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Special Section: Gatherings • News: Munger, UCSB Clap Back

food: Simple Feast Delivers Veggie Meals • arts: Royal Fireworks at S.B. Symphony FREE

Santa Barbara

NOV. 11-18, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 826

Mermaids Get Real

Maritime Museum Exhibits Photos of Aquatic Humanoids

by Maggie Yates


Make It a Holi-date!

Ring in the season with live music and cheer

She & Him

A Very She & Him Christmas Party Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM / Arlington Theatre Usher in the holiday season with the “old-school studio-pop sensibility” (NPR) of M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

My Bluegrass Heart Béla Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Bryan Sutton

Wed, Dec 15 / 8 PM / Arlington Theatre This unparalleled evening in support of Béla Fleck’s new album My Bluegrass Heart is a veritable Who’s Who of some of the greatest instrumentalists in bluegrass history.

Your One-stop Holiday Shop (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 2

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

A&L gift certificates are available online now.


volume 35, # 826, Nov. 11-18, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera

COVER STORY 21 Mermaids Get Real

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg

Maritime Museum Exhibits Photos of Aquatic Humanoids

Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley

by Maggie Yates

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates

Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

Distribution Scott Kaufman

Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

Wendy Read is the mastermind behind Gatherings (see insert), a new series that showcases the entertaining lifestyles of Santa Barbarans. She tells us more about herself and the idea for this project. Tell us a bit about your background. I’ve been in Santa Barbara for over 20 years and can’t imagine living anywhere else. I change careers pretty regularly — actress, attorney, charter school developer, nonprofit consultant — but I would say the common thread is that I am always interested in connecting people and ideas. Gatherings is really an extension of that interest. I love getting people together around a table and asking questions. Add good food, and I am very happy.

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Why will these pieces resonate with today’s readers? I think we are all ready to get off this long road of isolation. Ready to gather with friends and family again. Ready to set the table and have people over. We hope Gatherings will make that a little easier. Plus, I think readers will enjoy having a little peek into the lives of other people who live here.

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Are you looking for any input from readers for future spreads? Yes. We are hoping that Gatherings inspires readers to invite people over for a meal and a conversation, and we would love to hear about it!

Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy

INTRODUCING GATHERINGS COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 ON THE COVER: Photo by Ralph Clevenger. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

Send ideas to gatherings@independent.com. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

3


international series

masterseries

at the Granada Theatre SEASON SPONSOR:

at the Lobero Theatre

SAGE PUBLICATIONS

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2022, 7:30PM

2022 SEASON

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Vasily Petrenko, Music Director Olga Kern, piano

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2022, 7:30PM

103rd CONCERT SEASON

Welcome Back to Live Classical Music with CAMA!

FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2022, 7:30PM

SEASON SPONSOR:

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC

JORDI SAVALL AND LE CONCERT DES NATIONS Jordi Savall, Director & bass viol

FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 2022, 7:30PM

BENJAMIN GROSVENOR, piano SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2022, 7:30PM

ISABEL BAYRAKDARIAN, soprano

Elim Chan, conductor Igor Levit, piano

MARK FEWER, violin JAMIE PARKER, piano

CAMA and Music Academy of the West co-present the London Symphony Orchestra in concert in celebration of the Music Academy’s 75th anniversary

TUESDAY, MAY 24, 2022, 7:30PM

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2022, 7:30PM

Sir Simon Rattle

Elim Chan

Sir John Eliot Gardener

Olga Kern

JAMES EHNES, violin ORION WEISS, piano

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Sir Simon Rattle, Music Director TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2022, 7:30PM

ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS

Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Music Director

Jordi Savall

Benjamin Grosvenor

Isabel Bayrakdarian

James Ehnes

SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 12:30PM LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE JANUARY 18, 2022 Granada Theatre (805) 899-2222, granadasb.org | Lobero Theatre (805) 963-0761, lobero.org

Season subscriptions still on sale. Contact CAMA (805) 966-4324 | camasb.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA

FREE STUDIO SUNDAY

watercolor

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14 1:30 – 4:30 PM FREE Visitors of all ages are invited to participate in this hands-on, informal workshop with SBMA Teaching Artists. Each month, explore a different medium—clay, metal, ink, wood, photography, paper—inspired by works of art in the Museum’s collection or special exhibitions. In November, paint a still-life of pears in watercolor inspired by two paintings currently on view from the permanent collection. LOCATION: Family Resource Center, Ground Floor Santa Barbara Museum of Art 1130 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101

WWW.SBMA.NET 4

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


NOV. 4-11, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COURTS & CRIME

Grim Friday Hearing in Haobsh Trial

ELECTION

Prosecution Continues in Han Family Triple-Murder Case

M

The scene switched to an Arco station in Bonsall, California, where Haobsh was arrested just after midnight on March 25, 2016, and photos of his red Lexus, cell phones, sales receipts, and a Glock 9mm barely visible beneath the driver’s seat. Next was surveillance video from Arizona Firearms, where Haobsh is seen purchasing a Glock 9mm, a Ruger .22, and three boxes of ammunition on March 19. Several more photos displayed the plastic sheet- Accused killer Pierre Haobsh in Judge Brian Hill’s courtroom last week ing, rolls of duct tape, drill, Before the prosecutors tied their evidence grinder, and welding brazer that officers had bought in duplicating Hao- against Haobsh together in the morning, the bsh’s purchases per receipts found in his red court had viewed a couple hours of video in which Detective Jeff McDonald quesLexus. Other slides showed Haobsh visiting El tioned Haobsh soon after he was arrested. Capitán State Park on March 22 and evidence Haobsh has never admitted to killing the of his phone being used to search online for Hans—except to a friend, T.J. Direda, whose information on making a silencer, before testimony was collected by McDonald, and Judge Hill, who is hearing the case rather whom lead defense attorney Christine Voss than a jury, noted it was nearly 4:30 p.m. and attempted to demolish as an unreliable witness. the presentation ended for the day.

RYAN P. C RUZ

by Jean Yamamura ost of the verbal swordplay of the Pierre Haobsh murder trial last Friday morning went to impeaching witnesses, but the evidence presented later in the day reminded everyone in Judge Brian Hill’s courtroom of the horrible crime the man at the defense table was accused of committing. From the witness stand, Santa Barbara County Sheriff ’s Detective Travis Henderson verified that what looked like big plastic cocoons found in the Han family’s garage on March 23, 2016, held the murdered remains of the well-respected herbalist Dr. Henry Han; his wife, Jenny Yu; and their 5-year-old daughter, Emily Han. Prosecutor Ben Ladinig directed Henderson through a description of the photos, with the help of Deputy DA Casey Nelson. The slideshow started with an aerial of the seven acres of avocado orchard and chaparral around the Hans’ home on Greenhill Way in Noleta, narrowed to a side window in the garage, and then to the bodies wrapped in clear plastic sheeting and duct tape alongside the detritus of home life—a pink bicycle helmet, a car seat, boxes of stuff, random furniture, and clothing—beside two vehicles in the garage.

CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

EDUCATION

UCSB, Munger Respond to Backlash Thousands Sign Petitions to Halt Dormzilla by Tyler Hayden C Santa Barbara issued a statement Thursday highlighting the anticipated benefits of the controversial, hyperdense dormitory project designed by billionaire philanthropist Charlie Munger. The statement also acknowledged the proposed building’s small, windowless bedrooms “may not be right for everyone.” Munger has donated $200 million toward the estimated $1.5 billion project on the condition his plans are followed precisely. He also rebuffed intense criticism leveled at the project by architects across the country, calling detractors “idiots.” Munger Hall is designed to house 4,500 undergraduates on a far edge of campus. At 1.68 million square feet, it would qualify as the largest dormitory in the world. An opening date is tentatively scheduled for 2025. In an interview with Architectural Record this week, Munger is quoted as saying that those who actually study his models “go apeshit for them.” The drawbacks of living in a 10-foot-by-7-foot space without a window

U

would be offset by the dorm’s large rec rooms and study halls as well as on-site amenities, such as a market, bakery, and fitness center, Munger told the magazine, explaining, “It’s all about the happiness of the students. We want to keep the suicide rate low.” Munger, Berkshire Hathaway’s 97-yearold vice chair, insisted that windowless, single-occupancy bedrooms will be “quite endurable, especially with good ventilation.” “Nobody minds going into a basement restroom and peeing because there’s no window.” UCSB’s statement was presented as a Q&A with former vice chancellor and project leader Gene Lucas. Munger Hall, he said, was envisioned “for those students who want the experience of communal and co-living, but also want the privacy of a single bedroom.” Approximately 94 percent of the bedrooms would feature “virtual windows” with a “fully programmed circadian rhythm control system to substantially reflect the lighting levels and color temperature of natural light throughout the day,” the statement goes on. Fresh air would be pumped in by a powerful

ventilation system, and natural light would be available in common areas and kitchens. UCSB clarified Munger Hall would in fact feature 15 smaller exits around its perimeter. “Exits and exit stairs are designed to meet and exceed fire, life, safety, and building code requirements to ensure safe and quick egress from the building,” the university said. “Additionally, mass motion computer models of different emergency scenarios have been run to ensure exit times from the building during emergency exit conditions are acceptable.” Munger Hall attracted national attention this week—inspiring articles and op-eds in the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, VICE, Slate, and U.S.A. Today as well as news segments on NBC and CNN — after the Santa Barbara Independent reported one of its consulting architects had resigned in protest. Paul Goldberger, the architecture critic for the New Yorker, called the plans “a grotesque, sick joke—a jail masquerading as a dormitory.” Many petitions against the building have been gaining energy. More than 1,700 signed a petition created by six UCSB architecture CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news.

With the last of Election Day’s 6,500 ballots now finally counted in the Santa Barbara City Council race, Randy Rowse — former councilmember and restaurant owner — came in first out of a field of six mayoral contenders that included incumbent mayor Cathy Murillo and is set to be sworn in as the city’s 51st mayor in January. In District 4, incumbent councilmember Kristen Sneddon won reelection, widening her lead over challenger Barrett Reed, as did District 6 incumbent councilmember Meagan Harmon against her nearest challenger, Assistant City Administrator Nina Johnson. Full story at independent.com/its-final.

CORONAVIRUS CORONAVIRUS The approximately 42,000 children ages 5-11 in S.B. County are now eligible to receive Pfizer’s pediatric COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccines are available at pediatric health-care provider offices, pharmacies, and through community events at schools and other venues. The pediatric vaccine contains onethird of the adult dose and is administered with smaller needles designed specifically for children. COVID-19 vaccine dosage does not vary by patient weight but by age on the day of vaccination. Children will need a second shot of the Pfizer vaccine three weeks after their first shot. For more info, visit publichealthsbc.org/vaccine or call 2-1-1. As of 11/8, there were eight active cases of COVID19 being closely monitored by staff at the County Jail, and an investigation is underway after two inmates originally tested positive on 10/31, according to a Sheriff’s Office statement. One of the active cases involves an inmate who tested positive for COVID during the intake screening process, has been housed separately, and is not associated with the outbreak. All individuals who have tested positive are isolated at least 14 days and monitored by medical staff, and all exposed inmates are under quarantine.

BUSINESS Three investment firms have partnered to acquire the three-story, 175,000-square-foot building that housed Nordstrom in Paseo Nuevo before the store closed summer 2020 after 30 years in S.B. Dune Real Estate Partners out of New York and Orange County–based Shopoff Realty Investments and Praelium Commercial Real Estate have partnered to acquire the space for an undisclosed price. Shopoff and Praelium led the charge in the purchase, and representatives from Shopoff have expressed interest in using the space as a mix between smaller-scale retail and flexible offices.

COMMUNITY Each year, family and friends in Santa Barbara have gathered at La Casa de la Raza for its annual Día de los Muertos celebration of loved ones who have passed on. But with La Casa temporarily closed, S.B.’s Chicano community — including La Casa’s new sister project La Casita, Freedom 4 Youth, El Centro S.B., Showing Up for Racial Justice, S.B. Public Library Foundation, CONT’D ON PAGE 7 

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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UCSB’s design committee, Dennis McFadden, resigned in protest of “Dormzilla” — Munger Hall is as high as Godzilla is tall—writing that the university is ignoring the documented necessity for natural light, air, and views for mental wellness. The public, from the architecture writer for the New Yorker to editorials in the Los Angeles Times to student-led petitions, has piled on. In reply, UCSB Chancellor Henry Yang has insisted Munger Hall will be built and called the design “inspired and revolutionary.” The university expressed itself in a press statement as “deeply disappointed that the City of Goleta felt it necessary to resort to divisive litigation that forces both parties to spend public funds in this manner.” UCSB stated it would pay the hotel bed tax to Goleta and that fall enrollment numbers were always higher than the average over three quarters, which has always been less than 25,000. The university claimed an annual benefit to the local economy—$2.3 billion when indirect business benefits were counted—and that it had kept all its employees, their paychecks, and their rent and mortgage payments throughout the pandemic. From Goleta’s perspective, UCSB’s lack of housing included the “reduction in the city’s housing supply and increases in housing costs for its workforce, and greater demands on city services,” Deputy City Attorney Winnie Cai told the Independent. It forced essential workers like nurses, teachers, and public safety officers to have to commute. The city had tried to resolve the issue informally with UCSB for several years, but since 2019 has not received formal enrollment figures, a requirement of the Agreement. Of Munger Hall, Cai said, “In the absolute best-case scenario, it would be several years before any students would be living in those dorm rooms.” Ultimately, given the “harsh scrutiny” the university was facing, the city’s statement reads, “There is no foreseeable end in sight for these negative impacts on Goleta.” Find all of our Munger Dorm stories at n independent.com/munger-dorm.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

News Briefs Cont’d from p. 5

Marta (pictured), the three-month-old Amur leopard cub, made her public debut at the S.B. Zoo on 11/4. Amur leopards are the most endangered of all the big cats, with fewer than 100 remaining in the wild. Marta is the first Amur leopard to be born at the S.B. Zoo in more than 20 years. Zookeepers expect Marta and her mother, Ajax, to be more consistently visible by this weekend, most likely in the mornings until around 1 p.m. Kasha, Marta’s dad, will then move into the space in the afternoons. Metropolitan Theatres Chair and CEO Bruce Corwin died last week at age 81. Corwin was also a generous philanthropist; he was described in his Los Angeles Times obituary as a “mensch.” Under Corwin’s direction, The Arlington Theatre — long one of downtown Santa Barbara’s marquee movie houses — underwent a significant acoustical face-lift, making it a competitive venue for music performances as well. A female pedestrian was struck and killed by a pickup truck on 11/4 near Las Positas Road and Stanley Avenue. The driver immediately pulled over to report the incident, and the female pedestrian, whose name has not yet been released, was found unresponsive in the roadway. Officers conducted CPR until paramedics arrived, but the pedestrian died from her injuries. DUI does not appear to be a factor in this collision.Witnesses can call the SBPD at (805) 897-3719. A citizen alerted a city groundskeeper at Shoreline Park on 11/4 that a body appeared to be below the cliffs in the ocean. City police and fire personnel went to the scene at high tide, and Fire Department rescue swimmers found an individual who appeared to have died several hours before. Once the tide had receded, the body was retrieved and turned over to the Coroner’s Office. The individual was a man in his late sixties, and police say there were no obvious signs of foul play. The cause of death is being determined, and the man’s name will be released after his next of kin are notified.

SPORTS S.B.’s magical girls’ volleyball season came to a perfect ending 11/6 with a 3-0 victory over El Rancho at a raucous J.R. Richards Gymnasium to clinch this year’s CIF Championship. In a “battle of the Dons,” with both teams sharing the same school mascot, the home team came out on top in three straight sets: 25-19, 25-23, and 25-19. Full story at independent.com/girls-vball-cif.

OPERATION RECOGNITION

COURTS & CRIME An unnamed 32-year-old man was shot on East Cota Street following a verbal altercation at a bar on 11/4. City police responding to reports of the shooting discovered the victim in the alley adjacent to City Lot 10 downtown with a single gunshot wound in his neck, as well as evidence that a firearm had been discharged at the scene. The victim was transported by ambulance to Cottage Hospital ER. According to a police statement on 11/9, the suspected shooter is Kevin Rios, 22, of S.B. As of press time, Rios was still at large and considered armed and dangerous. The City of S.B. has filed a criminal misdemeanor complaint against the owner and the general manager of the Chase restaurant for allegedly violating the city’s emergency outdoor dining order. The Chase, located on the 1100 block of State Street, faces 11 misdemeanor counts, with the city alleging the restaurant has continued to encroach on the sidewalks with customer seating, tables, heaters, and lighting. Full story at independent.com/chase-restaurant.

Veterans Diploma Project

The Santa Barbara County Education Office invites individuals whose high school education was interrupted during World War II, the Korean War, or the Vietnam War due to military service or internment to receive their high school diplomas through our Operation Recognition program. Families may apply on behalf of eligible individuals who are deceased. Visit www.SBCEO.org/OR for more information Application deadline: January 14, 2022 Graduation ceremony: April 2022

GOLETA A petition circulating in Goleta to overturn the city’s ban on flavored tobacco collected more than the required number of signatures after a controversy broke out over the use of strategic lies by petition signature-gatherers. The petition was filed on 11/8 with more than 4,000 signatures — 2,040 are needed for the petition to be valid — and now goes to the County Elections Office for verification. Goleta’s City Council can then repeal the ordinance, place the referendum in a special election, or wait until the November 2022 election.

EDUCATION

Ele P ga rim nt iti an v e, d M Ru id- stic Ce , ntu ry

COU RTESY

@ChicanoCultureSB, Youth Makers Market, and Just Communities — pitched in to host the event outdoors at Ortega Park on 11/7, complete with singing, dancing, face painting, and a special Youth Makers Market pop-up. Full story at independent.com/ortega-park-comes-alive.

To Benefit

S.B. Unified School District has begun the process of transitioning from at-large elections to trustee-area elections, now with four possible maps of district boundaries, following the board’s decision to transition in 2018 as a response to the California Voting Rights Act of 2001. The process of creating a district boundary map involves the creation of conceptual trustee-area boundaries and providing opportunities for the public to learn more and give feedback. The next meeting on the topic is scheduled for the 11/16 school board meeting. Full story at independent.com/ trustee-area-elections.

make

ing day Shopp Your Holi !

ENVIRONMENT The Chumash National Marine Sanctuary — which would stretch offshore from roughly Naples in Santa Barbara County to San Simeon in San Luis Obispo County — has officially entered the designation process. The public will have several opportunities to send their views about the sanctuary to NOAA during the four designation steps. The next is “scoping,” in which NOAA requests thoughts and comments through 1/10/22 on the “sanctuary boundary, compatible uses, threats a new sanctuary would address, how best to promote marine science and education initiatives and other topics.” Full story at independent .com/new-marine-sanctuary. n

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NOV. 4-11, 2021

HOMELESSNESS

COUNTY

COU RTESY DIG N ITYMOVES

On Jail, Citizen Groups Tip Scale by Tyler Hayden anta Barbara has five community groups to thank for steering county officials toward a simpler and cheaper renovation of the aging Main Jail, County CEO Mona Miyasato told the Board of Supervisors this Tuesday, likely saving taxpayers millions and uniting leaders over a complex and controversial issue. Vijaya Jammalamadaka, president of the Santa Barbara “I want to say thank you to Chapter of the League of Women Voters, at a recent rally at the them,” Miyasato said at the top courthouse of her presentation to the supervisors. “Through our meetings any allocation of funds less than what he’s with them — they’ve met with all of our requested to “defunding the police.” Superdifferent department heads — we changed visor Das Williams previously accused our recommendation to your board. We Brown of perpetuating “bad facts” regardthought a little bit harder and looked at dif- ing state grant money and minimum bed ferent options.” requirements that got the board “bottleThe League of Women Voters, CLUE necked” into believing it had no choice but (Clergy & Laity United for Economic Jus- to approve a massive remodel. tice), Santa Barbara Defenders, Families Leading the charge among the superviACT!, and NAMI (National Alliance on sors for a more deliberate and limited rehab Mental Illness) had lobbied officials to was Gregg Hart, who noted Santa Barbara’s abandon a complete $90 million overhaul criminal justice apparatus accounts for of the jail and instead adopt a more modest nearly a quarter of the county’s $1.35 billion $24 million proposal to carry out deferred budget. “These costs are the elephant in the maintenance work nearly all parties agree room,” he said. is necessary — mainly, to bring the 60-yearIn prepared remarks that highlighted old facility into ADA compliance, make ongoing county reforms — including new improvements to its medical and mental- publicly accessible data dashboards for health infrastructure, and modernize its the Probation Department and the jail, HVAC, plumbing, and electrical systems. and a concerted effort to move old cases Perhaps most significantly, the groups through the courts more quickly — Hart also helped convince county leaders to invoked a 2019 report published by the delay a vote on the total remodel proposed national Crime Survivors for Safety and by the Sheriff ’s Office until a population Justice organization. It found that only 14 study can be conducted to determine percent of people felt very supported by exactly how many beds will be needed at the justice system after they fell victim to the 852-bed South County campus in the a crime, and that by a nearly 5-1 margin, future, given the imminent opening of the victims believe jails and prisons make 346-bed Northern Branch Jail and a drasti- inmates more likely to offend again. They cally reduced inmate population brought expressed overwhelming favor for rehabilion by COVID policy changes. Pre-pan- tation programs instead and interventive demic, the inmate count hovered around treatment for those with mental-health and 905; this week it was 644. substance-abuse issues. The pause for the study, argued The “It’s important for us to put the needs League of Women Voters and CLUE in a of victims and survivors at the forefront statement to the board, “will allow consid- of our criminal-justice-reform efforts,” eration of key innovations in jail design that Hart said. “We want to keep jail numbers assure humane conditions such as open down because it’s what victims want, it’s floor plans, better access to exercise, and key to reducing recidivism, it’s the direcdirect supervisions by corrections staff.” tion the state and other counties are going, These things have been proved to better because it saves taxpayers money, and, the health and safety of both inmates and most importantly, it’s the right thing to do guards, they said, and reduce recidivism. at this moment in history.” The assessment, expected to be completed Even Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, who spring 2022, will also assure funds are not had previously expressed concern that spent unnecessarily on areas of the South small jail numbers might mean more County facility that will become obsolete if crime, voted in favor of the study and the Santa Barbara’s overall inmate population possibility of fewer beds. “I just hope we remains the same or continues to decline, can continue to balance this as we move forward,” he said. Lavagnino also thanked the groups said. In pushing for a larger scope of work, Hart for his leadership on the issue and Sheriff Bill Brown has argued that jail fig- the citizen groups for intervening. “People ures are “artificially low” and certain to rise who’ve been talking about this for years are again once the pandemic ends. He’s likened finally being heard,” he said. n

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COU RTESY

Organizations Push County Toward More Affordable Remodel

CABIN LIVING: Each of Dignity Moves’ 33 “cabins” will come equipped with a bed, a desk, and a chair, as well as lighting, electricity, and air conditioning.

