-of-a-kind sea-glass creations and ocean-themed art from more than 20 artists. 10am4pm. Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center, 865 Linden Ave., Carpinteria. Free.

tinyurl.com/SeaGlassMarketplace 11/20: Chaucer’s Virtual Event Join virtually for an afternoon of story and artistry as Chaucer’s own Suzanne Rorick will host Terri Libenson, New York Times best-selling author of the Emmie & Friends series about the middle-school experience. 2-3pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@ chaucersbooks.com.

chaucersbooks.com/event 11/20: ME Sabor: Baila Conmigo This showcase will feature all of the amazing students of Me Sabor Dance Studio, who will celebrate Latino dance

S.B. Sea Glass and Ocean Arts Festival

11/20:

Drive-up Car Seat Inspection S.B. Cottage Hospital Trauma Services and other area agencies will offer child car seat checks by safety experts. There will be no driver’s license or registration checks. 9am-1pm. Franklin Neighborhood Center, 1136 E. Montecito St. Free. Call (805) 569-7451. tinyurl.com/CheckCarSeat

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event.

Volunteer Opportunity INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

Fundraiser

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31


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This is True Community Banking Sister Arthur and Rosa Paredes of St. Vincent’s Institution with Tino Muñoz, Portfolio Manager

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Shows on Tap

T HE

TAKE NOTE

COVID-19 Vaccines for Kids 5-11 Years Old Visit the website to find answers to questions such as: why should my child get vaccinated, is the vaccine safe, what dosage will my child receive, and more, as well as making an appointment and filling out the registration form.

COURTESY OF CDC

publichealthsbc.org/covid-19-vaccines-for-kids publichealthsbc.org/testing/

11/18, 11/20: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Thu.: DJ Chowder, 7-9pm. Sat.: Paradise Kings, 6-8pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 11/18-11/23: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Smitty & Julija, 8pm. $12. Fri.: Plastic Harpoons, Evolfo, Killer Kaya, 8pm. $10. Ages 21+. Sat.: Jena Douglas and Sherie Davis: Double Album Release Party, noon3:30pm, $10. King Bee: 20th Anniversary Celebration, 8pm, $10. Ages 21+. Sun.: John Jorgensen Bluegrass Band, 7:30pm. $35. Mon.: Trixie Blue with Band, 7pm. Free. Ages 21+. Tue.: Leilani Wolfgramm, Flowmads, 8pm. $15-$18. Ages 21+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

11/19-11/20: Eos Lounge Fri.: Steve Darko, 9pm-2am. $10. Sat.: Claptone, 6-10pm. $30. Ages 21+. 500 Anacapa St.

eoslounge.com 11/19-11/20, 11/23: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Fri.: Art of Funk, 6-8pm. Sat.: The Hoodlum Friends, 6-8pm. Tue.: Christopher Hawley Rollers, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

COURTESY

COURTESY

11/19: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254. urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

11/21:

Met Live: Fire Shut Up in My Bones Yannick Nézet-Séguin will conduct Grammy Award–winning jazz musician and composer Terence Blanchard’s adaptation of Charles M. Blow’s moving memoir, Fire Shut Up In My Bones. The first opera by a Black composer tells the poignant and profound story about a young man’s journey to overcome a life of trauma and hardship and features Music Academy alumna Briana Hunter (’14) in the role of Ruby. The opera contains adult themes and language. 2pm. Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. Free-$28. Call (805) 969-4726. musicacademy.org/events

culture with salsa, bachata, merengue, folklórico, flamenco, and more. 7pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. $15-$25.

mesabordancestudio.com/danceevents

SUNDAY 11/21 11/21: B.A.A.D (Bazaar, Arts, Drinks) Shop for vintage threads, clothing from the 2000s, art, and handcrafted goods as you enjoy drinks at this bazaar that happens on every third Sunday of the month. Eos Lounge, 500 Anacapa St. Free.

concert: 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $35. Call (805) 962-7776 or email marketing@ sohosb.com. sohosb.com/events

11/21: Yoga on Stearns Wharf This alllevels, joy-filled yoga class with an ocean view will raise money to support community members in financial need to provide yoga, meditation, breathwork, and coaching. 9-10am. Stearns Wharf, 217 Stearns Wharf. Suggested donation: $10-$25. Call (805) 633-0904 or email yoga@powerofyourom.com.

powerofyourom.com/classschedule

tinyurl.com/BAADsunday

11/21: The All-Star John Jorgenson Bluegrass Band This all-star bluegrass supergroup features John Jorgenson (guitar, mandolin, vocals), Herb Pedersen (banjo, guitar, vocals), Mark Fain (bass), and Patrick Sauber (guitar, vocals) in an intimate performance. Doors: 6pm;

MONDAY 11/22 11/22: Trixie Blue Area teen and alt-rocker Trixie Blue will perform music from her EP (on SoundCloud), composed of original songs and music that she cocreated with Gus Detar of Detar Music in S.B. while being isolated during the pandemic. Doors: 6pm;

11/20: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar Jacob Cole. 5:30-8:30pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126.

tinyurl.com/JacobColeNov20 11/20-11/21: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: The Reserve, 1:30-4:30. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:304:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com

11/20-11/21: Island Brewing Co. Sat.: Do No Harm Band, 6-9pm. Sun.: Cyrus Clarke, noon-3pm. 5049

6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

islandbrewingcompany.com/calendar 11/20-11/21: Maverick Saloon Sat.: Sam Kulchin, 1-4pm; Different Strings, 5-8pm. The Tex Pistols, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Teddy Spanke, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/ show: 7pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

TUESDAY 11/23 11/23: Warren Miller’s Winter Starts Now

for the thrill and finds solace on the chairlift: from Alaska’s Prince William Sound to Maine’s community of craftsmen and women devoted to sliding on snow, and from kids with Olympic dreams to the experienced skier. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $22. Call (805) 963-0761.

lobero.org/events

This film is an homage to every skier who lives

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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33


S.B. Birding

The Arlington Theatre

­

Arlington • Fiesta • Camino

Paseo Nuevo • Fairview

Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Metro 4 • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Nov 19-25, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

King Richard* (PG13): Fri-Tues: 1:30, 4:10, 7:20. Wed/Thur: 1:00, 4:10, 7:20. Belfast (PG13): Fri-Mon: 2:40, 5:05 7:30. Tues: 2:40, 5:05. Clifford (G): Fri-Mon: 1:45, 4:40, 7:00. Tues: 1:45, 4:40. Encanto* (PG): Tues: 7:00, 8:00. Wed/Thur: 1:10, 2:30, 3:45, 5:05, 6:20, 7:40.

CAMINO REAL Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Fri:-Sun 11:45, 12:40, 1:40, 2:35, 3:30, 4:30, 5:25, 6:20, 7:20, 8:15, 9:15, 10:10. Mon: 1:45, 12:40, 1:40, 2:35, 3:30, 4:30, 5:25, 6:20, 7:20, 8:15, 9:15. Tues: 11:45, 12:40, 1:40, 2:35, 4:30, 5:25, 7:20, 8:15, 10:10. Eternals (PG13): Fri-Sun: 12:00, 3:20, 6:40, 10:00. Mon/Tues: 1:00, 4:20, 7:40. Dune (PG): Fri-Tues: 1:20, 4:40, 8:00. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Mon: 12:30, 4:15, 7:45. Tues: 12:30, 4:15. Resident Evil* (R): Tues: 5:00, 7:30, 10:00. Wed/Thur: 11:55, 2:25, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00. House of Gucci* (R): Tues: 7:45. Wed/Thur: 11:50, 3:10, 6:30, 9:50.

HITCHCOCK Julia (PG13): Tues/Wed: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. The French Dispatch (R): Tues/Wed: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45.

Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Fri:-Thur 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. 34

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916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Fri: 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 9:30. Sat: 11:40,12:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30, 9:30. Sun: 11:40,12:30, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30. Mon/Tues: 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30. Wed/Thur: 12:20, 2:30, 3:30, 5:30, 6:30, 8:30. Clifford (G): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00. Sat/Sun: 11:35, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00. Ron’s Gone Wrong (PG): Fri: 2:20, 4:50, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 11:50, 2:20, 4:50, 7:15. Tues: 2:20. Spencer (R): Fri/Mon: 2:10, 5:00, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 11:30, 2:10, 5:00, 7:45. Tues: 2:10, 5:00. Encanto* (PG): Tue: 6:05, 7:40, 8:40. Wed/Thur: 12:20, 1:45, 3:10, 4:40, 5:45, 7:15, 8:20.

PA S E O N U E V O

371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512

1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Eternals (PG13): Fri-Tues: 2:20, 4:00(LP), 5:40, 7:20(LP), 9:00. Wed/Thur: 1:20, 4:45, 8:15. Dune (PG13): Fri-Mon: 2:10, 5:00, 8:00. Tues-Thur: 2:10, 8:00. Venom Let There Be Carnage (PG13): Fri-Mon: 2:30, 5:30, 8:20. Tues-Thur: 5:30. Resident Evil* (R): Tues: 4:15(LP), 6:45(LP), 9:15(LP). Wed/Thur: 1:30, 2:45(LP), 4:00, 5:15(LP), 6:30, 7:45(LP), 9:00.

F I E S TA 5

7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

ARLINGTON

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

King Richard* (PG13): Fri-Tues: 1:15, 4:30, 7:45. Wed/Thur: 12:50, 4:30, 7:45. Belfast (PG13): Fri-Mon: 1:35, 4:55, 7:20. Tues: 1:35, 4:55. The French Dispatch (R): Fri-Mon: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Tues: 3:00, 5:30. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Tues: 1:25, 4:00, 7:30. Wed/Thur: 1:00, 4:00, 7:30. House of Gucci* (R): Tues: 7:20, 8:20. Wed/Thur: 1:40, 3:20, 5:00, 6:45, 8:20.

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

A

HIGH RANSON PHOTOS

Backyard Birds: To Feed or Not to Feed

few years ago, my wife and I decided that the small patch of lawn between our condo and our neighbor’s, some 20 feet away, was not doing much for the world. We decided to cover the lawn with a free load of mulch from the city, plant drought-tolerant natives along with some flowering exotics to encourage insects, and to leave alone the leaves that fall from our coast live oak. What a difference this change has made. We have seen creatures that we hadn’t seen in our yard for the past 25 years: chipmunks, squirrels, rabbits, western fence lizards, and even a slender salamander. Insect life has proliferated. On a recent day, there were three giant swallowtails feeding on the lantana. And, of course, the birds came. As I write, a winter flock has descended upon the yard: white-crowned and Lincoln’s sparrows, oak titmice, California White-crowned sparrow towhees, mourning doves, a downy woodpecker, yellow-rumped warblers, house finches, lesser goldfinches, and pine siskins. All this in a tiny yard in amount of pleasure to the watcher, but in this time of urban Westside Santa Barbara. And there’s one reason drought, when there is often little food for birds to find in the wild, providing seed and water gives birds an important lifeline. Birds are in serious decline. The aforementioned pine siskin, for example, has seen a population drop of 80 percent since 1970 due to habitat loss, pesticide use, and, more than likely, climate change. I’ve heard it argued that feeding birds makes by Hugh Ranson, them dependent upon humans, but again, this Member of the Santa Barbara Audubon Society argument doesn’t hold water. The white-crowned sparrows that look for spilled seed below the feeders our yard attracts such diversity: We choose to put out leave in the spring when their clocks tell them to — the urge to migrate supersedes the handouts that people food for the birds. Hardware stores sell a variety of feeders and seeds; offer. Even resident birds, such as the house finch, a good mixed seed will attract a variety of backyard that have a close association with humans have many visitors. Many birds love sunflower seeds, both whole options for foraging if feeders are taken down. If you choose to feed birds, there are some imporand shelled. Goldfinches and siskins go crazy for nyjer seed that can be dispensed from a special “thistle sock.” tant considerations to take into account. When birds Another high-protein food source is suet, which can congregate, they are more susceptible to disease. Feedbe bought in blocks and housed in a metal cage. This ers need to be cleaned frequently, and water should year, the yellow-rumped warblers in my yard seem be changed daily. There are many online sites that describe how this cleaning should be done. One parparticularly taken with this treat. Feeding wild birds is a somewhat controversial ticularly insidious disease is salmonella. Last winter, an issue, with some believing that wild birds should be unusually good one for pine siskins, saw many of these left to forage on their own. I disagree. Not only does birds struck down by salmonella. The birds puff themfeeding our wintering birds bring an extraordinary selves up to retain body heat and become fearless. If you see birds with these symptoms, take your feeders down immediately. A safer method of feeding is to scatter seed on the ground; this ensures that birds won’t be in such close proximity to one another and are therefore far less likely to spread disease. The biggest human-caused threat to wild birds, however, is not disease from feeders, but house cats. It is estimated that cats kill 2.4 billion birds annually in the United States alone. Just today, I chased two neighborhood cats out of my yard who know a good thing when they see it. The cats are not to blame, of course — it’s in a cat’s nature to hunt; even a well-fed cat will kill birds. Indoor cats live, on average, far longer than outdoor cats. If you have an outdoor cat and can’t bear the thought of keeping it inside, please consider outfitting it with a collar and bell to give the birds more of a chance at survival; after all, we are Yellow-rumped warbler largely responsible for their decline. n

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Should They Be Left to Forage on Their Own?


