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news :

HAN FAMILY MURDER TRIAL | MUNGER DORM | ELECTION RESULTS FREE

Santa Barbara

NOV. 4-11, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 825

CAN CALIFORNIA CORRECT

Coffee? FARMER FIGHTS TO MAKE BEAN BUSINESS BETTER FOR ALL by Matt Kettmann

plus : DO

WE SAVE DE LA GUERRA PLAZA? | JAMES MELNIK REMEMBERED


The Fund for Santa Barbara | Community Celebration

offers huge thanks

to the many sponsors, donors, volunteers, and guests who helped raise over $165,000 for Change, Not Charity at our 28th Annual Community Celebration. TM

Voices Translation and Interpreting Ser vices

Event Co-Hosts: David Moore and Gloria Soto Events Manager: Elly Iverson Staff Marcos Vargas, Executive Director / Patricia Solorio, Associate Director / Kristin Hsu, Development Associate / Alina Rey Keswani, Development & Communications Manager / Kathleen Knight, Capacity Building Manager / Lennea Lopez, Administrative Assistant / David Melendrez, YMC Coordinator / Tania Reyes, Grants Associate / Hugo Valdovinos, Operations Supervisor 1219 State St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 | 120 E. Jones St. Suite #110, Santa Maria, CA 93454 | (805) 962-9164 | fundforsantabarbara.org 2

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Annette Gordon-Reed On Juneteenth: ‘Freedom Day’ and Its Importance to American History Wed, Nov 10 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed weaves together history and heartfelt memoir to tell the sweeping story of Juneteenth and the larger fight for equality.

Justice for All Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Zegar Family Foundation, and Anonymous

She & Him A Very She & Him Christmas Party Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre

Leonidas Kavakos, violin Yuja Wang, piano Fri, Nov 12 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Recognized for his virtuosity and superb musicianship, violinist Leonidas Kavakos joins forces with pianist Yuja Wang, lauded for her captivating stage presence and “wizardly technique” (Chicago Tribune).

Program

J.S. Bach: Sonata No. 3 in E major, BWV 1016 Busoni: Sonata No. 2 in E minor, op. 36a J.S. Bach: Sonata No. 1 in B minor, BWV 1014 Shostakovich: Sonata in G major, op. 134

My Bluegrass Heart Béla Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Bryan Sutton Wed, Dec 15 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre

Usher in the holiday season with the “old-school studio-pop sensibility” (NPR) of M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

This unparalleled evening in support of Béla Fleck’s new album My Bluegrass Heart is a veritable Who’s Who of some of the greatest instrumentalists in bluegrass history.

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

3


welcome

Henry | Carpinteria

SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls Carpinteria Rylen Lake, 9/18/2021 Goleta Athena Leilani Perez Lopez, 8/16/2021 Olivia Chih-Ching Chang, 9/17/2021 Hannah Grace Perry, 9/20/2021 Lompoc Quinn Cali Carlson, 9/7/2021 Amira Sophia Salas, 9/26/2021 Santa Barbara Esmeralda Arriaga Rangel, 8/25/2021 Nolani Suraya Basilio, 9/1/2021 Lucy Bloom, 9/7/2021 Serena Perry Seigle, 9/7/2021 Amelia Iascone, 9/8/2021 Ava Iascone, 9/8/2021 Wren Havilah Birich, 9/9/2021 Madisyn Emilia Munoz, 9/9/2021 Harper Cadence Adams, 9/12/2021 Charlotte Arina, 9/12/2021 Giada Marie Geddes, 9/13/2021 Zoey Maureen Mezzetta, 9/17/2021 Yoyo Zhang, 9/18/2021 Lilah Gomez, 9/20/2021 Kalyna Alexandra Steadman, 9/23/2021 Atzi Love Jasso, 9/29/2021 Lexi Marisol Guerrero, 10/5/2021

“Forever grateful for the compassion we experienced at Cottage.”

Baby Boys

Andrew, Henry’s father

health e baby

When Henry was three years old he was diagnosed with leukemia. He received treatment at Cottage Children’s Medical Center (CCMC), where Henry was admitted nearly two dozen times over the next three years. Henry just celebrated his final chemotherapy on October 8, 2021.

Are you expecting or do you have an infant? Sign up for our free newsletter specific to your due date or your baby’s age. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

Henry’s parents are thankful for the care Henry received and the kindness of the staff during Henry’s treatment.

Henry is now in the first grade and loves math and sports – especially baseball, swimming and skateboarding.

Cottage Children’s Medical Center cares for more than 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and eleven specialized outpatient clinics. Learn more at cottagechildrens.org.

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael H Kreitsek, MA Michael H Kreitsek, MA Michael H Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286 4

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Ventura Alaia Marie Penny, 9/9/2021

Goleta Dylan Frank Allen, 9/7/2021 Sebastian Cross, 9/7/2021 Artur Raymond Bachelet, 9/16/2021 Aidan Grey M Oropeza, 9/22/2021 Gunner James Leslie, 9/27/2021 Lompoc Miguel Jorge Andres Raya, 9/22/2021 Alex Jacob Rojas, 9/25/2021 Alexander Julio Nuñez, 9/28/2021 Santa Barbara Keanu Koa Jan Escobia, 9/2/2021 Osbaldo Cuentas Murillo, 9/6/2021 Mateó Villafana, 9/6/2021 Lucas Morgan Byerly, 9/16/2021 Nikolai “Nikko” Manuel Avelar, 9/19/2021 Julian Mora Velazquez, 9/20/2021 Phoenix J Camacho-Gonzalez, 9/24/2021 Ernest Trip Torres III, 9/27/2021 Robert Austin Dwyer, 10/5/2021 Jack William Jones, 10/7/2021 Santa Maria Jayce Michael Bendele, 9/21/2021 Ventura Luca Rae Cordero, 9/2/2021

Support the Zoo Donate today at sbzoo.org

We’ve got a lot of mouths to feed! (805) 962-5339 • sbzoo.org Just off Cabrillo Blvd. at East Beach


volume 35, # 825, Nov. 4-11, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

COVER STORY 21 Can California Correct Coffee?

Farmer Fights to Make Bean Business Better for All by Matt Kettmann

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ON THE COVER: Photo by Macduff Everton. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

SCAVENGER HUNT SUPERSTARS To celebrate and bring to life this year’s annual Best of Santa Barbara® issue, which came out two weeks ago, we hosted our first ever Scavenger Hunt on October 23, when 44 teams traveled all over town, solving clues in order to win $1,000. No team got a perfect score, but the winners, 404TeamNameNotFound, got 750 out of 760 points, just five points ahead of second place. Led by Becca Hilburn (a senior automation engineer at LogicMonitor), the winning team also included her husband, Taylor Hilburn (a build and release engineer at LogicMonitor); Kelsey Bardfield (a manager at Anchore); and Jen (a LogicMonitor software engineer who didn’t want to use her last name). “Our group has a mix of longtime Santa Barbara residents and newer residents, so we thought it would be fun to join forces and explore the town, where some stops would be new adventures for some and have nostalgic associations for others,” said Becca. “We know how to rely on each of our individual strengths to come together as a team, and we all possess a competitive spirit. We spent the first hour or so diving into the questions and organizing them into areas of town for efficiency, Googling the ones we had some trouble figuring out, double-checking our work, and then hitting the streets to check the items off the list (with a few pit stops for food and drinks throughout). It was a really fun weekend, and we hope the Independent runs it again next year!”

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

EMILY LEE

TABLE of CONTENTS

5


Get

Vaccinated.

Trude Fleischmann, Portrait of Marion and Helen Post, Vienna, Austria (detail), 1933. Gelatin silver print. SBMA, Gift of Joan Almond.

EVENTS

Facing Forward: Photographic Portraits from the Collection

Saturday, November 6, 1 pm

Through December 5, 2021

In the Meanwhile…Recent Acquisitions of Contemporary Art, Part II

Community-based Practice in Cultural Heritage Conservation: The Kamehameha I Sculpture of Hawai’i Free Reserve tickets at tickets.sbma.net. Sunday, November 14, 1:30 – 4:30 pm

Studio Sunday

Through January 30, 2022

Free

For more exhibitions and events, visit www.sbma.net. 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday 11 am–5 pm • Thursday 11 am–8 pm Advance reservations are recommended at tickets.sbma.net.

The News Letter Incisive news analysis and unmatched personal umbrage on the most pressing issues of the day from Senior Editor Tyler Hayden.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters

6

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

publichealthsbc.org/vaccine

EXHIBITIONS ON VIEW


OCT. 28-NOV. 4, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

ELECTION

Rowse Claims Early Lead in Mayoral Race

ELECTION RESULTS as of Wednesday, November 3

Sneddon and Harmon Lead in Council Races; Next Results Expected by Thursday

MAYOR

by Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey, and Jean Yamamura

onstituents and supporters lined the walls of El Paseo Restaurant Tuesday night to congratulate Randy Rowse on his early lead in the race for mayor of Santa Barbara. He claimed more than 40 percent of the vote, about 7,800 votes, in the first wave of results. In the City Council races, incumbents Kristen Sneddon and Meagan Harmon are ahead. Though about 4,612 votes remain to be counted, including mail-in ballots, drop-in, and provisional votes that came in after 10 a.m. Tuesday, the atmosphere at Rowse’s campaign party was celebratory. “I had a fabulous team and wonderful support,” Rowse said. “I think we need to take a breath as a city and ask ourselves what we’ve worked on Mayoral candidate Randy Rowse at El Paseo Restaurant on election night and what we need to work on.” The first results from the mayoral election put Rowse in the lead state Rowse. He was appointed to the with 40.5 percent of the vote (7,895 council in 2010, when he was the owner votes), followed by James Joyce III with of the popular Paradise Café watering 26.0 percent (5,072 votes), and incum- hole, serving for nine years on City bent mayor Cathy Murillo with 24.5 Council and winning two elections. percent (4,769 votes). The rest of the Rowse credited his win to his nonfield trailed in single digits: Deborah partisan approach to politics, and his Schwartz claimed 6.75 percent of votes ability to be collegial and form collabo(1,319 votes), with Mark Whitehurst rations across the aisle. “I don’t bring taking 1.6 percent (311 votes) and “Boat emotion into personal relationships,” Rat” Matt Kilrain at 0.67 percent (131 he said. votes). Though it seemed the gap between As city watchers predicted, Joyce Rowse and Joyce was too large to close, and Murillo split the Democratic vote Joyce and his constituents were jovial in what is nominally a nonpartisan con- as they crowded into Embermill Restest, leaving the field open to decline-to- taurant. Joyce—who had earned critical endorsements in the last month of his campaign, including from the Santa Barbara Independent and the Montecito Journal—was already looking to the future. “This is a community that can still make change,” Joyce said. “I’ll just have a different role in that.” Incumbent Councilmember Kristen Sneddon at Sama Sama Kitchen

CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

RYAN P. C RUZ PHOTOS

C

COMMUNITY

Randy Rowse É 7,895 votes — 40.5% James Joyce III É 5,072 votes — 26% Cathy Murillo É 4,769 — 24.5% Deborah Schwartz É 1,319 — 6.75% Mark Whitehurst É 311 — 1.6% Matt Kilrain É 131 — 0.67% VOTER TURNOUT CITYWIDE

35.4% of 55,308 total voters DISTRICT 4 Kristen Sneddon É 3,205 — 60.7% Barrett Reed É 2,055 — 38.9% VOTER TURNOUT DIST. 4

45.1% of 11,977 total voters DISTRICT 5 Eric Friedman É 2,715 — 96% VOTER TURNOUT DIST. 5

40.8% of 10,555 total voters DISTRICT 6 Meagan Harmon É 1,325 — 52.9 % Nina Johnson É 850 — 33.9% Jason Carlton É 243 — 9.7% Zachary Pike É 75 — 3% VOTER TURNOUT DIST. 6

29.3% of 10,555 total voters

Santa Barbara police have identified 53-year-old Manuel Zarzoso Sanvictores Jr. as the man who died at home following a moped collision on North Hope Avenue on 10/24. The collision, which involved Sanvictores and an unnamed friend on a separate moped accidentally crashing into each other, appears to be directly related to his death, according to police spokesperson Sgt. Ethan Ragsdale. Following the accident, Sanvictores returned home after experiencing chest pains and collapsed in his bathroom, dying shortly after paramedics arrived.

INFRASTRUCTURE The City of S.B. has begun work on a two-mile-long pipeline connecting its desalination plant to its main water distribution hub, the Cater Water Treatment Plant in the San Roque foothills. Anticipated to be completed in fall 2022, the pipeline is part of a project designed to expand the reach of the Charles E. Meyer Desalination Plant, which supplies about 25 percent of the city’s drinking water. Full story at independent.com/city-pipeline.

COURTS & CRIME S.B. police officers arrested Ventura man Alexander Robert Vargas, 22, on 10/27 after he allegedly strangled and battered a woman on East Gutierrez Street, fled from police, and attempted to run at officers with a knife. During his arrest, Vargas was tased and reportedly attempted to bite, kick, and break free from the officers. Vargas was taken to Cottage Hospital, where he was medically cleared, and then booked in County Jail for felony domestic battery, assault causing great bodily injury, and resisting an officer with violence and misdemeanor brandishing a knife. He is being held without bail. Isla Vista’s infamous Halloween weekend continued its downward trend of illegal activity, with only two arrests and 17 citations issued. Last year, there were two arrests and 20 citations issued over the weekend, and in 2019, there were six arrests and 44 citations. In 2013, by contrast, there were more than 200 arrests and 250 citations. Both of this year’s arrests were on 10/29 and for outstanding warrants. Of the nine citations given on 10/29 and eight on 10/30, only four were alcohol-related citations and the rest traffic related. No incident reports, arrests, or citations occurred on Halloween night itself. S.B. police responded 10/30 to a report of stabbing and shooting on the Eastside after two injured subjects, one with a stab wound and the other with a gunshot wound, were brought to Cottage Hospital ER within minutes of each other. According to witnesses, a verbal altercation led to Goleta resident Felipe Mercado, 34, allegedly pulling a handgun on a group of people. In response, an unnamed subject produced a knife and reportedly stabbed Mercado, who allegedly shot the subject in a lower extremity. Mercado was arrested after receiving medical care and charged with attempted homicide, among other offenses. His bail is currently set n at $1 million.

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

7


OCT. 28-NOV. 4, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

Witnesses Called in Han Family Murder Trial

Locally Owned and Operated

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Home Depot that were later found at the scene of the crime. Lieutenant Rob Minter of the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Department and Home Depot Corporate Manager Elena del Valle were the first on the stand. Del Valle is Home Depot’s Western Division manager in charge of “organized retail crimes” and assisted detectives in procuring security camera footage and purchase receipts for three separate purchases at two Home Depot stores. Footage shows Haobsh at Home Depot in Oceanside on the morning before the Han family was found dead, purchasing two packages of plastic sheeting and two rolls of duct tape—the same materials used to wrap the bodies of the victims. According to del Valle’s testimony, from Fresno to San Diego, there were only four

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ierre Haobsh —the man charged in the grisly triple murder of Santa Barbara ea. lb. herbalist Dr. Henry Han; his wife, Jennie Yu; and their young daughter, 7# Emily Han; in March 2016—slouched in SEEDLESS GRAPES PORK TRI TIP his chair in Judge Brian Hill’s courtroom, silent during most of the witness testimony, which laid the foundation, brick by brick, in lb. lb. the prosecutors’ case against him. The non-jury bench trial—which seeks ea. El Pato 7 oz. to bring closure five years after the Han Choice Boneless ASPARAGUS family lost their lives in an act of violence, RIB EYE STEAK prosecutors say, at the hands of Haobsh—is presided over by Judge Brian Hill, who will lb. lb. decide Haobsh’s fate after hearing witness testimony throughout the next few weeks. Folgers 8 oz. In Hill’s courtroom this August, District lb. LARGE SHRIMP BROWN ONIONS Attorney Joyce Dudley and prosecutors agreed to drop death-penalty enhancelb. lb. ments against Haobsh in exchange for him waiving his right to a jury trial. Springfield 15 oz. Pork GREEN CABBAGE Testimony began last SPARE RIBS week with Haobsh’s friend lb. and associate Thomas “TJ” Direda, who said the lb. lb. defendant admitted to the crime and asked for his Fresh Daily Springfield 8 oz. FUJI & GALA APPLES help in getting rid of eviGROUND BEEF dence. The prosecution team — led by attorneys lb. Hilary Dozer and Benjalb. lb. min Ladinig and primary investigator Detective Dona Maria (8 oz.) Mesquite (7 lb.) Travis Minute Maid 59 oz. Henderson — also THE ACCUSED: Triple-murder suspect Pierre Haobsh sits for his called witnesses tying arraignment in 2016. MOLE CHARCOAL Haobsh to items purchased at Home Depot ea. and found at the scene, as well as Chase purchases that matched the items detecBank employees who reviewed statements tives described, and from those four, they Parrot (16 oz.) Skippy (16 oz.) of a failed attempt to transfer $72,000 from were able to narrow it down to the single antacruzmarkets.com www.santacruzmarkets.com transaction on March 23, 2016. Further Han’s account to Haobsh. COCONUT WATER PEANUT BUTTER SANTA BARBARA GOLETA GOLETA The defendant himself didn’t react much. evidence showed Haobsh visited another 5757 Hollister Ave 5757 Hollister Ave 324 W. Montecito St As the prosecution team called witnesses, Home Depot location in Vista, California, By the bag ANANAS BANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAIN RICE BEEF TRI TIP ¢ 99 $ 99 Haobsh stared blankly. He wore a white on at least two occasions to purchase a few D TO STOCK HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS 49 ¢ ON$1 49 $ 59 1 2 NOVEMBER 2ND shirt, dark tie, and thick-rimmed glasses in more items, including brass piping and FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH Chicken MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL NEAPPLES PINEAPPLES 89 $ QUARTERS FOLLOW USLEGON INSTAGRAM the courtroom, more put together than in neoprene washers prosecutors believe were $ 89 2 2 $ 99 $ 99 ¢ 1 El Pato 7 oz.AND LIKE US 1 69 El Pato 7 oz. the preliminary hearing, where he appeared meant to fashion a homemade suppressor to ON FACEBOOK HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE ¢ MA TOMATOES shackled and in the bright-orange County be threaded onto a pistol. He was seen both PORK BUTT ¢ ROMA TOMATOES 59 59 ¢ $ 59 on in-store and parking-lot security footage, Jail jumpsuit. 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE ST Best 89 BE 1 ARA BARB SANTA INSTANT COFFEE Barbara SantaThin $ 89 sliced On Friday, he stirred only a few times entering a burgundy 2013 Lexus that he was $ 89 winner R E N N I W 5 UJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES CARNE RANCHERA WINNER to lean over and whisper into the ear of his driving when arrested. $ 98 89 ¢ PEAS & CARROTS 89 ¢ PEAS & CARROTS 5 ¢ head defense attorney, Christine Voss, as Friday’s final two witnesses were both ¢ 89 89 Santa Cruz EDIUM YAMS MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO the prosecution projected evidence on the Chase bank employees, branch manager SANTA BARBARA GOLETA ¢ WHIP TOPPING ¢ GOLETA SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA 59 59 $ 49 2 St St $ 49 screen before Judge Melissa Griffin and private-client banker Ave Hill in Department 2 5757 Hollister Montecito W.W.Montecito 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister 1 324324 1 EAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS of Santa Barbara Superior Court: receipts, Cesar Arellano. Ladinig projected images HEAD LETTUCE ORANGE JUICE Mahatma 2# ¢ By the bag $ 98 Mahatma 2# 79 ¢ ORANGE$JUICE 79 of bank statements, showing a failed transsecurity cam footage, and bank statements 89 $ 389 Support1local people at3 LONG GRAIN RICE to the crimes. LONG GRAINworking RICE of $72,000 from Han’s bank account to tying Haobsh bread daily from Now featuring fresh bread daily from ¢ ¢ sa Bakery 99 called witnesses who could fer $ Prosecution La Bella Rosa Bakery businesses! 99 $ Haobsh’s account, and another successful $ locally 59 lb.NOowned lb. SALES TO DEALERS lb. prove Haobsh had purchased items at transfer of $5,000. LIMITED STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS

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EDUCATION

‘CHARLIE’S VISION’: The Munger Residence Hall would stand 159 feet tall, just below the height of UCSB’s Storke Tower.

COU RTESY

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

REDISTRICTING IN THE CITY OF SANTA BARBARA BE A PART OF THE PROCESS – FALL 2021-SPRING 2022 Visit SantaBarbaraCA.gov/IRC to: learn more, subscribe to news, draw maps, and view the schedule of hearings of the Independent Redistricting Commission in YOUR district! *In Person Independent Redistricting Commission Hearings will be in the evening or weekends and include complimentary childcare and snacks. Participate via Zoom. Scan QR Code for more information and to stay informed. Spanish translation available.

Architect Quits over Mega-Dorm

For more information visit our web pages. Scan Code to learn more.

REDISTRITACIÓN EN LA CIUDAD DE SANTA BÁRBARA SEA PARTE DEL PROCESO – OTÓNO DE 2021 A PRIMAVERA DE 2022

Criticizes UCSB’s Munger Hall as ‘Social and Psychological Experiment’

A

by Tyler Hayden

consulting architect on UCSB’s Design Review Committee (DRC) has quit in protest over the university’s proposed Munger Hall project, calling the massive, mostly windowless dormitory plan “unsupportable from my perspective as an architect, a parent, and a human being.” In his October 25 resignation letter to UCSB Campus Architect Julie Hendricks, Dennis McFadden — a well-respected SoCal architect with 15 years on the committee — goes scorched earth on the new building concept: an 11-story, 1.68-millionsquare-foot structure to house up to 4,500 students, 94 percent of whom wouldn’t have windows in their small, single-occupancy bedrooms. The idea was conceived by 97-year-old billionaire-investor-turned-amateur-architect Charles Munger, who donated $200 million toward the project with the condition that his blueprints be followed exactly. Munger maintains the small living quarters would coax residents out of their rooms and into larger common areas to interact and collaborate. He also argues the off-site prefabrication of standardized building elements—the nine residential levels feature identical floor plans—would save on construction costs. The entire proposal, which comes as UCSB desperately attempts to add to its overstretched housing stock, is budgeted in the range of $1.5 billion. Chancellor Henry Yang has hailed it as “inspired and revolutionary.” McFadden disagreed sharply with what the university has described as “Charlie’s Vision” for the benefits of a “close-knit” living experience. “An ample body of documented evidence shows that interior environments with access to natural light, air, and views to nature improve both the physical and mental wellbeing of occupants,” he wrote. “The Munger Hall design ignores this evidence and seems to take the position that it doesn’t matter.”

