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H A L L O W E E N FREE

H A P P E N I N G S

Santa Barbara

OCT. 28-NOV. 4, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 824

FAMILY &

FOOTBALL

A SANTA BARBARA FAMILY BONDS THROUGH SPORTS BY RYAN P. CRUZ

ALSO INSIDE

Hayden on Bellosguardo State Probe Yatchisin on Riviera Bar • Capps on Campaign Finance Reform


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THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 28, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Annette Gordon-Reed

Warrior Women

On Juneteenth: ‘Freedom Day’ and Its Importance to American History

Featuring Madonna Thunder Hawk and Marcella Gilbert

Wed, Nov 10 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Wed, Nov 3 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall This documentary screening and conversation chronicles the work of a Lakota mother and daughter whose fight for Indigenous rights began in the late 1960s and continues to this day.

Presented in association with the Santa Barbara Women’s Political Committee

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed weaves together history and heartfelt memoir to tell the sweeping story of Juneteenth and the larger fight for equality.

Justice for All Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Zegar Family Foundation, and Anonymous

Justice for All Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Zegar Family Foundation, and Anonymous

Leonidas Kavakos, violin Yuja Wang, piano

She & Him

Fri, Nov 12 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Recognized for his virtuosity and superb musicianship, violinist Leonidas Kavakos joins forces with pianist Yuja Wang, lauded for her captivating stage presence and “wizardly technique” (Chicago Tribune).

A Very She & Him Christmas Party Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre Usher in the holiday season with M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

Program

J.S. Bach: Sonata No. 3 in E major, BWV 1016 Busoni: Sonata No. 2 in E minor, op. 36a J.S. Bach: Sonata No. 1 in B minor, BWV 1014 Shostakovich: Sonata in G major, op. 134 Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Music

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

Special Thanks:

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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WE ARE VERY EXCITED TO SHARE OUR ENDORSEMENTS FOR NOVEMBER 2021. CHECK OUT THE CANDIDATES’ WEBSITES TO LEARN MORE, DONATE AND VOLUNTEER!

MAYOR Deborah Schwartz

CITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 4 Kristen Sneddon

www.schwartzforsb.com/

www.sbsneddon.com

CITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 5 Eric Friedman

www.friedmanforcouncil.org

CITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 6 Nina Johnson

www.ninajohnsonsb.org

WWW.DEMWOMENSB.COM

SAVE DE L A GUERRA PLAZA Join the Committee to Save DLG Plaza

Dear Santa Barbaran, De la Guerra Plaza is threatened as never before. Join the Coalition to Save DLG Plaza to stop the misconceived City plan to remove all lawn area from the historic plaza. The proposal to pave over all of De la Guerra Plaza would destroy the historic authenticity of one of the city’s most important public spaces—which extends back in time 200 years. The proposed loss of De la Guerra Plaza’s historic character and the ability to continue to hold Fiesta Mercado there (a tradition extending back almost 100 years)—and the loss of the “speaker’s corner” element of De la Guerra Plaza, which is essential to public discussion in our community—would be great losses at a cost of millions of tax dollars.

CITY PLAN:

WHAT CIVIC LEADERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE PROPOSAL TO TRANSFORM DE LA GUERA PLAZA: “I grew up here, our daughter is a 9th generation Santa Barbaran. Our first Santa Barbara ancestor was a Spanish soldier under the second Commandante of the Presidio, Felipe de Goycoechea, who served here from 1784 to 1802. De la Guerra Plaza has always been an anchor of our Community. It is a historically important place that needs to be preserved Cut & Send in its historic use and configuration.” Russell Ruiz, 8th generation Santa Barbaran, Past Chair, SB City Water Commission

JOIN THE COMMITTEE TO SAVE DLG PLAZA!

“De la Guerra Plaza is the historic heart of Santa Barbara. It is vital that it is saved in its current use for future generations.” Gerry DeWitt, Past Member, Santa Barbara City Council

REMOVE ALL LAWN AREA 4

THE INDEPENDENT

“Preserving historic De la Guerra Plaza is essential to Santa Barbara’s future. The proposal to eliminate the existing lawn from De la Guerra Plaza and to introduce non-traditional elements would change the plaza forever and lessen vital historic continuity and civic use.” John C. Woodward, Past Chair, SB City Historic Landmarks Commission

OCTOBER 28, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Name Email You may use my name as a supporter of the Committee Yes Enclosed is my contribution of $ Mail to: Committee to Save DLG Plaza, P.O. Box 2635, Santa Barbara, CA 93120


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY 26 Family & Football A Santa Barbara Family Bonds Through Sports by Ryan P. Cruz

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 News Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

FEATURE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 ON THE COVER: Abel Renteria (left) and Miguel Unzueta. Photo by Erick Madrid. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

OUR SAILING JOURNALIST Our latest hire as a news reporter, Jun Starkey, hails from Bakersfield but moved to Santa Barbara when she was 10 so that her father could study marine technology at SBCC. She’s primarily in charge of our education coverage these days, including her story on page 12, and tells us more about herself below, including how she lived on a boat with her family for a few years.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 35, # 824, Oct. 28-Nov. 4, 2021

What draws you to being a journalist? I have always wanted to write, and journalism was a way for me to work on creating a cohesive narrative that was simple for people to follow, just in a nonfiction form. Now I think of journalism as more of a public service, disseminating important information in a digestible way to people who would otherwise not know what’s happening in their city. Also, when I was younger, every cool female character on TV was a journalist. What have you enjoyed writing about so far? I have covered mostly education issues, focusing on the school board and how they’ve navigated through these last few months of the pandemic. That has been very rewarding to me, because I think fighting the constant COVID misinformation can only be done by providing accurate info and providing a clear understanding of what a governing body can do to prevent the spread of a virus. How was the boat life? It was a cheaper way to stay in Santa Barbara and still have some income left over for, like, anything else. But because of that I know how to sail, not incredibly well, but still a life-saving skill.

ENDORSEMENT

“At this time in history, Sneddon reflects and represents an essential element in Santa Barbara’s long-festering debate over how much new growth development we want or need. Without her on the dais, that viewpoint would be would be dangerously absent.” 10/12/21 Full endorsement list at: SBSNEDDON.COM

Santa Barbara City Firefighters

Re-elect

KRISTEN SNEDDON for SANTA BARBARA CITY COUNCIL Paid for by Kristen Sneddon for City Council 2021 PO Box 20153, Santa Barbara, CA 93120 • ID#1398099

INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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breast cancer program

the full spectrum of breast care Our team of breast surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, researchers, genetic counselors, patient navigators, oncology dietitian nutritionists and other support staff provide comprehensive breast cancer care, right here under one roof in Santa Barbara.

Santa Barbara • Solvang (805) 879-0670 breastcancer.ridleytreecc.org

our expert breast cancer team

Dr. Leung BREAST RADIOLOGY

Dr. Choi

Dr. Mitchell

BREAST SURGERY

Dr. Campos

Dr. Gupta

Dr. Kennedy

Dr. Penn

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY

Dr. Cheng

Dr. Cotter

Dr. Suh

Dr. Voog

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

Meagan Harmon for City Council

Endorsed by the Democratic Party, Sierra Club, Planned Parenthood Action Fund, and City Firefighters

ENDORSED October 12, 2021

“We believe Meagan Harmon offers to put the best foot forward into the future.”

Endorsed by:

www.meaganharmon.org

Return your ballot by Tuesday, November 2, 2021 Paid Political Advertisement | Paid for by Meagan Harmon for Santa Barbara City Council 2021 | FPPC # 1419185

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


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Endorsements

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aybe the fate of Western Civilization doesn’t hang in the balance. But for the 91,000 people who call the City of Santa Barbara home, it seems that way. On November 2, city voters will choose which of the six candidates now running to be our next mayor. That’s a big deal. Plus, voters from two districts — 4 and 6—will determine which of the six candidates (two incumbents) now vying for a seat on the council dais will represent them in City Hall. Another incumbent, Eric Friedman, has no opponent. The issues are the same as they ever are: housing, homelessness, and the economic vitality of our downtown. Then, there’s Santa Barbara’s

response to the great racial reckoning taking place nationwide. And beyond that is the global threat of climate change. In other words, it’s about everything. Suffusing it all is a disquieting sense that the hubcaps may be flying off the wheels at City Hall. The rate of turnover in high-ranking leadership positions is enough to induce whiplash. The word “leadership”— always invoked come election season — has transitioned from mere campaign slogan to mantra. Like many of you, we at the Independent have struggled to come to terms with the candidates before us. Few choices were easy, but we take our work seriously. We hope you find the fruit of our agitation helpful. But whatever you decide, please vote.

James Joyce III for S.B. Mayor

Kristen Sneddon for District 4

Meagan Harmon for District 6

Eric Friedman for District 5

YOUR L (800) 74 BRANC

Fill the Foodbank! Drive-thru Food Drive Sat, Nov 6 • 10am-2pm Foodbank warehouse 4554 Hollister Ave (adjacent to Ben Page Youth Center)

Donate healthy food for our neighbors in need! Turkey Drive 2021 runs thru Nov 24

To read our full endorsements, visit independent.com/endorsements-2021

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FoodbankSBC.org/GiveFood INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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2021

Ojai Film Festival A Premier Collection of Independent Films from Around the World • Features, Documentaries and Animated Films • Screenplay Competition and Live Read • Seminars, Parties and Special Events • Diversity & Inclusion Mini-Festival • Environmental Focus Films • Celebrity Honorees OjaiFilmFestival.com

NOVEMBER 5-8 AT OJAI ART CENTER NOVEMBER 9-14 ALL FILMS AVAILABLE ONLINE 805.640.1947

ENRICHING THE HUMAN SPIRIT THROUGH FILM REDISTRICTING IN THE CITY OF SANTA BARBARA BE A PART OF THE PROCESS – FALL 2021-SPRING 2022 Visit SantaBarbaraCA.gov/IRC to: learn more, subscribe to news, draw maps, and view the schedule of hearings of the Independent Redistricting Commission in YOUR district! *In Person Independent Redistricting Commission Hearings will be in the evening or weekends and include complimentary childcare and snacks. Participate via Zoom. Scan QR Code for more information and to stay informed. Spanish translation available.

For more information visit our web pages. Scan Code to learn more.

REDISTRITACIÓN EN LA CIUDAD DE SANTA BÁRBARA SEA PARTE DEL PROCESO – OTÓNO DE 2021 A PRIMAVERA DE 2022 Visite SantaBarbaraCA.gov/IRC para: obtener más información, suscribase a las noticias, dibujar mapas y ver el calendario de audiencias de la Comisión Independiente de Redistritación en SU distrito. * Las audiencias de la Comisión Independiente de Redistritación de Distritos en persona serán por la noche o los fines de semana e incluirán cuidado de niños y refrigerios de cortesía. Participe a través de Zoom. Escanee el código QR para obtener más información y mantenerse informado. Traducción al español disponible. 8

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 28, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


OCT. 21-28, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

MI KE ELIASON / S.B. COU NTY F I R E DEPT.

ENVIRONMENT

COMMUNITY The Sheriff-Coroner’s Office has identified S.B. residents Oscar Moreno, 29, and Jessica Honor, 34, as the two people killed in a single-car crash at the Garden Street on-ramp of the southbound 101 on 10/20. The two left the highway at the Garden Street off-ramp, went through the intersection, and then went up the highway on-ramp, where the car crashed into a concrete wall, rolled over, and caught fire. The two were found to be deceased when they were taken from the car. CHP asks anyone with knowledge of the incident to call (805) 967-1234. A 53-year-old S.B. man died at home 10/24, hours following a moped collision with his friend on Hope Avenue. During their investigation, S.B. police learned that after the man was thrown from his moped, he and his friend went to another friend’s house, where he started having chest pains. The man, whose identity is being withheld pending notification of his family, then returned home, where he collapsed in his bathroom. AMR paramedics and City Fire responded to render aid, but he was ultimately pronounced dead at the scene. Investigators believe the earlier collision was directly linked to his death; the incident remains under investigation.

‘THANKFUL’: Emergency managers issued an evacuation order on Sunday that was lifted just over 24 hours later after the much-anticipated rainstorm passed without triggering a debris flow or flash flooding.

Lots of Rain, No Landslides

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County. At first they’d thought replacement cost the county $2 million per month in tipparts for the above-ground pipe system ping fees — or the charge to offload trash — would be trapped in the delivery boondoggle and the cost of taking trash to other landfills plaguing the country. But staffers were able was another $500,000 a month, expenses the to locate contractors with good supplies on county could ill afford after completing the hand, and two of the six landfill zones were new $150 million Tajiguas facility in July. back in operation already. That methane extracted from the buried trash powers the materials recycling facility, or MRF, which lost its air filter to the fire. Rebuilding the biofilter and its heavy-duty concrete walls—which had been torn apart to snuff out the woodchip bonfire — plus getting new ammonia scrubbers from an overseas supplier could take several months, McGolpin said, and accounted for much of the $10 million cost to replace the air system. The landfill staff were being very creative in coming back from the fire, McGolpin said, working AS THE SMOKE CLEARS: Tajiguas Landfill, which was hit by the around the clock to get Tajiguas Alisal Fire on its first night, began to open again this week, but up and running again. He noted rebuilding the biofilter and its concrete walls in the recycling center that ammonia readings had been (above) could still take months. low in the MRF when it was operational, “and with that knowledge we’re workFortunately, the most expensive part of the ing with the Air Pollution Control District facility—the $33 million anaerobic digester to see if there are other options” in starting and methane system—was spared by the fire. up the MRF again. The first test would be to All the recycling and conversion of organics restart the conveyor system that separates the to methane is part of lengthening the eightcontents of the blue recycling cans and to take year lifetime left to Tajiguas before it hits its air-quality samples throughout the day. permitted capacity. The long-term goal would This week, the landfill was opened again be to increase the volume at the landfill withfor loads of trash, and they didn’t have to haul out touching undisturbed earth, McGolpin to Ventura and Santa Maria anymore, McGol- said, or to go a little higher and a little farther pin said. A closed Tajiguas was estimated to up the canyon. n

L AE L WAGE N EC K / S.B. COU NT Y P U B LIC WOR KS

by Jean Yamamura long with the good news that Monday’s rainstorm did not wash anyone out in the Alisal Fire burn scar came the information that the fire was just about extinguished and comments from Public Works that the Tajiguas Landfill would be operational earlier than expected. The three-plus inches of rain rolled some rock onto the roads and mud into streets along Refugio, but UPS and FedEx vans continued to come and go, evidence of the relative mildness of the much-anticipated storm. Emergency managers had issued an evacuation order on Sunday that was lifted just over 24 hours later. The storm, which delivered more than four and a half inches of rain at San Marcos Pass, barely moved the storage needle at Lake Cachuma, which has seen only two healthy rain years during the past decade. Alisal Fire incident commanders had not yet signed off on 100 percent containment, said U.S. Forest Service spokesperson Andrew Madsen on Tuesday, but it was “as close to being contained as it can be without being at 100 percent.” Tajiguas Landfill, where most of southern Santa Barbara County sends its trash, was hit by the fire on its first night, October 11. Six or seven of the methane “wells”—or pipes down in the buried trash that collect the gas —caught fire, and the giant biofilter system in the recycling center was toast. But what was thought to take months to fix may actually take just a few weeks. The methane well fires were all extinguished pretty quickly, said Scott McGolpin, who heads Public Works for Santa Barbara

S.B. SH ER I FF ’S OFFIC E

COURTS & CRIME

Alisal Fire Nearly Out, and Tajiguas Landfill Slowly Reopening

Zachary Coughlin (pictured), a k a the “mirror bus” man, was sentenced 10/21 to the maximum penalty of 20 years plus 125 years in state prison after a jury in July found him guilty of 14 counts of rape and related criminal offenses against multiple victims. Coughlin was arrested in May 2020 after Isla Vistans reported he had assaulted women who visited his “mirror bus,” taking videos and photographs of the assaults, and that he lurked outside women’s homes, verbally insulting them. Edward Norman Hill Lewis, 43, of Lompoc was arrested 10/19 for multiple alleged sex crimes against minors. The Sheriff’s Office received the initial report of sexual abuse by Lewis on 7/1, which triggered a months-long investigation resulting in the identification of several additional sexual assault survivors who have reported incidents occurring throughout the county and dating as far back as the early 2000s. Lewis is

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news.

CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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OCT. 21-28, 2021

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CORONAVIRUS

Boosters: What to Know

Students are now able to schedule free, online one-onone appointments with knowledgeable and trained tutors to receive help with their homework, all from home! Tutors will also be able to help students use the library’s free homework help resources:

· ProQuest Homework Central · Britannica School which can be accessed with your library card 24/7! Tutoring sessions will be offered by appointment on

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Visit: GoletaValleyLibrary.org or call: (805) 964-7878 for more information

NOW HIRING Transportation Security Officers Full- and part-time positions starting at $20.73 per hour*

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oth state and county Public Health officials are urging those eligible to receive a COVID-19 vaccine booster following the Food & Drug Administration’s authorization of boosters for all three major vaccines — Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson—and the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention’s expansion of eligibility last week. “Vaccines are how we end this pandemic, and following this week’s announcements by our federal partners, boosters will play a critical role moving forward,” California Department of Public Health Director and State Public Health Officer Dr. Tomás Aragón said. The FDA expanded the emergency-use authorizations for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson last week to allow for the use of a single booster dose after having done the same for the Pfizer vaccine last month, and the CDC expanded eligibility for the booster to include those ages 65 years and older, and those who are 18 or older and live in long-term care settings, have underlying medical conditions, or work or live in highrisk settings. The FDA also approved “heterologous” boosters, also known as “mix-and-match” boosters, following a presentation of clinical trial data from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases that determined the “known and potential benefits of the use of a single heterologous booster dose outweigh the known and potential risks of their use in eligible populations.” DAN I EL DR EI FUSS F I LE PHOTO

K-8th Grade Live Online Homework Coaching is here for your students!

“These decisions, as well as the authorization to allow for mixing and matching of COVID-19 vaccine manufacturers for boosters, will allow more Californians to increase and maintain the strongest protection against infection heading into the winter months,” Aragón said. “All eligible Californians will benefit from this added protection and should make receiving their booster vaccine a priority.” According to the Santa Barbara County Community Data Dashboard, 78.4 percent of those eligible are vaccinated, and 70.7 percent are fully vaccinated. The Santa Barbara County Public Health Department released a guide with updated booster information, including a full outline of eligibility requirements. According to the guide, “people 65 years or older and people 50-64 years old with underlying medical conditions,” should receive a booster, and people 18-49 years who are in at-risk groups may receive a booster. Those eligible can find a booster vaccine —Ryan P. Cruz through myturn.ca.gov.

ENVIRONMENT

Large Buffer Zone Around Drilling Rigs Proposed

What We Do Matters

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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AFS-TSA-0680-SBA8-Print-SantaBarbaraIndependent-quarterpage-Bonus-JOA-v1.indd 1

10/13/21 9:59 AM

n the eve of Governor Newsom’s announcement that he would be attending the Glasgow climate summit, he traveled to Wilmington, a neighborhood in Los Angeles with the highest concentration of oil drilling in Los Angeles, to announce that California’s energy division would be adding to its regulations a 3,200-foot setback from homes and schools for new wells. Asthma, other respiratory illnesses, preterm births, and low birth weights are among the adverse effects from oil and gas pollution. At the center of the effort to protect Californians from those health consequences has been Santa Barbara’s State Senator Monique Limón and Assembly Bill 1057. “In 2019, I authored AB 1057 to ensure CalGEM [California Geologic Energy Management Division] could consider public health impacts when making rules related to oil and gas production,” Limón told the Independent. That buffer zone would protect homes, schools, and hospitals, she said. Her bill also added a responsibility for

CalGEM to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from hydrocarbon development and to increase oil industry bonds for decommissioning wells and oil and gas facilities. The new rule would affect 30 percent of oil operations in California, the governor said, adding the state was investing millions in grants for regions affected by the transition. “We don’t see oil in our future,” he said, but California had a responsibility to lead. Its economy — the world’s fifth largest — is the size of 21 states combined. California had also suffered the consequences of climate change, which cost taxpayers $99 billion in emergency funding across the United States annually. The 40,000 petitions and comments pushing for a limit on air toxins had been prompted by Food and Water Watch and their allies, said Alexandra Nagy, California director for the nonprofit. “People are getting horribly sick living next to oil and gas wells,” she said. The new CalGEM rule is in a public comment stage through December 21. —Jean Yamamura


PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CITY

‘NOT IN GOOD STANDING’: The Bellosguardo Foundation — which took possession of Huguette Clark’s 23-acre clifftop estate in 2017 — has been listed in the state Registry of Charitable Trusts as “delinquent.”

State Demands Independent Audit of Bellosguardo Department of Justice Gives Nonprofit a Month to Comply by Tyler Hayden he California Attorney General’s Office is demanding an independent audit of the Bellosguardo Foundation for its last three tax years after the nonprofit repeatedly failed to file complete financial records with the state Registry of Charitable Trusts. In a letter sent this Monday, October 25, officials gave the foundation until November 29 to conduct the outside audit. In the meantime, they said, Bellosguardo has been listed in the registry as “delinquent,” meaning it is “not in good standing and is prohibited from engaging in conduct for which registration is required, including soliciting or disbursing charitable funds.” While the foundation is registered in New York, it still must comply with California transparency laws that govern any nonprofit that fundraises in the state. The notice comes two weeks after the Santa Barbara Independent published an opinion column outlining local concerns over an apparent lack of progress by the Bellosguardo Foundation — which took possession of Huguette Clark’s 23-acre cliff-top estate in 2017 — in transforming the historic property into a public destination to “foster and promote the arts,” as Clark’s will dictated. It has instead been used exclusively as a high-dollar venue for parties, weddings, and private tours with little outward communication from its president or board. Bellosguardo’s defenders say proceeds from these events will help the organization carry out its mission of opening the grounds to all. In March, foundation president Jeremy Lindaman submitted an application, which was previously approved by the city’s Historic Landmarks Commission, to its Planning Division to begin offering guided tours. Longer term, Lindaman said, the property will be turned into a museum. Planning staff said they were in “general support” of the tours proposal but were struck by its

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lack of detail, including how and when they would be conducted, how parking would be accommodated, where restroom facilities would be located, and so on. “You have not directly answered any of our questions,” staff said at the time. In an email to the Independent this Tuesday, Lindaman said he will “likely” submit a revised application to the city “in the next week.” Meanwhile, the foundation’s website is asking local supporters to sign a petition in favor of the pending plan. “We are nearing the point where discretionary approval by the Planning Commission and possibly the Santa Barbara City Council is necessary,” the site reads. “It is critical that we are able to say how many of our supporters are Santa Barbara residents.” The foundation has also announced that a selection of artwork by Clark, who was a painter as well as a collector, will be lent to the Santa Barbara Historical Museum for an upcoming exhibition. “Revealing Mrs. Clark’s artwork for the first time in 90 years is just the beginning, with much more to come,” promised Sandi Nicholson, a member of the Bellosguardo board, in a prepared statement. “Our goal is to open the estate to the public as a center for the arts.” With regard to the audit, Lindaman said he’s deferring to the “advice and expertise” of the foundation’s accountant, Judy Dolan Holehouse with the financial firm Nasif, Hicks, Harris & Co. Holehouse has asked the Attorney General’s Office to reconsider its order, and if it does not, to give her longer than a month to comply. Publicly accessible records from 2018 and 2019 — the most recent available — show the foundation controls $86.9 million in assets, approximately $23 million of which is tied up in Clark’s 27-room summer mansion, though the aging building has depreciated in value by $1.5 million since 2017. The land it sits on was valued this year at $53

Raffles · Door Prizes · Refreshments & Snacks Make-n-Takes 11a, 1p & 3p *while supplies last Enjoyment for All Ages · Indoor/Outdoor Event Overflow Parking Behind Denny’s Restaurant

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Free and Open to the Public

Wildfire Prevention and Policy Lecture Series

OCT. 21-28, 2021

EDUCATION

Safety or Intimidating? by Jun Starkey

D America Between Three Fires When: November 4, 2021 3:30 -5:00 PM Where: Commencement Green Reception to Follow SRB Courtyard

Steve Pyne firehistorian, historian, urban andprofessor emeritus professor Arizona Steve Pyneis is a a fire urban farmer,farmer, and emeritus at Arizona Stateat University. a former life he 15 seasons the North Longshots at Grand Canyon National Park. StateIn University. Inspent a former life with he spent 15Rim seasons with the North Rim Longshots Among his recent fire books are Between Two Fires: A Fire History of Contemporary America and at Grand The Canyon National Park. Among recent areNext. Between Pyrocene. How We Created an Agehis of Fire, and fire Whatbooks Happens Two Fires: A Fire History of Contemporary America and The Pyrocene: How We Created the Age of Fire, and What Happens Next.

Help us create new voting district boundaries on: Monday, November 1, 2021 at 6:30 p.m. or Saturday, November 20, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. at 1 Wm. Moffett Pl. across from the Santa Barbara Airport

For more information visit https://goletasanitary.org or call Laura Romano at 805-967-4519 12

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Removal of San Marcos High Deputy Draws Flak uring this Tuesday’s Santa Barbara Unified school board meeting, several community members joined Sheriff Bill Brown in speaking out against the board’s unanimous decision at its last meeting not to renew its contract with the school resource deputy at San Marcos High School, despite district staff ’s recommendation to do so. The critics claimed the district met with activist groups and came to the decision without properly informing the public or taking proper consideration for the safety of students and faculty. Sheriff Brown said he was disappointed by the decision not to renew and touted the value of having an officer on campus not only for students, but for parents and staff as well. The purpose of a school resource deputy (SRD) is to build relationships, Brown said. “SRDs effectively defuse situations ranging from fights, threats, self-harm, and drug abuse on campus,” he said. “Their primary role is to establish good relationships with students and faculty, and utilize those relationships to avert trouble before it happens.” The role of a resource deputy is to provide support and guidance where necessary, Brown said, and he went on to commend the work of George Hedricks, a resource deputy at Dos Pueblos High School. “During the 10 years the school resource deputy George Hedricks has been assigned to Dos Pueblos High School, he has not felt the need to book a single student into Juvenile Hall,” Brown said. This board’s decision not to renew the position at San Marcos High came following several meetings with local student and activist groups, including the student group Cops off Campus! S.B. The group has amassed a following on Instagram through publishing testimonials from community members. The submissions are anonymous, and the majority feels that on-campus law enforcement officers create a culture of fear and intimidation on campus, especially for students of color. Speaking as a representative of Cops off Campus! S.B., San Marcos sophomore Noelle Cabrera asked that the district continue to include students in the conversation regarding how to fill the role of a supportive figure on campus without the use of law enforcement. “The Youth Coalition encourages you all to continue to move in the direction of reimagining school safety in a way that does not involve having police on campus, and

instead putting that money toward a resource that can benefit all students,” Cabrera said. The student group is part of a nationwide coalition demanding the removal of law-enforcement officers — including those from Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Border Patrol, and any local police or sheriff ’s departments — from any learning environment. Several groups, including Food Not Bombs Isla Vista, the Student Labor Action Coalition, and UCSB Cops off Campus, are holding an event on October 30 to protest the police presence in Isla Vista.