Grand Unveiling for Downtown Homeless Village Erecting 33 ‘Cabins’ in Santa Barbara Street Parking Lot by Nick Welsh n what was the best throwaway line of what otherwise was a political highmass event held this Monday to unveil plans for a new downtown homeless housing project, Santa Barbara County Supervisor Gregg Hart quipped, “Hey, at least we have windows.” Hart was riffing, obviously, on the infamously window-free Munger Hall dorm proposal to house 4,500 UCSB students that’s sparked a relentless and withering storm of criticism over the past two weeks. By contrast, each of the 33 proposed prefab housing units — each one 64 square feet and described by their manufacturer as “cabins” — come equipped with 2-footby-3-foot windows on the front wall; glass windowpanes on the front door; and tiny, pillbox-slat windows that admit natural light on the interior walls. Monday’s event was the public coming-out party for plans — to install 33 transitional housing cabins for people experiencing homelessness into a public parking lot on the 1000 block of Santa Barbara Street now owned by the County of Santa Barbara — that have been gestating in the murmuring and whispering stages for the past four months. On hand were a couple of county supervisors; a couple of city councilmembers; representatives from DignityMoves, the nonprofit agency that hatched these plans; a handful of homeless-housing professionals; a few concerned neighbors; and a coterie of high-ranking government officials whose job it has become to make seemingly unlikely dreams — like this DignityMoves proposal — come true. Supervisor Das Williams, who represents the district in which the project will be, promised those in attendance this village of tiny homes would defy expectations. The new homes, he said, “were a step above

I

what we’ve done in the past,” adding, “This is something different.” Not only will the proposed cabins — which will be assembled on-site beginning late this December — come equipped with windows, but they’ve been designed to conform with downtown Santa Barbara’s architectural stylistics; the roofs, for example, will have the terracotta coloring of Santa Barbara’s red-tile roofs. Each cabin comes equipped with a bed, a desk, and a chair. Each unit — with walls two-inches thick made from steel framing covered in plastic building materials — has lighting, electricity, and air conditioning. Guests will use common-area restrooms, sinks, and showering facilities. Unlike the 20 Pallet homes that provided housing to homeless people in Isla Vista from last December to June, no porta-potties will be used. A sewage hook-up was trenched to serve this community, thereby reducing smells and truck traffic from MarBorg waste haulers. Making this happen is Bay Area nonprofit DignityMoves, whose members include civic-minded entrepreneurs who all became CEOs of their respective ventures by the time they turned 40. Three members of this group happen to live in Santa Barbara. A press release issued for the occasion explained, “Our streets cannot be the waiting room for unhoused individuals.” The Santa Barbara Street village of tiny homes, it added, should be seen as “an interim housing step between tents and permanent housing.” The price tag per unassembled unit is $9,000, but with all the bells and whistles, the true cost is closer to $25,000 apiece. Using emergency federal dollars, the county supervisors allocated $500,000 to help defray the cost of “construction.” DignityMoves has raised $600,000 of the remaining $800,000. But the real cost CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

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NOVEMBER 11, 2021

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

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ENVIRONMENT

ExxonMobil Denied Trucking Permits

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CAPT. DAN I EL B ERTUC ELLI/SBC F D

he County Planning Commission may have effectively pulled the plug on offshore oil development in South Coast waters for the foreseeable future this past Earn a $1,000** sign-on bonus week, rejecting a bid by ExxonMobil to truck oil initially A job should be more than work. pumped off the coast of GaviTSA offers great federal benefits ota and processed at its Las like retirement plans, health Flores Canyon until stretches of two pipelines — deemed insurance, a uniform allowance unsafe after the 2015 pipeline and more. Get paid on-the-job rupture by Refugio Cantraining and shift differentials, yon—can be replaced. plus pay increases start in just six The Planning Commission voted 3-2 that the CAUTIONARY TALE: Planning Commissioners hope to avoid more months. Secure your spot on our increased risk of oil spills tanker-truck oil spills like this one off State Route 166 last year. team at Santa Barbara Municipal from tanker-trucking—parAirport and earn a $1,000** ticularly to nearby creeks and sign-on bonus! Apply today. streams—so outweighed any potential ben- commercial market if trucking were to be efits that they could not make the legally allowed was negligible given the enormity required “findings of overriding consider- of existing supply and demand. Likewise, the ation” needed to approve the project, given commissioners found the evidence Exxonthe unmitigable Class I negative environ- Mobil provided regarding new jobs did not mental impact associated with the proposal. support the conclusions drawn. In a letter, ExxonMobil decried the Mostly, the commissioners expressed vote as “a prejudicial abuse of discretion,” concern about the 78 additional truck trips contending that the commissioners gave a day that ExxonMobil is proposing on undue weight to the comments of “a few roads that are already prone to a high numU.S. citizenship required. Equal opportunity employer. *Pay rate varies by location. **Some conditions apply. non-expert witnesses” about the probability ber of accidents. Opponents of the proposal of “aggressive drivers” who might pass oil- cite the 258 truck accidents that took place laden trucks carrying the company’s cargo along the 140-mile journey ExxonMobil is along steep, narrow, and winding stretches proposing over the past 20 years. In the last AFS-TSA-0680-SBA8-Print-SantaBarbaraIndependent-quarterpage-Bonus-JOA-v1.indd 1 10/13/21 of Highway 166 on their way from Las Flores nine years, nine of those accidents involved Canyon to the Pentland processing plant in oil trucks; five people were killed; 13,300 gallons of oil were spilled; and, of that, the San Joaquin Valley. ExxonMobil likewise claimed that the 4,500 gallons were spilled into the Cuyama commissioners ignored “voluminous” River. evidence contained in the environmental By reducing the frequency of truck trips, impact report and in the county energy especially when rain is forecast, risks can staff ’s recommendation — in favor of the be significantly reduced, ExxonMobil has project—that the oil could be trucked safely. insisted. (If the proposal were so dangerous, ExxonShould the county supervisors adopt the Mobil asked, why didn’t Caltrans oppose commissioners’ recommendation in a vote the project?) slated to occur sometime this coming FebInstead, the commissioners argued that ruary, ExxonMobil made it clear legal action the amount of oil to be made available to the would swiftly follow. —Nick Welsh

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9:59 AM

Haobsh Trial Cont’d from p. 5 McDonald had questioned Haobsh for four hours, and sections of the video were shown the week before and again the day prior, depicting an increasingly agitated Haobsh switch from cool and collected to frantic denial in McDonald’s interview room (for a full report on last Thursday’s hearing, see independent.com/ inside-the-interrogation-room). If the video of McDonald’s later questioning is anything to go by, Haobsh decided to hold his tongue. During the hour of video viewed Friday morning in court, Haobsh answers “mm-hm” and “right,” alternating with “sure” as McDonald tries over and over in every conceivable line of questioning to awaken a sense of self-preservation in Hao-

bsh that would align with him giving facts about the murder of the Han family. Haobsh never takes the bait. In her cross-examination, Voss noted that McDonald had been working for 14 hours straight, traveling to Oceanside after midnight, where Haobsh was first held; listening in for an hour as police asked him questions; returning through Thousand Oaks, where he questioned Direda; and then continuing to Santa Barbara, where Haobsh went to the hospital for chest pains; and McDonald then interrogated him for four hours. Reviewing the seemingly incriminating texts Haobsh had sent Direda— “I’m screwed” and “If only I’d gotten there earlier” — and statements he’d made that CONT’D ON PAGE 10 

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NOV. 4-11, 2021

ENVIRONMENT

CORONAVIRUS

A Handful of Holdouts

Climate Report IDs At-Risk Groups

by Ryan P. Cruz s the state public health department’s deadline for health-care workers to get vaccinated came and went, those opposed to vaccines were forced to make a choice — some chose to get the vaccine, some chose to apply for medical and religious exemptions, and others remained opposed and willing to lose work if necessary. In early September, it was estimated that 10 percent of California’s health-care workers were still unvaccinated, but current numbers show that the state’s mandates have helped close that gap even further. Here in Santa Barbara County, Sansum Clinic has seen nearly all of its employees comply with the state’s mandate, minus a few holdouts. Though Sansum is legally bound to keep all employees’ personal health information confidential, including vaccination status, Public Information Officer Jill Fonte said that 99 percent of health-care providers and 98 percent of staff members are now fully vaccinated. Currently, there are 180 physicians, and nearly 1,000 staff overall; there is only one MD confirmed to be working unvaccinated with a religious exemption, with an estimated 15-20 staff who have received either medical or religious exemptions that allow them to work as long as they follow all safety protocols. “The small fraction who have a religious or medical exemption also are required to wear masks and also required to be tested at least weekly and in some cases twice weekly,” Fonte said. Of the 2 percent of Sansum employees who applied for an exemption due to medical or religious reasons, Fonte said a large number work in “non-clinical settings” or remotely from home. Less than a handful, she said, chose not to get vaccinated and also decided not to pursue an exemption. “And as a result, [they] were relieved of their positions,” Fonte said. This is in accordance with the California Public Health Department’s mandate that all health-care employees must be vaccinated in order to continue working. Several of those employees have indicated they would return if the mandate is lifted, she said. Dr. Mark Abate — a hematologist and oncologist who has practiced in Santa Barbara for more than 33 years with Sansum Medical Clinic, Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, and Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital — spoke against vaccine mandates and was granted religious exemption shortly before the September 30 deadline. Sansum granted his exemption a week before, and Cottage Hospital issued the exemption just a day before the mandated deadline. Abate said he was willing to lose the ability to work if necessary, but neither of his employers ever gave “any inclination” that his application would be denied.

ER IC K M ADR I D F I LE PHOTO

Only a Few Sansum Health-Care Workers Remain Unvaccinated

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Dr. Mark Abate

He is permitted for outpatient work at Sansum as long as he is tested weekly, but for inpatient work at Cottage Hospital, he is required to be tested twice weekly. “So for the last two months, I have been tested for COVID-19 twice per week,” Abate said. Working alongside coworkers who are for the most part fully vaccinated has not changed Abate’s mind, but he said colleagues have made it clear that they do not agree with his decision. “I have received some letters encouraging me to get vaccinated, most of which I feel are in the spirit of trying to be helpful,” he said, adding that he has also received letters of support and remains opposed to all vaccine mandates. Fonte also said that although most of Sansum’s staff are on board with vaccination, there is still a small minority that speaks out against the mandates — but the clinic maintains a priority for patient and staff safety by ensuring mask and testing protocols. “Of course, we realize from emails we receive, and from feedback from those who work at our clinic, that there are people in our community who hold different opinions on COVID-19 vaccines,” Fonte said. “We aim to provide a safe environment and follow all regulations that health-care organizations must abide by, while also promoting a culture of empathy and understanding, for patients and employees, regardless of the views they might hold.“ Staff are not required to disclose their vaccination status to patients, but Fonte said many of the clinic’s physicians have been “more than willing and happy to share their vaccination status” when asked by patients. “Our clinic leadership, health-care providers, and the vast majority of our staff believe that COVID-19 vaccination is the right and responsible choice and is something that has protected our patients, our community, and our own team,” Fonte said. n

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opulations with limited resources, mobility, or existing socioeconomic disparities were identified at the Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday as some of the most vulnerable groups for impacts and hazards brought on by climate change. These findings came after the board reviewed the state-mandated Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment, meant to analyze the severity of climate-change impacts on different populations. The report is intended to assist the county in setting priorities for a Climate Change Adaptation Plan to create policies and projects to prepare for, respond to, and recover from damage caused by climate-change-related hazards. Whitney Wilkinson, a project manager from the county’s Planning and Development, said the adaptation plan is expected to have a completed draft by winter 2022. “Developing a consensus about what we’re actually going to do, that’s the most important thing,” said Supervisor Gregg Hart. “We don’t have a lot of time, so we have to hurry people along with the understanding, but this is a critically important work product.” The assessment observed 22 populations and identified the frontline populations — those “who experience climate change first, and worse,” according to Wilkinson — as children, people living in poverty, homeless people, unemployed people, seniors, outdoor workers, people living in rural areas or areas on singleaccess roads, people living in mobile homes, overcrowded homes, renters,

people of color with limited access to resources, and undocumented people. The report also identified communal assets considered most vulnerable, including infrastructure such as roads, bridges, railroads, and water and wastewater facilities. Other vulnerable assets included residential structures, historic buildings, agriculture, agrotourism, aquatic ecosystems, public transit, and electricity services. For the county, the most common hazards contributing to climate vulnerability are wildfires, landslides and debris flows, inland flooding, and severe weather. The report found that within the next 80 years, the county will face a 36 percent increase in wildfire burn area. “More frequent climate impacts and disasters will increase the need for emergency management services,” said Wilkinson. “This has already shifted thinking,” Supervisor Das Williams said. Often, coastal areas like Santa Barbara focus on issues such as sea-level rise, Williams said, but the assessment highlighted several other hazards posing much more immediate risk. “We have much more clearly documented increases in sundowner winds, increases in fire weather, and extreme heat issues.” The assessment made suggestions on programs to combat potential damages due to the increase of wildfires. These included vegetation management projects, encouraging more fire-resistant features for future construction, creating a comprehensive Extreme Heat plan, and providing adequate evacuation routes and services to frontline groups. —Jun Starkey

Haobsh Trial Cont’d from p. 9 accurately described the murder scene, Voss asked if McDonald had heard Haobsh tell Oceanside police that he’d killed five or six people before and been in a shootout in Arizona; she was incredulous when McDonald said he had not. He’d been listening in a separate conference room and not paying very much attention, he said. Amid a plethora of cross-talk and an objection from Ladinig, which was ultimately withdrawn, Voss explained her line of questioning was to plant the seed that Haobsh might have had other reasons to tell Direda he was a monster. Voss also noted the “untrue” statements McDonald had told Haobsh during the interrogation. Haobsh’s father had not actually cried on hearing of the accusation, forensics had not yet processed the duct tape for fingerprints at that time, Don Goldberg’s dinner with Dr. Han on Sunday was made up — Haobsh said he had had dinner with Dr. Han on Sunday — the blood on Haobsh’s ear was his own, and Jenny Yu’s

phone was not “covered in blood.” Voss questioned McDonald about the conversation about Haobsh’s possible release in an ankle monitor: In his 19 years of law enforcement, he thought a suspect in a triple homicide could be released? she asked. McDonald temporized, saying, “There’s no such thing as absolutes. Anything is possible.” Voss replied, “Like unicorns?” The day’s hearing ended with the prosecution’s third attorney, veteran Hilary Dozer, contending with Voss over documents relied upon by her ballistics expert. Judge Hill warned Voss that his testimony might be paused if prosecutors needed more information from her expert. Testimony from the prosecution’s firearms expert took place on Monday. The trial is scheduled to resume Friday, November 12, and expected to go until Thanksgiving. For the latest coverage of the Han family murder trial, see independent.com/news.

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

At John Lewis’s Side Archie Allen Reflects on the Continuing Battle for Voting Rights

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NOW IN S.B.: Archie Allen at his chiropractic offices on Arrellaga Street

A white man had emerged from the restaurant, using an epithet common to the South in 1964: “What’s a white boy doing with all those n*****s?” the man shouted, grabbing Allen by the tie and preparing to launch his fist into Allen’s face. Luckily, Allen was wearing a clip-on tie that day. “When he grabbed it, it came off, and the tie on the floor threw him off,” said Allen. He soon found himself on the ground, knocked over by the aggressive melee surrounding him. Later that year, Allen was arrested while leading antisegregation protesters to a different restaurant in down-

town Nashville. Police blocked their path, and an officer grabbed him by his belt loop. “I went limp, and they threw me in the paddy wagon,” said Allen. “When I told my mother I was arrested, she was in great shock. She said, ‘No member of our family has ever been arrested!’ … Being arrested was a badge of honor, and there were many people in the demonstration who were disappointed that they had not been arrested.” Despite the intensity of such encounters, Allen said he rarely felt fear. “Bravery had not a lot to ONWARD: John Lewis, Archie Allen, and a group of protesters march together against segregation at the Freedom do with it. It was the logi- March on March 23, 1963, in Nashville. cal next step,” he said. The threats confronting Black members of the movement, Allen ropractic and kinesiology in 1985. He had come to Santa emphasized, were always greater. “After the Freedom Rides Barbara frequently in the ’70s, once joining Lewis to visit and the early sit-ins, John Lewis went back to Alabama Harry Ashmore at the Center for the Study of Democratic with Bernard Lafayette, where they were killing people for Institutions, and he described settling here as “the same even thinking about registering [to vote]. That, I consider thing that brought me every step of the way: I was simply following the doors that were open to me,” he said. His praccourageous.” Today, John Lewis, who died at age 80 in 2020, is remem- tice began in the same Santa Barbara building he works in bered for his Herculean actions during the civil rights move- today, and for 25 years, he’s taught wellness courses at SBCC ment: lunch counter sit-ins, the 1963 March on Washington, and the school’s Continuing Education. the concussions he survived during Freedom Rides and the “Bloody Sunday” march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. As his traveling companion in the early ’60s, Allen saw a Fifty-six years after the Voting Rights Act passed, Republicans in state legislatures are passing bills to suppress the different side of Lewis. “John was always photo-conscious. When he was vote, and Congressional Democrats cannot deliver their engaged in demonstrations, he was the epitome own bills in the Senate — most recently the John Lewis of seriousness. You never saw him smile at all,” Voting Rights Advancement Act, which was blocked by said Allen. “In relaxed moments, he was a totally filibuster last Wednesday. The bill would have maintained different person.” Lewis had a knack for impres- the federal approval required before states with histories sions of notable civil rights figures, said Allen — the of racial discrimination could alter election laws, a provivery same figures who forced him to edit out more sion the Supreme Court struck down in 2013. As a result, radical portions of his speech at the 1963 March on Texas changed its voting maps this October, and despite Washington. four million new residents since the last Census — many “When the Big Six went to the White House, of whom are Latino Americans — the state failed to add a Kennedy was trying to talk them out of march- single majority-Latino district. ing. A. Philip Randolph — the father of the March “When the Supreme Court struck that provision, they on Washington — was a very stately, tall man. And took the heart out of [the Voting Rights Act],” Allen said. John would mimic him saying, ‘Mr. President, the “The whole deal was that we were making progress… . So, masses are restless!’ He would do an excellent John that was a blatant affront to everything we were working Kennedy in response. And he would do Martin for.” Yet, John Lewis’s legacy remains important in the fight Luther King Jr. at the March on Washington — ‘Give for the right to vote, said Allen. us the ballot!’” “When John died, millions of people turned out with Allen was working in human relations in Nash- heartfelt support,” he said. “Just as we could not have imagville when Lewis became the director of the Voter ined that [our work] would all have to be redone, we could Education Project 1971, which aimed to register minority not have imagined the overwhelming support that this voters in the South. Lewis hired his friend as communica- movement for justice and equality brought into focus… . “Us old folks are proud of the youngins, who have not tions director, and they launched Voter Mobilization Tours only carried it through but have carried it far beyond what throughout Mississippi, Louisiana, and Florida. “We were brothers; we were constant companions; we we could have imagined at that time,” said Allen. He thought traveled together,” said Allen. “Even when we were not in a passage in John Lewis’s 2012 book about the passing of the the office setting, he was probably my closest companion torch said it best: “Ours is not the struggle of one day, one week, or one and friend throughout that whole period.” Lewis went on to run for Congress in 1977, though he year… . Ours is the struggle of a lifetime, or maybe even many was not elected until 1986. Allen served in the human rights lifetimes, and each one of us in every generation must do our movement for 16 years before becoming a doctor of chi- part.” n

VOTING ACCESS NOW

CA LE B RODR IG U EZ

by Caleb Rodriguez ixty-one years ago, Archie Allen had flanked a twentysomething John Lewis on the front lines of the civil rights movement, challenging Southern segregation and securing voting rights for Black Americans. Much has changed since the Santa Barbara chiropractor picketed in lockstep with the future congressmember — legislation to expand voting access has been blocked in the Senate this day. Nonetheless, Allen, while disappointed, remains optimistic as he witnesses a new generation of activists take up the fight for an equitable democracy. Growing up in western Virginia, the son of a Methodist minister, Allen’s only notion of Black people came from warnings to “avoid downtown” and racial slurs sung during schoolyard games. Allen remembered once seeing lines of white mine workers so caked in coal dust that he mistook them for Black people. “The nearest major town was Bluefield, Virginia — the heart of coal country,” said Allen. “One day, there were dozens of workers, and almost all of them were totally black. All you could see were the whites of their eyes. I remember asking my mother, ‘Are these colored people?’” It wasn’t until Allen attended Scarritt College — a Methodist college in Nashville, Tennessee — that Allen was exposed to a diverse community, including meeting the 23-year-old John Lewis, who was visiting as a guest speaker. “He spoke very softly and directly, very heartfelt,” said Allen. “This was the first person I had heard speak about the civil rights movement, especially a Black person.” According to Allen, Lewis was arrested the very next week for protesting segregation at the local YMCA. “That was the beginning of my involvement with the movement,” he said. Soon, Allen was leading marches protesting businesses that refused to serve Black people. During one demonstration at a shopping arcade, several protesters were attacked and arrested, while Allen was knocked to the ground in front of the segregated Tic Toc restaurant.

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Standing in Solidarity and Support of Serenity House Together, VNA Health, Cottage Health, Sansum Clinic, CenCal Health, and all of our community’s healthcare partners help patients and their families experience comfort and dignity at the end of life. To these partners and our generous community, thank you for supporting VNA Health so that we can maintain Serenity House as Santa Barbara’s treasured hospice home for all our friends, neighbors, and families.

Support Serenity House vna.health/SerenityHouseAnniversary

Serenity House 12

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930 Miramonte Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

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(805) 617-7777

PHOTO BY EMILY HART-ROBERTS

At Serenity House on the Mesa in Santa Barbara (L-R): Bob Freeman, CenCal Health President & CEO; Michael Bordorfsky, MD, VNA Health Hospice Medical Director; Lynda Tanner, RN, MSN, VNA Health President & CEO; Kurt N. Ransohoff, MD, Sansum Clinic CEO & Chief Medical Officer; and Ron Werft, Cottage Health President & CEO.


Homelessness Cont’d from p. 8

COU RTESY

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

NOV. 4-11, 2021

Charlie Munger

comes in the form of “wrap-around services” such ventures the county, and Good Samaritan, and they’ve assured him require to succeed. The supervisors have allocated $1.2 mil- they will not allow the project to become a magnet for all lion a year for the next three years to fund these services. the homeless people in the neighborhood. He is, he said, That money comes from federal American Recovery Act apprehensive, but also open. Initially, he said, it appeared dollars. that the allowed smoking area lay directly under his bedRunning this new tiny-home village will be Good room. That appears to have been changed. He worries still Samaritan, which operates 500 shelter beds in 30 locations about the impact of the village’s restroom area on the offices throughout Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties. directly above it on the second and third floors. Changing Good Sam CEO Sylvia Barnard pledged to provide 24-hour this, he said he was told, will not be possible. security and services to DignityMoves residents. All of the Supervisor Williams said he’s heard from many nearby people struggling with homelessness, she said, “are some- neighbors. “There’s a lot of fear,” he said. “It comes from body’s something,” meaning they are someone’s daughter, a plausible source,” he added, “but also from a lack of experience.” son, brother, or sister. Williams said this village marked a major foray by the While most of Good Sam’s operations lie to the north of the Gaviota Tunnel, Barnard’s organization just opened county into rectifying a homeless housing crisis the supera 50-bed transitional housing shelter in Isla Vista four visors declared in 2018. The number of homeless people months ago. It has yet to generate its first complaint. Visi- living on the streets has increased by 34 percent since the tors are not allowed, and there’s a 10 p.m. curfew for guests, pandemic hit; before that, he said, there was already a critichores are required, and no alcohol or drugs are allowed cal shortage of shelter space. Regardless, many homeless people avoid shelters like the on premises. Residents, Barnard stressed, are referred by other agencies; no walk-ins are accepted. The whole point plague. In the past two years, county decision-makers have is to equip guests with a range of services to help them make embraced the therapeutic potential of living behind doors the transition to more permanent housing. that can be locked. Including the DignityMoves project, On hand Monday was a handful of neighbors, including Williams said, the county has created 100 new spaces for David and Renee Beaver, who just moved into a fourth- the unsheltered. But based on their own calculations, they floor apartment on top of an office building right next still have 426 more to go. In this context, he said, the Dignidoor to the proposed village. Back in the 1980s, David’s tyMoves project has to work for that to happen. father — developer Jerry Beaver — built Nthe A Tbuilding, I O N A L DignityMoves H I G H Wspokesperson A Y T R AJack F FLorenz I C estimated the whimsically emblazoned with a beaver-shaped weather- site will welcome its first guests sometime in February 2022. A F E” Beaver T Y A IfDallMgoes I Naccording I S T RtoAplan, TIO vane on the top. “I’m a yes-in-my-backyardSperson, theN DignityMoves village will said, “but this attitude really gets pushed to the limit when remain on-site and in operation for three years. At that point, the hope is to build permanent supportive housing 32-plus homeless people are literally put in my backyard.” Beaver said he’s communicated with DignityMoves, in their place. n

Munger Cont’d from p. 5 history professors. Richard Wittman, one of the authors, said, “If this was any other project, you’d be laughed out of the room for proposing something on this scale with no research,” he said. Wittman and his colleagues recognized the severity of UCSB and Santa Barbara’s housing crisis. “That crisis, however, is in significant measure a result of UCSB’s own failure to fulfill the housing construction promises it made in its 2010 Long Range Development Plan,” they said. On Friday, the Santa Barbara chapter of the American Institute of Architects articulated its own opposition in a letter to Chancellor Henry Yang, who has described Munger’s plans as “inspired and revolutionary.” Meanwhile, Tommy Young, a fourth-year UCSB undergrad, created his own petition that has attracted more than 11,000 signatures. While UCSB has approved Munger’s plan, it must still be vetted by the California Coastal Commission and the UC Board of Regents, where there will be opportunities for public comment. Find the full version of this story and all our Munger LO C AT I O N n Dorm coverage at independent.com/munger-dorm.

CHILD PASSENGER SAFETY TECHNICIAN TRAINING November 16–20, 2021

FREE Seat Check Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

9.375x6.166 Santa Barbara County Fire Department 4410 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110 R E G I S T R AT I O N

To register, please visit cert.safekids.org Drive-up car seat inspection Course ID: CA20210915840 Free proper installation

OBJECTIVES

Schedule: Tuesday through Saturday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. You must attend the entire course.

Upon completion of this course, participan will be able to:

Fee: $95 paid to Safe Kids Worldwide. Class Details: Course materials are included with registration fee. Lunch is not included and is on your own each day. Registrants will receive a refund according to Safe Kids Worldwide Policy. Class is limited to 20 participants.

• Select appropriate child restraints and secure children in vehicles

Seat Check Saturday • Install child restraint systems (CRS) in

Saturday, November 20, 2021 • 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Franklin Neighborhood Center 1136 E. Montecito St., Santa Barbara • Who Should Attend? This instructional program is designed for: Instructors: NHTSA Certified Michael Hennessey — Lead Instructor Pamela Hennessey, Danny Maher

• Professionals involved with children and their families • Staff members at community organizations working with families and children • Firefighters and law enforcement

multiple types of vehicles Teach others how to install CRS in their vehicles Teach others how to restrain children in motor vehicles, buses and ambulances

• Utilize appropriate resources to retrieve • Health care workers in the EDs, related to child passenger safe clinic, pediatric settings, mother No citations issued; no driver license or information registration required. infant units and birth centers • Respond appropriately to legal and ethica

Vehicles will be inspected on a first-come,issues first-served • Pre-hospital providers related basis. to child passenger safety • Daycare providers

• Serve as a resource to the community and For more information, please call Trauma Services at organizations relating to child passenger safe • Foster care agencies (805) 569-7451 or visit cottagehealth.org/seatcheck.