So far, McFadden continued, the university has not offered any research or data to justify the unprecedented departure from normal student housing standards, historical trends, and basic sustainability principles. “Rather,” he said, “as the ‘vision’ of a single donor, the building is a social and psychological experiment with an unknown impact on the lives and personal development of the undergraduates the university serves.” McFadden explains he felt compelled to step down from the DRC after an October 5 presentation where “the design was described as 100 percent complete, approval was not requested, no vote was taken, and no further submittals are intended or required,” he said. “Yet in the nearly 15 years I served as a consulting architect to the DRC, no project was brought before the committee that is larger, more transformational, and potentially more destructive to the campus as a place than Munger Hall.” This kind of proposal is exactly why the committee exists, he said. McFadden draws comparisons between Munger Hall and other large structures to illustrate its colossal footprint. Currently, he said, the largest single dormitory in the world is Bancroft Hall at the U.S. Naval Academy, which houses 4,000 students and comprises multiple wings wrapped around numerous courtyards with over 25 entrances. “Munger Hall, in comparison, is a single block housing 4,500 students with two entrances,” McFadden said, and would qualify as the eighth densest neighborhood on the planet, falling just short of Dhaka, Bangladesh. It would be able to house Princeton University’s entire undergraduate population, or all five Claremont Colleges. “The project is essentially the student life portion of a midsized university campus in a box,” he said. The project is utterly detached from its physical setting, McFadden goes on, and has no relationship to UCSB’s “spectacular coastal location.” It is also out of place with the scale and texture of the rest of campus, he said, “an alien world parked at the corner of

Visite SantaBarbaraCA.gov/IRC para: obtener más información, suscribase a las noticias, dibujar mapas y ver el calendario de audiencias de la Comisión Independiente de Redistritación en SU distrito. * Las audiencias de la Comisión Independiente de Redistritación de Distritos en persona serán por la noche o los fines de semana e incluirán cuidado de niños y refrigerios de cortesía. Participe a través de Zoom. Escanee el código QR para obtener más información y mantenerse informado. Traducción al español disponible.

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ENOUGH: On Tuesday, Supervisor Das Williams (above) objected to what he termed a not-so-veiled threat of physical violence from a member of the public against the county’s top two public health officers.

“There is a level of frustration out there,” Nelson added. “There’s a need to let the air out of the balloon. That’s what I’m doing.” Nelson acknowledged, however, some of the comments made by the mandate critics cross the line of civility and said he’s spoken to them about that. Giving rise to Supervisor Williams’s concern were remarks made by Matthew Strezpek blasting as unconstitutional the county’s mask mandate, which he claimed limited the public’s mobility and ability to breathe. Complaining of what he termed “medical tyranny,” Strezpek stated, “We may place Van Do-Reynoso, Henning Ansorg, you, and several other officials under citizens’ arrest for misdemeanor crimes.” Ansorg and Do-Reynoso, he claimed, were guilty of crimes of child abuse “by forcing children to wear face masks.” He added, “Now we may sue you, arrest you, and share —Board Chair Bob Nelson videos of your arrest worldwide.” Strezpek may have threatened more direct action, but Nelson, to hold members of the public every Tuesday for many months now, the more accountable for such statements. He supervisors have heard heated denunciaalso questioned Nelson’s policy of setting tions from a coterie of critics who have aside time at the start of every supervisors’ frequently likened their policies to that meeting so members of the public could of Adolf Hitler and Nazi Germany. This sound off on the subject of COVID. This Tuesday, they heard from one speaker who approach, Williams said “may have out- claimed she and her mask-less daughlived its usefulness.” ter were forced off an MTD bus by a bus Nelson said he made a point to carve out driver who she described as “a member of time for the critics of the county’s COVID a minority.” Others complained of teachers response because they’d show up and speak having just been fired for refusing to get anyway, likely intruding on other matters vaccinated. of board deliberation. As a matter of law, Supervisor Gregg Hart, more dismissive the supervisors are limited on what lim- than alarmed, commented, “The number its they can impose on public comment. of speakers has dwindled to a micro-small They are entitled to limit the amount of group of people determined to say the same time members of the public can speak on thing week after week.” The question more pressing to other any issue and can limit public remarks to matters over which the supervisors have supervisors was at what point Ansorg and jurisdiction. Do-Reynoso believed it would be safe to by Nick Welsh hen a member of the public threatened to place Santa Barbara County’s top two public health officers under citizens’ arrest this Tuesday morning over the county’s indoor mask mandate — and share videotapes of the event with the world — Supervisor Das Williams had enough. Williams objected to what he termed a not-so-veiled threat of physical violence on the county’s Public Health Officer Dr. Henning Ansorg and Ansorg’s boss, Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso. He called on the board’s chair, Supervisor Bob

W

‘There’s a need to let the air out of the balloon. That’s what I’m doing.’

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COU RTESY

MENTAL HEALTH

Behavioral Wellness Gets New Director

W

ith precious little fanfare, the county supervisors on Tuesday announced the appointment of Antonette “Toni” Navarro as the new director of the county’s high-profile Department of Behavioral Wellness, a $143-million-a-year department with 403 full-time workers that provides mental-health services to 7,476 clients and drug and alcohol treatment for another 3,106. Navarro grew up in Santa Barbara, attended Santa Barbara High, and got her master’s degree in education at UCSB. For the past 15 years, Navarro, a marriage and family therapist by education, worked in leadership positions for Tri-Cities Mental Health, serving as clinical director and then as chief director for an agency that not long before her arrival found itself $25 million in debt and on the brink of bankruptcy. Returning to Santa Barbara, Navarro replaces outgoing director Alice Gleghorn, who announced her retirement this April. Famously no-nonsense in style and demeanor, Gleghorn got a lot done and is credited with stabilizing a department once described as ungovernable, but she just as famously did not get along with Santa Barbara’s cadre of mental-health advocates.

Antonette “Toni” Navarro

Lynne Gibbs, head of the local chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness, expressed cautious optimism, saying of Navarro, “I am impressed with her clinical background,” adding, “We look forward to working with her in a supportive partnership.” Far more exuberant in his excitement over Navarro’s arrival, Supervisor Das Williams exclaimed that she “was hitting doubles, triples, and home runs” during her interview, beating out 28 other applicants for the position. Williams heaped praise on Gleghorn for fixing many of the “nuts and bolts” of an ailing department and adding significantly to the infrastructure of treatment options. For all that, however, the county’s Psychiatric Health Facility—for people who pose an imminent threat to themselves or others—still only has 16 beds, a number that has not increased at all in 45 years. —Nick Welsh

Mega-Dorm CONT’D FROM P. 9 the campus, not an integrally related extension of it.” Even the rooftop courtyard looks inward and “may as well be on the ground in the desert as on the eleventh floor on the coast of California,” he said. “As a project that pushes economies of scale, prefabrication, and an alternate project delivery process,” McFadden concludes, “Munger Hall offers an answer to the question of how to resolve the housing shortage and growth pressures currently facing the University. As a design solution and a campus building, however, the project will long outlive the circumstances of its origin and will impact the life of the campus and the lives of its students for multiple generations.” UCSB spokesperson Andrea Estrada said while the university was grateful for McFadden’s service on the review committee, his comments on the Munger proposal and his resignation won’t stop it from being built. “The Munger Hall project and design is continuing to move forward as planned,” she said in a statement. “We are delighted to be moving forward with this transformational project.” In an additional comment, Estrada said the university recognized that Munger Hall might not be for everyone, stressing that UCSB currently provides housing for 10,000 students living in double- or tripleoccupancy rooms. By contrast, Munger Hall will offer each student their own separate, if very small, quarters. That, according to a statement from project architect Van

Tilburg, Banvard, and Soderbergh, will provide built-in social distancing as required by COVID. Fresh air, the architect insisted, will be vented into all rooms at twice the rate mandated by existing building codes and will be off-gassed directly to the atmosphere without any transfer to other rooms in the dorm. As for concerns about lack of direct natural light caused by the lack of windows, all individual rooms would have either conventional or virtual windows. “All virtual windows will have a fully programmed circadian rhythm control system to substantially reflect the lighting levels and color temperature of natural daylight,” according to the statement. All common areas, the statement added, “have significant access to natural light.” As far as emergency exits, the statement noted, the proposed structure would have 14 additional exits and entrances, in addition to the two major ones. Evacuation scenarios, the statement added, “have been studied at great length through on-going Mass-Motion and Evacuation modeling.” Greater design attention will be focused on the common areas as a transformational enticement to get students to mingle more, “substantially improving the mental and emotional health of the students.” Each house contains such amenities as a market, bakery, fitness center, gastropub, game room, grab-and-go room, and demonstration kitchen for those inclined to cook. n

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rescind the county’s indoor mask mandate. Do-Reynoso answered: when the case rate dropped to no more than six per 100,000 for two weeks running. Right now, she added, it’s hovering at nine cases per 100,000. Supervisor Steve Lavagnino expressed impatience at the persistence of the mask mandate in the face of higher vaccination numbers. Currently, Lavagnino noted, 79 percent of the vaccination-eligible population have gotten a shot. That, he said, should be cause for celebration. He said he remembered when the prospect of hitting 70 percent seemed out of reach. He ridiculed the idea that anyone who hasn’t gotten vaccinated already will soon get a shot. “Is this still an emergency?” Lavagnino asked, expressing frustration at the lack of a clearly set, well-understood goal. “I don’t know how to talk to people about how we get there.” One explanation—that the goal posts seem to keep moving—lies in the difference between vaccinating the total population and the vaccine-eligible population, Ansorg explained. With the CDC having just approved vaccines for kids 5-11, the number of county residents now eligible for vaccinations will increase by 10 percent. Assuming just 15 percent of the “eligible” do not get vaccinated under this scenario,

Ansorg calculated, that leaves 100,000 county residents still at risk. Given the approach of winter — with colder temperatures, more indoor activities, and the imminent arrival of prolonged holiday festivities—caution, he argued, was required to prevent a new surge. All that notwithstanding, the county’s recent COVID statistics show continued improvement. The number of new cases—30—is down 46 percent from two weeks ago, and the number of still-active cases — 291 — is down 21 percent. The number of hospitalizations—39—is up three percent. The number of deaths is 524, up from 516 a couple of weeks ago. Ansorg and Do-Reynoso told the supervisors that Marin County was the one county to embrace mask mandates and then lift those mandates. (Contra Costa and Alameda counties have lifted portions of their mandates, as well.) Marin’s vaccination numbers, according to Supervisor Hart, are significantly higher than Santa Barbara’s. Ninety-eight percent of all eligible in Marin have gotten at least one shot and 94 percent have gotten both. Translated into total population, 87 percent of all residents have gotten at least one dose and 81 percent have gotten both. “We have a ways to go,” Supervisor Hart concluded. n

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Arellano, who deals with clients with “high net worth” and was in charge of Han’s account, was asked about both transactions. The first was flagged in suspicion of fraud and denied, but when asked by Ladinig who received the $5,000, Arellano said: “The recipient was the defendant.” Voss argued that it’s plausible that Han had set up transfers in advance, similar to scheduled payments, and that the two were in business and the transactions were legitimate. On Monday, Dozer and Ladinig called Corey Schroeder, a latent fingerprint analyst from Fresno who has been certified in nearly a dozen counties and worked in the field for 25 years, to review fingerprint evidence he processed from the murder scene. Schroeder analyzed plastic bags, wrapping, and duct tape rolls—including the plastic sheets the bodies were found wrapped with—and found multiple fingerprints that matched Haobsh’s prints. Schroeder was able to find fingerprints on the plastic sheets used to wrap Jennie and Emily, but not on the third body, prosecutor said. In the afternoon, Ladinig called on Detective Jeff McDonald, who assisted in the initial interviews after Haobsh was arrested on Friday, March 25, 2016. Prosecutors played back the tapes, which showed a sleep-deprived Haobsh in a red

polo shirt being interviewed by McDonald, who slowly switches between small talk and philosophical discussions about the nature of “monsters” during the fourhour interrogation. In court, Haobsh sat silently, slouched in his chair and leaning back as the video was projected, and he watched himself stammer through answers. He parked his burgundy Lexus in Carlsbad for a day, he said, removing the battery and leaving it unlocked; that could be why the evidence was found inside when he was arrested. He gives short answers to most of McDonald’s questions, a simple yes or no. He seems more animated in the video, at least more than in Judge Hill’s courtroom in Department 2 of Santa Barbara Superior Court. When he does go into detail, he describes “new energy” and CBD technology he was working on with Han. He admits to speaking with Han the day before the murders, but he skirts questions about where he was on March 23. Prosecutors will continue with detective McDonald’s testimony, and the remainder of the interrogation tapes, on Thursday morning. Dozer and Ladinig will continue to call witnesses into next week, when the defense will have an opportunity to present its case. The trial is expected to continue n until Thanksgiving.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D DIST

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DISTRICT 4

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REGAINING THE DAIS: Based on their decisive leads Tuesday, incumbent councilmembers Kristen Sneddon and Meagan Harmon look likely to hold onto their District 4 and District 6 seats, respectively.

Elections CONT’D FROM P. 7

RYAN P. C RUZ PHOTOS

In response to Rowse’s early lead, Joyce voters,” she said. “They vote early, and they said he hopes Rowse focuses on foster- pay attention to the issues throughout all ing community and building relation- four years.” ships. “People laughed about me wanting District 6 saw the lowest voter turnto build community, but that’s what this out, with 29 percent, or about 2,500 out election is about,” Joyce said, going on that of 8,800 potential voters casting their balthere was a continuous exchange of ideas lots. Incumbent councilmember Meagan among mayoral candidates throughout Harmon was in the lead of a field of four the race, allowing candidates to learn from at 53 percent of the vote. Challenger Nina one another. “I hope [Rowse] has learned Johnson held 34 percent, Jason Carlton 10 percent, and Zachary Pike 3 percent. enough.” Incumbent mayor Cathy Murillo Harmon said there was a big push from was present at City Hall when the first wave of results was reported, and though she would later graciously accept her apparent defeat, she remained in good spirits throughout the night. “I’m gonna keep a positive attitude,” Murillo said. “Turnout is still going to be a factor.” Murillo attended the Democratic Party election night watch at the Cruisery, where Mayoral candidate James Joyce III the atmosphere was tentatively optimistic as everyone waited on the second wave of votes to be counted. The voter turnout in the first wave of results was about 35 percent, with 19,587 votes being counted in the citywide mayor’s race, out of the potential 55,308 voters in the city. On Tuesday night, 4,612 ballots were known to be uncounted, said Sarah Gorman, the city clerk. Of those, 460 had come Incumbent mayor Cathy Murillo by mail, 3,912 were in drop boxes, 42 were provisional, and 198 had her campaign to get voters out on Election no signature or had signature mismatches Day, and though she felt excited by the that voters can cure during a canvass to early results, she didn’t want to count her contact them, she indicated. chickens just yet. “There’s still a lot of votes In the council races, incumbent coun- to be counted,” Harmon said. “It’s not over cilmember Kristen Sneddon held an early ’til it’s over.” but decisive lead over challenger Barrett In District 5, it turns out that the soleReed, 61 percent to 39 percent for District named candidate, incumbent council4, with 45 percent of voters in the district member Eric Friedman, faced 113 write-in casting ballots. District 4 held the highest votes against him but landed with 96 perdistrict voter turnout rate for the election. cent of the vote. The next tally is expected to be Sneddon spent her evening at Sama Sama Kitchen and credited her win to the vot- announced by Thursday, November 4, at n ers in her district. “They’re very engaged 4 p.m., according to Gorman.

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Tail Wagging the Dog

READING WITHOUT WEEPING: The Tomahawk Choppers just won the World Series (against the Liars and Cheaters), Virginia voters have elected a Trump-backed Republican, and even with more than 4,500 votes as yet uncounted, Cathy Murillo appears to

and historic preservation, they are both strong supporters of tenants’ rights, criminal justice reform, and Santa Barbara’s newer, friskier, friendlier downtown promenade. The big change, of course, is at the top. As of election night, Murillo — who won four have been decisively pushed off her perch years ago with 27 percent of the vote against as Santa Barbara’s first Latina mayor. Voters a fractured field of moderate and businesshave replaced her with grumpy old white minded candidates — was coming in third guy Randy Rowse, making him the first XY with about 24 percent. Challenger James chromosomal candidate to be legally* elected Joyce III was slightly ahead of her Tuesday to the exalted post in 40 years. night, and that might change. But the Big Winner was Rowse, former owner of the ParGott im Himmel! Is Mercury now frozen in a perpetual state adise Café and a former city councilmember of right-wing retrograde? Is it time for all who is making a political comeback in hopes good progressives to pack their bags and of becoming the proverbial grownup in the room. At last count, Rowse was ahead with move to Vermont? Not even hardly. more than 40 percent of the vote. Election results, like bad dreams and the Rowse wins with just 40 percent for the entrails of pigeons, are pretty much what you only citywide seat at the table? Murillo won it four years ago with just 27 make of them. For those freaking out, it’s worth noting percent? that two card-carrying quasi-commie proThe punch line of the joke here is that Santa gressives — Kristen Sneddon and Meagan Barbara needs to either hold a run-off election Harmon — appear to have posted insur- or adopt ranked-choice voting — which I will mountable leads over their respective chal- not attempt to explain other than to say they lengers, Barrett Reed and Nina Johnson, both do it in Europe, Maine, and Burlington, Verof whom enjoyed strong — if legally question- mont, where I think Bernie Sanders hails from. able — financial support from business and Here’s the other punch line. If you start out development interests intent on taming City with just 27 percent, you need to work hard Hall’s Red Tape monster. While Sneddon to expand your base if you hope to survive and Harmon famously do not get along and politically. Murillo — who can legitimately seriously differ over such intractable issues lay claim to heading one of the most aggresas housingMersoLabs-November density, relaxed building heights, sively progressive councils — PM famously HLV Indy Print 9.375x6.166.pdf 2 10/29/21 ever 2:33

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did not do that. If your down-

town business community is on the ropes, you are not

betraying your principles by reaching out to help. And if you run for another office just one year into your mayoral term — in her case, a predictably unsuccessful bid for State Assembly — city voters might feel you’re not all that into them. And lastly, if you show up at a Black Lives Matter protest — in any capacity — be prepared to take a knee. Murillo won four years ago because the other side — four candidates — split the pot and her chief rival, then-councilmember Frank Hotchkiss, was, in fact, a card-carrying Republican who denied climate change and affirmatively supported Trump’s border wall. Fast-forward four years. We’re having absurd arguments over basic foundational facts: The 2020 election was not stolen; vac-

cinations improve your odds for staying alive; masks are genuinely depressing but the cheapest life insurance you can buy. This election, Murillo’s strategy was to tag Rowse as a right-wing conservative, backed by Trump supporters and greedy special interests. Wrong. Stupid. And worse yet, ineffective. Politically, Rowse has always been a chameleon, but never has he been a Republican, let alone a Trumper. And everyone knows him. So they know that glove don’t fit. Bad strategy. What will the Democrats do? Probably blame the Independent for endorsing James Joyce III, which took votes away from Murillo, thus giving Rowse the victory. Heard it already. But I’m not sure our endorsement accounts for all the 5,000 votes

Joyce got and that Murillo needed to have won. And I’m not sure what the Democratic Party means anymore. What I do know is that on election night there were five candidates who were Democrats holding five separate “victory” parties.

Last punch line: As councilmember, it worked for Rowse to drag his feet and slow down pet progressive projects. As mayor, he needs to expand his repertoire. Yes, there’s such thing as being too “woke” for one’s own good. But tenants really need more protection, the criminal justice system needs reform whether you believe the police are systemically racist or not, and climate change — responsible for the deadly acceleration of California’s megafires — is as real now than it ever was. Whether you’re red, blue, or purple, it don’t get more local than that. Lastly, Rowse needs to talk about the State Street Promenade with a lot more exclamation points and not nearly as many question marks for a change. Act like you actually like it. In the meantime, the council has a new city administrator to select, a new police chief to pick, and a whole lot of impossible issues to figure out. I’d say good luck with all of the above, but as I was told by the onearmed guitar player now on State Street, we make our own luck. So congratulations and condolences, instead. —Nick Welsh *In 1993, voters elected Hal Conklin mayor, but his election was invalidated by Judge William Gordon on the grounds that his candidacy violated the city’s term-limits ordinance.