COVID UPDATE

At Tuesday’s meeting, the board also gave an update on the district’s COVID vaccination efforts. As of October 21, more than 1,540 district employees have been fully vaccinated, with about 90 requesting exemption from the recent vaccine mandate for school employees. Since the beginning of the school year on August 16, about 100 students and 25 staff members have contracted COVID-19. The mandate required that all district employees receive their first shot by October 1 and their second by November 1. Chief of District Communications Camie Barnwell said there is a handful of employees who have not been vaccinated and have also not submitted a request for exemption. “These employees will be placed on unpaid leave. Human Resources will work with those who have requested exemptions on their unique request and any possible accommodations,” Barnwell said. Among students, 33 percent, or more than 3,000, secondary school students have submitted their vaccination cards, and more than 6,000 secondary school students have not confirmed their vaccination status. At elementary schools, about 84 percent of families have agreed to COVID-19 testing, with 15 percent not consenting. Of the more than 6,000 tests administered to students, 15 individuals have tested positive. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 9

S.B. COU NTY SH ER I F F ’S OF F IC E

being held in County Jail on $200,000 bail. Detectives ask anyone with information that could lead to locating additional survivors to call Detective Roy at (805) 681-4150.

kin. The driver of the Toyota SUV, Andrew Raymond Burgher, 31, was booked into County Jail on charges of murder and driving under the influence and is being held on $2 million bail. A small dog in his vehicle was taken to Animal Services unharmed. The California Highway Patrol requests that witnesses contact investigators at (805) 967-1234. Lonniel Morgan, 63, was arrested 10/21 after allegedly starting a fire inside the Amtrak station in downtown S.B. According to police, Morgan, a transient man who had just arrived by train earlier that morning, appeared to have used newspapers to start a fire in the nonoperational fireplace inside the passenger waiting area. An Amtrak employee put the flames out with a fire extinguisher before the fire could spread. Morgan was booked in County Jail for arson and arson during a state of emergency on $350,000 bail.

Sheriff’s deputies arrested Santa Maria residents Edgar Puga, 29, and Alejandro Maldonado, 34, on 10/21 for multiple charges after a traffic stop turned up a catalytic converter believed to be the one reported stolen from an RV in Santa Ynez, along with burglary tools, illegal firearms, and meth. Both suspects were booked into County Jail. Puga, who had five misdemeanor warrants for his arrest, is being held on an enhanced bail of $250,000, and Maldonado is being held without bail for a violation of his parole. Two people were killed on 10/26 when their sedan was hit from behind by an intoxicated driver on Cathedral Oaks Road. A 2016 Toyota 4-Runner speeding in the direction of Santa Barbara near Kellogg Avenue rammed a 2002 Mustang, which spun and struck two parked cars around 7:30 p.m. The identity of the deceased, a 39-year-old male driver and his female passenger, await notification of their next of

S.B. COU NTY F I R E DEPT.

PUBLIC SAFETY

Keith Haring in 3-D: Graffiti and Beyond Lowery Stokes Sims Firefighters arrived early 10/26 to a small Isla Vista house in the center of the 6600 block of Abrego Road fully engulfed in flames. The twostory structure was so hot firefighters could not get into the building, triggering a second-alarm response involving additional engine companies, said County Fire spokesperson Daniel Bertucelli. According to Spencer Brandt, I.V. Community Services District president, the building had been abandoned for some time and was not well-secured. Investigators are examining the site now to try to determine how the fire started, said Bertucelli. n

PAU L WE LL M A N FI LE P HOTO

BELLOSGUARDO CONT’D FROM P. 11 million and the property tax bill was $563,000, according to the County Assessor’s Office. Bellosguardo’s promotional and event expenses for 2018 and 2019 totaled $472,098, while event rentals only generated $190,650 in income, the records show. One of the nonprofit’s primary expenses, in addition to insurance, maintenance, and utility costs, is Lindaman’s Bellosguardo $150,000 annual salary, a raise from previous years, as well as the $60,000 and $55,000 salaries of a house supervisor and groundskeeper, respectively. Clark’s estate contributed $850,000 in cash to the foundation (her private funds are still being released from probate) as well as a $1.6 million doll collection, which has since been auctioned off. Private donations totaled $978,796. Some of the larger donors include Susie Bechtel, wife of Montecito bil-

ART MATTERS LECTURE

lionaire Riley Bechtel, who gave $75,500; Law & Order producer and foundation board chair Dick Wolf ($50,000); tech investor and entrepreneur Richard Janssen and his wife, Lucille ($27,500); board member Gary Tobey ($25,000); Lady Leslie RidleyTree ($25,000); the Busch Family Foundation ($25,000); and the Armand Hammer Foundation ($25,000). n

Independent curator and cultural analyst

t h u r s d ay, n o v e m b e r 4 , 3 p m p t via Zoom Students and Museum Circle Members: Free SBMA Members: $10 Non-Members: $15 Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desks in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net. For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters

This lecture demonstrates how Keith Haring evolved from engaging the wall as a renegade “tagger” in the context of 1980’s street art to expanding his artistic ambitions to include sculpture and objects. In this process he brought his 2-dimensional work out into space through his free-standing routed and painted figures and recruited a variety of objects—both found and pre-existing—as surfaces for his impulsive and compulsive embellishments. Haring’s interest in African and Oceanic Art was particularly evident in his collaborations with chanteuse/ provocateur Grace Jones and dancer/choreographer Bill T. Jones that encompassed the performative aspects of body painting and masking.

Keith Haring, Burning Skull, 1987. Enamel on aluminium, 46¼ × 31 × 9 inches. Courtesy of the Keith Haring Foundation.

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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Opinions

NEWS COMMENTARY

Pie in the Sky or Sky’s the Limit? Can St. Mary’s Seminary Help Homeless People Safely?

S

TEXT AND PHOTOS BY N I C K W E L S H ometimes,” said Santa Bar-

between the sprawling chaos of People’s Park and the Isla Vista Community Service District and bara Sheriff Bill Brown, “you removed in June. see a moose.” This folksy Zen aphorism Managing both the pallet dates way back to Brown’s days as chief homes and the Hedges House of police in Moscow, Idaho. A consultant of Hope is Sylvia Barnard, Brown had hired at the time recounted whose Good Samaritan Shelhow one morning, his kids announced ter nonprofit — based in Santa that three moose were grazing in the famMaria — now operates 500 shelily’s backyard. The consultant, Brown said, ter beds in 30 locations, all with would be late for work that day. His kids remarkably little to no drama. would be late for school. They all just sat Roughly 70 percent of the House’s and stared at the moose. What else could new residents are wrestling with severe addiction, heroin being the they have done? The “moose” in the room to which most common. Sheriff Brown now alludes is a wild-assed, To date, there have been no calls for service. creative, sure-to-be-controversial proposal Barnard and Good Sam are also hatched by downtown real estate investor slated to assume management of Richard Berti to “buy” the long-vacant St. Mary’s Seminary. He had first unveiled what’s called the DignityMoves the plan three weeks ago with the sudden tiny homes project slated to open abruptness of an impatient man on a mison Garden Street early this JanuGLEAM TEAM: Richard Berti (second from left) came up with the big idea of transforming the long-vacant St. Mary’s sion, which is exactly what Richard Berti is. ary. And just last week, the Santa seminary by Rattlesnake Canyon into a space where homeless people can get help. To date, the County of Santa Located off the steep and winding Barbara City Council voted to Barbara has committed $1 million to acquiring the $14 million property. Whether this effort proves to be a white elephant or a gift horse that should not be looked in the mouth has yet to be determined. To Berti’s left is commercial switchbacks of Las Canoas Road, Berti spend an additional $1.2 milreal estate agent Jason Jaeger; to his right are (from left) broker Austin Herlihy, prosecuting attorney Gordon Auchinproposed to dedicate the property — the lion to extend the lease for all the closs, and Father John Hardin of the Old Mission. seminary itself is 55,000 square feet; the rooms in San Roque’s Rose Garland involved is 35 acres — to the treatment den Inn motel for homeless guests displaced when six high-fire-risk and care of homeless people. “Nobody saw Berti’s proposal comes at a time when the unholy trinity encampments were shut down. this coming,” Brown acknowledged. “It was straight out of That brings the total spent for this motel to $2.8 milof homelessness, mental illness, and drug addiction is galleft field.” Early Monday afternoon, Brown had convened a two- loping throughout the nation. With Joe Biden in the White lion. Presumably, many guests at the Rose Garden Inn — a hour Zoom fest attended by a host of movers and shakers House and Democrats “controlling” Congress, billions of city project — will transition to the new DignityMoves tiny to discuss the possibilities of Berti’s idea and hear the pros dollars are now being allocated to address the humanitar- homes — a county project — though negotiations are still and cons. Immediate neighbors of St. Mary’s called the plan ian crisis. Of the $86 million in American Rescue Plan Act being hammered out. Good Samaritan — which, among a significant fire hazard in an already high-fire area. dollars now slated for the County of Santa Barbara, supervi- many other things, happens to run the largest drug and However, lending credibility to the proposal — some- sors committed — just last week — to spend $28 million on alcohol rehab operation in the county — will also manage what reluctantly and heavily qualified — was a commitment homeless services and infrastructure. DignityMoves. from the County of Santa Barbara to kick in $1 million to That same week, the supervisors were told that the The point of this recitation is that a lot’s been happennumber of unsheltered homeless people in Santa Barbara ing — or is about to — even though for many people, it buy the property. The asking price is $14 million. County — these are doesn’t seem that way. The campaign rhetoric surrounding individuals who bed homelessness in the current City Council election sounds down outside or in exactly like what voters heard 30 years ago. cars — increased by 34 percent since the pan- Pie in the Sky? demic started. In this context, Richard Berti’s proposal hit like a cross between a Molotov cocktail and a Hail Mary pass. In the Other Ideas halls of government, however, the fear is that his proposal is Heard From both a white elephant — probably half the property would From that pool of need to be retrofitted to comply with the Americans with county money, $7 mil- Disabilities Act — and a red herring. Skeptics suggest it’s lion is going to purchase just a way for downtown property owners to get homeless a former sorority house people off State Street and get them somewhere else. on El Colegio Road in Berti — in his mid-eighties and still a bull in a china Isla Vista that’s been shop — announced he’d written a refundable check for offering up to 50 struc- $435,000 to tie up the St. Mary’s seminary in escrow for 45 tured beds a night to days. It all depends on local governments expressing serious chronically homeless interest in buying the seminary and installing an operator people since July. Most who could do the job. of the residents of what’s Berti said he’s taken a lot of grief: “I’m just trying to get called the Hedges Half- something done. I want a place to happen where people way House — named can get help.” In the intervening time, he has been leading DREAM TEAM: Should the St. Mary’s effort ever fly, it will likely be because these people helped get it off the after the now deceased, tours to the site in hopes of encouraging city councilmemground. Thanks to an influx of federal funds, they took an old sorority house in Isla Vista and transformed it longtime homeless bers, county supervisors, private philanthropists, and other into a 50-bed shelter that in four months has yet to elicit its first call for service. Proving that you can fly an advocate Father John businesspeople. airplane as you build it are Lucille Boss, county housing specialist; Emily Allen, longtime homeless service Hedges — evolved from It’s impossible not to be swept up by the possibility of strategist; Kirsten Cahoon of Good Samaritan, who runs the I.V. shelter; Sylvia Barnard, who transformed a cluster of 20 pallet the place. A seminary for Vincentian brothers from the Good Samaritan into a 500-bed operation and runs the largest drug and alcohol treatment program in the homes that had been early 1960s until about 10 years ago, St. Mary’s offers nearly county; and Julie Lawrence, logistical wizard with the county’s General Services Department. parked last December wrap-around mountain views accompanied by an envel-

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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Diabetes Awareness Millions of people have diabetes and millions more are at risk of developing diabetes. Everyone knows someone affected by diabetes. SUCCESS: Ed Barber spent five years on the street before landing a perch in Isla Vista’s Pallet project, run by the Good Samaritan Shelter. Today, Barber works for Good Samaritan’s Hedges House of Hope in Isla Vista — which provides housing for up to 50 chronically homeless people — and he has a place of his own in downtown Santa Barbara.

oping silence. Just by being there, one can achieve a meditative state. There are dorm rooms, indoor and outdoor common areas, a commercial-grade kitchen, a gymnasium with a professional basketball court, and a chapel with 40-foot-high ceilings. And it’s all just sitting there, doing nothing. Currently, the property is owned by Revere Capital, which obtained it by foreclosure shortly after the city Planning Commission granted a conditional-use permit in 2016 allowing a residential drug and alcohol treatment center on the site. Neighbors were not thrilled with that plan either. For whatever reason, however, the rehab project never got off the ground. Since then, the property has been used for assorted spiritual retreats and overnight school field trips. The owner is just now putting the finishing touches on a major renovation effort, getting half the site ADA-compliant and repaving much of the driveway. A year ago the County of Santa Barbara checked out the property as a possible homeless shelter and passed: It’s too far from where homeless people are, and too far from service providers. With no bus lines, how would people get there? In competing for potential grants funding, that lack of transit access would hurt the county’s chances. Without grants, who would pay for the services? More problematic, what would happen if clients wandered off? What if there was a fire? Worse yet, what if the clients started the fire? And none of that addresses whatever unfinished repairs still need to be done.

Hope Is Eternal

Trying to sort out what, if anything, is possible is the responsibility of the Scoping Committee created during Sheriff Brown’s Monday Zoom meeting. Heading that committee is none other than Sylvia Barnard, CEO of Good Samaritan. Barnard and Good Sam enjoy an almost walk-on-water reputation: They know how to run shelters effectively, compassionately, and with little friction with neighbors. Ser-

vices are provided. Focused case management is pursued. Rules are enforced: no visitors allowed, 10 p.m. curfews, no drugs or booze allowed. Rooms are searched. Chores are required. Security is round-the-clock. Barnard has toured St. Mary’s and thinks it has huge potential for a residential treatment for those recovering from drug or alcohol addiction. In the South Coast, the need for such a facility is pressing. Ninetyday stays, Barnard said, tend to get the best results. It will fall to her and the scoping committee to figure out which programs might be best suited to the site and what licenses would be required. It would fall to Berti—as chair of the finance committee—to figure out how to raise the funds. And the administrative committee will have to figure out how to sustain ongoing programs. It’s anything but simple. In the meantime, Berti said he intends to ask Revere Capital to extend escrow on the property. “We need to squeeze the cantaloupe some more,” he said. If he doesn’t get it, the deal’s off. If he does, the various committees Sheriff Brown assigned can determine whether the site is programmatically and financially viable and how neighbors’ concerns can be addressed. Berti’s also giving serious thought to starting a new nonprofit to raise the funds to purchase the property outright. “It’s getting more complicated, floating around and a lot of questions,” he said. “I just wanted to do something simple.” The whole thing, acknowledged Brown, might turn out to be “a flash in the pan.” But maybe not. The possibilities seem enormous. “If it fails, it fails. At least we will have tried,” he said. In very short order, the proposal has generated considerable buzz, consternation, opposition, and collaborative excitement. Something good, Brown said, has to come from all that. “Sometimes you see a moose.” The writer of this article has done freelance writing for Richard Berti.

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

The Whale Tagging the Dog

DUDE: “That rug really tied the room

together, did it not?” Thus spake Jeff Lebowski, perhaps the best-known character ever imbued with the breath of life by actor Jeff Bridges, who himself is perhaps Santa Barbara’s best-known, best-liked down-home celebrity movie star. The theft of Lebowski’s aforementioned rug turns out to be the narrative spark that propels the rest of the movie, The Big Lebowski, which almost 25 years later still reigns as perhaps the best-known and best-liked of all the Coen Brothers’ fabulous films. Bringing the rug and The Big Lebowski to mind is this year’s mayoral and City Council races, which come crashing to a merciful end on November 2. Whatever happens afterward, we will still be standing. The sword of Damocles does not teeter over our heads. Even so, the results do matter. So vote. This year’s mayoral race is enough of a headscratcher for me to suspect I have lice. Incumbent Cathy Murillo — the first and only Latinx mayor in Santa Barbara history and go-to gal for all underdogs and Yellow Dog Capital-D Democrats — is running against five characters preaching the Gospel of ABC — Anybody But Cathy. It’s got to be tough. For my money, one of the mayor’s chief jobs is to function as the rug that ties the room together. Now that we have district

elections in place, the mayor is the only elected city official who could represent the whole city. That makes the mayoral rug function all the more vital. No mayor can be expected to be all things to all people, but the good ones are something akin to symphony conductors, bartenders, and maître d’s. The mayor doesn’t have the luxury of dancing only with the ones that brung you. You’re supposed to keep your friends close, but your enemies even closer. I worked with Cathy. I know her to be a courageous — and at times heroic — soul

who leads both with chin and heart. She works hard and does more than her critics acknowledge. She’s a whole lot of things. But, unfortunately, being a rug ain’t among them. She doesn’t tie the room together. To be fair, maybe nobody could. Murillo presided over Santa Barbara’s roughest four years since maybe the Great Depression or the Great Earthquake of 1925. Still, you show up for onetime Mayor Hal Conklin’s funeral even if he ran against you. She didn’t. When Murillo was first elected mayor, she ran against four more conservative-minded candidates. They split the vote, thus allowing Murillo — a champion of the underdog — to win with a scant 27 percent of the ballots cast. (And yes, “scant” is a loaded term.) This time around, it appears the same thing is about to happen, but in reverse. Purveyors of conventional wisdom — people such as myself — speculate because of

this, Cathy will lose. Her enemies are most definitely all riled up, but it’s questionable

how many friends will actually show up. That’s what the smart money dictates.

For the record, I have a standing bet with political blogster and prognosticator Jerry Roberts — a sometimes-hyperventilating member of the ABC Brigade — that Cathy will win anyway. Full disclosure: I also have a bet with someone else that James Joyce III — who coulda, shoulda, woulda been more of a contender — takes it. So much for my smart money. One screamingly obvious takeaway from the past two elections is this: We need mayoral runoff elections. And really, how hard could that be? Another even more screamingly obvious takeaway? We need our own version of campaign finance reform, which I admit is normally a cause championed only by lactose-intolerant people who worry too much about 5G. The whole point of carving the city into six districts was to make the seats of power more accessible — i.e., more affordable to a broader array of humanity than the older, whiter, more affluent demographic that’s traditionally controlled City Hall. There’s one candidate running for one district — Barrett Reed — who has raised more than $250,000. For one district? This should be cause for concern if not a full-fledged regurgitative attack. Right now, the state lim-

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its individual contributions to candidates to $4,900. At the risk of being arbitrary and

capricious, why not lower that to $1,000. In the meantime, it would seem, the local Democratic Party has been huffing oven cleaner. A communique from party chair Darcél Elliott implies that Murillo’s chief opponent, Randy Rowse, is in some fashion Trumpian. To be precise, the note doesn’t ever say that; instead it says Rowse — a former city councilmember afflicted with a bad case of ABCitis — is backed “by special interest and Trump Republican donors.” Elliott likens the race to the 2016 showdown between Trump and Hillary Clinton. Clinton lost that one, Elliott writes, because of false rumors and sexist attacks from Republicans and the news media. “Today we are risk of history repeating itself in Santa Barbara,” she warns. Excuse me? Randy very may well be the good old boy who morphed into a grumpy old white man; he’s a nondenominational mushy moderate who will be dragged into the future kicking and screaming. But Randy Rowse is not remotely Trumpian. He voted for Barack Obama in 2008. He voted for Mitt Romney in 2012. To tar Rowse with the Trump brush is worse than desperate; it’s just plain silly. Or to mangle yet another line from Jeff Lebowski, “Yes, well, you know, that’s just my opinion, man.” —Nick Welsh

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OPINIONS CONT’D KEVIN SIERS

Letters

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

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Michael HCounseling Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286

Rowse for Mayor

I

am voting for Randy Rowse for Mayor. I believe that Randy will bring a much-needed breath of fresh air to City Hall. Randy is a nonpartisan independent who sincerely wants to protect our community through support for our first responders, and through his desire to fight draconian land-use mandates from Sacramento politicians. Randy will focus on making city government more effective and efficient. Santa Barbara is a beautiful community, but it takes work to keep it that way. Randy Rowse is my choice as the best candidate that can do that —Joe Guzzardi, S.B. work.

A

s a lifelong Democrat, owner of Trusted Legal, and 20-year resident of Santa Barbara, I support Nina Johnson as a candidate for City Council. We need leaders with a clear vision for the city who will work collaboratively to make things happen. Nina has been a force for positive change for years. She was front and center when businesses had to close for the Thomas Fire, she has worked with residents to make downtown safer, she has championed community art projects, and she has long held a torch for a pedestrianized State Street. Most importantly, she has been present — showing up for residents morning, noon, and night to help people navigate City Hall red tape and get things done. She walks the walk, every day. Nina is not beholden to union money, to special interests, or to the idea of a career in politics. Her donors are people like me: local people invested in this community who know that if we don’t have real change and fresh ideas at City Hall, this city will die. Nina is running for office because she cares about making life better for the residents of this town, and that more than anything gets my vote.

—Naomi Dewey, S.B.

For the Record

¶ Grassini Family Vineyards won our Best of Santa Barbara® category for winery, but the write up went missing from print. We run it below. Also, we note that Tristan Pitre is winery director of Stonehouse restaurant, which won for Best Restaurant Wine List, and that Mike Jensen, son of Tony Jensen, has run Star Rug Cleaners, winner of the Best Rug Cleaner category, since 2011. Best Santa Barbara County Winery: Grassini Family Vineyards —Truly a family operation, Grassini

has captured this coveted category for four consecutive years now. Larry and Sharon Grassini planted Bordeaux varietals in the 1990s on land they bought in Happy Canyon in the 1980s, thus beginning an extraordinarily successful tradition of crafting great wines from cabernet and sauvignon blanc grapes. Their approach to winemaking goes back to the 17th century in its use of natural cooling caves and looks forward to the future with a sophisticated system of solar power and water reclamation. In addition to the grapes, Sharon and Larry also raised four daughters on the property, including Grassini’s CEO, Katie Grassini.

Get

Chair, Sierra Club Santa Barbara Group

Vote for Johnson

Vaccinated.

S

anta Barbara was an early leader in fossilfuel divestment, adopting a socially responsible investment policy excluding investments in fossil fuels, tobacco, and weapons in 2017. Mayor Cathy Murillo voted in favor of that morally and fiscally responsible policy, and her opponent, Randy Rowse, voted against it. Since then, massive pension funds in cities like New York have divested, and even BlackRock, the world’s biggest investment fund manager, has begun to do so. Maintaining this kind of environmental leadership is crucial. After the spill off Huntington Beach, that city became the 100th Pacific Coast municipality to pass a resolution opposing offshore drilling. Santa Barbara was early on that list and has played an important role in ocean protection ever since the 1969 oil spill. That’s why it would not be appropriate for the Mayor of Santa Barbara to headline a city event sponsored by fossil-fuel companies, including ones that caused the 2015 Refugio Oil Spill. In contrast, none of the other mayoral candidates had any compunction making their political speeches at the event. Mayor Murillo is the only candidate willing to stand up to fossil-fuel interests, and she’s the only one with years of experience chairing the Sustainability and Community Choice Energy committees that are successfully navigating a path to 100 percent renewable energy, EV-charging infrastructure, bike lanes, the State Street promenade, and more. Vote for steady and experienced leadership. Vote to reelect Mayor Cathy Murillo on —Katie Davis, November 2.

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E

BY LAURA CAPPS

lection Day is here, giving us our

DANIEL DREIFUSS FILE PHOTO

Campaign Finance Reform Is Desperately Needed in Santa Barbara

one chance to choose who will lead the city of Santa Barbara for the next five years. Voting is not only our sacred right but our power, yet special interests yield much greater influence than individual voters. Call me idealistic, but in my book, no one should have an advantage in the electoral process through the use of campaign funds. Far too much power is given to organized and well-financed forces. And that means the policies that govern us are often out of sync with what is best for all of us—especially the most vulnerable. Few will deny we have too much money Laura Capps in politics, even at the local level. The reason? Our outdated system allows it. Until this year, Santa Barbara County, which I applaud the one candidate in the mayoral race determines the campaign regulations for all our cit- who has a solid campaign finance plan and has the ies, had zero campaign finance regulations. Zero. courage to change the system. With his years in state That meant all sorts of entities—organizations, indi- government, James Joyce knows how the specialviduals, corporations, and special interests—would interest game is played. Yet if elected, he has promised spend thousands of dollars to advance their different to usher in a fresh, inspiring approach. He has introagendas. duced a reasonable plan to cap campaign contribuThankfully, our leaders in the California Leg- tions to $1,500 per person. This proposal, along with islature, frustrated with the Wild West attitude of other ethics measures, including a candidate spendcounty governments, imposed a minimum cam- ing cap, would have a dramatic impact on the way paign contribution limit of $4,900 that took effect campaigns are currently run, which in turn would improve our local policies. in January. Given this context, here is my message to the many That’s a step in the right direction, but $4,900 is far too much money to have pouring into regional undecided voters: Follow the money. One of the most campaigns, especially in small communities. For meaningful ways to assess a candidate is to review example, the City of Santa Barbara has just 55,000 who supports them financially. Jerry Roberts regularly does a diligent job of sifting registered voters. Only around 30,000 are expected to vote in this election. It doesn’t take much money through and reporting on their financial records. But to make an overwhelming impact in a community you can see for yourself. The City of Santa Barbara has a portal on their website where anyone can review of our size. Many counties and cities throughout California every contribution and expenditure made by each have tried to level the playing field with more realis- candidate. Once in the portal, type in the candidate’s name tic limits: The City of San Francisco, nine times our size, has a limit of $500 per person. Ventura County and look for the PDF forms labeled 460. As you has a contribution limit of $750. Berkeley, which sleuth away, you’ll likely be astounded by the preponhas roughly the same size population as ours, has a derance of huge donations totaling $1,000-$5,000 $250 limit, 20 times higher than what is now legal in each from developers, unions, hotel management companies, mysterious LLCs, and entities outside of Santa Barbara. At this rate, the top fundraising candidates in the our town. How can this be right? The candidates who prevail on November 2 have mayoral race are poised to spend more than $20 per vote to win. More than a million dollars has already the privilege of leading our city into the future. They will each make decisions that directly impact our been raised in the mayor’s race alone. And Planning Commissioner Barrett Reed, who quality of our daily lives. It’s vital to our well-being, is challenging City Councilmember Kristen Sned- and to the well-being of our city, that those policies be don (whom I’ve endorsed), is on pace to spend a made on the merits, not on monied influence. whopping $40 per vote. To say that is outrageous is While that ideal is impossible to decree, the surest way toward progress is for our system to be improved an understatement. I don’t fault the individual candidates or their with reasonable campaign finance limits and other donors. They both are playing by the rules—state- ethics regulations. imposed rules that need to be improved — but the Though I encourage our local leaders to set limits rules nonetheless. Most candidates will tell you that and parameters that are more aligned with our comfundraising is the worst part about politics. Yet when munity, thereby allowing more people to participate they are elected, few stand up to change the system, in the process, the rest of us don’t have to wait. Ordibecause they know that by being the incumbent, nary citizens can initiate a campaign finance ballot they will have a great advantage fundraising in their proposition to mandate it. n next election. Who’s in?