Successful participants will become Nationally Certified Child Passenger COVID safety precautions will be in place. Masks required. For questions, please contact Safety Technicians. Mike Hennessey at carseat101@hotmail.co

Please be prepared to have your vehicle available to be used during the training. Wear comfortable clothes as you will be working in vehicles as well as the classroom. This course is physically demanding. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

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obituaries Phyllis Gates Fenger 7/11/1922 - 9/23/2021

Phyllis Gates Fenger of Carpinteria, California, died peacefully at home among family and friends on September 23, 2021 at age 99. Born July 11, 1922 in Denver, Colorado to Nelle and Herman Gates, Phyllis became a person of many talents and interests. After earning her BA in French, with minors in Spanish and Education from University of Colorado in 1942, she taught school, raised a family, became a librarian, read and traveled extensively, and worked as a travel agent. She studied Russian, SerboCroatian, Italian, and Greek, took up sailing, tennis, golf, folk and Scottish country dancing. Phyllis volunteered at Cottage Hospital, Main and Aliso School Libraries, and Carpinteria Friends of the Library bookstore. She served as an election poll worker during many elections and believed voting a privilege and duty. She studied and worked as a docent at the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Nature Park and the Carpinteria Valley Museum of History. Phyllis wrote 100-plus memoir-style stories, and at age 94 authored a book based on her cousin’s diary about her experience as a WW1 nurse in France. American Red Cross Nurse: Beulah Feely 1917-1918 was accepted into the National World War 1 Museum and Memorial in Kansas City, Missouri. Witty and generous in conversation, Phyllis collected people from next door and around the world who became lifelong friends, all of whom knew it was highly unlikely they’d ever beat her at Scrabble. She was also a devoted dog lover and raised ten 4-legged family 14

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com members in her lifetime. Phyllis was preceded in death by several dear, close contemporaries, her beloved grandparents, parents, brother Phil, and son Mike. She is survived by her daughter Ellen, of Santa Barbara, and many cherished and devoted friends and family members. A special thank you to Carmen for her abiding love and care. Funeral services will be November 20, 2021 at 11 AM at All Saints-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, 83 Eucalyptus Lane, Santa Barbara. Masks required and the family prefers all attendees be Covid-19 vaccinated. Please enjoy wearing brighter colors as Phyllis never wore black or somber clothing.

Joel Towne Deweese 10/14/1942 - 9/12/2021

The world has lost a true Renaissance man. Joel Towne Deweese was born in Brooklyn, NY, on October 14, 1942. His parents were both native Nebraskans. His mother, Rowena Merle Beadle Deweese, from Kearny, was the first woman to graduate from the University of Nebraska with a degree in journalism and drama. His father, Wilford Joel Deweese, from Lincoln, was a surgery resident at King’s County Hospital in Brooklyn at the time of Joel’s birth. His father’s residency was interrupted by service in a mobile field surgical hospital in Italy during WWII. In January 1947, the family moved to Bemidji, MN, where Joel’s mother founded the Paul Bunyan Playhouse and his father started a long and successful career as a general surgeon. Joel graduated from Bemidji High School in 1960 as a National Merit Scholar Finalist; Dartmouth College in 1964 Phi Beta Kappa with a major in biology; and the University of Minnesota

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

Medical School in 1968 with an M.D. degree. Following a year’s internship at Weld County General Hospital in Greeley, CO, Joel returned to Bemidji, where he wore the many hats of a small-town general medical practitioner. An auto accident in November 1977 caused permanent quadriplegia. In 1979, he moved to Santa Barbara where he taught medical terminology to court reporting students and the lecture portion of California EMT certification at Santa Barbara City College. In 1981, he married Mary Liebl of Sheboygan, WI, in a beautiful lake-side ceremony at his parents’ home in Bemidji. Their life together in Santa Barbara was full of fun, laughter, family, and friends. They also shared and loved numerous wonderful cats throughout the years. Early in his life, Joel enjoyed being an ultra-active outdoorsman – cross country, downhill, and water skilling, tennis, golf, bird-hunting and canoeing were some of his passions. In the summers, he guided campers on trips to the Quetico Canoe country of Ontario and Minnesota. In the spring of 1961, sitting number four, he helped power the Dartmouth freshman lightweight 8-man crew to victory after victory, culminating in the setting of the course record at the National Rowing Championships in Worcester, MA. A voracious reader, Joel’s vast knowledge extended to science, nature, medicine, sports, his beloved classical music, poetry, literature, fine wine, and Irish Whiskey. He was an avid devotee of the study of WWII; indeed, his knowledge on the subject rivaled the best scholars in the field. His wry sense of humor and quick wit were always a source of entertainment and amusement. Joel was a loving and devoted husband, son, and brother to five younger siblings. A fiercely loyal and devoted friend, he cultivated and cherished lifelong friendships, some for more than seventy years. An intellectual until the end, two weeks before his

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death, Joel was still winning his favorite board game of Trivial Pursuit against family and dear friend, Marty McKenzie. Mary will really miss her “Mr. Google.” Joel’s siblings would like to acknowledge his amazing wife, Mary, for her devotion and loving care for him during their life together. Joel’s mother often referred to Mary as “Joel’s Angel”. While all of the siblings treasured their many visits to Santa Barbara with Joel and Mary over the years, a special acknowledgement to his brother Mac, who resides in Massachusetts, for his numerous and varied home improvement projects as well as the many instances of respite care he provided for Joel. Joel passed away at home on September 12, 2021, surrounded by friends and family. He is survived by his wife of 39 years, Mary Liebl Deweese; his siblings – Mac Deweese (Robin Fies), Sarah Lewandowski (Doug), Wilf Deweese (Chris), Dr. Sam Deweese (Dr. Janet Bergeron), Jennifer Deweese (Clem Czerniak), numerous nieces and nephews, and his first wife, Dr. Natalie Roholt. His survivors also include in-laws Mardi Kemp (John), Jack Liebl (Pam), Tom Liebl (Lisa) and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents, Dr. W.J. (Bill) and Rowena Deweese and in-laws Robert and Helen Liebl formerly of Sheboygan, WI. The family is deeply grateful for Joel’s wonderful doctors including Dr. Stanley McLain at Sansum Clinic in Santa Barbara, the visiting nurses and hospice of Santa Barbara and all of the other care givers throughout the years. Memorials can be sent to: Easy Lift of Santa Barbara, 53 Cass Place, Suite D, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 Arbor Day Foundation, 2611 Arbor Avenue, Nebraska City, NE 68410 Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care (VNA Health), 512 E. Gutierrez Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 Friends of Dartmouth Rowing, 6083 Alumni Gym, Hanover, NH 03755

Michael V. Wood

9/15/1966 - 10/27/2021

On Wednesday, October 27, 2021. Michael Wood, son of Vincent and Judy Wood passed away at the age of 55. Michael was born September 15, 1966 in Newport Beach, CA and lived there with his parents and siblings until 1971. That year he moved with his family to Santa Barbara, CA. Mike attended Cleveland School, Santa Barbara Jr. High and Santa Barbara High School. Motorcycle riding in the backcountry of Santa Barbara was always his favorite activity. On May 12, 1985 he was riding with friends near Pendola Ranger Station (Santa Barbara backcountry), where he was involved in a horrific accident with another motorcyclist. Mike suffered a traumatic brain injury that changed his life forever. After many years in and out of hospitals and rehabilitation centers he lived with his parents. In September 2006 Mike was transferred to Casa Colina Residential Facility in Apple Valley, CA. He remained living there until his death. Mike is survived by sisters Debbie Furnari (Mario), Santa Clarita and Kelly Silva, Goleta and brother Christopher Wood (Heather Danely) of Santa Ynez. Also surviving are nieces Alexandra Rodriguez (Scott), Michelle Rifkin (Garrett), Chloe Wood and nephew Brody Wood. Great-nieces Autumn and Ella Rodriguez as well as several aunts, uncles and cousins survive. Internment will take place at the SB Cemetery at a future date. The Wood Family would like to thank the staff at Casa Colina, Apple Valley for their outstanding care and making Mike’s life meaningful as possible. Donations in his memory may be sent to Jody House, 625 Chapala St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101.


obituaries Leo Roger Pedersen 1935- 2021

Leo Roger Pedersen died of congestive heart failure at home on October 20th, 2021. He is survived by the love of his life and wife of 37 years, Martha Pedersen (Bassett); his children and their spouses, Katherine and Bill Parker and Eric and Lori Pedersen; and his grandchildren, Matt and Kevin Parker and Stacia and Zoey Pedersen. Leo was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1935 to Danish immigrants, Otto and Christine Pedersen. He was predeceased by his three siblings Frank, Lillian and Gene. His family moved to Santa Barbara when he was in middle school and he graduated from Santa Barbara High School where he played clarinet in the marching band. When asked “Why the clarinet?”, he said “That’s what we had in the house”. He enjoyed jazz music and played in the jazz band. Leo graduated from the USC School of Architecture where he met his first wife Selena Pedersen (Stone) and started a family with their first child Katherine. Leo remained a fan of USC football throughout his life and enjoyed going to games and watching them on TV. After graduating from USC, he brought his family back to Santa Barbara where he was employed by one of the oldest architectural firms in town. He worked his way up from draftsman to managing principal partner. Leo later joined forces with his architect son Eric to form their own firm, Pedersen Architects, LLP where they specialized in healthcare design. In addition to having a solid aptitude for running a business, Leo was also a talented designer. He designed a beautiful home in the hills of Montecito. Eric fondly remembers his father’s hands-on approach to design and construction

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com and the many trips to the hardware store on weekends for building supplies. Leo volunteered for several non-profit boards during his life. He served on the Santa Barbara Cemetery Board, Wood Glen Hall Board, the Hope Ranch Architectural Board, and was President of the American Institute of Architects. Many family vacations were spent backpacking in the backcountry of Santa Barbara and the Sierras where Leo enjoyed “roughing it”. He took great pride in “catching his own dinner” while fishing. He was an avid photographer and shot thousands of nature slides. His family and friends affectionately called him “Fearless Leader” When Leo bought his first MG-TD, a 1952 sports car, it changed his life. It became his “daily driver”. He eventually bought another TD to restore which he did meticulously and it won many awards. He went on to restore a 1948 MG-TC and built a race car out of MG-TD parts. He and Martha toured the UK twice in the TC, and some of Leo’s fondest friendships were made through car clubs and events. He appreciated people who could be as unusual as their vehicles. Leo enjoyed being with Martha. They liked doing everything together including traveling, caring for their animals, and savoring the quiet moments of life. They joked that their relationship survived several remodels in three separate houses where they were able to express their creativity with beautiful results. While Leo lived most of his life in Santa Barbara, he and Martha moved to Atascadero to retire where Leo was delighted to have a three-car garage for the first time. He continued to restore MGs and form new friendships with car enthusiasts and his book club members. He volunteered in an English literacy program and took great satisfaction teaching ESL students. He also contributed his professional expertise to the Atascadero Library Expansion. Leo was a hard worker and diligent perfectionist. He had a great sense of humor, rec-

ognized the ironic and was able to laugh at himself. He enjoyed a comfortable chair, a good book, and the company of friends while eating a delicious meal and relishing a fine glass of wine. He will be sorely missed by all who knew and loved him. Donations can be made on his behalf to the American Heart Association or the organization of your choice.

Cody Mitchell Root 8/7/1985 - 10/6/2021

Alexa Root, three nephews, three sister-in-laws, and one brother-in-law. Cody was preceded in death by his mother, Gina Disparte, grandmother, Rojan Disparte, grandmother, Patricia Root, and aunt, Susan Root. An outdoor Celebration of Life will be held on November 13th, 2021 at 1 PM in Hope Ranch. Please contact the family to RSVP, and for the address. In lieu of flowers please make donations to the Summit for Danny foundation in Cody’s name.

William Jack “Rocky” Mayer III 4/3/1953 - 7/16/2021

Beloved Son, brother, grandson, uncle, and friend to many, Cody Mitchell Root died unexpectedly on October 6, 2021. Cody was 36 years old and was born August 7, 1985 in Santa Barbara, CA. Cody lived a bright life, full of love and laughter. He enjoyed spending time with his family and friends any chance that he got. He considered many of his friends as his extended family. Cody could light up a room with his shining personality and infectious laugh. He always had a story to tell or a fun fact to share during any conversation. He was always everyone’s biggest supporter, and gave words of wisdom and comforting advice to anyone who needed to hear it. He lived life fully and enjoyed every opportunity that came his way. He loved being outdoors and in nature seeing the wildlife and beautiful plants. Cody held many jobs in the Santa Barbara community and met many people; he never forgot a name or face, and was always happy to greet people when he saw them again. He made many friends and many connections throughout Santa Barbara County. Cody is survived by his two grandfathers, Warren Root and Charlie Disparte, his father and step-mother, Art and Colleen Root, brothers, Jacob and Jared Root, and David Quiroz, sister,

William Jack “Rocky” Mayer III, 68, of Tucson Arizona passed unexpectedly on July 16, 2021 in Paonia, Colorado. Rocky told his friends that he had enjoyed a wonderful motorcycle ride in the beautiful mountains that day, while participating at a motorcycle event in Paonia. He was born April 3, 1953 in San Luis Obispo, California to the late William Jack “Bill” Mayer Jr. and Frances E. “Fran” (Hill) Mayer. Rocky grew up in Pomona, California, graduating from Ganesha High School in 1971, and voted Class Personality and King of the Sweethearts in his senior class – titles that continued to fit him perfectly. Rocky moved to Santa Barbara, California after high school, where he worked for Montello’s furniture as store manager and for Carrows restaurants in the franchise manager program. In 1973 Rocky met his future wife Angelee Conroy in Santa Barbara, and they were married there in 1982. He was the sales director and salesperson trainer for Arrow Industrial Supply Co. in Canoga Park around 1976 to 1985, when he left and established Rock Industrial Sales Inc. in Ventura, Cali-

fornia, which was successful for 10 years. He then decided to change careers and stay in the family business of manufacturing “Bill Mayer Day Long Saddles”, custom made motorcycle seats. He started this business in Ventura and Ojai California, at which time he married Laura Nunn and moved the business to Eagle, Idaho. Eventually returning to Ventura, he reconnected with Pat Liampetchakul, and they decided to move to Nampa and Boise, Idaho for about two years, and then they settled in Tucson, Arizona late last year. Rocky will be remembered for being the most outgoing, fun, adventurous, travel loving (his favorites – Costa Rica, Cabo, Aspen, Hawaii) person that you could ever meet. The “Rock” was bigger than life and his heart was filled with love and concern for so many others, including people he never met. He was a friend to so many people in all parts of his life. He was always the first to reach out and offer help to those in need. He cared about the people in his life and it showed. Rocky always left an impression, always upbeat and will be greatly missed by many. Rocky is survived by his fiancé Patcharee Liampetchakul of Tuscon, AZ; his sisters, Linda Jean Curry (Russell) of Carlsbad, CA and Susan Elaine Mayer of Wanatchee WA; brothers, Richard Harvey Mayer of Fort Wayne, IN and Jacob Roderick Mayer (Tony) of Idaho Falls, ID; and his very close nieces and nephews. A private family Buddhist ceremony was held in Tucson, AZ, and at 100 days, a private final prayer ceremony was held at the Wat Thai Temple in North Hollywood. His ashes were scattered in the ocean off the coast of Ventura, CA after the ceremony. A big lover of dogs, Rocky rescued and adopted many, many dogs from different shelters, including his most recent buddy “Butch”. In his remembrance, please consider supporting your local animal shelter. Have a long, long heavenly ride Rocky. Continued on p.16

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

George Alexander Bunson

Leland McCormack Crawford, Jr.

George Alexander Bunson passed away surrounded by his family in Santa Barbara, CA. George was born in Charleroi, Pennsylvania on February 19,1932. He received a Bachelor of Arts from Drexel University in 1955. After serving a term as an officer in US Army Combat Engineers, he joined Garret Air Research in Los Angeles. He married Diane Meyers in 1960. In 1961 they moved to Santa Barbara to work for Santa Barbara Research where he helped design many space projects including guidance for the Surveyor spacecraft and many earth and weather satellite projects. When he retired in 1993, he was Manager of the Engineering Services Laboratory. In retirement George enjoyed backpacking, wood working, beekeeping, tennis, fishing @LakeCachuma, and playing the harmonica. George is survived by his wife of 61 years Diane; children Diane Greenwood, George {Traci} and Grandchildren, Darren Hitchman, Corinna Hitchman, David Bunson and Kathy {Tristin] Stromberg. A family memorial will be held in San Diego in December. In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to ALZ Santa Barbara or Assisted Hospice Care in George’s memory.

On September 23, 2021, Leland McCormack Crawford, Jr. passed peacefully at home in Montecito. Family and caregivers were by his side. Leland, the youngest of three children, was born at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital on July 10, 1929. He spent his childhood riding bikes with his two sisters from the Santa Barbara Mission to the Montecito Country Club, the Coral Casino, Miramar Beach and the muni tennis courts. He later graduated from Santa Barbara High School and UC Berkeley, where he met his wife Francesca Jensen. He was an active Chi Phi fraternity brother and finished his law degree at UC Hastings. After serving in the U.S. Army, Leland practiced law for 52 years in Santa Barbara, 7 of those years in partnership with his father. Always civic minded, Leland served frequently as President of the board — sometimes more than twice — for the following organizations: Rotary Club of Santa Barbara, The State Bar Associations of both Santa Barbara and CA, Casa Dorinda, Lobero Theatre, Montecito Retirement Association, Santa Barbara Mental Health Association, and the State of CA Mental Health Association. He served as a board member for the Boy Scouts of America, Kiwanis Club, Montecito YMCA, Santa Barbara Historical Society, and Valley Club, the latter his pride and joy for being one of its longest-term members. During their active and loving 63 years of marriage, Leland and Frani volunteered for Montecito’s Beautification Day and many other charities, played tennis and golf, danced, socialized with friends, family and organized golf trips all over the world. Leland read

2/19/1932 - 10/25/2021

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7/10/1929 - 9/23/2021

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

volumes of historical novels and books on US and world history, rarely missing the chance to debate history or current affairs. Never a dull moment be had when in his company. He shall be missed. Leland was predeceased by his mother Mae McCormack and his father Leland Morris Crawford; his sisters Eleanor Cassedy and Elizabeth Fee; and his adoring, beloved wife Francesca Jensen Crawford, whom he finally joins to continue their eternity of love and friendship. Leland is survived by his devoted daughter Paula Emmens and her husband Bruce; son Leland M. Crawford III and his wife Stacey; granddaughter Sophia and her husband Dan Hennigan; grandson Robert Emmens. Services will be held at All Saints by the Sea Episcopal Church in Montecito on Tuesday, November 23 rd at 2pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Santa Barbara Mental Health Association and Santa Barbara Historical Society.

Jennifer Leigh Blankenbeckler

5/13/1976 - 8/9/2021

Jennifer Leigh Blankenbeckler, age 45, of Santa Barbara, CA, passed away on August 9, 2021, at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital surrounded by her family. Born on May 13, 1976, in Louisville, KY, Jen was the daughter of John C. Blankenbeckler, Jr. and Leigh Lewis Blankenbeckler, little sister to John C. (Jay) Blankenbeckler, III, sister-in-law to Paulette Blankenbeckler and “Aunt Jenz” to her beloved nieces, Taylor and Riley. In 1979, Jennifer’s family moved to San Diego, CA, where she excelled academically and athletically. She got her first taste of competition at 6 years old, the youngest at the time to participate in the San Diego Breakers 5k. Later, she helped her volleyball and basketball teams at Poway High to win California Inter-

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scholastic Federation championships. Jen was a scholar athlete of the year as a senior. Jennifer was recruited to play volleyball at several colleges but chose the University of Arkansas, where she spent two years before transferring to the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), which would be her future, “permanent” home where a network of extraordinary friends and professional colleagues would be with her through her final days. Jennifer graduated from UCSB in 1998 with Bachelor of Arts Degree in Communications. Jennifer possessed an adventurous spirit and love of travel which took her across Europe, Central America and the US., with favorite spots in Hawaii, Colorado and the California Sierras. Starting with family trips during her youth in Kentucky and Virginia, Jennifer developed a love of camping, fishing, and skiing, which drew her to Vail, Colorado after college, where she served as a youth ski instructor. In the years that followed, Jennifer worked with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society in Orange County, CA, and with St. Mary’s Regional Medical Center in Lewiston, ME, where she received her degree in Applied Science as a Medical Assistant. Eventually, Jennifer returned to Santa Barbara, working again at the iconic Paradise Café as a waitress, bartender, and manager and then as a Medical Assistant with the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center. A little on Jennifer’s big heart: She was fiercely independent and proud to take care of herself. Jennifer was, hands down, the best gift giver – ever. Never missing anyone’s birthday, her cards and kind gestures were often handmade and thoughtfully personalized for the recipient. She could be hysterically, unabashedly silly – or deep, present, and serious…but always attentive to the needs of people around her. Jennifer was caring and generous, both to those she barely knew and her oldest friends, maintaining those friendships over long distances and stretches of time. Jennifer’s life was marked by cancer, but in a way that empowered her to use it as a tool to serve others. It became her calling after she endured life-threatening

brain cancer when living in Vail at the young age of 25. Once recovered and in remission, Jennifer dedicated her life supporting others with cancer, from fundraising and running marathons for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and the Dempsey Challenge to volunteering for numerous cancer causes like the Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation and The Brad Kaminsky Foundation, and serving as a hands-on mentor for those enduring challenging prognoses and treatments. For the past five years, in her role at the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, Jennifer brought compassionate empathy and her famous, radiant smile to patients. Jennifer was known for going above and beyond, blending her organizational fastidiousness with her big, authentic warmth. She held a tremendously high standard of service for her patients – because she intimately understood what they were going through. In her spare time, Jennifer took it upon herself to mail cards to family members who ultimately lost their loved ones to cancer. She attended most of her patients’ services and funerals and stayed in touch with widows and families. In 2018, Jennifer donned her Cancer Warrior Cape again after a diagnosis of Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Her brother was a bone marrow match, and his gift gave her three more precious years with her family, friends, and patients. On this last go-round with cancer, Jennifer initially considered it just another interruption in her life. Ultimately, though, Jennifer’s fate was to do better work on the other side. “Angel” is a word that is never used lightly, yet it was one often applied to Jen in her service, love and friendship. Now she is officially our angel. In lieu of flowers, donations in Jennifer’s name can be made to the Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation and/or the Brad Kaminksy Foundation.


Letters

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Vendors who made our day magical!

Workshops • Gifts • Party Goods Thank you to all who attended our

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DAVE GRUNLAND

"A place where my kids can create and I don't have to clean up the mess!"

On the City Election

A

Zoom meeting with mayoral candidates really caused me to despair due to the general acceptance that (1) new housing must be built in Santa Barbara; (2) the problem of increased traffic can be denied or dismissed as being solvable through “smart planning,” with no examples of how even a single project with, say, 40 units would not increase traffic; and (3) the “the elephant in the room”—water. You can modify height and density requirements to fit in more housing, and you can wish away the inherent parking and traffic problems, but you cannot tell renters they can’t use water. Water is a problem that cannot be legislated away. We live in an ongoing drought. From the beginning, the state told us they were never going to be able to supply all the State Water we were paying for, so that is not the answer. The desal plant is running, but I doubt it will be able to supply the demand created by new housing. Water is, and has been, a problem that has been ignored in the rush to build more housing. Think about all the problems before building more housing! Don’t build with the expectation that some future planners will solve the problems you create. —Duff Kennedy, S.B.

V

...

oting in this year’s city election was an exercise in pure frustration, knowing that if I cast my single vote for the mayoral candidate that I really most preferred I increased the likelihood that my least preferred candidate would win by a slim plurality. I strongly agree with Nick Welsh’s column about the need to reform Santa Barbara election practices, both campaign financing and ballot reform. But why call for a run-off election process when rank-order voting would accomplish the same thing without the added expense and effort of a second —Marilynn Brewer, S.B. election?

I

...

nstead of a run-off election, in a ranked voting system, each voter would select two or three candidates and list them as first, second, or third choice. First choice gets three points, second gets two, and

third gets one. The person with the most points at the end is elected. This will take less time and cost a lot less money. I think it accomplishes the same thing.

. . . —Carl Hopkins, S.B.

I

n the spirit of a new column, I would suggest containing community submissions of gratitude and disappointments, perhaps “Pats on the Back & Thumps on the Head”: A thump on the head goes to all the Santa Barbara candidates running for office that ordered corrugated plastic yard signs for their supporters. These signs will last years when they only need to last weeks. A pat on the back goes to those candidates who had cardboard signs made that are completely recyclable. These folks are mindful of the impacts their choices have on our community and planet.

Gun Funds

—Michelle Rainville, S.B.

S

an Jose has become the first city in the nation to require gun owners to carry liability insurance. The ordinance was passed more than a month after a Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority worker opened fire on colleagues at the light rail yard, killing nine. Gun owners will also have to pay an annual fee to help the city respond to gun-related violence. The Pacific Institute on Research and Evaluation is working on a study that would help guide that decision-making process. A preliminary report by the institute put the public cost of gun violence in San Jose at around $63 million a year. Santa Barbara need to pass a law that makes the gun owners pay, not the taxpayers. —Sharon Dalpozzo, Carpinteria

For the Record

3554 State Street, Santa Barbara 805-679-5288

ink.paper.crafts

Notice of Funding Availability and Mandatory Application Workshop Human Services and Community Development Block Grant Notice is hereby given that the City of Santa Barbara will be soliciting proposals from eligible applicants for fiscal year 2022-2023 Human Services and Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) Programs. A mandatory Application Workshop will be held November 18, 2021 from 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM. In order to apply, a representative of each applicant is required to attend this workshop in its entirety. To register for the workshop, sign up at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/ register/4826723423680341264. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. Applications are due 4:30 p.m. December 22, 2021. NO EXCEPTIONS. Further information can be obtained online or by contacting the Community Development Programs staff at LDrewes@SantaBarbaraCA.gov. It is the applicant’s responsibility to see that their application is complete and submitted online on or before the stated due date and time. Incomplete applications will NOT be accepted. Acceptance of application does NOT guarantee funding. See all requirements and process details at www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov.