OPINIONS CONT’D

MICHAEL EDWARD MORGENSEN 8/20/1963-8/2/2021

JOHN COLE SCR ANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE

Letters

Munger Games The latest Dormzilla story appears in this issue’s news section, but was posted October 28 at independent.com. It received national attention and a response from Gauchos across the U.S. A representative handful appears here, and we thank WebWeasel for the headline suggestion:

A

s a public health nurse, a survivor of mental illness, and an alumni of UC Santa Barbara, I am stunned to hear that Chancellor Yang and the UC Regents are considering the seriously flawed dormitory design of amateur architect Charlie Munger. A building where 94 percent of the inhabitants do not have windows in their rooms and do not have roommates is a recipe for disaster. My freshman year at UCSB, I was one of the lucky few students who lived on the ocean-side eighth floor of the San Nicolas dorm. This room came with a million-dollar view of the ocean and the university’s lagoon. When I moved in, I felt like I’d won the lottery. As the year wore on, and it became obvious I was suffering from depression, that view and the roommate that came with it saved my life. That first year, I was reclusive. I rarely left my room for anything more than class and the occasional meal. My roommate, on the other hand, was a social butterfly. She frequently invited new friends over to have a look at our view. Our dorm room was constantly full of her friends. They did their best, in true Gaucho style, to include me and invite me to campus events and parties. While I didn’t have the energy or ability to push past my illness to join them, their frequent engagement propelled me forward. I looked forward to their visits, even though I usually spent them curled up in my bunk in an oversized hoodie, sometimes sobbing for reasons I could not articulate or even understand. Finally, my roommate urged me to contact the university’s counseling center. I did. I credit her, and the psychiatrist I later saw at the student health center, with saving my life. I finally got the help I needed and 22 years later live a full, happy, and medicated life. If I’d lived in the dark, isolated environment that promises to be Munger Hall, I honestly don’t think I’d be here today to share my story. Munger’s dormitory design is meant to shunt students into common spaces for the sake of collabora-

tion and socialization. Anyone who has ever spent a day on the UCSB campus will see that, in general, these sun-seeking, fun-loving, and intelligent individuals are quite good at collaborating and socializing already. Those who aren’t, those like me, who struggle with mental illness, will only wither in the isolation and seclusion of their private rooms. They won’t have the comings and goings of a roommate to maintain a sense of normalcy and connection to the outside world. They won’t have windows to let in the abundant natural light that is a feature that draws many students to this beautiful campus. To the Regents, I ask: Have you forgotten your own motto? Fiat lux. Let there be light. —Lacie Grisley, Ellicott City, MD

...

My awesome son-always loving and caring-so talented-art-theatre-fabulous keyboardist-mechanics-“fix and make anything”-restored artwork and murals in the famous Santa Barbara Courthouse and painted the 30’ high ceiling beams with flowers in the new Santa Barbara Airport-his talent will live forever. He was a builder and painter and beatified many Santa Barbara and Montecito Estates. God maybe thought my wonderful son, who shared his studio apartment and cared for me two years during my recent spousal abuse, had finished his earthly purpose. Michael was a proud Santa Barbara “kid” and never wanted to live anywhere else. His wish was granted as God suddenly whisked him off to heaven as he suffered an unexpected massive heart attack. He attended Dos Pueblos High and Santa Barbara City College. He was preceded in death by his father, Carl Edward Morgensen, and survived by his mother, Patricia Starr. I have peace and closure and the memories of the fifty-seven years of life of my son, Michael. Love Forever from Patricia, his Mom

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Giorgio Angelini My unsolicited architect advice?

The guy is 97. Tell him it’s being built to his specs. Start the permit process. He’ll probably be dead before the coastal commission approves it. Then redesign the floor plan. Or scrap it all together. It’s ugly af. • David Marshall Just because it’s time for Mr. Munger to enter a box without windows doesn’t mean 4,000 undergraduates should have to.

I

...

have photographed and interviewed incarcerated kids all over the country for the last 15 years. Thirty-five different states, thousands of kids, incarcerated. I worked at Abu Ghraib, GITMO, all over the planet. The plan for Munger’s dorm looks so familiar, but Guantanamo has more windows.

—Richard Ross, S.B.

For the Record ¶ Section 8 payments to landlords, stated to be capped at $1,500 in the Rose Garden Inn story on October 11, actually range between $1,296 to $4,485 depending on size of residence and utilities. ¶ In last week’s story on the 24-hour relay run in 1972, Bill Trimble was then the head track and field coach for the Dos Pueblos Chargers.

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obituaries Pravrajika Bhavaprana (Nancy Kenny) 1946 - 2021

Nancy Kenny, known to countless Santa Barbarans as Bhavaprana, passed away on October 21, 2021, after a slow decline from Alzheimer’s disease. Her last days and passing were lived as her life was – gracefully and gently. Bhavaprana had a uniquely unusual birth in June of 1946 – born into a New Jersey family that moved to Southern California eight years later – a family in which every member would become a devout spiritual practitioner and devotee of Vedanta. In the early 1960s, Bhavaprana’s brother became a monk (Swami Vedarupananda) at the Vedanta Society of Northern California, leaving the family initially wounded and stunned. Deciding they needed to investigate the matter, their mother Amala Kenny – with young Nancy in tow – trekked north. Their shock soon turned to veneration when they met Swami Shantaswarupananda, a saintly monk who headed up the Berkeley Vedanta Center. By 1965, both mother and daughter had become devotees at the Vedanta Society of Southern California, both initiated by Swami Prabhavananda, the scholar-monk celebrated by Christopher Isherwood and Aldous Huxley. Bhavaprana’s younger sister Kathe and her brother Jim would become a disciples of Swami Aseshanada. (Jim’s wife would also became a Vedantin.) Kathe is now a board member of the Vedanta Society in Portland while Amala Kenny was instrumental in the formation of the San Diego Vedanta Center. The family’s last holdout, father Joe Kenny, took initiation from Swami Swahananda in his later years. Though her day job was working as a cytologist at Good Samaritan Hospital in 16

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Los Angeles, Bhavaprana spent her evenings and spare time attending lectures and classes at the Hollywood Vedanta Center off Franklin Avenue. In 1974, Bhavaprana joined the Santa Barbara branch of the Vedanta Society, receiving her initial vows (brahmacharya) in 1981 and final vows, (sannyasa) in 1988. While her temperament and life were quiet and unostentatious, she made profound contributions to the work and scope of Vedanta around the world. With her customary rigor and attention to detail, she created her own darkroom where she developed a series of high quality photographs – working from rare pictures taken of Sri Ramakrishna, India’s revered 19th century saint, his spiritual partner and wife Sri Sarada Devi, and direct disciples such as the famed Swami Vivekananda, who introduced meditation to the West in the 1890s. She was also a fine writer and contributed a number of articles to various Vedanta journals and assisted Swami Swahananda in his writings. A scholar of Vivekananda’s life and teachings, Bhavaprana initiated a project where she (and other nuns in the order) typed up Vivekananda’s entire Complete Works so that it would be digitally available to one and all. The project took over a year, but her single-minded focus and enthusiasm never flagged. Though a talented musician, she eventually sold her beloved cello to help purchase an early Apple computer, one of the first models available. She knew that the future of Vedanta’s reach and scope would be via the internet so she poured her energy into digitizing the scholarship. To the amazement of many, she taught herself HTML so that she could do her own coding. She created one of the first Vedanta websites – vedanta. org (all 120 pages of it) which became the website blueprint for other Vedanta Societies around the globe. In her own quiet way, Bhavaprana left a remarkable footprint. She had a lifelong stutter that, while usually unnoticeable to others, was an immense burden for her.

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

For years, she would ask her sister-nuns to make telephone calls for her because she found it impossible to start conversations. Karl Whitmarsh, a former president of the Vedanta Society, who had also dealt with stuttering, taught her what she called “the technique”—which she practiced and practiced until stuttering was no longer an issue. And with her newfound triumph, she began giving lectures – discourses that were uniquely thoughtful and inspiring. Many things that could be said about Bhavaprana—her singular faith and dedication, her love for the children who attended the Vedanta Sunday School, her wry humor and easy laugh, or her formidable work ethic. But what cannot be quantified—was her empathy, warmth and compassion. It is a blessing she is now free of the body and mind that so encumbered her. She will be greatly missed and remembered by all who had the privilege of knowing her. A memorial for Bhavaprana with be held Saturday, December 4, 2021 at 11:00 am in the Santa Barbara temple – 927 Ladera Lane, SB, CA 93108. All are welcome to attend

Jeanne Thornton

10/31/1922 - 10/27/2021

Jeanne Thornton passed peacefully at home on October 27, 2021 surrounded by loved ones; four days shy of her 99th birthday. Jeanne (born Margaret Jeanne Brenner) was born in Kansas City on October 31, 1922 to Edwin and Elizabeth Brenner. She was the only daughter and the youngest of four children. During the Great Depression, Jeanne’s family moved north to Alaska, following two of her brothers who had found work there as gold miners. Jeanne graduated from Seward High School then moved to Fairbanks to enroll at the University of Alaska. It was in Fairbanks that she met Harold Thornton, another Midwestern transplant, and they married on July 3, 1941, beginning a loving marriage that lasted 71 years until his death in 2012. Harold and all three of Jeanne’s brothers served in World War II, during which Jeanne was evacuated out of

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Alaska. Towards the end of the war, Jeanne and Harold were reunited and remained in Alaska with their two young daughters, Alaska Jeannette, born in 1942, and Charlotte Joyce, born in 1946. They lived briefly in the tiny village of Hope before settling in the fishing town of Kenai. Life in Kenai was raw, rugged, and isolated which meant depending on other people and loving thy neighbor was a rule for survival. They learned to build a community and lived an adventurous life in America’s Last Frontier. Jeanne was a brave and adventurous dynamo. She became a Jill of all trades by necessity. In Kenai, she and Harold built a garage with a café attached and their family home on the second floor. Jeanne ran the café and raised their two young daughters while Harold set his entrepreneurial spirit in motion with Jeanne’s support. During her years in Alaska, Jeanne served as a town postmistress, learned to drive a dogsled team, and even had a handful of encounters with moose wandering through the town. In 1953, seeking warmer weather and a respite from the pioneer life of Alaska, the family moved to Washington, where they welcomed their third daughter, Elizabeth Janell, in 1953. Finally, in 1964, Jeanne, Harold, Joyce, and Janell moved to Santa Barbara. Jeanne and Harold moved into their beautiful home on the hill in 1969, where they enjoyed the view for the rest of their lives. Their home was filled with joy, love, Jeanne’s art, and the smell of cookies in the oven. Active in social activities, even enjoying online bridge when she couldn’t go in person, Jeanne was always quick to volunteer her home for her bridge teams, book clubs, and social groups where home-cooked meals were served on her handpainted plates. A life-long learner and hobbyist, Jeanne kept her mind out of the mud when she took up china painting and quilting in her 40s. She made sure each grandchild had a set of china and a handmade quilt in their home. Jeanne’s china painting was so prolific a greatgrandson once asked, “Did

she paint Mongolia, too?” She was a talented artist, teacher, and mentor of her crafts. She enjoyed needlepointing, cooking, reading, story telling, singing hymns, and gardening. She shared her hobbies with those around her, encouraging others to nurture their creative talents. She was also a world traveler visiting dozens of countries with Harold and sharing her love of Alaska with her family throughout the years. Jeanne both loved and was loved by her large family. She was proud of her 3 daughters, 8 grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren, nieces, and nephews. Jeanne was eager to show those around her how much she cared about them, whether that was through letter writing, sharing a meal, offering cookies, or traveling together. Petite in height but big in presence, Jeanne made a lasting impression on those who knew her with her kindness, sweet laugh, and sparkling eyes. Jeanne was grateful to live in beautiful Santa Barbara and cared deeply about the community. She enjoyed spending her time volunteering with PEO (Philanthropic Educational Organization), the Assistance League, Harding Elementary School, and Santa Barbara City College. Jeanne kept her wants simple, a conservationist at heart, she darned her socks, never wasted a drop of water, composted all her scraps, and hand fed the jays through her final days. Jeanne is survived by beloved friends and family. As Jeanne said, “the flow of love has been exceptional and very much enjoyed.” In lieu of flowers Jeanne would be happy to see you spread kindness or make a donation to P.E.O. Chapter HD, Santa Barbara, Attn: Joan Jamieson, 1708 Garden Street,Santa Barbara, CA 93101. She would be thrilled to hear that her memory inspired you to find a pen pal, spend time with your dearest dears, or do something for your community.


In Memoriam

obituaries

James Fredrick Melnik

his father, Sam Mackenzie, and his brother Doug Mackenzie. He was excellent at anything he put his mind to and made friends wherever he went. A life fully lived.

Sheldon Mackenzie 3/25/1963 - 10/8/2021

1942-2021

Artist, Landscape Designer, Friend him. Jim— to his many friends, fans, and clients — was a character to be sure. An artist, landscape designer, father, grandfather, husband, drinking buddy, and spiritual guide, he had many talents, but mainly, Melnik was my friend. For more than 15 years, I was his personal assistant — but his codename for me was “the Empress of the Universe.” We shared a deep bond honoring our Polish heritage, a love of Polish vodka, pierogi, Gołąbki (stuffed cabbage rolls), laughter, and spending time together contemplating the wackiness of life. We decided it is the story we tell ourselves that reminds us of who we really are—what rivers run through us, what blood we share, what secrets and lies we hold dear or spread around like wildfire— and Melnik’s recurring cosmic theme was that all that really mattered was kindness. He grew up not on the wrong side of the railroad tracks, but between them, in upperstate New York to a family as complicated as most. After his mother passed away, Jim, his two brothers, and his older sister were raised by their father. One of his first jobs was working in a donut factory —squishing the custard into the soft donuts—and he marveled at how ironic it was that the kid who couldn’t afford to buy a donut was making them. His dad died just a day before Jim’s high school graduation — an event that stung for the rest of his life. But as he was walking home that afternoon, his art teacher told him about a scholarship. He applied that night, and he got it. Lucky for him, this allowed him to pursue a lifetime in the arts. Stories about his childhood were moving, poignant, hilarious, and tragic. He met his one and only true love, Patty, over a cup of tea one afternoon. They moved to the West Coast, married, and lived at Sunnyridge, a commune in Oregon. They snuck away one afternoon and ate Cheetos and cottage cheese in an alleyway somewhere in Oregon. That was Melnik. Devoted to the cause and yet a rascal at the same time! When he arrived in Santa Barbara and began his landscape design business, his talents blossomed. Jim was a guy who could hang with the high cats who lived behind the fabled gardens and gates of Montecito. More comfortable with a sketchpad than a cell phone in his hands, a minor detail that often exasperated his more modern-day colleagues. Over the course of his career, Jim did numerous public landscape works, including reimagining the Japanese Garden for Lotusland and a number of pieces for the City of Ventura and Thousand Oaks. He considered each garden a blank canvas and would begin with a “walk-about” to get the vibe of a place. And then, as he often said, he’d start from big to small, imagining how hardscape and water features would inform

1929 - 2021

PAUL KURTA

M

BY C H A R L E N E H U S T O N elnik, that’s what I called

John David Hugunin, Sr.

the more intimate details of his designs. He was flown all over the world to work on gardens for clients—England, Costa Rica, Cuba, Canada. And on the rare occasion when he would appear before architectural boards of review, he went mano y mano with the “out-of-town architects who showed up in their Armani suits, bearing laptops and computer assisted designs— looking like they chopped up Architectural Digest magazines and ate them for breakfast in bowls full of one percent milk.” Jim proudly and humbly walked in carrying his beautiful hand-drawn site plans, each and every one a work of art. While Melnik’s pride in his work was bountiful, his greatest joy in life was spending time with his three kids — Josh, Jed, and Patience. He was so proud of them and what they have all accomplished in their lives, including bringing his six grandchildren into this world who delighted him in his twilight years. We had a chili club that met every Wednesday night for years, and there was always a place at his table for a wandering minstrel or any lost soul who was hungry and had no other place to be that night. His friends came from all backgrounds, religions, and walks of life. Jim was always an independent, strong character, and it was heartbreaking to bear witness to his last couple of years when things started to change. In the end, his strong body became weak, and although he might not have been able to remember the botanical names for all of the plants that he moved about our earth, he could remember every drop of kindness that was bestowed upon him. People are curious how Jim died, and I can assure you that in the end, Melnik slipped away as gently as he walked on this earth. He was found lying on his bed. He looked like he just took his last breath and laid back to contemplate his fate. So now, we grieve the loss of a man who touched so many lives and so many gardens, yet we rejoice in the fact that he is now free to find out what lies beyond the great beyond. Melnik was always true to himself. I loved him, and he loved me, and I will miss my dear friend. n

Sheldon Todd MacKenzie: March 25, 1963 – October 8, 2021. He was 58 On October 8, 2021 the world lost a great man.Sheldon Todd Mackenzie was a beloved son, a loving father, and a caring friend who passed away on October 8, 2021. He was born on March 25, 1963 to Dorothy Mackenzie and Dewight “Sam” Mackenzie in Santa Barbara, CA. Sheldon grew up attending Hollister elementary school while playing football with YFL and went on to play football in San Marcos High school. He graduated there with the class of ’81. He received a scholarship to University of Pacific (UOP) for his skills on the football field. While attending UOP he met his future wife Rebecca Suttmann and went on to graduate with a Bachelor’s degree in business in 1985. Sheldon and Rebecca moved to the Bay Area and married on October 12, 1991. Sheldon was employed by several Insurance companies. Sheldon and Rebecca raised two sons, (Kyle and Scott) in Redwood City, CA. Sheldon and Rebecca later parted in 2005 and both stayed in the Bay Area. In Sheldon’s later years he went back to San Marcos High school to assist with coaching the football team. He wished to help the community through his passion and knowledge of the sport. His other hobbies included playing the drums and bass guitar, as well as fishing with his 2 sons. Sheldon’s survived family members include his mother, Dorothy Mackenzie-Schmidt, his ex-wife, Rebecca, and his 2 sons, Kyle MacKenzie (Antonella) and Scott MacKenzie (Jennie), as well as his step-father, Earl Schmidt and stepsister, Hen Rasmussen. His family wishes to thank his long time love and partner, Velvali Huston in Salinas, CA, for her relentless love and support of Sheldon over the past many years. They felt God’s love brought them together and that they completed each other in many ways. Sheldon was preceded in death by

John David Hugunin, Sr., of Santa Barbara, passed away peacefully the morning of September 24, 2021 at Cottage Hospital. He was 92. Mr. Hugunin was born in St. Paul, Minnesota in 1929 to Hiram Hugunin and his wife, Mary, and was raised there along with his sister Sylvia. After earning a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s in psychology, he moved to Chicago and made a name for himself as an advertising copy writer. He later served as the founding president of The Bradford Exchange, which in time grew to be America’s largest collector’s plate company. Seeking to forge his own path, he founded his own company, Pemberton & Oakes, in 1976, and moved the company to Santa Barbara in 1979, where it thrived until he retired in the mid-1990s. More important than business, however, was John’s commitment to enjoying life, whether traveling the world with friends and family, fishing in Alaska and Mexico, or entertaining at home in Santa Barbara. He helped found a men’s group over 30 years ago that still meets to this day, and was known for inviting one and all into his home, often cooking elaborate meals such as paella and coq au vin. Perhaps his longest running pursuit was dining out locally—for many years, he ate out six nights a week, and even in later life he was a frequent fixture at favorite restaurants such as El Encanto and Stella Mare’s. Mr. Hugunin is survived by his sons, John and Greg, his grandchildren Nat and Sean, his nieces Margie, Jill, and Jan, and his favorite nephew, Jeff. The family extends special thanks to Nina Scarcello and Mary Orr for their loving care and support throughout John’s long and rewarding life. A private ceremony was held by the family. Continued on p. 18

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NOVEMBER 4, 2021

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

ous nieces, nephews, cousins and many childhood friends. Predeceased by his father, John McCadden, Jr. A private memorial service will be held in St. Louis Missouri.

David McCadden

8/31/1951 - 9/23/2021

June Marian Gill

6/8/1943 - 10/4/2021

David McCadden of Solvang, California passed away on September 23, 2021 from cancer. David was born August 31, 1951 in St. Louis, Missouri to John and Patricia McCadden. David attended Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic grade school and graduated in 1969 from Chaminade College Preparatory School in St. Louis. He graduated from University of Kansas in 1973 with a bachelor degree in business management. After his graduation he moved to Santa Barbara and married his first wife Marianne Brouwers in 1974 at the Santa Barbara Mission Church. They had one child, a son, Morgan McCadden. David’s entrepreneurial spirit lead him into the t-shirt business where he owned multiple retail shops throughout Santa Barbara – with Udder Madness being the most popular and memorable stores he owned. In May of 1998, David’s wife Marianne passed away from cancer. After her death, David sold all his stores in 1999 and briefly worked in the Insurance business before moving back to retail and in 2004 became a licensor for the brand “Old Guys Rule” which he managed and ran until 2014. In June 2016, David married his second wife, Tina Jackson at the Santa Barbara Courthouse Sunken Gardens. At the time of his death, he worked as a customer development rep for Inogen of Goleta. During his time with Inogen, David was amongst the top sales persons of the company and made Presidents Club each year of his 7 years of employment which is the most prestige of awards given out. When David wasn’t working, he enjoyed hiking, running various races throughout California, bike riding, photography, cooking, traveling and playing with his three dogs. He is survived by his wife Tina, his son Morgan, his mother Patricia, his three brothers, John (Paula), James (Colleen) and Michael (Helen) along with numer18

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her relationship with Gary Unruh the two of them traveled together extensively, both close to their new home in Carmel, California as well as abroad. Posts placed on social media reflected the enriching experiences they enjoyed. June was loved by many and will be greatly missed by all who knew her. A memorial will be streamed online at a later date.