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Why the Market Can’t Solve Our Housing Crisis

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S

HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE CITY OF SANTA BARBARA

BY HARVEY MOLOTCH

ome think we can build our

way out of the housing crisis — relax the rules, maybe cut out “excessive regulation.” Developers will respond, prices will decline, and regular people will be able to afford Santa Barbara. It won’t work, and here’s why. Santa Barbara is part of a property market beyond local borders. Whether it’s condos, rentals, or singlefamily houses, the market operates as an interlinked whole. That’s why our housing cost changes are in sync with the rest of the state and region. In 1981, 40 years ago, the median Santa Barbara house sold for $145,000. In Los Angeles that same year, the median house price was significantly less—$107,710. Today, by Zillow numbers, L.A. is still cheaper than S.B., about 20 percent cheaper— not all that changed over the 40 years. And just as prices have recently “gone crazy” here, so they have done elsewhere. The problem is not local. A frequently proffered remedy is to exploit the socalled “law” of supply and demand. Put more units on the market to push prices down. Would that work? The case of Vancouver, Canada, is instructive. To deal with its rapid housing price inflation, starting about 30 years ago, Vancouver okayed massive downtown high-rise and upped densities in residential areas. Akin to our ADU (accessory dwelling unit) program for second houses on the same lot, Vancouver encouraged so-called “alley houses”—and more. The result? Vancouver became second only to San Francisco as the continent’s least affordable city. Watching all this unfold was enough to change the attitude of a key backer of density increase, Professor Patrick Condon, head of landscape architecture at the University of British Columbia. He has recanted. In his new book Sick Cities, he explains just why it has worked out so poorly. Developers and landowners certainly liked it. With higher allowable densities, they could do more with their land. To the degree that land price can be spread over more units, landowners get more money. If you sell two units on a given land parcel instead of just one, there is potential to double your money. With eight units, the windfall further escalates. For the prospective buyer or renter, it is a different story. The developer will try (and succeed, says Condon) to charge the same per finished unit—as if there had been no density increase. Of course, developers must pay for other things besides land, but land is the fundamental driver of housing price. This is key to understanding the Vancouver outcome: The city’s land became more valuable with the density increases. This inflation got passed on to the enduser. Build it, and they will pay for it. If the market can’t do the job of lowering house prices, what can be done? A simple answer, and one with tried-and-true results in Santa Barbara—and far more extensively in other parts of the world—is for the city to itself

build housing. Go visit projects of the Santa Barbara Housing Authority; they are dense, handsome, and delightful. Private nonprofits have created hundreds of units more. Together, the city and the nonprofits now account for about 15 percent of our total housing stock. That’s high for a U.S. city, but we need to get still more housing out of the market altogether. A tactic only sparingly used in Santa Barbara is “inclusionary zoning.” Developers must provide affordable units as part of their projects. Another strategy is to demand that employers create housing to offset impacts of their business or institutional expansion (UCSB is a local case). Cities like Boulder, Colorado; and Cambridge, Massachusetts, have tried more ambitious versions of such tactics. While the overall market does not get restructured, a city can gain some social and income diversity even when prices remain otherwise very high. Increasing land value is the last thing you want to do. Ironically, if you restrict what can be done with land, land price will tend to go down. Land investors will pay less for property that has more restrictions — speculators hate that. Government regulation, on the other hand, has delivered great public benefits: open space, more beautiful buildings, gardens, playing fields, beaches, trails, concert spaces, street trees, bicycle paths, and open vistas. We must not in the false pursuit of affordability undercut these hard-earned gains. Somehow, as the rich get richer and property costs escalate, we need to capture more of the bounty for public purpose, housing most especially. Taxes—federal, state, or local—is one route. Somehow, we need to put resources into people’s hands—by building them places to live or getting them enough income to pay even outrageous prices. Either way is going to be an uphill climb, but facing reality is better than downward delusion. Harvey Molotch is professor emeritus of sociology at UC Santa Barbara and at New York University. He was also a Centennial Professor in the Cities Program at London School of Economics. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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obituaries Thomas F. Heck

7/10/1943 - 10/3/2021

Thomas Heck, scholar, musician, husband, and father, passed away on October 3 from the effects of Parkinson’s disease. The youngest of three sons born to Harold J. Heck and Suzanne (“Bunny”) Holt, Tom spent most of his early childhood in New Orleans, except for a year in Japan when he was nine and his father was teaching foreign trade at Waseda University. A few years later the family moved to Paris where Tom’s father worked as commercial attache at the American embassy. It was in Paris that the teenaged Tom first took up the guitar that was to become his life’s work. After a year of acculturation there, Tom enrolled in a French lycee, immersing himself in French and eventually passing the baccalaureat, which qualified him to pursue a university education in France. Tom elected, however, to return home. He earned his bachelor’s degree in music at Notre Dame University and then went on to graduate school, studying music history at Yale University. In 1967 he met Anne Goodrich, then a senior at Vassar College. They married a year later and booked berths on an old freighter headed for Europe, as Tom had won a Fulbright grant to do dissertation research. This resulted in Tom’s seminal work on the birth of the classical guitar and its cultivation in Vienna in the early 19 th century, as reflected in the work of guitarist and composer Mauro Giuliani. Tom’s book was republished several times in updated editions as new information came to light. After teaching music history for five years, Tom earned a degree in library and information science. He was the director of the Music and Dance Library at The Ohio State University for 22 years. In 1973, while on vacation in Santa Barbara, he and some musical colleagues founded the Guitar Foundation of America. He 20

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was a frequent contributor to its journal, Soundboard, and in 2015 he created a special annual edition called Soundboard Scholar. Tom’s interests broadened to encompass theater history, after he became intrigued by depictions of masked actors holding musical instruments, including guitars. Another Fulbright, to Florence, Italy, enabled him to develop an extensive bibliographic work on the sources of the Italian improvised theater, the Commedia dell’ Arte. With his wife Anne and an Italian colleague, Francesco Cotticelli, he translated and published important source documents in this field. A grant to the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies led to a collaborative work with several colleagues to produce Picturing Performance, a book about what the visual arts can contribute to our knowledge of the performing arts of music, dance, and theater. Never one to rest on his laurels, Tom led a very active life even in retirement. Moving to Santa Barbara in 2001, he became a music minister, first at St. Mark’s University Parish at UCSB, and then with the Catholic Church of the Beatitudes, a community affiliated with Roman Catholic Women Priests. He studied Web design at Santa Barbara City College and became webmaster for several local non-profits. For many years he recorded, edited, and mounted the audios of speakers to Word and Life, a study and discussion group describing itself as “thoughtful Christians in search of a mature faith.” He took voice lessons and developed a second career of going to retirement homes with his guitar and songbook to engage seniors in singing the songs they knew from their youth. His voice teacher and colleague, Carol Ann Manzi, often joined him, and they collaborated on a number of musical events and projects. He was always eager to lend a helping hand to individuals he met, and to community efforts to serve those in need. For example, Tom volunteered his services with Visiting Nurse and Hospice Care, visiting hospice patients in their homes or at Serenity House. He especially enjoyed speaking and singing with patients in French, German, Italian, or Spanish. Tom is survived by his

OCTOBER 28, 2021

wife Anne; daughter Kalyra Goodrich and her sons Lukas and Jakob; son John, his wife Thara, and their two children, Leena and Rohan; and his mother-in-law, Dorris Goodrich. He will be remembered for his academic contributions, especially in the guitar world, but also for his passionate concern with world peace and for his quiet but timely support for many immigrants and refugees from central and Eastern Europe and Southeast Asia. Contributions in his name can be made to the Guitar Foundation of America, the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, the International Rescue Committee, or the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. A memorial service will be held at a later date still to be determined.

Mike Chase 8/28/2021

A quietly joyful noise will be raised to celebrate the all too brief, but rambunctious, adventurous, and at times difficult life of Mike Chase contractor, winetour-guide, reporter, writer, free-thinker, father, friend, story-teller, musician, husband, brother,curmudgeon and great lover of the-even-greateroutdoors—this coming Saturday, October 30 at 1 pm at 64 Paradise Road. Friends and admirers who may have lost touch with Mike over the years are invited to join in. He died on August 28 at the age of 62 after an especially swift and savage onslaught of cancer. Mike Chase was infused with both an innate kindness and an essential wildness of spirit long before the likes of Robert Bly arrived on the scene to encourage males of the species to beat drums in the woods or follow their bliss. Chase grew up in Santa Barbara’s Trout Club, where as a

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child he jumped off rooftops onto mattresses down below, swung like Tarzan from vines and dove into creeks, boxed with his brothers and explored every nook and cranny of every nook and cranny his immediate great outdoors had to offer. Nature was not something Mike read about; it was life. It was fun; it’s what you did. Long before tattoos became cool and trendy, Mike had a tattoo of a large sprawling oak tree tattoo inscribed onto his back. He would laugh about it later with his characteristic Mike Chase laugh, describing himself in jest as “The quivering oak.” Over the years, Mike worked countless jobs; bartender, oil field worker, lumber worker, and contractor. In the 1990s, he worked as a reporter and writer for the Santa Barbara Independent where his passion for Santa Barbara’s unique environment far exceeded and superseded the paper’s typical governmental focus on matters of growth and development. He was all about what sprouted out of the ground, what creatures swam in the creeks, and what forces put them in peril. When the United States Forest Service started charging people for the right to visit their own forests—the Nature Pass program–Mike was morally incredulous. As a reporter, however, Mike was scrupulously balanced. But when it came to highlighting the richness of life hiding in plain sight, he was voraciously detailed. As a writer, Mike tilted more towards John Steinbeck than Edward Abby though both spirits found refuge in his heart. He worked hard at writing as he worked hard at everything he did. As a human being, Mike could be pig headed, stubborn and obstinate. It does not appear he was capable of going along to get along. He spoke his truth, no matter how wrong others knew it might be. On the flip side, Mike was forever curious and always open. He was not mean. And he was also blessed with a genuinely great laugh and wonderful absurdist sense

of humor. He could laugh at— or about—most anything. But he was the quickest of all to laugh at himself. Mike was forever pushing himself out of his comfort zone. One wondered if such a zone ever existed for Mike. In one such venture, he decided to take up singing lessons with the end result being that he would have to stand up and sing in front of a live audience at Soho. As a contractor, Mike would find himself too often caught in the crossfire between unscrupulous developers and unreasonable bureaucrats. On more than a few occasions, he would find himself having to fight way too hard to ensure that his crews got paid on time. They definitely got paid. Mike told a story of dangling one developer upside down outside the window by his heel. He always told it as if someone else did it. But the way he laughed in telling it, his friends always wondered. On the other hand, Mike got to enjoy a truly epic creative collaboration working with vintner Richard Sanford to help Sanford bring his truly epic dreams for his winery on Santa Rosa Road to fruition. The results were truly awesome. As with many people, Mike’s personal life was rarely simple or easy. His own father left the family household when Mike was just born. On the few occasions Mike would encounter his father, paternal discipline of some sort was involved. As a father of two children, Ryland and Kendra, he had to chart his own course. As Mike would readily acknowledge, he was far from perfect. But few fathers anywhere have been more present—delighting in and demanding of his kids– than was Mike Chase. The loves and labors of Mike Chase are far more complicated and compelling than this scratchy summation. To find out more, please show up for his last party, where Mike–we hope–will be there in spirit. Maybe bring along something to eat or a story to share. Mike ended all his e-mails with a line he stole from Woody GGuthrie, which I’d like to steal from Mike. “Take it easy,” he would say. “Just take it.”


obituaries Jack Kisch 11/22/1926 - 10/7/2021

Jack Kisch passed away peacefully on October 07, 2021 at home with his loving wife by his side, he was 94. Jack was of the greatest generation of gentleman with a kind heart and a gentle, loving soul. He loved people, boats, and working with his hands. Born in Longview, Washington to Frank Nick Kisch and Laura Christina Kisch (Bernard), he was the youngest of five siblings. Jack was a WWII veteran. After his discharge from the Army, Jack met and married the love of his life, Marilyn Masterson, at a roller rink in Longview. They were married for 72 years. In 1955 Jack moved his family to Goleta to help his fatherin-law, Ralph Masterson, work on his lemon and avocado groves. Jack fell in love with the sea. He began building and racing sail boats and affectionately became known as “Capt. Jack”. In 1962 he moved to Ventura and opened the boat shop Jack’s Marina. In 1968 he returned to Santa Barbara to open Harbor Boat Sales on State Street. Whether sailing, water skiing, fishing, rafting or watching the big ships navigate the Columbia River, he loved the water…even frozen water. In his 50’s, Jack took up ice skating and became an amateur ice dancer and won many trophies during local and statewide competitions. Jack joined the Elks Lodge in Longview and continued to be an active member in the Santa Barbara Elks Lodge #613. His friendly personality, building talent and willingness to help were recognized with many awards including the Man of the Year 2006-2007

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

and the Per Ken Todd Award 2017-2018. Jack was a skilled woodworker. For many years he contributed his craftmanship to building wooden toys for the Unity Shoppe. At the age of 84, Jack built an 18-foot wooden canoe in his garage to the delight of friends and neighbors who would stop by to watch the progress. Jack could be found tinkering in the garage up to his very last day. Jack is survived by his wife Marilyn Kisch (Masterson); daughter Darilyn and her husband Joel Myers; son John and his wife Angela Kisch; daughter Laura Perry and grandsons; Carl Perry and Conrad Perry. There are no services planned. In lieu of flowers, a donation to your favorite charity is requested.

aunts, and cousins. There will be a rosary vigil at 6:00 pm, on October 28, 2021, at Saint Raphael Catholic Church, 5444 Hollister Avenue. Funeral Mass at 11:00 am on October 29, 2021, at Saint Raphael Catholic Church, followed by interment at Goleta Cemetery, 44 South San Antonio Road. Following interment there will be a reception at Saint Raphael’s Church Hall.

Nathaniel Stephen Montross

It is with heavy hearts that must share that AZ Knapp passed away on July 1, 2021. AZ was born in Cooperstown, New York in 1952. The only son of Howard and Doris Knapp, he grew up in Unadilla and Sidney, NY with his sisters Nancy Voorhees of Santa Barbara, nephew Barry and Kathryn (Richard) Meron of Gansevoort, NY. AZ started playing football in Jr. High, and graduated from Sidney HS in 1970. AZ excelled in many sports. He moved to Santa Barbara and attended Santa Barbara City College in ‘71-‘72. He was a great offensive tackle and became a record-breaking field goal kicker and punter. Coaches Bob Dinaberg and Carmen Di Poalo’s helped, AZ with a full athletic scholarship transfer to Utah State, where again he had a record-breaking career. In the mid 70’s AZ became field goal kicker for the Green Bay Packers and later for the Seattle Seahawks. AZ loved to Scuba Dive and often spoke about his travels to Catalina Island, the Cook Islands, and Virgin Islands. In 1978 having been men-

5/25/1981 - 9/23/2021

Nathaniel Stephen Montross was born on May 25, 1981 in Santa Barbara and died suddenly at his home in Santa Barbara on September 23, 2021. Nathaniel had a generous heart, he would befriend the less fortunate, feed hungry friends and would always protect those he loved. Nathaniel had a great sense of humor; he was always making those around him laugh especially his nephew Byron. Nathaniel was also fun loving, he enjoyed surfing, skateboarding, motorcycle riding, and playing with his niece and nephews. Nathaniel is survived by his parents Stephen and Silvia Montross, his sister Selina, brothers Brandon (Karyn) and Adam (Samantha), grandmother (Margaret), nephews Anthony, Daniel, Byron, niece Julianna and numerous uncles,

AZ Knapp 5/18/1952 - 7/1/2021

tored and taught by his dad; AZ started a successful business AZ Plumbing in Santa Barbara, eventually moving it to Bozeman, Montana since he enjoyed mountain sports. He also worked as a Ski Instructor during this time, proving he was well qualified in both. He made many friends with his intellect, quick wit, humor, willingness to help others and that great big AZ smile. In later years AZ moved to Sandpoint, Idaho where he began coaching at Sandpoint High School under his good friend and well known Coach Satini “Brother” Puailoa . Mentoring was one of AZ’s greatest joys, he coached punting and goal kicking from his wheelchair daily during Football season for several years. He enjoyed living in Sandpoint, the annual 50’s and 60’s Car show in May and the July 4th Celebration were some of the highlights of the year for him. He kept in touch with friends throughout the country inviting them to visit Sandpoint, ID where AZ spent his last years. AZ is survived by his sister Kathryn, (Richard) and nephew Barry and many good friends. He had such a big personality he will be forever remembered by his friends and family and has been welcomed into Heaven by his Savior.

Richard D. Godfrey 1/28/1935 - 10/12/2021

Richard Dudley Godfrey “Dick” passed peacefully on the morning of October 12, 2021 in his home city of Santa Barbara, California. He was 86 years of age. Dick was born on January 28, 1935 in New York City to Henry Fletcher Godfrey and Marie Louis Godfrey (nee Gray). Dick is survived by his wife of 62 years, Katherine Bernhard Godfrey

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(Kate), his son, John Godfrey, two daughters, Liza Kirkbride (Chris) and Susan Godfrey, and 6 grandchildren: Katie, Grace, Molly, Jazmine, Eru and Jonathan. Dick completed secondary education at Portsmouth Abbey near Newport, Rhode Island. He graduated in 1957 from Brown University with a major in Political Science. That same year he married Kate and joined the United States Army, and the couple were stationed in France. Upon completion of his service, Dick and Kate returned to Providence, Rhode Island where Dick entered the banking profession with a focus on Trust Services. He advanced to head the Asset Management subsidiary of the Industrial National Bank of Providence and accepted a job at American Express in San Francisco in 1975. He relocated his family to Los Angeles shortly afterwards where they settled in Pacific Palisades. There, Dick enjoyed a successful career with Trust Company of the West, retiring as Managing Director of Private Investments. Following a lifelong enjoyment of the ocean and sailing, he and Kate retired to Santa Barbara. In Santa Barbara, Dick embarked on a new career of volunteerism. He served on various Boards and Committees, including the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and Cottage Hospital. Possibly his proudest achievement was his association with Direct Relief, where he served as Board Chair and passionate Ambassador. Dick’s legacy will always be his steadfast love of family and dedication to the betterment of humanity. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State Street in Santa Barbara, on November 6th, 2021 at 1:00 pm. There will be a reception following. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Direct Relief at directrelief.org.

OCTOBER 28, 2021

Continued on p. 22 THE INDEPENDENT

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obituaries Peter (Pete) Clements 8/3/1963 - 9/16/2021

John Robert Peter Clements came into this world on August 3, 1963. He was born at the Port Arthur Hospital in Port Arthur, Ontario Canada. His mother, father and older brother relocated to Orange County, California when he was two years old. A blond haired, blue eyed boy with a smile that expressed an inner light. Pete quickly took to the lifestyle of Southern California skateboarding, surfing, skiing and dirt biking around the orange groves outside of DisneyLand with his friends. When Pete was 17 years of age, he began attending cooking classes with his mother who was the food stylist/ managing food editor for The Orange County Register. Like butter, Pete was drawn to cooking. His talent was immediately recognized by the teachers at De Rosas Cooking School. His mother fed his hunger for cheffing and took him to learn from many teaching chefs of that time including Julia Child, Marion Cunningham, Jean Brady, and Jacques Pepin. At one class Pete remarked to Jacques that one day he might like to “cook like him” at which chef Pepin responded, “You will be better than me.” Pete went on to find the excitement of kitchens including Mr.Stox, La Toque, Spago and many others. He would show up in kitchens prior to service dressed in a pressed chef coat and knife roll in hand asking if he could commis and learn for free. When Pete was 22 years old, he was accepted into an apprenticeship at Michaels Waterside Inn in Santa Barbara. Here he got to work with young French chefs trained at Le Gavroche by Albert and Michel Roux. It was in this kitchen he met his wife and 22

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discovered a new outdoor passion in cycling and the sport of triathlon. Following the apprenticeship he went to work as a sous chef, pastry cook and executive chef in many Santa Barbara restaurants including Louies at The Upham Hotel, Montecito Café, Brandons in Piccadilly Square, San Ysidro Ranch and El Encanto. He worked in an exclusive resort in Antigua as well and did parties for private clients all while starting a family. After his first son was born, he took a job at Emilio’s Trattoria. It was here that Pete found his voice as a chef, mentor and innovator. His success at this small oceanside eatery was indisputable as he utilized all of the skills he had learned using local fresh produce, meats and seafood creating a farm to table experience that was both exciting and delicious. His success gave him the chops to open up his kitchen to young chefs. Pete was passionate about sharing his knowledge and love for food with anyone who wanted to learn. It is difficult to say how many chefs and food lovers alike learned from him. Pete is the proud father of three beautiful children, Christopher Tosh, Sara Marguerite and Taylor Kershaw. He adored his family and could be found in his time away from the kitchen spending his days off sharing his passions and love of life with them. Surfing and camping at Jalama, Rincon or simply riding bikes or skateboarding around their neighborhood. He found delight and nothing brought a bigger smile to his face than his three children. As young adults his children followed his lead, his daughter took to cooking and worked in bakeries and assisted in catering events. His sons participated in surfing contests and bike racing. Pete burst with pride at watching his boy racers navigate criteriums, or tasting whatever his girl baker shared with him. Four years ago his daughter gave birth to his first granddaughter, Leia Marguerite. A year later Charlotte Grace. Pete loved his

OCTOBER 28, 2021

grandbabies and visited them in Alaska any chance he got. He was always happy to partake in their extraordinary and amusing adventures, teaching the girls how to enjoy good food all while loving them up. Pete passed away while on a bike ride in Spain on September 16, 2021 of natural causes. We are greatly saddened at the sudden loss of such a vibrant and loved member of our family. The community that grew up and around him, his close friends, kitchen companions, surfers, cyclists, the many fans of his divinely inspired tasty vittles, his children, grand children all of us fortunate enough to have shared a meal with him….to experience his talent and respect for the art of food, the love he served up we will all miss his joy… for Pete is undoubtedly the finest chef, friend and father that I ever had the pleasure to know.

Elbert Webster Price 1926 - 2021

A lifelong artist and sculptor, Elbert also loved sailing, cooking, gardening, bicycling, and repairing anything that was broken. He also greatly enjoyed designing/building and he constructed several boats, houseboats, and a house on the “bayou” located on Lake Street in Lake Charles. He built these and many other structures along with his wife, Shirley. Elbert is survived by his wife of 40 years, Shirley Tracy Leger Price; his former spouse, Blanche Joan Van Deveer Price Sullivan; and their four children, Julia Price-Kent, Karen Price Luda, David W. Price, and Kathryn Price Murphy, He is also survived by his stepchildren, Mary Leger Spaulding, Steven E. Leger, Connie Leger Owens, Linda Leger Cannizzaro, and his fourteen grandchildren and five great grandchildren. Elbert Price’s legacy will survive through his many paintings, sketches, and sculptures. These works of art will continue to bring joy to those who share them.

Joan Elizabeth (Pierce) Fogel 1932 - 2021

Born over 95 years ago in July 1926, to Elbert Webster Price, Sr., and Grace Chapman in Memphis, Tennessee, artist/sculptor Elbert Webster Price passed away in Ventura, California, on the 16th day of September. Growing up in Oklahoma and Arkansas, Elbert, a WWII veteran, joined the Navy in 1944. After serving, he attended the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, in Pennsylvania. In the late 1940’s, Elbert began his career in advertising and educational television in Memphis, Tennessee. He then became Executive Director with the United Fund and United Appeals organizations in Alexandria and Lake Charles, Louisiana. Later he became a stockbroker in the Lake Charles area for many years. In 1984, Elbert relocated to Santa Barbara, California to pursue his dream, art as a full time occupation.

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Joan Elizabeth (Pierce) Fogel, was born on January 20, 1932, the daughter of Chester A Pierce and Lillian (Reinhardt) Pierce. She was born and raised in Leominster, Massachusetts and she is predeceased by her son, Joseph M Fogel, who died January 22, 2010, and her four brother’s; Chester, Warren, Lloyd and Richard Pierce and two sister’s, Arlene (Pierce) Gardner and Beatrice (Pierce) Kingsbury. Joan was a vibrant person who was a kind and loving daughter, aunt, mother, grandmother and greatgrandmother. For those who knew her, she was Joni and her pride and joy was her family.

She moved from Leominster, Massachusetts to California after marrying Paul Fogel in 1956, where they raised 3 children, Lynn, Joe and Becky. She resided in Santa Barbara, California for 52 years before moving to Texas in 2020 to live with her youngest daughter, Becky, her son in law, Ed and grandson Garrett. This move also brought her closer to her two granddaughters and two great grandsons, whom she adored. She had a devout love for music, and after retiring from UC Santa Barbara in 1996, she joined the Prime Time Band, where she learned to play the flute and performed in many concerts throughout the community. She was also an amazing pianist, who brought joy to many throughout the community by sharing her amazing talent and love for music. She loved to travel on cruise ships and ventured as far as Alaska and the Panama Canal. She was an extremely social person, with an infectious laugh and was loved by many. She is survived by her daughters, Lynn I Fogel and partner, Kurt Triffet, of Ventura, CA, and Lybeth (Fogel) Morton aka Becky and her husband, Edward Morton of McKinney TX; her granddaughters; Amanda (Schreck) Morton and her husband, Thomas, and son PJ (great grandson) of Wiley, TX, Lauryn Fogel-Ramirez and her fiancé, John Perez and son, Lotus (great grandson) of Frisco, TX and her only grandson, Garrett Morton of McKinney, TX and many loving nieces and nephews that are scattered throughout the country. She will be sorely missed, but we all know that her Faith in the Lord Jesus Christ brings us all peace and joy.


obituaries Iola Larson 4/4/1918 - 10/16/2021

Iola (Ebba Marie Iola Wackelin) Larson was born to Ebba Elizabeth and Harold Leander Wackelin April 4, 1918 in Chicago, Illinois. She was baptized three months later and became a child of God thereafter. During the fall of 1918, Iola was sent to her grandparents’ in rural Indiana to protect her from the pandemic. Her cherished “little brother”, Harold, was born in 1923. They enjoyed a happy childhood and spent many weekends and vacations at their grandparents’ farm in the Indiana Dunes. When Iola was in her teens she met Forrest Larson at a church basketball game. They were married in 1942 in Seattle, Washington. Iola worked in the U. S. Navy Shipyard in Bremerton and Forrest was stationed at an Army Artillery Coast Defense Installation nearby. Their first child, Judith, was born in 1943. After Forrest was discharged they set up a home in Chicago and were active in Salem Lutheran Church. David was born in 1949 and Ralph in 1955. In 1951, Iola’s father died. Soon afterwards the family moved into the bungalow owned by Iola’s parents. Iola began a career in credit union management and continued in that field for 40 years. During that time Iola became the treasurer of the HEW Federal Credit Union in Chicago. Upon her retirement, Iola received a congratulatory letter from President George H. W. Bush for her loyalty and dedication. In 1968 the family moved to the Beverly area of Chicago and joined Ridge Lutheran Church. Iola was active in the congregation serving as church council secretary and assisting minister; she delivered

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altar flowers and communion to hospitalized and shut-in members. In 2009 Iola moved to The Samarkand retirement community in Santa Barbara, California. She joined Trinity Lutheran Church, where she served as lector and participated in Bible study. She took classes at the Wake Center in Santa Barbara and at The Samarkand, where she made enameled jewelry and mosaics. Iola is survived by her children, Judith Kinder (Gary), David Larson, and Ralph Larson (Carol). Memorial contributions may be made to Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago and Lutheran Social Services of Illinois. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, November 20th at 10 am at Trinity Lutheran Church in Santa Barbara.

Bennie J Olson 4/28/1934 - 10/10/2021

Bennie J Olson passed away peacefully on October 10, 2021. Bennie was born on the family farm in Little Cedar, Iowa on April 28,1934 where he lived until 5th grade when the family moved to Forest City, Iowa. He graduated from Forest City High School in 1951. Seeking adventure, he hitchhiked to Idaho and worked for the U.S. Forest Service that summer. Bennie married his high school sweetheart, Kathleen Ann Kloster Olson, on April 18, 1954. He enlisted with the U.S. Army in September and was stationed in the Panama Canal zone during the Korean War. Kathy joined Bennie in Panama City for the last 18 months of his assignment. Bennie attended Iowa State University, graduating with a degree in Electrical Engineering in 1959. He accepted a position with Lockheed

Martin, Watkins-Johnson in Sunnyvale, California. Bennie and Kathy headed for the West Coast with their daughter, Karen (2 yrs) and son, Craig (6 months) in the back seat of their 1958 VW Bug. Sons David and Eric were born during their time in the Bay Area. The Olsons enjoyed many adventures in their VW Bus with their expanding young family. While on a trip to Southern California they decided to take the scenic route over San Marcos Pass and fell in love with the beautiful city below. Paradise found! The family moved to Santa Barbara in 1964 when Santa Barbara Research Center hired Bennie as an Aerospace Engineer. In 1971, Bennie and Kathy purchased a business in their hometown of Forest City, Iowa. The family took off for the Midwest where they enjoyed reconnecting with family and old friends. They returned to Santa Barbara in 1973 and Bennie continued working in his former position at SBRC until his retirement in 1992. An adventurous spirit, Bennie loved creating opportunities for fun with his family. His 87 years were filled with a lifetime of memories; from camping trips to Yosemite, water skiing in Northern California, fishing, snow skiing at the family’s cabin in Kirkwood, making homemade ice cream, hiking, and cheering his children on in all of their endeavors. As a beloved ‘Papa’, he continued to share these family traditions, his love of the outdoors, and travel with his adoring grandchildren. The Olson home has always been a gathering place for family and friends where countless evenings have been spent on the deck enjoying family dinners, sunset views, and lots of laughter. Bennie will be remembered, and greatly missed, for his infectious laugh, his big heart, and his love of life.