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¶ In last week’s story about Munger Hall, we note only one market, bakery, fitness center, gastropub, game room, grab-and-go room, and demonstration kitchen will occupy the entire building, not one set on every floor.

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Opinions

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CONT’D

The Unequal Harm of Campus Deputies Students Report Fear and Clumsy Handling of Sexual Assault BY KYM PASZKEICZ AND CARRI E HUTCH I NSON FOR SHOWI NG U P FOR RACIAL JUSTICE S A N TA B A R B A R A

T

he Santa Barbara Unified School District

board faced a historic vote on October 12 when it decided not to renew the contract for an armed School Resource Deputy (SRD) at San Marcos High School. The significance of this vote cannot be overstated. Districts across the state face the same choice: to continue to fund armed police on school campuses or to reimagine school safety by discontinuing police presence. Before the board voted, the student-led youth coalition Cops Off Campus S.B. gathered testimonials from students who had direct experience with the deputies, also known as School Resource Officers, or SROs. The clear disparities in testimonies by students of color and white students revealed two different sets of experiences, which appeared to be determined largely by ethnicity and race. One white student called attention to this fact in public comments on October 12, stating, “As I look at the student testimonies, I see such a disparity between the experiences of students of color and white students like myself.” He noted how, when asked about their experiences with school deputies, students of color report feeling “afraid, violated, and harassed” and experienced “intense anxiety.” He asked, “How can all students in Santa Barbara Unified School District learn, and achieve our educational goals, when marginalized students are having such a different experience and being criminalized on our school campuses? … No one should want this harm to continue.” Most testimonies from students of color were anonymous for fear of retaliation: “The presence of police on our school campus was not reassuring…. They make problems worse and racially profile and target some students.” “I was an honor student, but I felt afraid of cops at school….” “SROs do not make me feel protected or safe; rather, they make me feel anxious and stressed on campus.” The Santa Barbara district is not alone in their new position about armed deputies on school campuses. In the face of irrefutable data justifying their removal, school districts across California are making the move, including those in San Jose, Marin, Los Angeles, Pomona, Oakland, Fremont, Palm Springs, Los Altos, Claremont, Salinas, and San Francisco, and the list is growing. In managing limited school funds, district leaders are becoming increasingly aware that paying for cops on campus is a misuse of resources. No research to date shows that police on campus prevent or deter violent crime. In 197 instances of gun violence at U.S. schools since 1999, campus deputies have had a 1.5 percent success rate. When a gunman opened fire on a school in Parkland, Florida, in 2018, 17 people were killed despite the presence of an armed school deputy. Cops on campus not only fail to protect students, but in many instances, they create harm. Statewide

SBCC THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT Presents a Student Showcase

Laughing with

data matches the testimonies of Santa Barbara’s students: When police are in schools, many students tend to feel less connected with the school, less trusting of adults, and less safe. Compared to schools without armed police, the arrest rates for schools with them are 3.5 times higher, and in some states as much as 8 times higher. The ACLU noted in a May 2021 article, “Exacerbating this problem is the fact that certain student groups are policed disproportionately. This is the case for students of color who are arrested or referred to law enforcement at significantly higher rates than their white counterparts,” a pattern that creates the school-to-prison pipeline.

D urang

A Night of Christopher Durang Short Plays Directed by Matt Talbott Contains Adult Language and Content

NOVEMBER 10-20, 2021

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It isn’t just students of color who are negatively impacted by cops on campus. The ACLU adds that in schools with deputies “students with disabilities are arrested or referred to law enforcement nearly three times the rate of their non-disabled peers.” At a subsequent school board meeting, Sheriff Bill Brown criticized the board’s vote, stating that campus deputies “provide a safe space for survivors of abuse.” The testimony of one San Marcos alumni paints a different picture. She shared, “My friend from high school was raped, and instead of getting her the appropriate help, an SRO intervened. She felt even more violated and was trying to kill herself by jumping into traffic….” In this case and many others, direct reports indicate that school deputies worsen the impacts of trauma and abuse rather than giving the kind of support that can only be provided by experienced health professionals. The Santa Barbara school board not only voted against the renewal of the police contract but also voiced a commitment to more effective forms of support and intervention for all students. San Marcos will still have a line of communication with law enforcement should a criminal emergency need immediate attention, but funds formerly spent on the campus deputy position will be allocated to a new position dedicated to meeting student safety needs using a trauma-informed and restorative lens. As stated by Boardmember Wendy Sims-Moten, “We cannot continue to go forth when we have the opportunity to rethink campus safety … I think this is the opportunity to step up and do what we need to do.” Unfortunately, brave decisions like these are always followed by pushback. To show support for the school board’s decision, sign the petition at chng n .it/WmhbCXQD.

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Image courtesy of Lovepop

Heal the Ocean Honorary Top Dog Julia Louis-Dreyfus

Heal the Ocean proudly salutes the generous Sponsors and Supporters who made our Imaginary “Surf Dog” Gala 2021 such a success! With your help, we raised over $200,000 – this is epic! We thank Julia Louis-Dreyfus for again being our Honorary Chair (our Top Dog!), hosting it all with such joy. We are deeply grateful to the following Surf Dog Dream Lineup Sponsors and Surf Dog Supporters who jumped in the ocean with us and helped us with very real donations. Thank you, one and all!

2021 SURF DOG DREAM LINEUP SPONSORS FUNSHAPE

RHINO CHASER

Nora McNeely Hurley & Michael Hurley

BIG GUN

Brynn & Charles Crowe Dan & Rae Emmett Abby Turin & Jon Gans Julia Louis-Dreyfus & Brad Hall Sam Scranton in memory of Sherilyn Scranton

Tomchin Family Foundation

Thomas & Nancy Crawford The Roy E. Crummer Foundation Greg & Elisabeth Fowler/ G.A. Fowler Family Foundation The Radis Family

HYBRID

Tom & Sheila Cullen

SHORTBOARD

Larry & Wendy Barels Big Speak Inc. Susan Baerwald & Marcy Carsey/ Just Folk Johnson Ohana Foundation Jay & Talia Roston

SKIMBOARD

Martha Blackwell J’Amy Brown The Ruth Brown Foundation

with special thanks to Charla Brown

Steve Starkey & Olivia Erschen Tisha Ford Austin Lampson/ Homeowners Financial Group John & Gloria McManus Steve & Blair Raber Melissa Riparetti-Stepien & Christian Stepien Patsy Tisch Zog Industries

HAND PLANE

Gordon Auchincloss & Belita Ong Lee Parker Bacon Terri Carlson, MD Ani Casillas/The Casillas Family Thomas Dabney Susan Eng-Denbaars & Steve Denbaars Judith Little Kenny Loggins Evan Turpin Susan Venable & Charles Vinick

2021 SURF DOG SUPPORTERS SKIMBOARD SUPPORTER Joan Fried Hermine & Gary Gallup Dick & Peggy Lamb Dodd & Beth Geiger/ Alex & Gina Ziegler HAND PLANE SUPPORTER The B & B Foundation Kathleen McCauley Laurain Anonymous Andy & Yvonne Neumann Leslie & Phil Bernstein Melanie & K. Leonard Judson Mary Staton & Michel Saint-Sulpice Hunter Turpin Janet McGinnis Jim Winter Denise Nelson Ray Link & Jill Taylor Nina Terzian Alan & Kathryn Van Vliet

DROP IN Peter & Rebecca Adams John Mike & Marcia Cohen

HANG TEN Dennis & Liz Boscacci Hope Bryant Rich & Krista Coffin Dennis Doheny Debbie & Bill Fisher Betty & Peter Gray

Lee Heller Susanne Humbel-Heierling Daniel & Marilyn Johnson Chris Lambert Jim Marshall Nancy Roberts & Bruce Ohannessian Oniracom Oran Young & Gail Osherenko Pete & Shelley Overgaag Anthony Allina, MD & Christiane Schlumberger Judith Bennett & Stephen Schweitzer Eldon Shiffman Cath & Steve Webb George & Judy Writer Jeff & Jana Young

IN THE BARREL Judy & Bruce Anticouni Jeanne Barnard Cotty & Isabella Chubb Lloyd & Richard Dallett Karla Shelton & Bruce Dobrin Sylvelin Edgerton Jon Gilkeson Myla Kato Sheila Lodge Liza Jane MacNaughton Teresa McWilliams Christine Ryerson Ron & Jeanie Sickafoose Joni & Gary Stauffer Dr. Richard Nagy & Dr. Julie Taguchi

Grant & Dana Trexler The Trigueiro Family The Alan Wann Ohana Janet & Harvey Wolf Caroline & Donald Young Mark Zwickel KICKOUT Anonymous Chip & Kelly Bell Nancy Castro Susie Howell Carolyn McCleskey Bill, Pam, & Lilly Poehler Melinda Staveley Deb & Tom Trauntvein Skip Willis

Unique American Folk and Outsider Art

Heal the Ocean, 1430 Chapala St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 965-7570; info@healtheocean.org; www.HealtheOcean.org 20

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Mermaid

C OVER STORY

DEEP FOCUS: A mermaid glimpsed through the kelp forest. Photo by John Kelsey.

I

Be the

Maggie Yates Reflects on an Exhibition of Mermaid Photos and Her Own Aquatic Experience

n the limitless blue sea, iridescence glimmers off the scales of her slick and powerful tail. She is graceful and glamorous, a dancer of the depths, this mermaid captured on camera. Jewels in her hair, gills at her ribs, the model in Erin Brydon’s photograph is a vision of pin-up perfection, but she is not a Photoshopped fantasy. This magic illusion is evidence of collaboration between a photographer and a trained mermaid model — as close to a real mermaid as you can get. This image, part of the exhibit Mermaids: Visualizing the Myths and Legends Through Photography, is one of many on display at the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum.

by Maggie Yates

The show celebrates the work of Brooks Institute photographers who’ve done the impossible: captured images of mermaids in the wild. Specifically, they took these images in the ocean off the Channel Islands, where they found their subjects deep in ocean lore. Mermaids have universal appeal. These beings with human intelligence can live underwater in a world that we can only access with vehicles and gear. They combine strength and sensuality in an appealing way that exudes the aura of freedom a romanticized life at sea offers. At a critical point in my life, a moment of emotional doldrums, I saw a T-shirt that said, “Always be yourself. Unless you can be a mermaid, then be a mermaid.” Desperate to redefine my existence, I seized on a radical notion: Screw being myself; I was going to be a mermaid.

There is a power in manifestation — creating reality out of fantasy — and I started the process by growing my hair. What if I didn’t have to be myself all the time? What if, instead, I could be a beautiful, carefree being from the mysterious depths? The tail came next. Sleek and shimmering, the single big fin binds the legs, forcing a vertical undulation of the body to propel through the water. The monofin in the fluke of the tail allows the wearer to glide gently through the deep (unlike the spastic kicking of two feet). Finally, I took the literal plunge at mermaid school, where I became acquainted with an entire culture of merpeople. I’m not the only person, it seems, with mermaid dreams: People of all genders from all corners of the world harbor the fantasy of diving deep and swimming effortlessly

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C OVER STORY

The Arlington Theatre

­

­

TAIL FLIP: Mermaid models must learn to swim like fish. Photo by Liz Grady. Paseo Nuevo • Fairview Fiesta 5 • Arlington • Camino

Metro 4 • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Nov 12-18, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Belfast* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:45, 5:20, 7:45. Clifford* (G): Fri-Thur: 2:15, 4:40, 7:00. The French Dispatch (R): Fri-Thur: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30.

Eternals* (PG13): Fri: 1:00(LP), 2:20, 4:20(LP), 5:45, 7:40(LP), 9:15. Sat/Sun: 1:00, 2:20, 4:20(LP), 5:45, 7:40(LP), 9:15. Mon-Thur: 2:20, 4:20(LP), 5:45, 7:40(LP). Dune (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:15, 4:55, 8:15. Mon-Thur: 2:00, 4:55, 8:15. Venom Let There Be Carnage (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:30, 4:00, 6:40, 9:00. Mon-Thur: 2:30, 5:20, 8:00.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

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Eternals* (PG13): Fri: 12:50, 1:50, 3:10, 4:10, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:50. Sat/Sun: 11:50, 12:50, 1:50, 3:10, 4:10, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30, 9:50. Mon-Wed: 1:50, 3:10, 4:10, 6:30, 7:30, 8:30. Thur: 1:50, 4:10, 5:10, 7:30, 8:30. Dune (PG): Fri: 3:20, 6:40, 10:00. Sat-Sun: 3:20, 6:40, 10:00. Mon-Wed: 1:40, 5:00, 8:20. Thur: 1:40, 5:00, 8:20. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:00, 4:30, 8:00. Mon-Wed: 2:00, 4:30, 8:00. Thur: 2:00, 4:30. Venom Let There Be Carnage (PG13): Fri: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40. Sat/Sun: 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40. Mon-Wed: 2:10, 5:30, 7:50. Thur: 2:10. Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Thur: 4:00, 5:30, 7:00, 8:20, 9:20.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Dune (PG): Sat-Wed: 3:30, 7:00. Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Thur: 4:00, 7:00. 22

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Clifford* (G): Fri: 2:00, 3:10, 4:20, 5:30, 6:40, 7:50. Sat/Sun: 12:50, 2:00, 3:10, 4:20, 5:30, 6:40, 7:50. Mon-Thur: 3:10, 4:20, 5:30, 6:40, 7:50. Red Notice (PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:20, 5:00, 7:40. Mon-Wed: 5:00, 7:40. Thur: 5:20. Antlers (R): Fri-Thur: 4:40. Ron’s Gone Wrong (PG): Fri-Sun: 1:45, 7:05. Mon-Thur: 7:05. The Addams Family 2 (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 3:30, 5:45. Sat/Sun: 1:15, 3:30, 5:45. Thur: 3:20. Halloween Kills (R): Fri-Thur: 8:00. Ghostbusters: Afterlife* (PG13): Thur: 5:15, 8:15.

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Belfast* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:30, 4:55, 7:20. Mon-Thur: 4:55, 7:20. Spencer (R): Fri-Sun: 1:20, 5:05, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 5:05, 7:30. The French Dispatch (R): Fri-Sun: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 5:00, 8:00. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:30, 4:00, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:45.

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

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as the legendary human/sea-creature hybrid. Exploring the world of mermaiding was akin to developing a superpower: I feel athletic and silky underwater, a transformation from the chaos of a merely human body submerged. It’s a nonnarcotic way of transcending the customariness of life and experiencing the world in an utterly new way. From children in Halloween costumes to professional mermaid performers and models (mermodels), there is an entire subculture of people who dream of life underwater. I love meeting other mermaids and hearing their stories, including a young trans woman in a rain-

bow tail at the Madonna Inn pool, celebrating pride, and a couple in their fifties who rocked teal hair and tails to spread awareness about ovarian cancer. There’s even a mermaid convention every year in Sacramento for merpeople to come together and celebrate their shared fascination (and shop, shop, shop!). Professional mermaids are a focused version of the mermaid hobbyist. These mermodels are generally excellent swimmers; many also know how to free-dive, and they all practice the art of underwater posing. In Chiara Salomoni’s photo, we see the active arms and relaxed expression of the kind of skillful poses that experienced mermaids achieve as they float, unaffected by the laws of physics, in the blue depth. These mermodels are magically fluid in the watery environment around them, and their elaborate costumes hint at the splendors under the sea. The photographers who shot these images in the channel developed them at the Brooks Institute of Photography, where the next generation of photographers once studied their craft. Senior faculty member and photographer Ralph A. Clevenger taught a course on underwater phoAUTHOR AQUATIC: Maggie Yates submerged at Weeki Wachee Springs. Photo by Shad Springer.


Leonidas Kavakos, violin Yuja Wang, piano tography. A highlight of the Brooks experience was the class journey to the Channel Islands on a dive boat to take underwater images of fashion models. In preparation for one of these trips, Clevenger learned about the existence of professional mermaids from a student. The benefit of using mermaids as subjects when learning underwater photography is that students can tell fabulous stories with their images rather than just capturing fashion underwater. For example, in John Kelsey’s image, the mermaid swims languidly through towers of kelp in an undersea forest. Light streaming around the mermaid’s form in silhouette gives an otherworldly appeal to the familiar kelp, making it easy to imagine that these fascinating aquatic creatures do exist, concealed in the underwater features just offshore. There are myriad technical challenges in creating underwater images of mermodels. For one thing, without the benefit of masks or goggles, the mermaids are blind underwater, making communication during the actual shoot impossible. They also need to come up for air every few minutes, as does the photographer if not in SCUBA gear. The dive crews for these Brooks shoots were very safety-conscious, with safety divers in the water with the models to offer assistance and air from their SCUBA tanks. The sea surge also swirls the models’ hair and lifts their bodies toward the surface. Creating neutral buoyancy without the weight belt that the divers wear is difficult, and sometimes it’s necessary to place weights on the mermaid tail to keep the mermodels from floating upward. It takes a lot of shots to get the perfect combination of flowing hair, facial expression, and flattering body shape, all without verbal communication between models and photographers. Beyond that, the mermaid costume—generally a cloth or silicone tail with a monofin flipper and an embellished shell breastplate—does not offer an abundance of warmth, and the waters of the channel are cold; the mermaids could only model for short periods of time before needing a break on the surface with a warm shower. Clevenger worked with curator Emily Falke to create this stunning exhibit for the Maritime Museum. Together, they selected 16 images from the work of Clevenger and his students, several of whom are now professional photographers. They then printed them at life size. “When you see the exhibit, you’re standing in front of these bodies that are the size of yours, so you feel like you’re in the water with them,” says Falke. “These are very glamorous—even almost sort of provocative in some ways—sensual, beautiful photographs.” The accompanying text tells the stories of mermaid myths from all over the world, as far back as ancient Assyria. In the Western European canon of myths, the mermaids were known to foretell bad luck on the sea, such as a storm or a shipwreck. The mermaid myth became inexorably intertwined with the siren myth along the trail of history, and the idea of mermaids as temptresses whose song lured men into the ocean so they could be drowned became a popular motif in art and folktales. This vicious history behind the

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Fri, Nov 12 / 7 PM UCSB Campbell Hall Recognized for his virtuosity and superb musicianship, violinist Leonidas Kavakos joins forces with pianist Yuja Wang, lauded for her captivating stage presence and “wizardly technique” (Chicago Tribune).

Program

J.S. Bach: Sonata No. 3 in E major, BWV 1016 Busoni: Sonata No. 2 in E minor, op. 36a J.S. Bach: Sonata No. 1 in B minor, BWV 1014 Shostakovich: Sonata in G major, op. 134

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

11/11 - 7:15

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TURKEY DRIVE 2021 Everyone deserves a healthy holiday meal! DROP OFF TURKEYS/CHICKENS! Mon-Fri • 7am-3pm thru Nov 24 for Thanksgiving delivery

Foodbank Warehouse 4554 Hollister Ave (Next to Page Youth Center)

Sun, Nov 21 • 8am-1pm All Saints-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church 83 Eucalyptus Ln

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Catholic Church

SHINE ON: Erin M. Brydon’s photo captures the ideal of mermaid undersea serenity.

1300 E Valley Rd

Learn more/Donate: FoodbankSBC.org/TurkeyTime

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NOVEMBER 11, 2021

glamour adds a level of femme-fatale energy (what Falke refers to as “girlpower”) to the stories told by the images. “They’re kind of daring,” she says. “They were taking the sailors down! They are not just these Botticelli-esque creatures; they were tough cookies!” Clevenger, a lifelong diver, is the opposite of the unlucky sailor in that the mermaid tribe he’s discovered is eager for collaboration. His photo of a golden mermaid presents the idea of mermaids interacting with the camera and crew, another enticing fantasy. Her flirty pose begs the question: Are humans and mermaids compatible? “It’s a great story,” says Clevenger. “With the cross-cultural connection with lakes and oceans and how people relate to those places … it doesn’t surprise me that people made gods and goddesses and myths based on the ocean.” The museum exhibit, which opens November 11, wouldn’t be complete without a live mermaid sighting, so don’t miss the mermodels in the harbor on November 13, ready for photo ops (sign up for a photography slot at sbmm.org). The reality behind being a mermodel or a mermaid performer is that it involves hard work. Creating these illusions goes far beyond donning a tail; mermaids should look like aquatic beings who don’t need to hold their breath. Especially for photography or performance, there is an art to looking natural underwater, and it takes practice. My journey to mermaidhood began in Weeki Wachee Springs, Florida, where performing mermaids have entertained audiences in an underwater arena since the 1940s. After World War II, former navy trainer Newton Perry started a mermaid academy there. He trained young women to swim in the mermaid tail, synchronize their movements, and AT HOME IN THE WATER: Author Maggie Yates smile naturally for the floats in a spring-fed pool in Santa Barbara. fans — all while at least five feet underwater. The

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Newspaper_Santa Barbara Independent 1/4 page_4.583 x 6.166

C OVER STORY

Three minimally-invasive treatment options

One Heart Center

The Cottage Heart Center is a national leader in interventional cardiology.

SEA CREATURES: A mermaid model caught as she surfaces among seabirds in the Santa Barbara channel. Photo by Beatriz Moino.

Cottage is the only hospital on California’s Central Coast that provides all three minimallyinvasive treatments.

TAVR Replaces valve for aortic stenosis

MitraClip™ Repairs leaky valve

Watchman™ Reduces stroke risk due to AFib

mermaid performers could catch a breath of oxygen through air hoses hidden throughout the sizeable spring pool. Back when the Weeki Wachee mermaid show was a roadside attraction on a two-lane highway, Perry’s performers would stand on the side of the road to entice cars to stop at the spring, not unlike the legends of mermaids luring sailors into the rocky shoals. Three-quarters of a century later, the mermaid magic still happens in Weeki Wachee, though the roadside attraction is now a state park with water slides and kayaking. There is a new generation of mermaids now, but the legendary sirens of the deep (mermaid alumni) teach a mermaid “boot” camp at the Weeki Wachee amphitheater. I attended this mermaid school in 2019, and a woman in her eighties, a Weeki Wachee mermaid from the 1950s (she performed for Elvis Presley in her heyday and is still an extraordinary swimmer) taught me to swim in the mermaid tail. I learned some basic underwater acrobatics and how to look natural while posing underwater. No part of this was an easy task, but a sense of calm in underwater endeavors makes the mermaid experience transcendent. (And there’s something rather energizing about knowing you have the power to lure sailors to their death, should you choose. Though in Weeki Wachee, where the mermaids are friendly, the interactions with landlubbers involved more flicking the tail fin at enchanted children than curator of Mermaids drowning unlucky seafarers.) Nowadays, I’m a mermaid anyat SBMM where I can take the tail for good swimming, including our local beaches. Mainly, my mermaid alter ego gives me a chance to be more present in the aquatic environment, genuinely feeling the magical mysteries of the deep. In a culture that demands some level of conformity, it’s a pleasure to have a way to celebrate impracticality, especially one that connects me to the ocean, such a force in our natural world and the culture of Santa Barbara. As a coastal city, we have a connection with the sea right at our doorstep, and the mermaid experience exemplifies that relationship. Becoming a mermaid didn’t solve any of my problems, but it made life more enjoyable. It offered me a fantasy life that I’d been lacking, and on days when I find it difficult to be myself, I remember that I can be a mermaid instead — undoubtedly the preferred option. n

‘They’re kind of daring. They were taking the sailors down!’ —Emily Falke,

Learn more at cottagehealth.org/heart

CELEBRATE

Thanksgiving Thanksgiving Buffet

Adults $89 & Children $45 Seating: 12:00 - 3:00 pm & 4:00 - 7:00 pm

Thanksgiving at The Set Seating: 11:30 am - 9:00 pm

To make a reservation, please call (805) 884- 8526 or email SBAFP_SpecialEvents@Hilton.com Taxes & gratuity additional. An 18% gratuity will be added to parties of 6 or more. For more information, scan the QR code.

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LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 NOV 12

T H IS SUNDA Y!

NOV 14

TOMORROW

at 6:57 pm sharp

ONES TO WATCH PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

Paul Thorn & Band

Hale Milgrim is back with ANOTHER carefully-crafted show, featuring rare concert footage and insider stories with some (OK, a lot) of help from his friends. Join Hale for a visual, musical journey over the last 60 years complete with his memorable insights ... and a few things that he actually remembers.

NOV 18

“Duhon brings the craft of a master short story writer to his songs and in doing so creates a series of skillfully rendered vignettes.” – The LA Beat AND

NOV 19 NOV 20

John Craigie

Bluegrass and American Roots Music that evokes melodies of yesterday with a pinch of modern irony.

#KeepItWarm2021 Tour with special guest Chris Pureka

Hailed as a “Modern-Day Troubadour,” folk singer John Craigie is best known for his candid storytelling, sense of humor, and poignant songwriting. The artist carries on the legacy of classic folk singers while blazing a trail of his own. A Craigie performance is not just a music show, it’s a collective experience.

DEC 3

DEC 7

Scan this!

Download our app for digital ticketing & calendar of events. Opt-in for insider access to pre-sales tickets, promos and more!

An Evening with

SUN. NOV. 14 / 6 PM LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

805.963.0761 / LOBERO.ORG

Marc Broussard with Jamie McLean Band

Martin Media Presents

Whose Live Anyway?

“Few modern voices are as powerful as Marc Broussard’s soulful bayoubred baritone.” – The Washington Times

Brett Dennen See the World Tour

With a singular gift for meditating on life’s most meaningful subjects you know Dennen from his decade-plus career as a singer/songwriter. Peppered in equal parts with shrewd quips and vulnerable admissions, his latest album is ultimately an exploration of life’s deepest meaning.

26

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NOV 24

DEC 14

Scan & Download the Lobero App Today! • Digital ticketing • Calendar of Events

The Robert Cray Band The five-time GRAMMY® Award winner has created a sound that rises from American roots and arrives today both fresh and familiar.