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per 50ml (90mg CBD), belongs on the same display shelf in your dressing room as the Comme Des Garcons Stüssy Laguna Beach or the Maison Margiela. The expression of terroir lies at the heart of Wellfounded’s program of cannabis products. Rotman speaks proudly of the “things that make California cannabis the best in the world,” naming “big swings between night and day temperatures” and the transverse airflow that she refers to as “the Buellton air conditioner,” among other factors that enhance the quality of the terpenes in her farm’s plants. Wellfounded uses cannabis grown outdoors under Central Coast sunshine to create capsules, tinctures, topicals, and fragrances imbued with the aesthetics and sensuality that Rotman feels best define cannabis products in the wellness category, a midway point between medicinal and recreational approaches. With this new fragrance, and a California-exclusive THC Eau de Parfum scheduled to launch soon, Wellfounded continues to develop a comprehensive program of cannabis products that’s female-centric yet male-friendly and that embraces the best of what’s happening in adjacent fields such as skincare and fragrance. With this CBD-infused Eau de Parfum, Wellfounded takes odor, which has at times been a liability for cannabis, and transforms it into a clean, even elegant asset. For more information, visit wellfounded .scentbeauty.com. n

Buellton Cannabis Farm Releases CBD Fragrance by Charles Donelan products contain CBD and thus have the potential to achieve the same soothing effects as other consumption methods, they smell clean and fresh — nothing like what most folks associate with weed. At Wellfounded Botanicals in Buellton, the newest product is an Eau de Parfum. Sitting outdoors on a breezy October afternoon with acres of mature cannabis plants in the background, Wellfounded CEO Sara Rotman describes the scent as “based on the terroir and the atmosphere of being here at this farm.” The fragrance combines notes of ocean air, coastal sage, eucalyptus, and ripe cannabis. It comes in an elegant black perfume spray bottle with squared-off corners, a magnetic cap, and Wellfounded’s sky-blue logo embossed on the lower left corner. The presentation easily equals that of any high-end fragrance from a fashion house. It sends a clear message that this product, which retails for $80

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Recreating a Lost Ecosystem

PHOTOS COURTESY NCOS

Outdoors

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or decades, human activity had completely evicted burrowing owls and other animals and plants from an open space beyond the elbow of Storke Road as it turns toward Isla Vista. At the North Campus Open Space, some of these species are now trickling back due to the efforts of staff, volunteers, and student workers to restore the former ecosystem to its former health and undo many years’ worth of ecological damage. The deepest wound came in the form of a golf course developed in 1965 over wetlands and adjoining uplands. But even seemingly benign actions also played a significant role. When residents introduced tall Australasian trees such as the eucalyptus, they gifted the red-tailed hawk, already populous in California, vantage points from which the raptors could swoop down on their unsuspecting prey. Planting eucalyptus trees, according to Greenhouse Manager Wayne Chapman, is a death sentence for an owl

North Campus Open Space at UC Santa Barbara by Nicholas Liu that needs unbroken grassy places to survive. Other animals such as snakes and squirrels, which often construct the burrows that owls take shelter in, also fall victim to the hawk. Since the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration bought the land in 2013, Chapman, Director of Ecosystem Management Lisa Stratton, and other staff members have approached the project with careful precision. Each elevation is built not only to accommodate its own inhabitants but also to ensure the collective ecosystem’s survival. Closest to the water are mud flats where birds pick at clams (800) Local 741-1605 Your Auto Club Branch for sustenance; farther back are uplands populated by bees and other pollinators that infuse life into newly reintroduced plants. Although more than 100 acres of land now resemble the original terrain, Restoration Coordinator Andy Lanes emphasized the sustainability measures taken in the face of emerging challenges. “With rising sea levels, we need a buffer against flooding,” he explained. “We undertook this project in a

WHO GOES THERE? Artificial burrows are created to provide migrating burrowing owls with shelter from predators and the elements.

way that allowed geological uplift and sedimentation to keep pace with sea-level rise and also made interior space for ecosystems to fall back on.” In order to reintroduce extirpated plants, the restoration crew obtains two kinds of seeds from the most genetically similar populations: one that flowers immediately, and one that waits for perfect environmental conditions. Once both are planted, the growing process is monitored and recorded, with each specimen tagged to keep track of germination rates. Since planting began in 2017, restoration staff, volunteers, and student workers have installed more than 350,000 plants in addition to 650,000 purple needle grasses. But for all the painstaking human effort, unexpected forces can often frustrate their designs. Flocks of voracious geese are a recurring threat to the plants. Other times, there are more positive outcomes. In the late 1990s, two biologists encountered an unusual plant growing on a field that once held oil waste; it was later identified as the Ventura marsh milkvetch, thought to be extinct for at least 30 years. Now, the Open Space is an epicenter of resuscitation efforts. “It’s possible that dormant seeds hitched a ride in soil that was used to fill in the oil disposal site,” Chapman posited. “Those seeds can remain viable for decades.” Restoration of the area is not limited to natural formations. Dotted across the landscape are wooden boards laid upon the ground; whenever predators approach or the sun becomes too unbearable, snakes and other small reptiles can wriggle underneath for shelter. Fences demarcate areas within which animals can freely roam, preventing them from wandering onto the roads. In Santa Barbara County, the summer months are often mercilessly dry; Chapman anticipates the installation of a guzzler, a kind of underground water fountain from which animals can hydrate themselves. And finally, there are the burrows in which owls make their winter quarters. Some are naturally occurring, while others have been fashioned out of rocks by the staff. Chapman noted that the first owls should be coming around now. “When an owl revisits the Open Space, they usually come to the same burrow they settled in last time,” he said. “That’s how we know which ones lived, and which ones died.”

BACK FROM THE BRINK: Long thought extinct, the Ventura marsh milkvetch is undergoing resuscitation efforts. 36

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Tours of the North Campus Open Space are offered every third Saturday at 9:30 a.m. and meet at the Carlton-Duncan Visitor Plaza. Free parking is available at 6969 Whittier Drive in Goleta.


GARY KIM

living

Sports

Gauchos Fly High T

he public came to the Thunderdome last week to watch UCSB basketball games for the first time since March 2020. The Gaucho women had fans squirming in the new chair-back seats, while the men’s team attracted students with a hamburger giveaway and kept them standing and cheering a highlight show. Here’s how it went down. JPL TAKES FLIGHT: The Gaucho men’s 119-65 blowout of San Francisco State might have been boring except for the coming-out-and-up party of Josh Pierre-Louis. The 64 junior was a one-man wrecking crew in the first half, as he scored 22 points, many of them on highflying dunks. He finished the game with 25 points and four assists on passes that also had a creative touch. “The best athlete I’ve ever coached,” gushed Joe Pasternack, UCSB’s fourth-year coach, who had previous stops at Arizona and Cal.

But Recent Losses Bring Reality Check by John Zant Pierre-Louis said it’s his role to energize the Gauchos. “They call me Magneto,” he said, referring to a superhuman Marvel Comics character. I prefer the nickname JPL (as in Jet Propulsion Laboratory), which I coined a year ago when I first saw the Temple transfer blast off above the rim. His game may remind longtime hoop fans of the Skywalker, a k a David Thompson, the 64 North Carolina State/Denver Nuggets star who danced in the air. UCSB’s senior forward Amadou Sow, a three-time All-Big West performer, also scored 25 points. All 13 Gauchos scored against the Division 2 Gators, including freshman guard Max Sheldon, a walk-on from San Marcos High. On Monday night, an arduous road trip brought the Gauchos down to earth. The Washington State Cougars, a high-level Division 1 team, built a 23-point lead in the first half and cruised to a 73-65 victory. JPL made just one basket in seven attempts. The 69 Sow had a solid double-double (25 points, 11 rebounds) and helped UCSB make the final score respectable. The Cougars posted their 16th consecutive non-conference victory and are expected to make some noise in the Pac-12. They are looking for their first NCAA tournament appearance since 2008, when Santa Barbara’s Taylor Rochestie was their outstanding point guard. The Gauchos made it to the NCAAs last season, and a one-point loss to Creighton left them hankering for another shot. It will all come down to March, when they take the floor at the Big West Tournament as defending champions. With Pullman, Wash., in their rearview mirror, the next month is about polishing their game, piling up wins and building momentum. UCSB’s next five games are at the Thunderdome, beginning Saturday at 1 p.m. against Chicago State.

MILLER TIME: Danae Miller is a five-year starter for the UCSB women’s team. The 57 guard out of Long Beach Poly took the NCAA’s reward of extra eligibility after the COVID year. Miller brings “poise and composure” to the team, coach Bonnie Henrick son sa id, a nd t he Gaucho women needed her in their opener, a seesaw battle against Loyola Marymount. There were 12 lead changes in the game, and Miller affected the last one by drilling a three-point shot with just over a minute to play, putting UCSB ahead 60-58. She later made a free throw, her team-leading 18th point, and the Gauchos won, 61-58. All eyes were on Ila Lane in the opening minutes. The 64 UCSB center was playing her first game since WE HAVE LIFTOFF: Josh Pierre-Louis slams another dunk. March 2020, when she was named Big West Freshman of the Year after leading the nation in rebounding. Lane sat DUKE-OR-DIE: No. 7–seeded Duke has a bye into the out the entire 2020-21 season, and the rust showed when second round of the NCAA men’s soccer tournament. On Sunday, the Blue Devils will host the winner of she badly missed her first three shots. But it was a familiar sight when Lane ran down loose Thursday night’s UCSB-UCLA tussle in Westwood. balls. “Her effort never fails,” Henrickson said. She fin- Do not assume they’d rather play the Gauchos. UCSB has a 4-0 all-time record against Duke. If they get past ished the game with 10 rebounds and eight points. Like the Gaucho men, the women followed their the Bruins, the Gauchos will loom as an extremely opener with a long road trip to Evanston, Ill., where dangerous opponent. “This group of players has a they faced Northwestern, a tough Big 10 team. The chance to go deep in the tournament,” said sophomore Wildcats made sure they would not get into a clutch Finn Ballard McBride, who has scored a team-high shooting contest, roaring out to a 21-4 lead after the first nine goals while 11 other Gauchos have cracked the quarter. UCSB played them fairly even the rest of the scoring column. In other postseason soccer, Westmont College preway, ending in a 72-46 defeat. Lane got her rebounds (11) and scored on her first vailed in a pair of penalty-kick shootouts to win the touch of the game, but that spelled trouble. “We started GSAC women’s championship and could reach the forcing the ball in and threw it to [Northwestern],” NAIA national tournament by winning opening-round Henrickson said. “Nine turnovers in the first quarter. matches on its home pitch Thursday and Saturday. We have to do better passing the ball into the post.” Junior guard Alexis Tucker, a transfer from Texas FOOTBALL WEEKEND: Friday night lights will be blazing for Cate School’s Rams and SBCC’s Vaqueros. Tech, led UCSB with 14 points. The Gaucho women stay on the road Saturday at Cate has reached the CIF 8-Man Division 1 football Pepperdine. Their next home game will be December 2, championship game for the first time and will kick off against Grace Brethren at 7 p.m. at Carpinteria High’s against Denver. Memorial Stadium. SBCC’s Vaqueros, coming off a 52-7 STRONG STARTS: The men’s and women’s basketball teams victory over Santa Monica, will host Orange Coast Colat Westmont College are a combined 10-0 and will face lege in their regular-season finale at 5 p.m. at La Playa The Master’s in their first Golden State Athletic Confer- Stadium. Sam “Bam” Cunningham will be remembered in ence double-header on Saturday evening. The Warrior women are defending NAIA champions and ranked a public tribute at 11 a.m. Saturday at Santa Barbara No. 1 on the preseason poll. SBCC is winning in hoops High’s Peabody Stadium, where he launched a football too; the Vaquero men (3-1) have tripled their number of career that would take him to USC — and with the wins in the past two years (a 1-25 record in 2019-20 and Trojans, famously, to Alabama — and the New England Patriots. n no games the following season). INDEPENDENT.COM

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of THOUGHT

THE SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT ’S ANNUAL EDUCATION GUIDE

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2 Promotional Content | Schools of Thought 2021 | Santa Barbara Independent


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of THOUGHT The Santa Barbara Independent ’s Annual Education Guide

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hile the struggle to educate our children throughout a pandemic has certainly been real, the storied and widely varied institutions and learning programs here in Santa Barbara have proved that they can adjust, pivot, and adapt. Teachers are learning to teach differently, parents are learning a lot about their kids, and students are learning other ways to show up — some prefer a traditional classroom, others thrive remotely, and a growing number have found their niche in homeschooling and other paths of indepen-

dent study. The formation of these silver linings has grown from the impacted classrooms, the figure-it-out-as-we-go Zoom rooms, and the ongoing dedication of our educators, now back on busy campuses as COVID-19 case numbers settle. As with any upgrades in educational philosophy and approach, this year showcases lots of new thought. It also relies on time-tested approaches that simply needed a bit of adjustment to carry students and teachers through another challenging year.

by KEITH HAMM

This special section asked the issue’s sponsors about trends, topics, and signature educational programs, from which editorial content was produced independently.

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ure, kids are cute and fun and can perhaps even lend great meaning to our flicker of existence aboard this beautiful blue dust ball hurling through empty space. But you know what else? Parenting is tough. Got teens? Even tougher. Pile on the day-to-day stressors common among most modern earthlings, and your connection to your kids can come apart faster still.

Social and Emotional Intelligence for Teens — and Their Parents

Fortunately, there’s AHA!, which for years has been helping teens — and their folks — be better versions of themselves. On the grown-up front, the nonprofit’s team of social-emotional educators, parent coaches, and therapists is providing extensive parent education and support this year — from stand-alone groups to multi-class series, all with Spanish interpretation. For more info, we caught up with Melissa Lowenstein, AHA!’s director of programs. Describe parent stress. In general, parents are overscheduled and feel they don’t have enough time or energy to devote to parenting. Our culture celebrates overdoing, overachieving, and busyness, and many parents never feel like they are doing enough. We’re seeing exhaustion and overwhelm. Rates of anxiety and depression in young people have skyrocketed in response to the pandemic, and parents are unsure about how to help. Parents of teens are especially impacted because the natural arc of teen development can make it more challenging for parents to relate honestly and deeply with their child.