He is survived by his wife of 67 years, Kathy Olson; his children Karen Olson Reynolds, Craig (Lori) Olson, David (Carla) Olson, Eric Olson; grandchildren, Kathryn, Alexa, Ben, Cory, Stacey, Lauren, Andrea, Morgan, Erica, Hailey, Hannah and Ben; and 6 great grandchildren. Please join us at the Celebration of Life for Bennie on Saturday, November 13 at 2:00p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church at 909 N. La Cumbre in Santa Barbara. Reception to follow.

Nancy Dixon Davidson 1/18/1939 - 9/15/2021

Nancy Dixon Davidson of Santa Barbara died peacefully on September 15, 2021. Nancy was born on January 18, 1939 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Sigmund and Elizabeth (Brown) Eisenscher. In 1941 her mother remarried Emory H. Dixon, who became a father to her. After graduating from Topeka High School, Nancy attended the University of Colorado where she became passionately involved in politics and in the school newspaper, majoring in political science and receiving multiple honors. While attending CU Boulder, she met her lifelong partner, Roger H. Davidson, whom she would marry in 1961 in Fort Collins, Colorado. After graduation, Nancy moved to Washington, D.C., working in the office of Senator John A. Carroll of Colorado. Once married, Roger and Nancy moved to Hanover, New Hampshire in 1962, where she worked for the Dartmouth News Service. In 1966 Nancy gave birth to their first son, Douglas Ross Davidson. In 1968 the family moved to Goleta, California where Roger joined the Department of Political Science at UC Santa Barbara. In 1969 Nancy gave birth to their second son,

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Christopher Reed Davidson. She will be remembered as a loving and dedicated mother to her two sons. She was very involved in the local school community, and volunteered as a Cub Scout Den Mother while continuing to work as a book editor. In 1980 the family moved back to Washington, where Nancy began an eighteenyear career as an editor at the Brookings Institution, becoming their first acquisitions editor. In 1999, Nancy and Roger retired, moving back to Santa Barbara. In retirement, Nancy dedicated her time to worthy causes, becoming co-chair of the local Planned Parenthood’s annual book sale and serving on their board of directors. She was also active in cultural affairs, serving on the board of Ensemble Theatre Company and raising funds for their theater renovation. Over the years Roger and Nancy would cherish their time with many dear friends in Washington, New York, Boulder, Hanover, Santa Barbara, Goleta, and elsewhere. Nancy was well known for playing Scrabble and leading singing groups among her friends. She and Roger would frequently break into song on the spur of the moment. She was an avid reader who also shared her love of books through her book club, and she will be fondly remembered for her insight and sense of humor. Nancy was a loving and supportive wife to Roger, her husband of almost 60 years, and together they shared a lifelong passion for music, art, literature, theater, and travel. She was a devoted mother and grandmother to her sons Douglas (Victoria) and Christopher (Theodora) and her six grandchildren (Elizabeth, Thomas, James, Alexander, Emily, and Olivia). She is also survived by her half brother, Michael Eisenscher, and half sister, Judith Schaffner. In lieu of flowers, gifts in her honor may be made to the Davidson Family Fund at the University of Colorado, or to the Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

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obituaries Juan Turner

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Val Bisoglio

1/31/1960 - 10/12/2021

5/7/1926 - 10/18/2021

On Tuesday, October 12, 2021 Juan Turner passed away at the age of 61. His parents, Verla Mae Brown Carter, and Anderson Turner, preceded him in death. Juan was born in New Orleans, Louisiana and raised in Santa Barbara, CA. He received his education at Franklin Elementary School, La Cumbre Jr. High, and Santa Barbara High School for a brief period where he participated in track and field. Juan also attended Chanel Islands High School and Oxnard Community College. After college, Juan worked at the Port Hueneme Naval Base, and later as a painter and tradesman. Juan became passionate about his faith in God and music, confessed Christ at an early age, and was baptized at Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church. As a youth he sang with the voices of Greater Hope Choir where he later became the minister of music for Greater Hope and faithfully and generously donated his time, and services to various churches within the district. Juan leaves to cherish his memory his children: Natasha Chasity Miller, Tywanda Stallings, Kevin Turner, Juan Turner, Jr., Siobhan Turner, and Jalen Turner; his two brothers, Lyle Juan Carter, Terry Carter, and one sister Juanita Turner. Many nieces, nephews, and cousins also survive him. A memorial service will be held on Friday, October 29, 2021 at 1:00 PM at Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church 430 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Reverend JB Ficklin, Jr., Officiant

Popular character actor Val Bisoglio passed away October 18, 2021, at the age of 95 at his beloved mountain home near Los Olivos, CA. Born Italo Valentino Bisoglio on May 7, 1926, in New York City, he was proud of his Piemontese roots. His parents, Mario Bisoglio and Virginia Gallina Bisoglio, immigrated to the United States in 1920-21 from towns near Monferrato, Alessandria, Italy. He began acting as therapy to help treat severe migraines. His first acting coach was Jeff Corey. He loved the stage and was drawn to the work, lives and language of modern and contemporary playwrights, including August Strindberg, Eugene O’Neill, Harold Pinter, plus the Theatre of the Absurd. Val appeared on the New York stage in Kiss Mama, A View from the Bridge and Wait Until Dark. He was also on stage in New York City’s Shakespeare in the Park with Arthur Penn. He starred in a multitude of television shows during the 1960’s-1980’s. His best- known roles were as Sgt. Sal Pernelli, the cook on M*A*S*H, and Danny Tovo, the restaurateur in Quincy, M.E. His final television role was as Murf in The Sopranos in 2002. Favorite among his family is his performance as Chief Gray Cloud in The Frisco Kid. He is perhaps best known for playing Frank, Sr., John Travolta’s father, in Saturday Night Fever. A non-acting pursuit for which he was proud was participation in the Mobilization for Youth pilot project of the Kennedy Administration. This anti-poverty program trained teenage dropouts to be employable. Val is survived by his sons Joseph Valentino Bisoglio and wife Devon, Sgt. Scott Chap-

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man and wife Andrea, and by Casey DeFranco. And, by his wife of 25 years, Bonnie B. Ray Bisoglio and brothers-in-law E. Scott Ray and wife Kerry, Gaylord W. Ray, M.D., and wife Cindy, Will R. Ray and J. Enos Ray and his wife Julie. Charitable gifts in Val’s memory may be made to the Motion Picture and Television Fund (mptf.com), 23388 Mulholland Drive, Woodland Hills, CA 91364, to the Wildling Museum of Art and Nature (wildlingmuseum.org), 1511-B Mission Drive, Solvang, CA 93463 or to the charity of your choice.

retirement. He is preceded in death by his parents, 1 brother and 3 sisters. A Funeral Mass will be held at St. Marks Catholic Church, 6550 Picasso Rd., Isla Vista, on November 2, 2021 at 10:00 AM. In lieu of flowers consider a donation to your favorite charity or Visiting Nurses and Hospice Care

Carol Metzler Taylor 8/4/1946 - 9/26/2021

Robert Fleace

5/27/1930 - 10/13/2021

Bob passed away peacefully at home on October 13, 2021. He was born to Victor and Minnie Fleace on May 27, 1930 and raised on the family farm near Okabena, Mn along with 3 Brothers and 9 Sisters. There were always fun stories to tell whenever the family would get together. Bob attended school in Okabena, graduating from High School in 1948. He served in the U.S. Army from 1951-1953 and then embarking on a lifetime of work in the construction industry. Upon moving to Goleta in 1962 he worked on many interesting projects in the Santa Barbara area throughout the years. He took much pride in his fine woodworking skills and he loved the challenge of fixing most anything. In 1954 he married Donna Fenske and together they raised a family of 1 daughter, Barbara Manzo of Santa Barbara and 2 sons, Barry of Goleta and Brett of Gilbert, AZ He particularly enjoyed 2 Grandsons, Brian Manzo and Chris Fleace . Traveling in the motorhome and exploring new places and visiting family and friends was what he enjoyed in his

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Carol M. Taylor’s brilliant light went out on September 26, 2021. Carol’s vibrant spirit burned bright throughout her 75 years in Santa Barbara. She was born to Pattie Metzler née Eaton, a homemaker from Eastern Washington, and Fred Metzler, WWII Airforce Veteran and artist, on August 4th, 1946. She inherited her mom’s love for singing and her father’s passion for art. After graduating from Santa Barbara High School in 1964 Carol attended Santa Barbara City College, San Francisco State, and ultimately received her degree and teaching credentials from UCSB. Carol returned to the Santa Barbara High School district in 1970 as a teacher at both La Cumbre Junior High and eventually Santa Barbara High School. For 38 years, she was a beloved Spanish and Art teacher to generations of students. Carol loved teaching and simply adored her students. She was immensely proud of the many students who went on to use their creativity to make a life for themselves, whether they were painting, tattooing, doing makeup, cooking food, making music, dancing, writing, teaching, building lowriders, or fashion designing. To her, creative work was one of the highest callings and something everybody should have the

chance to do. Carol was one of the founders of the Visual Arts and Design Academy (VADA) at Santa Barbara High School. She poured her heart into creating a program that integrates rigorous academic coursework with project-based, career-focused art and design instruction, in a supportive and creative environment. In addition to her work at SBHS and VADA, Carol believed passionately in public art and providing access to everybody in our community. She worked closely with the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, to connect students with opportunities like mural painting, internships, scholarships, and VADA’s altar at the now 30-year-old Dia de Los Muertos celebration. Carol created space for people to explore, understand and be themselves both in her work and at home. She wanted her daughters to have the opportunity to express themselves so they had the freedom to make questionable hairstyle decisions as adolescents. They learned a lot from the experience. Carol and her husband, Art, loved to host parties, and were famous for their Halloween Haunted Driveway that struck fear and joy into the hearts of all who attended. Among her friends, Carol was known for her naughty sense of humor, pride in her family’s history, and constantly repainting the walls of her home every color of the rainbow. She is survived by her two daughters, Torrey Kightlinger née Balch (and her husband Patrick), and Alexa Senter née Korngiebel (and her husband Aaron); her beloved grandchildren Avery, Bowen, and Brynn Kightlinger; her siblings Karen Wilson (Metzler), Sandy Metzler, and Kurt Metzler; and former spouse John Balch. In lieu of flowers, Carol’s daughters ask that donations be made in her memory to the Visual Arts and Design Academy at the following URL: https://bit.ly/VADA-CMT A celebration of life will be held on November 7th at 1 pm at Godric Grove in Eilings Park.


obituaries Agnes Rozsa Jacobson 5/17/1938 - 10/17/2021

Agnes Rozsa Jacobson of Santa Barbara died peacefully beside her children on October 17, 2021. Agnes Valeria Rozsa was born May 17, 1938 in Debrecen, Hungary, to Anna and Arpad Rozsa. In her early years, she lived with her parents and their fox terrier, Hari (one of many terriers, all named Hari). She was the baby amongst her extended Hungarian family, most of whom who were lost in the Holocaust. During the war, Agnes was hidden underground by a Christian family, although her survival was reportedly due to her mother’s non-Jewish identity. Agnes was extraordinarily strong and wise; as a 6 year old, her stern eyes and calm demeanor convinced a Gestapo officer that her father, hiding in a closet, was “not here”. Agnes also shared a story of her mother requesting she follow her to a nearby shelter; Agnes flatly refused, screaming “Nem!” (no) … moments later the shelter was bombed. Agnes reflected on how she survived on lentils and water alone during her hiding. Following the war, Agnes moved to Budapest with her mother and step-father, and was subsequently sent to boarding school at her mother’s request — a traumatic change for Agnes. She also fell under the care of various governesses, all who came and went, one after the other. Agnes’ father, who was rebuilding a family clothing business back in Debrecen, came to Budapest to visit Agnes whenever he could. Agnes returned to Debrecen at the age of 10, after which Arpad married Klari, who Agnes would consider her “true mother”. Agnes, Arpad and Kari, and later two cousins (Miklos and Etta)

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would occupy two bedrooms of Arpad’s original spacious apartment, with the remaining bedrooms shared by nine other people, and all sharing one bathroom. They remained cozily together for three years. Agnes attended elementary school in Debrecen until the eighth grade, when she was selected to attend a topranking Gymnasium (secondary school) where the best students are prepared to study medicine, science and education. The Hungarian Revolution began during her final year of Gymnasium in 1956, and she soon participated in a youth march to appeal to factory workers to join in the revolt. Soviet tanks entered Debrecen early in the repression of the revolt, and Agnes remembered shells flying very near her and passing through a neighboring apartment. The borders were soon closed. The fathers of Agnes and boyfriend Mihael agreed that their children needed to leave Hungary immediately, but on their own. The plan was for them to take a Red Cross transport across the border into Austria. Amidst the chaos, however, their plans had to be abandoned, and Agnes and Mihael were forced to make alternative connections, pay required sums, and ultimately cross freezing waters. This crossing would impact Agnes’ mobility for life. Agnes and Mihael successfully escaped to Austria in December, 1956. Agnes’ first cousin, Marika Frank Abrams, and her husband, Sydney Abrams, were anxious to bring their cousin to the United States. At the time, a first cousin was not considered a close enough relative to immigrate. Sydney wrote U.S. Senator Henry M. Jackson to ask for his assistance, and the Senator petitioned congress to request that the current emigration restrictions be revised. Soon thereafter, Agnes was on a plane destined for the Abrams’ home in Washington State. Agnes began her new life in Seattle, where she attended English classes and worked at a nursery school where her young nephew, Ede, was

attending. According to Agnes, her limited English skills opened non-verbal avenues of communication which significantly deepened her connection with the children. Marika and Syd were lifelong artists and theatre aficionados, and as active members of the Jewish Community, they frequented JCC events together. During one such Chekov play, they were so impressed by a theatrical portrayal by one actor, Harold Jacobson, that they made their way backstage to introduce themselves and invite him to a dinner party at their home. There, Harold met Agnes, and the two would soon be married for life. They had two children, David and Irene. Agnes and Harold were nature lovers and devoted environmental philanthropists. Together, they discovered and photographed national parks and forests throughout western North America. Backpacking and skiing became a family staple. They were also devoted to loving and caring for their rescued dogs as their own children. Agnes was an avid rock and stone collector. Her backpack was always much heavier upon her return. At home, every counter, hutch, and window sill was covered with precisely placed rocks. The symbolism and meaning imbued into the rocks brought her much joy. Agnes embraced humanity through her immersion into music, poetry, geology, astronomy, linguistics and nutrition; she loved to share her knowledge with family and friends. Agnes’ understanding of, and compassion toward, all living beings was unsurpassed. Her kindness touched everyone to their core, as this is who she was, to her core. Agnes was preceded in death by her husband, and is survived by her children and grandson, Nathan. Many thanks to the loving and caring staff of Maravilla and Central Coast Hospice.

Bryan Edward Bowie 4/15/1955 - 10/19/2021

It is with great sadness we have to say goodbye to our younger brother Bryan; husband, father, grandfather and uncle. Bryan passed away after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. Bryan was born and raised in Santa Barbara and attended local schools. He discovered early on a life long love for surfing. His love of the ocean brought him into his occupation as an urchin diver until he retired. Bryan met and fell in love with another Santa Barbara native, Elaine LeCompte. They married and had two sons, Brandon and Josh. When not working or spending time with his family, Bryan could be found at Hendry’s Beach or walking his dogs Sweetie and Shelby. In his later years, he spent his free time with his wife on stand up boards, biking, flying model airplanes, or playing with the grandkids. Bryan is survived by his wife Elaine, sons Brandon (Emily) and Josh, and grandchildren Easton and Ella Bowie. Bryan is predeceased by his parents Robert “Bob” and Barbara Bowie. Bryan also leaves behind his brother Harry (Carol) Bowie, sister Barbie (Ron) Glass, Uncle Gary (Carolyn) Bowie, as well as, many cousins, nieces, and nephews. In lieu of flowers, a donation to Serenity House in Bryan’s name is appreciated. “Bryan, I love you so much. You are my best friend, my soul mate, and my lover. I will forever miss you”, Elaine.

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Karl William Bream 9/9/1933 - 6/18/2021

Karl William Bream passed away on Friday, June 18, 2021 at the age of 87. He was born to William and Pauline Bream on September 9, 1933, in Santa Barbara, California. He graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1951 and was soon drafted into the U.S. Navy where he served his country aboard the heavy attack cruiser the U.S.S. Los Angeles, known as the flagship for the Pacific Fleet. There, Karl saw extensive action in the Korean War. Karl was rated as a medical corpsmen and received numerous commendations and medals during his 4-year term abroad ship. Upon his honorable discharge, Karl returned home to Santa Barbara and attended the local college. Before his retirement, Karl was employed as a draftsmen for the County of Santa Barbara, and later, as a building and safety inspector up until his retirement in 1988. Karl remained active in the community, working various projects, as a private residential inspector and co-founding the Santa Barbara corvette club in 1962. Karl was a sport enthusiast, and enjoyed was various sports to include Nascar Racing. He developed a passion for gardening, and his green thumb produced his pride and joyan array of colorful, beautiful orchids. His family and friends remember his thoughtful, kindhearted, and giving nature. As such, upon his passing, Karl expressed his need to deliver his profound thanks to his long time physician, Dr. M. Bernstein, his home care nurses, his neighbors, Joe and Linda, and his good friend Juanita Carter, for all their care and support throughout his life’s journey. Karl is survived by two sisters, Mary Douglas and Linda Cromer, his son and daughterin-law, Kristian and Tereza Bream and his daughter, Kori Mang. Karl also leaves behind his three granddaughters, Meghan Rowe, Kylie Mang and Emily Bream, and many nieces, nephews and life-long friends. Funeral arrangements are forthcoming.

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FAMILY& FOOTBALL

A SANTA BARBARA FAMILY BONDS THROUGH SPORTS BY RYAN P. CRUZ PHOTOS BY ERICK MADRID

I

FAMILY CONNECTION: Cousins Abel Renteria (left) and Miguel Unzueta have helped lead Santa Barbara to a 7-2 record and a playoff berth.

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n the tradition of American high school football, families have always held a sacred place. On Friday nights across the country, stadiums are packed with cheering relatives, proud mothers and excited siblings, fathers reliving their glory days, and little boys watching the big boys battle it out under the bright lights. One of those places is here at Santa Barbara High School, where a close-knit community of families have grown up together, playing in parks and backyards, and finally gathering together at Peabody Stadium for a few weeks every fall to see the latest generation run onto the field, wearing the olive and gold. Once a Don, always a Don. Football has always been a big deal at Santa Barbara High School, ever since they won their first CIF title in 1929. In recent times, there have been remarkable family legacies; maybe the most famous were the Cunningham brothers — Sam, Anthony, Bruce, and Randall — who shattered football records and racial barriers throughout their careers from the 1960s through the ’80s. Most recently, former head coach Will Gonzales has seen his two sons play for the Dons: Jackson was part of Santa Barbara’s run to the CIF final two years ago, and today, his youngest boy, Grant, is a defensive standout on this year’s team. Then there is the Renteria family. Poncho Renteria was the quarterback who led the Dons to their last CIF championship more than 30 years ago, and now his son Abel, as quarterback, is taking the team through to a strong 7-2 record that will certainly result in a playoff bid. The team captain is his cousin Miguel Unzueta. For full transparency, I must say that I’m partial to these two; they are my cousins, and we are part of a huge sports family. Soccer, baseball, basketball, football — you name it, we played it. My mother is Claudia Renteria, the oldest of six Renteria brothers and sisters. She took our grandfather’s athletic genes and became a force on the basketball court for Santa Barbara in the ’80s. Second oldest, Martin, was a Dons soccer player, but it was Poncho who became a sports legend. Not everybody in the family went to Santa Barbara High. My cousin Gabe Renteria; his twin, Daniel; and I went to Dos Pueblos. But even when I played defensive back for the Chargers more than 10 years ago, I honored my Uncle Poncho by wearing his number 12, as did my cousin Gabe, who played quarterback a few years later. Football is part of our family; at birthday parties, barbecues, and beach days, all the cousins, 15 in total, would be running routes and fighting for jump balls. It’s


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something Abel and Miguel have been doing forever — first as toddlers, tackling each other in Grandma’s living room, and now under the bright Friday night lights. Even though a couple of us went to Dos Pueblos, when my cousins are lining up for the Dons, we’re all cheering them on. For our whole family, seeing those two guys playing together this season has been a dream come true. “It’s crazy,” said Silvia Unzueta, Miguel’s mother. “We always talked about it, and now here we are.”

A FAMILY HISTORY

Even before the backyards or the bright lights of Peabody Stadium — even before Poncho — this family connection to athletics ran deep, and it started with another sport in another country. Alfonso Becerra Renteria grew up in Jalisco, Guadalajara, where he played soccer throughout his childhood and was named goalie for the Junior National Championship team in 1960. He had dreams of a soccer career, but after he married Maria Luz Palomino Renteria and they had two young children — 4-year-old Claudia and one-year-old Martin — he wanted to give his family a chance for a more secure future. So in January 1968, Alfonso left his athletic dreams behind, and he and Maria Luz packed up their Sophomore quarterback Abel Renteria (#6) handed off to senior team captain Miguel Unzueta (#4) for a long jet sweep run in a 45-17 win over family and crossed the border at Tijuana, hopcrosstown rival Dos Pueblos. ing to find that future in the United States. Eventually the Renterias made their way to the Santa Ynez Valley, where Maria Luz’s star quarterback, leading his team to a 12-1-1 season and “It was a big challenge for him,” Poncho said. “First year brother, Fernando, had moved years earlier to work at the school’s first CIF championship since 1960. During as a quarterback, the stadium opening up. And his whole Pea Soup Andersen’s. Alfonso got a job there working in that time, he broke many of Randall Cunningham’s pass- thing — he doesn’t want to let anyone down.” the kitchen and then moved to the kitchen of Birkholm’s ing records and notched his own place in Santa Barbara’s On top of that, Miguel had just suffered a hamstring Bakery before working as a driver. list of great quarterbacks. strain in preseason and was forced out of the lineup for Three years and three kids later, in 1971, they moved Thirty years later, another generation of quarterbacks the first three weeks. “Probably the saddest thing I’ve ever to Santa Barbara, now with a set of twins — Maria and have come through — including John Uribe and Deacon had to go through,” Miguel said. “I’ve never missed that Silvia — and a baby girl, Luz. The family’s knack for sports Hill — who set new records and created new memories. many games in a row.” lived on with Alfonso, who played club soccer at Dwight Hill, who now plays Division 1 at Wisconsin, was quarThe Dons struggled to find any offense that game and Murphy Field, and then with Claudia and Martin in high terback when Miguel was a sophomore on the team that suffered a tough shutout loss to start the season. Abel took school sports, but it was their sixth and last child, Alfonso made a run for the championship two years ago. When the loss personally and wondered if every game would be Jr., nicknamed “Poncho,” who would make a name for Hill graduated, it gave Abel the opportunity to be QB1 as tough. But after that week, he decided to forget about himself on the football field. going into this season. the noise. “It happened way quicker than I thought,” “I try to block it out; I try to think that I’m just playing Abel said. But it seemed natural to him to be football, just doing the thing that I love,” he said. “I’ve throwing to his cousin Miguel. They’ve been been playing football all my life. It’s just another football doing it forever. “We’ve always had the chem- game. Don’t even think about being under the lights and istry,” he said, “since we were little.” Miguel all these people.” agreed: “As a little kid, I always thought it FINDING THEIR FLOW would happen.” After that first loss, something happened. The defense, FIRST-GAME JITTERS led by Vince Gamberdella and Grant Gonzales, started to Coach JT Stone named Abel as the Dons’ shut teams down. Abel became more comfortable, looked starting quarterback over the summer. more like himself, and started to earn the respect of the Though Abel had spent the offseason train- upperclassmen on the roster. He tossed the ball to everying and getting ready for the task, the reality body he could, throwing touchdowns to five different of playing his first game at home in front of a receivers and running for a few of his own. newly renovated, jam-packed Peabody StaIn his second game, Abel scored twice through the air dium was enough to rattle any 15-year-old and once on the ground, and for the first time, he looked As the youngest, Poncho had the benefit of tagging sophomore — especially when it’s fueled by high hopes like he was ready for the varsity level. “After the third along with his older siblings, soaking in everything they and huge shoes to fill. game, I was like, ‘Wow, I could really do this,’ ” Abel said. were doing. Claudia was a captain for the Dons girls’ bas“That was the most nervous I’d ever been,” Abel admit- “We got a flow; we got chemistry.” ketball team in 1980, and when the whole family would ted about the season’s first game. There was the pressure “To be honest, I didn’t think he’d be this successful so come to watch her play, Poncho would wander over to the of his father’s legacy, the questions as to whether he could early on,” Poncho said. “Now he’s playing with this confootball field. The star quarterback at the time was Randall replace Hill, and the fact that he was leading and playing fidence, it’s kinda wild. It’s pretty amazing to watch as a Cunningham, who went on to play 16 seasons in the NFL. against players who were years older than him. father. He’s got so much potential. I was never at his level Watching Randall sparked something in Poncho. Claudia For his father, it was just as nerve-racking. “We had a at his age, and I’m absolutely proud of him.” noticed it and began encouraging that passion in her baby moment, both of us,” Poncho said. “I was very nervous, The team gained momentum, and Coach Stone started brother. “Claudia, she really pushed me,” Poncho said. trembling. And he was nervous when I went down to give to see the potential for this season to be more than just a rebuilding year. “Abel’s been doing great. He’s only a By 1989, that pushing paid off. Poncho was the Dons’ him a hug, and you could just see it in his face.”

Football is part of our family; at birthday parties, barbecues, and beach days, all the cousins, 15 in total, would be running routes and fighting for jump balls.

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Left: Poncho Renteria, Abel’s father, led Santa Barbara to its last CIF title in 1989. Right: Miguel Unzueta, Abel Renteria, and Carlos Unzueta take a picture with Coach JT Stone, years before they would be running his offense. sophomore, and I told him at the beginning of the season, ‘All I need you to do is move the chains,’ and he does that,” Stone said. The Dons went on a roll, blowing through Thousand Oaks (27-3) and Righetti (42-7). Heading into the Big Game against San Marcos, Miguel was also set to return, adding another weapon to Santa Barbara’s deep arsenal. Miguel’s strength has always been his leadership skills. Even when he was hurt, he did everything he could to help his team from the sideline. “It was hard for him and hard for us to watch,” Coach Stone said. “He’s that senior that we’re all pushing for.” He’s really stepped up and been able to lead by example, his dad said. “He’s quiet, does what he

‘ I don’t like to

show fear. If I see a one-on-one, I’m not gonna slide; I’m gonna

WINDOW CLEANING

show them I’m not afraid.’

PRESSURE WASHING

—Abel Renteria

needs to do. He brings his hard hat and just gets it done,” said Miguel Sr. “And a lot of guys I think feed off that. He’s not really the guy that gets in your face; that’s not his style.” The Big Game against crosstown rival San Marcos was the debut of the cousins’ connection, and the Renteria family crowded into a corner at Peabody Stadium to watch the boys play. When Abel dropped back to throw a touchdown pass to Miguel early in the game, the family exploded with hugs and highfives. They had been waiting to see this for years. “There’s a lot of family pride in actually watching these two kids go out there and do their thing,” Miguel Unzueta Sr. said. The Dons won that game 40-7.