“After nearly 40 years, Robert Cray remains as viable as ever. In a world turned upside down, his music continues to serve as comfort food for the soul.” - Something Else!

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC INDEPENDENT.COM

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NOV.

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

11-17

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

FRIDAY 11/12 11/12-11/14: Buellton Fall Festival

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

Shows on Tap

COURTESY

This three-day festival will feature more than 30 bands on two stages, carnival games and rides for toddlers to adults, a street faire and food vendors, and more than 15 craft breweries and wines. Visit the website for a full schedule. Fri.: 4-10pm; Sat.Sun.: 11am-10pm. Avenue of the Flags, Buellton. Free-$35. Call (805) 448-7070 or email info@surfbeerfest.com.

11/11, 11/13: M.Special Brewing Co. Thu.: DJ Chowder, 7-9pm. Sat.: Nobile Grizwald, 6-8pm. 634 State St.

Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

BuelltonFallFest.com tinyurl.com/FallCarnivalTickets tinyurl.com/BeerWineTickets

11/11-11/17: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Haddon Cord, Jack-

11/12: Virtual: Fall Prevention for the Holidays Join the Braille Institute for a discussion of ways to stay safe from falls this holiday season, learn tips, and share experiences of fall prevention. 1-2:30pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6222 or email tlafino@ braillinstitute.org.

tinyurl.com/StoppingFalls

11/11-11/12, 11/15-11/17:

11/12: Lobero Live: Go to Hale: Quips & Clips — Music That Connects Us This special one-night-only concert film

Foodbank Turkey Drive 2021 The Foodbank of S.B. County wants to help the families and individuals in our community that are struggling to make ends meet. Drop off fresh or frozen turkeys and chickens or financial donations through November 24. Thu.-Fri., Mon.-Wed.: 7am-3pm. Foodbank Warehouse, 4554 Hollister Ave. Free. Call (805) 967-5741.

of rare footage highlights musical artists from acoustic to orchestral. Doors: 6:30pm; show: 7pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $20. Call (805) 963-0761.

tinyurl.com/TurkeyDrive2021

11/11-11/16: Exhibit Reopening: Mermaids: Visualizing the Myths and Legends — Photography by Ralph A. Clevenger & Friends Former teacher at Brooks Institute Ralph Clevenger will take students and professional mermaids (models) on a dive to photograph mermaids in the ocean. Sixteen of these images will be on display through March 31, 2022. Thu.-Tue.: 10am-5pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free. Read more on p. 21.

sbmm.org

11/11-11/17: Fall in Love with Jamie Slone Wines! Take a journey through four of the S.B. American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) at this educational tasting of red wines, where you will learn about key grapes from each region, unique climates, and how soil types influence the wine. Tastings go through November 30. Visit the website to register and for daily times. Jamie Slone Wines, 23 E. De la Guerra St. Prices vary. Call (805) 560-6555.

exploretock.com/jamieslonewines

11/12-11/14: 37th Annual Vaquero Gala, Show, and

11/11: Beavers in the Landscape with Dr. Emily Fairfax Join Dr. Emily

Sale Kick off the weekend at the Gala

Fairfax, PhD, from CSU Channel Islands as she shares her groundbreaking work with beavers and their unique ability to rehydrate landscapes in a talk titled Climate, Fire, Drought — Who Do You Call? Beavers! Wood-fired pizza will be for sale. 5-8pm. Farmer and the Cook Patio, 339 W. El Roblar Dr., Ojai. Free. Call (805) 962-2571 or email margie@sbpermaculture.org.

dinner honoring “Vaquero of the Year” followed by a weekend of traditional Vaquero horsemanship demonstrations, traditional dancers performed by Baile de California, and the Vaquero sale of horse tack, artwork, apparel, jewelry, house decor, memorabilia, and more. Don’t forget about the pig roast and barn dance with live country-swing music. Proceeds will go toward the museum. Visit the website for a full schedule. Fri.:

sbpermaculture.org 11/11: Zoom Live Downtown Business Spotlight: Food & Drink: Breakfast & Brunch Join S.B. Independent Senior Editor Matt Kettmann in conversation with Alex Natrielli (D’Angelo Bakery) and Juan Jimenez (JJ’s Diner) in this week’s interview. 3pm. Free. independent.com/

COURTESY

THURSDAY 11/11

lobero.org/events

spotlight

11/11-11/17: A Crimson Holiday S.B.’s uptown artisan gift gallery will offer items from 40+ of the area’s most talented artists and designers through January 7, 2022. Thu.-Sat., Wed.: 10am-7pm; Sun.: 11am-6pm; Mon.-Tue.: 10am-6pm. La Cumbre Plaza (former Tiffany & Company), 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call (805) 570-1987 or email mardanne@silcom.com.

acrimsonholiday.com

11/12:

Metro Entertainment 30th Anniversary Meet Pikachu

and Punisher War Machine as you celebrate 30 years of Metro Entertainment with a storewide sale, free food (1-4pm), and cosplayer photo ops. 10am. Metro Entertainment, 6 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 9632168 or email metrocomix@aol.com. tinyurl.com/MetroEntertainment

son Gillies, Daring Greatly, 7:15-10:30pm. $15. Fri.: Electric Guest, Your Smith, 9pm. $23. Ages 21+. Sat.: S.B. Voice Academy Singer Showcase, 6:30pm; $8. Area 51, 8:30pm; $10. Ages 21+. Sun.: S.B. Jazz Society & James Arnold, 1-3:30pm; $10$35. Young Singers Recital, 5:30-7:30pm; free. Mon.: Young Singers Recital 6-8pm. Free. Tue.: Wavves, 8pm. $25-$30. Ages 18+. Wed.: Peter Harper, 7:30pm. $15. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

11/12: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar 5-9pm; Sat.: 10am-5pm; Sun.: 10am3pm. Santa Ynez Valley Historical Museum and Parks-Janeway Carriage House, 3596 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Prices vary. Call (805) 688-7889 x104 or email info@ santaynezmuseum.org.

tinyurl.com/VaqueroCelebration tinyurl.com/VaqueroSchedule

11/12: UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Leonidas Kavakos and Yuja Wang Violinist Leonidas Kavakos, known for his virtuosity, superb musicianship, and the integrity of his playing, will join forces with Yuja Wang, the Beijing-born pianist praised for her artistry, captivating stage presence, and “wizardly technique” (Chicago Tribune). 7pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: $15; GA: $45-$65. Call (805) 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

11/13:

Anna May. 5:30-8:30pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126.

tinyurl.com/AnnaMayNov12

11/12-11/13: Eos Lounge Fri.: Andreas Henneberg, Desert Hearts, Bedrock, Berlin, 7pm. $5. Sat.: Opiuo, 7pm-1:30am. $25. Ages 21+. 500 Anacapa St. eoslounge.com

11/12-11/14: Maverick Saloon Fri.: The Rondales, 5-8pm; The Brian Titus Trio, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: About Time, 5-8pm; Pull the Trigger, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: The Regulars Trio, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

11/12: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

An Evening with Chloé

Zhao Oscar-winning director of

2020’s Nomadland (and Ojai resident) Chloé Zhao will screen her film The Rider (Rated R), an American contemporary Western drama shot in the Badlands of South Dakota, followed by a Q&A and reception. 7pm. Ojai Art Center, 113 S. Montgomery St, Ojai. $30.

tinyurl.com/OjaiChloeZhao

11/13-11/14: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Bobby Fin & Dave. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

11/13: Island Brewing Co.: 20th Anniversary Party The Knitpickers, 6-9pm. Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

tinyurl.com/Knitpickers

Volunteer Opportunity

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

27


UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS

TH IS

FRI DA Y!

Career Opportunities Await

Are you tired of working late nights and receiving no benefits? That can all change now! Casa Dorinda, California’s Premier Retirement Community, is searching for experienced culinary professionals who are looking for stability, and family friendly work schedules. If you are looking to show and grow your skills, we have the right opportunity for you.

Friday November 12th 7:30 pm PST Online Performance

Line Cooks, Full-Time Prep Cooks, Full -Time Kitchen Porters, Full-Time Servers, Full and Part-Time

ZOOM LINK (SCAN THE QR CODE OR SEE BELOW) https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/83463698044 Yesika Salgado is a Los Angeles based Salvadoran poet who writes about her family, her culture, her city, and her fat brown body. She has shared her work in venues and campuses throughout the country. Salgado is a two time National Poetry Slam finalist and the recipient of the 2020 International Latino Book Award in Poetry. Her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Teen Vogue, Univision, CNN, NPR, TEDx, and many digital platforms. She is an internationally recognized bodypositive activist and the writer of the column Suelta for Remezcla. Yesika is the author of the best-sellers Corazón, Tesoro, and Hermosa, published with Not a Cult.

FOR THE FULL 2021 EVENT CALENDAR: WWW.MCC.UCSB.EDU

Rancho Palomino

Santa Barbara

Rancho FALL FEST!

$1,000 Signing Bonus and Exceptional Benefits! For further information and to apply please visit www.casadorinda.org/careers or drop by to see us. We would love to meet you! 300 Hot Springs Rd. | Montecito, CA | 805.969.8625 Casa Dorinda is a private LifeCare community, type A CCRC, owned and operated by the Montecito Retirement Association, a nonsectarian, nonprofit, tax-exempt organization. State of California Licenses RCFE #421700160, SNF #050000112, CCRC Certificate of Authority #126.

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series

y Todam ! at 3p

November 20-23 JOIN US FOR FUN ACTIVITIES!

Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with Alex Natrielli (D’Angelo Bakery) and Juan Jimenez (JJ’s Diner) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with t Nexek! We

HORSEMANSHIP, ARCHERY, CULTURAL ARTS AND HOLIDAY GIFT PROJECTS: SILK BATIK, CERAMICS, HAND SEWING, JEWELRY, AND MORE

WE ARE VACCINATED! SEE YOU ON THE RANCHO! TELL A FRIEND! SAVE $20.00 WITH CODE “FUN101” LIMITED SEATS. SIGN UP NOW ONLINE: RANCHOPALOMINOSB.COM DECEMBER FARM FUN “WINTER WONDERL AND” DEC. 20-24 HORSEMANSHIP, HORSEBACK RIDING ON A NEW TRAIL COURSE, ARCHERY & ARTS! SEE YOU ON THE FARM! $300 PER PERSON, $100 HOLD MY SEAT. SEE RANCHOPALOMINO.COM FOR DETAILS.

TERUHISA OGUE Teru Japanese Cuisine

BUCK THANANAKEN Wabi Sabi

Japanese Cuisine Thursday, November 18 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

SUMMER 2022 “HOLD MY SEAT!”OPENS JANUARY 1ST, SANTA BARBARA LOCATION TBA 28

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


NOV.

T HE

11-17

COURTESY

MONDAY 11/15

Honoring the Vets

11/13: 8th Annual Salute to the Vets This salute will include a military vehicle display, vintage airplane flyover, live music performances, food and drink for purchase, a pin-up contest, vendor booths, and a raffle all in support of area veterans’ programs. 11am-6pm. Maverick Saloon, 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Call

and unframed prints created by area artists dedicated to using hand- and pressprinting techniques. Shop for yourself or get a head start on holiday shopping. Fri.: 5-7:30pm; Sat.: noon-5pm; Sun.: noon-4pm. S.B. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. Free. Email mail@ sbprintmakers.com.

sbcaw.org/upcoming

SATURDAY 11/13 11/13: 30th Anniversary The Rocketeer Screening, Dinner, and Museum Tour Experience the 30th anniversary screening of 1991’s The Rocketeer (Rated PG) in one of the film’s original sets, take a museum tour, and enjoy a prime rib dinner. Doors: 5pm; screening: 7pm. Santa Maria Museum of Flight, 3015 Airpark Dr., Santa Maria. $40.

tinyurl.com/AnniversaryRocketeer 11/13: Photo with a Mermaid and Mermaid Sighting In conjunction

with the opening of its upcoming exhibit Mermaids: Visualizing the Myths & Legends — Photography by Ralph A. Clevenger & Friends, the public is invited to meet and have their picture taken with mermaids in the Harbor. Photos: 11:30am or 1pm; sighting: 12:30pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Way, Ste. 190. Members: $10; nonmembers: $30/session (includes museum admission). Call (805) 962-8404.

tinyurl.com/SaluteTheVets

and you want to learn about the benefits and resources you are entitled to, come and meet with a Veterans Service Officer every first and third Tuesday of the month. Dependents and spouses are eligible for benefits too. 2-4pm. Free. Call (805) 962-7653 or email JLemberger@SantaBarbaraCA.gov.

collaboration with the American Guild of Organists, will present its first program since February 2020. Organists Raymond Egan, Adán Fernández, and Thomas Joyce will present a program including works by J.S. Bach, Felix Mendelssohn, Maurice Duruflé, and more. 3-5pm.

WEDNESDAY 11/17

tinyurl.com/VetsConnectNov16

Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State St. Free.

tinyurl.com/ThreeOrganists

11/13: Doublewide Kings Play the Allman Brothers Band Take in the music of the Allman Brothers Band as the Doublewide Kings invite special guests to join them to play old favorites like “Jessica,” “Midnight Rider,” and more, as well as deep cuts. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $50; VIP: $71 -$100. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org.

lobero.org/events

11/13: S.B. Voice Academy Singer Showcase Support area talent with a night of rock, pop, blues, and jazz music with S.B.’s All Star Band backing up a great lineup of singers. Doors: 6pm; Show: 6:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $8. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

11/13-11/14: Royal Fireworks The S.B. Symphony will welcome guest conductor Nic McGegan for a tribute to the 300th anniversary of the Brandenburg concertos in an entire concert devoted to Baroque and featuring one of Handel’s most popular works for the orchestra. Sat.: 7:30; Sun.: 3pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. Call (805) 899-2222 or email boxoffice@granadasb.org. Read more on p. 36.

tinyurl.com/SBSymphonyFireworks

11/17: Open Adult Jam Session

11/14: Estate Planning Essentials Workshop This two-hour public workshop with expert speakers will concentrate on the importance of wills, trusts, power of attorney, healthcare and advance directives, and more. Reservations are appreciated. 3-5pm. Fleischmann Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 x109 or email cbaker@sbnature2.org.

11/14: Central Coast Recorder Society (CCRS) Monthly Meeting CCRS invites you to join the upcoming monthly meeting to play together and learn from professionals in an afternoon of music! Attend one meeting before you become a member. 1-4pm. Goleta Presbyterian Church, 6067 Shirrell Wy., Goleta. Members: $10; membership: $60. tinyurl.com/NovCCRS

Bring your instrument(s) and some songs to share, or just enjoy the music and make new friends at this open jam session. 7pm. JAMS, 631 ½ N. Milpas St. Free. Email maria@riseup.net.

jamsmusic.org/home

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

tinyurl.com/EstateWorkshop

SUNDAY 11/14

THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

TUESDAY 11/16

FRIDAY

11/16: Head Games Trivia Night Eat, drink, think, and win! Join every Tuesday for the ultimate live-media trivia experience for a chance to win prizes. 6:30pm. Draughtsmen Aleworks Goleta Taproom, 53 Santa Felicia Dr., Goleta. Free. Call (805) 387-2577.

draughtsmenaleworks.com/events

The Show Must GO ON

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

WEDNESDAY

11/12-11/13: Dos Pueblos Theatre Company presents Love and Information This show will explore the

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

delicate balance between polarities in a time that is increasingly fragmented by too much social media. This script that has no character line assignments will make you ponder the head and heart, known and unknown, belief and unbelief, love and information, and may make you laugh and cry. Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 2 and 7pm. Dos Pueblos Charger Theatre, 7266 Alameda Ave., Goleta. $8-$12. Call (805) 968-2541 x2345.

tinyurl.com/MermaidPhoto

11/13: The S.B. Music Club Opening Concert The S.B. Music Club, in

tinyurl.com/Woodinville-Truffle

11/16: Vets Connect @ the Library If you are a veteran

COURTESY

11/12-11/14: S.B. Printmakers Pop-Up Print Sale Purchase framed

(805) 350-2006 or email sb.veteransfoundation@gmail.com.

COURTESY

pcvf.org/veterans-day-ceremony

Woodinville and Truffle Pairing Experience Taste

bourbon, rye, port, and El Encanto’s very own single barrel, all perfectly paired with local chocolate truffles, facilitated by Woodinville Brand Ambassador August O’Mahoney. 3-4:30pm. Belmond El Encanto Hotel & Spa, 800 Alvarado Pl. $65. Ages 21+.

11/11: Veterans Day Ceremony Honor our country’s veterans with the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1649 and Pierre Claeyssens Veterans Foundation with a program that will include a flyover by the Condor Squadron, performances by the UCSB Color Guard and Gold Coast Pipe Band, an appearance by the S.B. Choral Society, guest speakers, and a grand finale flyover. 10-11am. S.B. Cemetery, 901 Channel Dr. Free.

11/15:

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

dptheatrecompany.org

11/11-11/13: San Marcos High Theater presents Clue Guess whodunit in this play where farce meets murder mystery and is based on the iconic 1985 Paramount movie, which was inspired by the classic Hasbro board game Clue. 7pm. Marquis Performing Arts Center, San Marcos High School, 4750 Hollister Ave. GA: $5-$12; VIP: $20. Call (805) 967-4581 or email ssaleh@ sbunified.org. smhstheaterdept.com/event

11/12-11/14: S.B. High School Theatre presents Carrie: The Musical Based on the Stephen King novel and film of the same name, Carrie: The Musical follows Carrie, an awkward teen with telekinetic powers, who is dominated by an oppressive religious mother and humiliated by classmates. Fri.-Sat.: 7pm; Sun.: 2pm. S.B. High School Theatre, 700 E. Anapamu St. $10-$25. sbhstheatre.com

INDEPENDENT.COM

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

29


My Life

living

COURTESY

p. 30

Hearing my father’s voice on a windup Victrola phonograph

K ATYA AUSTIN

Gardening

Smarty Plants

Four Tips for Indoor Gardening by Randy Arnowitz

Every Heart Has a Song W

hen I was a child of 4 or 5, my father used to listen to old-fashioned Neapolitan songs. They were sentimental, romantic, perhaps overwrought — Italian schmaltz, as someone described them. But my father would close his eyes and allow them to transport him. One day, he came home from New York’s Little Italy with a new LP of songs sung by Luciano Virgili, with names like “Piccola Santa,” “Addio Signora,” and “Cuore Ingrata.” The music filled the room, and I glimpsed in

my father’s response unfamiliar aspects of his identity—a different language, a yearning, a sense of who he was before he was my father, and of dreams he had long ago deferred. Afterward, lost in thought, he set the record down on the seat of an upholstered chair. I sat on that chair, heard an ominous crack, and feared that with the broken record, I had broken his heart, or perhaps incurred his wrath. Instead, he saw that I was scared, looked at me tenderly, and said: “I love you more than I love that record.” Thus, he taught me about love, and I am forever fond of Italian schmaltz. The sound of it takes me away. I have been thinking lately about the songs that evoke the stories of our lives, prompted by something my daughter wrote on that theme. She was raised on a Gaviota ranch, but she has lived in England for more than a decade, and a song she said was formative for her is one by the late folk singer Kate Wolf, called “The Redtail Hawk,” which mentions in refrain “the golden, rolling hills of California.” The song calls immediately to my daughter’s mind a whole landscape—the way it smells, the quality of light, the warmth of the sun, her history here. And although she is 5,000 miles away, she writes: “This is the song

that showed me how a few words, or a set of sounds, can capture a place, can recall it in such exquisite detail that it’s as if you’re there again whenever you hear them. And, equally, it showed me that a place is something you can carry with you. A home is something you can, if you’re lucky—and I have been—carry with you.” It’s powerful magic, carrying a landscape in your heart, or a lesson in love, and a song can surely prompt it. Sometimes there’s a bonus of time travel, too. Our friend Bernard in England, for example, located his favorite song on his phone and played it for us at a dinner gathering. It was a chanson called “La Mer” sung by Charles Trenet, a wistful tune that expressed the young Bernard’s mindset for the journeys ahead. I watched him close his eyes, swaying, carried away … and for a moment, he was a teenage boy walking on the shore, his whole life in front of him. There was no timidity about tenderness here, either. I love unabashed sentiment. It’s the legacy of those Italian songs. Time travel indeed: My father’s voice is pressed onto a little disc recorded in 1942 when he was stationed at the army base Camp Cooke, before it was Vandenberg. He had gone into Lompoc to book railroad tickets and detoured to a recording booth at the USO center. I have since been in that very building, now the Recreation Center on Walnut. “This message will announce my homecoming verbally,” he says. “I will be home around January 5. Until that date, I can hardly wait.” He goes on to make jokes about KP duty, sends his love, and adds, “We’re having a heck of a time trying to get tickets for a steam liner. By 10 o’clock, we will know whether we have succeeded….” My dear friend and colleague Treebeard had a windup Victrola phonograph and played this record for me at 78 rpm more than 70 years later, and I will never forget the delight I felt hearing my father’s voice. When he discovers he has more time on the record, he sings “My Old Kentucky Home”—incongruously for a bornand-bred New Yorker, but it’s a homesick song, so why not? Longing is a universal language after all, and home is a form of knowing that transcends time and place, and what we understand of love can be compressed and conveyed in a few invincible notes. n

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The Melodies Evoke the Stories of Our Lives by Cynthia Carbone Ward

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

W

ith so many of us confined to our homes for the last year and a half, indoor activities and hobbies like bread making, board games, and jigsaw puzzles exploded in popularity. So did indoor gardening. Here are four easy tips to keep your green friends thriving and, well, green. Location. Location. Location: It’s very important to give your houseplants the proper amount of sunlight in order for them to grow well. Some plants will prosper in low light, while others require bright light. Before picking out a plant, do some research to find out what kind it requires. Keep in mind that sunlight coming through a southern or western window can scorch tender foliage. Also, just because a plant can grow in low light, that doesn’t mean it will thrive in a dark, windowless living room. Gro-Lights can help. Your desk at work under fluorescent lights can be more than adequate for many plants. Drink up: There is no simple answer to, “How often should I water my plant?” The temperature of the room, the time of year, the type of plant, and, most importantly, what type of medium (soil) it is planted in are all important factors. Some plants like to be kept on the moist side, while others, like cacti and succulents, like to dry out somewhat between waterings. A good rule of thumb for all things green is to water them when the soil in the pot “approaches dryness.” That is, don’t water when the plant is already wet or soggy, but don’t let the roots dry out. The best way to determine this is with your fingers. Gently put them in the soil and use your best judgement. With practice, you will get good at it. I’m not a big fan of moisture meters. You already have 10 of them at the ends of your hands. They are what they eat: Although some potting soils do contain nutrients for plant growth, these nutrients are soon used up or leached out of the soil from frequent watering. Regular feeding with a “natural” or “organic” type of fertilizer will keep your plants growing and flourishing. Generally, it is best to feed your plants only during the months when they are actively growing. Follow label directions, but use much less more often. Don’t bug me: If you care for your plants properly, they are less likely to get bugs and diseases. Always use the least toxic, most earth-friendly remedies to eliminate pests. Spider mites, for example, thrive on dusty plants, so wash off foliage frequently, including the undersides. If you have those annoying fungus gnats buzzing around the surface of your soil, try using a more porous, less heavy potting soil. To make a homemade insecticide, mix a few teaspoons of liquid dish soap with a quart of water. Spray or wipe the solution onto the leaves and stems of your plants to kill aphids. For harder-to-kill varmints such as a scale, try a dilute solution of horticultural oil, and for mealybug, a Q-tip dipped in rubbing alcohol should do the trick.