Harriet Elaine Murphy Parks 3/10/1938 - 7/23/2021

June Marian Gill, age 78, passed away peacefully in her sleep in Carmel, California on Monday morning, October 4, 2021. Born in Los Angeles on June 8, 1943, she was the daughter of Harold Leslie Gill and Dorothy Margaret Kress. She has one surviving halfsister, Carolyn Gill of Redlands, California. June is also survived by her loving partner of 16 ½ years, Gary L. Unruh, of Carmel. June cherished her role as godparent to Caledonia Gerner, Ella Gerner, and Benjamin Gerner. In addition to immediate family, June loved her chosen role as grandmother to Aiden Unruh-Nichols and Alex Unruh-Nichols as well as a loving stepmom to Holly Elizabeth Unruh, all of Monterey, California. June and Gary spent 14 years as residents of Santa Barbara and the last 2 ½ in their new home in Del Mesa Carmel, a beautiful retirement community. June’s education included high school graduation from Ventura High, a BA from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a PhD in French Literature from the University of California, Berkeley. She taught French, Spanish, and cross-cultural courses at CSU Fresno during her 34-year tenure. She traveled extensively due to her interest in varied cultures and her love of nature. She was an excellent photographer of birds, flowers and animals, these being the subjects of the majority of her pictures. She supported nonprofits that focused on nature preservation and on equal rights for women. Her grandmother was one of the earliest of women to take on an academic position as a Spanish Professor at the University of Texas, Austin. June had many close friends, most of whom she communicated with right up to her last days. During

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

Harriet Elaine Murphy Parks passed away on July 23, 2021 in the presence of family. Harriet was born in Morristown, New Jersey and raised in Santa Barbara, California to William and Gertrude Jones Murphy. Mr. Murphy was the leading caterer in Santa Barbara, and Harriet was the eldest of the four Murphy girls – Willette Jean, Margaret Ann and Kathleen Andrea. Because of their father’s catering business, during the Murphy girls’ formative years, Harriet and her sisters grew up around food, sharing a special love for the dining experience. After graduating from Santa Barbara High School, she attended the University of Nebraska where she met her future husband. They married in 1961 and eventually settled in Los Angeles. After the dissolution of her marriage, she became bedridden with a life-threatening illness. With five children and a nephew to raise on her own, she fought through her illness and determined a way to support her family via her penchant for cooking. Through the assistance of friends and family, she realized her vision, and Harriet’s Cheesecakes Unlimited was launched in 1983. Throughout the years, Harriet evolved the business into a family endeavor, with each of her children playing a vital role in its success. Armed with a cult following, Harriet’s Cheesecakes has been featured on Food Network’s “The Best Thing I Ever Ate!”, Oprah Winfrey’s and Ava Duvernay’s “Cherish the Day” on OWN

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and in Los Angeles magazine, just to name a few. Aside from her culinary accomplishments, Harriet was best known for her tremendous heart, faith in God, cooking favorite meals for friends and family and being the matriarch and glue of her family. Harriet is survived by her children, Robin Elaine, Douglas Murphy, Dawn Alison, Gregory Allen, Michael Kenneth (wife, Misheline), her nephew, Leroy Lonnie Jordan, her sisters, Willette Murphy Klausner (husband, Manuel), Margaret Murphy and her beloved grandchildren, Giana Serenity and Mckenzie Ryan-Skye. Although a bright light has been extinguished, she will never be forgotten by the many people she touched. Her spirit will live on forever in our hearts.

James Fredrick Melnik 8/23/1942 - 10/21/2021

James (“Jim”) Fredrick Melnik died peacefully at home in Santa Barbara on October 21, 2021. Jim was born in Syracuse, New York on August 23, 1942, to his parents John and Mary. He was the youngest of four siblings (John, Hank, and Barbara). He attended Thomas J Corcoran High School and the State University of New York at New Paltz, where he studied Art. Jim met Patricia Chambers, née Giteles, in Long Island, New York in 1967 and they married in 1973. They had three children (Joshua, Patience, Jedidiah) who were the joys of Jim’s life. Jim made his living as

a landscape designer here in Santa Barbara for over 40 years. He considered each garden a blank canvas and approached his work as an artist. Many of his designs are hidden behind the fabled gates of private estates, but he also did more public work for Lotusland and the City of Ventura. Each of his hand-drawn landscape design site plans are works of art. Jim was comfortable with a sketchpad in his hands, but not with a cell phone–an inconvenience that didn’t deter his clients, some of whom flew him all over the world to work on their gardens in England, Costa Rica, Cuba, and Canada. Jim is survived by his sister Barbara Foscolo (Nicholas) of New York, his children Josh Melnik (Lisa), Patience Melnik (John Kochendorfer), and Jed Melnik (Tamara) and his six grandchildren (Vivian and Phoebe; Abraham and Jedidiah; and Cyrus and Seona) and a gaggle of nieces and nephews (John, Stephen, Amy, Frank, Beth, Chris, and Frank) Jim was always an independent, strong, creative ‘old soul’ who enjoyed Polish food and kindness. Jim had a chili club that met every Wednesday night for years and there was always a place at his table for a wandering minstrel or a soul who was hungry and had no other place to be that night. Many of his clients became his friends and enjoyed many evenings sharing meals, poetry, and stories. He had friends from all backgrounds, religions, and walks of life. If you want to share a story about your own experiences with Jim, please email charmadillo@me.com In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to Santa Barbara Beautiful. Graveside Services will be held Friday at 1:15pm, November 5, 2021 at Santa Barbara Cemetery. All are welcome to attend.


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Save De la Guerra Plaza BY LANNY EBENSTEIN

e la Guerra Plaza is one of the most historic sites in our community. José de la Guerra was the preeminent leader in early Santa Barbara history. Born in Spain in 1779, De la Guerra became commandante of the Santa Barbara Presidio in 1815 and remained in this capacity until the early 1840s— a time during which, according to Santa Barbara historian Walter Hawley, “the presidio passed through the best days of its existence.” The Spanish and then Mexican presence in early California was tiny, as was the Native American population. It is estimated there were about 10,000 to 12,000 Europeans in all of Alta (Upper) California and perhaps 20,000 Native Americans in 1840. About a tenth of these totals lived in Santa Barbara. It was, with Monterey, one of the two leading centers in Alta California. José de la Guerra dominated Santa Barbara civic and social life during this period. His home — Casa de la Guerra — anchored the northern side of De la Guerra Plaza, which was at the center of the town of Santa Barbara, the Mission being located two miles away. Perhaps 90 percent of the European populations lived within a few hundred yards of Casa de la Guerra and De la Guerra Plaza. All important visitors to Santa Barbara visited José at his adobe mansion. Many memorable social occasions occurred in the plaza, some with echoes that remain to this day. De la Guerra Plaza was the first city property “hereby constituted and set aside forever” by the Santa Barbara

Common Council as a “City Square and Promenade” in 1853. Four members of the De la Guerra family— Francisco, Joaquin, Pablo, and Antonio— served as mayor in Santa Barbara’s first decade as a state in the United States. According to David Gebhard, through the early 20th century, Santa Barbara “remained the most Hispanic city in California.” Various adobes surrounded De la Guerra Plaza — which originally had a more rectangular layout — including adobes of the Carrillo, Gutierrez, and Ortega families. The plaza was the site of Santa Barbara’s first city hall, fire building, and jail. In 1922, Santa Barbara voters approved by a margin of six-to-one a bond measure for construction of the current City Hall, which allowed restoration of De la Guerra Plaza as a physically unencumbered open space in close to its current form. Fiesta Mercado has been located in De la Guerra Plaza since the 1920s. The location of both City Hall and the Santa Barbara News-Press building adjacent to the plaza has made it a central gathering point for political events and rallies of all sorts from all perspectives for a century. De la Guerra Plaza clearly qualifies as a city historic landmark and for placement on the National Register of Historic Places. Casa

voices

de la Guerra is already on the National Register of Historic Places, as is El Paseo; Casa de la Guerra is also a California Historical Landmark. It is most unfortunate that the current “revitalization” proposal for De la Guerra Plaza foresees a radically different plaza— one that would consist entirely of a hardscape and remove all lawn area. A 2011 study of De la Guerra Plaza found that its vegetation has “retained its integrity of design, setting, and feeling”; the plaza’s “historic pattern of land use has retained its integrity”; and the “views and vistas of the plaza have retained their integrity of location, setting, and feeling.” Now is the time for Santa Barbarans concerned about the loss of this historic oasis in the heart of downtown to step forward and make their voices heard. Unless the “revitalization” process changes course to a more fruitful direction, historic De la Guerra Plaza would be lost forever. Lanny Ebenstein is a member of the Committee to Save De la Guerra Plaza.

What Are We Saving?

T

BY SULLIVAN ISRAEL

he claims published in the “Save De la Guerra Plaza” ads appearing in the Independent by the Committee to Save DLG Plaza are not only absurd, but factually incorrect. They write that there will be a “loss of all lawn area.” Have any of the authors been to the plaza recently? All the grass is dead, and there are patches of dirt. This is because we live in a dry climate and are in a years-long drought. The city has been discouraging homeowners from wasting water on lawns as Lake Cachuma diminishes every day. We should not promote lawns right in front of the City Hall. Either way, the “lawn” has already been lost. They also write that “it would no longer be possible to hold Fiesta Mercado [or host] speakers and political rallies and events [at the plaza].” Again, this is completely untrue. The new plan calls for a resurfacing of the plaza that will bring all the ground up to the same level (rather than having the parking and road areas lower than the center grass and sidewalks). This, if anything, will make it easier to hold events in the plaza, and not worry about curbs and accessibility. Additionally, the plan calls for the planting of shade trees across the space, which will make it more pleasant to attend any event in the plaza. Finally, they write that there will be a “loss of historic character.” What “historic character?” Are they referring to the depressing, shade-less grass patch surrounded by crowded parking that is empty at almost all times of the day, nay, the year, except for a brief week in August when the grass is trampled to dust under the feet of thousands of Fiesta-goers (and takes months to grow back)?

What many may not realize is that the plaza’s current state is actually an unfinished plan from the 1920s. From 1874 to 1923, City Hall stood directly on top of the PERSPECTIVE: De la Guerra Plaza as seen from City Hall in recent years (above) and a proposal offered at plaza. Architect BerHistoric Landmarks in May, which views it from the opposite side nard Hoffman, who planned El Paseo and restored the De la Guerra adobe, actually proposed plans The back of a bunch of businesses face it, as well as the that added a grand fountain. George Washington Smith, lifeless facade of the News-Press building. The plaza itself Lutah Maria Riggs, and James Osborne Craig also pro- is sunny and has no seating. This should change. While the present design is not perfect, the guiding posed designs, some including a central bandstand. With the 1925 earthquake shifting focus to rebuilding the city, principles discussed at the Historic Landmarks Comthe many plans for the plaza were never realized. Redoing mission in May — which include “activity nodes” that the plaza today will finally realize the vision created by spur social interaction, such as art, a fountain, entertainprominent architects who designed our most noteworthy ment — are right on target. We need good reasons for buildings. people to go to the plaza and spend time there, safe from The problem with people who think this way is that cars, and pleasant in the shade. they are afraid of change. As a resident of the area, I walk Please don’t take the comments of a handful of angry past Plaza De la Guerra on a weekly basis, and it is almost “not-in-my-backyarders” sway you to think that most Santa always devoid of life. I’d like to ask the people who wrote Barbarians think this way. Everyone I know, at least, would the ad supporting the status quo: Have you ever really love to see some changes to the plaza. Some people are just spent time in the plaza? How many of you, I wonder, go always afraid of change, even if that change is for the best. downtown and spend more than five minutes in the plaza, or even think of it as a destination of its own? Sullivan Israel is a UCLA junior majoring in civil engineering and gives They probably don’t— for good reason. There is noth- tours of the history and architecture of Santa Barbara based on a ing in that space that is attractive or interesting in any way. decade of research. INDEPENDENT.COM

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COFFEE? ONE GOLETA FARMER’S FIGHT TO MAKE THE BEAN BUSINESS BETTER FOR ALL

BY MATT KETTMANN J PHOTOS BY MACDUFF EVERTON

W

hen Jay Ruskey the farmer started talking like

ing company, Frinj Coffee. I got a little jittery, and not just from the coffee. Ruskey, I quickly realized, was no longer just a small-time organic farmer exploring obscure fruits like caviar lime, lychee, and longan up a dead-end road on the western edge of Goleta. He was inventing an entirely new California industry, completely from scratch, and one that ultimately aims to add resilience to agriculture in a changing climate and challenge coffee’s status quo, which may be the most exploitive commodity market on the planet. And he’s doing it all at light speed. “The California wine industry developed over the centuries,” explained Ruskey, who sees countless parallels between the fine wine and high-end coffee markets. “This is putting that on a micro time scale, like running a mile in 10 steps.” I first met Kristen and Jay Ruskey at a swanky media dinner nearly a decade ago, when he was better known as the guy who proved that caviar limes — a spiky shrub from the Australian bush also known as finger limes — could fetch a rewarding price for California farmers. (I now grow one in my backyard.) He’d done the same for dragon fruit and also had success with cherimoya, while other species, such as lychee, longan, and goji berry, didn’t seem as promising. He was also growing coffee at that time, which I covered in a 2014 article that I wrote called “Farming the Fringe.” (And yes, I’m proud to report that the headline did inspire the name of his coffee brand.) Though he’d planted his first coffee bush nearly two decades earlier, around 2000, the beans remained just part of what Ruskey did until 2017. That’s the year it finally rained again — on March 27, Lake Cachuma went from 6.3 percent capacity to 63 percent — so he planted coffee at 18 more farms from Santa BarTEAM RUSKEY: Jay and Kristen Ruskey have always grown interesting fruits but Jay Ruskey the tech entrepreneur one morning last June, I started wondering whether he’d put something else in my coffee. He’d just brewed us a batch from beans grown at his farm, Good Land Organics, where I was expecting to get a brief update on how he was still managing to eke out an existence in the exotic fruit trade. Ruskey had just launched a new series of farm tours, which I assumed was the latest part of his continued preaching about the wonders of California-grown coffee to an audience afraid of its high cost. But then he’s saying things like “Series A funding” and “genome sequencing” and “vertical integration” and casually mentioning that now more than 70 farms across Southern California are growing beans to fuel his grow-

decided to go all-in on coffee in 2017. “I don’t know if there is coffee with more care on the planet than Frinj right now,” said Jay Ruskey, who works with more than 70 farms across Southern California now.

bara to San Diego. That’s also the year the coffee bean’s genome was sequenced for the first time, using one of his plants. And then came the Whittier Fire that summer, which Good Land Organics narrowly escaped on July 14, Ruskey’s birthday. “All right,” thought Ruskey that day, “let’s go.” Needing the collective weight of many farms to build an industry, Ruskey formed Frinj Coffee (officially, they use all caps, as in FRINJ). He put Good Land Organics under that umbrella and invested in the technology and the human talent to take the harvests from sweet cherries to roasted beans. Then Ruskey began “aggressively” enlisting other farmers who were seeking a high-end crop that served multiple purposes, from withstanding the market swings of lemons and avocados to providing a base for agritourism to adding value to existing orchards through interplanting. As per the innovative Frinj model, those farms’ harvested beans go straight to the company, which handles the rest, from fermenting and roasting to marketing and sales. “I took the world’s most complicated supply chain — over 20 hands usually touch coffee before you drink it — and I can go from farmer to Frinj to consumer. That gives the highest return possible for the farmer,” said Ruskey, who’s pledged to pay 50 percent of each harvest’s value back to the grower. “It always irked me that, in highpriced coffee, the farmer doesn’t know what’s going on. In general, coffee farmers get under 5 percent return. What Frinj does in California is like nowhere else in the world.” It is, however, still just an experiment. Growing coffee, which originally hails from Ethiopia and tends to be grown in the tropics where water is free, land is cheap, and labor is cheaper, is challenging in our dry Mediterranean climate. The plants need about as much water as avocados, but they can be planted much more densely and pay exponentially more. There are no serious coffee pests or diseases currently in California — largely because coffee has never been grown here — but they could show up tomorrow.

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Meanwhile, other countries, specifically those that consume large amounts of coffee and sit on the actual Mediterranean Sea, might jump on board one day and undercut the premium pricing. This is all the more tenuous when Californian coffee fetches $80 to $450 a pound, which can translate to $20 cups at a café. But the market for high-end coffee continues to skyrocket, and experts do agree: Frinj Coffee competes with the best beans in the world, which is a testament to the benefits of this coastal climate and to the meticulous efforts of Ruskey to constantly educate his collective and improve their processes. “There’s slight anxiety around the whole thing, and not just because of the coffee,” said Ruskey as we finished our cups of his top-shelf geisha beans that morning. “It’s real; it feels real; it is really happening. But there seems to be an understanding that it could totally crack.”

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Coffee makes the perfect poster child for global inequality. To put it crudely, dark-skinned people in poor countries get paid next to nothing to grow a product for lighter-skinned people in rich countries, where that product is consumed daily, without much regard to the true human or ecological price of a pour. This chasm plays out in many facets of the industry, including the science side. That’s what Juan Medrano, a longtime professor of animal science at UC Davis, suddenly found out in March 2013, when he began investigating the DNA of coffee. Medrano, who was born near the coffee lands of Antigua, Guatemala, is renowned for his 30-plus years of genetic work on cows, particularly to improve milk production. But his interest in coffee was sparked by his friend Ricardo Koyner, a top coffee grower in Boquete, Panama. “Hey, Juan,” asked Koyner, “why don’t you do that same thing you do for cows for coffee?” So Medrano went down and brought cuttings back to Davis to check them out. “Trying to analyze the data, we realized there was no genome sequence of coffee,” said Medrano. In other words, there was no baseline with which to compare Koyner’s cuttings. “Everyone was surprised; I was surprised,” said Medrano. “There is a disconnect. Coffee is mainly produced in developing countries where there is very little funding.” In a world where everything from puffer fish and body lice to Persian walnuts and platypus have been sequenced —roughly 3,500 species overall, including about 600 plant species and 300 animal species since the technology was created in 1977 —how could one of the world’s most popular crops remain unexamined? Medrano couldn’t let that stand. As Medrano contemplated the challenges of acquiring clean cuttings from Central American farms for this extremely sensitive process, he heard from his son, who was attending graduate school at UCSB, that some guy

was growing coffee in the hills above Goleta. “I had no idea,” replied Medrano. “That’s fantastic.” The next weekend in June 2014, Medrano was touring Good Land Organics, where he learned that Ruskey had the geisha variety, an ideal candidate for sequencing due to its distinctive nature. “Jay was very willing and happy to collaborate with us,” said Medrano. Given his background in investigating all sorts of species, Ruskey was well aware of the need for this work. “The plant material in the coffee world has been left alone,” he explained. “For how much coffee we consume, we’ve ignored, as an industry, plant development.” And that’s critical, especially when building a brand-new regional industry with a plant that’s never been commercially grown in this environment. Understanding a species’ genome allows growers to identify good and bad traits of certain varieties and then to breed plants that work best for a given setting. Just as critical, the genetic key allows breeders to track hybrids immediately rather than waiting years for nature to reveal the results. “If you make crosses, you can actually tell if you create a cross,” said Medrano. Put simply, knowing the genes of beans adds jet fuel to the Frinj engine. Not that the sequencing happened overnight. Finding funding even in the developed world wasn’t easy for Medrano, who talked to numerous coffee organizations in the United States and elsewhere. “Everybody thought it was a really good idea and interesting, but that’s as far as I got,” he said. Then he heard from his Japanese friend José Kawashima, considered one of the world’s top “coffee hunters.” Kawashima was tight with folks over at Suntory, one of the world’s largest beverage companies. The corporation agreed to fund the genome sequencing project, and Medrano was off. Well, sort of. “If you could work continuously, you could do it in a year,” he said of the project, which had just enough funding for technical services but not salaries. “It took us more than four years.” Those results were released in 2017. Along the way, Medrano and Ruskey became good friends, and the professor signed on as a Frinj’s chief technology officer.


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FARMING THE FOOTHILLS: The 42-acre Good Land Organics farm where the Ruskeys grow coffee and much more sits in the foothills on the western edge of Goleta. The coffee plants produce bright-red cherries, which must be dried to produce the beans.

Though he himself comes from the tropics, Medrano appreciates how the California climate can produce a unique coffee. In Central American locales like Boquete, the best coffee grows high up on the volcano, as the altitude makes for cooler evenings, which slows the coffee bean’s metabolism and makes for a long growing season. Along the coast of Santa Barbara and points south, the warm days are cut by fog and sea breezes, creating a similar effect. “We’re planting almost at sea level, but we are doing the same as they do in altitude with latitude,” said Medrano. “That’s why the maturation of the cherries in California takes a long time, almost 11 months, but we get good-quality cherries capable of producing very good-quality coffee.”

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EVOLUTION OF A FARM Coffee wasn’t Ruskey’s first stab at a challenging, out-of-place fruit. Cherimoyas were. The year was 1989, and Ruskey’s parents — dad, a probate lawyer, and mom, the president of the Junior League of Los Angeles, among other philanthropic, community-building causes — saw how deep their Hollywood-raised son was getting into agriculture. Ruskey had fallen in with the surf community of Ventura and Santa Barbara while growing up and connected with ag while working as a laborer on cut-flower farms in Carpinteria. He was enrolled at Cal Poly but not making much progress in flowers or horticulture, so his parents bought a farm at the end of Farren Road in Goleta, then called Condor Ridge Ranch. “I can farm in this land,” thought Ruskey, agreeing to manage the property while finishing college. “That refocused my efforts. It made my schooling a lot more real.” The 42-acre property was planted mostly to cherimoya, but that orchard was no longer producing. They’re an extremely difficult crop, requiring hand pollination and then going from rock-hard when harvested to gooey-ripe when you turn your back. “I got a crash course on exotic fruit farming and, immediately after, how to market highly perishable exotic fruits,” said Ruskey, who actually attended Cheremoya Avenue Elementary. He found his way into some farmers’ markets up north and enjoyed connecting directly with consumers to hear what they wanted. Given that cherimoya only needed attention for

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CUPPING TIME: Experts believe that Frinj produces some of the highest-quality coffee in the world, able to command up to $450 per pound. The Ruskeys brew and share coffee on their farm during tours.

about five months of the year, Ruskey was able to start a Cal Poly chapter of the California Rare Fruit Growers, which taught him organizational and public speaking skills. He also traveled to farms across the Central Coast, and eventually started dabbling in passionfruit, caviar limes, lychee, longans, papaya, and so on. “I was trying to find a way to have yearround cash flow for the farm, and to keep my employees happy and busy,” he said of his constant diversification model. “It really sucks for vacation time, but from a business standpoint, it seemed like the right thing.” And that’s when coffee came across the table. Ruskey planted his first bush 21 years ago, when there wasn’t much of a high-end market. “I grew it because I was a sucker for hard-to-grow crops,” he laughed during a recent phone call. His wife, Kristen, confirmed as much. “You had a reputation for growing things that were difficult to grow,” she said. “There was always someone challenging the next person with something new and unique. Jay was part of that.” To date, Good Land Organics has been the testing ground for many dozens of fruit species trials, and that work continues alongside the coffee. When Jay and I tramped around the hills last June, ostensibly to check out his coffee bushes, he also gave me a Surinam cherry and tree tomato to try while explaining the wonders of ice cream bean trees, wampee (a grape-sized citrus), and a variety of drought-tolerant species ideal for windbreaks, like the Australian she-oak. Once back in the barn, he also let me try a small fruit only under a code of secrecy. It was delicious. Unlike Jay’s urban upbringing — his Jesuit high school Loyola sat squarely in South Central gangland—Kristen grew up in the bucolic Sierra foothills of Tehachapi, where she became a world-champion equestrian. Having trained in Buellton, she wound up at UCSB studying communications. When she was 21 and an intern at the

S.B. Zoo, she attended a holiday party and met Jay, who was 26. They got married on the farm on September 29, 2001, just weeks after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Despite the timing, it was a joyous affair, said Kristen, explaining, “People were happy to celebrate something good.” Kids soon came—a daughter in 2006, and then surprise twins in 2009. “At that point, we were both pretty reliant on coffee drinks,” said Kristen, who’d spent much of her twenties working for Red Bull, creating experiences around that caffeinated beverage. By then, Jay was just beginning to grasp that coffee was unlike any other crop he’d handled. “It’s different than just picking something off a tree, sorting it based on weight and size, and selling it,” he explained. “Coffee is a whole different beast. It’s like being a baker, so that was quite the learning curve.” He was already a go-to guy for other farmers looking to plant the next cool crop, and coffee kept rising to the brim of those conversations. “More than half the United States drinks coffee,” said Ruskey. “It kept resonating with everyone.” Meanwhile, the prices kept setting records year over year, opening the door further for $80-plus-perpound coffee from California to succeed. By that pivotal year of 2017, when Frinj was formed, Ruskey was working with 18 farms. Today, more than 70 have been planted. The bulk of these farms aren’t part of the formula yet, because it takes up to five years for coffee plants to produce a commercial crop. But there will be more than 20 farms ready in 2022. “Next year,” said Ruskey, “is a big year.”