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SETTING THE TONE The Dons repeated their success against Ventura in a comeback, last-second 28-21 win that really set the tone for the season. Abel was noticeably more confident, calm in the pocket and a surprisingly strong runner, tucking the ball whenever he needed. He started to play aggressively, smashing through tacklers and barreling into the end zone for a couple of touchdown runs. “I don’t like to show fear. If I see a one-on-one, I’m not gonna slide; I’m gonna show them that I’m not afraid,” Abel said. “I want people to start respecting Santa Barbara for who we are. I want people to be scared to play us.” It’s that confidence at such an early age that has people looking not toward the past—at Poncho’s legacy, and Deacon Hill’s—but to the future, to the potential of this kid who still has another couple of years ahead of him in high school football. “He has his own identity. It’s cool to watch. I’m stressing on the sidelines, and he just handles it,” Poncho said. “I think he’s still scratching the surface Abel and Miguel on what he can do; it’s kind connected for two touchof crazy.” downs in the first quarter When Abel daydreams, against Dos Pueblos. it’s about playbooks, defenMiguel’s performance sive packages, and blitzes. earned him the Santa On game day, he says it’s Barbara Athletic Round like seeing these scenarios Table’s Player of the Week award. he runs through his head appear right in front of him. He instantly knows what read to make — he’s imagined it a million times already. “I notice every time I really think, or overthink, I don’t do it right,” he said. “But if I just play and let loose and do my job, everything works out.” He’s also been exposed to so many former quarter-


C O V E R

S T O R Y

NOW through October 31 backs’ advice: from his father; Uribe; Hill; and big cousin Gabe, who has coached Abel since he could throw. It’s really been “success by committee,” where it takes a whole village to raise a star quarterback. “It’s good to hear what everyone has to say, ’cause at the end of the day, they’re all trying to help me reach my goals,” Abel said.

TORNADO WARNING

With only one game left, the Dons have flipped the preseason expectations and won seven out of nine games. As a rolling October fog floated over Scott O’Leary Stadium in Goleta for a crosstown rivalry game between Dos Pueblos and Santa Barbara, the visiting Dons team exploded with two quick touchdown strikes from Abel to Miguel. The Dons went on to win 45-17, clinching the City Championship, and Miguel was named Santa Barbara Athletic Round Table’s “Player of the Week,” an award Abel also earned earlier in the season. With the win against Dos Pueblos, they have earned a spot in the CIF playoffs and an opportunity to change into their special gold jerseys and play as the Golden Tornado — a tradition for every playoff game since 1929. The tradition is not lost on the boys, who grew up looking up to the players in gold running out of the tunnel at the old Peabody Stadium. “It’s still like a dream to me,” Abel said. “I’m going out of the tunnel, and there’s all these people here to see us play.” “I remember going to Santa Barbara games too,” said Miguel, “and just knowing I was gonna be a part of that tradition — that was something really special to me.” Today, Abel is putting a lot of pressure on himself to perform, especially for the seniors on the team, particularly his cousin. Miguel, however, is trying to stay in the present and take in every moment of his senior year. “It’s bittersweet, just knowing that you’re gonna be done with high school,” Miguel said. “It went so fast. It kinda felt like I was a freshman only a couple days ago.” But right now, the whole team knows what has to be done. “We’re just locked in right now,” Miguel said. “We have one goal: to make the playoffs and run the table.” And in the stands at each game, the whole Renteria contingent will be there, watching nervously — but with pride — at these two baby-faced toddlers turned into young men. After the game, they will wait their turn, behind the bright-eyed kids asking them for handshakes, pictures, and hugs. It’s partly embarrassing and partly encouraging to have so many family members watching so closely, but both cousins agree that growing up in this family is a blessing. “It makes me feel good about myself that I have a big, supportive family,” Abel said. “No matter what, they are gonna be on my side.” n

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1


F

E

A

T

U

R

E

the ghosts of

I

f you have never stopped to ponder the rich, ghostly

sharing her tales, figuring correctly that the paranormal angle would generate intrigue rather than scare people away. (She was never fired.) Small and guest-focused, Brown’s Santa Barbara tour options include a “Dead of the Night” theme, which guides you through sections of downtown that will have you exercising all five senses. You can even book a “paranormal pairing” experience combining wine tasting and ghost stories. Guests are also provided a goodie bag that contains “spiritual protection items” including crosses and rosaries (and a snack in case you get hungry!). Accompanying Brown on our tour was Allison Kross, who shared with us a beverage recipe titled the “Hot Comandante,” inspired by by Celina Garcia the winter weather and “the GHOST HUNTER: Julie Brown’s interest in the supernatural began with a stint aboard the spirit” of José de la Guerra. historically haunted Queen Mary. From the moment Brown When she isn’t leading or conducting research for her made her entrance — dressed in a silky canary-yellow gown ringlets. Petrified, he dashed out of the basement, exited the ghost tours, Brown volunteers as a docent for the Santa and a crown to match — it was clear this was not going to theater, and ran across the street to call his mom. When he Barbara Mission, and she is also a tenured finance profes- be a regular Saturday night. She began the tour by asking told his teacher what had happened, she thought that he was sor at Santa Barbara City College, where she also serves as if anyone had ever had a paranormal experience. Answers making it up to get out of punishment. She accompanied him the Department Chair of Business Administration. Brown ranged from encounters with relatives who have passed to the theater in order to show him there was nothing to be founded Santa Barbara Ghost Tours in 2017 after spending on to curious figures in the corners of one’s eyes to strange afraid of, but let’s just say that after her visit she never made several months researching curiously overlooked elements reflections in the mirror. Some guests said they weren’t sure him, or anyone, volunteer there again. Another stop on our tour led us to where there have been of Santa Barbara’s history. But her fascination with the spirit they’d classify their experiences as paranormal, to which Brown responded, “If you ever think you have [had one], sightings of a woman with a white umbrella believed to be world started long before then. Brown has been collecting ghost stories since she worked you most certainly have.” named Kana, who was of Japanese descent. Here, Brown as a tour guide at Long Beach’s famous Queen Mary while Brown then spoke of previous generations of Santa Bar- shared her findings about Kana’s romantic relationship, attending USC. At the time, she explained, the owners did barans who, with or without our knowledge, have sprinkled which needed to be kept secret during her lifetime due to the not wish for the Queen Mary to be known as the “ghost reminders that they were once here — or, perhaps, that they cultural differences between her and her partner. Brown was ship” it is recognized as today and for her to frighten their never left. She said our local ghosts are rather friendly and speaking from a parking lot on the outskirts of the Presidio, clientele. However, despite her boss threatening to fire her if also communicative, if you know what to look for. Of the where there is a shabby wooden fence and a long patch of she did not stop “spooking” their guests, Brown continued 100-plus stories Brown has uncovered, here are a few that dirt, which Brown believes is Kana’s final resting place. “I think she keeps coming back here because, well, look at it stick out: According to Brown, and unbe- — it’s disrespectful to the memory of those who are buried knownst to many, one of our very here,” Brown said. Along the tour, Brown told us more tales of deceit, unreown theaters — you’ll have to take the tour to find out which one! — is quited love, and hidden treasure, and we came to our final considered the most haunted the- stop at the site of what Brown refers to as Santa Barbara’s ater in California. Before being most horrific murder that took place all the way back in 1921. demolished by the 1925 earth- After the deadly altercation between the town cobbler and quake, it was known for holding the his wife transpired, City Hall purchased the property where occasional séance, and the female the victim’s body was found. When recounting the gritty architect behind the new building details of her discovery, Brown said that she never forgot omitted windows so that “spirits the words that came out of the husband’s mouth when the may not escape.” authorities caught him red-handed. In more recent years, Brown To learn what the cobbler said and to hear more about shared, a local student was made the spirits that grace the streets of Santa Barbara’s past and to volunteer at the theater as a present, schedule a tour with Santa Barbara Ghost Tours. form of detention. While working Don’t fret if you left your rosary at home — Julie Brown has in the basement, he felt a chill, and got you covered. WHAT LIES BENEATH: The site of what Julie Brown calls Santa Barbara’s most horrific when he looked to his side, he saw murder is now occupied by City Hall. a faceless woman with tight brown See sbghosttour.com. energies and history of Santa Barbara, you are certainly not alone. Whether your family has lived here for generations or you are just passing through, Santa Barbara Ghost Tours (SBGT) is sure to illuminate an array of mysteries and histories one may not expect from this sleepy beach town. Led by Julie Brown, SBGT paints a larger portrait of the city, incorporating personal and family histories of local residents as well as past events like the 1925 earthquake and the Spanish Colonial era, in addition to delving into the Asian-American communities and their connection to the Presidio neighborhood. Of course, the tour would not be complete without mention of historical figures, from José de la Guerra to Pearl Chase, as well as lesser-known spirits, which Brown brings into the limelight.

ALLISON KROSS PHOTOS

SANTA BARBARA

Tour Illuminates Town’s Mysteries and Histories

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

OCT. NOV.

28 3

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

FRIDAY 10/29 10/29, 10/31: Opera S.B. PresentsIl tabarro (The Cloak) and El amor brujo (Love, the Magician) Decide if you want to

10/30:

Revisiting Jimmy’s Oriental Gardens

Join the S.B. Trust for Historic Preservation and learn about S.B.’s Nihonmachi (Japan Town), take a neighborhood history tour in and around El Presidio de Santa Bárbara State Historic Park, experience a private viewing of the new exhibit about Jimmy’s Oriental Gardens, and have a Mai Tai and sample signature egg rolls. 4-5:30pm. Steps next to the Pickle Room, 122 E. Canon Perdido St. Members: $35; GA: $50 (includes SBTHP membership). Call (805) 965-0093. sbthp.org/revisitingjimmys

THURSDAY 10/28 10/28-10/31: 20th Annual Ojai Storytelling Festival Enjoy funny,

experience Puccini’s “darkest opera” Il tabarro about broken dreams, love, and murder on Friday or Manual de Falla’s fiery masterpiece, El amor brujo, with flamenco song and dance with dancers from State Street Ballet on Sunday, or see both! Fri.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $99$159/per opera. Call (805) 963-0761.

operasb.org

SATURDAY 10/30

Día De

Los Muertos

10/29:

10/28: Vijay Gupta in Conversation with Pico Iyer Join UCSB Arts & Lectures as they present celebrated violinist, speaker, and MacArthur Fellow Vijay Gupta in conversation with novelist and travel writer Pico Iyer on The Healing Power of Music. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: $10; GA: $25-$35. Call (805) 893-3535.

personal altar by using collage and a cigar box inspired by El Día de los Muertos. Typewriters will be available to compose a love letter or poem for the altars. Come early for free face painting. Face painting: 4-6pm; workshop: 6-8pm. $50. The Crafter’s Library, 9 E. Figueroa St. Call (805) 770-3566. thecrafterslibrary.com/calendar

10/30: Día de los Muertos: Raising Awareness and Funds Against Gun Violence Enjoy food vendors, craft beer and wine, merchant booths, and live music. Bring a chair and blanket for grass seating. Proceeds will go toward the Resilience Institute to provide food and assistance to area residents in applying for government programs. Noon-8pm. Chase Palm Park, 323 E. Cabrillo Blvd. GA: $65$80; children ages 12 and under: free. Ages 21+ for alcohol. tinyurl.com/ChaseDDLM

10/31: Carpinteria Día De Los Muertos Bring a picnic, tour the altars, and celebrate with DJ Marco, live performances, and arts and crafts for the kids. 11am-2pm. Carpinteria Cemetery, 1501 Cravens Lane, Carpinteria. Free. tinyurl.com/CarpinteriaDDLM

10/30: Online Seminar Series: A Voice from the South by Anna Julia Cooper and The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois — Part Three Register online to receive

a link for this seminar about two seminal Black thinkers, Anna Julia Cooper and W.E.B. Du Bois. The reading for this seminar is chapters 9-12 of The Souls of Black Folk. Noon2pm. Free-$25. Email greatbooksojai@gmail.com.

SUNDAY 10/31 10/31: Yu-Gi-Oh! Burst of Destiny Core Premiere Tournament Get five packs of the brand-new set before anyone else, compete for limited edition play mats, and enter a raffle for a chance to win an exclusive foil card! Call or stop by to sign up. 11:30am. Metro Entertainment, 6 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 963-2168.

tinyurl.com/YuGiOhTourney

MONDAY 11/1 11/1: Monthly Virtual Garden Talks with UC Master Gardener: Native Plants & Soil UC Master Gardeners of S.B. County invite you to learn useful, interesting, and research-based home gardening information with gardeners of all experience levels. 7-8pm. Free. Call (805) 893-3485 or email anrmgsb@ucanr.edu.

ucanr.edu/sbmg

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

TUESDAY 11/2

11/2:

Reading and Book-Signing: Author Mary Tonetti Dorra: Two Lives on Four Continents: A Double Memoir Author Mary Tonetti Dorra will share her experience and give a reading from her upcoming book, Two Lives on Four Continents: A Double Memoir, about how Mary and her husband found each other and traveled from Alexandria, Egypt; to Washington, D.C.; Fort Worth, Texas; Central and South America; and Italy. 4-5:30pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free-$5. Call (805) 884-6243.

tinyurl.com/DoubleMemoir

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. THE INDEPENDENT

Altared Memories at The Crafter’s Library Create a

agorafoundation.org/current-seminars

soulful, and heartwarming stories for children to adults from some of the best storytellers in the country along with workshops, the Story Shop Boutique, Halloween activities for the kids, and an outdoor performance on the last day. Visit the website for a full schedule. Thu.: 4pm-Sun.: 1pm. Individual tickets: $15-$45; passes: $73-$190. Various Ojai locations. ojaistoryfest.org

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THE CRAFTER’S LIBRARY

Glass Animals, Blackstarkids. $45.50$75.50. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com

COURTESY

COURTESY PRESIDIO RESEARCH CENTER

10/28: S.B. Bowl Concerts

OCTOBER 28, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Madonna Thunder Hawk

WEDNESDAY 11/3

11/3:

Film Screening and Conversation: Warrior Women Director/producer Dr. Elizabeth Castle

will moderate a conversation with Madonna Thunder Hawk, leader in the American Indian Movement, and Marcella Gilbert, a Lakota mother and daughter who started her fight for Indigenous rights in the late 1960s. The conversation will follow a screening of the documentary that chronicles their lifelong work. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: Free; GA: $20. Call (805) 893-3535. Read more on p. 45. tinyurl.com/WarriorWomenA-L

Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser


en

COURTESY

w e o l Shows on Tap howhappenings music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

tinyurl.com/ PaliOct29

10/30-10/31: EOS Lounge Sat.: Fields of Funk Metalachi

10/28-11/3: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Metalachi, 8:30pm. $15. Ages 21+. Fri.: Dante Elephante, Queentide, 9pm. $15-$20. Ages 21+. Sat.: The Molly Ringwald Project Halloween Bash, 9pm. $15. Ages 21+. Sun.: Sandy Cummings & Jazz du Jour, 12:30-3:30pm. Free with lunch reservations. Mon.: Jazz Jam with Kimberly Ford, 7:30pm. $10. Tue.: Singer-Songwriter Showcase: Victoria Voss, 7pm; Luminesse, 8pm; Ben Betts, 9pm. $10. Wed.: Idaho, The Phone Booth, WRYN, 8pm. $10-$15. Ages 21+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com/events

10/29-10/31: Island Brewing Co. Fri.: Killer Kaya, 4-8pm. Sat.: Will Breman, 6-9:30pm. Sun.: Rent Party Blues Band, 5-8pm., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

islandbrewingcompany.com

After Party. 8pm. $10-$20. Sun.: Nala (Dirtybird). 9pm-1:30am. Free. Ages 21+. 500 Anacapa St.

eoslounge.com

10/29-10/31: Maverick Saloon Fri.: About Time, 5-8pm; Dusty Jugz, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Oddly Straight, 1-4pm; Dewey Roberts, 5-8pm; LiveWire, 9-11:30pm. Sun.: Sam Mitchell, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

10/30: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Jim Rankin, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066

coldspringtavern.com

10/30: Topa Topa Brewing Co. (S.B.) The Academy. 6-9pm. 120 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call (805) 324-4150. topatopa.beer

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 • sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

10/28:

COURTESY

10/29: Pali Wine Co. Live

Virtual Presentation and Q&A: B.A.T.S.: Bats

Aren’t That Spooky Miguel Ordeñana, wildlife

biologist with the National History Museum of L.A. County, will give a presentation on his large-scale study of bats in L.A.’s urban core called the Backyard Bat Survey. Learn about the nocturnal nature of bats, what they eat, and about the different varieties of bats in and around the area! 6pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/BatsArentThatSpooky 10/28-10/29: Haunted Pumpkin Patch This multi-day event with state-ofthe-art lighting, audio, and visual decorations will provide a safe and family-friendly Halloween theatrical experience with guided tours through magical lands, costumed performers, and a souvenir pumpkin to take home. 7-11pm. Estero Park, 889 Camino del Sur, Goleta.

tinyurl.com/HauntedPatch

for locations and cast your vote. Free.

Ages 21+

facebook.com/SYVScarecrowFest

tinyurl.com/PubCrawlOct29

10/28-10/31: Spooky Zoo Wear your

10/29-10/30: 27th Annual Halloween House Solvang’s annual Halloween haunted

costume and head to the Santa Barbara Zoo for frightfully fun decor and photo ops while you visit your favorite animals. Reservations are required. 9:30am-5pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free$19.95. Call (805) 962-5339 or email zooinfo@ sbzoo.org.

sbzoo.org/event-calendar

10/28-10/29: Monstera Mash: A Boo-tanical Stroll Through Lotusland All ages are invited to follow

10/28-10/31: S.B. Ghost Tours Check out

the map and experience the spooktacular decorations, learn about poisonous plants and creepy creatures, and discover surprises around every corner. Advance reservations are required. Tours: 12:30, 2, and 3:30pm. Ganna Walska Lotusland, Cold Spring Rd., Montecito. Free-$60. Call (805) 969-9990.

an afternoon or evening Paranormal Wine and Spirits Tour or a Dead of the Night Tour. Various times and locations. Some tours are ages 21+. $55-$85. Call (805) 905-9019 or email santabarbaraghosttours@gmail.com. Read more on p. 31.

sbghosttour.com

lotusland.org/events

10/28-10/31: Lane Farms Pumpkin Patch Come for the hayrides, farm

together for this creative Halloween craft taught live by Maureen Harris-Coyle of Heaven Scent Beauty. Register to receive your DIY kit. 7pm. $55.

lanefarmssb.com

10/28-10/31: Big Wave Dave’s Pumpkin Patch Enjoy kids’activities and photo ops as you find the perfect pumpkin, from mini to giant. 10am-9pm. La Cumbre Plaza (Macy’s parking lot), 3865 State St. Free. Call (805) 218-0282.

bigwavedaveschristmastrees.com

10/28-10/31: Solvang Farmer Pumpkin Patch Choose from a variety of more than 400 pumpkins and find your way out of a 10-acre corn maze. 10am-6pm. 1000 Alamo Pintado Rd., Solvang. Free. Call (805) 350-8335.

tinyurl.com/SolvangPumpkin Patch

tinyurl.com/HalloweenSoap-DIY

10/28: Pumpkin-Carving Contest This annual pumpkin-carving contest will be fun for the entire family with prizes, treats, and more. Bring your own pumpkin! 5:30-7:30pm. Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. Call (805) 745-8272.

tinyurl.com/IslandBrewCoPumpkin

10/29: Trunk or Treat 2021 This familyfriendly outdoor event will offer a safe alternative to your traditional Halloween trick-or-treat! Wear your costume and enjoy activities and treats. ¡Este evento al aire libre para toda la familia ofrecerá una alternativa segura a su tradicional truco o trato de Halloween! Use su disfraz y disfrute de actividades y delicias. 5-8pm. Spencer Adams Parking Lot, 171 W. Victoria St. Free.

sbpal.org/trunk-or-treat.html

10/29: Santa Barbara Halloween Pub Crawl Come in costume and visit more than 10

10/28-10/31: Santa Ynez Valley Scarecrow Festival Scarecrows will be displayed all over the valley in hopes of winning the 2021 Harvest Cup. Visit the website

cityofsolvang.com/310/Haunted-House

10/29: Halloween Glow & Flow! with Sierra Nolan All levels are invited to this glowin-the-dark, creative, Halloween-inspired yoga experience. Wear a costume or neon and white colors. 7:30-9pm. Sol Seek Yoga Studio, 25 E. De la Guerra St. $31.50-$35. Call (805) 259-9070.

tinyurl.com/Glow-FlowYoga

10/29: Halloween Costume Party

10/28: Halloween Melt & Pour SoapMaking Virtual Workshop Get your friends

animals, corn maze, farm equipment, and pumpkins! Visit the website for safety guidelines. Thu.-Fri.: noon-7pm; Sat.: 10am-7pm; Sun.: 10am-5pm. Lane Farms, 308 S. Walnut Ln. Free. Call (805) 964-3773.

house will return to entertain and scare visitors. 6-9:30pm; kid-friendly version: 6-6:30pm each evening. Solvang’s Annex Bldg., 411 Second St., Solvang. $8-$10.

bars and nightclubs with one all-access pass that includes shots, drink discount vouchers, and free cover. Check in 7-10pm; event runs until 2am. Institution Ale Company, 516 State St. $15-$30.

Wear a costume that might win a prize for best individual or couple! There will be late-night complimentary pizza. 6pm. Community Craft Uncommon Wine and Beer, 2446 Alamo Pintado Ave., Ste. C, Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/LosOlivosCostumeParty

10/30: World Dance for Humanity Thriller 2021 Join in the fun of this annual community celebration with proceeds going toward The Rwanda Education Fund and the Westside Boys & Girls Club. 2-4pm. S.B. County Courthouse Sunken Gardens, 1100 Anacapa St. Free-donations accepted. Call (805) 966-5439 or email janetworlddance@outlook .com.

tinyurl.com/2021Thriller

10/30: Fall Fest 2021 Wear a costume to this fall celebration that will feature games, candy, food, music, hay rides, a jump house, and a giant inflatable obstacle course. 4-6:30pm. Community Covenant Church of Goleta, 5070 Cathedral Oaks Rd., Goleta. Free.

comcov.org/fallfest

10/30: Bike DeLights: Halloween in Outer Space! Dress yourself and your bike to enhance the theme of outer space with aliens, planets, stars, and twinkling lights or channel your favorite alien movie! 4:30pm. Moreton Bay Fig Tree, Chapala and Montecito sts. Free.

tinyurl.com/AlienBikeRide

howl-oween happenings cont’d on p. 35 INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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33


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NOV 19

Join us, if you dare, for an outdoor magical evening of revelry under the stars, including an exciting costume contest, specialty spirits, ghoulish delights, and spooky surprises! Prizes to the scariest, funniest, and most original costumes. 21+ Event.

NOV 6

John Craigie

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34

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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howl-oween happenings

T HE

OCTOBER

cont’d from p. 33

COURTESY

10/30-10/31 Howl-OWeen Whisker Virtual Run or Walk Make a donation, then walk, jog, skip, rollerblade, hike, or ride a bike on your favorite path or trail and post pictures on Facebook or Instagram all to raise money for the S.B. County Animal Care Foundation and the homeless, injured, and sick shelter animals due to the pandemic. Don’t forget to take your pooch. Free-donations accepted.

COME and CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN WITH US!

tinyurl.com/HowlOWeenRun

10/30-10/31: Ojai Storytelling Festival Halloween Activities Take in music and an evening of spooky tales from six storytellers on Saturday, and then on Sunday take the kids in costume for crafts, games, and treats. Sat.: 6-8pm. Libbey Bowl, 210 S.Signal St.,Ojai. $20-$35. Ages 13+. Sun.: 10am-3pm. Libby Park Fountain, 210 S. Signal St., Ojai. Free.

28th - 31st

10/31:

S.B. Downtown Halloween Head on downtown and look for the orange “trick-or-treat” signs and festive balloons for a fun and safe Halloween experience. 3-6pm. Downtown S.B. Free.

Thanks for voting us bEST PLACE TO DANCE!

downtownsb.org/events/halloween

ojaistoryfest.org/schedule

10/30: Valhall-O-Ween Boxing Toughman Contest Compete in this contest or be a spectator. Noon. Valhalla MMA Kickboxing & Fitness, 1113 State St. Competitors: $15; spectators: Free.

tinyurl.com/Valhall-O-Ween

10/30: Draughtsmen Aleworks Halloween Don costumes and go dance to Halloween jams by Joystix, eat BBQ, and drink a brew (for purchase). 5-9pm. Draughtsman Aleworks, 53 Santa Felicia Dr., Goleta. Free. Ages 21+.

draughtsmenaleworks.com/events/ halloween

10/30: Halloween Zombie Crawl Calling all zombies to roam through more than 10 bars with an all-access pass to shots, drink discount vouchers, and free cover. 7pm-2am. Institution Ale, 516 State St. $35. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/ZombieCrawlOct30

10/30: Halloween Variety Show at The Crafter’s Library Costume up and go see area singer/ songwriters, comedians, and poets put on a great show hosted by Andrew Rawls with emcee Samantha Bearman of Sam Bear Comedy. 6-9pm. The Crafter’s Library, 9 E. Figueroa St. $20. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/HalloweenVariety

10/30: The Rocky Horror Picture Show See the 1975 cult classic and musical The Rocky Horror Picture Show (rated R) in person. A limited number of prop bags will be available for $5 (no outside props allowed). 7-9pm. Alcazar Theatre, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. $15. Call (805) 684-6380.

tinyurl.com/RockyHorrorCarp 10/30: Mischief Masquerade: Outdoor Halloween Dance Party This magical evening of revelry will offer music from DJ Scott Topper, specialty spirits, and a contest for scariest, funniest, and most original costumes. 8pm-midnight. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $50-$65. Ages 21+.

lobero.org/events/mischief-masquerade

10/30: Lompoc Old Town Market Trick-or-Treat Event Kids ages 12 and under can visit the 30 participating businesses throughout Lompoc with a Kids’Activity

corner at Centennial Park, the corner of S. H St. and E. Cypress Ave., Lompoc. Visit the Facebook page for a map of locations. 2-4pm. Downtown Lompoc. Free. Call (805) 736-4567 or email shelby@lompoc.com.

facebook.com/lompocvalleychamber 10/30: Fields of Funk Costumes are encouraged for this utopian festival that will feature live DJ sets by Chromeo, Poolside, Dām-FunK, Egyptian Lover, and Amo Amo, as well as dancing, food trucks, clothing vendors, art installations, a full bar, and a silent disco. 3-10pm. Elings Park, 1298 Las Positas Rd. $50-$100; parking: $20; roundtrip bus transfers from I.V.: $12.

tinyurl.com/FieldsOfFunk

10/31: Halloween Outdoor Cinema: The Addams Family Make a reservation to see the 2019 animated movie The Addams Family (rated PG). Treat bags will be handed out. Gates open: 5pm; screening: 6pm. Corner of Meadowvale Rd. and Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. Free.

tinyurl.com/HalloweenCinema

10/31: Lucidity Halloween Soirée: Magical Creatures with David Starfire & Soohan Come dressed as a magical creature and explore three floors of beats with David Starfire, Soohan, 9Lives, and Luna Jay each playing two sets; a variety of character-driven performances; live art; donation-based healing services; face painting; and cash prizes for best costumes. Door: 8pm; music: 9pm-2am. Backstage Kitchen & Bar, 409 State St. $30-$40. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/LucidityMagicalCreatures

10/31: Trick-or-Treat on Milpas Street Participating stores marked with balloons will be handing out treats. Visit the corner of Alphonse and Ortega sts for information on Eastside community resources for the community and to buy a $5 raffle for a chance to win prize baskets to raise funds for S.B. Eastside Society future events. 2-5pm. Free.

facebook.com/SBeastsidesociety

10/31: Ghost Village Road Storefronts along Coast Village Road will be passing out candy. 3-6pm. Coast Village Rd., Montecito. Free.