Randy Arnowitz, or Mr. Greenjeans as he is known in Santa Barbara, is a gardener and writer who cultivates green thumbs throughout Southern California. See greenjeansmr.com.


living

Shopping

Take a Santa Ynez Walkabout

INSPIRING CREATIVITY COURTESY

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f you haven’t been to Santa Ynez lately, you’re in for a treat—especially if you’re a shopper who loves a good browse. Since becoming a Santa Ynez local in February, I’ve done my fair share of retail research (ahem, “therapy”), both on my own and while showing visitors around. To my surprise and delight, I quickly discovered that my small town of 4,100 residents has an impressive concentration of quality shops, eateries, and watering holes that keeps getting better. Over the past several months, more new retailers have joined the compelling mix of homewares, antiques, clothing, farm goods, and gifts purveyors. These independent shops are all located in an easily walkable threeblock district encompassing Edison Street, Sagunto Street, and Meadowvale Road. The ambiance is very cute to boot, thanks to the historic 1880s-era buildings and Old West vibe. So, whether you’re looking for day-cation inspiration, a leg-stretching break on a wine tasting tour, or want to get a head start on

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Owners/husbands Pearson McGee and Spencer Turnbull recently opened a second space to create a dedicated home shop (3558 Sagunto St.) and clothing store (the original at 3630 Sagunto St.). Both locations are artfully merchandised and full of high-end luxury lifestyle goods, including their own line of straw totes, leather sandals (named after Santa Ynez streets), and men’s cashmere sweaters. The new home shop now has more space to accommodate antiques, art, and furniture, along with sumptuous textiles and dinnerware by the likes of Farmhouse Pottery and Jono Pandolfi. An ever-changing array of home décor, art, and gifts can also be found at Lark Trading Co. (3568 Sagunto St., larktradingco .com). Owner/interior designer Starr Hall Egan sources eclectic antiques, spices, tinctures, and candles that are displayed among cookbooks, barware, and garden goods. Antique hunters will want to pop into Valerie’s Vintage & Supply Co. (3568 Sagunto St., valeriesvintageandsupply.com) right next door. Forage Florals (1095 Meadowvale Rd., forage florals.com) is another treasure trove of lovely gifts and home accessories. In addition to gorgeous bouquets made with fresh flowers and plants sourced locally, the shop is stocked with divine-smelling diffusers and candles, attractive vases and vessels, and other tabletop items. If you need refreshments between shopping stops, Queen Cup (queencupcoffee.com) is my go-to coffee shop in the same Santa Ynez Mercantile complex as Forage Florals. You’ll find warm service, excellent coffee and tea drinks, and cute merch, including Mexican blankets, hats, and shirts. They share a space with Lucky Hen Larder (theluckyhenlarder.com), who makes gourmet-level sandwiches and salads. Santa Ynez also has an outpost of Panino (3569 Sagunto St., paninorestaurants.com) for supersatisfying sandwiches. Hit Pony Espresso (3558 Sagunto St., Ste. A; pony-espresso-106136.square.site) for a sweet treat or take advantage of their new earlyevening aperitivo hours for small plates and wine. If a casual burger and beer are calling your name, mosey over to the Maverick Saloon (3687 Sagunto St., mavericksaloon.com), or take it up a few culinary notches at Brother’s at the Red Barn (3539 Sagunto St., brothersredbarn.com). And S.Y. Kitchen (1110 Faraday St., sykitchen.com) never disappoints for a refined Italian lunch or dinner paired to local wine or craft cocktails. n

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A Shopper’s Guide to the Country-Western Wine-Country Township by Shannon Brooks holiday shopping, consider this your cheat sheet of essential shopping stops on a Santa Ynez walkabout. Devine Supply (1050 Edison St., Ste. D; devine supply.com) is the newest darling on the block. The airy boutique is a family affair, helmed by Vicki Devine and her daughters, Sabrina and Kat. They carry a thoughtful mix of premium clothing for women and men, as well as jewelry, accessories, and home accents. In the same complex is Loom Boutique (1050 Edison St., Ste. B; shoploomboutique .com), which just celebrated its first anniversary. Owner/buyer Torrie Smith is a passionate young entrepreneur who prides herself on offering affordable, stylish goods for women. Another one for the ladies is Favour (3585 Sagunto St., shopfavour.com), a standalone shop that looks unassuming from the street. It’s packed with a robust selection of designer denim, dresses, tops, and loungewear hand-picked by proprietress Lindsay Branquinho. Plenty (1110 Faraday St., loveplenty .com) also exemplifies Santa Ynez style as interpreted through the savvy eyes of co-owner BFFs Julie White and Stephanie Braly, who offer an affordable, colorful mix of country chic bohemian dresses, separates, and vintage denim. Their neighbor Heaven Scent (3601 Sagunto St.) is a small beauty apothecary and women’s clothing and accessories shop. Speaking of accessories, KJ Murphy’s Custom Hatter (3569 Sagunto St., kjmurphys.com) is a hatlover’s dream. Kevin recently moved into a much larger space, expanding his offerings beyond his own made-to-order creations to include a wide range of Stetsons, Resistol, and Charlie 1 Horse hats. But it’s one of his custom-made toppers I’m saving up for! All of my guests have found something to covet at Santa Ynez General (santaynezgeneral.com).

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Gatherings I N T R O D U C I N G T H E I N D E P E N D E N T ’S G U I D E TO E N T E RTA I N I N G

HARVEST DINNER IN A DOWNTOWN ADOBE

by Wendy Read Photos by Nik Wheeler I have often thought that if you want to get to know someone better, have them cook you a meal. From the food they choose to how they set the table, you will get insight into who they are and where they come from. Welcome to Gatherings, the Independent’s Guide to Entertaining. Throughout the seasons, we will be telling the stories of how people in Santa Barbara County gather together, share meals, prepare food, and celebrate traditions. Whether it be a dinner party in a downtown adobe, a neighborhood potluck on the Mesa, a picnic in Alameda Park, or a farm dinner in Los Olivos, hosts from all over the county will share their favorite recipes, decorating ideas, and any tips they may have for making entertaining less stressful. Not only will Gatherings give you new entertaining ideas and introduce you to amazing Santa Barbara artisans and resources, but we hope it will also inspire you to create similar gatherings, bringing us all together for a better understanding of our community. If you are planning an upcoming gathering that you would like to share, or know of a neighborhood celebration, please send us word at gatherings@independent.com.

We would love to hear from you.

The Independent | November 11, 2021 | Gatherings | 1


Sally’s patio table ready for guests

A Feast for the Eyes Sally Terrell is an artist, and I can always count on a new creative project sprouting up in her home studio. Whether it’s making jewelry, creating assemblage art, designing the interior of friends’ homes, or collecting eclectic folk art, Sally’s sense of color and design is always finding ways to shine. I love walking into Sally’s hidden downtown adobe because it is full of interesting things she has brought home from her travels. Colorful frames, metal sculptures, large and small paintings, and whimsical wooden figures cover her walls. Objects have stories, and everywhere you look in Sally’s house, you can learn about different places and cultures. Have you ever seen a Haitian Vodou flag? Sally’s house is full of them. How about Honduran Lenca ceramics? Sally collects them, too. Everyone in her wide circle of friends feels lucky to share a meal around her large, rustic table. So my husband and I didn't hesitate to say yes to her harvest celebration dinner invite.

Adding All the Ingredients Preparing for this dinner meant a trip to the Saturday Farmers’ Market, where Sally has her favorite vendors, such as Jeronimo from Casitas Valley Pastures. He runs a small farm, where he raises chickens the old-fashioned way: cage-free, cruelty-free, pasture-raised, nonGMO, no antibiotics, free-range, and with sustainable farming practices. (See casitasvalleypastures.com.) “That is all important to me,” Sally said, “but just as importantly, they taste incredible. Juicy and succulent.” Jeronimo shared his roast chicken recipe with her a while back that has become one of her go-to dinners. “It only requires lemons, salt, and fresh herbs, and it is easy and delicious,” she said. As she zipped around, visiting one stall after another, her baskets were soon full of sweet carrots, delicata squash, yellow onions, bouquets of fresh herbs, arugula, a bag of Meyer lemons, a log of goat cheese, figs, and fresh pecans, plus bouquets of autumncolored chrysanthemums, bright-orange marigolds, and straw flowers. Following her around, I was reminded that the Santa Barbara Farmers’ Market is one of the city’s greatest calling cards. Or, as a friend once put it while visiting, “Of COURSE Santa Barbara has a beautiful market — even the vegetables are photo-ready.” (See sbfarmers market.org.) After a final stop at the Roan Mills stall for sourdough wheat baguettes (roanmills.com), we walked back to her house to set the table and prepare the evening meal. Sally’s menu included Jeronimo’s roast chicken, her own recipe of carrot soup, and two recipes — a fig arugula salad and delicata squash dish — from one of my favorite food blogs, Feasting at Home (feastingathome.com). For dessert, an apple pie and a pumpkin pie had already been ordered from Sandra Adu Zelli, the talented baker behind Gipsy Hill Bakery (gipsyhill bakery.com).

2 | Gatherings | November 11, 2021 | The Independent


Menu APPETIZER: Olives, Nuts, and Smoked Gouda Cheese Dip Sally’s Carrot Soup Chicken with Fresh Herbs and Meyer Lemons Arugula Salad with Figs Roasted Delicata Squash with Hazelnuts DESSERT: Gipsy Hill Bakery Pumpkin and Apple Pies

Turn the page for the recipes!

The Table Setting The table was transformed into a glittering, colorful harvest spread. Sally’s advice? “Choose a color theme and scour the house for objects that complement those colors. Flowers, plants, candles, food, fabric, ceramics, wooden balls … anything that fits in with your colors.” The final result was enjoyed by all. The candlelit table was gorgeous, the food was flavorful and delicious, but most of all, we were all so happy to laugh and share stories around a table again! If you know of an upcoming gathering that you would like to share, please let us know at gatherings@independent.com.

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Joining around the table were (from left) Rob Sternin, Mimi deGruy, Jim Dragna, Sally Terrell at the head of the table, James Read, and Pru Sternin. Not pictured: Sarah and Fred Kass, Amy Michelson, and Wendy Read.

The Independent | November 11, 2021 | Gatherings | 3


recipes

Sally’s Carrot Soup 10 Small Servings INGREDIENTS

15 large carrots, peeled and finely chopped

Fig and Arugula Salad with Pecans, Basil, and Goat Cheese Serves 4-8

AUTHOR: Sylvia Fountaine from Feasting at Home

1 quart chicken broth (4 cups)

INGREDIENTS ¼ cup red onion, thinly sliced

1 yellow onion, finely chopped

½ cup toasted pecans

5 tablespoons of sweet butter

5 ounces baby arugula

2 tablespoons turmeric salt and pepper assorted herbs for garnish

(I used tarragon, sage, mizuna, rosemary, and pomegranate seeds)

DIRECTIONS

1. I f sensitive to red onions, thinly slice and soak in salted water for 15 minutes.

(about 6-7 cups)

6-8 figs, stems removed, quartered 10-15 basil leaves, torn ½ cup firm goat cheese, crumbled

DIRECTIONS: 1. Melt the butter in a pot. Add the onions, cover, and cook over low heat for about 30 minutes. Onions should be tender. 2. Add carrots and chicken stock. Bring to a boil.

(use the kind in a log, or try gorgonzola)

SALAD DRESSING 3 tablespoons olive oil

3. Cook and simmer on low heat for 30 minutes until the carrots are tender.

2½ tablespoons balsamic vinegar

4. Puree soup in a blender or food processor or immersion blender until smooth.

½ teaspoon salt

1-2 teaspoons maple syrup

5. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

½ teaspoon pepper

6. Garnish with different combinations of herbs.

¼ teaspoon vanilla (optional)

Roasted Casitas Valley Pastures Chicken INGREDIENTS 1 whole chicken, washed and dried 1 thinly sliced lemon

(save 3 slicesof lemon for garnish after roasting)

Himalayan pink salt

(Regular salt will work, too)

olive oil ½ stick butter rosemary sprigs sage leaves 1 cup chicken broth DIRECTIONS: 1. Preheat oven to 425°F.

INGREDIENTS 2 delicata squash, sliced into ½-inch rings, seeds removed (leave skin on; it’s edible)

4 shallots, quartered lengthwise 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons maple syrup 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper

3. Heavily salt the skin.

3 tablespoons maple syrup

4. Stuff the cavity with rosemary, sage, and lemon.

½ teaspoon Aleppo chili flakes (optional)

5. Insert rosemary and sage under the skin.

1 teaspoon cumin seeds

8. Cook for 1 hour. 9. Let rest for 10 minutes before carving. 4 | Gatherings | November 11, 2021 | The Independent

4. Drizzle the dressing ingredients into the salad bowl (or feel free to mix dressing together in a small jar or bowl first), tossing the salad until all the leaves are lightly coated. Add the figs and goat cheese, and lightly toss to incorporate. 5. Taste, adjust vinegar and maple to your liking, adding more if you prefer.

AUTHOR: Sylvia Fountaine from Feasting at Home

2. Coat the whole chicken with olive oil.

7. M elt butter in chicken broth and baste the chicken every 15 minutes.

3. Place arugula, pecans, drained onions, and torn basil leaves in a large bowl. (At this point, you could refrigerate until serving, placing figs and goat cheese over top of the greens.)

Roasted Delicata Squash with Hazelnuts Serves 6-8

MAPLE APPLE CIDER GLAZE 1/3 cup apple cider vinegar

6. Place chicken in a roasting pan and put it in the oven.

2. Toast pecans in a dry skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally until fragrant and lightly toasted, about 5-6 minutes.

(optional)

pinch of salt Garnish: 1/3 cup toasted, crushed hazelnuts; fresh Italian parsley

DIRECTIONS 1. Preheat oven to 425°F. 2. W ash squash and slice into ½-inch rings. Scrape seeds out of each piece with a spoon. (If you are in a hurry, you can slice the delicata squash in half lengthwise, scrape out seeds, then slice into half-moons ½ inch thick.)

3. P lace in a medium bowl with the quartered

shallots, and drizzle with oil and maple syrup. Add salt and pepper and toss to evenly coat well. Place on a parchment-lined sheet pan in a single layer (you may need two, depending on your pan size).

4. R oast in the oven 20 minutes, then check every 5 minutes, until deeply golden.

5. W hile this is roasting, make the glaze. Place vinegar

and maple syrup in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add cumin seeds and Aleppo chili flakes. Bring to a gentle simmer, lower heat, and simmer until it becomes thick and syrupy — about 5 minutes. You should end up with about ¼ cup. Turn heat off.

6. W hen squash is done, place on a platter, scattering the shallots about. Top with the hazelnuts, then spoon the sauce over the top. (If sauce thickens too much while cooling, add a couple of teaspoons of water, heat, and stir. It will loosen.)

7. S catter with Italian parsley and serve immediately.


COURTESY PHOTOS

FOOD &DRINK

p.33

y deliver

SIMPLE FEAST Makes Plant-Based Fancy F

or a few nights earlier this year, Chez Kettmann

app in 2014, shifted to selling meals three years later, and then also took Sweden by storm, now delivering nearly a quarter million meals per month to its Scandinavian fans. But it’s brand-new to the United States, just sending its first meals to Southern California subscribers this past April, and now calls Santa Barbara as its American home. “Everything we have in the boxes is developed by chefs,” explained Anders Vald, the company’s chief innovation officer, as we stood in Simple Feast’s office/test kitchen on East Haley Street. Part of The Mill development, the headquarters are actually in the same space that was once the barbecue joint Wildwood Kitchen, and the irony of a plantbased operation taking over a smoked meat mecca isn’t lost on anyone. “It’s a little different,” admitted a smiling Vald, whose team redesigned the interior into a sleek, streamlined space that they hope to show off with occasional pop-up dinners once the pandemic fizzles out. As we chatted, a trio of chefs led by Ciara Crivello tweaked new dishes in the kitchen, steps away from the grid of ideas that they’ve scribbled on a large whiteboard in what was once Wildwood’s dining room. A majority of those creations eventually find their way into shipments, but there are a number of thresholds to get there. “We cook like a customer would to make sure that the full user experience is on board with what we want to achieve,” explained Crivello of their process. The chosen dishes must rely on ingredients that are 100 percent organic, grown by farms near to Simple Feast’s distribution center in Oxnard, and can survive a shipment in the company’s sustainable packaging, all of which is either reusable or biodegradable. Such earth-minded ethics form the core of Simple Feast’s mission. “We put up a lot of barriers for ourselves in the beginning,” said Vald of those commitments. “We believe we can change something in the food system. The one thing everyone agrees on is that the more plants you eat, the better it is for you and for the planet.” But they didn’t want to fall into the granola-or-bust stereotype either. “It’s still a little stigmatized,” said Vald of the vegetarian lifestyle. “We didn’t want to be those people. We are family people who like good things and good food.”

Danish Company Developing Menus for American Market in Santa Barbara BY MATT KETTMANN herb butter. Like the other dishes, the spice was ample but not overwhelming (yet my kids are well-trained), the ingredients über-fresh, and the recipes easy enough to follow, though requiring a bit of technique. I had all four burners firing simultaneously for the soba meal and three going for the tikka masala, satisfying my chef urge without requiring the forethought needed to plan out such spreads. That prep was handled by Simple Feast, which designed the menus, sourced the veggies and dry goods, crafted the sauces, packaged everything in numbered containers, and shipped them to my porch. The Copenhagen-based company was founded as a recipe

BOXING CHAMPS: The Copenhagenbased company Simple Feast develops plant-based menus for American subscribers in a Santa Barbara test kitchen, then delivers them all around Southern California.

That’s why the company started with chefs who had worked in Michelin-starred restaurants, a fact they tout loudly. As to the style of cuisine, it’s quite varied, as evidenced in my meals or what was on the website last week, a mix of Mexican, Thai, Chinese, Italian, and Indian. In fact, Simple Feast was always inspired by California cuisine, which is to say globally minded but bringing regional produce to your table. Throw that in with the polished Nordic aesthetic, and out comes the moniker “CoCal,” as in Copenhagen-California. Though CoCal hasn’t caught on quite yet, there’s potential there, especially with Simple Feast’s ambitions leading the way. The company is a much larger entity in Denmark and Sweden, where they also sell prepackaged meals such as Bolognese and tikka masala in grocery stores, as well as sauces, condiments, and fermented items. “That’s the goal here too,” said Vald. “From the beginning, we always wanted to be a global company.” COVID threw a slight screwball at their business model. “The competitive picture changed a lot,” said Vald, referring to the rise in restaurants doing takeout and other delivery services that popped up. But Simple Feast gets the word out through advertising, across the digital and social media realms as well as on billboards and through the entertainment industry, which was an early adopter of the service. For now, Simple Feast — whose three-meal shipments cost either $89 or $150 a week, depending on quantity — is delivering to Santa Barbara and Southern California, with plans to expand to the Bay Area early next year. In the meantime, there will be constant activity in their kitchen on East Haley, where the chefs are spinning out the latest pakoras, pot stickers, and pozole at a steady pace. “We just want to do good food, that’s what it’s all about for us,” said Vald. He’s not even a vegetarian himself, and nor am I, but we both believe that Simple Feast should satisfy even meat-eaters. And the more of us who opt for veggies more of the time, the better our bodies and the planet will be. As Vald put it, “Let the plants be a larger part of the plate.” See simplefeast.com. n

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NOVEMBER 11, 2021

FOOD & DRINK

was one of the best vegetarian restaurants in town. Night one was a Mediterranean theme, starring chickpea falafel — hand-rolled by my daughter — with a sesame-white-bean spread alongside a cucumber-tomato salad and roasted zucchini topped with crunchy dukkah, with tomato-chile paste as the kicker. Night two shifted Asian: sweet and sour veggies on hearty soba noodles, with chili-garlic stir-fried green beans and bok choy coated in a garlic-sesame glaze. “I’m very impressed with this dish,” said my wife of the piquant noodles, though my son craved the beans, and I most enjoyed the savory bok choy. Then night three leaned Indian: chickpea tikka masala and black caraway-dressed quinoa, with lightly browned cauliflower and yellow squash slathered in

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lish language that refers to something happening in the future, as in, “I will have finished this article by the time you read it.” To actor-turnedwinemaker Sunny Doench, it’s the perfect grammatical lens for understanding wine. “When I’m in the vineyard at bud break, I am totally gobsmacked by the fact that it will be wine,” said Doench, who launched her Future Perfect wines in May of this year. “It will become a grape that I will harvest and make into wine and then people can have their own future perfect with their experience of the grape. That’s my nod to the trajectory of the grape, from the vine to the bottle to people’s memories.” Originally from Ohio, Doench moved to Los Angeles more than two decades ago to pursue on-screen dreams, starring in all sorts of productions, from the first and last seasons of Beverly Hills 90210 to more than 20 indie films. “I’ve been lucky enough to make a living,” she explained. “I’ve been doing this for quite a while.” Wine caught her fancy along the way, prompting her to get Level 2 certification from WSET, or the Wine & Spirit EducaACTING TO WINE: After acting in numerous television shows and tion Trust. When her husband, a private independent films, Sunny Doench started Future pilot, started flying for a family Perfect wine and opened her Los Olivos tasting in Santa Barbara, they stayed room this past May. for extended periods in an Airstream near Los Olivos. About four years ago, when bottom floor of a quaint Craftsman. These he suggested they move there days, Doench is almost always inside herself, permanently, she instantly but her husband also helps when he’s not away approved. flying. “He’s such an angel,” she said. “Our nervous systems BY MATT KETTMANN They pour a lineup of acid-driven, lowerwere hardwired by the stress alcohol wines, including sauvignon blanc, of driving in Los Angeles,” said rosé, sparking rosé, grenache, pinot noir, syrah, Doench. “I was so happy to move to wine country.” and tempranillo—some of which are already sold They bought a small farm with goats and chickens out—with releases of riesling and cabernet franc to just a couple of blocks from the center of Los Oli- come. Especially rare are the single-vineyard botvos, and Doench began working for Jessica Gasca tlings of pinot and syrah from The Joy Fantastic at Story of Soil. For more than three years, Gasca Vineyard, from which Christine and Hunken almost taught her all the facets of the wine business, from never sell fruit. checking out vineyards and making wine to runThe wines are packaged in colorful, flashy labels ning tasting rooms and wine clubs. Doench then featuring a bright rainbow arcing across a sun, befriended Amy Christine and Peter Hunken, own- whose color changes depending on what’s inside. ers of Holus Bolus and The Joy Fantastic Vineyard, There are metallic, holographic stars on the sun for and they encouraged her to officially start a brand the sparkling wine, for instance, and a black speckled sun on the Sta. Rita Hills syrah. and open a tasting room. “The logo is meant to be whimsical and not too “They really took me under their wings and were so encouraging for Future Perfect. I wouldn’t be here precious,” said Doench. “At the end of the day, it’s if it wasn’t for those two,” said Doench, who said not too hard to make wine. My job is to get the best Christine kept pestering her to open a tasting room. farmed fruit, and then it’s a big practice of patience. “She said it every day until I believed her.” So the label is not pretentious.” Eventually, Doench found an open space and She’s still fired up about each step of the process and got the keys on January 1, but it took another five gets so excited that other winemakers are known to months to get permits and everything else in order. laugh at her kindly. “I feel about winemaking the way “Right before month five, I thought I would have to I feel about filmmaking—it feels like I won the lottery,” close the door,” she said. “It was heartbreaking and she said. “I can’t sleep. I’m so happy to go to picks and be at the winery all day and race to the tasting room, sort of terrifying.” But she opened on Memorial Day weekend, right even though I get very little sleep. It’s so awesome.” around her birthday. “It was just magical,” recalled Doench, who took over the former home of Toretti 2933 San Marcos Ave., Ste. 101, Los Olivos; (805) 697-7162; Family Vineyard, down San Marcos Avenue on the futureperfectwine.com

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JOYOUS STUFF MAESTRO NICHOLAS McGEGAN’S FESTIVE MISSION

FISHBON E-BOOK RELEASED

Look no further for the story of Santa Barbara’s wildest, most underground arts and performance collective. Thanks to the hard work of cofounder Clay Bodine, Fishbon has a lavishly illustrated e-book that documents the history of this uproarious and frequently outrageous group of artists, performers, and cultural renegades. Fishwork packs 385 pages with stories, photos, illustrations, and embedded links to online videos that document the journey of Fishbon from its origins in the 2001 Solstice Parade to its most recent manifestation as Fishbon del Sur in Ecuador. Follow along as Bodine, Laura Inks, Tracy Beeler, Dominique Reboul, Alan Macy, and many others evolve a dynamic and prolific response to Burning Man’s inspiration, Clan Destino’s inspiration, and myriad other counter-cultural influences through a series of immersive events. Thrill to their collective insouciance, and experience their brushes with more conventional organizations, including the law, from a safe distance. To download the free e-book, go to tinyurl.com/fishworkbook. —CD

FISHBON FOLLIES: Participants in one of the events detailed in Fishworks

L I F E PAGE 36

COURTESY

London in April 1749. The Santa Barbara Symphony audience will hear dances excerpted from this work and annotated for the ensemble by McGegan. “Anything French meant a grand scale,” the maestro told me. “The Paris Opera orchestra was at least 50 musicians.” This makes the excerpts from Naïs particularly well-suited to the scale of a modern orchestra. Santa FIRECRACKER: Nicholas McGegan will conduct Handel’s Royal Fireworks with the Santa Barbara Symphony this weekend. Barbara Symphony violist Erik Rynearson will be featured in the fourth work, by big symphony orchestras,” rather than the Viola Concerto in G Major of Georg being restricted to chamber orchestras and Philipp Telemann. It’s the first known con- period instruments. Arriving as he does certo for the viola, and Telemann finished with his own carefully prepared scores, it in the same year as Bach completed the McGegan proceeds to rehearse the musiBrandenburgs—1721. cians with the attitude that this repertoire is For Rynearson and all of the musicians there for them to “have fun, not go back to in the Santa Barbara Symphony, the oppor- conservatory.” Although some of the works tunity to work with maestro McGegan from before 1760, which he advocates for represents another aspect of what makes with such passion, may be unfamiliar, he playing in the Santa Barbara Symphony promises that it is not necessary for the special. Beyond being the foremost expo- players to “wear wigs” to perform them nent of this baroque period—no small feat well. The Santa Barbara Symphony will play in an era of burgeoning interest in early the Royal Fireworks program on Saturday, music—McGegan carries himself with primal gusto. He “loves having a good time November 13, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, onstage,” as he puts it, and is adamant when November 14, at 3 p.m. For tickets and it comes to spreading the word that this information, visit thesymphony.org or call repertoire is “joyous stuff.” He thinks it is the Granada box office at (805) 899-2222. “great that baroque music is being played —Charles Donelan

LAURA BARISONZI

W

hen the Santa Barbara Symphony returns for their first fully orchestral concert of the season this Saturday and Sunday, November 13 and 14, the audience will experience the pleasure of being in the right place at the right time. In this case, the right place is the Granada, and the right time is the 18th century. Led by guest conductor Nicholas McGegan, music director laureate of the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and Chorale, the Symphony will perform a lively program of great baroque music, including George Frideric Handel’s Music for the Royal Fireworks. This suite has passed two challenging tests: the test of time and being heard over the sound of explosions. Speaking with McGegan by phone last week, I learned that, in addition to celebrating our community’s ongoing return to live performances, this Royal Fireworks program offers yet another reason to be festive. This year is the 300th anniversary of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos, No. 4 of which is on the program. For Bach lovers, the opportunity to hear any of these immortal works can’t be missed, especially when maestro McGegan leads the band. The other two compositions on the bill, while less well-known, deserve close attention. McGegan has done an extraordinary service to the music world through his scholarly and artistic devotion to the vast corpus of baroque opera, so no concert of his would be complete without an example of this work. Naïs, by Jean-Philippe Rameau, was written to commemorate the same historical event as Handel’s Royal Fireworks — the Treaty of Aix-LaChapelle — and premiered in Paris just five days before the skyrockets went off in