PLANTING PARTNERS With nearly 20,000 coffee plants going into the ground this year, CEO David Armstrong’s Ventura-based Hobson Family Farms is the biggest of Frinj’s 70-plus partners. The six-generation


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family-owned company goes back to William Dewey Hobson, who settled in the region in 1859 and went to Sacramento to carve the new Ventura County out from the larger Santa Barbara County in 1871. Though they slowly sold off agricultural holdings over the decades — including what’s now the Pierpont neighborhood —Hobson-Smith LLC (the official name) continues to farm vast acreages across the state, from avos and lemons in Santa Paula to those row crops on 101 south of Rincon to 4,500 acres of vineyard in Monterey County. Armstrong, who was raised in Colorado but enjoyed success as a real estate investor in Los Angeles before moving to Ventura in 2003, is the first non-family CEO for the Hobsons. He met them through his work creating the Downtown Ventura Organization, the city’s very successful business improvement district, and started working for the company five years ago, with no agricultural background. The current Hobson and Smith generations are pursuing their own dreams, he said, but are still very involved at the board level. “One of the nice things working for a generational company is that I’m not looking at quarterly profits,” said Armstrong. “I’m looking at what it’s gonna do for the grandkids. And a big part of that is sustainability. That’s what they want. That’s important to them. It’s really not a choice anymore.” A couple of disasters led Armstrong to coffee. “The Thomas Fire did a number on us,” said Armstrong, who was in the middle of replanting their scorched ranch near Santa Paula with the traditional avocado and lemon orchards. Then came COVID. “All of a sudden, half of our market disappeared,” said Armstrong, referring particularly to lemons, which were hammered when restaurants shut down. “I was looking for ways to diversify and not be so subject to those aspects of the market. We already have all the other risks with farming. We’ve got a strong base, but we can start branching out to see what else works.” He was skeptical when first meeting with Ruskey in October 2020. “Everyone I tell, they say, ‘You can’t grow coffee in California!’” said Armstrong. “I spent a lot of time working to understand why it works here, and it made me think it will work. You can see Jay’s results.” Working with a near-blank slate of 14 acres, which they identified from across the ranch’s 7,000 acres based on soil quality and wind protection, the Frinj partners redid all the irrigation with efficiency in mind, mulched dying lemon trees to go at the base of the coffee bushes, and left rows of old lemon trees up as windbreaks. They planted both heavy-bearing and qualityminded coffee varieties, with ice cream bean trees interplanted for shade. “It’s really amazing how helpful Jay and his team are,” said Armstrong. “They’re on

everything. That really helps us mitigate the farming side of the risk, and it benefits both of us. We’re not skimping on anything. If this is gonna work, we have to do everything that we can to make sure it works.” Now familiar with how the lemon and avocado industries work — where packing houses function like loose cooperatives —Armstrong is enthused about the more involved Frinj arrangement. “The Frinj model might eventually become the model,” he explained, “where there’s a partnership in terms of getting the best possible product.” The Hobson planting just started in June, so there probably won’t be a commercial harvest until at least 2025. But Armstrong is already giddy about the potential that coffee presents for income-generating tourism. Like Ruskey, he sees winery-like tasting rooms down the road, and he looks forward to hosting tours and selling coffee on-site while exploring the byproducts of the process, like the antioxidant-rich sweet tea that comes from the fresh cherry flesh. “People crave experience, and where else can you get a coffee experience in the United States?” asked Armstrong. “We have to have an agritourism face to expose people to all of these cool things.” The tourism attraction angle is already in action down at The Flower Fields at Carlsbad Ranch, where CEO Chris Calkins first started planting coffee bushes in 2014. At the time, he was looking for crops that his 300,000 annual visitors could relate to, but also that weren’t vulnerable to pests and relatively low in water usage. He went with olives (from which they make and sell oil), blueberries, and coffee, now tending to about 1,500 plants between the ranch and his own home in Leucadia, called Quail Haven.

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In the future, he’d like to be selling brewed coffee, packaging beans into gift bags for the weddings and special events that they host, and explaining more of the entire coffee process. But for right now, it’s mostly look and see, although people can snag a ripe berry if they find one. “They’re really pretty,” he said of the bushes themselves. “They have beautiful, glossy green leaves. Aesthetically, it’s pleasing.”

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He laughed when I asked if there have been any struggles along the way. “For farming, you can never say that things go smoothly — there’s always something,” said Calkins. For instance, last year, they harvested a whopping 5,000 pounds from 250 mature trees. “The trouble is, we exhausted the trees, so this year it’s going to be lighter,” said Calkins. “We’re trying to figure out how to balance this.” They’re also experimenting with reclaimed water to see if they can get the same quality even with higher salinity. No matter the ups or downs, all roads lead back to Frinj. “We’re really relying on Jay and his group,” said Calkins. “They’re doing the marketing, and they are trying to execute a strategy that will benefit all of us.” If it doesn’t work out? “What’s the worst case?” said Calkins. “We drink our own coffee. What’s so bad about that?”

BUT HOW’S THE COFFEE? After 30 years spent in the upper echelons of the coffee industry, Lindsey Bolger — who went from being a barista during college to running Green Mountain Coffee Roasters and then Keurig — was highly skeptical when she first heard coffee was being grown on the West Coast. “Really, that seems like a bit of a stretch,” she recalled over the phone while sitting on a park bench in Nantucket. “If I really wanted a great cup of coffee, I’d know where to go, and it isn’t California.” Bolger is considered one of the world’s greatest cuppers, the highly trained judges of coffee quality whose opinions — which are usually in alignment due to their strict standards and protocols — dictate high-end pricing. Their regimented analysis covers a laundry list of data points very few people even think about when slurping their cup, from dry and wet fragrances to retro nasal vapors to uniformity and cleanliness to various types of acidity. “Coffee without acid is like champagne without bubbles,” said Bolger. Developed over the past couple of decades, this cupping process is educating both consumers (on

why they should pay more) and farmers (on why they can charge more), and it aims to be an objective means of determining which farms are really special. “Not every coffee farm can produce coffee of high quality,” said Bolger. “Do you have the raw materials, the soils, the coffee varietals, the knowledge of coffee farming, of coffee processing, and eventual coffee roasting?” She believes the “Four Ps” are critical to answering that question. “The right place, right plant, right process, and right people,” she explained. “Those fundamentally create the foundation for whether or not a coffee is actually going to meet expectations or exceed them.” When she finally tried Ruskey’s California-grown coffee in 2019, the Ps seemed to be in place. “It was the actual cupping experience of putting coffee to my lips and understanding that automatically and sensorially, it absolutely could hold its own against some of the highest-quality and highest-priced coffees,” said Bolger, who now consults as a cupper for Frinj. “He’s making a bold claim that coffee of exceptional quality can be grown in California and that California can procure something that is distinct enough to capture the interest and attention of consumers who are willing to pay a premium for their coffee experience. And he’s proven that.” She recognizes the irony of $80-plus-per-pound coffee grown by mostly wealthy folks in Southern California as somehow being a savior for a global commodity market. But she believes it is a step in the right direction. “For as long as I’ve been in the industry, which is 30 years, coffee has been significantly undervalued by the industry, by the trade, and by consumers,” said Bolger. “It’s really about time that we took all of those considerations into account: cost of production, cost of labor, cost of quality, cost of marketing. If Jay can set a new bar, I honestly think that the industry, regardless of where you’re growing coffee, will benefit.” At least maybe, she continued, Americans used to cheap coffee will stop rolling their eyes when they see a $12.99-per-pound coffee for sale in the grocery store bins. Said Bolger, “That really doesn’t come close to reflecting the value and the effort required to create that coffee.” Back up in Ventura, where David Armstrong is betting a small slice of the Hobson Family Farms on coffee, he’s embracing Frinj’s global message as well. “It’s amazing that, in California, we have all these people who love their CSA boxes and farmers’ markets, but they use poorly paid labor and bring what they drink every day in from Central and South America,” he said. “How cool is it going to be when you can be a locavore for coffee?”

YOUR74 L (800) BRANC

Learn more about Frinj and order coffee at frinjcoffee.com.

TRY FRINJ YOURSELF

Do you want to try this Goleta-grown coffee for yourself? Golden Line, which is located inside of Villa Wine Bar at 618 Anacapa Street, is pouring hand-brewed cups of Frinj every Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. There are two options, both grown by Jay Ruskey himself at Good Land Organics: The Geisha is $16 a cup and the Caturra is $10 a cup.

Fin INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

27


LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 NOV 6

APR 12

THIS WEEKEND!

JUST ANNOUNCED! Tickets on sale Friday, 10 am

and EARL MINNIS PRESENTS

The Immediate Family

Tonight!

NOV 4

Danny Kortchmar, Waddy Wachtel, Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel, and Steve Postell A unique group of iconic musicians, known for their long, illustrious careers backing up countless Hallof-Fame artists. Having played together for decades, but never as their own band, this supergroup of artists join together to perform their own songs.

NOV 12

Aoife O’Donovan

The GRAMMY® award-winning artist, one of the most soughtafter singer/songwriters of her generation, operates in a thrilling musical world beyond genre. Deemed “a vocalist of unerring instinct” by the New York Times, she has released two critically-acclaimed and boundary-blurring solo albums.

NOV 19

ONES TO WATCH PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS

Paul Thorn & Band NOV 18

at 6:57 pm sharp

John Craigie

#KeepItWarm2021 Tour

with special guest Chris Pureka Hailed as a “Modern-Day Troubadour,” John Craigie is best known for his candid storytelling, sense of humor, and poignant songwriting.

DEC 3 Hale Milgrim is back with ANOTHER carefully-crafted show, featuring rare concert footage and insider stories with some (OK, a lot) of help from his friends. Join Hale for a visual, musical journey over the last 60 years complete with his memorable insights ... and a few things that he actually remembers.

Brett Dennen

NOV 20

See the World Tour

Dennen has a gift for meditating on life’s most meaningful subjects with equal parts innocence and razor-sharp wit.

DEC 7

NOV 14

An Evening with

Marc Broussard with Jamie McLean Band

NOV 23

Blessed with both a rarefied talent and an innate stylistic and emotional authenticity, Marc has become one of the most indelible artists of his generation.

Scan & Download the Lobero App Today!

DEC 14

Andew Duhon & The Bryan Titus Trio Native New Orleans songwriter, Duhon, is a storyteller with a weighted and soulful voice. The Bryan Titus Trio features Bluegrass and American Roots Music that evokes melodies of yesterday with a pinch of modern irony.

28

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

• Digital ticketing • Calendar of Events

The Robert Cray Band Bridging the lines between blues, soul, and R&B, the five-time GRAMMY® award winner remains as viable as ever.

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC INDEPENDENT.COM

The Bentson Foundation

Opt-in to receive

Pre-sale ticket opportunities, Special Promos, Discounts & More!

John C. Mithun Foundation


NOV.

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

4-10

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

“Lifting Spirits”

11/4:

Opening Exhibition Reception: Young Sparrows Artist Inga

Guzyte will show six of her iconic skateboard portraits featuring heroic young women among flowers and other natural forms as well as a series of sparrow sculptures that celebrate the resilience and strength of daughters everywhere. The exhibit shows through December 27. Thu.: 5-8pm; Fri.-Wed.: 10am-5:30pm. Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery, 11 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 730-1460.

sullivangoss.com/exhibitions

11/4: Nebula Dance Lab Presents Humanity Inspired by Charles Dickens’s short story The Child’s Story, this evening-length adaptation will explore living one’s truth, being present, and celebrating differences through dance, music, and multimedia set in thematic neighborhoods of New York City. 8-10pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $26-$46; VIP: $56. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org.

lobero.org/events

11/4, 11/6: Plant-Based Holiday Side Dish Cooking Class If you are vegan-curious and love side dishes such as rustic mashed potatoes, Green Bean Almondine, Fall Harvest Salad, and more, then this hands-on class for adults is for you. This class will also be offered November 10. 6-8pm. A to Z Cooking School, Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. $45. Call (805) 452-3497 or email nancy@atozcookingschool.org.

tinyurl.com/PlantBasedSides 11/4-11/6, 11/10: Exhibit: The Dark Watchers Oil Paintings by

Benjamin Brode This exhibit includes 22 of the original 25 paintings (for sale) in the book In Search of the Dark Watchers: Landscapes and Lore of Big Sur, Field Sketches and Paintings by Benjamin Brode, Field Notes by Thomas Steinbeck. Volumes of the first edition of the book will be for sale. The exhibit shows through December 11. Thu.-Sat., Wed.: 11am-6pm. Corridan Gallery, 125 N. Milpas St. Free. Call (805) 966-7939.

corridan-gallery.com

11/4-11/7: Personal Stories: Return to LIVE! Original stories of rediscovered love, youthful motorcycle cross-country adventures, love affairs, mojitos, and more will be performed by their authors. Visit the website for the full schedule. Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo Ctr. $18-$25. Call (805) 963-0408.

centerstagetheater.org/shows

FRIDAY 11/5 COURTESY

COURTESY

THURSDAY 11/4

awkward teen with telekinetic powers, who is dominated by an oppressive religious mother and humiliated by classmates. The show runs through November 13. 7pm. S.B. High School Theatre, 700 E. Anapamu St. $10-$25. sbhstheatre.com

SATURDAY 11/6 11/6: 6th Annual S.B. Mural Bike Ride by Chicano Culture S.B. Chicano Culture S.B. will host this ride through the Westside and Eastside of S.B. to visit mural locations and learn about local history and meet artists, business owners, and special guests. Meet up: 1pm; roll out: 2-4:30pm. Ortega Park (corner of Salsipuedes and Cota sts.), 604 E. Ortega St. Free (donations appreciated).

tinyurl.com/MuralRide

11/6-11/7: S.B. Mesa Artists Studio Tour The members of the Mesa Artists Studio Tour (MAST) will open their studios for the public to see their working environment. Visit the website to download the map or tour brochure and follow the yard signs and red balloons on tour days. 11am-4pm. Free. Call (805) 453-1558 or email sallyshamilton@ gmail.com.

santabarbaramesaartists.com 11/6: Virtual Gathering: Celebrate Gratitude with SB ACT RSVP to join and hear about all of the work of the Santa Barbara Alliance for Community Transformation’s partnerships in addressing homelessness, human trafficking, immigration advocacy, and more in S.B. County. 10:30am-noon. Free. Call (805) 259-4692 x105 or email info@sbact.org.

sbact.org/gratitude 11/6: The S.B. Social: An Iroko Experience Join this social with amazing

Derrick Curtis

11/5-11/6:

BASSH Twentieth Anniversary Concert: The Art & Soul of Dance

Derrick Curtis and his team of talented professionals will bring together S.B.’s best choreographers and dancers to create a program of spectacular dances in ballroom, Latin exhibition, swing, hip-hop, jazz, and more! 7:30pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. $15-$35. Read more on p. 37.

sbbassh.com

11/5-11/6: S.B. High School Theatre Presents Carrie the Musical Based on the Stephen King novel and film of the same name, Carrie the Musical follows Carrie, an

COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

performances by the world champions Iroko from Tampa, Florida, as well as other special performances. Class: 8:30; social: 9pm-2am. ME Sabor Dance Studio, 810 E. Gutierrez St. $15. Call (805) 705-7939.

tinyurl.com/MeSaborSocial

11/6: S.B. Bowl Concerts Khruangbin, Kikagaku Moyo. 7pm. 1122 N. Milpas St. $45$75. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

11/6: Then Comes Baby Family Resource Opening Tour the site, meet teachers and staff, and enjoy family fun activities at this new family resource center for new and expecting parents and caregivers in S.B. that will offer services to ease the transition into parenthood. 10:30am-1:30pm. Then Comes Baby, 200 N. La Cumbre Rd., Ste. H. Free. Email deedeej@then-comesbaby.com.

11/6:

Lobero Live: The Immediate

Family The Immediate Family, featuring band members Danny Kortchmar, Waddy Wachtel, Leland Sklar, Russ Kunkel, and Steve Postell, will perform their own songs from 2020’s Slippin and Slidin’ and 2021’s Can’t Stop Progress, and more. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $36-$46; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761.

lobero.org/events

11/6-11/7: Out Riders Presents Wild Horses Festival This two-day experience will feature country and American roots music from Whitey Morgan, Jamestown Revival, Nikki Lane, and more on Saturday and Ryan Bingham, Paul Cauthen, The White Buffalo, and more on Sunday. Visit the website for the performance schedule. 1-8pm. S.B. Polo Fields, 3300 Via Real, Carpinteria. $55-$105. Call (805) 684-6683 or email howdy@outriderspresent.com.

Art by Norma Angelica

11/7:

ers Market Enjoy food for sale, music, workshops, vendor market, and altars. Beginning November 4, you can bring a photocopy of your loved ones to El Presidio de Santa Bárbara Chapel for the community altar honoring all our loved ones who have passed. Disfruta de comida a la venta, música, talleres, mercado de vendedores y altares. A partir del 4 de noviembre puedes traer una fotocopia de tus seres queridos a la Capilla del Presidio de Santa Bárbara para el altar comunitario en honor a todos nuestros seres queridos que han fallecido. 10am-4pm. El Presidio de Santa Bárbara, 123 E. Canon Perdido St. Free.

mujeresmakersmarket.com/ events

outriderspresent.com

SUNDAY 11/7 11/7: BeatoFest Immerse yourself in the arts with art exhibits, demonstrations, and live music from Francisco Leon, California Old Time Fiddlers District 8, Jill Martini & The Shrunken Heads, and Kimberly Lee. Visit the website for the schedule. 11am-4pm. Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts, 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. Free. Call (805) 646-3381.

MONDAY 11/8 11/8: Science Pub from Home: Fish Pee in the Sea Marine scientist June Shrestha will speak about the surprising role fish pee plays in building resiliency within the kelp forests of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary. Register online. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Email jrolle@sbnature2.org.

sbnature.org/visit/calendar

TUESDAY 11/9

tinyurl.com/Beatofest

11/7: SBAcoustic Presents Marley’s Ghost with Jon Wilcox & Friends Come listen to the sound where Americana meets gospel as Marley’s Ghost demonstrates their rich harmonies and amazing storytelling along with S.B.’s Jon Wilcox (also in Marley’s Ghost), who will open the show. Doors: 6pm; show: 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. Call (805) 9627776. $22. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events/marleys-ghost

tinyurl.com/BabyOpenHouse

11/9:

INDEPENDENT.COM

Virtual Discussion: Global TV: Lupin

Join Jean Beaman (Sociology, UCSB), France Winddance Twine (Sociology, UCSB), and Lisa Parks (Film and Media Studies, UCSB) for a virtual discussion of Lupin, the groundbreaking contemporary spin on the legendary capers of gentleman thief Arsène Lupin written by French author Maurice Leblanc. Lupin is available for screening on Netflix. 7-8pm. Free. Call (805) 893-4903 or email mattryan@ucsb.edu.

tinyurl.com/GlobalTVLupin

Volunteer Opportunity

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event.

Día de los Muertos Mujeres Mak-

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

Fundraiser

THE INDEPENDENT

29


The Arlington Theatre

­

­

Metro 4 • Camino

Paseo Nuevo

Fiesta 5

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Nov 5-11, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

The French Dispatch (R): Fri, Mon: 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Tue-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Antlers (R): Fri, Mon-Thur, Sat/Sun: 8:00. Ron’s Gone Wrong (PG): Fri, Mon: 5:15. Sat/Sun: 2:45, 5:15. Halloween Kills (R): Fri, Mon: 5:30, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 3:00, 5:30, 7:45. Tue-Thur: 5:30. Clifford* (G): Tue-Thur: 4:45, 7:05.

Full Belly Files

Matt Kettmann’s Full Belly Files serves up multiple courses of food & drink coverage every Friday, going off-menu from our regularly published content to deliver tasty nuggets of restaurant, recipe, and refreshment wisdom to your inbox.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Eternals* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 12:45(LP), 2:20, 4:05(LP), 5;45, 6:30, 7:30(LP), 9:15. Mon-Thur: 2:00, 4:05(LP), 5:20, 7:30(LP), 8:40. Last Night in Soho (R): Fri/Sat: 1:10, 3:50, 9:50. Sun: 1:10, 3:50. Mon-Thur: 2:20, 5:40, 8:20. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:00, 5:00, 8:30. Mon-Thur: 2:10, 5:00, 8:30.