10/31: Carr Winery presents Halloween Night Join this night for wines, beats by DJ Fab, a costume contest, and more in the haunted wine cave. Costumes required! 7-11pm. Carr Winery, 414 N. Salsipuedes St. $25$35. Ages 21+

tinyurl.com/CarrHalloween

15 West Ortega Street, santa barbara, ca INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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35


SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series

y Todam ! at 3p Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with Maya Schoop-Rhutten (Chocolate Maya), Maria Elena Plascencia (SB Sweets), Bulent Derdiyok (LOKUM) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

Join Charles Donelan in conversation with t Nexek! We

Zoom Event

With

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From Using Pronouns to Uncovering Unconscious Bias

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ANDI GARCIA ArtCrawlSB

DIANE AND RALPH WATERHOUSE Waterhouse Gallery

ALEXANDRA TERRY Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara

1st Thursday Thursday, November 4 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

RSVP at AWC S B.O R G

DERRICK CURTIS PRODUCTIONS

BASSH 2021 THE ART AND SOUL OF DANCE FRIDAY & SATURDAY

NOVEMBER 5 & 6, 7:30 PM MARJORIE LUKE THEATRE 721 E. COTA ST., SANTA BARBARA $35 GENERAL ADMISSION, $25 SENIOR/STUDENT, $15 CHILD

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CONTACT YOUR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE TODAY!

805-965-5205 ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM

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INDEPENDENT.COM


living

Sports

p. TK

TOM KELSEY

PAUL SHANKLIN

p. 37

“I’m sure that contributed to the adrenaline they needed to finish the relay,” Trimble said. The Dos Pueblos record still stands, as far as anyone knows. The 24-hour relay proved too daunting to engender repeated attempts. It has gone the way of the Pony Express, a heroic endeavor from another time.

THEN AND NOW: Ten runners from Dos Pueblos High posed after setting a national 24-hour relay record in 1971 (left photo). Standing: Dale Nickel, Craig Bjorkman, Joe Szerwo, Doug Hopwood, Terry Baker, and Gil Rocha. Kneeling: Tom Kelsey, Joe Lambert, Tom Phillips, and Carl Udesen. They set a new national record a year later. Seven of them got together recently for the 50th anniversary of their feat (left to right): Nickel, Kelsey, Szerwo, Lambert, Phillips, Hopwood, and Rocha.

Remembering the 24-Hour Relay Reunion Celebrates Dos Pueblos High’s 1972 Record by John Zant

Then it was Rocha’s turn to run again, starting another cycle of miles by the 10 DP distance runners. And so it went for the rest of the day and through the night — with Phillips and Lambert consistently cranking out sub-5:00 miles — until exactly 10 a.m. the next day, as Nickel was rounding the final turn of the team’s 1,106th lap. The Chargers had run 276 miles, 769 yards — the distance from Goleta to San Jose — breaking the high school record in the Runner’s World 24-Hour Relay. The previous record was 271 miles, 1,217 yards — established in 1971 by a DP team that included nine of the boys who ran in 1972. “It was the hardest thing we’d ever done,” Hopwood said, “and we did it again.” Kelsey read about the 24-hour relay in Runner’s World magazine and convinced his teammates that they should go for the prep record at the end of the school year when all were in shape from the track season. They were well trained by their coach, Gordon McClenathen. “He taught us all about commitment, hard work that pays off, and so much more,” Phillips said. “I know that I speak for all of us when I say that those life lessons we got from Gordon have gone with each and every one of us as we went our separate ways, and made us the men we are today.”

Assistant coach Bill Trimble arranged a reunion of the men with McClenathen, a runner himself for most of his 87 years, at Stow Grove Park last month. Phillips said the event “rekindled the comradeship we had 50 years ago.” It also brought back memories of those long, sleepless days and nights of running in circles. “It seemed like my eyes were closed for five minutes before I had to go out again,” Rocha said. Bjorkman recalled that after the 1971 relay, which went from noon to noon, “I went to bed at 2 p.m. and woke up at 8 the next morning” — an 18-hour nap. Parent shone headlights on the track at night. To Nickel, the uneven track was like a moonscape. “I saw the tops of asphalt bumps,” he said. McClenathen timed every mile while also massaging cramps out of the runners’ legs. June 10, 1972, was the last day of school, and that morning the track was lined by students and teachers who shouted encouragement to the tiring runners, most of whom put in 28 miles. JOHN DENT

S

tarting at 10 a.m. on June 9, 1972, Gil Rocha ran a mile, four laps around Dos Pueblos High’s 440-yard track, in five minutes and four seconds. He carried a baton that he handed to Tom Phillips, who also ran a mile, in 4:53. The baton was passed to eight more runners — Dale Nickel, Joe Szerwo, Joe Lambert, Tom Kelsey, Craig Bjorkman, Carl Udesen, Mark Pruner, and Doug Hopwood, who finished his mile at 10:49 a.m.

Phoebe Wolfe Lyons

TRAILS AND HILLS: Cross-country produces motivations like those that drove the boys through those miles 50 years ago — running for the team as well as yourself. “We have a strong team culture,” said Phoebe Wolfe Lyons, the leader of the pack at Dos Pueblos, where the running tradition has spread across both genders. Coach Jen Brown said 72 “hardcore runners” train and compete for the Chargers this fall. The girls’ team is fast and young — only one senior in the top 25. In Channel League meets this fall, the DP girls have swept as many as the top seven places. The top five all have cracked the 20-minute barrier in three-mile races. The Chargers, hoping to qualify for the state finals this fall, tested themselves in the sweepstakes race at the prestigious Mt. SAC Invitational last weekend. They finished as the third-best team in Division 3. Three juniors led the way on the notoriously hilly course — Wolfe Lyons (19:07), Elliot Gleason (19:58), and Sarah Dent (20:17), followed by freshman Ruby Heinrich-Linthicum, and junior Reese Wahlberg. Other results at Mt. SAC included Cate School senior Anna DiSorbo running 19:08 in a girls’ individual division; Santa Barbara High sophomore Blaise Snow clocking 16:02 in his first big-time race; and San Marcos winning a D3 boys’ varsity race, led by seniors Jacob Snodgress (16:06) and Ethan Dwelley (16:25). Following this week’s County Championships in Lompoc, the Channel League Finals will be held on Wednesday, November 3, at Dos Pueblos on a course that circles the softball fields and winds through oak woodlands. HITTING THE STREETS: Get ready to lace up your running shoes for the return of the Santa Barbara Half Marathon and, for those not inclined to go 13.1 miles, the Independent 5K, on Sunday, November 7. The pandemic that prevented such events from happening the past couple of years also brought about a change that will enhance the experience. State Street has become more pedestrian-friendly, and both courses will send the runners on a final mile through the heart of downtown, with the finish line just short of the Highway 101 underpass. The popular Wine Country Half Marathon drew a capacity turnout of 2,400 runners to the Santa Ynez Valley last weekend. It featured the appearance of Arroyo Grande’s former prep phenom Jordan Hasay, who’s now 30 years old. She finished second overall (1:20.06) behind Santa Ynez native Connor Reck (1:16:12). n

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

Love from the Other Side

by Camille Garcia Today — amid colonization, the melding of cultures and religions, and Disney and Pixar’s Coco—what does celebrating Día de los Muertos look like? In Santa Barbara, Maria Caudillo sets candles and fragrant cempazúchitl (marigolds) on the Día de los Muertos altar in her home. The cempazúchitl scent is said to help guide the dead to the altars, where they’ll also find their favorite food and drink, and photos and personal items placed there by their living family members. The altars, or ofrendas, act as portals for deceased loved ones to cross through, in order to celebrate and spend time with the living. “My mom used to say you should always put water [on the altars], too,” Caudillo said, “because [the dead] are coming back from a very long trip, and they might be thirsty.” Like Christmas or birthdays, Día de los Muertos has long been a regular—and essential—holiday for Caudillo and her family. Originally from Romita, Guanajuato, in central Mexico, she has observed it since she was a child, helping her family visit and clean their loved ones’ graves, and adorn them with candles, flowers, and bites to eat for the occasion: tamales, atole, and pan de muerto. Caudillo and her family moved to Santa Barbara when she was 8. For a long time, they couldn’t visit the cementerio in Guanajuato, so they’d build a home altar and pray and tell stories about their relatives on the other side.

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Today, the molcajete (mortar and pestle) that belonged to Caudillo’s Tía Faustina is a regular item on her Día de Muertos ofrenda. “[My Tía Faustina] was basically our grandma, and she was such a loving and beautiful person,” Caudillo said. “[For Día de los Muertos], we’d tell stories of her, about how she’d give us hot tortillas fresh off the comal … you just always felt the love from her.” Gloria Sanchez-Arreola recalls observing Día de los Muertos at church, as it coincides with the Catholic celebration of All Souls Day. The daughter of Mexican immigrants who grew up in Los Angeles, Sanchez-Arreola eventually learned the Indigenous history of Día de los Muertos as a UCSB college student, about 20 years ago. The holiday centers on the belief that humans exist in a cyclical world. Death is simply part of that cycle, and it doesn’t necessarily signify darkness or loss. Rather, it’s a passing on to the next phase of existence from which spirits can return. As the holiday occurs around the time of the fall cosecha, or harvest, we are reminded that nature is cyclical, too. In fact, ofrendas are often created with natural elements in mind, since incorporating wind, fire, earth, and water are ways to pay homage to the land and to life itself. These discoveries inspired Sanchez-Arreola to be proud of her cultural roots and traditions, and to organize spaces for others to foster that same connection to their heritage. “I just never grew up with a practice where I gave my ancestors an offering, and I have some grief about that,” she said. “So, through my grief, I’ve sought out community to co-create this practice for the next generation.” Caudillo will combine Día de Muertos festivities with Halloween, and celebrate with her extended family. For her, this “profound and ancient” tradition is simply about “creating sacred space.” “It doesn’t matter how humble your altar is or how extravagant it is, as long as you’re creating a sacred space to be able to remember your loved ones and use it as storytelling,” she said, “and passing that on to the next generation.” Public events are also part of citywide Día de los Muertos celebrations, and several are happening the following weekend. Check the Independent’s calendar section for the full listings. n


living

Society Matters Text and photos by Gail Arnold

Executive Director Ariana Katovich, Board President Roland Bryan, and Board VP Gretchen Lieff

Director of Operations Julia Parker and volunteer Scott Jordan

Wildlife Care Network Holds Benefit for Wildlife O

n October 15, Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network (WCN) held a delightful tropical-themed Wild Night Out on the grounds of Chase Palm Park’s Carousel House. The event netted $105,000 for the nonprofit’s invaluable work rescuing, rehabilitating, and releasing wildlife. Last year, WCN served more than 4,700 wildlife patients. The 200 guests enjoyed mingling at the idyllic, spacious oceanfront venue on a warm Santa Barbara evening. Guests could choose from multiple bars and food stations at their leisure and got to enjoy a fun dance performance by Hulu Anyone. A speech by Executive Director Ariana Katovich and a video updated guests on WCN’s work and its soon-to-open hospital. Renowned photographer, author, and producer Ian Shive shared how honored he is to be a boardmember and discussed the importance of WCN’s work. Fox NFL Sunday host Curt Menefee led the auction with both warmth and professionalism. There is much excitement for the new hospital set to open by the end of the year. Dedicated staff have persevered for decades with very limited facilities. The current operation on North Fairview in Goleta consists of one 500-square-foot building, sheds, and trailers. Each year, 2,000 songbirds are cared for in a single trailer, which also houses its surgical site. The ICU is in a shed.

The 5,400-square-foot state-of-theart hospital with advanced medical equipment and surgery, radiology, and ICU spaces will enable better patient outcomes and less stress on wildlife and staff. The facility will allow WCN to rehabilitate oiled birds onsite, instead of the current practice of stabilizing the birds and then having them undergo a stressful journey to a specialized facility in L.A. for rehabilitation. The natural oil seeps off our coast make oiled birds a year-round occurrence, and each week, volunteers Boardmembers Mindy Denson and Becky Gaal make the trip to L.A. Of course, there are the dreaded oil spills that inevitably also will come. The $6 million campaign also funds new enclosures and upgraded pools and enables WCN to hire its first wildlife veterinarian. In addition to saving wildlife, Dr. Avery Berkowitz, who was hired last year, will also train staff, interns, and volunteers. Prior to Berkowitz’s arrival, animals were transported offsite for tests, surgeries, and other procedures, which delayed care and added to the stress on the animals. WCN cares for more than 200 species. About three-quarters of Boardmember Connie Pearcy and Medical Director Dr. Avery Berkowitz patients are birds, with songbirds composing more than half of these. The remaining wildlife consists mainly of small food, clean, plan events, and more. While the capital mammals, including raccoons, striped skunks, and campaign goal has been reached, WCN needs funds for brush rabbits. About 60 percent of rescues are from daily operations, which can now expand thanks to the south S.B. County, nearly a quarter from Ventura new facilities and resources. It relies on individuals and County, and the rest from surrounding areas. Their foundations for nearly all of its income. Helpline at (805) 681-1080 fields more than 7,000 For more info about WCN, or to volunteer or make a calls annually. donation, go to sbwcn.org. Volunteer Coordinator Liora Bregman, Development Coordinator WCN has about 300 active volunteers and always Sabrina Skelly, and Communications Manager Lauren Gonzales welcomes new ones to answer the Helpline, prepare For coverage of other events, go to independent.com/society. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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1 THURSDAY NOV 4, 5-8PM st

1st Thursday Barbara. On and cultural FREE access State Street

is an evening of art and culture in Downtown Santa the first Thursday of each month, participating galleries art venues are open from 5-8 PM offering the public to art in a fun and social environment. In addition, comes alive with performances and interactive exhibits.

MICHELTORENA STREET

Arlington Arli i

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18

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County Administrative

Gra Granada 9

8 ANAPAMU STREET

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M14 useum 13 Museum/ Library

15 17 16 Arcada L LaArcada ada La

Court Cou House

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CARRILLO STREET

CANON PERDIDO STREET AN N 21 22

DE LA GUERRA STREET

Cityy Hall

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HALEY STREET

EAST GUTIERREZ STREET

26

ANACAPA STREET T R EET

FIG AVENUE

COTA STREET

24

GARDEN STREET

23 Paseo Nuevo Nu uevo

obero Lobero

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20

STATE STREET

DE LA VINA STREET

VICTORIA STREET

5

TThe he New New6V Vic 7

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PARTICIPATING VENUES

1 SBIFF’S SANTA BARBARA FILMMAKER SCREENING SERIES SBIFF Eduction Center, 1330 State Street 2 THE SHOPS AT ARLINGTON PLAZA 1324 State Street 3 THOMAS REYNOLDS GALLERY 1331 State Street, 415-676-7689 4 SANTA BARBARA FINE ART 1321 State Street, 805-845-4270 5 SANTA BARBARA ART WORKS 28 East Victoria Street, 805-260-6705 6 DOMECÍL 1221 State Street, Suite 7 7 LONETREE 1221 State Street, Suite 24 8 10 WEST GALLERY 10 West Anapamu Street, 805-770-7711 9 SULLIVAN GOSS – AN AMERICAN GALLERY 11 East Anapamu Street, 805-730-1460 10 COURTHOUSE TAVERN 129 East Anapamu Street, 805-770-7077 COLETTE COSENTINO 11 ATELIER + GALLERY 11 West Anapamu Street, 805-570-9863 12 CRUSH BAR & TAP 1129 State Street, Suite A, 805-770-8077 13 SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART 1130 State Street, 805-963-4364

14 FAULKNER GALLERY 40 East Anapamu Street, in the SB Public Library 15 SANTA BARBARA ARTS 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #24, 805-884-1938 16 WATERHOUSE GALLERY 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #9, 805-962-8885 17 GALLERY 113 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #8, 805-965-6611 18 BELLA ROSA GALLERIES 1103 State Street, Suite A, 805-966-1707 19 SANTA BARBARA TRAVEL BUREAU 1028 State Street, 805-966-3116 20 THE YES STORE 101 Paseo Nuevo 21 GRASSINI FAMILY VINEYARDS 24 El Paseo, 805-897-3366 22 JAMIE SLONE WINES 23 East de la Guerra Street, 805-560-6555 23 MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SANTA BARBARA 653 Paseo Nuevo Terrace, 805-966-5373 24 SANTA BARBARA HISTORICAL MUSEUM 136 East de la Guerra Street, 805-966-1601 25 FAITELL ATTRACTIONS 619 State Street, 805-770-3163 26 MARGERUM WINE COMPANY’S SANTA BARBARA TASTING ROOM 19 East Mason Street, Located at the Hotel Californian, 805-845-8435

PERFORMANCES & SPECIAL EVENTS

ART CRAWL Meet at Stairs to SBMA, 1130 State Street, 5:30 PM

CORNER OF MASON STREET & HELENA AVENUE

STATE STREET PROMENADE MARKET State Street, 1000 Block, 3:00 - 8:00 PM OUT OF THE BLUE BAND State Street, 1000 Block, in the Promenade Market, 5:00 - 8:00 PM

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FOOD&DRINK

Bringing Authentic Oaxaca to Santa Barbara

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INSPIRING CREATIVITY JOIN US!

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any Vargas es una Oaxaqueña orgullosa

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— a proud Oaxacan. Born in a town called Telixtlahuaca, she moved to Santa Barbara with her parents and brother when she was 8. Though she spent most of her life here, Oaxaca has “always felt more like home” to her. As an adult, she continues to be inspired by her cultural heritage, as well as her work. Vargas owns and operates La Calenda, a shop that sells Oaxacan goods and educates about its cultures and traditions. It originally opened in 2013 as a brick-and-mortar on De FINDING INSPIRATION: Bany Vargas (right) finds creativity la Vina Street but now operates solely online throughout the people of Oaxaca. and at pop-ups. The idea for La Calenda came naturally. distorts or ignores the true histories of Oaxacan Vargas’s mother, Esperanza Lopez, originally traditions, such as those around mezcal or Oaxacan wanted the family venture to be a Oaxacan food tamales. As an immigrant who grew up connected restaurant, but Vargas had another idea. to and appreciative of her roots, Vargas believes “I always dress in traditional Oaxacan clothes, her work is a necessary response to the trendy, [such as] huaraches and traditional blouses, and inauthentic, and appropriative depictions of her people have always asked me about my shoes and homeland in the mainstream. my bags or whatever I’m wearing,” she said. “So “My culture is not a trend,” she said. “It actually I told my parents, ‘We should start with a store.’ ” means something to me.” Vargas’s intuition was right. Locals loved their She wants all those who meet Oaxaca—whether offerings from the start: colorful hand-woven huipi- through people, food, artesanías, or travel — to les (blouses), ceramic and barro mugs and pitchers, more deeply know and respect its histories and traditions, and especially its people. “I see so many people now loving Oaxacan culture,” Vargas said. “I feel like the least you can do is try to understand our culture.” Vargas’s world has remained very binational. She moved back to Oaxaca in 2020 and returns to BY CAMILLE GARCIA Santa Barbara a few times a year to sell at markets, organize Oaxaca-related events, and connect with and handmade jewelry and bags, as well as different her family and customers. tea blends and traditional salsa and hot chocolate. On November 1, she’s hosting a Día de los As La Calenda grew, they expanded their sourc- Muertos celebration with her friend, a mezcalero, ing to include goods from other parts of Mexico, at Palenque 5 Estrellas in Matatlán, Oaxaca. On too, including Guanajuato, Mexico City, and December 3-5, she’ll be selling in Santa Barbara, at Michoacán. the 36th Annual Folk & Tribal Arts Marketplace at Forming ethical business partnerships and the Museum of Natural History. friendships with artesanos throughout Mexico has Through La Calenda, Vargas, who is also a chef, been “the best part” of Vargas’s work, she said. She makes and sells authentic Oaxacan dishes, using directly sources goods from them at their asking ingredients sourced from the region. Around the price and includes them in La Calenda’s workshop holidays, she makes tamales using traditional heirand tour programming. loom corn masa from Yanhuitlán, Oaxaca. “Without the artisans, we wouldn’t exist,” she She lovingly recalls her annual summer trips said. “I do not haggle the people I work with for a to visit her grandparents and extended family in Oaxaca. She’d help her grandmother Rosaura Diaz lower price. I respect their work.” Clientele has stuck with La Calenda even after de la Rosa — called “Chaguita” by family — make the physical store closed in 2019 and transitioned to traditional Oaxacan hot chocolate, a beloved famonline only with occasional pop-ups. You can still ily recipe that she now wants to share with others. buy beautiful, handmade artesanías, clothing, and In fact, Chaguita — who will turn 100 next year food items from Mexico, or buy a “mini ofrenda kit” — was a key inspiration for Vargas and her family to to make your own Día de los Muertos altar. You also start La Calenda. Vargas recognizes the greatness of can take a traditional crafting workshop or go on their cultural traditions and wants others, including an in-person tour in Oaxaca, organized and led by her own family, to see it, too. “I wanted [my grandma] to see that something Vargas. It’s all part of her mission to bring Oaxaca to Santa Barbara and beyond, in a thoughtful and that she might see as simple, like making hot chocolate,” she said, “that it could actually be something authentic way. In recent years, Vargas has observed an increased really, really important.” interest in Oaxacan culture but has also witnessed For a full listing of upcoming events, sales, and the commercialization of her culture that often more, see lacalendasb.com. n

Bany Vargas Runs La Calenda Pop-Up Shop

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NOT THE SPORTY: After decades as the Sportsman Lounge, this prominent building on West Figueroa Street is now home to Riviera Bar, which is serving hamburgers, classic cocktails, and much more.

Fun atmosphere, friendly service, delicious food & tasty drinks! Mon - Thurs. 3pm - 11pm Friday 3pm - 1am Saturday 12pm - 1am Sunday 9a - 11pm | Open early for NFL Football Happy Hour Mon-Fri 3-7p | Sat 12-4 Kitchen Opens at 4pm Daily

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Riviera Bar certainly looks familiar, but it’s not as familiar as you think. Sure, it came from the old Paradise Café, as is the case for many of the people behind this cozy establishment on West Figueroa that opened July 29. But it’s not the fish you stared at over your margarita above the bar — it’s one from an office. “Paradise was more a general attitude toward customers and building a community,” explains the new bar’s owner, Kevin Boss. “This is Riviera, a new thing.”

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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While many involved with Riviera are Paradise veterans — along with Boss, there’s manager Oliver Davis, operating partner Jim Mishler, and even office manager Karen Collyer — the boss asserted, “Paradise was a child of the ’80s.” Riviera is after more of a midcentury feel; think Tadich Grill and the Buena Vista in San Francisco or Musso & Frank in Hollywood as comparisons. Said Boss, “We want that same old-school feel, but updated.” So, while they definitely serve food, note the name is direct and doesn’t add “café” or “tavern,” or anything after an “and” or ampersand, or god forbid, a +. “We definitely want to be perceived as a bar,” he said, “a place people hang out, talk to strangers, tell lies.” Of course, anyone who has done any carousing in Santa Barbara over the past forever knows there was a bar that used to occupy this space: the beloved-by-boozers Sportsman Lounge (now reinvented on State Street). Turns out that Boss and his group have owned this building for well over a decade, and when the Sportsman’s lease was up, he knew it was time for his project. “I had a really soft spot for the Sportsman,” he recalled. “Back when I used to work at Chuck’s in

the 1970s, we used to come here after we closed down, and there’d be a country and western band playing and you could get a bologna sandwich and a can of beer.” The Sportsman, said Boss, enjoys a much longer history than most know: from the late 1930s to the 1960s, it served food, too, more akin to Joe’s or Harry’s of today. “Then in the 1960s, it changed into more of a day bar,” Boss said. “But the kitchen was always here.” Now thoroughly renovated — like the entire establishment — that kitchen provides a short but pleasing menu with vegetable-forward snacks (like tempura green beans and zucchini fritters) and a double cheeseburger Boss admits they nicked from Au Cheval in Chicago. “We’re not trying to be super-elevated with the food,” said Boss, “but we’re not just a burger-and-a-brew place, either.” Head bartender Chad Nielson, who previously worked at places such as Pearl Social and Somerset, helps to make that true, creating a tasty menu of classic and house cocktails that currently features an on-point Boulevardier and a Sicilian Spritz that gets its bubbles from a classy Sorelle Bronca Prosecco. “So many bars focus on house syrups and tinctures made with seasonal ingredients,” explained Nielson, “so we decided to really focus on the spirits.” Boss believes that some of the more creative cocktail joints in town can get “a little too self-reflexive, a little meta.” So far, Riviera seems the opposite of self-conscious, walking a charming line of being retro and not precious, dark but not dingy, old-school but not shabby, easygoing but not sloppy. You can find that vibe embodied in something like its subtle, sweetly tweaked classic Spanish Manhattan, which features Rittenhouse rye, Bordiga rosso vermouth, and amontillado. Think of it as a locals’ bar any tourist should be delighted to find. “We never wanted to be on State Street,” said Boss. “We always wanted to be a destination.”