How does parent stress impact student success? It can be difficult for under-resourced parents to make time or learn strategies for supporting their child. An under-resourced adult who isn’t acting as a role model for living an emotionally and relationally healthy life can’t effectively resource a child who is struggling. Children pick up on parental stress, and it adds to their own burden, which can mean difficulty with school or other areas of life. When parents can better manage their stress, how does that help children? Children are exquisitely sensitive to parental stress. When it goes unacknowledged and unmanaged, it often comes out as short-temperedness, inconsistency with boundaries, or distancing between the person suffering in silence and the others in their family. A parent who learns ways to manage when things are hard and uses those tools where their children can witness them is a fantastic role model. When children see an important adult in their lives facing adversity and doing what’s needed to right themselves, they learn how to do the same. Even if they’re never taught explicitly, they absorb it and model it right back. What subjects are tackled in parent classes? The five-class series at Carpinteria Unified School District (on Zoom) and Goleta Valley Junior High (at the campus in spring, with dinner and childcare) looks at parenting in the context of developing key aspects of social-emotional intelligence. [We cover] self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making, all [of which are] foundational to good parenting. No quick trick or standalone parenting strategy can replace parents taking

COURTESY

MANAGING STRESS FOR ALL AGES WITH AHA!

time to self-examine and work on their own relational and emotional competency. The greatest thing about this series is that the skills and knowledge parents gain are incredibly useful in all relationships: partnerships, relationships at work, friendships, and other family relationships. Social-emotional learning training is much desired by employers these days, so we will offer those who complete the five classes a certificate of completion to share with current or prospective employers. You’ve been at this for a while, right? We have offered parent groups consistently since our beginnings in 1999. For most of that time, we offered these groups only to parents of teens in AHA! after-school, summer, and Peace Builder programs. In response to demand from schools who wished to offer more support to their parents, we developed the five-class series for this school year. Groups are always offered by donation. Best way to sign up? Reach out to Joy Elizondo at joy.ahasb@ gmail.com or call the office. 1209 De la Vina St., Ste. A; (805) 770-7200; ahasb.org

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Photo: Nell Campbell

The SBCC Promise The SBCC Promise, which is funded entirely by private donations, has provided more than 5,000 local high school graduates with the opportunity to pursue their dreams at Santa Barbara City College. All required fees, books, and supplies are covered for two years. The SBCC Foundation fuels the excellence of Santa Barbara City College by engaging the community, building relationships, and inviting the generosity of donors. The resources raised and managed by the Foundation enrich college programs, remove barriers, and empower students to succeed.

Your gift makes it possible. sbccfoundation.org 4 Promotional Content | Schools of Thought 2021 | Santa Barbara Independent


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Upper elementary teacher Peggi Robinson goes over the Four Cs with her students.

THE MONTESSORI CENTER SCHOOL’S FOUR CS

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efore she became the head of Montessori Center School five years ago, Melanie Jacobs had more than 20 years of experience on-site, starting as a part-time assistant teacher right after college and moving up to earn her elementary and administrative credentials.

A Century-Plus of Collaboration, Critical Thinking, Creativity, and Communication

For more than 100 years, Montessori education has been integrating what its educators call “The Four Cs” (collaboration, critical thinking, creativity, and communication) into early childhood and elementary education. Here, Jacobs explains what they mean. COLLABORATION: “The ability to collaborate with others is a crucial skill for young people today,” Jacobs explained. “To work in collaboration with others means that you can listen to other perspectives and cohesively share your thoughts. It also means that you can work within a team, utilizing the strengths of those around you to meet goals and expectations.” Montessori groups children in three-year age groupings: ages 3-6 (transitional K-K); ages 6-9 (1st3rd); and ages 9-12 (4th-6th). “This allows students to

act as leaders, serving as role models to the younger students academically and socially.”

CRITICAL THINKING: “At its simplest,” Jacobs said, “critical thinking is the ability to think clearly and rationally about the world around us by taking in information, analyzing it, and making decisions based on that information. To foster this in young children, it is necessary to allow them to be as independent as possible. Our Montessori environments are designed to allow as much independence as possible at every stage of development. Our teachers are trained to observe and give students time and space to think things through by not intervening too soon. “As they grow and develop, they are guided in the scientific method, conducting experiments, creating hypotheses, and making judgments based on their observations. Montessori lessons are famous for their concrete representations of academic concepts, giving students a very clear idea of the why and how behind each idea.” CREATIVITY: “Montessori students are great at thinking out of the box, exploring various ways to solve problems creatively,” Jacobs continued. “Within each classroom, our students are urged to participate in discussions that explore their creativity and the sharing of ideas. Students are encouraged to keep an open mind and respect the ideas of their peers and teachers. After receiving a lesson, students are often given freedom in how they would like to do their follow-up work, such as making a book, chart,

or oral presentation. Artwork is often incorporated into their daily work to promote self-expression. We also have specialist teachers in art, music, Spanish, physical education, library, computer, and drama to help develop students’ creativity.” COMMUNICATION: “Communication is truly the key to a successful educational experience, and it is at the heart of the Montessori philosophy. From a young age, we encourage our students to express themselves clearly and respectfully. Many of our classrooms create agreements [that] impart the needs of the students and teachers. These agreements are made collaboratively with active participation from the students. These agreements are then signed, posted, and referred to all year as a reminder of all of the expectations in the classroom. “Our students are also given opportunities at an early age to speak to a group. In our preschool rooms, examples of this would be sharing an interesting item [or] presenting a piece of work they completed. In our elementary classrooms, students recite poems, give oral presentations on historical figures, present year-long projects, and participate in drama and music productions. The older students in all of our classrooms act as leaders and role models. All of these experiences help to build confidence and communication skills, preparing them for middle school and beyond.” 401 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta; (805) 683-9383; mcssb.org

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s the story goes, about 100 years ago, Pasadena residents William and Kitty Crane awoke one morning to discover they’d literally shared a dream to start a school in Santa Barbara. At the time, William was an English professor at Caltech, and Kitty was big on music and performing arts. In 1928, they helped cofound Crane Country Day School on 11 acres in Montecito. From the get-go, they focused on delivering an experiential education to their young Where Experiential students, with Learning Emphasizes Kitty emphasizing that every Public Speaking child would be in a musical or play every year. Today, the founders’ time-tested legacy carries on, and the theme of hands-on, experiential learning has expanded. “Public speaking is woven into the curriculum at every grade level,” explained Kristen Peralta, the K-8 independent school’s director of marketing and communications. Just last month, for example, the kindergarteners were reciting memorized poems and reading stories to gathered parents. In 1st grade, students asked their parents, “What kind of bird am I?” as they fielded questions and described the appearances, habitats, and food preferences of the feathered fauna they’d been studying. Meanwhile, 5th graders were dressing up and acting out the contribu-

tions of their favorite American historical figures. Every year in 8th grade — with supportive coaching that helps the kids find their own voices — the final public-speaking piece is a lengthy, heavily attended presentation on topics handpicked by each student, this year ranging from ant ecology to mental-health issues in sports. During the pandemic last year, they learned how to adapt their speeches and slides to online only, using Google Meet and fielding questions remotely via the application’s chat feature. The life skills also extend to the Crane kids in the audience watching their fellow students speak or perform. As an audience member, one learns respect, social skills, and critical thinking, Peralta pointed out. Based on feedback over the years — and as a Crane alum herself—Peralta said that the school’s public-speaking practices “really help set them up for high school and beyond.” She also credits Crane’s steady run of plays and musicals in promoting student confidence and strengthening character. “In a fun way, they are getting more comfortable in front of an audience,” she said. 1795 San Leandro Ln., Montecito; (805) 969-7732; craneschool.org

COURTESY PHOTOS

FOUNDING PRINCIPLES THRIVE AT CRANE COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL

At top, 1st-grade teachers Courtney Fleming (in pink sweater) and Megan Flannery (with green paper) enjoy their student’s speech. Above, an 8th-grade student practices her public speaking skills at a podium.

new elementary program

opening fall 2022 GUIDING CHILDREN 3 MONTHS TO 6TH GRADE

apply now for fall 2022! 805-845-6555 office@southcoastmontessori.org 6 Promotional Content | Schools of Thought 2021 | Santa Barbara Independent

www.southcoastmontessori.org


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anta Barbara City College’s groundbreaking SBCC Promise is bouncing back after a 35 percent enrollment drop since the early days of the pandemic. With the slow return to some semblance of normalcy, students are revisiting the promise of a debt-free education at one of the finest community colleges in the nation.

SBCC Foundation Ensures Regional Students Return to School Across the country, college promises have taken on a range of student support, with offerings of a semester or a year of tuition-free learning. SBCC, on the other hand, goes bigger. “What we are doing here is leading nationally, absolutely top of the heap,” said Geoff Green, CEO of the SBCC Foundation, which launched the program in 2016 with funding from the private sector. As students return and numbers stabilize, Green would like to tackle a few items on his wish list: offer the SBCC Promise to all local prospects no matter when they graduated high school; extend the program to part-time students; and help cover childcare for Promise parents. For more details, I asked SBCC Promise Manager Sergio Lagunas. What’s the Promise offer? The SBCC Promise supports students who complete high school (or equivalent programs)

within the school’s district [from Gaviota to Rincon]. Students must enroll during their first or second semester following high school completion. The Promise covers all required registration fees (tuition), student fees, textbooks, and course materials for two academic years, including summer terms. Participating students must enroll fulltime, apply for financial aid, and meet with an academic counselor to maintain eligibility.

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COLLEGE IS COVERED AT SBCC

The average SBCC Promise student saves about $900 each semester for two academic years. We recognize every student is unique, and each student has individual educational and career goals. In fact, about 40 percent of SBCC Promise students are enrolled in a Career Technical Education program, such as Cosmetology, Real Estate, and Culinary Arts. Most students participate in the SBCC Promise during the two years of eligibility; however, there are students who complete their educational goals sooner due to completing courses through the dual enrollment program while attending high school.

Who’s eligible? Eligible students are local graduates from a public, private, or alternative high school, including homeschool, court school, or online school in the What are some recent challenges? Many district. They are also new college Paola Melchor is a recent graduate of the SBCC students have faced challenges involvstudents who graduate from high Promise program. ing online education, family responsischool or equivalent programs, bilities, and illness since March 2020 including Adult High School, GED completion, or have that have led students to drop courses or withdraw compassed the California High School Proficiency Exam in pletely for a semester or an entire year. We understand that the district. SBCC Promise [covers] AB 540 and undocu- the pandemic has caused many students to postpone their education, and we welcome any eligible returning students mented students who meet all eligibility requirements. to continue. How’s it going? Since fall 2016, we have helped 5,770 students by covering their required tuition and student fees, 721 Cliff Dr.; (805) 965-0581; sbcc.edu; (805) 730-4416; all required textbooks, and all required course materials. sbccfoundation.org

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AH a! TM

Healthy Attitudes, Emotional Harmony, and Lifelong Achievement for Teens

AHA! is an educational non-profit that has brought social-emotional learning and community building to over 60,000 students, educators, and families in Santa Barbara, Carpinteria, and Goleta since 1999.

Out-Of-School Groups

Summer Programs

AHA! Peace Builders In-School

Educator Trainings

Parent Groups

Interested in getting involved? Start by visiting our website: www.ahasb.org

EMPATHY

RESILIENCE

MINDFULNESS

AWARENESS

CONNECTION

INQUIRE TODAY

FALL 2022 • GRADES K–8 1795 San Leandro Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93108 • (805) 969-7732 • craneschool.org 8 Promotional Content | Schools of Thought 2021 | Santa Barbara Independent


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A love-based education that honors the whole child.

Students keep their schoolwork in school at South Coast Montessori.

HATING HOMEWORK AT SOUTH COAST MONTESSORI

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ith an emphasis on personalized learning for each child, South Coast Montessori will expand its elementary program starting in fall 2022. Until then, parents — and their kids — can continue to expect oneon-one and small-group instructional settings, along with equal importance placed on emotional learning as academic excellence. To a parent, that all sounds great. But there’s something else, too. Many parents

door time each day. In our Montessori classrooms, we have seamless indoor/outdoor activities. [They can be] done inside, or the children have the option to work outside in fresh air. “ 3) It takes away from family time. “Children should be spending time out of school with their family and friends and be involved in daily aspects of family life. Grocery shopping, running errands, reading books, drawing, cooking, laughing. School requires a certain behavior and expectation, and they spend lots of time joyfully Five Reasons Why learning different subjects and most importantly developing a Taking School Work Home love for learning. Reading books Is Terrible for Children every night is the only assignment I give as a teacher, and it’s can attest to weighty homework loads with the intention to develop a love for cutting into a kid’s home life and after- reading. Homework does not support school sports and free time. parenting; [it’s asking] parents to teach At South Coast Montessori, they concepts that should be being taught at understand. For details, we called on school by a trained teacher. There is so Mishelle Ordosgoitia, the school’s lead much parents can do to teach other very elementary guide, to walk us through important life skills that have nothing to five reasons why homework is terrible do with academics”. for children. 4) Homework limits time to pursue interests 1) It’s stressful! “Children are in school outside academics. “As parents, one of our almost all day,” Ordosgoitia explains. most important jobs is to be observant “Academics should be happening in and support our children’s passions and school, and children need to be allowed interests. What makes their eyes sparkle to have a balanced life with lots of activi- with curiosity? Is it horseback riding, ties or down time outside of school. dancing, jujitsu, art, studying a second Research has shown there is no real bene- language, baseball, or soccer? The list fit in assigning homework. So much more goes on. Find what your child loves and learning could be happening—learning is moved by and unconditionally support how to be a good human being, a good them in their endeavors.” brother, a good friend, [plus] age-appro- 5) It negatively impacts free time. “I strongly priate expectations and responsibilities encourage parents to purposefully schedat home, [such as] setting up the table, ule free time. Time where there are no baking, anything that brings joy to your set commitments or anything that absochildren and also allows them to feel like lutely needs to happen. In this time in a contributing and essential member of society, it is so easy to get caught up in the the family. ‘busy’ world and drag our children with 2) Homework has a negative impact on us. Children need downtime and time to outdoor activities. “Children should be be bored so creativity can spark.” spending as much time as possible outIn closing, Ordosgoitia reminds us: doors. Going for a walk, riding a scooter, “They are only children once. Children going to the park or beach. We live in a need to be children, not little adults.” region that allows us to spend most of our year enjoying the outdoors. Children 7421 Mirano Dr., Goleta; (805) 845-6555; should have at least three hours of out- southcoastmontessori.org

Early Childhood through Eighth Grade.