Composer Jennifer Higdon

MUSIC ACADEMY PREMIERES SONGS BY JENNIFER HIGDON On Thursday, November 18, mezzo-soprano Sun-Ly Pierce and pianist Chien-Lin Lu, the 2019 Marilyn Horne Song Competition winners, will premiere a song cycle written expressly for them by Pulitzer Prize– and Grammy-winning American composer Jennifer Higdon. Wise Moon sets five short poems about the moon in music intended to bring out the unique talents of these two young artists. Higdon was present as a judge at the competition in 2019, and her journey to writing this new work began that day. “Sun-Ly embodied the songs she sang in the competition in a way that was entirely convincing,” Higdon said, adding that she felt “as though entering into a world with them.” Higdon was equally impressed with the “control and colors” she heard from Chien-Lin Lu’s piano. The impact of his playing led her to imagine the work as intensely collaborative — more a duet than a song cycle. The concert, which will also include Debussy, Schoenberg, Wolf, Britten, and Bolcom, begins at 7 p.m. Higdon’s work will also feature in an upcoming concert by the Santa Barbara Symphony. On February 19-20, 2022, as part of the Symphony’s “Beethoven in Bloom” program, harpist Michelle Temple will perform Higdon’s Harp Concerto. Higdon won the 2020 Grammy for Best Contemporary Classical Composition for the Harp Concerto, her third Grammy. For tickets and more information about the Marilyn Horne Song Competition recital on November 18, visit music academy.org. —CD

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 36

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KHRUANGBIN

& ENTERTAINMENT

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POP, ROCK & JAZZ

CARL PERRY

K

hruangbin, the Houstonbased trio that sold out the Santa Barbara Bowl on the final Saturday of its 2021 season, takes its name from the Thai word for airplane. If, after listening to them, you guessed that “khruangbin” meant “reverb,” you should be forgiven. It’s an entirely understandable error. Khruangbin have been one of the most unlikely hit touring acts of the last five years, playing to huge crowds at festivals and other outdoor mega-venues such as Red Rocks in Colorado. Their low-key, mostly instrumental jamming mixes elements of psychedelia, surf, funk, and Cambodian rock to produce a hypnotic effect that soothes and entertains in equal measures. On Saturday, November 6, guitarist Mark Speer and bassist Laura Lee showed up to the Bowl in matching black wigs, dressed up Presented by and ready to rock, while drumGoldenvoice. At the Santa Barbara mer Don “DJ” Johnson Jr. held the Bowl, Sat., Nov. 6 beat steady from behind a simple trap set. Perched on three flying-saucer-shaped platforms, Khruangbin sent funky grooves spinning off into the night from a quarter past eight until just before the Bowl’s 10 o’clock curfew. Over the course of 18 songs,

UCSB Singing Gauchos

Department of Music

Fall Concert Series UCSB Chamber Players **FREE EVENT** November 17 | 7:30 pm | Karl Geiringer Hall

they sang just enough to prevent the show from being labeled all-instrumental, without ever coming on like attention-hungry rock stars. In fact, if there’s a secret to the Khruangbin sauce, it’s the quiet egos with which these three go about their gauzy, blissful business. Fan favorites included a dope medley featuring snippets of “Back in Black,” “Dazz,” and “Benny and the Jets,” followed by “Pelota,” a slinky Spanish-language original. Given the context of such horrible news earlier that day from their hometown of Houston, fans at this crowded but mellow affair were doubly blessed to be part of such a soft scene. — Charles Donelan

REVIEWS

CHARLES DONELAN

T

UCSB Middle East Ensemble November 20 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB Chamber Orchestra November 29 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB Jazz Ensemble November 30 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall UCSB Choirs by Candlelight: Clarity December 1 | 7:30 pm | Trinity Episcopal Church UCSB Ensemble for Contemporary Music December 2 | 7:30 pm | Karl Geiringer Hall

IDAHO, WRYN, AND THE PHONE BOOTH his triple bill at SOhO teamed up two Central Coast artists, opener Wryn and closer The Phone Booth, with Los Angeles slow-core forerunners Idaho for a night of intensely imagined songs and moody, darkly melodic music. Whatever comes next in the culture, one gets the feeling that these musicians will all remain true to their individual visions. Wryn’s opening solo set showed a performer in the midst of a creative surge. Song after song poured out, evidence that recent studio time has been abundantly fertile. Summoning thoughts of Dry-era PJ Harvey, the sound was tough yet heartfelt, and loaded with potential. It will be interesting to see how these recent At SOhO, Wed., Nov. 3. compositions evolve into more complete arrangements. In the meantime, Wryn demonstrated ample ability to hold the stage with just guitar and voice. Idaho these days involves founding member and songwriter Jeff Martin along with three excellent, highly simpatico musicians — Luke Burba on bass and backing vocals, Robby Fronzo on four-string guitar and backing vocals, and John Darren Thomas on drums. A typical Idaho song churns from sultry and mysterious to heavy and fierce in a series of waves. Then, in a blink, it’s over. Jeff Martin’s voice has never been stronger, and it’s clear that the four-string guitar fetish is a lot more than a gimmick. Fans of the band should check out the trailer for Traces of Glory: The Musical Journey of Idaho. I’ve seen a rough & ENTERTAINMENT cut, and the combination of the

UCSB Wind Ensemble November 18 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

UCSB Gospel Choir December 3 | 7:30 pm | Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Purchase Tickets $10 general admission | $7 seniors, military, non-UCSB students FREE UCSB students and children under 12 Purchase tickets via the new AXS Tickets app, online, or call (805) 893-2064. Scan the QR code or visit music.ucsb.edu/news/purchase-tickets for more information. We recommend that patrons purchase tickets in advance of all events. Masks and proof of vaccination or negative COVID test required. See music.ucsb.edu/news/covid-19-information for more details.

ARE YOU HIRING? Idaho

band’s music with Martin’s archival film and video is evocative in a major way. The Phone Booth’s driving indie sound made a perfect ending to this long night of great music. The band members are from Santa Barbara, with personnel including Michael Easbey on vocals and guitar, Josh Blumenthal on bass, Tony Pennington on guitar, and Ben Pecorari on drums. Catch them on Bandcamp—their 2019 album, Roman, is pure Santa Barbara–bred brilliance. —CD

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Join us in reading November’s book of the month! NOVEMBER’S THEME: BOOKS WRITTEN BY INDIGENOUS AUTHORS

D I SCUSS ION :

Wednesday, December 1, 6pm Location: Municipal Winemakers on the patio B OOK OF THE MON TH :

An American Sunrise by Joy Harjo

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Sarah Sinclair will give you the inside scoop on real estate, going behind the scenes each Sunday to see our region’s casitas, cottages, and castles.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF NOVEMBER 11

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): For much of her life, Aries poet Mary Ruefle enjoyed imagining that polar bears and penguins “grew up together playing side by side on the ice, sharing the same vista, bits of blubber, and innocent lore.” But one day, her illusions were shattered. In a science journal, she discovered that there are no penguins in the far north and no bears in the far south. I bring this to your attention, Aries, because the coming weeks will be a good time to correct misimpressions you’ve held for a while—even as far back as childhood. Joyfully modernize your understanding of how the world works.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Actor Elizabeth Taylor described her odd rhythm with actor James Dean. Occasionally, they’d stay awake ’til 3 a.m. as he regaled her with poignant details about his life. But the next day, Dean would act like he and Taylor were strangers—as if, in Taylor’s words, “he’d given away or revealed too much of himself.” It would take a few days before he’d be friendly again. To those of us who study the nature of intimacy, this is a classic phenomenon. For many people, taking a risk to get closer can be scary. Keep this in mind during the coming weeks, Taurus. There’ll be great potential to deepen your connection with dear allies, but you may have to deal with both your and their skittishness about it.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): There are many different kinds of smiles. Four hundred muscles are involved in making a wide variety of expressions. Researchers have identified a specific type, dubbed the “affiliation smile,” as having the power to restore trust between two people. It’s soothing, respectful, and compassionate. I recommend you use it abundantly in the near future—along with other conciliatory behavior. You’re in a favorable phase to repair relationships that have been damaged by distrust or weakened by any other factor. (More info: tinyurl.com/HealingSmiles)

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): According to feminist cosmologists Monica Sjöö and Barbara Mor, “Night, to ancient people, was not an ‘absence of light’ or a negative darkness, but a powerful source of energy and inspiration. At night the cosmos reveals herself in her vastness, the earth opens to moisture and germination under moonlight, and the magnetic serpentine current stirs itself in the underground waters.” I bring these thoughts to your attention, fellow Cancerian, because we’re in the season when we are likely to be extra creative: as days grow shorter and nights longer. We Crabs thrive in the darkness. We regenerate ourselves and are visited by fresh insights about what Sjöö and Mor call “the great cosmic dance in which everything participates: the movement of the celestial bodies, the pulse of tides, the circulation of blood and sap in animals and plants.”

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Your heart has its own brain: a “heart brain.” It’s composed of neurons similar to the neurons in your head’s brain. Your heart brain communicates via your vagus nerve with your hypothalamus, thalamus, medulla, amygdala, and cerebral cortex. In this way, it gives your body helpful instructions. I suspect it will be extra strong in the coming weeks. That’s why I suggest you call on your heart brain to perform a lot of the magic it specializes in: enhancing emotional intelligence, cultivating empathy, invoking deep feelings, and transforming pain.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): How did naturalist Charles Darwin become a skillful thinker who changed the world with his theory of evolution? An important factor, according to businessperson Charlie Munger: “He always gave priority attention to evidence tending to disconfirm whatever cherished and hard-won theory he already had.” He loved to be proved wrong! It helped him refine his ideas so they more closely corresponded to the truth about reality. I invite you to enjoy using this method in the

coming weeks, Virgo. You could become even smarter than you already are as you wield Darwin’s rigorous approach to learning.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You could soon reach a new level of mastery in an aptitude described by author Banana Yoshimoto. She wrote, “Once you’ve recognized your own limits, you’ve raised yourself to a higher level of being, since you’re closer to the real you.” I hope her words inspire you, Libra. Your assignment is to seek a liberating breakthrough by identifying who you will never be and what you will never do. If you do it right—with an eager, open mind—it will be fun and interesting and empowering.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio theologian Eugene Peterson cleared up a mystery about the nature of mystery. He wrote, “Mystery is not the absence of meaning, but the presence of more meaning than we can comprehend.” Yes! At least sometimes, mystery can be a cause for celebration, a delightful opening into a beautiful unknown that’s pregnant with possibility. It may bring abundance, not frustration. It may be an inspiring riddle, not a debilitating doubt. Everything I just said is important for you to keep in mind right now.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In 2017, Richard Thaler won the Nobel Prize for Economics. His specialty: researching how unreasonable behavior affects the financial world. When he discovered that this great honor had been bestowed on him, he joked that he planned to spend the award money “as irrationally as possible.” I propose we make him your role model for the near future, Sagittarius. Your irrational, non-rational, and trans-rational intuitions can fix distortions caused by the overly analytical and hyperlogical approaches of you and your allies.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Neurotic” and “neurosis” are oldfashioned words. Psychotherapists no longer use them in analyzing their patients. The terms are still useful, though, in my opinion. Most of us are at least partly neurotic—that is to say, we don’t always adapt as well as we could to life’s constantly changing circumstances. We find it challenging to outgrow our habitual patterns, and we fall short of fulfilling the magnificent destines we’re capable of. Author Kenneth Tynan had this insight: “A neurosis is a secret that you don’t know you are keeping.” I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because you now have extra power to adapt to changing circumstances, outgrow habitual patterns, and uncover unknown secrets—thereby diminishing your neuroses.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Author Darin Stevenson wrote the following poetic declaration: “‘No one can give you the lightning-medicine,’ say the people who cannot give the lightning medicine.” How do you interpret his statement? Here’s what I think. “Lightning medicine” may be a metaphorical reference to a special talent that some people have for healing or inspiring or awakening their fellow humans. It could mean an ingenious quality in a person that enables them to reveal surprising truths or alternative perspectives. I am bringing this up, Aquarius, because I suspect you now have an enhanced capacity to obtain lightning medicine in the coming weeks. I hope you will corral it and use it even if you are told there is no such thing as lightning medicine. (PS: “Lightning medicine” will fuel your ability to accomplish difficult feats.)

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): The superb fairywren gives its chicks lessons on how to sing when they are still inside their eggs. This is a useful metaphor for you in the coming months. Although you have not yet been entirely “born” into the next big plot twist of your hero’s journey, you are already learning what you’ll need to know once you do arrive in your new story. It will be helpful to become conscious of these clues and cues from the future. Tune in to them at the edges of your awareness.

This Giving Tuesday, the Santa Barbara Independent will encourage our readers to participate in Giving Tuesday by highlighting area nonprofits and their great work in our newsletter, in print, and online. Deadline to participate: Friday, November 19 Visit independent.com/ givingtuesday2021 for more details

HOMEWORK: Write an essay on “What Rob Brezsny Is Most Ignorant About.” Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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the ability to apply and interpret campus and university policies that govern Academic Personnel/ HR. Requires broad knowledge and comprehensive understanding of UC and campus Academic Personnel policies, practices, and procedures. Must possess excellent communication, organizational, and computer skills. Must have excellent attention to detail, and the ability to be accurate, thorough, professional, and service‑oriented, working with a variety of constituents in a fast‑paced environment with frequent interruptions. Must be able to work independently and deal with multiple competing deadlines, using sound judgment to reprioritize work and adjust timelines as necessary. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $25.00‑ 30.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/18/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26570

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

CAMPUS DINING Serves as the Payroll Administrator and subject matter expert regarding payroll/personnel and timekeeping for Residential Dining Services. Utilizes a solid understanding of payroll/ personnel and time reporting systems, UC Policies and Procedures, and collective bargaining agreements. Researches and resolves a wide range of complex payroll issues. Oversees the hiring for all Residential Dining students, career, and limited employees. Provides support to the

Office Managers and Assistant Office Managers in each of the four dining units. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. 3 years of experience using UC systems. High level of competency in written and verbal communication. Demonstrated proven ability to maintain strict confidentiality of privileged information; excellent interpersonal skills to interact and collaborate with personnel at all levels. Working knowledge of Word/ Excel/Publisher/PowerPoint/Goo‑ gle Workspace. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.09‑ $32.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 23264

ASSISTANT CLERY COMPLIANCE COORDINATOR

UCSB POLICE Provides direct support for the UC Santa Barbara Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus CrimeStatistics Act (Clery Act) compliance program. Serves as a professional resource for all laws and regulations outlined in the Federal CleryAct, helping develop a “best practice” Clery compliance program for UC Santa Barbara. Reqs: Strong verbal and written communication skills and demonstrated experience effectively conveying information. Excellent organizational and time management skills, with the ability to prioritize workload to meet deadlines. Demonstrated ability to

identify research, analyze, interpret, and conduct complete analyses of complex laws, statutes, policies, and data. Ability to plan, organize, and deliver workshops/training courses and training materials appropriate to the program being in a manner that engages the audience and helps them understand and retain the message. Demonstrated ability to develop, design, and implement operational and administrative policies and practices. Ability to work with sensitive information and preserve confidentiality, meet deadlines, maintain objectivity, and prioritize workload in an organized manner. Demonstrated ability to write clear and concise reports, policies, and correspondence and present information to stakeholders. Demonstrated critical, innovative, and strategic thinking skills and judgment to make sound decisions in uncertain or ambiguous situations; ability to approach challenges with a clear perception of organizational and political impacts. Bachelor’s Degree or related field and at least three to five years relevant experience OR Master’s Degree/J.D. and at least one or two years of relevant experience is preferable. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting requirements of Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,600 ‑ $111,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/17/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25846

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL ANALYST

GSED (DEAN, SCHOOL OF EDUCATION) Independently manages the overall cycle and administration of academic personnel matters, including faculty merits and promotions, faculty recruitment, personnel and payroll issues for academic appointments, and the supervision and assignment and delegation of duties for the Academic Personnel Coordinator in the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education (GGSE). Reviews, analyzes, and interprets academic personnel policies, providing high‑level advice and support to department Chairs, faculty, staff, and the Dean. Analyzes a complex and diverse scope of Academic Personnel/ HR issues to determine creative and practical solutions Implements new and frequently changing policies, procedures, and systems, and communicates these effectively to a wide range of audiences. Serves as the departmental liaison with the Dean’s Office, Academic Personnel, and the Office of Equal Opportunity on academic personnel and recruitment matters collaborating with those offices to resolve policy interpretations on various cases. Reqs: Thorough knowledge and

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THE INDEPENDENT

Get involved in the arts. Join the Granada team! Box Office Associate. FT or PT avail. Core hours noon to 6pm Tues-Sat with additional hours for shows or admin. Tech savvy to learn ticketing software-Tessitura . Facilities Assistant PT . Care for a community treasure and liaison with show production. Hours centered on show requirements and some regular maintenance duties. Front of House Assistant PT. Work with volunteers to make patron show experience top tier. Hours variable depending on show schedule. Consortium Support Specialist FT. Database management and tech support for ticketing and patron tracking. Tech savvy to learn a complex system – Tessitura. Concessions Server PT. Great customer service focus and opportunity for tips. Hours variable depending on show schedules.

To apply: www.granadasb.org/About/Careers NOVEMBER 11, 2021

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CATERING SALES MANAGER

CAMPUS DINING Responsible for the catering sales and administrative management of the Catering Office with over 200 hundred monthly events and annual sales over $1.5M. Serves as the departmental liaison, assisting clients with planning catered events, assisting with menu selection, and arranging for rental equipment, linens and event décor. Works with Events and Administration on room logistics for in‑house events. Processes catering orders, keeping accurate records of events, distributing catering in weekly staff meetings, updating posted orders as necessary, and communicating all changes necessary to staff. Bills clients and works with the Accounting Office to ensure all events for month‑end are billed and payments received. Manages on site catered events when needed. The Financial responsibilities of this position relate to forecasting, monitoring, and recording monthly sales for budget purposes. Reqs: Must have excellent customer service skills; both on phone and email. Proficient at Excel. Previous event management experience preferred. Excellent organizational skills. Ability to manage in a high‑paced office environment with multiple demands; must be skilled in prioritizing and decision making. Notes: Ability to work a flexible schedule including some nights and weekends. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$28.90/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity,

national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/17/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #26507

CCSP DEPARTMENT ADMINISTRATOR

COUNSELING, CLINICAL & SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY (CCSP) Provides administrative oversight of all departmental and clinic operations, and supervision of department staff and student assistants. The department houses approximately 20 Academic Senate Faculty and Lecturers, offers an accredited doctoral program in Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology, and includes the Hosford Counseling & Psychological Services Clinic. In addition to providing high‑level support to the CCSP Department Chair for managing faculty support, serves as the primary administrative point of contact for the department. Maintains the department budget, gathers and analyzes financial and other resource data; prepares reports for analyses of operational activities, evaluates current and proposed services. Independently develops appropriate business procedures and practices with procurement, financial and personnel processes according to University policies and GGSE procedures. Audits and oversees payment processing and general ledger reconciliation. Maintains historical background of the Department in order to provide analytical evaluation and institute procedural changes as needed. Researches complex financial discrepancies and works with staff contacts in the Dean’s office as needed to resolve issues

related to functions such as student services, budget, human resources, payroll, space, and school‑wide communications. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and training. Administrative work experience. Ability to communicate effectively verbally and in writing. Solid organizational skills and ability to work on multiple tasks within specific timeframes. Ability to interpret policy, procedures, and accurately communicate them. Proficiency with Excel, Word, and Email applications. Familiarity with Databases and/ or Web‑based applications. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.62 ‑ $28.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/17/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26498

CLINICAL NURSE LIMITED

STUDENT HEALTH Acts as a clinical nurse, triaging students in order to make appropriate appointments and referrals, providing advice for minor illnesses and injuries and patient education. Provides direct patient care per established nursing protocols. Works in an immunization/ travel clinic. Provides contraceptive counseling. Acts as a resource to physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, LVNs and medical

Continued on p. 42


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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Tide Guide

Sunrise 6:32 Sunset 4:54

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3D source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“On the M-end” -- in both cases.

NOW HIRING FOLLOW US ON

Web content managers handle all digital formats including website, newsletters, and social media. HTML/CSS knowledge a plus. Will train the right candidate.

INSTAGRAM

This full-time position will publish all editorial content on independent.com as part of a team of two web content managers. Looking for motivated individuals, who have great attention to detail and are ready to collaborate.

@sbindependent

WEB CONTENT MANAGER The Santa Barbara Independent has an opportunity in our Digital Department.

Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance; Section 125 cafeteria plan; 401(k); and vacation program. This position is currently authorized to work from home, but weekly inperson meetings in Downtown Santa Barbara are required. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

Please send résumé along with cover letter to

hr@independent.com

57 Wriggly 1990s video game/TV protagonist who wears a 1 Alan of “M*A*S*H” robotic suit to move around 5 Falling-out 9 “Human Behaviour” singer 60 Burj Khalifa’s city 61 Olympic squad that once 14 Writing style where had Bird and Jordan “computer” is “c0mpu732” 65 Including everything 15 Daughter of LBJ 66 Prospector’s find 16 Enticing sort 67 Gymnastics legend Korbut 17 Symposium for cinema 68 John ___ Garner (FDR’s buffs, maybe first veep) 19 Ammonia compound 69 Cosmo competitor 20 e.e. cummings offering 22 Earth goddess created by 70 “Sure, whatever” Chaos 24 Roger’s “77 Sunset Strip” 1 Sitcom alien costar 2 Hawaiian Airlines offering 25 “Born,” in some notices 3 “Macarena” duo Los ___ Rio 26 Monetary notes? 28 “South Park” episode “Mr. 4 It might be tacked onto your Hankey, the Christmas ___” withdrawal 5 Fruit used in gin drinks 30 O.J. trial judge Lance 6 Turn into baby food 31 Literary misprints 35 “Right Here Waiting” singer 7 “Wabash Cannonball” Richard singer Roy 39 Princess Peach’s realm, in 8 East ___ (U.N. member the Mario series since 2002) 42 Fencing sword 9 “Pow!” 43 “Le stagioni del ___ amore” 10 Move on a checkerboard (1966 movie also called 11 Constellation with a belt “Seasons of Our Love”) 12 Zellweger who played Jones 44 “Suits” network 13 Krispy ___ (doughnut chain) 45 “The Big Bang Theory” role 18 Drafter of the Constitution, e.g. 47 Julia of “10 Things I Hate 21 Maintenance About You” 22 Stood 49 Pelican State sch. 23 Stood 52 Its flag features a red dragon 26 FDR’s on it 56 Different roles, 27 Circus act where an acrobat metaphorically grabs on by the teeth

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

29 “This is wild” 32 “Winnie-the-Pooh” marsupial 33 Morning times, briefly 34 Purchase at a booth (abbr.) 36 Of age 37 Derby winner’s flowers 38 “Do not open ‘til ___” 40 “I Can’t Breathe” singer 41 “It should’ve been me, ___!” (Yu-Gi-Oh meme) 46 For some time 48 “Same here!” 49 Escorted from the door 50 Finnish steam room 51 Around the city 53 Beaver home 54 “Captain Blood” star Flynn 55 Enjoy a scratch-and-sniff sticker 58 1 on the Mohs scale 59 Green carving stone 62 Caribou’s kin 63 Word before Khan 64 National Asparagus Month ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1057

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

NOVEMBER 11, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT NOVEMBER 11, 2021

41 41


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT assistants.Reqs: Must be licensed by the State Board of Registered Nursing. Must be CPR/BLS certified and kept current. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must be licensed by the State Board of Registered Nursing. Must be CPR/BLS certified and kept current. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a limited position at 40%. Salary is commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25479

COUNSELOR/ TRANSFER STUDENTS

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Utilizes advanced counseling skills gained at the Master’s degree level in counseling or related fields; exhibits culturally inclusive active listening skills and provides counseling services for personal, social and academic issues, including but not limited to cultural identity, educational, relationship, family, sexuality and sexual identity issues. Collaborates in the successful development, planning, budgeting and administration of Transfer Services. Evaluate programs and services to make relevant improvements in design, policies, procedures and implementation, for current and future years. Reqs: Experience in providing in‑depth,

42

wide‑ranging and complex academic advising and holistic services to undergraduates. Working knowledge of MS Office products and Google Connect/Drive applications. Ability to coordinate and present educational programs and present educational, academic, social, cultural events/ programs and workshops. Ability to work in a highly collaborative manner with a diverse group and a variety of cultural backgrounds.Experience with social media management on multiple platforms, updating department website, and Emma application. Ability to work occasional evenings and weekends. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $57,000 ‑ $63,975/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/3/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25905

GROUNDS EQUIPMENT OPERATOR

PARKING Operates large street sweeper to keep all parking lots, campus roads, and other paved areas clean and free of debris. With the potential future addition of a smaller sweeper to Grounds equipment inventory, the incumbent may also sweep bike paths and other paved areas as directed. Performs daily inspection and cleaning tasks on the machine as per manufacturer’s recommendations and also performs weekly and periodic required service to sweepers such as brush changing, filter element cleaning, tire inflation, hydraulic hose inspection, suction unit friction shoe inspection, and torque check of necessary threaded fasteners to maintain the machine in optimal operating condition. May also use trucks and trailers to collect and haul debris from parking lots. May also use other hand and power tools as required and trained on by Lead Parking Maintenance Worker. May also perform other tasks such as planting, tree pruning, trimming, sign repair, traffic control, dust control, litter control, hand irrigation, weeding, fertilizing, or pavement painting or maintenance as required by Lead Parking Maintenance Worker. Reqs: Ability to follow oral and written directions. 3 years of experience as an Equipment Operator which includes operating ride‑on mowers, sweepers, and large equipment. Experience working in multiple‑family housing environments. Minimum of 3 years experience as a Groundskeeper. Ability to work with diversified staff, students and residents. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $19.07‑ $21.93/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/17/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26342

LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work

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PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

CONFERENCE DINING ASSOCIATE

CAMPUS DINING The Conference Dining Associate plans, organizes and manages dining and catering content for assigned, moderately complex summer conference programs on campus and at university‑owned apartments. Provides and reviews financial data and statistical data for each conference program. Responsible for ensuring that each event is presented professionally, within university policies and departmental standards. Executes and enforces event contracts. Supervision of two student employees during the peak conference dining season. Reqs: Two to three years of experience and strong knowledge in event planning and management in the hospitality sector. Exceptional customer service skills with the ability to cultivate professional business partnerships. Proficiency with Microsoft applications and general database management. Ability to learn specialized software systems quickly. Notes: Overtime may be required from May‑August to meet the operational needs of the department. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.62‑$30.65/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/23/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26766

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NOVEMBER 11, 2021

services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long‑term social services, including long‑term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of California. Master’s degree in Social Work. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #25943

NCEAS FINANCIAL ANALYST

CENTER ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS Responsible for the daily management of the Center’s financial matters. Areas of responsibility include on‑boarding of all new employees, Academic Personnel Processes, UCPath and Kronos processing for all staff and academic employees; accurate leave reporting; purchasing; payment processing for entertainment expenses; monthly space rent; and form 5 expenditures. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or an equivalent combination of education and work experience. Proficiency in Excel and Word. Strong analytical skills and an ability to prioritize multiple tasks with minimal supervision. Creative problem‑solving abilities. Ability to work effectively and cooperatively as a staff team member. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. The position is funded by federal contract/subcontract and requires an E‑Verify check. $24.62 ‑ $27/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25311

LICENSED VOCATIONAL NURSE (LVN)

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and clinical nurses. Assists with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/ out patients, filling out the necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Acts as a resource for non‑licensed staff. Utilizes nursing knowledge in these tasks as well as but not limited to providing patient education, administering immunizations, and functioning within the scope of practice. Reqs: Licensed by the CA State Board of Nursing. Must be CPR certified/Basic Life Support (BLS) certified or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at all times during employment. Must be organized, detailed oriented, confidential and dependable. Strong oral/written communication, organizational and customer service skills. Proficient in Microsoft and Google suite. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse and Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current license at all times during employment. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11month position, M‑F 7:30am – 4:30pm. 4 weeks of furlough is taken during quarter beaks and summer months. May include Thurs. evenings from 10am‑7pm. $30.42‑ $37.83/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21751

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Acts as an assistant using independent judgment, organizational support to personnel and credentialing duties. Is responsible for a variety of administrative tasks that include being the primary support person for the Administrative Services Director and Business Operations Officer, managing various department documents, forms and other paperwork, providing information by telephone and in person, and assisting other management staff with project‑related tasks. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. Excellent written and oral communication skills, effective interpersonal skills and the ability to exercise independent judgment. Must be organized, accurate and dependable. Demonstrated attention to detail with frequent interruptions. Must successfully complete and pass a background check before employment and date of hire. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/24/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26735

PLUMBER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Sprinkler Fitter: Maintains and repairs

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

fire sprinkler systems and fire hydrants in on‑campus and off‑campus UCSB facilities. Designs, redesigns and assembles from working drawings and blueprints various systems including water, steam, sanitary and storm drains, irrigation and sprinkler systems and compressed air lines. These installations require a thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes, the ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings, and the ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow; performs welding, soldering and brazing as required; installs and repairs plumbing fixtures, air compressors, pumps, steam and hot water boilers. Reqs: Must possess the skills, knowledge and abilities essential to the successful performance of Journey Level Plumber duties as evidenced by a journeyman plumber certificate or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Substantial journey‑level experience in institutional, industrial and commercial plumbing installation and maintenance.Thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes. Ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings. Ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Preferred Qualifications: C16 license or 3 years experience installing, repairing or maintaining commercial fire sprinkler systems. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $37.56/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. Job # 26306

SENIOR ACADEMIC PERSONNEL ANALYST

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL Serves as a primary resource and contact for academic personnel policy for the Chancellor, Executive Vice Chancellor, Associate Vice Chancellors, Deans, Provosts, Academic Senate, Organized Research Units, and academic departments. Maintains a broad and functional understanding of academic personnel policies and procedures to provide oversight and training for the campus. This position requires a high level of initiative, problem‑solving ability, independence and judgment, a strong professional orientation, effective verbal and written skills and the capacity to organize and handle a wide range of responsibilities accurately and consistently. Skill in working as a member of a team and in collaborating with individuals on a variety of levels is required. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Thorough knowledge of complex personnel, compensation, and related policies and procedures, and employment law related to academic client groups. Strong understanding of the organizational structure and responsibilities of the academic personnel function. Ability to develop creative solutions which may have no precedent. Strong decision making, analytical, problem solving, critical thinking and resource management skills. Strong interpersonal skills and demonstrated ability to build and work successfully in teams. Skills in organization and customer service to effectively manage multiple important priorities. Proven ability to organize department work

functions in an efficient and effective manner. Excellent skills to work collaboratively and act persuasively in sensitive situations; skills in conflict management techniques. Requires understanding of academic personnel related systems and databases. Experience with Microsoft Office Suite and Google Workspace. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $73,000‑85,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/18/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26478

SITE RELIABILITY ENGINEER

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT The ETS Infrastructure group is looking for a self‑motivated team player with at least 3 years of Linux system administration experience including advanced networking. We help to manage the North Hall Data Center, host enterprise Campus‑wide applications, provide system administration, and maintain the Core IT virtual Infrastructure both on‑premises and in various public clouds. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Information Technology; or equivalent work experience. Please see https://www.it.ucsb.edu/ enterprise‑technology‑services to learn more. $67,500 ‑ $104,600/ yr. depending on experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24591

STUDENT SERVICES ADVISOR 2

SUMMER SESSIONS Serves as a primary point of contact for phone inquiries, email inquiries, and in‑person visitors, and triages registration and fee issues in collaboration with BARC, Financial Aid, Office of the Registrar, College Advising offices, and academic departments. Assists with Summer Sessions outreach, promotion, and training, review of summer program applications, and maintenance of student records. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent experience in academic advising or customer service related fields. Ability to understand and inform students about campus policies, procedures, and requirements. Basic knowledge of working with a diverse student population, and sensitivity to culture, race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and socio‑economic status. Strong interpersonal skills, with a proven ability to communicate professionally and effectively, both verbally and in writing. Skills in problem solving, judgment, and decision‑making. Solid organizational skills and proven detail orientation. Basic knowledge of the UC system, student information systems, and Summer Sessions operations. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. No extended vacations may be taken during spring or while programs are in session. Must work occasional weekend and/or evening hours while programs are in

session, as needed. $23.66 ‑ $26.82/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/24/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26613

STUDENT SERVICES MANAGER

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Responsible for the oversight of all aspects of the Graduate and Undergraduate Student Affairs programs of HASC. Within the specific areas of Student Affairs, Curriculum and Project Management, Finance, Academic Personnel, and Space Management, the Student Services Manager independently identifies, analyzes, and solves problems in support of Departmental and University teaching and research missions. Reqs: Bachelor of Arts or equivalent combination of education and experience. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills including the ability to professionally interact with students, staff, and faculty on the phone, virtually, via email, and in person. Excellent analytical and problem‑solving skills. Strong computer and organizational skills. Ability to work independently under general supervision and prioritize tasks in conjunction with multiple deadlines. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $55,600‑$69,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/24/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26562

RETAIL

VALLE VERDE retirement community is seeking a customer service‑driven store clerk to run our small campus store. We are looking for a self‑starter with an entrepreneurial spirit who would enjoy working in a resort‑style community while interacting with our wonderful residents! Duties will include stocking the store, keeping the store clean, operating a POS machine and handling small amounts of cash. Position involves standing for periods of time and lifting up to 20 pounds. Hours will be from 9.00AM to 4.30PM. To apply visit www.valleverdecareers.com, email info@ValleVerdeCareers.com, or call 805‑883‑4003 Valle Verde offers competitive pay and phenomenal benefits. Eligible positions (30+ hours/week) start with 20 paid days off, plus seven holidays, a company‑matching 401(k) and health plans that give you cash to use for those unexpected health issues. We also offer a Tuition Reimbursement to promote your career advancement.

ARE YOU HIRING? Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com


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LEGALS why spend your hardearned dollars on social media where you already have an audience? For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1‑855‑270‑3785 UPDATE YOUR HOME with Beautiful New Blinds & Shades. FREE in‑home estimates make it convenient to shop from home. Professional installation. Top quality ‑ Made in the USA. Call for free consultation: 1‑877‑438‑0330. Ask about our specials! (Cal‑SCAN)

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REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FOR SALE

Downtown Office Condominium 146 E. Carrillo St. (second floor) 959 Square Feet Reception area Four Offices (all with desks) Conference Room Three Parking Spaces Front & Rear Entrances Monthly Expense Fee $516.13 Sale Price $750,000.00 Dennis Peterson, Owner Cell Phone 805‑452‑9905 Email: captainpeterson@dapentinc. com

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LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JEFFREY HARB, also known as JEFFREY EUGENE HARB and JEFFREY E. HARB Case No.: 21PR00489 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JEFFREY HARB, also known as JEFFREY EUGENE HARB and JEFFREY E. HARB A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: KRISTI HARB in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: KRISTI HARB be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 12/16/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ROBERT O. MANGUS NO: 21PR00459 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ROBERT O. MANGUS A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: ROBERT O. MANGUS, JR., THOMAS A. MANGUS, and SHELLIE BURBANK in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): JACQUELYN

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QUINN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s to will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 12/02/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: April M. Lavigne, Law Offices of April M. Lavigne. 7 W. Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA (805) 881‑1230. Published Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LARRY J. WINTER (aka LARRY WINTER) NO: 21PR00509 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of LARRY J. WINTER, (aka LARRY WINTER) A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: CHARLIZE WINTER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): CHARLIZE WINTER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good

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cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 12/23/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Rosaleen Wynne, Esq, 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146; (805) 966‑1204. Published Nov 11, 18, 24 2021.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: #1 CAR WASH, #1 GASOLINE at 1901 South Broadway Santa Maria, CA 93454; Crest Trading Company 1601 Skyway Drive 114 Bakersfield, CA 93308 The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 06/13/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0001736. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Vickey Rockberg (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 3, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30, Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: OLIVE STREET DESIGN at 1509 Olive St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tara E. Dees (same address)This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Tara Dees Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002885. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BROWN AND WILMANNS ENVIRONMENTAL at 850 Cathedral Vista Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Brown And Wilmanns Environmental, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Michael S Brown, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002847. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DAKOTA RAE DESIGN at 215 Bath St B11 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Dakota Rae Taylor (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Dakota Taylor, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002843. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY at 215 Pesetas Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Sansum Clinic 470 South Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Jennifer Rose, Executive Assistant Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002866. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TINO’S ITALIAN GROCERY at 210 W. Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; M&Z Italian Grocery 111 S. Voluntario St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Deanna Morinini, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002744. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DJ’Z ELECTRONIC REPAIRZ at 280 N. Fairview Ave Unit 2 Goleta, CA 93117; Jonathon Zayha (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathon Zayha, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002848. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HOT SPRINGS CANYON RANCH at 5000 Highway 154 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael A Taras, Jr 3120 NE 57th Street Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33308; Sharon J. Taras (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Michael A. Taras JR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002875. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MANZO TILE at 279 San Napoli Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; Jesus Manzo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jesus Manzo Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County

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Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002854. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CONRAD COLLECTIVE at 1671 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Julane Conrad (same address) Kevin Conrad (same address)This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Julane Conrad Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002892. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002923. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OROZCO PLASTERING at 635 E. Maple St. Oxnard, CA 93033; Moises Orozco Hernandez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Moises Orozco Hernandez, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002884. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HASHING2HEATING at 864 Highland Dr. #5 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jonathan A. Heffner (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathan A. Heffner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002906. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TRUTH IN RECRUITMENT at 1111 Chapala St Ste 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jackie Carerra, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002960. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CREEKSIDE STORIES at 902 Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jan Dewitt (same address) Charlene M. Huston (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Jan Dewitt, Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002901. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE ADULT STORE at 405 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; S.B. Books Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Donovan Green, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 05, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002810. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: US HISTORIC TOUR at 2575 Treasure Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tirzah E. Riley (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Tirzah Riley, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002899. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROOTED SANTA BARBARA COUNTY at 1111 Chapala Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Founation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jackie Carrera, President & CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002925. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CENTRAL COAST HEALTH INFORMATION TECNOLOGY INCORPORATED at 758 Via Miguel Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Central Coast Health Information Technology Incorporated (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Michiel De Bruin, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BERNIE BAGGS VO LLC, BERNIE BAGGS VO, BERNIE BAGGS at 290 Main St Los Alamos, CA 93440; Bernie Baggs Vo LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Bernard Baggarly, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002818. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GROW YOUR REPUTATION at 7041 Armstrong Rd. Goleta, CA 93117; Michael J Shierloh (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Michael Shierloh Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002841. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: COLORS WINE CELLARS at 206 South C St. Lompoc, CA 93436; Christopher M. Rogers (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Christopher Rogers, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002874. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS

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BUSINESS

NAME

NOVEMBER 11, 2021

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JAK PHOTOGRAPHS at 767 Cypress Walk Apt C Goleta, CA 93117;Juliana A Kunz (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Juliana A Kunz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2021‑0002958. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: QUEEN MARY SEAFOODS at 2405 Calle Linares Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Henry D. Hepp (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Henry Hepp Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002996. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHAINED SB at 1204 Diana Road Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Stefanie J. Bayles (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Stefanie Bayles Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002920. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: KEG N BOTTLE MARKET #4 at 915 Embarcadero Del Mar Goleta, CA 93117; NBK, Inc. 6060 El Cajon Blvd. San Diego, CA 92115 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randy Konja, Vice President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002805. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GILL FORD MAZDA at 440 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Gill Motors SB, Inc. 1100 S. Madera Ave. Madera, CA 93637 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Gagandeep Chahal, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003005. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PHILASOPHIE at 474 Cinderella Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Philasophie LLC 2108 N. Street Ste N Sacremento, CA 95816 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Melissa Mininni, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002905. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE UNCOMMON BALANCE at 2021 Chino Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Courtney R. Salviolo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Courtney

Salviolo, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002998. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MITSUYE YAMADA & MICHAEL YASUTAKE JUSTICE FUND at 522 University Rd. 5034 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA 93106; Diane Fujino 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117; Matef Harmachis 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Unincorporate Assoc. Other Than a Partnership Signed: Matef Harmachis, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002990. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SBBIKE, BICI CENTRO, SBBIKE+COAST, COAST+SBBIKE at 506 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Greg Janee, Secretary Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002921. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SAVOR MATCHA at 133 East De La Guerra, #239 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Aiko Strasser, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003116. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ICAREHEALTHCARE at 150 Via Lee Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Catherine A Callahan (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Catherine Callahan Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003061. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND POOL SERVICES at 770 La Roda Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jimmy Jerry Russell (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jimmy J Russell, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002987. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE POPE’S NEW at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Industrial Way LLC 2060 Huntington Dr. Ste 1 San Marino, CA 91108 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Robert Tweed, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

County on Nov 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003089. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOCALE GROUP, LOCALE PARTNERS, LOCALE REAL ESTATE, THINK LOCALE at 1290 Coast Village Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Jonathan R Perkins 1628 La Vista Del Oceano Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathan Perkins Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021‑0002913. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YWAM‑SANTA BARBARA, YOUTH WITH A MISSION‑SANTA BARBARA, YWAM SB at 4978 La Gama Way Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Interntional Reconciliation Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: David Mitchell, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003056. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ORGULLO WINES, AREA 5.1 at 140 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Orgullo Wine Group, LLC 567 West Channel Islands Boulevard 238 Port Hueneme, CA 93041 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Guillermo Gomez, Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 05, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003094. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: KIN BAKESHOP at 199 S. Turnpike Road, Suite 103 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Mor, Inc. 5109 San Simeon Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: William Chen, Chief Financial Officer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003105. Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KRISTEEN LEIGH GO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03463 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KRISTEEN LEIGH GO TO: KRISTEEN LEIGH ALATRISTE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection

that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Nov 22, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 15, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF HEATHER ELYSE CARASTRO HAGEN TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03962 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: HEATHER ELYSE CARASTRO HAGEN TO: HEATHER ELYSE FLEMING THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 07, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 13, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TYLER JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03264 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TYLER JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO: TYLER NORTH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 14, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct

15, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KIRSTEN BLICHER HINRICHS TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03996 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KIRSTEN BLICHER HINRICHS TO: DAY WITHERSPOON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KRISTINE CASULLO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03385 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KRISTINE CASULLO TO: KRISTINE CHRISTENSEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 03, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. November 26, 2021 at 3:30 PM Amanda De Luna Personal, Totes, Clothes, Bags, Guitar Timothy Neros Personal Belongings John Williams Bags


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PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONT.)

The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD; SPECIAL NOTICE OF LAWSUIT (Pursuant to Labor Code section 3716 and Code of Civil Procedure section 412.20 and 412.30) WCAB No. ADJ9761982 To: DEFENDANT, ILLEGALLY UNINSURED EMPLOYER: APPLICANT, RAUL ADAME DEEFENDANTS, JOSHUA RICHARD BRAUN NOTICES 1) A lawsuit, the Application for Adjudication of Claim, has been filed with the Workers’ Compensation Appeals Board against you as the named defendant by the above‑named applicant (s). You may seek the advice of an attorney in any matter connected with this lawsuit and such attorney should be consulted promptly so that your response may be filed and entered in a timely fashion. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney reference service or a legal aid office. (See telephone directory.) 2) An Answer to the Application must be filed and served within six days of the service of the Application pursuant to Appeals Board rules; therefore, your written response must be filed with the Appeals Board promptly; a letter or phone call will not protect your interests. 3) You will be served with a Notice‑ (s) of Hearing and must appear at all hearings or conferences. After such hearing, even absent your appearance, a decision may be made and an award of compensation benefits may issue against you. The award could result in the garnishment of your wages, taking of your money or property or other relief. If the Appeals Board makes an award against you, your house or other dwelling or other property may be taken to satisfy that award in a non‑judicial state, with no exemptions from execution. A lien may also be imposed upon your property without further hearing and before the issuance of an award. 4) You must notify the Appeals Board of the proper address for the service of official notices and papers and notify the Appeals Board of any changes in that address. TAKE ACTION NOW TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS! Issued by: WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD Name and address of Appeals Board: WCAB 130 E. Ortega Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Name and address of Applicant’s Attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; FORM COMPLETED BY: Ellia Limon, Telephone No.: (805) 965‑4540. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served: as an individual defendant Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2, 2021. WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD; SPECIAL NOTICE OF LAWSUIT (Pursuant to Labor Code section 3716 and Code of Civil Procedure section 412.20 and 412.30) WCAB No. ADJ3476488 To: DEFENDANT, ILLEGALLY UNINSURED EMPLOYER: APPLICANT, MARIA CABELLOS DEEFENDANTS, CARRIE AGUILAR INDIVIDUAL DBA CASA BLANCA NOTICES 1) A lawsuit, the Application for Adjudication of Claim, has been filed with the Workers’

Compensation Appeals Board against you as the named defendant by the above‑named applicant (s). You may seek the advice of an attorney in any matter connected with this lawsuit and such attorney should be consulted promptly so that your response may be filed and entered in a timely fashion. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney reference service or a legal aid office. (See telephone directory.) 2) An Answer to the Application must be filed and served within six days of the service of the Application pursuant to Appeals Board rules; therefore, your written response must be filed with the Appeals Board promptly; a letter or phone call will not protect your interests. 3) You will be served with a Notice‑ (s) of Hearing and must appear at all hearings or conferences. After such hearing, even absent your appearance, a decision may be made and an award of compensation benefits may issue against you. The award could result in the garnishment of your wages, taking of your money or property or other relief. If the Appeals Board makes an award against you, your house or other dwelling or other property may be taken to satisfy that award in a non‑judicial state, with no exemptions from execution. A lien may also be imposed upon your property without further hearing and before the issuance of an award. 4) You must notify the Appeals Board of the proper address for the service of official notices and papers and notify the Appeals Board of any changes in that address. TAKE ACTION NOW TO PROTECT YOUR INTERESTS! Issued by: WORKERS’ COMPENSATION APPEALS BOARD Name and address of Appeals Board: WCAB 130 E. Ortega Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Name and address of Applicant’s Attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; FORM COMPLETED BY: Ellia Limon, Telephone No.: (805) 965‑4540. NOTICE TO THE PERSON SERVED: You are served: as an individual defendant Published: Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2, 2021.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE

TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): DAVID H. SHOR, an individual, JUDI B. SHOR, an individual, and DOES 1‑25, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JAMES L. HUDGENS, EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL W. MCCANN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica

no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 21CV03593 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Raymond Chandler 15 W. Carrillo St. Ste 220 Santa Barbara, CA 93101, (805) 965‑1999 (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Law Offices of Raymond Chandler, 15 W. Carrillo St., Ste 220, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 965‑1999;DATE 9/8/2021 Deputy Clerk; Terri Chavez. Published. Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021.

ORDINANCE NO. 21-11 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADOPTING AN AMENDMENT TO TITLE 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO ALLOW CERTAIN ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES RELATED USES IN THE GENERAL COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT On November 2, 2021, at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) conducted the second reading and adopted Ordinance No. 21-11 that would allow Indoor Sports and Recreation in the General Commercial (C-G) zoning district. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 21-11 at a regular meeting held on the 2nd day of November, 2021, by the following roll call vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND RICHARDS NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

TEMPORE

KYRIACO,

The Ordinance will be effective 31 days from the date of adoption. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, November 11, 2021

IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON In re the Conduct of:) Case Nos. 21-38 & 21-59 MICAH D. FARGEY, Bar No. 096814 Respondent. PUBLISHED NOTICE TO ANSWER TO: Micah D. Fargey Last known address: 7307 SW Beveland Road, Ste. 200, Portland, OR 97223 You are hereby notified that the Oregon State Bar (Bar) has filed a formal complaint and an amended formal complaint against you, alleging your violations of RPC 1.3, RPC 1.15-1(a), RPC 1.15-1(c), RPC 1.15-1(d), RPC 1.16(d), RPC 8.1(a)(2), RPC 8.4(a)(2), RPC 8.4(a)(3), and RPC 8.4(a)(4) in five causes of complaint. A true copy of the formal complaint and amended formal complaint can be obtained from the Oregon State Bar Disciplinary Board Clerk (Disciplinary Board Clerk) at 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. The Bar seeks to impose formal discipline upon you for these alleged violations. You are further notified that you may file with the Disciplinary Board Clerk, with a service copy to the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, your verified answer within fourteen (14) days from the date of service of this notice upon you. Upon the filing of your answer with the Bar or in case of your default in so answering, the amended formal complaint shall be heard, and such further proceedings as the law and the facts shall warrant. You are further notified that an attorney accused of misconduct may, in lieu of filing an answer, elect to file with the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, a written resignation from membership in the Bar. Such a resignation must comply with BR 9.1 and be in the form set forth in BR 13.7. You should consult an attorney of your choice for further information about resignation. The address of the Oregon State Bar is 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. EXECUTED this 5th day of November 2021. OREGON STATE BAR By: /s/ Veronica R. Rodriguez Veronica R. Rodriguez, Bar No. 181818 Assistant Disciplinary Counsel Published Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON In re the Conduct of:) Case Nos. 21-38 & 21-59 MICAH D. FARGEY, Bar No. 096814 Respondent. PUBLISHED NOTICE TO ANSWER TO: Micah D. Fargey Last known address: 7307 SW Beveland Road, Ste. 200, Portland, OR 97223 You are hereby notified that the Oregon State Bar (Bar) has filed a BR 3.1 petition for suspension during pendency of disciplinary proceedings (BR 3.1 Petition) against you based on the allegations as set forth in the Bar’s amended formal complaint. A true copy of the BR 3.1 Petition can be obtained from the Oregon State Bar Disciplinary Board Clerk (Disciplinary Board Clerk) at 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. The Bar seeks your immediate suspension from the practice of law pending the disposition of disciplinary charges filed against you as set forth in the Bar’s amended formal complaint. You are further notified that you may file with the Disciplinary Board Clerk, with a service copy to the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, your verified answer within fourteen (14) days from the date of service of this notice upon you. Upon the filing of your answer with the Bar or in case of your default in so answering, the BR 3.1 Petition shall be heard, and such further proceedings as the law and the facts shall warrant. You are further notified that an attorney accused of misconduct may, in lieu of filing an answer, elect to file with the Bar’s Disciplinary Counsel, a written resignation from membership in the Bar. Such a resignation must comply with BR 9.1 and be in the form set forth in BR 13.7. You should consult an attorney of your choice for further information about resignation. The address of the Oregon State Bar is 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Post Office Box 231935, Tigard, OR 97281-1935, United States. EXECUTED this 5th day of November 2021. OREGON STATE BAR By: /s/ Veronica R. Rodriguez Veronica R. Rodriguez, Bar No. 181818 Assistant Disciplinary Counsel Published Nov 11, 18, 24. Dec 2 2021.

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 11, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT NOVEMBER 11, 2021

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