20 W. Figueroa St.; (805) 679-5170; rivierabarsb.com


Timbers Roadhouse and Whiskey Joe’s Now Open

Locally Owned and Operated

Timbers Roadhouse and Whiskey Joe’s have opened at 10 Winchester Canyon Road in western Goleta. The of iconic Timbers building was THANK YOU FOR VOTING US Santa barbara SANTA BARBARA built by Tex Blankenship in 1952 and is now operated by 324 W. Montecito St the family behind Woody’s BBQ. Timbers is open for Mahatma 2# By the bag dinner Tuesday-Sunday, Beef PASILLA CHILES 5-10 p.m., while Whiskey T-BONE STEAKS Joe’s is open Monday-Sunday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m. lb. Timbers is a steakhouse lb. lb. lb. run by Executive Chef 7# Andrew Crawley, who is in Whole PAPAYA his 33rd year in the industry. Chicken CHICKEN BREASTS Crawley’s Roadhouse Specialty Beef menu includes traditional cuts of meat lb. lb. and a wide range of sides, AWAITED OPENING: Timbers Roadhouse and Whiskey Joe’s are now open on Winchester Canyon Road. while the Classics menu lb. ea. El Pato 7 oz. ITALIAN & MEXICAN includes ribs, pork chops, PORK CHOPS roasted chicken, duck leg, SQUASH and shrimp. There are also fish options, •Everytable, 1001 State St. (formerly Saks Fifth Avenue) sandwiches, and a hamburger. lb. lb. “Whiskey Joe’s menu is slightly dif- •Hibachi Steak House (reopening), 500 State St. ferent than Timbers,” says bar manager Folgers 8 oz. Thin Sliced Charise Bacchus. “We will have happy •Hook & Press Donuts, 15 E. Figueroa lb. lb. BABY CARROTS hour starting soon, and we’re excited St. (formerly Jeannine’s Bakery) CARNE ASADA 1# Bag about it. Our wine list serves local and •IHOP, 7127 Hollister Ave., Goleta (forThin sliced international, and I think we will have merly Itsuki) ea. lb. one of the best whiskey and tequila •In-N-Out Burger, 515 McMurray Rd., selections in town.” Buellton Unfortunately, I arrived a few min- •Jersey Mike’s Subs, 145 N. Fairview Santa Cruz D'ANJOU PEARS Springfield 15 o Ave., Goleta utes too late to be their very first cusPORK CHORIZO lb. tomer. That honor goes to Stan Shaner, •Juice N Things, 4991 Carpinteria Ave., lb. who lives in the nearby neighborCarpinteria (formerly Coffee Bean & lb. hood. “We have watched it be closed Tea Leaf) lb. Santa Cruz for years and were very sad, and now •The Kitchen, 530 State St. (formerly Samy’s Camera) that it’s opened up, it is beyond belief,” Beef Springfield 8 oz CUCUMBERS said Shaner. “They have done a beauti- •Mangione’s Italian Ice, 1222 State St. BACK RIBS (formerly Spoon) ful job of remodeling. It’s spectacular. Timbers is the marriage of the greatest •Mattei’s Tavern, 2350 Railway Ave., lb. lb. local building, with so much history, Los Olivos (reopening) lb. and the people known for the great- •Mr. B Restaurant & Café, 140 S. Hope est barbecue restaurant. It’s a marriage Ave. (La Cumbre Plaza, formerly Pizza El Mexicano (4 lb.) (doz.) Minute Maid 59 Mizza) made in kitchen heaven. I am so happy LONG GRAIN RICE LARGE EGGS and hoping that the community will •Pavilions, 1040 Coast Village Rd., support it.” Montecito (changing from Vons) •Pepe’s Mexican Restaurant, 254 lb. ea. Orange Ave., Goleta (reopening) CRYSTAL BALL KNOWS ALL: After intense concentration and a wave of my hand •Red Pepper, 2840 De la Vina St. (forZulka (2 lb.) Springfield (24 ct.) www.santacruzmarkets.com www.santacruzmarkets.com over the all-knowing crystal ball, my eatmerly New Si Chuan Garden) ery oracle has revealed a list of food and •Reunion Kitchen, 1118 E. Cabrillo Blvd. CANE SUGAR WATER drink locations appearing in your future: (formerly East Beach Grill) By the bag By the bag BANANAS •Augie’s Tequila Bar, 700 State St. (for- •Sea Legs, 5905 Sandspit Rd., Goleta BANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAIN RICE BEEF TRI TIP BEEF TRI TIP ¢ ¢ 99 $ HAND $ 99 LIMITED TO STOCK ON • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL 49 $ 59 1 49DAYS $ 59 (formerly Beachside Bar-Café) merly Left at Albuquerque) 1 2 2 FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND Chicken •Belching Dragon Tavern, 800 State •Starbucks, 3052 De la Vina St. (forChicken MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL PINEAPPLES PINEAPPLES LEG QUARTERS $ QUARTERS FOLLOW USLEGON INSTAGRAM$ 99 $ 89 289 St. (formerly Starbucks and Weston’s merly Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf) 2 $ 99 ¢ ¢ 1 1 69 El Pato 7 oz. 69 El Pato 7 oz. AND Camera) •Tap Thai, 7060 Hollister Ave., Ste. D-6, HOT TOMATO SAUCE LIKE US ON FACEBOOK HOT TOMATO SAUCE BUTT ROMA TOMATOES PORK BUTT ROMA TOMATOES Goleta (formerly Sharky’sPORK Woodfired •Carp Kitchen and Grocery, 4945 Car59 ¢ 59 ¢ $ 59 ¢ $ 59 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE ST Best 1 89 BE 1 Mexican Grill) pinteria Ave., Ste. A, Carpinteria ARA BARB SANTA INSTANT COFFEE Barbara SantaThin BEST Thin sliced $ 89 sliced $ 89 winner WINNER •Corazón Guisados, 214 State St. (for- •Unnamed, six new restaurants coming 5 FUJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES CARNE RANCHERA CARNE RANCHERA WINNER ¢ ¢ $ 98 $ 98 merly Ca’Dario Pizzeria) to the Turnpike Center 89 PEAS & CARROTS 89 5 PEAS & CARROTS 5 89 ¢ Santa Rd. Cruz (for•Drift hotel and restaurant, 524 State St. •Unnamed, 1024 Coast Village 89 ¢ Santa Cruz MEDIUM YAMS MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO PORK CHORIZO SANTA BARBARA GOLETA ¢ (formerly Scientology) merly Little Alex’s) ¢ SANTA BARBARA $ SANTA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA BARBARA 59 WHIP TOPPING 59 249W. Montecito $ 49 2 St St $ 49 Montecito W.W.Montecito 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister 324Goleta St 1 324324 •Dune Coffee, 5915 Calle Real, Ste. A, •Unnamed, 5690 Calle Real, 1 PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE Goleta (formerly Pizza Hut) (formerly Outback Steakhouse) ORANGE JUICE ORANGE JUICE Mahatma 2# ¢ $ the By the bag $ 98 Mahatma 2# By 79 $ 89 198bag 79 ¢ $ 89 3 Support1local •Dutch Garden, 4203 State St. •Unnamed, 1187 Coast Village Rd. people working at 3 LONG GR LONG GRAIN RICE Now featuring fresh bread daily from featuring fresh bread daily from (reopening) (formerly Khao Kaeng) ¢ ¢Nowowned La Bella Rosa Bakery $ La Bella Rosa Bakery locally businesses! 99 $ JOHN DICKSON PHOTOS

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The Arlington Theatre

­ ­

Metro 4 • Camino

Paseo Nuevo • Fairview

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Fiesta 5 • Camino

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Oct 29 - Nov 4, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

FA I R V I E W 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

The French Dispatch* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Antlers* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:20, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:45, 5:20, 7:45. Ron’s Gone Wrong (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed:4:45, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 4:45, 7:15.Thur: 4:45. Spencer* (R): Thur: 7:15.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Last Night in Soho* (R): Fri-Sun: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50. Mon-Wed: 5:30, 8:10. Thur: 2:50, 5:30, 8:10. My Hero Academia: World Heroes’ Mission (NR): Fri-Sun: 1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:30. Mon-Thur: 2:00, 5:20, 7:50. Dune* (PG): Fri: 1:40, 3:20, 5:00, 6:40, 8:20, 10:00. Sat/Sun: 12:00, 1:40, 3:20, 5:00, 6:40, 8:20, 10:00. Mon-Wed: 1:40, 3:20, 5:00, 6:40, 8:20. Thur: 1:40, 3:20, 5:00, 8:20. Halloween Kills (R): Fri: 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10. Sat/Sun: 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10. Mon-Wed: 2:40, 5:10, 7:40. Thur: 2:40, 5:10. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:00, 4:30, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 1:50, 4:30, 8:00. Eternals* (PG13): Thur: 6:40, 8:30, 10:00.

o n Pa

ARLINGTON Charles Donelan’s Pano captures the full range of arts and entertainment available in our region in one panoramic weekly wide shot, scanning our cultural horizon for the best in theater, visual art, film, dance, music, and more every Wednesday.

Sign up at independent.com/newsletters 44

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 28, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Dune* (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:20, 7:45. Sat: 1:00, 4:20, 7:45. Thur: 4:20. Eternals* (PG13): Thur:7:45.

Thank You!

METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

Last Night in Soho* (R): Fri: 4:00(LP), 6:50(LP), 9:30(LP). Sat/Sun: 1:20(LP), 4:00(LP), 6:50(LP), 9:30(LP). Mon-Wed: 5:00(LP), 7:45(LP). Thur: 5:00, 7:45. Halloween Kills (R): Fri: 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. Sat/Sun: 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. Mon-Wed: 5:30, 8:00. Thur: 8:00. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri: 4:10, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 12:40, 4:10, 7:45. Mon-Wed: 4:45, 8:15. Thur: 4:45, 8:15. Venom Let There Be Carnage (PG13): Fri: 4:20, 6:40, 9:00. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 4:20, 6:40, 9:00. Mon-Wed: 5:10, 7:30. Thur: 5:10. Eternals* (PG13): Thur: 6:20(LP), 9:40(LP).

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Antlers* (R): Fri: 3:25, 5:50, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 1:00, 3:25, 5:50, 8:15. Mon-Thur: 5:50, 8:15. My Hero Academia: World Heroes’ Mission (NR): Fri: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 5:30, 8:00. Ron’s Gone Wrong (PG): Fri: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. The Addams Family 2 (PG): Fri: 2:20, 4:50, 7:05. Sat/Sun: 12:05, 2:20, 4:50, 7:05. Mon-Wed: 4:50, 7:05. Thur: 4:50. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (PG13): Fri: 1:45, 4:40, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:40, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:45. Spencer* (R): Thur: 7:05.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

The French Dispatch* (R): Fri: 1:50, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30. Sat/Sun: 1:50, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30. Mon-Wed: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Thur: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30. Dune* (PG13): Fri: 2:20, 3:20, 5:45, 6:45, 9:15. Sat/Sun: 2:20, 3:20, 5:45, 6:45, 9:15. Mon-Wed: 2:20, 3:20, 5:45, 6:45. Thur: 2:20, 3:20, 6:45. No Time To Die (PG13): Fri: 2:00, 5:30, 9:00. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 5:30, 9:00. Mon-Wed: 3:30, 7:00. Thur: 3:30, 7:00. Red Notice* (PG13): Thur: 7:15.


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

SANTA BARBARA, THE LABEL CALIAMERICANA RELEASE LAUNCHES NEW MUSIC COMPANY

A

ny artist would have been happy to see the people who gathered on the roof of the Canary Hotel on Thursday, October 21, for the Santa Barbara Records launch party. From chart-topping rockers to Hollywood A-listers, the cream of our creative community turned out to hear short sets from four artists — Tina Schlieske, Danny McGaw, Omar Velasco, and Jessie Payo. They were celebrating the release of CaliAmericana, a compilation album featuring eight recording artists with ties to our city, including the four CALIAMERICANA ARTISTS: Clockwise from top left: Jessie Payo, Danny McGaw, Hannah Siglin, Omar Velasco, Hana who played the launch party, plus Hannah Siglin, Erland Aluna, Erland Wanberg, Tina Schlieske, Mendeleyev Wanberg, Hana Aluna, and Mendeleyev. success or sustainability, the task can seem major label contracts have been stymied by long-term deals that promise the world and The release of CaliAmericana signals the overwhelming. end up leaving their music without the disEnter Santa Barbara Records, with a plan. arrival of Santa Barbara Records, a new indeWhen I spoke with Akoni the day after the pendent record label dedicated to leading tribution and marketing required to reach positive change in the music industry and event by phone, he explained the goal of this an audience. Billy O’Connell teaches this at generating cultural and economic capital for venture very clearly by saying, “We are creat- Loyola University, New Orleans, where he artists in our community. Music industry ing the support system for our artists that I is a professor in the university’s School of veteran Billy O’Connell, the general manager wish I had when I was starting out.” A gradu- Music Industry. His knowledge of the ins of Santa Barbara Records, served as master ate of San Marcos High School, Akoni rose and outs of recording contracts, marketing of ceremonies for the event, which also fea- through the ranks of the music world on the plans, touring, and rights holding comes tured remarks from Tariqh Akoni, a native basis of his extraordinary skills as a guitar- from decades of experience, first on the label of Santa Barbara and world-renowned gui- ist and arranger, arriving at the pinnacle of side at Sire Records during its peak of influtarist/music director, who serves as the new success with his most recent gig as music ence, and then as the manager for such artists label’s director of artists and repertoire. director for multi-platinum recording artist as the Pixies and Throwing Muses. It’s common knowledge that the music Josh Groban. With Santa Barbara Records, O’Connell industry has been in turmoil at least since As head of A&R for the new label, Akoni and Akoni are united by the goal of creatthe turn of the 21st century, as traditional is responsible for finding talent and nurturing ing a new model for independent labels, approaches to earning money from music their sound in a way that will not only offer one based in a realistic yet ambitious view have been upended by digital methods of them immediate success but also allow them of what a recording contract can and should content distribution. With the business sys- to build a sustainable life in music. “Everything do for the person who signs it. It’s an excittems for developing talent and getting music we do is dedicated to leaving the artists better off ing venture, and with the high level of talent to the public struggling to cope with changes than when we found them,” Akoni said. to be heard on CaliAmericana, it’s already in technology, artists face shifting challenges If you detect a note of revisionism in attracting the attention of some of the and moving targets as they seek to manage that statement, you have good ears. Record music world’s most influential players. For their individual careers. It has never been labels do not have a uniformly positive track more information, and to obtain a copy of easy to make it as a musician, but in 2021, record when it comes to artist development. CaliAmericana, visit santabarbararecords with so many options and no clear path to Too many promising musicians who signed .com. —Charles Donelan

WARRIOR WOMEN UCSB Arts & Lectures continues its Justice for All series on Wednesday, November 3, with a documentary film and talkback featuring the women of the Warrior Women Project — Madonna Thunder Hawk, Marcella Gilbert, and Dr. Elizabeth Castle. The approximately hour-long film screening will be followed by a discussion with the director/producer, Castle; and the film’s subjects and stars, Gilbert and Thunder Hawk. These women represent the matriarchal leadership of the Lakota people and are among the most prominent Native American activists in the world today. The excitement surrounding the revision of American history by the scholarship and through the oral histories of Indigenous women will blow you away. It’s some of the most important work being done in American history today, and this is a can’t-miss opportunity to witness and interact with some of the movement’s central figures. See artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. —CD

L I F E PAGE 45

DAVE DAVE DAVE MCMURRAY MCMURRAY MCMURRAY

DIGS DIGS THE THE DEAD DEAD

Coming up through the jazz and blues scene in his hometown of Detroit, Dave McMurray cut his teeth touring with blues legend Albert King in the late ’70s. In 1981, he was exploring the outer limits of jazz with Griot Galaxy when he got called into the studio for the first album by Was (Not Was). That gig led to a lot more studio sessions and a lifelong association with producer and Blue Note Records president Don Was. What kind of studio sessions? How about Gladys Knight, Geri Allen, Iggy Pop, and the Rolling Stones? It was through another more recent Don Was joint that McMurray became interested in arranging and playing the Grateful Dead songbook. He was part of a jam session Was put together for the Dead’s Bob Weir, an all-star affair featuring the likes of Terence Blanchard designed to explore the potential of the band’s catalog as the basis for jazz improvisation. McMurray jumped in, learned the tunes, and was knocked out by the reception. “I couldn’t believe it,” he told me by phone last week. “The songs were odd, with good chords, really musical, and they were long, but the main thing was how they went over — the audience was hypnotized.” For his July 2021 release on the Blue Note label, Grateful Deadication, McMurray went to school on the endless vault of Grateful Dead live recordings, tracing the evolution of their music tune by tune. “They’d start out with a song, and the first live version would be six minutes,” McMurray said. “Six months or a year later, the same song would be 20 minutes long. I was hooked.” Dave McMurray will play these thrilling, critically acclaimed Grateful Dead arrangements at Music Alley in Santa Barbara on Tuesday, October 26. Conveniently scheduled for after the Phish show at the Santa Barbara Bowl, it will be a scene. Visit music-alley.com for tickets. —CD

Madonna Thunder Hawk

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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CLASSICAL

“SEX, SUN, AND SUSPICION. A STAR-POWERED PSYCHOLOGICAL THRILLER.” – TIME OUT

4K RESTORATION & 40TH ANNIVERSARY FRI: 6:45pm / SAT: 4:30pm / SUN: 5:00pm MON: 7:30pm / TUES: 2:30pm WED: 4:45pm / THURS: 5:00pm

“A WONDERFULLY INTIMATE PORTRAIT OF THE LEGENDARY OCEANOGRAPHER” – THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER

F

ans of mandolin virtuoso Avi Avital had a lot to be thankful for at the first CAMA concert since the 100th-anniversary performance with the Los Angeles Philharmonic in March 2020. Avital was brilliant, delivering not only his customary sinuous performances of Bach and Vivaldi but also leading Les Violons du Roy on an unexpected and rousing romp through one of his jazz compositions as an encore. However, IN FLIGHT: Mandolinist Avi Avital takes a solo with Julian Wachner at the harpsichord what gave this concert and the members of Violons du Roy accompanying him. something extra was the jewel-like performance of Les Violons du Roy and the presence of Julian the Fugue for string orchestra. In addition, he gave Wachner as a harpsichord- a splendid introduction to The Art of the Fugue Presented by ist, conductor, and musical that involved the audience in singing various CAMA. At the raconteur. melodies to understand how Bach put it together. Lobero Theatre, Wachner was a last-minute The audience responded warmly throughout the Tue., Oct. 19. replacement for scheduled program, with special recognition reserved for maestro Jonathan Cohen, the regular music Avital’s marvelous arrangement of Bach’s Violin director of Les Violons, who was taken ill. He Concerto No. 1 for mandolin and for the encore demonstrated the necessary familiarity with the mentioned above, which sent the crowd home material, consisting of five concertos by Bach and floating on a magic carpet of swinging 16th notes. Vivaldi and an arrangement of Bach’s The Art of —Charles Donelan DAVID BAZEMORE

OCT 29 - NOV 4

LES VIOLONS DU ROY WITH AVI AVITAL

FRI: 4:30pm / SAT: 1:15pm, 7:15pm SUN: 12:30pm, 2:45pm MON & TUES: 5:00pm WED: 2:30pm / THURS: 7:45pm

4K RESTORATION FOR TWO NIGHTS ONLY FRI & SAT: 9:30pm

FOLLOWED BY A Q&A WITH WRITER/DIRECTOR/COMPOSER JEYMES SAMUEL SAT: 9:00am PROOF OF COVID-19 VACCINATION OR NEGATIVE TEST REQUIRED

SBIFFRIVIERA.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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THE INDEPENDENT

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his joyous production brought something truly unprecedented to the Granada stage. While we have had touring Broadway performances, ballets, and symphony orchestra concerts in the past, this was all that rolled into one, and more, since it heralded the return of two beloved organizations to their home stage for the first time since the pandemic struck in March 2020. Kismet, a Broadway musical of the old school, features a love story, memorable melodies, great dancing, and plenty of wisecracks. The fact that it is set in a medieval Presented by Muslim commuSara Miller POET AND PHILOSOPHER: Jonathan Raviv as Hajj and Joseph Kamal as McCune. At The nity comes second Omar in Kismet Granada Theatre, to the various traSat., Oct. 23. ditional Broadway and left the audience wanting to see these two lovers roles these fine actors were cast to play. As Hajj, the reunited. poet, Jonathan Raviv sang and connived his way What made this show a great choice for the Santa out of a dozen tight situations with the kind of zany Barbara Symphony and State Street Ballet was ingenuity associated with Groucho Marx. As his revealed in Act II, when it became clear that there nemesis, the Wazir of Police, Austin Durant deliv- would be copious attention paid to that fascinatered a top-flight comic performance, including the ing cultural anomaly, the seraglio. Thanks to the broadly amusing second act number “Was I Wazir?” excellent choreography created by William Soleau, Ani Djirdjirian sang wonderfully in the ingé- ensemble numbers such as “Radhalakum,” “Samahnue role of Marsinah, Hajj’s loyal daughter and ris’ Dance,” and “Zubbediya,” had the SSB ballerinas the Caliph’s love interest. Ariel Neydavoud por- combining classical technique with stunning gymtrayed the Caliph with a mixture of hauteur and nastics and plenty of vintage Broadway va-va-voom. earnestness befitting both a Maestro Kabaretti drove his orchestra through descendant of Mohammed and these polyrhythmic segments like the leader of a a love-struck young man. Their hopped-up big band, thus creating the heightened & ENTERTAINMENT duet on “Stranger in Paradise” atmosphere necessary for the whole fantastic world was the romantic climax of Act I of Kismet to come alive. —CD

REVIEWS

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KISMET

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“in the royal class of Schubert interpreters” - Sunday Times (London)

FACULTY ARTIST RECITAL

GROUND CONTROL TO MAJOR MICHAEL: Westmont students Rachel Herriges and Landon Moir are space-bound in Kitty Hawk or Kill Devil by Hannah Kenah.

KITTY HAWK OR KILL DEVIL

T

he Westmont Theater Department is back in business with a production of playwright Hannah Kenah’s Kitty Hawk or Kill Devil, a play that celebrates the firsts of flight, from the Wright brothers in the early 20th century to the Apollo 11 moon mission in 1969. These Presented by the two tales are woven Westmont College together with the Theater Department. saga of a modern At Porter Theater, family who harbors Fri., Oct. 22. Shows through Oct. 30. deep comic antipathy for the Wright brothers’ decision to take their flight trials to North Carolina instead of completing them in their great home state of Ohio. Playwright and Westmont alum Diana Small directs a strong cast in this relatively fast-paced play, including a standout performance from Rachel Herriges, who plays Lucas, a young boy in modern-day Ohio. Herriges channels the spastic energy of a preteen boy and melds it with an innocence and wisdom that makes for a thought-provoking characterization. Another notable perfor-

mance is given by Emiliana Brewer as Ruth Lyle, the fictional secretary to the Wright brothers, who offers a robust take on a role that is physical, funny, and poignant. The Porter Theater is set efficiently with projection screens that transport the audience to the fields of Ohio and into orbit around the moon. Landon Moir plays astronaut Michael Collins while hanging from an onstage tower in a harness that creates the illusion he is floating in outer space. Various onstage levels offer ample locations for the three stories to take place both concurrently and in series, while still maintaining a sense of intimacy and connection between segments. Themes explored include the cultural obsession with being in first place and the idea that there is only success or failure, no middle ground, giving lots of opportunity for bittersweet moments of simultaneous pride and disappointment. It’s a cleverly devised production that hits notes of hope, sacrifice, and the importance of being curious. —Maggie Yates

Paul Berkowitz A solo piano recital featuring two rondos by Mozart, 15 Improvisations of Poulenc, and Schubert’s G Major Sonata D894

Friday, October 29 | 7:30 pm

Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, UC Santa Barbara $15 general admission | $13 senior/military/non-UCSB students FREE UCSB students and children under 12 music.ucsb.edu/news/purchase-tickets or (805) 893-2064 Masks and proof of vaccination or negative COVID test required. See music.ucsb.edu/news/covid-19-information for more details.

All Booked

POP, ROCK & JAZZ

WILCO

C

an you blame Wilco for opening their October 20 concert at the Santa Barbara Bowl with “A Shot in the Arm”? Not only is it funny, but it’s also one of their best tunes and would have made a great start even withPresented by out the excruciating Goldenvoice. At topicality of the refthe Santa Barbara Bowl, Wed., Oct. 20. erence. Over the last two decades, the band — Jeff Tweedy, John Stirratt, Glenn Kotche, Mikael Jorgensen, Pat Sansone, and Nels Cline — has developed into one of the most impressive live acts in music. They come with a glorious catalog of material that ranges from sweet little rockers like “Box Full of Letters” to the experimental

extravagance of albums such as Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, A Ghost Is Born, and Ode to Joy. And on Wednesday night, it felt as if they might play absolutely all of it. There’s so much goodness here that it’s hard to single anything out as a highlight. Is it the sweetness of Tweedy’s voice or the urgency of the excellent live arrangements that seem to breathe new life into each number, no matter how familiar? What about the soaring virtuosity of Cline’s guitar work? It’s all of the above and more. When you think about what’s been missing in terms of live music, this concert had it all, and the Santa Barbara audience was ecstatic to be back and basking in the splendor. —CD

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INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

47


KEEPING

Santa Barbara Beautiful FOR 55 YEARS

We ar e

Cour age,

BUNNIES U R G E N T LY NEEDING S H E LT E R

Con

We are

Rescuing & re-homing animals in your community since 1992

Media Grants

RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

for Santa Barbara County Nonprofit Organizations WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS, NEIGHBORS, AND FAMILY.

WE ARE JODI HOUSE.

“Being a part of Girls out of my shell, talk t new opportunities. I home and a place expressing myself. A I have the persevera try again.” — Monica

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre DAVID BAZEMORE

INSPIRING ALL GIRLS T

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa STRONG, SMART, AND 25are pleased to continue Barbara Independent & our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their messageCasa del Herr to the greater Santa Barbara community.

THE MANY FACES OF BRAIN INJURY IN THE SANTA BARBARA COMMUNITY

th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary l a sterling year of performances & events

Jodi House is the only nonprofit organization in Santa Barbara County that is solely to supporting brain injury survivors in their continued Join dedicated us for a gala evening recovery and rehabilitation. honoring Saraongoing Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up healthy,

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

educated independent independent.

The GranadaTheatre

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

statestreetballet.com

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

DAVID BAZEMORE

ROSE EICHENBAUM

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5/23/19 3:43 PM

RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

Santa Barbara Beautiful Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit

SLEEPING BEAUTY KEEPING Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

DAVID BAZEMORE

group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces Change a Child’s Story SBCASA.ORG a custom four-page insert specific to the Good Work Lives On individual agency's needs. The insert is published We are and distributed in the Santa Barbara Change a Child’s Story SBCASA.ORG SHINING A Independent, with the cost underwritten by LIGHT IN OUR Hutton Parker Foundation. COMMUNITY

FOR 55 YEARS

25

th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary l a sterling year of performances & events Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

We ar e

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.”

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

“My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Rachel, Age 17

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

The GranadaTheatre

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

statestreetballet.com

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

ROSE EICHENBAUM

DAVID BAZEMORE

Cour ag On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa e, Co nfiden Continue reading for details ce & Char acte r

Barbara County!

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.”

ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATI

“My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me OFcare.” SANTA BARBARA the entire time I was in foster Rachel, Age 17

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with t enhancing our community’s awareness and appr architecture and the built environment.

A public nonprofit charitable organization

And this is

what we do!

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

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RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES YMCA 105 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805.569.1103 • ciymca.org/youthandfamilyservices

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Youth and Family Services YMCA operates four core programs that provide a continuum of care to underserved at-risk youth. Youth, young adults, and families that participate in our programs experience greater safety and well-being while they develop skills and lasting relationships to improve their resilience and build a successful, independent future.

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

St. George Youth Center provides critical family, community and afterschool programming to keep youth away from high-risk behaviors.

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

My Home continues the care for youth as they become young adults but still need critical support services as they pursue educational or employment opportunities.

SLEEPING BEAUTY Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre DAVID BAZEMORE

A CONTINUUM OF CARE

Street Outreach Services provide on the street assistance to youth and young adults who find themselves living on the streets or being at-risk of homelessness.

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Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

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AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

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granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

DAVID BAZEMORE

ROSE EICHENBAUM

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Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Casa del Herrero Media Grant application. educated independent.

The GranadaTheatre Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

statestreetballet.com

2/22/19 3:20 PM

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Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

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Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up healthy,

Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on notion that we are, for better or for worse, different peop different places  places — and — and on the conviction that it is architect task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Bo

Noah’s Anchorage is a safe haven for at-risk and homeless youth and provides programs to end the cycle of homelessness.

th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary l a sterling year of performances & events

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

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2/22/19 3:20 PM

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

ARE YOU HIRING?

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.” Rachel, Age 17

Change a Child’s Story

SBCASA.ORG

Good Work Lives On

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County!

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Continue reading for details

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION OF SANTA BARBARA

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with the goal of enhancing our community’s awareness and appreciation of architecture and the built environment. A public nonprofit charitable organization

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Since 1989, changing the world for one cat at a time.

Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on the notion that we are, for better or for worse, different people in different places — and on the conviction that it is architecture’s task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Botton

2/22/19 3:20 PM

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF OCTOBER 28

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries philosopher Emil Cioran wrote, “When I meet friends or people I know who are going through a difficult period, I usually have this advice for them: ‘Spend 20 minutes in a cemetery, and you’ll see that, though your worry won’t disappear, you’ll almost forget about it and you’ll feel better.’ ” I don’t think you’re weathering a terribly difficult phase right now, Aries, but you may be dealing with more riddles and doubts and perplexities than you’re comfortable with. You could be feeling a bit darker and heavier than usual. And I think Cioran’s advice would provide you with the proper stimulation to transform your riddles and doubts and perplexities into clarity and grace and aplomb. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the spirit of a dead ancestor.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): According to some spiritual teachers, desire interferes with our quest for illumination. It diverts us from what’s real and important. I know gurus who even go so far as to say that our yearnings deprive us of freedom; they entrap us and diminish us. I strongly disagree with all those ideas. I regard my longing as a primary fuel that energizes my drive to free myself from pain and nonsense. How about you, Taurus? In alignment with astrological omens, I authorize you to deepen and refine and celebrate the yearning in your heart. Your title/nickname could be: (1) Yearning Champion. (2) Desire Virtuoso. (3) Connoisseur of Longing.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Author Jessamyn West confessed, “I am always jumping into the sausage grinder and deciding, even before I’m half ground, that I don’t want to be a sausage after all.” I offer her testimony as a cautionary tale, Gemini. There’s no astrological reason, no cosmic necessity, that decrees you must become like a sausage anytime soon. Such a fate can be easily avoided. All you must do is commit yourself to not jumping into the sausage grinder. Also: In every way you can imagine, don’t be like a sausage. (To meditate on sausage-ness, read the Wikipedia entry: tinyurl.com/SausageMetaphor.)