Santa Barbara Independent | Schools of Thought 2021 | Promotional Content

9


COURTESY

FIND YOUR STRENGTH, MAKE YOUR MARK #DiscoverBishopDiego

Virtual Parent Information Night

Cardinal in Training Prospective students are invited to join us at our boys’ varsity basketball game!

Thursday December 2nd, 5:30 p.m.

As one option of the TRIAD program, Providence students learn wilderness skills while on extended backpacking trips.

A TRIAD of Learning at Providence School

Thursday December 9th, 7 p.m.

F

Learn more and RSVP for all events on our website.

or years, Providence School’s popular “Beyond the Classroom” program has connected students of all grade levels (preschool-12) to tours, retreats, and adventures that blend academics with real-world experience, from historical trips through California and

Contact us for additional information regarding our Personalized Tuition Model. We work closely with families to ensure that a Bishop education is affordable for those at all income levels. 4000 La Colina Road • 805-967-1266 • www.bishopdiego.org

Summer Math Academy 2021

1 to 1 Tutoring Available Comprehension • Theory • Analysis

Gateway Educational Services • PO Box 6333, Santa Barbara, CA 93160 • (805) 895-1153 info@gatewayeducationalservices.org • www.gatewayeducationalservices.org

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Elementary School Math & Pre-Algebra for Juniors

This program is designed for 1:1 support and tutoring. Tracking weekly homework assignments, prep for exams and finals. Study skills development, learning to take math notes and how to study for math exams. All students begin with a placement exam.

Integrated Math I & II, Algebra I & II, Geometry & Pre-Calculus This program is designed for 1:1 support and tutoring. Tracking weekly homework assignments, prep for exams and finals. Study skills development, learning to take math notes and how to study for math exams. All students begin with a placement exam.

Individual programs for your students’ needs

STAY CONNECTED

* We feature Common Core Math and Traditional Math for private school students.

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and a half hours of focused study each morning, followed by another session of equal length in the afternoon. The second option focuses on outdoor adventure, covering, for example, a full week of planning, training, bike maintenance, and camping skills, followed by another week of hiking and biking in Zion, Arches, Upper School Students and Bryce Canyon national parks. Along the way, the Take Advantage of Two-Week students will be reading Intensive Program about nature and creation in poetry and — because Providence is a Christian Washington, D.C., to gardening and school — scripture. whitewater rafting. “It’s the experiences that stick with This year, for its 9th to 12th grad- the students,” said Scott Mitchell, the ers, Providence added TRIAD (Travel, outdoor education director. “The honResearch, Investigate, Apprentice, est campfire conversations, the moment Discover), a two-week intensive study they overcome a long-held fear to the program that encourages students to cheer of their classmates, and unplugpractice their passions in-depth and to ging from the world and taking in the home in on their interests and aptitudes. sights, smells, and feelings all help bring “It’s an idea we’ve been batting fullness to their educational experience.” around for about four years,” said Rod The third option combines the Meadth, principal of the middle and college-level study format with an upper schools. “Indirectly because of internship, during which students the pandemic, we realized how quickly follow a course of study in the mornwe can pivot. And we were in the mood ing before signing in for an afternoon to change things up, to come out of 2020 interning with an organization in the with some initiative.” community. “Providence School rests solidly upon In addition to hiking and biking, the the creativity and enthusiasm of our TRIAD course offerings run a range of teachers and students,” he added. “We interests, from photography, moviemaklearned a lot during COVID about how ing, printmaking, and cooking to sketch resourceful and adaptable our teachers comedy, theatrical costuming, rocket buildand students are. As an independent ing, and mock trial, among other options, school, we have broad freedom to craft all of them taught by Providence teachers. programs and classes that we believe “We are very consciously showcasing are worth pursuing — not because any our teachers,” Meadth said. “They are all external entity requires it of us. TRIAD such interesting people with so much gives us a chance to engage students and to offer. TRIAD really leans on their showcase the talent of our community in creativity.” unexpected ways.” To that end, TRIAD unfolds for two Preschool and Lower School (PS-6): 3225 Calle weeks in May, with three options. The Pinon; (805) 962-3091; Middle and Upper first option has students tackling a sub- Schools (7-12): 630 E. Canon Perdido St.; ject in a college-level format, with two (805) 962-4400; providencesb.org

10 Promotional Content | Schools of Thought 2021 | Santa Barbara Independent


COURTESY

Staci Richard (center) is the head of Laguna Blanca’s Science Research Program.

Staci Richard (center) is the head of Laguna Blanca’s Science Research Program.

Two-Year Deep Dives at Laguna Blanca

L

aguna Blanca has long been known for signature programs. With titles such as Mission to Mars, Soapbox Derby, Urban Adventures, and its TEDx talks — returning in February after last year’s pandemic pause — the independent school embraces project-based learning. A recent addition, launched in 201718, is the Science Research Program, a

At year’s end, it’s fashioned into a comprehensive report and final presentation before an audience of peers, parents, mentors, teachers, and Laguna Blanca boardmembers. These presentations are essentially 15-minute “conference talks,” says Richard, and include visuals, questions from the audience, and a recap of the student’s two-year STEM journey. All of it is buoyed by Laguna’s recently opened Center for Science and Innovation, anchored by Science Research new biology and chemistry laboratories and the built-out Program Is Latest Track for Nakamura STEM Research & Innovation Lab, an interdisMotivated Students ciplinary maker space for 3D design and robotics. “That’s an two-year course of study for motivated important piece of the program,” Richstudents to pursue an invigorating and ard said. “It can be hard to ask kids to do real “deeply edifying odyssey into the weeds of scientific inquiry,” said Tara Brouc- research,” she reflected. “It’s a long proqsault, the school’s communications cess, and they see how hard it can be. director. Sometimes it feels to me that they’re Heading up the program, Staci Rich- doing undergraduate research. And as ard said it’s grown considerably since these students are going off to college, its initial cohort to a little more than 40 we’re seeing that they’re more confident meeting and talking with professors and percent of eligible students. The Science Research Program starts getting access to research laboratories.” That’s a big plus, she says. But the in 10th grade by growing each student’s understanding of the STEM (science, flip side can be good, too. “Some stutechnology, engineering, and math) dents learn along the way that what field and teaching them how to read they thought would be interesting really research papers and exposing them to a doesn’t interest them. And that’s been range of speakers and discussion groups another great outcome.” to help channel their enthusiasm. Either way, she added, their eyes have In 11th, the students select an been opened to a much broader range of emphasis — examples include solar STEM careers than they would normally energy, aquaculture, robotics, AI, and see in high school. “And it’s been a great Alzheimer’s research, among other pur- way for the kids at Laguna Blanca to suits — for a full-year dive that’s guided take advantage of the great things hapby mentors, most of whom are based pening in Santa Barbara,” said Richard. in Santa Barbara. (Last year, via Zoom, “They’re connecting with doctors and the program pioneered remote mentor- tech people and nonprofits. It’s been a ships, some with out-of-state experts, way to build community.” Richard said.) This second year consists of a thor- 4125 Paloma Dr.; (805) 687-2461; ough examination of one specific area. lagunablanca.org

Join us for an interactive discussion and Q&A with our Head of School, Melanie Jacobs and Director of Admissions, Alyssa Morris. Learn more about our academic program and why the Montessori Method might be a good fit for your child.

VIRTUAL OPEN HOUSE Thursday, November 18 | 4 pm

RSVP: a.morris@mcssb.org (805) 683-9383 | WWW. MCSSB.ORG

Santa Barbara Independent | Schools of Thought 2021 | Promotional Content

11


8:15AM MORNING ELECTIVE

9:15AM ACADEMICS

Time to Connect VIRTUAL OPEN HOUSE DECEMBER 4, 3:00 PM

We invite you to join us and learn about our SBMS community. Please RSVP with mandy@sbms.org to attend. An Independent School, Grades 6-9. Applications due February 4, 2022.

3:00PM SPORTS

12 Promotional Content | Schools of Thought 2021 | Santa Barbara Independent

1321 Alameda Padre Serra, SB 93103 805-682-2989 | www.sbms.org | Financial Aid Available


MATT KETTMANN PHOTOS

FOOD &DRINK

p.39

Two Decades of M5 Tasting 18 Vintages of Margerum Wine’s Rhône Blend

T

he vertical tasting, in which multiple vintages of the

same wine are tasted in chronological order, is the most enlightening enological experience that exists. Because the basic bones of each wine are similar, sipping through the lineup— whether it’s just from three subsequent years or across two decades— reveals the differences of each year’s weather, the nuances of vineyards as they age, and the evolution of a winemaker’s technique. Vintners who dare to present verticals lay bare their life’s work, opening a window into the triumphs and tribulations of their past for all in attendance to debate. Doug Margerum dared as much last week, when he invited seven wine professionals to taste through 18 vintages of M5, his signature Santa Barbara BY MATT KETTMANN County–grown red blend of five grapes: grenache, syrah, mourvèdre, counoise, and cinsault. Inspired by the wines of Châteauneufdu-Pape in France’s Rhône Valley, M5 is the face of Margerum Wine Company, which he launched in 2001 following two decades of owning and operating the Wine Cask on Anacapa Street. After two vintages of crafting a syrah-grenachemourvèdre blend, Margerum was able to track down the last two grapes in 2003, and M5 was born. “We use grenache as the base, and then add syrah ’til it tips and mourvèdre ’til we like it,” explained Margerum, although syrah was the dominant percentage due to lack of available grenache until 2011. “The counoise and cinsault are the salt and pepper.” Our tasting was organized in three flights of five, descending from the not-yet-released 2020 vintage, all the way down to 2006; the last three wines came out more casually after those first 15. In addition to me, in attendance were Margerum Wine Co. employees Stephen Janes, Tom DeWalt, and Lisa Delanty as well as bouchon owner Mitchell Sjerven (who also ran a later incarnation of Wine Cask with Margerum), San Ysidro Ranch sommelier Tristan Pitre, and Tony Cirincione, the regional sales rep for Chambers & Chambers Wines. For me, all of the wines exhibited a very floral character, somewhere between rose and carnation, with a hint of cinnamon, whether they were from riper vintages, like 2015, or more austere ones, like 2011. We had minor disagreements, like when Sjerven thought the 2011 — whose peppery spice I love — to be a tad astringent, to which Margerum suggested pairing cheese. Sjerven also thought the 2012 may be hitting its peak, meaning that it would only devolve with

FOOD & DRINK

BOTTLE & BARRSELS

time. “No!” replied Margerum, offering an argument otherwise related to color, flavor, and mouthfeel. Pitre piped up, “It’s probably the most developed of the wines.” That satisfied Margerum, who thanked Pitre with a laugh, offering, “Clearly, you’re the one who sells wines.” Margerum discussed the changes over the years: the move from corks to screwcaps in 2014 (when he did half cork/half cap); the shift to estate-grown syrah in 2016; the creation of the M5 Reserve program in 2007; the launch of an M5 White in 2015. He GETTING VERTICAL: Last week’s tasting of 18 vintages of the M5 Rhône-style red blend made by Doug Margerum also clarified that he (above) revealed a lot of similarities and eye-opening differences for Margerum Wine Co.’s flagship wine. hasn’t been the day-today winemaker since 2016, when Michael Miroballi took those reins. approach retains complexity in the finished wines and “I still do the blends, but I’m not there every day. Look keeps them lively even as the years tick by. The evidence in that regard was stark, for we found that at my hands,” he said, showing off fingers and palms that weren’t stained purple like most winemakers sport this time the oldest wine in each flight — the 2016, the 2011, and the of year. “They’re clean.” 2006 — to be the freshest of each series. And then came What hasn’t changed is Margerum’s approach to fer- the 2003, perhaps the most vibrant of them all. mentation, which he does in a very slow and cool manner, “It’s uncanny,” said Janes. “It’s the oldest wine on the compared to the hot and fast approach that many employ, table.” Sjerven concurred. “You’re right,” he said. “The ’03 in part to free up tanks faster to fit more grapes. The gentle is unbelievable.” After Janes did a quick search on his computer, he reported back, “There’s only 12 bottles left of the 2003 — actually, minus the one we just drank.” That’s why you say yes when invited to verticals such as this one, because there’s only so much left of any vintage. “None of these wines are for sale,” said Margerum. “It’s just a trip down memory lane.” That turned out to only be partially true. The entire Margerum Wine Co. library just went on sale through the website, including a handful of the M5s we tasted, plus wines they no longer make, like Klickitat pinot gris from Washington and Purisima Mountain bottlings. Meanwhile, the 2021 harvest — which many are claiming to be one of the best ever due to its length, though we’ve heard that before — continued into its 48th day. “It will be the longest vintage on record for Margerum,” said Margerum, who still had 60 tons left hanging on the vines that November 8 night. I’ll be honored to taste how they contribute to the next M5, whether we get vertical again next year or, more likely, wait another decade.

See margerumwines.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

39


EEPING

a Barbara Beautiful FOR 55 YEARS

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

We a re

Coura

ge, C onfid

ence

& Ch

arac te

r

Media Grants

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

We are

Rachel, Age 17

for Santa Barbara County Nonprofit Organizations

Change a Child’s Story

SBCASA.ORG

And this is

what we do!

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread INSPIRING ALL GIRLS TO BE their messageSTRONG, to the greater Barbara community. SMART,Santa AND BOLD “Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

5

th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020 THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up healthy,

Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group isy Seaso Bab is chosen each month.& The Santa Barbara Independent The GranadaTheatre design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in thedel SantaHerrero Barbara Independent, with Casa the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation.

AMERICAN MASTERS

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

n

er is H

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

DAVID BAZEMORE

SB Wildlife Insert.indd 1

Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience.

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

“My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.” Rachel, Age 17

Change a Child’s Story

SBCASA.ORG

Visit independent.com/ givingtuesday2021 for more details

4/12/19 9:46 AM

ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION OF SANTA BARBARA

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with the goal of enhancing our community’s awareness and appreciation of architecture and the built environment. A public nonprofit charitable organization

e!