CAMINO REAL

F I E S TA 5

7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Eternals* (PG13): Fri:1:00, 2:05, 3:10, 4:20, 5:25, 6:30, 7:40, 8:45, 9:50. Sat/Sun: 11:50, 1:00, 2:05, 3:10, 4:20, 5:25, 6:30, 7:40, 8:45, 9:50. Mon-Thur: 2:05, 3:10, 4:20, 5:25, 6:30, 7:40, 8:45. Last Night in Soho (R): Fri-Sun: 4:50, 10:10. Mon-Thur: 5:15, 8:10. My Hero Academia: World Heroes’ Mission dubbed (NR): Fri-Thur: 1:55. My Hero Academia: World Heroes’ Mission subbed (NR): Fri-Sun: 7:30. Dune (PG): Fri: 3:20, 6:40, 10:00. Sat/Sun: 12:00, 3:20, 6:40, 10:00. Mon-Thur: 1:40, 5:00, 8:20. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:20, 4:30, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 1:45, 4:30, 8:00.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Dune (PG): Sat-Thur: 3:30, 7:00.

Thank You! 30

METRO 4

Red Notice (PG13): Fri, Mon, Tue/Wed: 5:00, 7:45. Sat/Sun, Thur: 2:20, 5:00, 7:45. Antlers (R): Fri, Mon: 5:45, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 3:20, 5:45, 8:15. Tue-Thur: 8:15 My Hero Academia: World Heroes’ Mission dubbed (NR): Fri, Sat/Sun, Mon-Thur: 4:35. Ron’s Gone Wrong (PG): Fri, Mon: 7:15. Sat/Sun: 2:05, 7:15. Tue/Wed: 7:15. Thur: 2:05. The Addams Family 2 (PG): Fri, Mon: 4:45, 7:00. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 4:45, 7:00. Tue/Wed: 4:45. Thur: 2:30, 4:45. Halloween Kills (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:30, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Thur: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Clifford* (G): Tue/Wed: 4:20, 7:00. Thur: 2:00, 4:20, 7:00. Belfast* (PG13): Thur: 7:15

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

Spencer* (R): Fri-Thr: 1:20, 5:05, 7:30. The French Dispatch (R): Fri-Thur: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Dune (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:10, 4:45, 8:15. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 4:00, 7:45.


Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

11/4: Eos Lounge Gorgon City’s Olympia Tour,

THURSDAY

4pm. $40-$70. Ages 21+. Lot 500, 500 Anacapa St.

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

eoslounge.com

FRIDAY

11/4-11/5, 11/7-11/9: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: KBong, Johnny Cosmic, 8pm. $15. Ages 21+. Fri.: JMSN, Malia, 8pm. $20-$22. Ages 21+. Sun.: Marley’s Ghost, Jon Wilcox & Friends, 7:30pm $22. Mon.: M.O.B. Jazz Quintet, 7:30pm. $15. Tue.: Hobo Johnson and the Love-

SUNDAY

D urang

COURTESY

TUESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

Carmen & The Renegade Vigilantes

FOLLOW US ON

FOLLOW US ON

FACEBOOK

INSTAGRAM

@sbindependent

@sbindependent

@sbindependent

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

WEDNESDAY

#sbindy

11/5: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

tinyurl.com/PaliNov5

11/10: Beach Cleanup with the Sea Center: East Beach Register in advance and

11/6: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar Eric Noble

bring reusable cleanup supplies, if you can, and the Sea Center will provide plastic bags and gloves. All participants must complete a waiver and bring it with them. Earn Community Service hours. Meet on the east side of Stearns Wharf, on the grassy area between the beach and the public restrooms. 2:30-4:30pm. 195 Stearns Wharf. Free.

on guitar. 5:30-8:30pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-9126.

805.965.5935 www.theatregroupsbcc.com at the

Thank you to our season sponsor:

11/6-11/7: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: John Lyle. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:304:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

tinyurl.com/BeachCleanupNov10

FOLLOW US ON 11/10: Edward Borein’s Artist Friends in INSTAGRAM Join this talk by Jeremy Tessmer, Santa Barbara @sbindependent @sbindependent FOLLOW US ON

FACEBOOK

COURTESY

WEDNESDAY 11/10

art historian and director at Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery, that complements the exhibit Borein and #sbindy His Circle of Friends, on view at the S.B. Historical Museum through January 22, 2022. 5:307pm. S.B. Historical Museum, 136 E. de la Guerra St. $15-$20.

tinyurl.com/BoreinsArtistFriends

NO LATE SEATING

LIVE CAPTIONING

Sunday 11/14 Matinee

1 THURSDAY TONIGHT! NOV 4, 5-8PM

FOLLOW US ON

Join us for an evening of art and culture in Downtown SB. FREE! Music by Out of the Blue. * Masks required *

TWITTER

@sbindynews

coldspringtavern.com

JURKOWITZ THEATRE st INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

STAY CONNECTED

tinyurl.com/EricNoble

@sbindynews

NOVEMBER 10-20, 2021

@sbindependent

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

of Christopher Durang Short Plays FOLLOW US ON

Contains Adult Language and Content

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 2597476. cfsb.info/sat

A Night TWITTER

Directed by Matt Talbott

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

11/5-11/7: Maverick Saloon Fri.: About Time, 5-8pm; Brian Kinsella Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Dave Bernal, 1-4pm; Sam Mitchell, 5-8pm; Carmen & The Renegade Vigilantes, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Different Strings, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

tinyurl.com/AnnetteGordon-Reed

with

STAY CONNECTED

SATURDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

Harvard professor and Pulitzer Prize– winning author share insights from her new book, On Juneteenth: “Freedom Day” and Its Importance to American History. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: Free; GA: $25. Call (805) 893-3535.

Laughing

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

sohosb.com/events

Annette GordonReed Hear the

Presents a Student Showcase

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

makers, 8pm. $25-$30. Ages 18+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

11/10:

SBCC THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT

STAY CONNECTED

T HE

@sbindynews

w w w.D owntownSB.org

11/10: SBCC Theatre Arts Department Presents Laughing with Durang Talented SBCC students will perform short plays from the much-celebrated playwright Christopher Durang, such as For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls (a parody of The Glass Menagerie), Medea (about Medea and a chorus of three women who try to figure out if it’s appropriate to kill your children to punish your husband), and three more short plays. The plays show through November 20. 7:30-9:30pm. Jurkowitz Theatre, SBCC West Campus, 969 Cliff Dr. $10-$18. Contains adult language and content. Call (805) 965-5935.

theatregroupsbcc.com/shows

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

31


Health

living

ADDI ZERRENNER

p. 32

JUN STARKEY

Community

Why I Run And Why You Should Try by Addi Zerrenner Author Addi Zerrenner struggled with anorexia nervosa before she found running. The Library on the Go is loaded with custom book carts that can be set up outside.

T

he past two years have taught us all what is truly important in this life. For me, two of those things are health and community. Growing up in Santa Barbara as a multi-sport athlete before specializing in competitive distance running, I can’t think of a better way to celebrate both our health and community than participating in the Santa Barbara Half Marathon and the Independent 5K. Taking place on Sunday, November 7, it is the very first distance race to go through beautiful downtown Santa Barbara via State Street, bringing neighbors together to pursue health and a great time. Each individual’s running journey is different. I found running during my freshman year of high school when I joined the track and field team at Dos Pueblos High School as a way to stay in shape for soccer. The summer before, I was hospitalized for anorexia nervosa. I had been voted “most athletic” by my 8th grade class just a few months prior, yet I had become so weak that I could not medically participate in sports and missed out on so many social events. I felt like an imposter on the soccer field and an outsider at school. Then I started running, and I felt at home. It gave me a reason to want to be strong and healthy, alive, and vivacious. It has been through running that I have been able to work on healing myself each and every day from my eating disorder. But it was the community of runners that truly made me fall in love. The act of doing something physically challenging alongside one another can really bring people together, whether that’s during a casual run or a competitive

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race. People of all different races, ethnicities, capabilities, sizes, and genders can experience a common bond of moving their body through space. I no longer felt like an outsider at school as I had created incredible relationships with teammates through the miles and miles we traveled together. They didn’t care how slow or fast I ran and didn’t care at all about what I looked like running alongside them. I find so many people too intimidated by going for a run, signing up for a race, or going to the gym due to preconceived ideas of what they “should look like.” Having run competitively for about a decade and now working as a personal trainer and running coach locally, one of my biggest goals is to help people achieve a balanced approach to their health. I work to pursue less of what health should look like and more about how health should feel. I tell my clients that as long as you are putting your best effort forth in whatever exercise you do and only comparing yourself to the person you were yesterday, then you’re doing a pretty great job. Whether you are reading this and have never participated in a race before, or you have done hundreds of races and already signed up, I encourage you to participate in the Santa Barbara Half Marathon or Independent 5K. Perhaps you will come out for the amazing tour of Santa Barbara; perhaps it’s to start your health journey; or perhaps it’s to connect with the wonderful running community. Whatever your reason may be, I encourage you to get out of your comfort zone in the pursuit of health and community! santabarbarahalf.com

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Books on Wheels

he Santa Barbara Public Library is reintroducing its book mobile, now called Library on the Go, for the avid readers who have not been able to visit the library in person, largely due to the pandemic. “With public health concerns over large gatherings likely to continue for some time, this model will also allow for expanded

neighborhood navigation center, which provides resources to homeless citizens. Librarians make sure to curate the book selection depending on where the van is headed. It recently made an appearance at the Asian American Neighborhood Festival, so the librarians included material written by and about Asian Americans. Molly Wetta, a senior librarian, said the purpose of the new van is to provide resources to the communities that need them most and to create a safe space for exploration. “We want this to be a place where people can ask questions,” Wetta said. The van, which offers a Wi-Fi connection, provides many of the same services the library did before the pandemic forced it to reduce its offerings, such as early learning classes and kits, nutrition courses, and readings. The van also checks out Chromebooks and hot spots, microscopes, and telescopes. Taylor Benson, one of the regular librarians who captain the van, said working it allows him to build relationships with the people he meets, learning more about them each time. “Coming to the library is a conscious decision, but the van is easy to stumble upon,” Benson said. The Women’s Fund of Santa Barbara provided $100,000 to put the van into action, with another $150,000 coming from private donations. n

Library on the Go Works Around the Pandemic by Jun Starkey reach outside the library’s building,” said spokesperson Erick Mendez. For the children of Santa Barbara, the arrival of the van is like a holiday. It’s loaded with custom book carts that can be pulled out and set up outside, with kids perusing rows of children’s books, young adult titles, and graphic novels. Librarians patiently walk the children through the process of checking out their books, asking if they have their own library card or kindly reminding them to return the books they checked out previously. As soon as the process is complete, the kids plop down on the nearest seat and begin to read as they wait for their peers to finish browsing. Though the van is a serious hit among younger groups, it also has regular stops at several senior living centers and the


living

Cannabis Corner

CANNDESCENT’S

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‘The Art of Flower’ Collection

erhaps the single most universal factor in people’s experiences with cannabis comes down to a humbling acknowledgment that “your mileage may vary.” Virtually everyone who has gotten stoned has at some point faced a situation where two or more people consume the same product in the same manner and experience varying results. Two of you are on the sofa and thinking about going to the beach while a third friend sits in silence on the floor because it feels safer down there. Not ideal. At the California-based cannabis company Canndescent, one of the main goals of research,

was regarding this marketing challenge, he began by acknowledging that there’s a high degree of responsibility involved in what he called “curating someone’s headspace.” In a matter of a few moments, he’d drawn a simple diagram for me that articulated his understanding of the range and specific requirements of the different segments of the cannabis market. I guess that Harvard Business School gives you these kinds of tools. In any case, it worked. I got what he was saying. The key idea is that there can be winners in every category across all the divides he described in that simple set of four boxes — rural versus urban, value versus premium, etc. In creating Canndescent, the company’s top-shelf premium line, they considered every aspect of the branding and packaging, from font and color to the glass container’s size, shape, look, and feel. The result is a gorgeous little box, inside of which sits an equally appealing globe containing your premium weed. Looking at the line from a strictly aesthetic standpoint, it sits on the shelf somewhere between Hermès and Veuve Clicquot. Ultimately though, the real breakthrough in Canndescent’s marketing strategy takes place at the level of what Sedlin characterizes as the product’s “user interface.” Rather than frame the purchaser’s decision as a choice among competing strains, or even the industry-standard distinction between Indica and Sativa dominance, each of Canndescent’s pre-rolls are labeled with a verb. You choose what effect you want to experience by thinking about what you plan to do. Are you looking to relax, soothe yourself, or maybe even sleep? That’s CALM. If relaxation is still your goal, but you aren’t quite ready to settle down, try CRUISE. For people who find that they enjoy cannabis as an element in their preparation for activities like drawing, playing music, or even gaming, there’s CREATE. When it’s time to share your high with friends or a partner, Canndescent recommends a product called CONNECT. And finally, for the increasingly large segment of the cannabis market that’s highly active when actively high, there’s CHARGE, a blend that will boost your appetite for movement. Whether or not these products can deliver the desired effects to the same extent to different individuals remains an open question. Still, the simple fact that Canndescent is looking at the premium cannabis market this way, in terms of choosing an outcome and pursuing it through strains engineered to accomplish it, must be considered a big step in the right direction. To learn more about how these products work, consult the information about genetics and dominant terpenes for each available on canndescent.com. Those who wish to learn by doing can find Canndescent products in Santa Barbara at the Farmacy. n

Guiding Consumers Toward Repeatable Experiences with Cannabis by Charles Donelan product development, and marketing is to give consumers a more personalized control of their high. While cannabis connoisseurs may know enough about different strains and genetics to curate their use, newcomers and more cautious or casual consumers need help. As a result, guidance at the point of purchase looks like a critical place for companies entering the adult-use market to educate and care for their customers. At Canndescent, they refer to this goal as their commitment to “The Art of Flower.” As a cannabis “brand house,” Canndescent grows, packages, and markets four distinct product lines, each designed to appeal to a different segment. Canndescent is California’s number-one overall supplier of pre-rolls. As such, it wields significant influence over the future direction of an entire industry. On a recent morning in Montecito, I sat down with Canndescent CEO Adrian Sedlin — over coffee, not cannabis — and listened as he outlined some of the ideas driving the company’s success. The extraordinary proliferation of strain names is perhaps the most widely known feature of traditional cannabis marketing, second in importance only to the Sativa-Indica distinction. These dauntingly obscure, often goofy monikers are a sure-fire way to elicit snickers from non-users. “Have you got any Purple Urkle? How about some Bob Saget OG?” Apart from the comedy value of this method of distinguishing among what are often quite different flowers, there are many objections to using either the names of celebrities or terms borrowed from sweets and candies to market psychoactive substances. Ask the folks who tried to sell fruit-flavored vape cartridges how that worked out. Still, for a particular segment of the population, this type of fun and games with names remains a functional and appealing aspect of the culture. The other day, I saw a pouch labeled “Sleepy Joe OG.” When I asked Sedlin what Canndescent’s strategy

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remember walking into the old Mercury Lounge during college at UCSB. I’d just turned 21 and this dimly lit, cavernous beer-and-wine bunker oozed an effortless vibe of mystery, originality, and possibility. Walking into the space that is now Centennial Beer Hall, I was thankfully hit with the same excitement — and a modernized beer list to boot. Owner Ron Batdorf bought the historic location — which has been an Old Town Goleta watering hole since it was built in 1957, originally as Gus’s Cocktail Lounge —in April and spent four months remodeling the vintage vibe into a sleek style. He opened in August with 14 taps that focus on American craft breweries and artisanal producers. “I really fell in love with craft beer while living in the Bay Area, where there are so many fantastic breweries and beer bars,” said Batdorf. “Going out to those beer bars really helped me to grow my knowledge and understanding of beer styles and flavors pretty quickly because of the vast selection of beers that were available at those spots.” He hopes to do the same for us. “My goal for Centennial Beer Hall is to bring a similar experience to Goleta, to share my love of independent craft beer with the community here, to celebrate the great things our local breweries are doing, and hopefully to introduce people to beers they maybe haven’t had the opportunity to try before,” he said.

New Face for Historic Old Town Goleta Bar BY REBECCA HORRIGAN

On a recent visit, it was tough to refrain from sampling every beer on the list, which was refreshingly different from the options I typically see around town. Standouts included a perfectly balanced Belgian Strong Golden Ale from The Bruery in Placentia, a juicy Arctic Haze IPA from Ventura Coast Brewery, and a Societe Not Enormous Berliner Weisse sour. After trying a variety of IPAs, I was thankful that this latter brew was “not enormous” in terms of ABV but still big on crisp, tart flavor. The tap list is always rotating and consistently fresh. When Batdorf selects a beer for the list, he buys one keg. Once it’s gone, something else goes on the list in its place, which ensures the beer is being served exactly as intended. “Selecting the beers for our tap list is absolutely the most fun part of my day,” Batdorf said. “I just try to do my best to select beers that are high-quality, delicious, and bring something special or unique to the table. I work directly with a few breweries and a couple beer distributors to build our tap list, and

CARL PERRY PHOTOS

Fun atmosphere, friendly service, delicious food & tasty drinks! Mon - Thurs. 3pm - 11pm Friday 3pm - 1am Saturday 12pm - 1am Sunday 9a - 11pm | Open early for NFL Football Happy Hour Mon-Fri 3-7p | Sat 12-4 Kitchen Opens at 4pm Daily

TAP MAN: Rob Batdorf is changing his taps frequently at Centennial Beer Hall.

we’re continually looking to grow our network of brewery-direct sourcing relationships.” There’s also a thoughtful menu of Central Coast wines available for those who prefer the grape to the grain. Standouts include a smooth Wonderwall pinot noir from Field Recordings and a crisp sauvignon blanc from Beckmen Vineyards. The indoor atmosphere feels clean and modern, and the outside is welcoming. On a cool fall night, we enjoyed sipping our beverages in the warm glow of the charming back-patio fire pit. You may recognize Batdorf from Lucky Penny, where he ran the kitchen from 2017 to 2019. A graduate from culinary school in San Francisco, Batdorf lent his talents to The Lark and most recently to the Ritz-Carlton Bacara before launching Centennial. He plans to use his culinary chops to create a menu of small bites in the future but isn’t going to rush the process. For now, they have such simple snacks as the New Orleans favorite Zapp’s potato chips. But Centennial also upgraded the classic Merc Lounge snack—popcorn—by selling the hometown gourmet brand Hippy Pop. Food trucks and vendors frequent the bar as well. “Currently we have Takitos 8oh5 every Thursday,” explained Batdorf. “The Birria Boyz are becoming a regular staple, and we have a Beer Brunch planned with Goodland Waffles for next month.” There’s also more live music and trivia nights coming in the future. But for now, the polished simplicity, quality beverages, and relaxing community vibe make Centennial Beer Hall a solid spot to explore intriguing beers in a comforting environment.

5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta; (805) 324-4724; centennialbeerhall.com


Fill the Foodbank!

Tap Thai Opens in Goleta

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

Foodbank warehouse 4554 Hollister Ave (adjacent to Ben Page Youth Center)

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need! Turkey Drive 2021 runs thru Nov 24

FoodbankSBC.org/GiveFood

TAKE US HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS...

FOOD & DRINK

restaurant is adding a second location at 7060 Hollister Avenue, Suite D-6, in Goleta (next to Smart & Final), replacing Sharky’s Woodfired Mexican Grill, which closed in March 2020. Tap Thai’s flagship location opened at 3130 State Street in October 2010, after a brief appearance on De la Vina where I was their very first customer. Reader Josh let me know that the Goleta Tap Thai has opened. I stopped by the restaurant and was told that the menu is similar, but not exactly the same as their upper State Street eatery and that their wine and beer selection will be expanded soon. The menu includes appetizers (Tap Rolls, Calamari on Fire, Chicken Satey, Shrimp Rolls, Summer Rolls, Green Bean Tempura, Crispy Sesame Tofu, Salt & Pepper Garlic Wings), noodles (PCU Noodles, Tap Signature Pad Thai, Spicy Drunken Noodles, Spicy Khao Soi Gai), woks/rice (Spicy Fried Rice, Simply Fried Rice, Pineapple Fried Rice, Pork Spare Ribs, Spicy Basil), curries (Panang Curry, Spicy Green NEW NOODLES: The second location for Tap Thai is now open near Curry, Salmon Lover, Yellow Curry), Smart & Final in western Goleta. and a variety of soups, salads, and sides. Since we are at least six months past the due Lunch is available daily 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m., while dinner is offered 5-9 p.m. They close at 9:30 p.m. date, several readers asked me about their status, so I reached out to management and was told on Fridays and Saturdays. that the current plan is to reopen in January 2022. CARP KITCHEN OPENS: Last April, reader Primetime I am hearing that they decided to replace the sent the word that Carp Kitchen and Grocery entire roof, the entire kitchen, and fix a variety of was coming to 4945 Carpinteria Avenue, Suite A, other things, which is the cause of the extended in Carpinteria, the former home of Crushcakes. downtime. Reader Deforest says Carp Kitchen and Grocery has now opened, serving lunch daily 10 a.m.-4 BEANS BBQ COMING: This just in from reader p.m. but closed on Tuesdays. Digrdad: “Beans BBQ, a quality catering com“Carp Kitchen & Grocery is a specialty food pany, is going to open a brick and mortar at 1230 store serving lunch at a prepared food counter, State Street. They hope to open in February. Kristi for takeout and delivery,” says a description of the is fantastic. Thanks.” From what I can tell, this will business. “The counter is surrounded by a small be between Saigon and Brasil Arts Café. grocery with a broad selection of freshly made foods such as dressings, sauces, pasta, breads, etc. STARBUCKS CHANGES? Last April, I wrote that the Other grocery items will be available, such as local Santa Barbara Architectural Board of Review and imported cheese, canned fish, hot sauces, was looking at 3052 De la Vina Street, formerly locally made specialty food items, and fresh flow- Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. “Proposal for exterior ers. A curated selection of home goods, cutting alterations including new exterior paint and boards, cookbooks, and unique food-centrist gifts material changes, landscape alterations, ADA will also be sold in the shop.” upgrades, outdoor seating, and exterior lighting Visit carpkitchen.com. to rebrand the existing 1,740 square foot (gross) building into a Starbucks,” read the agenda item. PEPE’S REOPENING IN JANUARY: In December 2020, About the same time, fencing appeared around Goleta icon Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant at 254 the property, and it appeared remodeling had Orange Avenue was damaged by a fire. “It was begun. a kitchen fire,” said owner Osiris Castellanos at This week, reader Thomas tells me that the forthe time. “It destroyed all of our kitchen equip- lease sign has returned and that the Coffee Bean ment, and there was smoke damage throughout and Tea Leaf decor is still intact seven months the building. We will hopefully open by March later. So our best guess is that Starbucks is no lonor April 2021.” ger taking the space.