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

40

Ba

Continue reading for details

son

Deadline to participate: Friday, November 19

Good Work Lives On

y 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County!

ea by S

2/22/19 3:20 PM

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. wyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.”

er is H

e!

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

educated independent.

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

This Giving Tuesday, the Santa Barbara Independent will encourage our readers to participate in Giving Tuesday by highlighting area nonprofits and their great work in our newsletter, in print, and online.

Since 1989, changing the world for one cat at a time.

Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on the notion that we are, for better or for worse, different people in different places — and on the conviction that it is architecture’s task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Botton

THE INDEPENDENT

2/22/19 3:20 PM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021 Architectural Foundation Insert FINAL.indd 1

INDEPENDENT.COM 1/11/19 1:56 PM

ASAP Cats Insert.indd 1

Toesy

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JOHN DICKSON

CHICKEN CORNER: Kyle’s Chicken House is now serving sandwiches, tenders, and more in Isla Vista.

Kyle’s Chicken House

TAKE US HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS...

W

hat started as a limited-time-only spe-

cial became such a popular item at their other locations that the creators of Kyle’s Kitchen decided its Krispy Chicken recipe deserved its own restaurant. So now Kyle’s Chicken House is open at 900 Embarcadero Del Mar in Isla Vista, formerly a Kyle’s Kitchen and the original home of Silvergreens. “When we introduced our Krispy Chicken Sandwich at our Kyle’s Kitchen restaurants, it was such a hit, we knew we were onto something that people were really craving,” said owner Jay Ferro. “At Kyle’s Chicken House, we’re serving a fun and crave-worthy menu of comfort food you can feel good about enjoying because, like all our restaurants, everything is made from scratch in-house, using the highestquality ingredients possible.” Each piece of Krispy Chicken spends 24 hours marinating in an herbed buttermilk marinade and is then hand-breaded to order. The sandwiches are served on special house-made brioche buns, freshly baked daily. As the name suggests, the menu revolves around fried chicken, featuring a variety of sandwiches like the OG Chicken Sandwich, the Nashville Hot, and more. Purists can enjoy Fried Chicken Tenders or make a meal out of it, which includes crinkle-cut fries, Texas Toast, and dipping sauce. Also making a debut are their new Cheese Fries, featuring crinkle-cut fries smothered in queso cheese. The menu will continue to grow. As part of the Kyle’s brand restaurant family, Kyle’s Chicken House will also donate a portion of its proceeds to the Kyle’s Kitchen Special Needs Giving Back program, which has already donated more than $200,000 to date. The oneof-a-kind program helps people with special needs and disabilities reach their potential. The concept comes from the Ferro family, owners of Kyle’s Kitchen and Kyle’s Protein Grill, and the founders of the now-shuttered fast-salad concept Silvergreens. Kyle’s Chicken

House will also offer online ordering and catering. Hours are 11 a.m.-9 p.m. daily. Visit kyles chickenhouse.com. TAMALE CLASS: Chef Richard Lambert will teach the techniques he uses to make his award-winning tamales and salsas during a 90-minute class on Sunday, December 12, 2-3:30 p.m. The classroom is located at Rusty’s Pizza (upstairs meeting room), 232 West Carrillo Street. Each attendee will be served a variety of tamale samples and be shown how each flavor can be created at home. Additional class handout materials include escamocha (tropical fruit dessert), recipes, a listing of ingredient sources, and tamale reheating and storage guidelines. Attendees also receive the e-book version of Lambert’s cookbook, Preheat to 350 Degrees, featuring recipes along with personal anecdotes gathered over his lifetime. Tuition is $55 per person and class attendance is limited to 30 participants. Enroll online at tinyurl.com/ makingtamales.

FOOD & DRINK

HITS ISLA VISTA

Happy Holidays PIES! fromICEallCREAM of us to all of you!

CHOOSE ANY FLAVOR INCLUDING PUMPKIN PIE

Mission Street Ice Cream & Yogurt

Fine Ice Cream and Yogurts

201&West Mission St.since • 569-2323 ~ An Independently Owned Operated Shop 1986 ~ 201 West Mission St. • 569-2323

DESSERTS IN PASEO NUEVO: This just in from

reader Brendan: “A place called ‘Zio and Sweet Italian Desserts’ has opened in Paseo Nuevo, in the space where Le Macaron used to be. It looks like they have gelato and pastries.” The website zioandsweet.com describes their offerings as follows: “Our gelato, sorbetto, and pastries all come from real old-world recipes of a family from Milan that started in the dessert business over 60 years ago. They make the products that we proudly serve to you. Nobody can make it better.” Call (805) 770-8668 or walk on over to 819 State Street, Suite A.

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

GOOD CUP’S LAST POUR: Readers Kevin and Tricia

let me know that Good Cup at 918 State Street has closed after nine years in business. The java shop opened in October 2012. Good Cup on the Mesa at 1819 Cliff Drive closed in September 2018, so the brand has now departed from Santa Barbara

L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

Milpas 216 South Milpas Street

Lompoc 1413 N H Street

Downtown 628 State Street

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Buellton 209 E Hwy 246

Santa Maria 985 E Betteravia Road

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

41


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

MODERN DRAMA’S BIG BIRD

T

o members of the theater tribe, the plays of Anton Chekhov have the status of holy scripture. More even than with Shakespeare, whose universal appeal militates against such strict gatekeeping, the threshold experience of performing Chekhov stands as the rite of passage that ushers an actor into the realm of the theatrical elite. Experienced actors and directors measure their careers in Chekhov chunks. They memorialize their first times and celebrate their anniversaries as though his Three Sisters were their stage brides. When the UCSB Department of Theater opens Seagull, the second of Chekhov’s five major plays, on Thursday, November 18, in the school’s Hatlen Theater, echoes of multiple theatrical legacies will resound through the cast of young actors making their Chekhov debuts. For director Risa Brainin, who has directed all five of the Chekhov masterworks (and several more than once), the feeling is “like coming home.” A new cast of BFA students engages in the layered character work that undergirds successful performances by rehearsing Seagull with her. The script for this production was created by Libby Appel, distinguished Artistic Director Emerita of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and mother of Professor Irwin Appel, Brainin’s colleague at UCSB and yet another mentor through whom these students come to know the dramatic

TRIANGLE: Kirsten Høj with Ethan Kim (standing) as Konstantin and Harut Simonian as Trigorin

DAVID BAZENORE PHOTOS

UCSB THEATER STAGES CHEKHOV’S SEAGULL

tradition. All of which invites an obvious question: Something’s important about Seagull, but what is it exactly? What is Chekhov’s work about, and why does it inspire such devotion and reverence among the initiated? Let’s start with the bird. Chekhov’s gull is a symbol, and the characters in the play know and accept it as such. On the one hand, the seagull is free, natural, and capable of flight. On the other hand, the bird is, like a woman (especially a young woman), vulnerable to men’s violence. In a more traditional story, WINGSPAN: Kirsten Høj as Nina in UCSB’s Seagull the young woman would stand for the What comes across most powerfully, society, embodying its potential for renewal and what gives Chekhov’s plays their and regeneration. In this founding docu- unique place in theatrical culture, is the ment of modern drama, the symbol stands uncanny perception of sharing a single between the story and its meaning, empty- pervasive mood, the feeling of knowing ing the standard analogies and throwing something big and knowing it together, familiar ways of knowing into question. albeit each in their way. That’s what keeps The characters in Seagull want to be all these actors and directors coming known, yet they all struggle to express back to the big bird of modern drama — themselves. In some relationships, such as director Brainin puts it, “the need to as Trigorin and the actress Arkadina, the be seen and recognized for who you are.” thrust toward self-revelation plays out Ironically, it’s the wanting, and not the as farce. Their words and deeds convey getting, of this recognition that brings a the potential curdling of self-awareness great Chekhov cast together. into cynicism and self-dramatization. Seagull plays at the Hatlen Theater from In others, like Arkadina’s son, the inse- Thursday, November 18, through Monday, cure playwright Treplev, the desire to November 22. For tickets and informabe known leaks away in a seeping sense tion, visit theaterdance.ucsb.edu. of futility. —Charles Donelan

READY TO HANG AT CAW

Santa Barbara does a lot of things well, and none better than throwing a big art party. Ready to Hang, the community-wide art show and party at the Community Arts Workshop, is consistently one of the best. Taking place this year from 4-7 p.m. on Saturday, November 20, the exhibit will fill CAW with hundreds of 12x12 works from artists residing in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. Seeing the vast array of works and styles submitted by artists known and unknown, experienced and otherwise, all in the same space makes for an indispensable opportunity to feel which way the art winds blow, circa 2021. —CD

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HEADING OUT: “Wild Horses of Nevada” by Maynard Dixon, oil on canvas, 1927

EDWARD BOREIN, COWBOY ARTIST

Longtime Santa Barbara resident and prolific western artist Edward Borein is the subject of two shows currently on view at the Santa Barbara Historical Museum. In one wing, viewers can see the museum’s beautifully curated permanent collection of Borein’s work accompanied by many artifacts from his life and career, including saddles, a door, and a printing press. A second show focusing on Borein’s circle of friends will hang in the museum’s ample main gallery space until January 22, 2022. A noted authority on Borein’s work, Marlene R. Miller, has curated both exhibits with a keen eye for what makes this famous Santa Barbaran such an exemplary figure. Born and raised in California, Edward Borein arrived in time to witness the last decades of traditional longhorn cattle ranching in the southwest and Mexico. Adept at drawing from an early age, Borein combined an extraordinary work ethic as an artist with the physical derring-do of an early 20th-century cowboy, or vaquero, as he would likely have preferred to be known. Through long-standing friendships with famous personalities such as Will Rogers and Leo Carrillo, and by sheer persistence as a producer of many thousands of images of ranch life, Borein rose to prominence as the greatest Western artist in the country after his role model Frederic Remington. Fulfilling the expectations aroused by this line of work meant keeping an elaborate collection of western and native artifacts and participating in activities that ranged from authentic cattle drives to Buffalo Bill’s Wild West shows. In addition to these two fascinating and complementary exhibits, the Historical Museum has published a splendidly illustrated biography of the artist, Edward Borein: Etched by the West, by the art historian B. Byron Price. A catalog for the Borein and His Circle of Friends show is also available, making it possible to savor the curatorial work that went into the exhibit for years to come. —CD

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 42

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DAVID BAZEMORE

UCSB Middle East Ensemble

Department of Music

Fall Concert Series UCSB Wind Ensemble November 18 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

STAR POWER: Leonidas Kavakos and Yuja Wang form one of the highest-profile duos in contemporary music.

LEONIDAS KAVAKOS AND YUJA WANG

T

he practice of programming the music of Johann Sebastian Bach as a point of departure in recitals featuring more recent compositions has taken a firm hold on the world of chamber music in recent years. This concert featured Bach’s Sonata No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1016 as the prelude to Ferruccio Busoni’s Sonata No. 2 in E Minor, Op. 36a Presented by UCSB in the first half, and Arts & Lectures. At Bach’s Sonata No. 1 in UCSB’s Campbell B Minor, BWV 1014 as Hall, Fri., Nov. 12. the lead into the Sonata for Violin and Piano in G Major, Op. 134 of Dmitri Shostakovich in the second. The teaming of Leonidas Kavakos (violin) and Yuja Wang (piano), two of contemporary music’s biggest stars, naturally led to a high degree of anticipation for this, the first in UCSB Arts & Lectures 2021-2022 Classical Greats series. Their performance together did not disappoint.

UCSB Middle East Ensemble November 20 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

A strict, somewhat dry approach to the Bach Sonata No. 3, particularly on the part of Kavakos, served as an effective counterpoint to the sweeping romanticism of Busoni’s extravagant composition in E minor. Despite having spent much of his career in the scholarly study of Bach, and notwithstanding the inclusion of variations on an aria from Bach’s Notebook for Anna Magdalena Bach, Busoni’s writing in this piece is searching and enigmatic, especially in the sprawling third movement. Kavakos sounded very much at home in this piece, and Wang reminded us that the composer was a pianist while never outshining or overwhelming the violin part. The duo reserved the real fireworks for the finale, which displayed Shostakovich at his most jagged and idiosyncratic. The artists’ extreme confidence and musicality in performing these challenging pieces made this concert an occasion to savor. —Charles Donelan

ROYAL FIREWORKS

Y

ears of experience leading many of the world’s greatest orchestras through the music of the 18th century have given maestro Nicholas McGegan perfect pitch when it comes to speaking from the podium. His introductory remarks at this recent Sunday matiPresented by ne e p er for mance w it h Santa Barbara the Santa Barbara SymSymphony. At The Granada Theatre, phony were mo dels of Sun., Nov. 14. balance — equal parts erudition, wit, and warmth. Describing the opening sequence of dances drawn from the opera Naïs by Jean-Philippe Rameau, McGegan delineated the historical context the work shares with George Frideric Handel’s Royal Fireworks Music, the final of the program, & ENTERTAINMENT piece t h r o u g h a c o nt r a s t between French and

REVIEWS

English modes of celebration. In France, the signing of a peace treaty called for a mixture of music, song, and ballet. In England, the king was pleased to pair his concert with explosions. The surprise was that the French work called for sound effects courtesy of a thunder-making panel and a rotating paper contraption that mimicked the noise of rain. In the last piece, explicitly titled “Fireworks,” a timpani did the trick. Santa Barbara Symphony principal violist Erik Rynearson played Telemann’s Viola Concerto in G Major beautifully to close out the first half. After the intermission, the Symphony’s concertmaster, Jessica Guideri, performed the violin solos in Johann Sebastian Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G Major, BWV 1048, with vigor and exactitude. As a finale to the first full orchestral concert of the season, the Royal Fireworks Music made a superb choice: festive, majestic, and inspiring. —CD

UCSB Chamber Orchestra November 29 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB Jazz Ensemble November 30 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB Choirs by Candlelight: Clarity December 1 | 7:30 pm | Trinity Episcopal Church UCSB Ensemble for Contemporary Music December 2 | 7:30 pm | Karl Geiringer Hall UCSB Gospel Choir December 3 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Purchase Tickets $10 general admission | $7 seniors, military, non-UCSB students FREE UCSB students and children under 12 Purchase tickets via the new AXS Tickets app, online, or call (805) 893-2064. Scan the QR code or visit music.ucsb.edu/news/purchase-tickets for more information. We recommend that patrons purchase tickets in advance of all events. Masks and proof of vaccination or negative COVID test required. See music.ucsb.edu/news/covid-19-information for more details.

All Booked A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers. Sign up at independent.com/ newsletters

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Join us in reading November’s book of the month! NOVEMBER’S THEME: BOOKS WRITTEN BY INDIGENOUS AUTHORS

D I SCUSS ION :

Wednesday, December 1, 6pm Location: Municipal Winemakers on the patio B OOK OF THE MON TH :

An American Sunrise by Joy Harjo

independent.com/indybookclub

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF NOVEMBER 18

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries poet and philosopher Friedrich Hölderlin (1770-1843) had many ups and downs. He was one of Germany’s greatest poets and philosophers, but he also endured more emotional distress than most people. His biographer wrote, “Sometimes this genius goes dark and sinks down into the bitter well of his heart, but mostly his apocalyptic star glitters wondrously.” You may have been flirting with a milder version of a “bitter well of the heart,” Aries. But I foresee that you will soon return to a phase when your star glitters wondrously — and without the “apocalyptic” tinge that Hölderlin harbored.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Author David Foster Wallace felt sad about how little of our mind’s intense activity can be shared with others. So much of what goes on inside us seems impossible to express. Or if it is possible to express, few of our listeners are receptive to it or able to fully understand it. That’s the bad news, Taurus. But here’s the good news: In the coming weeks, I believe you will experience much less of this sad problem than usual. I’m guessing you’ll be especially skilled at articulating your lush truth and will have an extra receptive audience for it.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): “I never resist temptation,” declared playwright George Bernard Shaw. Why did he dare to utter such an outlandish statement? “Because I have found that things that are bad for me do not tempt me,” he said. I propose that you aspire to embody his attitude during the next eight weeks, Gemini. Make it your aspiration to cultivate a state of mind wherein you will only be tempted to engage with influences that are healthy and educational and inspiring. You can do it! I know you can!

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): While still a teenager, Cancerian cowboy Slim Pickens (1919-1983) competed in the rodeo, a sporting event in which brave athletes tangle with aggressive broncos and bulls. When America entered World War II, Pickens went to a recruiting office to sign up for the military. When asked about his profession, Pickens said “rodeo.” The clerk misheard and instead wrote “radio.” Pickens was assigned to work at an armed forces radio station in the American Midwest, where he spent the entire war. It was a safe and secure place for him to be. I foresee a lucky mistake like that in your near future, Cancerian. Maybe more than one lucky mistake. Be alert.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): To create your horoscope, I’ve borrowed ideas from four famous Leos. They all address your current astrological needs. First, here’s Leo author P. L. Travers: “More and more I’ve become convinced that the great treasure to possess is the unknown.” Second, here’s Leo author Sue Monk Kidd: “There is no place so awake and alive as the edge of becoming.” Third, Leo poet Philip Larkin: “Originality is being different from oneself, not others.” Finally, Leo author Susan Cheever: “There is no such thing as expecting too much.”

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I encourage you to adopt the perspective expressed by spiritual author Ann Voskamp. She wrote, “I want to see beauty. In the ugly, in the sink, in the suffering, in the daily, the moments before I sleep.” I understand that taking this assignment seriously could be a challenging exercise. Most of us are quick to spot flaws and awfulness, but few have been trained to be alert for elegance and splendor and wondrousness. Are you willing to try out this approach? Experiment with it. Treat it as an opportunity to reprogram your perceptual faculties. Three weeks from now, your eyes and ears could be attuned to marvels they had previously missed.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran educator and anthropologist Johnnetta Cole wrote, “The first sign of an educated

person is that she asks more questions than she delivers answers.” I agree and would also say this: A prime attribute of an intelligent, eager-to-learn person is that she asks more questions than she delivers answers. I encourage you to be like that during the coming weeks, Libra. According to my astrological estimation, you are scheduled to boost your intelligence and raise your curiosity. An excellent way to meet your appointments with destiny will be to have fun dreaming up interesting questions.

Dine Out

TAKE OUT SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY-AT-HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Some people become so expert at reading between the lines they don’t read the lines,” wrote author Margaret Millar. That’s not a common problem for you Scorpios. You are an expert at reading between the lines, but that doesn’t cause you to miss the simple facts. Better than any other sign of the zodiac, you are skilled at seeing both secret and obvious things. Given the astrological omens that will be active for you during the rest of 2021, I suspect this skill of yours will be a virtual superpower. And even more than usual, the people in your life will benefit from your skill at naming the truth.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Storyteller and mythologist Michael Meade believes that each of us has an inner Indigenous person — a part of our psyche that can love and learn from nature, that’s inclined to revere and commune with the ancestors, that seeks holiness in the familiar delights of the earth. The coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to cultivate your relationship with your inner Indigenous person. What other experiences might be available to you as you align your personal rhythms with the rhythms of the earth? What joys might emerge as you strive to connect on deeper levels with animals and plants and natural forces?

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn novelist Haruki Murakami writes, “I was always hungry for love. Just once, I wanted to know what it was like to get my fill of it — to be fed so much love I couldn’t take any more. Just once.” Most of us feel that longing, although few of us admit it. But I will urge you to place this desire in the front of your awareness during the next two weeks. I’ll encourage you to treat your yearning for maximum love as a sacred strength, a virtue to nurture and be proud of. I’ll even suggest you let people know that’s what you want. Doing so may not result in a total satisfaction of the longing, but who knows? Maybe it will. If there will ever be a time when such fulfillment could occur, it will be soon.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): An article published in the journal Scientific American declared, “Most people don’t know when to stop talking.” Conversations between strangers and between friends typically go on too long. A mere 2 percent of all dialogues finish when both parties want them to. That’s the bad news, Aquarius. The good news is that in the coming weeks, your sensitivity about this issue will be more acute than usual. As a result, your talk will be extra concise and effective — more persuasive, more interesting, and more influential. Take advantage of this subtle superpower! (Further info: tinyurl.com/ WhenToStop)

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Since 1996, Ira Glass has produced the renowned radio series This American Life. In 2013, as a reward for his excellence, he was offered a raise in his annual salary from $170,000 to $278,000. He accepted it for one year, but then asked that it be lowered to $146,000. He described the large increase in pay as “unseemly.” What?! I appreciate his modesty, but I disapprove. I’m always rooting for Pisceans like Ira Glass to embrace the fullness of their worth and to be aggressive about gathering all the rewards they’re offered. So I’m inclined, especially right now, to urge you NOT to be like Glass. Please swoop up all the kudos, benefits, and blessings you deserve.

HOMEWORK: Tell how everyone in the world should be more like you. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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Patient Services Representative Sansum Clinic is the leader in healthcare in Santa Barbara, with 100 years of excellence. As one of the first points of contact for our patients you be expected to provide high quality customer service in terms of appearance, demeanor and interactions with patients and their families. This candidate will work directly with patients, members of our healthcare team and physicians. Duties will also include data entry, scheduling, providing instructions/directions and completing necessary paperwork. Qualified candidates will have a 1 year of customer service and clerical support experience. Preferred candidates will have medical office experience as well as knowledge of medical terminology. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, as well as 403b retirement plan. Interested candidates can apply online at https://www.sansumclinic. org/employment to position #2995.

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL ANALYST

GSED (DEAN, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION) Manages the overall cycle and administration of academic personnel matters, including faculty merits and promotions, faculty recruitment, personnel and payroll issues for academic appointments, and the supervision and assignment and delegation of duties for the Academic Personnel Coordinator in the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education (GGSE). Reviews, analyzes, and interprets academic personnel policies, providing high‑level advice and support to department Chairs, faculty, staff, and the Dean. Analyzes a complex and diverse scope of Academic Personnel/HR issues to determine creative and practical solutions Implements new and frequently changing policies, procedures, and systems, and communicates these effectively to a wide range of audiences. Serves as the departmental liaison with the Dean’s Office, Academic Personnel, and the Office of Equal Opportunity on academic personnel and recruitment matters, collaborating with those offices to resolve policy interpretations on various cases. Reqs: Thorough knowledge and the ability to apply and interpret campus and university policies that govern Academic Personnel/ HR. Requires broad knowledge and comprehensive understanding of UC and campus Academic Personnel policies, practices, and procedures. Must possess excellent communication, organizational, and computer skills. Must have excellent attention to detail, and the ability to be accurate, thorough, professional, and service‑oriented, working with a variety of constituents in a fast‑paced environment with frequent interruptions. Must be able

NONPROFIT SEXUAL ASSAULT Response Team COORD. FT/benes. Eng/Span REQUIRED. Provide srvs. to survivors of sexual assault. See www.sbstesa.org/careers.

to work independently and deal with multiple competing deadlines, using sound judgment to reprioritize work and adjust timelines as necessary. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $25.00‑30.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26570

ASSISTANT CLERY COMPLIANCE COORDINATOR

UCSB POLICE Provides direct support for the UC Santa Barbara Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus CrimeStatistics Act compliance program. Serves as a professional resource for all laws and regulations outlined in the Federal CleryAct, helping develop a “best practice” Clery compliance program for UC Santa Barbara. Reqs: Strong verbal and written communication skills and demonstrated experience effectively conveying information. Excellent organizational and time management skills, with the ability to prioritize workload to meet deadlines. Demonstrated ability to identify research, analyze, interpret, and conduct complete analyses of complex laws, statutes, policies, and data. Ability to plan, organize, and deliver workshops/ training courses and training materials. Demonstrated ability to develop, design, and implement operational and administrative policies and practices. Ability to work with sensitive information and preserve confidentiality, meet deadlines, maintain objectivity, and prioritize workload in an organized manner. Demonstrated ability to write clear and concise reports,

policies, and correspondence and present information to stakeholders. Demonstrated critical, innovative, and strategic thinking skills and judgment to make sound decisions in uncertain or ambiguous situations; ability to approach challenges with a clear perception of organizational and political impacts. Bachelor’s Degree or related field and at least three to five years relevant experience OR Master’s Degree/J.D. and at least one or two years of relevant experience is preferable. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting requirements of Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,600‑$111,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/17/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25846

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, GOV RELATIONS

GOVERNMENTAL RELATIONS Assist with establishing and maintaining collegial and productive relationships with federal, state, and local officials and their staff on behalf of the campus. Provide information and work with campus staff, faculty, student groups, and alumni on federal and state legislative issues and UC advocacy campaigns. In collaboration with the Director, develop and implement strategies consistent with campus priorities to educate

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WEB CONTENT MANAGER The Santa Barbara Independent has an opportunity in our Digital Department. This full-time position will publish all editorial content on independent.com as part of a team of two web content managers. Looking for motivated individuals, who have great attention to detail and are ready to collaborate. Web content managers handle all digital formats including website, newsletters, and social media. HTML/CSS knowledge a plus. Will train the right candidate. Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance; Section 125 cafeteria plan; 401(k); and vacation program. This position is currently authorized to work from home, but weekly inperson meetings in Downtown Santa Barbara are required. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

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officials, staff, and community groups about the campus and the University of California. Attend government, community, campus, and other meetings and represent the Director as necessary. Provide high‑level analytical, research, and administrative support to the Director on ongoing and special governmental relations projects and initiatives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. 3‑5 years of experience working in community engagement; public relations; public policy or legislative agenda setting; and/or working at a federal, state, or municipal government level on funding and legislative processes or an equivalent combination of education and/or experience. Demonstrated experience working with local, state, and federal elected officials or related policy or political considerations. Solid analytical skills and ability to develop recommendations for positions on matters facing campus. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Able to travel and work occasional evenings and weekends. $61,200‑$70,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/29/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26236

COUNSELOR/ TRANSFER STUDENTS

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Utilizes advanced counseling skills gained at the Master’s degree level in counseling or related fields; exhibits culturally inclusive active listening skills and provides counseling services for personal, social, and academic issues, including but not limited to cultural identity, educational, relationship, family, sexuality and sexual identity issues. Collaborates in the successful development, planning, budgeting, and administration of Transfer Services. Evaluate programs and services to make relevant improvements in design, policies, procedures, and implementation, for current and future years. Reqs: Experience in providing in‑depth, wide‑ranging, and complex academic advising and holistic services to undergraduates. Working knowledge of MS Office products and Google Connect/Drive applications. Ability to coordinate and present educational programs and present educational, academic, social, cultural events/programs and workshops. Ability to work in a highly collaborative manner with a diverse group and a variety of cultural backgrounds.Experience with social media management on multiple platforms, updating department website, and Emma application. Ability to work occasional evenings and weekends. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $57,000‑$63,975/yr. The University

of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/3/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25905

DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATOR

COUNSELING, CLINICAL & SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY Provides administrative oversight of all departmental and clinic operations, and supervision of department staff and student assistants. The department houses approximately 20 Academic Senate Faculty and Lecturers, offers an accredited doctoral program in Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology, and includes the Hosford Counseling & Psychological Services Clinic. In addition to providing high‑level support to the CCSP Department Chair for managing faculty support, serves as the primary administrative point of contact for the department. Maintains the department budget, gathers and analyzes financial and other resource data; prepares reports for analyses of operational activities, evaluates current and proposed services. Independently develops appropriate business procedures and practices with procurement, financial, and personnel processes according to University policies and GGSE procedures. Audits and oversees payment processing and general ledger reconciliation.