Sat, Nov 6 • 10am-2pm JOHN DICKSON

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ast June, I wrote that Tap Thai

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FROM ROCK TO STEEL ROSHA YAGHMAI’S DRIFTERS AT MCASB

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rifters,Rosha Yaghmai’s new solo exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB), divides rather than cuts the MCASB gallery space. The curved white wall of the installation that Yaghmai has designed partitions MCASB’s main area in two, choreographing the act of crossing the square room into something out of Pina Bausch— an unscripted Café Müller. Not only is there a wall to circumvent, but there are also large rocks extracted from the California landscape along the way and erect steel pipes on the other side. Yaghmai’s landscaping of the room forces bodies out of the linear strolls galleries ordinarily inflict and onto offbeat paths reminiscent of the journeys we often need to make on our way to solace. Yaghmai is thus inviting us to drift, an invitation also apparent in the series of paintings that hang on the wall that divides the space. Titled “Afterimages,” these works blur classic illustrations of the epic Persian poem Shahnameh (The Book of Kings). Yaghmai is American-Iranian, but rather than connect the dots for the visitor, this borrowing and blurring of her Persian patrimony scrambles them further. First, though Shahnameh is the national epic of Greater Iran, it mixes history and myth. Second, when speaking of the series, Yaghmai references psychedelic experiences. Indeed, “Afterimages” will dizzy the close observer. But in doing so, they rewrite beauty, muddling its sharp edges while blending fantasy and reality. Yaghmai’s “Afterimages” are beautiful precisely in the confusion they instill. They are like our darkest psychedelic moments seen in retrospect, or the fragments of a puzzling lineage we’re still trying to piece together. The Afterimages are portals, hanging midway between natural rocks and human-made steel pipes. Yet whereas many dominant narratives point to nature as our path to spiritual salvation, the por-

tals take us from natural rock to human-made steel instead. To be clear, Yaghmai is not playing down nature. But she is complicating the narrative. The care applied to her unearthed pipes render them somehow more organic than nature. One feels empathy, even grief, looking at them stripped of their old function, performing acrobatics of steel in their afterlife. Yet by fusing them with new metal, Yaghmai gives them closure. By beautifying and erecting them, she honors their past existence. It is a well-deserved ending—or a new beginning. After all, pipes are the invisible enablers of our modern wellbeing. They carry water or gas to our homes. Yaghmai explains that her work deals with disappearing landscapes and unearthing embedded knowledge. As such, her pipes perform an unexpected extraction that questions our previously held beliefs. Maybe idolizing nature is escapism. Maybe our buried pipes hold more truth. The psychedelic realm that’s symbolized by these paintings and the concave wall that separates the natural world from the human-made one in this exhibit is there to question this age-old division further. Psychedelics are a great equalizer. When tripping, a stone is no more or less than

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INVITATION TO DRIFT: Artist Rosha Yaghmai with a detail from her work “Lavender Aura,” now on view at MCA Santa Barbara.

a pipe. Neither Humanity nor Nature are competing for hierarchy in the psychonaut’s mind. Matter is engaged in one collective movement. Maybe a Pina Bausch choreography. Drifters methodically targets the set ways through which we see the world and our lives. In conversation, Yaghmai shared her resistance to the requisite “languaging” of her work, an understandable concern. By asserting how often things are not what they appear, her work recontextualizes its own story, pulling it out of the set tracks it occupies and locating it in the body. As with the pipes, rocks and patrimonies she unearths, Yaghmai’s art yanks at our attempts to grasp reality through mononarratives, leaving us wafting, curiously hanging onto our bodies, less certain of it all, firmly drifting in a space of neither / or. —Halim Madi

20 YEARS OF BASSH When it comes to the theatrical presentation of social dance styles in Santa Barbara, BASSH is the one. After several postponements and some health challenges for the show’s producer and emcee Derrick Curtis, this unique multidisciplinary evening of dance magic is back, with two performances scheduled at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, November 5, and Saturday, November 6, at the Marjorie Luke Theater. As always, the range of approaches will be inclusive, from Persian and hip-hop to aerials, belly-dancing, ballroom, and beyond.

Curtis, a mentor to thousands of Santa Barbara dancers and a recipient of the Indy’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Dance in 2017, had one of his legs amputated from the knee down in February 2021. Thanks to a successful GoFundMe campaign and his indomitable spirit, Curtis is now walking on a prosthetic leg. He looks forward to seeing his many former students and Santa Barbara’s vibrant dance community at the shows. For tickets and information, visit sbassh.com. —Charles Donelan

S.B. READS JOY HARJO Each year, Santa Barbara Public Library selects a book for Santa Barbara Reads with the intention that it will be widely read and discussed in the community. Our goal is to broaden horizons, consider the world from another’s perspective, and make connections with one another. We invite all members of the community to explore humanity through stories. This year’s title is An American Sunrise, a collection of poetry by United States Poet Laureate Joy Harjo. These poems explore Indigenous pasts, presents, and potential futures in the U.S. and prompt readers to unpack the impact of America’s colonial history. These conversations are particularly relevant in Santa Barbara, where the city’s heart stands in the shadow of the “Queen of the Missions” and streets named for Spanish Colonizers intersect with those bearing Chumash names. Harjo steeps her poems in the history of her ancestral lands and culture. They are both profoundly personal and expansively mythic in scope. Harjo invites us to remember, and to reckon with, the past. Free copies of An American Sunrise will be available from Santa Barbara Public Library beginning Saturday, November 6, at 3 p.m. That’s when the library will kick off Santa Barbara Reads with a Poetry Walk, featuring poems written in response to An American Sunrise by local poets. Join the Indy Book Club in discussing An American Sunrise Wednesday, December 1, at 6 p.m. at Municipal Winemakers. View the full schedule of events related events at sbplibrary.org/sbreads. Santa Barbara Reads is funded through the annual support of the Santa Barbara Public Library Foundation. NEA Big Read: Santa Barbara Reads 2021 is also supported by an NEA Big Read grant, a National Endowment for the Arts program in partnership with Arts Midwest. —Molly Wetta, Santa Barbara Public Library

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Pano

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

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Charles Donelan’s Pano captures the full range of arts and entertainment available in our region in one panoramic weekly wide shot, scanning our cultural horizon for the best in theater, visual art, film, dance, music, and more every Wednesday.

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POP, ROCK & JAZZ

UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS

& ENTERTAINMENT

GLASS ANIMALS

REVIEWS

CARL PERRY

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reamland, the title of both the Glass Animals’ hit album and current North American tour, was an apt description of the state their October 27 performance induced in the capacity crowd at the Santa Barbara Bowl. From the front row of the pit to the deepest corners of the bleacher seats, people were euphoric. After nearly two years of limited access to this kind of collective effervescence, they were ready to pop, and off they went. Animals front man Dave Bayley danced in circles, waved his arms in the air, and delivered his Presented by mesmerizing songs in a Goldenvoice. At wailing soul falsetto, all the S.B. Bowl, to the impeccably timed Wed., Oct. 27. playing of a tight, tourtested band. Seventeen songs in total, 10 from Dreamland, five from How to Be a Human Being, and two from their 2014 debut, Zaba, added up to a little more than 90 minutes of sheer musical bliss. Glass Animals have mastered the art of the stadium mix. Bass guitarist Ed IrwinSinger laid down groove after groove with the kind of inescapable body-rocking intensity more commonly found on the

dance floor at an elite after-hours club. With its clever swimming pool concept and entertaining vintage Windows graphics, the brilliant set gave Bayley the perfect playground for keeping the energy flowing all night long. Although he never dove off the diving board attached to the edge of the stage, his guitar solos had the hectic amperage of crowd surfing. While hits such as “Dreamland” and “Heat Waves” certainly delivered, deep cuts such as “Your Love (Déjà Vu)” were just as powerful, conjuring an ’80s vibe that had everyone on their feet and moving to their take on danceable rock circa 2021. —Charles Donelan

Friday November 12th 7:30 pm PST Online Performance

ZOOM LINK (SCAN THE QR CODE OR SEE BELOW) https://ucsb.zoom.us/j/83463698044 Yesika Salgado is a Los Angeles based Salvadoran poet who writes about her family, her culture, her city, and her fat brown body. She has shared her work in venues and campuses throughout the country. Salgado is a two time National Poetry Slam finalist and the recipient of the 2020 International Latino Book Award in Poetry. Her work has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, Teen Vogue, Univision, CNN, NPR, TEDx, and many digital platforms. She is an internationally recognized bodypositive activist and the writer of the column Suelta for Remezcla. Yesika is the author of the best-sellers Corazón, Tesoro, and Hermosa, published with Not a Cult.

CLASSICAL

IL TABARRO AND EL AMOR BRUJO

FOR THE FULL 2021 EVENT CALENDAR: WWW.MCC.UCSB.EDU

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SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business Il tabarro

ZACH MENDEZ

pera Santa Barbara is on a roll this season, offering uplifting programs that please audiences while revealing the potential of inter-organizational collaboration to enrich our performing arts community. El amor brujo of Manuel De Falla is mostly ballet, but with an expressive operatic element provided by the mezzo-soprano soloist, a role sung in this production by Nina Yoshida Nelsen. The curtain opens on two performers playing one character— Nelsen as the voice of the conflicted protagonist, Candelas, and State Street Ballet’s Ahna Lipchik as her dancing embodiment. Thanks to Stacie Logue’s costume design, this twinning was both easy to see and delightful. The inventive Presented by Opera Santa Barbara. At the Lobero and lucid stagTheatre, Fri., Oct. 29. ing by director Layna Chianakas meshed beautifully with Cecily MacDougall’s breathtaking choreography. As the dueling love interests, Carmelo and Spectre, Tanner Blee and Ryan Lenkey were mesmerizing, proving that athleticism can enhance emotional characterization. Deise Mendonça made a splendid Lucia, and the overall experience of the choreography was profoundly satisfying—El amor brujo could be a textbook example of a story best told through dance. Nelsen’s arias brought out the extreme range of styles that De Falla was capable of at the height of his creative powers. To the State Street Ballet team that took on this bold assignment, “music sounds better with you.” In less than no further ado, Steven Kemp’s engaging and multidimensional set became the deck of a French cargo barge for the opening scene of Il tabarro. This thrilling tableau

of a male chorus unloading a giant net full of sacks while a lone soprano protagonist pondered her fate set the tone for the next hour’s rapid escalation of feeling and incident. As Giorgetta, the conflicted heroine, Alaysha Fox gave a gripping performance. Harold Meers delivered an equally convincing portrait of a man caught in something comparable to that big cargo net as her lover, Luigi. Every opera should have a brilliant role for a mezzo-soprano, and Il tabarro is no exception. As La Frugola, the chatty wife of Talpa (Benjamin Lowe), Nina Yoshida Nelsen laid the fertile imaginative and musical soil out of which Giorgetta and Luigi’s deadly dream of urban escape flowered only to die. Finally, this Halloween holiday classic came complete with a dark villain, the murderous Michele, sung by the brilliant baritone Todd Thomas. Congratulations to Opera Santa Barbara and its artistic and general director Kostis Protopapas on presenting one of the season’s most significant highlights with this remarkable double feature. —CD

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF NOVEMBER 4

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Are you still hoping to heal from psychological wounds that you rarely speak about? May I suggest that you consider speaking about them in the coming weeks? Not to just anyone and everyone, of course, but rather to allies who might be able to help you generate at least a partial remedy. The moment is ripe, in my opinion. Now is a favorable time for you to become actively involved in seeking cures, fixes, and solace. Life will be more responsive than usual to such efforts.

Join us in reading November’s book of the month! NOVEMBER’S THEME: BOOKS WRITTEN BY INDIGENOUS AUTHORS

DI S CU SS I O N :

Wednesday, December 1, 6pm Location: Municipal Winemakers on the patio BO O K O F T H E M O N T H :

An American Sunrise by Joy Harjo

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): “The delights of self-discovery are always available,” writes author Gail Sheehy. I will add that those delights will be extra accessible for you in the coming weeks. In my view, you’re in a phase of super-learning about yourself. You will attract help and support if you passionately explore mysteries and riddles that have eluded your understanding. Have fun surprising and entertaining yourself, Taurus. Make it your goal to catch a new glimpse of your hidden depths every day.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Gemini novelist and philosopher Muriel Barbery says, “I find this a fascinating phenomenon: the ability we have to manipulate ourselves so that the foundation of our beliefs is never shaken.” In the coming weeks, I hope you will overcome any tendency you might have to manipulate yourself in such a way. In my view, it’s crucial for your mental and spiritual health that you at least question your belief system‚ and perhaps even risk shaking its foundation. Don’t worry: Even if doing so ushers in a period of uncertainty, you’ll be much stronger for it in the long run. More robust and complete beliefs will be available for you to embrace.

CANCER

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(June 21-July 22): In her book Mathilda, novelist Mary Shelley (1797-1851) has the main character ask, “What had I to love?” And the answer? “Oh, many things: there was the moonshine, and the bright stars; the breezes and the refreshing rains; there was the whole earth and the sky that covers it.” I bring this to your attention in the hope of inspiring you to make your own tally of all the wonders you love. I trust your inventory will be at least 10 times as long as Mathilda’s. Now is a favorable time for you to gather all the healing that can come from feeling waves of gratitude, even adoration, for the people, animals, experiences, situations, and places that rouse your interest and affection and devotion.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Our memories are always changing. Whenever we call up a specific remembrance, it’s different from the last time we visited that same remembrance‚ colored by all the new memories we have accumulated in the meantime. Over time, an event we recall from when we were 9 years old has gone through a great deal of shape-shifting in our memory, so much so that it may have little resemblance to the first time we remembered it. Is this a thing to be mourned or celebrated? Maybe some of both. Right now, though, it’s to be celebrated. You have extra power to declare your independence from any memories that don’t make you feel good. Why hold onto them if you can’t even be sure they’re accurate?

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 1962, astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth in a spacecraft. His flight marked the first time that NASA, the agency in charge of spaceflight, had ever used electronic computers. Glenn, who was also an engineer, wanted the very best person to verify the calculations, and that was Virgo mathematician Katherine Johnson. In fact, Glenn said he wouldn’t fly without her involvement. I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because I believe the coming months will be a favorable time for you to garner the kind of respect and recognition that Katherine Johnson got from John Glenn. Make sure everyone who needs to know does indeed know about your aptitudes and skills.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to an Apache proverb, “It is better to have less thunder in the mouth and more lightning in the hand.” If you act on that counsel in the coming weeks, you will succeed in doing what needs to be done. There is only one potential downfall you could be susceptible to, in my view, and that is talking and thinking too much about the matter you want to accomplish before you actually take action to accomplish it. All the power you need will arise as you resolutely wield the lightning in your hands.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): To encourage young people to come to its shows, the English National Opera has offered a lot of cheap tickets. Here’s another incentive: Actors sing in English, not Italian or French or German. Maybe most enticing for audiences is that they are encouraged to boo the villains. The intention is to make attendees feel relaxed and free to express themselves. I’m pleased to give you Scorpios permission to boo the bad guys in your life during the coming weeks. In fact, I will love it if you are extra eloquent and energetic about articulating all your true feelings. In my view, now is prime time for you to show the world exactly who you are.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “If we’re not careful, we are apt to grant ultimate value to something we’ve just made up in our heads,” said Zen priest Kōshō Uchiyama. In my view, that’s a problem all of us should always be alert for. As I survey my own past, I’m embarrassed and amused as I remember the countless times I committed this faux pas. For instance, during one eight-month period, I inexplicably devoted myself to courting a woman who had zero interest in a romantic relationship with me. I bring this to your attention, Sagittarius, because I’m concerned that right now, you’re more susceptible than usual to making this mistake. But since I’ve warned you, maybe you’ll avoid it. I hope so!

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn author Asha Sanaker writes, “There is a running joke about us Capricorns that we age backwards. Having been born as burdened, cranky old people, we become lighter and more joyful as we age because we have gained so much practice in wielding responsibility. And in this way we learn, over time, about what are our proper burdens to carry and what are not. We develop clear boundaries around how to hold our obligations with grace.” Sanaker’s thoughts will serve as an excellent meditation for you in the coming weeks. You’re in a phase when you can make dramatic progress in embodying the skills she articulates.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As author Denise Linn reminded us, “The way you treat yourself sends a very clear message to others about how they should treat you.” With that advice as your inspiration, I will ask you to deepen your devotion to self-care in the coming weeks. I will encourage you to shower yourself with more tenderness and generosity than you have ever done in your life. I will also urge you to make sure these efforts are apparent to everyone in your life. I am hoping for you to accomplish a permanent upgrade in your love for yourself, which should lead to a similar upgrade in the kindness you receive from others.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): You have at your disposal a prodigiously potent creative tool: your imagination. If there’s a specific experience or object you want to bring into your world, the first thing you do is visualize it. The practical actions you take to live the life you want to live always refer back to the scenes in your mind’s eye. And so every goal you fulfill, every quest you carry out, every liberation you achieve, begins as an inner vision. Your imagination is the engine of your destiny. It’s the catalyst with which you design your future. I bring these ideas to your attention, dear Pisces, because November is Celebrate Your Imagination Month.

HOMEWORK: Describe what actions you’ll take in the next six months to make your world a funner, holier place. Newsletter@freewillastrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 40

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HEALTH & FITNESS

Patient Services Representative Sansum Clinic is the leader in healthcare in Santa Barbara, with 100 years of excellence. As one of the first points of contact for our patients you be expected to provide high quality customer service in terms of appearance, demeanor and interactions with patients and their families. This candidate will work directly with patients, members of our healthcare team and physicians. Duties will also include data entry, scheduling, providing instructions/ directions and completing necessary paperwork. Qualified candidates will have a 1 year of customer service and clerical support experience. Preferred candidates will have medical office experience as well as knowledge of medical terminology. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, as well as 403b retirement plan. Interested candidates can apply online at https://www.sansumclinic.org/ employment to position #2995. STROKE & Cardiovascular disease are leading causes of death according to the AHA. Screenings can provide peace of mind or early detection! Call Life Line Screening to schedule a screening. Special offer 5 screenings for $149. 1‑833‑549‑4540

PROFESSIONAL

BUSINESS CONTINUITY SPECIALIST

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Under the direction of the Emergency Manager, serves as the Business Continuity Specialist and as a member of the Emergency Operations Team. Develops, maintains and implements business continuity and disaster recovery strategies and solutions, including risk assessments, business impact analyses and documentation of business continuity and disaster recovery procedures. Analyzes impact on, and risk to, essential business functions including information systems and vendor supply chain risks to identify resource requirements and to promote mitigations to acceptable recovery options. Supports the Emergency Manager to provide coverage for the EOC and coordinates with other department staff to

facilitate the delivery of services to the campus community. Serves as EH&S liaison to department safety representatives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Strong analytical, organizational, and critical decision‑making skills. Strong verbal/ written communications. Must be able to interface and coordinate work efficiently and effectively with business partners in remote locations. Strong administrative skills, with effectiveness in developing tasks and managing resources to achieve target dates. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $61,200 ‑ $70,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/12/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #26160

CLINICAL NURSE LIMITED

STUDENT HEALTH Acts as a clinical nurse, triaging students in order to make appropriate appointments and referrals, provides advice for minor illnesses and injuries and patient education. Provides direct patient care per established nursing protocols. Works in an immunization/ travel clinic. Provides contraceptive counseling. Acts as a resource to physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, LVNs and medical assistants.Reqs: Must be licensed by the State Board of Registered Nursing. Must be CPR/BLS certified and kept current. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of

Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Must be licensed by the State Board of Registered Nursing. Must be CPR/BLS certified and kept current. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a limited position at 40%. Salary is commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25479

COUNSELOR/ TRANSFER STUDENTS EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Utilizes advanced counseling skills gained at the Master’s degree level in counseling or related fields; exhibits culturally inclusive active listening skills and provides counseling services for personal, social, and academic issues, including but not limited to cultural identity, educational, relationship, family, sexuality and sexual identity issues. Collaborates in the successful development, planning, budgeting, and administration of Transfer Services. Evaluates programs and services to make relevant improvements in design, policies, procedures, and implementation, for current and future years. Reqs: Experience in providing in‑depth, wide‑ranging, and complex academic advising and holistic services to undergraduates. Working knowledge of MS Office products and Google

Connect/Drive applications. Ability to coordinate and present educational programs and present educational, academic, social, cultural events/ programs and workshops. Ability to work in a highly collaborative manner with a diverse group and a variety of cultural backgrounds.Experience with social media management on multiple platforms, updating department website, and Emma application. Ability to work occasional evenings and weekends. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $57,000 ‑ $63,975/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/3/22. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25905

DATA ANALYST

DIVERSITY EQUITY AND INCLUSION Plans long‑term diversity, equity, and inclusion studies, including the preparation of proposals, design of survey instruments, and determining sampling procedures. Gathers, analyzes, prepares, and summarizes the collection of information and data; recommends statistical approaches, trends, sources, and uses. Prepares data for presentation to clients and other audiences. Identifies multivariate strategies. Prepares reports of studies for internal validation and cross‑validation studies. Analyses the interrelationships of data and defines logical aspects of data sets. Develops systems for organizing data to analyze, identify

and report trends. Manages database for research data for projects. Reviews new software instruments and potential effects on statistical testing. May make programming modifications. Participates in the development and implementation of data security policies and procedures. Keeps abreast of technical advances in storage, documentation, and dissemination of computerized data. May supervise data entry, database management, and research analysis of work‑study students/interns, support staff and/or lower‑level analysts. Partners with other cross‑functional stakeholders to enable the successful delivery of reports, dashboards, and analytics to measure progress against defined actions. Communicate key findings to various stakeholders to facilitate data‑driven decision‑making into areas needing greater attending against defined action plans. Tracks DEI campus data and prepares reports, presentations, statistics, charts and graphs on a variety of DEI subjects to address enrollment, campus climate and program‑related issues. Ensures confidentiality of sensitive DEI data, including adherence to Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA ) policy. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Thorough knowledge of research function. Thorough skills associated with statistical analysis and systems programming. Research skills at a level to evaluate alternate solutions and develop recommendations. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The position is funded by federal contract/ subcontract and requires an E‑Verify check. $78,630‑$104,600/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin,

disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/9/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25874