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Mon 22

Sun 21 12:14 am 3.3

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5:48 pm -0.1

Tue 23

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12:15 pm 4.5

8:25 pm 0.3

19 D

27

3D

10 H source: tides.net

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EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM Supports the management, long‑range planning, organization, coordination, oversight, and/or performance of multiple operational activities and services for one or more buildings, including space planning, general maintenance, specialized facility systems, and operations, call center triage, and tracking of repair services, move planning and coordination, development of procedures, policies, and communications related to infrastructure and safety. Assists with special projects and office

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management for achieving the objectives of the organization. Manages the administration of off‑site file storage. Provides back‑up front entrance coverage as needed. Assists with office safety and security. Serves as an active member of the Emergency Response Team and is trained in first aid and CPR; serves as an Injury and Illness Prevention Program committee member. Work location is the UCEAP Systemwide Office in Goleta. Reqs: BA or AA degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Working knowledge of practices and procedures relating to facility maintenance. Written communication skills to prepare a variety of correspondence, reports, policies, and procedures, and training documents. Skills to work under pressure to successfully meet deadlines when required. Active listening, interpersonal communication, and problem‑solving skills to effectively resolve questions, concerns, issues, or problems and ensure cooperative and productive working relationships. Skills to work independently and as part of a team. Working organizational skills to work on multiple projects with competing deadlines, to establish goals and workload priorities with strong organization and attention to detail, and to meet project deadlines within budget and time constraints. Working knowledge of practices and procedures of safety and emergency preparedness. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. This is an essential position with 100% of the work performed onsite. Requires occasional on‑call work, outside of business hours, for emergencies and/or critical site‑related projects or issues. $24.62‑$28.73/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 12/1/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26941

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Maintains historical background of the Department in order to provide analytical evaluation and institute procedural changes as needed. Researches complex financial discrepancies and works with staff contacts in the Dean’s office as needed to resolve issues related to functions such as student services, budget, human resources, payroll, space, and school‑wide communications. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and training. Administrative work experience. Ability to communicate effectively verbally and in writing. Solid organizational skills and ability to work on multiple tasks within specific timeframes. Ability to interpret policy, procedures, and accurately communicate them. Proficiency with Excel, Word, and Email applications. Familiarity with Databases and/or Web‑based applications. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.62‑$28.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26498

(CONT.)

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61 Major book publishing company (or what the 1 Submarine acronym circled squares contain) 6 Batting game for little kids 66 Easy “Card Sharks” card to play from 11 Cousin in 2021’s “The 67 “The Beverly Hillbillies” star Addams Family 2” Buddy 14 “Fingers crossed” 68 Poe’s middle name 15 Vietnamese capital 69 “Totally tubular” 16 Pasture grazer 17 Replaces, as with a charged 70 Causing jumpiness, maybe 71 Ibsen heroine Gabler battery

Across

19 Local response to “Want some Irn-Bru?”, perhaps 20 Android alternative for smartphones 21 Doctor who’s a playable character in “Overwatch” 22 Choir member 24 “Let’s get together sometime” 29 “That’s the one” 30 Was on the radio 31 Actress Menzel of “Wicked” 34 Not well 36 Singer Rita 39 More than enough at the buffet 43 Come-___ (enticements) 44 Princess in L. Frank Baum books 45 Bug persistently 46 Like TV’s “Batman” 49 Buffoon 50 They may involve blue material 56 Not fully upright 57 Org. for Pelicans and Hawks 58 Losing tic-tac-toe line 60 Seafood restaurant freebie INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

Down

1 Emphatic exclamation, in Ecuador 2 “Incredible!” 3 Static, e.g. 4 Fitting 5 “Parks and ___” 6 What’s exited in Brexit, for short 7 Herb used in Thai cuisine 8 “Can I take that as ___?” 9 Grant played by the late Ed Asner 10 Roadside rubbish 11 Plaint that may prompt words of encouragement 12 “Happy Birthday ___” 13 Annoying sibling, maybe 18 Some insurance groups, for short 23 Letters on a wide wedge, maybe 25 “Auld Lang ___” 26 Pick up aurally 27 Country cottage, in Russia 28 M as in NATO? 31 “Where did ___ wrong?” 32 Home refuge

33 Put a message on, as jewelry 34 Hostess snack cake 35 Philosophy suffix 37 “Messenger” material 38 Competition hosted by Terry Crews, for short 40 Faux pas comment 41 Grateful Dead bass guitarist Phil 42 El ___, TX 47 Word before hours or fours 48 Units to measure London’s Shard, e.g. 49 “___ I!” (“Same here!”) 50 Title elephant of children’s lit 51 City on the Mohawk River 52 Preposition with mistletoe? 53 John H. Johnson’s magazine 54 “What ___ it take?” 55 “A pity” 59 TV’s “Warrior Princess” 62 “Supermarket Sweep” network 63 Codebreaking org. 64 “Likely story!” 65 Stadium chant for Marta, e.g. ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1058

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

NOVEMBER 18, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT NOVEMBER 18, 2021

47 47


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT GROUNDS EQUIPMENT OPERATOR

PARKING Operates a large street sweeper to keep all parking lots, campus roads, and other paved areas clean and free of debris. With the potential future addition of a smaller sweeper to Grounds equipment inventory, the incumbent may also sweep bike paths and other paved areas as directed. Performs daily inspection and cleaning tasks on the machine as per manufacturer’s recommendations and also performs weekly and periodic required service to sweeper(s) such as brush changing, filter element cleaning, tire inflation, hydraulic hose inspection, suction unit friction shoe inspection, and torque check of necessary threaded fasteners to maintain the machine in optimal operating condition. May also use trucks and trailers to collect and haul debris from parking lots. May also use other hand and power tools as required and trained by a Lead Parking Maintenance Worker. May also perform other tasks such as planting, tree pruning, trimming, sign repair, traffic control, dust control, litter control, hand irrigation, weeding, fertilizing, or pavement painting or maintenance as required by the Lead Parking Maintenance Worker. Reqs: Ability to follow oral and written directions. 3 years of experience as an Equipment Operator which includes operating ride‑on mowers, sweepers, and large equipment. Experience working in multiple family housing environments. Minimum of 3 years experience as a Groundskeeper. Ability to work with diversified staff, students, and residents. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $19.07‑ $21.93/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26342

GROUNDSKEEPER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Performs operational level groundskeeping duties as assigned. Cultivates planted areas; plants, fertilizes, and maintains shrubs, small trees, lawns and other ground covers; may operate irrigation systems manually and by automatic controls. Uses a variety of hand and powered tools and equipment, including lawn mowers, edger, line trimmers, hedge trimmers, blowers, and vacuums. Cleans grounds and walks of litter; empties trash receptacles; maintains and makes minor repairs to tools, irrigation, and drainage systems. Reqs: Minimum three years experience in institutional or commercial landscape maintenance and installation. Demonstrable knowledge of plant care, safe equipment use, landscape irrigation principles, horticultural pest control experience, a strong work ethic, and the ability to be a team player. Ability to communicate effectively in English. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $18.38‑$21.55/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual

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orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu.Job # 26139

IT OPERATIONS MANAGER

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Administer computing infrastructure and services for students, staff, and faculty including admin of mixed server technologies, integration of external services, Windows domain mgmt., host virtualization, wired/ wireless network infrastructure, desktop OS, and application imaging, scripting, application of security best practices, and documentation. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in the related field, or equivalent experience. Preferred: Experience with Windows server technologies (Active Directory, PowerShell, Hyper‑V, Active Directory, Group Policy). Other technologies (VMware, DNS, DHCP, Apache, Linux, cloud computing, RMM, OS imaging, network infrastructure). $67,500‑$90,000/yr. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #21366.

LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long‑term social services, including long‑term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of California. Master’s degree in Social Work. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25943

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

support to physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurses. Assists with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out the necessary paperwork, taking phone messages, and following directives from the clinicians. Acts as a resource for non‑licensed staff. Utilizes nursing knowledge in these tasks as well as but not limited to providing patient education, administering immunizations, and functioning within the scope of practice. Reqs: Licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Must be organized, detailed oriented, confidential and dependable. Strong oral/written communication, organizational and customer service skills. Proficient in Microsoft and Google suite. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must be licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must have a current license at all times during employment. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11month position. 4 weeks of furlough is taken during quarter breaks and summer months. May include Thurs. evenings. $30.42‑$37.83. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21751

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Acts as an assistant using independent judgment, organizational support to personnel and credentialing duties. Is responsible for a variety of administrative tasks that include being the primary support person for the Administrative Services Director and Business Operations Officer, managing various department documents, forms and other paperwork, providing information by telephone and in person, and assisting other management staff with project‑related tasks. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. Excellent written and oral communication skills, effective interpersonal skills, and the ability to exercise independent judgment. Must be organized, accurate and dependable. Demonstrated attention to detail with frequent interruptions. Must successfully complete and pass a background check before employment and date of hire. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/24/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26735

PROGRAMMING MANAGER NCEAS FINANCIAL ANALYST

CENTER ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Responsible for the daily management of the Centers’ financial matters. Areas of responsibility include on‑boarding of all new employees, Academic Personnel Processes, UCPath and Kronos processing for all staff and academic employees; accurate leave reporting; purchasing; payment processing for entertainment expenses, monthly space rent; and form 5 expenditures. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or an equivalent combination of education and work experience. Proficiency in Excel and Word. Strong analytical skills and an ability to prioritize multiple tasks with minimal supervision. Creative problem‑solving abilities. Ability to work effectively and cooperatively as a staff team member. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The position is funded by a federal contract/subcontract and requires E‑Verify check. $24.62 ‑ $27/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25311

ARTS & LECTURES Responsible for programming, booking, and managing Arts & Lectures public events. This position is essential to the success of current season events as well as future years’ programming. As a public‑facing senior representative of the organization, the Programming Manager is responsible for building and sustaining collaborative relationships between Arts & Lectures and Artists, Lecturers, Agents, Tour Managers, Venue Management, University, and other representatives. This position is a critical bridge to solicit, organize, and disseminate complex event information between organizations, and within Arts & Lectures’ various departments. Ensures that complex contractual obligations are met for the Lecture, Film, and Performing Arts programs as well as special events. Reqs: Advanced knowledge of and professional experience utilizing concepts, principles, and best practices of event planning execution, including programming and production of highly complex events. Extensive professional experience managing high visibility, high‑impact, high‑risk events; ability to apply best practices and industry standard techniques under pressure, and to deal with multiple constituents, often with competing priorities. Familiarity with and the ability to articulate and promote Arts & Lectures programming and organizational structure including its vision, mission, goals, objectives, achievements, and infrastructure. Extensive project

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management expertise, including experience programming a full season of engagements. Advanced interpersonal communication skills to build and maintain relationships at all organizational levels and with a variety of constituents. Highly developed political acumen and communication abilities to build and sustain collaborative relationships with A&L Executive Director, Artists, Lecturers, Agents, Tour Managers, Venue Management, and other representatives. Proven success in exercising sound independent judgment; ability to maintain confidentiality, and act with tact and discretion with sensitive or confidential information. Extensive experience in meeting goals and objectives within budget and time constraints in an arts/live events capacity with a volume of at least 60 public events annually. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Ability and willingness to work frequent events and weekends. $67,500‑85,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/30/2021. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26877

SENIOR ACADEMIC PERSONNEL ANALYST

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL Serves as a primary resource and contact for academic personnel policy for the Chancellor, Executive Vice Chancellor, Associate Vice Chancellors, Deans, Provosts, Academic Senate, Organized Research Units, and academic departments. Maintains a broad and functional understanding of academic personnel policies and procedures to provide oversight and training for the campus. This position requires a high level of initiative, problem‑solving ability, independence and judgment, a strong professional orientation, effective verbal and written skills, and the capacity to organize and handle a wide range of responsibilities accurately and consistently. Skill in working as a member of a team and in collaborating with individuals on a variety of levels is required. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Thorough knowledge of complex personnel, compensation, and related policies and procedures, and employment law related to academic client groups. Strong understanding of the organizational structure and responsibilities of the academic personnel function. Ability to develop creative solutions which may have no precedent. Skills in organization and customer service to effectively manage multiple important priorities. Proven ability to organize department work functions in an efficient and effective manner. Excellent skills to work collaboratively and act persuasively in sensitive situations; skills in conflict management techniques. Requires understanding of academic personnel‑related systems and databases. Experience with Microsoft Office Suite and Google Workspace. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $73,000‑85,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other

characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26478

SITE RELIABILITY ENGINEER

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT The ETS Infrastructure group is looking for a self‑motivated team player with at least 3 years of Linux system administration experience including advanced networking. We help to manage the North Hall Data Center (NHDC), host enterprise Campus‑wide applications, provide system administration, and maintain the Core IT virtual Infrastructure both on‑premises and in various public clouds. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Information Technology; or equivalent work experience. Please see https://www.it.ucsb.edu/ enterprise‑technology‑services to learn more. $67,500‑$104,600/yr. depending on experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24591

applications, and maintenance of student records. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent experience in academic advising or customer service‑related fields. Ability to understand and inform students about campus policies, procedures, and requirements. Basic knowledge of working with a diverse student population, and sensitivity to culture, race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and socio‑economic status. Strong interpersonal skills, with a proven ability to communicate professionally and effectively, both verbally and in writing. Skills in problem solving, judgment, and decision‑making. Solid organizational skills and proven detail orientation. Basic knowledge of the UC system, student information systems, and Summer Sessions operations. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. No extended vacations may be taken during spring or while programs are in session. Must work occasional weekend and/or evening hours while programs are in session, as needed. $23.66 ‑ $26.82/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/29/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26613

STUDENT SERVICES MANAGER SR. CUSTODIAN

UCEN ADMINISTRATION Responsible for the following functions in the University Center and other department buildings as required: Custodial Care of the University Center Department Buildings, Following and Enforcing Policies, Procedures and Directions, Safety, Security, Customer Service, and Employee Development. Reqs: Responsible for all aspects of custodial work such as cleaning floors, walls, windows, furniture, restrooms, stairs, ceilings, garbage cans, entryways, and walkways; emptying garbage cans, changing lights, moving equipment, and supplies, and arranging furniture. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work NIGHTS and/or weekends as this position is for an evening shift position. $20.14‑$21.38/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/29/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26880

STUDENT SERVICES ADVISOR 2

SUMMER SESSIONS Support and advise new, continuing, and returning UCSB students, and visit high school students regarding Summer Sessions’ programs, courses, policies, deadlines, and fees. Serves as a primary point of contact for phone inquiries, email inquiries, and in‑person visitors, and triages registration and fee issues in collaboration with BARC, Financial Aid, Office of the Registrar, College Advising offices, and academic departments. Assists with Summer Sessions outreach, promotion, and training, review of summer program

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for the oversight of all aspects of the Graduate and Undergraduate Student Affairs programs of HASC. Within the specific areas of Student Affairs, Curriculum and Project Management, Finance, Academic Personnel, and Space Management, the Student Services Manager independently identifies, analyzes, and solves problems in support of Departmental and University teaching and research missions. Reqs: Bachelor of Arts or equivalent combination of education and experience. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills including the ability to professionally interact with students, staff, and faculty on the phone, virtually, via email, and in person. Excellent analytical and problem‑solving skills. Strong computer and organizational skills. Ability to work independently under general supervision and prioritize tasks in conjunction with multiple deadlines. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,600‑$69,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/24/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26562

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HOUSES/DUPLEXES FOR RENT HOUSE FOR RENT two bedrooms,1 bath, ref, dishwasher, wash/dryer machine outdoor yard, patio, two car garage. Hope Ranch annex. 1/2 mile from Mira Mesa beach. Pets ok/No smoke/ No vape. La Cumbre School district. Charming single family cottage, very clean 246 Puente Dr. SB 93110; (DO NOT DISTURB OCCUPANTS) $4250 per mo. (805) 618‑8433 8am‑3pm pst.