GRADUATE PROGRAM ADVISOR

GLOBAL STUDIES Manages all aspects of the current graduate programs, including the Master’s Program, the Ph.D. Emphasis Program and a Ph.D. program. Assures that graduate students meet the academic, teaching, and research requirements of both the Global Studies Program and the University. Acts as Program liaison to the Graduate Division. Identifies problems, suggests solutions, and develops procedures for graduate affairs. Advises graduate students on all aspects of the graduate program. Administers and tracks annual block grant funds, TA allocations, recruitment funds, gift funds, fellowships and grants. Responsible for the employment for graduate student academic employees. Provides Department and University policy and procedural information to graduate students, faculty, staff, applicants and potential applicants to the graduate program. Coordinates graduate recruitment, admission and orientation. Manages database for all graduate student records. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/ or equivalent experience/training. Knowledge of advising and counseling techniques. Must be able to follow established guidelines and policies regarding academic advising criteria. Must be able to interact effectively with students, faculty, staff and other campus offices on a variety of advising issues and provide information and

guidance regarding departmental and UC policies. Strong written and verbal communication skills, including active listening. Proficient in the use of MS Office Suite and ability to learn new online systems. Abilities in problem identification, reasoning. Ability to develop original ideas to solve problems. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $23.66 ‑ $27.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/8/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25901

GROUNDSKEEPER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Performs operational level groundskeeping duties as assigned. Cultivates planted areas; plants, fertilizes and maintains shrubs, small trees, lawns and other ground covers; may operate irrigation systems manually and by automatic controls. Uses a variety of hand and powered tools and equipment, including lawn mowers, edger, line trimmers, hedge trimmers, blowers, and vacuums. Cleans grounds and walks of litter; empties trash receptacles; maintains and makes minor repairs to tools, irrigation and drainage systems. Reqs: Minimum three years experience in institutional or commercial landscape maintenance and installation. Demonstrable knowledge of plant care, safe equipment use, landscape

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NOW HIRING

WEB CONTENT MANAGER The Santa Barbara Independent has an opportunity in our Digital Department. This full-time position will publish all editorial content on independent.com as part of a team of two web content managers. Looking for motivated individuals, who have great attention to detail and are ready to collaborate. Web content managers handle all digital formats including website, newsletters, and social media. HTML/CSS knowledge a plus. Will train the right candidate. Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance; Section 125 cafeteria plan; 401(k); and vacation program. This position is currently authorized to work from home, but weekly inperson meetings in Downtown Santa Barbara are required. EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

Please send résumé along with cover letter to

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EMPLOYMENT irrigation principles, horticultural pest control experience, a strong work ethic, and the ability to be a team player. Ability to communicate effectively in English. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $18.38‑$21.55/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 11/12/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu.Job # 26139

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of California. Master’s degree in Social Work. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner.Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check.. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 11/8/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #25943

MEDICAL ASSISTANT‑LIMITED

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/ out patients, filling out the necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians, as well as scheduling appointments. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), American Medical Technologists (AMT), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA), Note: Those who have graduated from an EMT program may also be considered, although the MA program is preferable. Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at time of hire is required and non‑negotiable. Notes: This is a limited position at 40%. Mon.‑Fri./7:45am‑4:30pm (may include Thursday evenings until 7pm).

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Student Health requires all clinical staff to successfully pass the background check and complete the credentialing process before the employment date. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $23.27/hour. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #25239

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/ out patients, filling out the necessary paperwork, taking phone messages, and following directives from the clinicians. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), American Medical Technologists (AMT), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA), Note: Those who have graduated from an EMT program may also be considered, although the MA program is preferable. Applicants without proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/ Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at time of hire. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Starting at $23.27. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 24912

PLUMBER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Design, redesign and assemble from working drawings and blueprints various systems including water, steam, sanitary and storm drains, irrigation and sprinkler systems, and compressed airlines. These installations require a thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes, the ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings, and the ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow; perform welding, soldering, and brazing as required; install and repair plumbing fixtures, air compressors, pumps, steam and hot water boilers. Reqs: Must possess the skills, knowledge and abilities essential to the successful performance of Journey Level Plumber duties as evidenced by a journeyman plumber certificate or an equivalent combination of education and

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experience. Substantial journey‑level experience in institutional, industrial, and commercial plumbing installation and maintenance. Thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes. Ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings. Ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Note: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $37.56/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26306

SITE RELIABILITY ENGINEER

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT The ETS Infrastructure group is looking for a self‑motivated team player with at least 3 years of Linux system administration experience including advanced networking. We help to manage the North Hall Data Center (NHDC), host enterprise Campus‑wide applications, provide system administration, and maintain the Core IT virtual Infrastructure both on‑premises and in various public clouds. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Information Technology; or equivalent work experience. Please see https://www.it.ucsb.edu/ enterprise‑technology‑services to learn more. $67,500 ‑ $104,600/ yr. depending on experience. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 24591

SUPPLIER ENABLEMENT SPECIALIST

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Manages all supplier onboarding and content management processes, including negotiation of business terms, payment matrix, invoicing methodology and Gateway catalog management. Serves as the primary point of contact for Gateway vendors. Manages strategies to increase utilization of the e‑procurement tool, strategically sourced contracts, drive sustainable process changes, improve transaction efficiency, and improve cash flow cash management. Requires self‑motivation with the ability to work proactively in an organization experiencing ongoing change. Demonstrates exceptional interpersonal and communication skills to provide customer service in a fast‑paced, high‑volume dynamic work environment. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated competence in financial ERP and/or eProcurement systems. Possesses a customer service focus across broad and diverse subject areas. Excellent analytical and problem‑solving skills. Ability to use independent judgment, initiative, and analytical skills to problem solve and

address complex administrative and financial issues. Ability to manage a significant volume of transactions, perform complex financial analysis, and customized reporting. Ability to independently execute a wide range of duties, pay strict attention to detail, and prioritize work to meet deadlines among competing demands. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $28.00‑ $29.50/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/9/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25942

WATER TREATMENT SPECIALIST

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Performs a variety of skilled tasks in the maintenance, alteration, and repair of buildings and related facilities and equipment, utilizing one or more of the building trades. Works independently or as part of a maintenance crew and performs other related duties as required. The focus is on the campus water services which encompass hot and chilled loop systems for 64 academic buildings on campus. The Water Treatment Specialist is responsible for troubleshooting issues, maintaining required records, conducting scheduled testing, and analyzing reports on a daily and/or weekly basis, for the: hot water boiler services, steam boiler water services, cooling water services, towers/condensers, and soft water systems. Works closely with campus Engineers, vendors, academic departments and researchers, outside contractors, and UCSB Design & Construction Services in the construction of water treatment facilities, start‑up testing, chemical cleanings, and analyzing boiler or system failures. Responsible for the chemicals used in the campus water systems, including; ordering, storage, labeling and disposal. Reqs: Three years of experience working with water treatment systems, such as cooling towers, steam boilers, and high purity systems. Ability to read blueprints. Experience working in new construction for the implementation and design for water treatment systems installed for research facilities. Must have experience working with chemical supply companies to establish baseline thresholds and scheduled deliveries. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $35.34/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/15/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 26297.

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Charles Donelan’s Pano captures the full range of arts and entertainment available in our region in one panoramic weekly wide shot, scanning our cultural horizon for the best in theater, visual art, film, dance, music, and more every Wednesday.

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Tide Guide

RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT

*Note: Daylight saving time starts Sunday, Nov. 7 at 2 am

Day

$1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915

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High

Thu 4

3:09 am 1.1

9:27 am 6.2

4:12 pm -0.6

10:33 pm 4.4

Fri 5

3:43 am 1.5

10:01 am 6.5

5:01 pm -0.9

11:31 pm 4.1

Sat 6

4:20 am 1.9

10:40 am 6.6

5:53 pm -1.1 5:50 pm -0.9

3:59 am 2.3

10:23 am 6.4

1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200

12:47 am 3.6

4:43 am 2.7

11:13 am 6.1

6:53 pm -0.7

Tue 9

2:14 am 0.5

5:42 am 3.0

12:12 pm 5.7

8:03 pm -0.5

2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549

Wed 10

3:43 am 3.7

7:20 am 3.3

1:27 pm 5.1

9:15 pm -0.2

Thu 11

4:51 am 4.0

9:28 am 3.1

2:58 pm 4.7

10:21 pm 0.0

STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

WANT TO RENT

4D

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11 H

19 D

27 source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“It’s Symbolic” -- a trip around the keyboard.

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Across

@sbindynews

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12:34 am 3.8

MUSIC LESSONS

@sbindependent

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AUTO

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MUSIC

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Sunrise 6:34 Sunset 4:58

1 Joan who sang “I Love Rock ‘n Roll” 5 Shaq’s former college team 8 “Family Guy” dog 13 Laguna contents 14 Street through the middle of town 15 Casual eatery, in Canadian slang 16 Underground illegal activity that may be busted by the Feds 18 Passing notices 19 “Butter” group 20 Alla ___ (cut time, in music) 21 Adorable pet 22 Some negatively persuasive strategies 24 Goes by 27 Some med. insurance groups 28 Time magazine co-founder Henry 29 Intuitive ability 30 Sports drink ender 33 Unrealistic comparisons for real-life couples (since problems don’t often get resolved in 30 minutes) 38 Obnoxious person 39 Willful participant? 40 Fit one within the other 41 “Bye Bye Bye” group ‘N ___ 42 Former spelling of “Westworld” actress Newton’s name (she restored the W in 2021) INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

45 Turned up on the beach 49 Otherwise named 50 Moby-Dick, for one 51 URL ending, sometimes 54 Dwarves’ representative in the Fellowship of the Ring 55 Searchlight used in Gotham City 57 “___ Holmes” (Netflix movie) 58 Release, as energy 59 MC ___ (“Keep On, Keepin’ On” rapper) 60 Jorts material 61 ___ ipsa loquitur 62 Yoked animals

Down

1 Door frame component 2 Multi-award-winning accomplishment 3 Margarine containers 4 Paving material 5 Shaq’s former pro team 6 Pasta-draining device 7 Release from a leash 8 Food that comes in florets 9 Counterargues 10 Question about Biblical betrayal 11 High point of a house 12 They get counted or turned up 14 Jazz vocalist Carmen 17 Basics 22 Built to ___ 23 AFL-CIO part 24 “Frozen” princess

25 “Sesame Street” human character for 25 years 26 Does something 29 To an advanced degree 30 Like some bourbons 31 Lucie Arnaz’s dad 32 90 degrees from norte 34 Strident agreement 35 Heal up 36 Optimistic “David Copperfield” character 37 2nd or 4th of VIII? 41 “Okay to proceed?” 42 “In other words ...” 43 “The Planets” composer Gustav 44 “Whose woods these ___ think ...”: Frost 45 Carried on, as a battle 46 Flaring dress style 47 Judge seated near Sofia 48 Ignominy 51 Stone used for chess sets 52 Give out some stars 53 Watkins ___, NY 56 Day-___ (fluorescent paint) ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1056

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

NOVEMBER 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT NOVEMBER 4,4, 2021

43 43


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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ROBERT O. MANGUS NO: 21PR00459 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ROBERT O. MANGUS A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: ROBERT O. MANGUS, JR., THOMAS A. MANGUS, and SHELLIE BURBANK in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): JACQUELYN QUINN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s to will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 12/02/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: April M. Lavigne, Law Offices of April M. Lavigne. 7 W. Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara, CA (805) 881‑1230. Published Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JEFFREY HARB, also known as JEFFREY EUGENE HARB and JEFFREY E. HARB Case No.: 21PR00489 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JEFFREY HARB, also known as JEFFREY EUGENE HARB and JEFFREY E. HARB

44

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: KRISTI HARB in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: KRISTI HARB be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 12/16/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published Nov 4, 11, 18 2021.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: BUNNIN CADILLAC at 301 S Hope Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Believe Automotive Inc. (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 05/09/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0001416. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Believe Automotive Inc. (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 6, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E18, Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: BUNNIN CHEVROLET CADILLAC at 301 S Hope Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Believe Automotive Inc. 9230 Olympic Blvd #203 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 01/29/2020 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2020‑0000326. The

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 4, 2021

person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Bunnin Chevrolet Cadillac (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 1, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30, Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ROOTED SANTA BARBARA COUNTY at 1111 Chapala Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Founation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jackie Carrera, President & CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002925. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BROWN AND WILMANNS ENVIRONMENTAL at 850 Cathedral Vista Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Brown And Wilmanns Environmental, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Michael S Brown, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002847. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DAKOTA RAE DESIGN at 215 Bath St B11 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Dakota Rae Taylor (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Dakota Taylor, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002843. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY at 215 Pesetas Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Sansum Clinic 470 South Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Jennifer Rose, Executive Assistant Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002866. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TINO’S ITALIAN GROCERY at 210 W. Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; M&Z Italian Grocery 111 S. Voluntario St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Deanna Morinini, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002744. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DJ’Z ELECTRONIC REPAIRZ at 280 N. Fairview Ave Unit 2 Goleta, CA

93117; Jonathon Zayha (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathon Zayha, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002848. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HOT SPRINGS CANYON RANCH at 5000 Highway 154 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael A Taras, Jr 3120 NE 57th Street Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33308; Sharon J. Taras (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Michael A. Taras JR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002875. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MANZO TILE at 279 San Napoli Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; Jesus Manzo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jesus Manzo Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002854. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CONRAD COLLECTIVE at 1671 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Julane Conrad (same address) Kevin Conrad (same address)This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Julane Conrad Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002892. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HASHING2HEATING at 864 Highland Dr. #5 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jonathan A. Heffner (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathan A. Heffner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002906. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: OLIVE STREET DESIGN at 1509 Olive St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tara E. Dees (same address)This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Tara Dees Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002885. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CREEKSIDE STORIES at 902 Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jan Dewitt (same address) Charlene M. Huston (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Jan Dewitt, Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County

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Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002901. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: US HISTORIC TOUR at 2575 Treasure Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tirzah E. Riley (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Tirzah Riley, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002899. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CENTRAL COAST HEALTH INFORMATION TECNOLOGY INCORPORATED at 758 Via Miguel Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Central Coast Health Information Technology Incorporated (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Michiel De Bruin, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002923. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BERNIE BAGGS VO LLC, BERNIE BAGGS VO, BERNIE BAGGS at 290 Main St Los Alamos, CA 93440; Bernie Baggs Vo LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Bernard Baggarly, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002818. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GROW YOUR REPUTATION at 7041 Armstrong Rd. Goleta, CA 93117; Michael J Shierloh (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Michael Shierloh Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002841. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OROZCO PLASTERING at 635 E. Maple St. Oxnard, CA 93033; Moises Orozco Hernandez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Moises Orozco Hernandez, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002884. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TRUTH IN RECRUITMENT at 1111 Chapala St Ste 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jackie Carerra, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002960. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑

(s) is/are doing business as: THE ADULT STORE at 405 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; S.B. Books Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Donovan Green, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 05, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002810. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: COLORS WINE CELLARS at 206 South C St. Lompoc, CA 93436; Christopher M. Rogers (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Christopher Rogers, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002874. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLUCLEAN MAID SERVICES at 1445 Harbor View Dr #127 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Susana Soto De Magallanes (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Susana Soto De Magallanes Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002801. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DEL PLAYA BREW CO. at 130 N. Calle Cesar Chavez #F Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Anthony R Simentales 3742 Venitia Lane #A Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Anthony Robert Simentales, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002708. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUILDING HOPE, LLC DBA GARDEN STREET APARTMENTS at 617 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Building Hope, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Annmarie Cameron, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002833. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GI SERVICES at 4825 San Gordiano Ave. Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Alfonso Gonzalez Flores (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Alfonso Gonzalez Flores, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002731. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OFFGRID at 421 N Milpas St Santa Barbara, CA 93103 Edec Digital Forensics LLC (same address) This business is


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conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Eric Ryan, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002839. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MARIPOSAS SB at 404 W Padre St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Juanita Reveles (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Juanita Reveles, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002734. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ASTRO CONSULTANTS, ARCAIOS CONSULTANTS, PATAGONIA ARCHAEOLOGY, HERITAGE ARCHAEOLOGY at 903 West Mission Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ignacio Requena (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Ignacio Requena Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002826. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LEGACY SERVICES at 7th Street Apt. B Carpinteria, CA 93013; Alexis Olaya Torres (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Alexis Olaya Torres, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002717. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AIKU APOTHECARY at 27 West Anapamu St #488 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Aiku LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Tobias Levi Brown‑Heft, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002781. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GREYWEATHER at 990 N Patterson Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Teagan Ross Giffin (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Teagan Ross Giffin, Sole Proprietor Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 01, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002792. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JAK PHOTOGRAPHS at 767 Cypress Walk Apt C Goleta, CA 93117;Juliana A Kunz This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Juliana A Kunz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from

the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2021‑0002958. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHAINED SB at 1204 Diana Road Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Stefanie J. Bayles (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Stefanie Bayles Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002920. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SBBIKE, BICI CENTRO, SBBIKE+COAST, COAST+SBBIKE at 506 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Greg Janee, Secretary Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002921. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: QUEEN MARY SEAFOODS at 2405 Calle Linares Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Henry D. Hepp (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Henry Hepp Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002996. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GILL FORD MAZDA at 440 Hitchcock Way Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Gill Motors SB, Inc. 1100 S. Madera Ave. Madera, CA 93637 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Gagandeep Chahal, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0003005. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PHILASOPHIE at 474 Cinderella Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Philasophie LLC 2108 N. Street Ste N Sacremento, CA 95816 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Melissa Mininni, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002905. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MITSUYE YAMADA & MICHAEL YASUTAKE JUSTICE FUND at 522 University Rd. 5034 HSSB Santa Barbara, CA 93106; Diane Fujino 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117; Matef Harmachis 456 Cool Brook Lane Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Unincorporate Assoc. Other Than a Partnership Signed: Matef Harmachis, Treasurer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002990. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE UNCOMMON BALANCE at 2021 Chino Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Courtney R. Salviolo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Courtney Salviolo, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002998. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: KEG N BOTTLE MARKET #4 at 915 Embarcadero Del Mar Goleta, CA 93117; NBK, Inc. 6060 El Cajon Blvd. San Diego, CA 92115 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randy Konja, Vice President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002805. Published: Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DATA TECHNOLOGY CONSULTING at 4521 Vieja Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Steven Davis (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Steve Davis Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002769. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KRISTEEN LEIGH GO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03463 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KRISTEEN LEIGH GO TO: KRISTEEN LEIGH ALATRISTE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Nov 22, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 15, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF HEATHER ELYSE CARASTRO HAGEN TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03962 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: HEATHER ELYSE

CARASTRO HAGEN TO: HEATHER ELYSE FLEMING THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 07, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 13, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TYLER JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03264 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TYLER JOSEPH SCHMIDT TO: TYLER NORTH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of

Hearing Dec 14, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 15, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 4, 11, 18, 24 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. November 26, 2021 at 3:30 PM Amanda De Luna Personal, Totes, Clothes, Bags, Guitar Timothy Neros Personal Belongings John Williams Bags The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): DAVID H. SHOR, an individual, JUDI B. SHOR, an individual, and DOES 1‑25, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JAMES L. HUDGENS, EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL W. MCCANN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the

information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en

el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 21CV03593 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Raymond Chandler 15 W. Carrillo St. Ste 220 Santa Barbara, CA 93101, (805) 965‑1999 (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Law Offices of Raymond Chandler, 15 W. Carrillo St., Ste 220, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 965‑1999;DATE 9/8/2021 Deputy Clerk; Terri Chavez. Published. Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021.

Get Involved with the City – Apply for a Board or Commission Applications due by November 24, 2021 Are you looking for a meaningful way to get involved in your community? The City of Goleta is looking for community members to #JoinTeamGoleta by serving on the Planning Commission, Public Engagement Commission, or Mosquito and Vector Management District Board of Santa Barbara County. City Clerk Deborah Lopez said, “We have a very active community and serving on a Board or Commission is a great way to give back. It provides an opportunity to participate in the decision-making process for Goleta and work with staff at the City or County level.” The Planning Commission sits as a decision-making body on land use issues for the City and consists of five members who each serve a four-year term. Their role is to review and take appropriate action on discretionary development applications and to make recommendations to the City Council regarding any proposed legislative actions, including the General Plan and its implementation, as required by law. The Planning Commission meets on the second and fourth Mondays of each month starting at 6:00 p.m. Compensation is $100 per meeting. There will be one vacancy. To be eligible, applicants must reside within City limits and be a qualified elector. Those interested in looking for opportunities and ways to increase public engagement in City government are encouraged to apply to serve on the Public Engagement Commission. To be considered, you must be a resident of the City of Goleta and not employed by the City. There are four vacancies. The Commission has six regularly scheduled meetings per year and Commissioners are compensated $50 per meeting. Currently, the Public Engagement Commission is assisting with the district mapping process to determine district lines for the City’s first District Elections in November of 2022. The Mosquito and Vector Management District Board of Santa Barbara County consists of eight members, five of which are appointed by the County Board of Supervisors and three of which are appointed by the City Council of the member cities of Carpinteria, Goleta, and Santa Barbara. The City of Goleta is currently accepting applications for one vacancy from residents who are interested in serving on this Board. The District’s Board of Trustees meets on the second Thursday of each month at 2:00 p.m. to discuss District business and authorize fiscal and operational activity. Interested applicants must submit an application by Wednesday, November 24, 2021, at 5:00 p.m. for consideration. For more information, go to https://tinyurl.com/goletaboards-commissions or e-mail cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org. INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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