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ROBERT O. MANGUS NO: 21PR00459 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ROBERT O. MANGUS A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: ROBERT O. MANGUS, JR., THOMAS A. MANGUS, and SHELLIE BURBANK in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): JACQUELYN QUINN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s to will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 12/02/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear

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at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: April M. Lavigne, Law Offices of April M. Lavigne. 7 W. Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA (805) 881‑1230. Published Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JEFFREY HARB, also known as JEFFREY EUGENE HARB and JEFFREY E. HARB Case No.: 21PR00489 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JEFFREY HARB, also known as JEFFREY EUGENE HARB and JEFFREY E. HARB A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: KRISTI HARB in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: KRISTI HARB be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 12/16/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice

form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LARRY J. WINTER (aka LARRY WINTER) NO: 21PR00509 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of LARRY J. WINTER, (aka LARRY WINTER) A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: CHARLIZE WINTER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): CHARLIZE WINTER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 12/23/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON In re the Conduct of:) Case Nos. 21-38 & 21-59 MICAH D. FARGEY, Bar No. 096814 Respondent. PUBLISHED NOTICE TO ANSWER TO: Micah D. Fargey Last known address: 7307 SW Beveland Road, Ste. 200, Portland, OR 97223 You are hereby notified that the Oregon State Bar (Bar) has filed a BR 3.1 petition for suspension during pendency of disciplinary proceedings (BR 3.1 Petition) against you based on the allegations as set forth in the Bar’s amended formal complaint. A true copy of the BR 3.1 Petition can be obtained from the Oregon State Bar Disciplinary Board Clerk (Disciplinary Board Clerk) at 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. The Bar seeks your immediate suspension from the practice of law pending the disposition of disciplinary charges filed against you as set forth in the Bar’s amended formal complaint. You are further notified that you may file with the Disciplinary Board Clerk, with a service copy to the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, your verified answer within fourteen (14) days from the date of service of this notice upon you. Upon the filing of your answer with the Bar or in case of your default in so answering, the BR 3.1 Petition shall be heard, and such further proceedings as the law and the facts shall warrant. You are further notified that an attorney accused of misconduct may, in lieu of filing an answer, elect to file with the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, a written resignation from membership in the Bar. Such a resignation must comply with BR 9.1 and be in the form set forth in BR 13.7. You should consult an attorney of your choice for further information about resignation. The address of the Oregon State Bar is 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. EXECUTED this 5th day of November 2021. OREGON STATE BAR By: /s/ Veronica R. Rodriguez Veronica R. Rodriguez, Bar No. 181818 Assistant Disciplinary Counsel Published Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON In re the Conduct of:) Case Nos. 21-38 & 21-59 MICAH D. FARGEY, Bar No. 096814 Respondent. PUBLISHED NOTICE TO ANSWER TO: Micah D. Fargey Last known address: 7307 SW Beveland Road, Ste. 200, Portland, OR 97223 You are hereby notified that the Oregon State Bar (Bar) has filed a formal complaint and an amended formal complaint against you, alleging your violations of RPC 1.3, RPC 1.15-1(a), RPC 1.15-1(c), RPC 1.15-1(d), RPC 1.16(d), RPC 8.1(a)(2), RPC 8.4(a)(2), RPC 8.4(a)(3), and RPC 8.4(a)(4) in five causes of complaint. A true copy of the formal complaint and amended formal complaint can be obtained from the Oregon State Bar Disciplinary Board Clerk (Disciplinary Board Clerk) at 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. The Bar seeks to impose formal discipline upon you for these alleged violations. You are further notified that you may file with the Disciplinary Board Clerk, with a service copy to the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, your verified answer within fourteen (14) days from the date of service of this notice upon you. Upon the filing of your answer with the Bar or in case of your default in so answering, the amended formal complaint shall be heard, and such further proceedings as the law and the facts shall warrant. You are further notified that an attorney accused of misconduct may, in lieu of filing an answer, elect to file with the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, a written resignation from membership in the Bar. Such a resignation must comply with BR 9.1 and be in the form set forth in BR 13.7. You should consult an attorney of your choice for further information about resignation. The address of the Oregon State Bar is 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. EXECUTED this 5th day of November 2021. OREGON STATE BAR By: /s/ Veronica R. Rodriguez Veronica R. Rodriguez, Bar No. 181818 Assistant Disciplinary Counsel Published Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. 50

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NOVEMBER 18, 2021

appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Rosaleen Wynne, Esq, 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146; (805) 966‑1204. Published Nov 11, 18, 24 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELLEN SERRA NO: 21P00524 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELLEN SERRA A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: KEVIN ROBERT SERRA in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): KEVIN ROBERT SERRA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 01/06/2022 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote, Esq, Law Offices of James F. Cote 222 East Carrillo Street,

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Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1204. Published Nov 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: #1 CAR WASH, #1 GASOLINE at 1901 South Broadway Santa Maria, CA 93454; Crest Trading Company 1601 Skyway Drive 114 Bakersfield, CA 93308 The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 06/13/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0001736. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Vickey Rockberg (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 3, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30, Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GROW YOUR REPUTATION at 7041 Armstrong Rd. Goleta, CA 93117; Michael J Shierloh (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Michael Shierloh Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002841. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TRUTH IN RECRUITMENT at 1111 Chapala St Ste 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jackie Carerra, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002960. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: COLORS WINE CELLARS at 206 South C St. Lompoc, CA 93436; Christopher M. Rogers (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Christopher Rogers, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002874. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE ADULT STORE at 405 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; S.B. Books Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Donovan Green, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 05, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002810. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OROZCO PLASTERING at 635 E. Maple St. Oxnard, CA 93033; Moises Orozco Hernandez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Moises Orozco Hernandez, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021.

This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002884. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BERNIE BAGGS VO LLC, BERNIE BAGGS VO, BERNIE BAGGS at 290 Main St Los Alamos, CA 93440; Bernie Baggs Vo LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Bernard Baggarly, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002818. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GILL FORD MAZDA at 440 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Gill Motors SB, Inc. 1100 S. Madera Ave. Madera, CA 93637 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Gagandeep Chahal, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003005. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE UNCOMMON BALANCE at 2021 Chino Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Courtney R. Salviolo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Courtney Salviolo, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002998. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JAK PHOTOGRAPHS at 767 Cypress Walk Apt C Goleta, CA 93117;Juliana A Kunz (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Juliana A Kunz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2021‑0002958. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: KEG N BOTTLE MARKET #4 at 915 Embarcadero Del Mar Goleta, CA 93117; NBK, Inc. 6060 El Cajon Blvd. San Diego, CA 92115 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randy Konja, Vice President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002805. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MITSUYE YAMADA & MICHAEL YASUTAKE JUSTICE FUND at 522 University Rd. 5034 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA 93106; Diane Fujino 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117; Matef Harmachis 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Unincorporate Assoc. Other Than a Partnership Signed: Matef Harmachis, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County

Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002990. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PHILASOPHIE at 474 Cinderella Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Philasophie LLC 2108 N. Street Ste N Sacremento, CA 95816 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Melissa Mininni, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002905. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHAINED SB at 1204 Diana Road Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Stefanie J. Bayles (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Stefanie Bayles Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002920. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SBBIKE, BICI CENTRO, SBBIKE+COAST, COAST+SBBIKE at 506 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Greg Janee, Secretary Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002921. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: QUEEN MARY SEAFOODS at 2405 Calle Linares Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Henry D. Hepp (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Henry Hepp Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002996. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ICAREHEALTHCARE at 150 Via Lee Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Catherine A Callahan (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Catherine Callahan Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003061. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND POOL SERVICES at 770 La Roda Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jimmy Jerry Russell (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jimmy J Russell, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002987. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE POPE’S NEW at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Industrial Way LLC 2060 Huntington Dr. Ste


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1 San Marino, CA 91108 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Robert Tweed, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003089. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOCALE GROUP, LOCALE PARTNERS, LOCALE REAL ESTATE, THINK LOCALE at 1290 Coast Village Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Jonathan R Perkins 1628 La Vista Del Oceano Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathan Perkins Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021‑0002913. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YWAM‑SANTA BARBARA, YOUTH WITH A MISSION‑SANTA BARBARA, YWAM SB at 4978 La Gama Way Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Interntional Reconciliation Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: David Mitchell, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003056. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ORGULLO WINES, AREA 5.1 at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Orgullo Wine Group, LLC 567 West Channel Islands Boulevard 238 Port Hueneme, CA 93041 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Guillermo Gomez, Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 05, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003094. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: KIN BAKESHOP at 199 S. Turnpike Road, Suite 103 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Mor, Inc. 5109 San Simeon Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: William Chen, Chief Financial Officer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003105. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SAVOR MATCHA at 133 East De La Guerra, #239 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Aiko Strasser, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003116. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE

POPE’S NEW at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Industrial Way LLC 2060 Huntington Dr Ste 1 San Marino, CA 91108 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Robert Tweed, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003089. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOKI VENDING at 1426 Burton Mesa Blvd. Lompoc, CA 93436; Kevin Maxwell Telfer 740 N H Street #161 Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Individual Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002961. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE GOODLAND COALITION at 6155 Verdura Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Robert E Wignot (same address) George A Relles 484 Valdez Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Unincorporated Assoc. Other Than a Partnership Signed: Robert E. Wignot, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0003103. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: OLIVE HOUSE INC., FEELEY WINES, LOS OLIVOS OLIVE OIL COMPANY, TWENTY MILE WINERY at 1603 Copenhagen Dr. Solvang, CA 93463; Olive House Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jeff Feeley, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E17. FBN Number: 2021‑0003068. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MINDFUL EATING INSTITUTE at 610 Maple Avenue, #B Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Petra Beumer (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Petra Beumer, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 09, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003121. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEE WILD COLLECTIVE at 875 Cieneguitas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Evan R Froewiss (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Evan Froewiss Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 11, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003134. Published: Nov 18, 24. Dec 2, 9 2021.

NAME CHANGE AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TYLER

JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03264 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TYLER JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO: TYLER NORTH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 14, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 15, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KRISTINE CASULLO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03385 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KRISTINE CASULLO TO: KRISTINE CHRISTENSEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KIRSTEN BLICHER HINRICHS TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03996 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KIRSTEN BLICHER HINRICHS TO: DAY WITHERSPOON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the

objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive

weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES RFP ‑ Isla Vista Parking Study The Isla Vista Community Services District is seeking proposals for an Isla Vista Parking Study. Submittal Due Date/Time: Tuesday, November 30, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT)

Submittal Location: Electronic submittals via email to generalmanager@islavistacsd. ca.gov

Monday, November 16, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT) Submittal Due Date/Time: Monday, November 30, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT)

https://islavistacsd.ca.gov/ rfp‑isla‑vista‑parking‑study

Submittal Location: Electronic submittals via email to generalmanager@islavistacsd. ca.gov

ISLA VISTA PLANNING REPORT & EDUCATIONAL WORKSHOP REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

https://islavistacsd.ca.gov/

The Isla Vista Community Services District is seeking proposals for an Isla Vista Planning Report and Educational Workshop. Requests & Clarifications Deadline:

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE TREE TRIMMING AND TREE MAINTENANCE SERVICES FOR PARKWAY STRIPS AND FACILITIES 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site which can be accessed at the following link (http://www.cityofgoleta.org/i- want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities) until 3:00 P.M., December 21, 2021, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available on the CITY website at http://www.cityofgoleta. org/i-want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities. The work includes but is not limited to tree maintenance, tree trimming, pruning, removal, stump grinding, plantings, chipping, cleanup of work maintenance procedures and all labor, supervision, material and equipment necessary to provide TREE TRIMMING AND TREE MAINTENANCE SERVICES FOR PARKWAY STRIPS AND FACILITIES. The services shall be performed in accordance with the Contract Documents, which includes provisions that the work shall be performed without the use of pesticides or commercial fertilizers. The term of the contract shall be thru June 30, 2024, however it will be subject to annual approval of the budget on July 1st of each year within the contract term. A non-mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting is scheduled on December 7, 2021, at 10 A.M at 130 Cremona Dr. Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 for this project. Meet outside of Suite B. No relief will be granted to contractors for any conditions or restrictions that would have been discovered if they had attended the pre-bid meeting. Please RSVP via PlanetBids no later than close-of-business the day prior to the scheduled bid walk. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received within three (3) City business days of the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR TREE TRIMMING AND TREE MAINTENANCE SERVICES FOR PARKWAY STRIPS AND FACILITIES.” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class ”C-27 – Landscaping Contractor” Contractor’s license and valid Class “C-61/D-49 – Limited Specialty/Tree Service” Contractor’s license in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted, nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 9617505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact J. Paul Medel in writing at pmedel@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA _______________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: November 18 and December 2, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 18, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT NOVEMBER 18, 2021

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