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Our fellow Cancerian, author Franz Kafka, told us, “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free.” And yes, some of us Crabs go through phases when we crave safety so much that we tolerate, even welcome, being in chains. But the fact is that you’re far more likely to be safe if you are free, not in chains. And according to my reading of the astrological omens, that’s extra true for you now. If you can celebrate Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: runaway prisoner, escape artist, freedom fighter.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Some of us yearn for allies who can act like saviors: rescue us from our demons and free us from our burdensome pasts and transform us into the beauties we want to become. On the other hand, some of us do all this hard work by ourselves: rescue ourselves from our demons and free ourselves from our burdensome pasts and transform ourselves into the beauties we want to become. I highly recommend the latter approach for you in the coming weeks, Leo. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here is a costume suggestion: your own personal savior.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “One of the reasons people are so unhappy is they don’t talk to themselves,” says author Elizabeth Gilbert. “You have to keep a conversation going with yourself throughout your life,” she continues, “to see how you’re doing, to keep your focus, to remain your own friend.” Now is a favorable time to try such an experiment, Virgo. And if you already have skill in the art of carrying on a vibrant dialogue with yourself, now is a perfect moment to upgrade and refine it. Try this experiment: Imagine having a conversation with the Future You.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “In the absence of willpower, the most complete collection of virtues and talents is worthless.” Libran occultist Aleister Crowley wrote that, and I agree. But let’s phrase his idea more positively: To make full use of your virtues and talents, you must develop a strong willpower. And here’s the good news, Libra: The coming weeks will be a favorable time to cultivate your willpower, along with the assets that bolster it, like discipline, self-control, and concentration. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are accessories I recommend for you to carry with you, no matter what your costume is: a wand, a symbolic lightning bolt, an ankh, an arrow, a Shiva lingam stone or crystal.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Mardi Gras is a boisterous festival that happens every February all over the planet. One hotspot is New Orleans. The streets there are filled with costumed revelers who enjoy acting in ways that diverge from their customary behavior. If you want to ride on a float in the parade that snakes down Royal Street, you must, by law, wear a festive mask. I invite all of you Scorpios to engage in similar festivities for the next three weeks — even if you’re not doing much socializing or partying. It’s a favorable time to experiment with a variety of alternate identities. Would you consider adopting a different persona or two? How could you have fun playing around with your self-image?

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Jungian psychotherapist and storyteller Clarissa Pinkola Estés reminds us, “In fairy tales, tears change people, remind them of what is important, and save their very souls.” I hope you’re open to the possibility of crying epic, cathartic, catalytic tears in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. According to my analysis, you have a prime opportunity to benefit from therapeutic weeping. It could chase your fears and cure your angst and revivify your soul. So please take advantage of this gift from life. Be like a superhero whose superpower is to generate healing by crying.

Join us in reading October’s book of the month! OCTOBER’S THEME:

HORROR

D I SCUSS ION :

Wednesday, November 3, 6pm Location: Municipal Winemakers B OOK OF THE MON TH :

Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam

independent.com/indybookclub

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Filmmaker Wim Wenders said, “Any film that supports the idea that things can be changed is a great film in my eyes.” I’ll expand upon that: “Any experience, situation, influence, or person that supports the idea that things can be changed is great.” This is a useful and potentially inspiring theme for you to work with right now, Capricorn. In accordance with astrological rhythms, I hope you will be a connoisseur and instigator of beneficial, beautiful transformations.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Fitness buff Jack LaLanne was still doing his daily workout when he was 95. He was also famous for performing arduous feats. At age 65, for example, he swam a mile through Japan’s Lake Ashinoko while towing 65 boats filled with 6,500 pounds of wood pulp. I think you’re currently capable of a metaphorically comparable effort, Aquarius. One way to do it is by mastering a psychological challenge that has previously seemed overwhelming. So meditate on where your extra strength would be best directed, and use it wisely! If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here are costume suggestions: fitness buff, bodybuilder, marathon runner, yoga master.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): When birdwatchers describe a bird, they speak of its “jizz.” This term refers to the distinctive character of its habitual movements, flying style, posture, vocal mannerisms, and coloring. One aficionado defines jizz as the bird’s “indefinable quality,” or the “vibe it gives off.” I’ve got a theory that right now you’re as bird-like as you’ve ever been. You seem lighter and freer than usual, less bound to gravity and solemnity, and more likely to break into song. Your fears are subsiding because you have the confidence to leave any situation that’s weighing you down. If you can do Halloween without risk from COVID-19, here’s a costume suggestion: the bird that has your favorite kind of jizz.

HOMEWORK: Tell me why you’re such a gorgeous creature. Newsletter@freewillastrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021

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California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23750

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ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR

MATERIALS DEPARTMENT Responsible for high‑level administrative duties including: front office management, graduate program support, access control, faculty administration, and financial assistance for the Materials Department. Reqs: High level of administrative and organizational skills and ability to handle multiple tasks with frequent interruptions, as well as meet deadlines with minimal supervision. Strong interpersonal skills working with a diverse group of people. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Ability to act professional at all times, including when dealing with sensitive issues. Ability to think creatively when finding solutions to problems. Must be able to establish priorities, perform effectively under pressure and adapt to changing needs and issues. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$26.98/hr. The University of

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ASAP/HR ADMIN ASSISTANT

HUMAN RESOURCES Responsible for the administrative operations for Academic & Staff Assistance Program (ASAP), including coordination of events, website updates, and managing a complex scheduling system and database. Requires extreme confidentiality, sensitivity, tact and diplomacy. Independently performs a variety of administrative support duties in support of HR business operations. Prepares and processes various University paperwork necessary to issue payments to vendors and service providers in compliance with University, division and department policies and procedures and audit requirements. Serves as the HR front desk generalist, utilizing a case management system to triage or answer a wide range of questions. Interacts professionally with all levels of University personnel, utilizing sound judgment, diplomacy and confidentiality in person, by e‑mail or telephone. Reqs: Demonstrated understanding of the need to maintain high levels of confidentiality in a clinical setting with regard to verbal and written information (e.g., HIPAA requirements). Solid organizational skills and ability to multi‑task with demanding time frames. Solid communication and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively with all levels of staff and faculty verbally and in writing. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 11/4/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 25720

CLINICAL NURSE LIMITED

STUDENT HEALTH Acts as a clinical nurse, triaging students in order to make appropriate appointments and referrals, provides advice for minor illnesses and injuries and patient education. Provides direct patient care per established nursing protocols. Works in an immunization/travel clinic. Provides contraceptive counseling. Acts as a resource to physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, LVNs and medical assistants.Reqs: Must be licensed by the State Board of Registered Nursing. Must be CPR/

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BLS certified and kept current. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse.Must be licensed by the State Board of Registered Nursing. Must be CPR/BLS certified and kept current. Satisfactory completion of criminal history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is a limited position at 40%. Salary is commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/29/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25479

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS ANALYST

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for developing and submitting research proposals, awards and/or transactions related to contract and grant management and maintains contract and grant records in compliance with institutional and research sponsor policies. Responsible for the post‑award administration, financial management, and analysis of the Contracts and Grants for the Computer Science Department. Additionally, will backup/support the Contracts and Grants Manager with Award Closeout. Responsible for the completion of post‑award activities of research awards totaling more than $12M annually. Duties include setting up new awards and analyzing award terms and conditions, advising faculty, staff, and students of proper University and agency policies regarding extramural funding policies and procedures. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or/and equivalent work experience. Ability to establish and maintain priorities, multi‑task and meet deadlines while balancing a high volume workload. Analytical and problem‑solving skills. Excellent attention to detail and communication skills. Ability to exercise independent judgment. Ability to perform financial analysis and customized reporting. Proficiency with Microsoft programs such as Excel, Word, Powerpoint, etc. Proficiency with Google software programs. Must be comfortable explaining guidelines and policies. Working knowledge of and experience with financial accounting, analysis and reporting techniques. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $25.00‑$28.75/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24290

DATA ANALYST

DIVERSITY EQUITY AND INCLUSION Plans long‑term diversity, equity, and inclusion studies, including the preparation of proposals, design of survey instruments, and determining sampling procedures. Gathers, analyzes, prepares, and summarizes the collection of information and data; recommends statistical approaches, trends, sources, and uses. Prepares data for presentation to clients and other audiences. Identifies multivariate strategies. Prepares reports of studies for internal validation and cross‑validation studies. Analyses the interrelationships of data and defines logical aspects of data sets. Develops systems for organizing data to analyze, identify and report trends. Manages database for research data for projects. Reviews new software instruments and potential effects on statistical testing. May make programming modifications. Participates in the development and implementation of data security policies and procedures. Keeps abreast of technical advances in storage, documentation, and dissemination of computerized data. May supervise data entry, database management, and research analysis of work‑study students/interns, support staff and/or lower‑level analysts. Partners with other cross functional stakeholders to enable the successful delivery of reports, dashboards, and analytics to measure progress against defined actions. Communicate key findings to various stakeholders to facilitate data‑driven decision‑making into areas needing greater attending against defined action plans. Tracks DEI campus data and prepared reports, presentations, statistics, charts and graphs on a variety of DEI subjects to address enrollment, campus climate and program‑related issues. Ensures confidentiality of sensitive DEI data, including adherence to Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA ) policy. The position reports to the Vice‑chancellor for Diversity, equity, and Inclusion. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Thorough knowledge of research function. Thorough skills associated with statistical analysis and systems programming. Research skills at a level to evaluate alternate solutions and develop recommendations. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The position is funded by federal contract/subcontract and requires an E‑Verify check. $78,630‑$104,600/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/9/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25874

DATA SCIENCE PROGRAM COORDINATOR

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COMPUTER SCIENCE Under the general supervision of the Data Science Initiative Director, is responsible for student affairs and academic personnel coordination for the Data Science (DS) Initiative. With Data Science Director and Business Officer, develops and prepares program curriculum plan for each academic year and prepares temporary sub‑0 budget. Serves as the initial source of information, advises students regarding general and program information. Ensures grades are reported and develops and updates the Schedule of Classes and other publications. Requires knowledge of policy and procedures for undergraduate education. Serves as the departmental liaison with the Office of the Registrar on all matters pertaining to program courses grades and undergraduate records. Responsible for processing all employment transactions for DS academic employees, including lecturers, teaching assistants and undergraduate learning assistants, in UCPath. Serves as resource for and advises DS Initiative Director on academic personnel policies including procedures covering academic recruitment, appointment, and advancement; compensation and salary administration; labor contracts; visa procurement; benefits; payroll. Provides administrative support for program coordination. Reqs: Strong written and verbal communication skills. Ability to organize, prioritize, and complete work with frequent interruptions. Ability to work with a diverse group of students, faculty, staff, and other campus offices on a variety of tasks. Strong problem‑solving skills. Ability to be accurate and thorough with careful attention to details. Ability to use various programs (Excel, Word, Google) to complete required tasks. This position is funded through June 30, 2023 pending further funding. $24‑$26/hr. The University of

California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/29/2021. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #25428

EOP COUNSELOR/ COORDINATOR

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Utilizes advanced skills gained at the Master’s degree level in counseling fields (student affairs and/or higher education); exhibits culturally inclusive active listening skills (e.g., appropriately establishing interpersonal contact, perception checking) and provides counseling services for personal, social and academic issues, including but not limited to cultural identity, educational, relationship, family, sexuality and sexual identity issues. Focuses on working with African American EOP student population. Designs, implements and evaluates cultural, academic and programmatic services for the African diasporic Cultural Resource Center (AdCRC). Develops program designs and tools to assess quality of programs and events offered. Assists in campus efforts to recruit and retain underrepresented students. Plays a key role in the Division of Student Affairs Initiative to build bridges for EOP students and the AdCRC. Reqs: Experience in providing in‑depth, wide‑ranging and complex academic advising and holistic services to

undergraduates. Working knowledge of MS Office products and Google Connect/Drive applications. Master’s degree in counseling or related area or years of equivalent experience/ training. Ability to coordinate and present educational programs and and present educational, academic, social, cultural events/programs and workshops. Experience with social media management on multiple platforms, updating department website, and Emma application. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $57,000‑ $63,975/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 24544

FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES COORDINATOR

UC Education Abroad Program Supports the management, long‑range planning, organization, coordination, oversight and / or performance of multiple operational activities and services for one or more buildings, including space planning, general maintenance, specialized facility systems and operations, call center

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Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low 11:31 pm 0.6

Thu 28

7:30 am 3.7

9:59 am 3.6

3:29 pm 4.3

Fri 29

7:18 am 3.9

11:50 am 3.2

4:58 pm 4.3

Sat 30

12:19 am 0.5

7:30 am 4.2

Sun 31

12:56 am 0.4

Mon 1

1:30 am 0.4

Tue 2

2:03 am 0.5

Wed 3 Thu 4

28

Sunrise 7:18 Sunset 6:05

High

12:42 pm 2.7

6:06 pm 4.5

7:46 am 4.5

1:23 pm 2.1

7:03 pm 4.6

8:06 am 4.9

2:02 pm 1.3

7:55 pm 4.7

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2:43 pm 0.6

8:47 pm 4.7

2:35 am 0.7

8:56 am 5.8

3:26 pm -0.0

9:39 pm 4.6

3:09 am 1.1

9:27 am 6.2

4:12 pm -0.6

10:33 pm 4.4

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“Locked In” -- in memory of comedian Sean Lock (1963-2021).

You are not alone!

REAL ESTATE COMMERCIAL PROPERTY FOR SALE

Downtown Office Condominium 146 E. Carrillo St. (second floor) 959 Square Feet Reception area Four Offices (all with desks) Conference Room Three Parking Spaces Front & Rear Entrances Monthly Expense Fee $516.13 Sale Price $750,000.00

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MONEY TO LOAN RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 1‑818‑248‑0000. Broker‑principal DRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑ SCAN)

RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or

townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

WANT TO RENT FIRE REFUGEE seeking one bedroom or guest house in nature or on quiet beautiful land for incredible person relocating from Malibu. Can pay $2000 per mo. (310) 985‑0068

57 “___ to think so” 58 Response, part 2 1 The “T” of MIT, briefly 61 Joined (up) 5 Close friend 62 “Ich bin ___ Berliner” 8 Lumps of dirt 63 Sports reporter Andrews 13 Cream-filled Hostess cake 64 Insult from Bob and Doug McKenzie 14 2016 Olympics locale 65 Holstein sound 15 Bucks 66 “Curses, foiled again!” 16 Question presented by Jimmy Carr that starts “If you could change ...”, 1 Despite, in poetry part 1 2 Long, long, long time 18 Grandmother, in 3 Not too hard on the wallet Guatemala 4 Place with a lot of activity 19 Question, part 2 5 Hybrid hatchback 21 Daily news sources, still 6 It just isn’t ... “isn’t” 23 Traveling through 7 Sluggish 8 2018 series spun off from 24 Back muscle, for short “The Karate Kid” 25 Crossword constructions 9 Reed and Bega, for two 26 Singer ___ Lipa 10 Palindromically titled 1976 28 Rap duo Kris ___ album with “Evil Woman” 30 Plea at sea 11 Southfork Ranch setting 31 Comedian’s asset 12 Elevator passageways 32 Kung ___ beef 15 The Rock, in “Moana” 33 Question, part 3 17 ___ d’oeuvres 39 4, on a phone 20 IVF eggs 40 Soccer official 21 Family-friendly film ratings 41 Spheroid 22 Three in ___ (tic-tac-toe win) 26 Metal singer Ronnie James 43 “Finding Dory” actor ___ Willem 27 Mid-road maneuver 46 “CSI” evidence 29 Go bad 47 Hindu title of respect 31 “1917” backdrop 49 Cockney’s residence? 32 Adobe file format 50 Improvise with the band 34 Earlier 52 Rocky’s surname 35 1989 Jack Nicholson role 53 Pithy response from Sean 36 “Back to the Future” Lock, part 1 actress Thompson

Across

Down

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37 Canadian-born hockey legend 38 “Switch” attachment 42 South American slitherer 43 “___ that what you will” 44 Painter Modigliani 45 “___ that were in the mood” (“Vogue” line) 46 Driver’s lic. issuer 47 Big name in chemicals (and audio tapes and floppy disks, once) 48 Activist lawyer Gloria 51 Danny Pudi’s character on “Community” 52 It’s good in Puerto Rico 54 Zest of ___ 55 “Unexpected ___ in bagging area” 56 Home of Xenia, Youngstown, and Zanesville 59 “Boyz N the Hood” actress Long 60 Demolition compound ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1055

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OCTOBER 28, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT OCTOBER 28, 2021

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active listening. Proficient in the use of MS Office Suite and ability to learn new online systems. Abilities in problem identification, reasoning. Ability to develop original ideas to solve problems. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $23.66‑$27.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/8/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25901

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STUDENT HEALTH MEDICAL DIRECTOR

STUDENT HEALTH Responsible for all Student Health Service (SHS) clinical care and protocols, and the medical and legal oversight of all licensed non‑behavioral health professionals. Assists the Executive Director in assuring the quality and cost effectiveness of medical care at Student Health, compliance with all regulations and accreditation standards, controlling liability risk, and acts on behalf of the Executive Director in their absence. Provide both individual clinical services and consultations for patients in Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Gynecology & Urgent Care (as qualified) to support staff with the diagnosis and treatment of complex patients, and will provide a liaison to the local medical community, and respond to all campus public health emergencies. Reqs: Must have a current CA Medical, DEA License, and Board Certification at all times during employment in order to practice and function in this clinical role; credentials are renewed periodically. Must have 3+ years minimum of experience as a medical or associate director, or chief medical officer in a healthcare facility. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent Adult Abuse. Student Health requires that clinical staff must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Medical License and DEA license during employment. Must have and maintain current Board Certification in Family Practice, Internal Medicine or Pediatrics or Emergency Medicine throughout employment. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender

SUPPLIER ENABLEMENT SPECIALIST

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES Manages all supplier onboarding and content management processes, including negotiation of business terms, payment matrix, invoicing methodology and Gateway catalog management. Serves as the primary point of contact for Gateway vendors. Manages strategies to increase utilization of the e‑procurement tool, strategically sourced contracts, drive sustainable process changes, improve transaction efficiency, and improve cash flow cash management. Requires self‑motivation with the ability to work proactively in an organization experiencing ongoing change. Demonstrates exceptional inter‑personal and communication skills to provide customer service in a fast‑paced, high‑volume dynamic work environment. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated competence in financial ERP and/or eProcurement systems. Possesses a customer service focus across broad and diverse subject areas. Excellent analytical and problem‑solving skills. Ability to use independent judgment, initiative, and analytical skills to problem solve and address complex administrative and financial issues. Ability to manage a significant volume of transactions, perform complex financial analysis and customized reporting. Ability to independently execute a wide range of duties, pay strict attention to detail, and to prioritize work to meet deadlines among competing demands. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $28.00‑ $29.50/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/9/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25942

RETAIL

VALLE VERDE retirement community is seeking a customer service‑driven store clerk to run our small campus store. We are looking for a self‑starter with an entrepreneurial spirit who would enjoy working in a resort‑style community while interacting with our wonderful residents! Duties will include stocking the store, keeping the store clean, operating a POS machine and handling small amounts of cash. Position involves standing for periods of time and lifting up to 20 pounds. Hours will be from 9.00AM to 4.30PM. To apply visit www.valleverdecareers.com, email info@ValleVerdeCareers.com, or call 805‑883‑4003 Valle Verde offers competitive pay and phenomenal benefits. Eligible positions (30+ hours/week) start with 20 paid days off, plus seven holidays, a company‑matching 401(k) and health plans that give you cash to use for those unexpected health issues. We also offer a Tuition Reimbursement to promote your career advancement.

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STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), American Medical Technologists (AMT), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA), Note: Those who have graduated from an EMT program may also be considered, although the MA program is preferable. Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at time of hire. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory background check. To comply with

UCSB POLICE DEPARTMENT Processes police reports and citations for filing with the court, meeting daily court filing deadlines as needed. Coordinates the Campus Bicycle/ Skateboard Safety Program. Schedules, processes and maintains all Bicycle/ Skateboard Safety classes. Handles cash and checks, and prepares weekly deposits in compliance with University Cash Handling policy. Maintains an Excel spreadsheet for all Bicycle/ Skateboard Safety services. Interacts directly with campus students, faculty, staff as well as non‑affiliates and Courts. Utilizes a high level of professionalism, diplomacy, and customer service. Must be organized, neat, and able to prioritize multiple assignments while maintaining a high level of accuracy. Disseminates crime data in weekly, monthly, and annual reports. Reqs: Strong verbal and written communication skills and demonstrated experience effectively conveying information to others. Proficiency in data entry and the fuse of spreadsheet and database software systems, with the ability to adapt to changes in technology. Demonstrated ability to identify, research, analyze, interpret, and conduct analyses of complex laws, statutes, policies, and data. Adaptability, including implementing frequent changes in regulations, policies, and procedures.Willingness to work cooperatively with coworkers in a shared‑work environment. Ability to work with sensitive information and preserve confidentiality, meet deadlines, maintain objectivity, and prioritize workload in an organized manner. Willingness to work varying daytime schedules as assigned, including weekends and holidays occasionally. Any combination of education and experience that provides the above knowledge, skills, and abilities. High school diploma or equivalent, and two years of general clerical experience, including typing and record maintenance. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting requirements of Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. The employee will be a staff member of the UC Santa Barbara Police Department and therefore must pass a thorough background investigation of personal and work history, including a fingerprint check of criminal history. $24.61‑$35.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/29/21.

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY DEPARTMENT The ETS Infrastructure group is looking for a self‑motivated team player with at least 3 years of Linux system administration experience including advanced networking. We help to manage the North Hall Data Center (NHDC), host enterprise Campus‑wide applications, provide system administration, and maintain the Core IT virtual Infrastructure both on‑premises and in various public clouds. Reqs: If you have a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or Information Technology; or equivalent work experience, and want to join our team, please see https://www.it.ucsb. edu/enterprise‑technology‑services to learn more. $67,500 ‑ $104,600/ yr. depending on experience. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 24591

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MEDICAL ASSISTANT

RECORDS TECHNICIAN & CAMPUS BIKE SAFETY COORDINATOR

SITE RELIABILITY ENGINEER

identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 24397

TWITTER

STUDENT HEALTH Provides a full range of social work services, with emphasis on identifying treatment resources and providing psychosocial interventions (individual, group, crisis) not offered by other campus resources, to assure that students receive optimal benefit from medical and/or psychiatric care. The primary client population to be served is students with significant psychosocial stress, acute and chronic mental illnesses and in need of short and long‑term social services, including long term counseling and case management support. Reqs: Must be currently registered as a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the state of California. Master’s degree in Social Work. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/

STUDENT HEALTH Provides medical and administrative support to the physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurses, and licensed vocational nurses assisting with exams and procedures, taking vitals, checking in/out patients, filling out necessary paperwork, taking phone messages and following directives from the clinicians, as well as scheduling appointments. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent. Certification with one of the following agencies required; American Association of Medical Assistants (AMA), American Medical Technologists (AMT), California Certifying Board of Medical Assistants (CMAA), Note: Those who have graduated from an EMT program may also be considered, although the MA program is preferable. Applicants without a proper certification will not be considered. Current CPR certification/Basic Life Support (BLS) certification required or dually certified in both AHA Advanced Cardiac Life Support and AHA Pediatric Advanced Life Support at time of hire is required and non‑negotiable. Notes: This is a limited position at 40%. Mon.‑Fri./7:45am‑4:30pm (may include Thursday evenings until 7pm). Student Health requires all clinical staff successfully pass the background check and complete the credentialing process before the employment date. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Starting at $23.27/hour. Salary commensurate with experience.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job #25239

Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24190

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LICENSED CLINICAL SOCIAL WORKER

MEDICAL ASSISTANT‑LIMITED

Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11‑month position with 4 weeks of furlough taken during quarter breaks and summer months. Starting at $23.27/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 24912

@sbindynews

STUDENT AFFAIRS INFORMATION SYSTEMS Supports all division users at their locations; installs and configures computer hardware and software. The Tier 2 Help Desk responds to requests that are escalated by Tier 1 Help Desk Field Representatives. Responsible for the analysis of functional requirements, and diagnoses, research and resolution of problems. Reqs: Ability to work independently to troubleshoot and resolve end‑user problems, within the context of a collaborative teamwork environment. Strong written and verbal communication skills. Experience with the Windows 10 operating system is essential. Strong technical background with experience supporting hardware and software, including internal PC components (hard drives, RAM, etc.), peripherals (webcams, mice, keyboards), monitors, printers, and productivity software. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.86‑29.53/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/29/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25439

Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 11/8/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #25943

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GLOBAL STUDIES Manages all aspects of the current graduate programs, including the Master’s Program, the PhD Emphasis Program and a PhD program. Assures that graduate students meet the academic, teaching and research requirements of both the Global Studies Program and the University. Acts as Program liaison to the Graduate Division. Identifies problems, suggests solutions, and develops procedures for graduate affairs. Advises graduate students on all aspects of the graduate program. Administers and tracks annual block grant funds, TA allocations, recruitment funds, gift funds, fellowships and grants. Responsible for the employment (UC Path) for graduate student academic employees. Provides Department and University policy and procedural information to graduate students, faculty, staff, applicants and potential applicants to the graduate program. Coordinates graduate recruitment, admission and orientation. Manages database for all graduate student records. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Knowledge of advising and counseling techniques. Must be able to follow established guidelines and policies regarding academic advising criteria. Must be able to interact effectively with students, faculty, staff and other campus offices on a variety of advising issues and provide information and guidance regarding departmental and UC policies. Strong written and verbal communication skills, including

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triage and tracking of repair services, move planning and coordination, development of procedures, policies and communications related to infrastructure and safety. Assists with special projects and office management for achieving the objectives of the organization. In the absence of the Assistant Director, is responsible for the day‑to‑day operations of the office and supporting the needs of all units at the System‑wide office including. Develops an understanding of program goals, functions, and processes to complete ongoing tasks and projects successfully. Understands and maintains the confidentiality of protected or sensitive information. Make sure all queries are followed up in a timely manner. May develop and oversee the system for scheduling conference calls and conference room reservations. Manages the administration of off‑site file storage. Reqs: skills to work independently and as part of a team. Working organizational skills to work on multiple projects with competing deadlines, to establish goals and workload priorities with strong organization and attention to detail, and to meet project deadlines within budget and time constraints. Working knowledge of practices and procedures of safety and emergency preparedness. Demonstrated Customer Service experience; ability to multitask and prioritize while providing excellent customer service. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. This is an “essential” position with 100% of the work performed onsite. Remote work is not available and will not be considered. Work location is the UCEAP Systemwide Office in Goleta, CA (near UCSB). Requires occasional on‑call work, outside of business hours, for emergencies and/or critical site‑related projects or issues. $24.62‑$28.73/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 11/8/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 25725

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MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS !!OLD GUITARS WANTED!! GIBSON, FENDER, MARTIN, Etc. 1930’s to 1980’s. TOP DOLLAR PAID. CALL TOLL FREE 1‑866‑433‑8277 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/ mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855‑761‑1725 BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices ‑ No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 1‑877‑649‑5043 (AAN CAN) BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920 Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services, Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844‑511‑1836. (AAN CAN) CABLE PRICE Increase Again? Switch To DIRECTV & Save + get a $100 visa gift card! Get More Channels For Less Money. Restrictions apply. Call Now! 877‑693‑0625 (AAN CAN) DIRECTV ‑ Watch your favorite live sports, news and entertainment anywhere. More top premium channels than DISH. Restrictions apply. Call IVS ‑ 1‑888‑641‑ 5762. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV NOW. No Satellite Needed. $40/month. 65 Channels. Stream Breaking News, Live Events, Sports & On Demand Titles. No Annual Contract. No Commitment. CALL 1‑866‑825‑6523 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1‑855‑380‑2501 DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Help Find Missing Kids! Call 1‑888‑491‑1453. (CalSCAN) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877‑266‑0681 (AAN CAN) ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑424‑7581 (Cal‑SCAN) GENERAC STANDBY Generators. The weather is increasingly unpredictable. Be prepared for power outages. Free 7‑year extended warranty ($695 value!) Schedule Free in‑home assessment. 1‑844‑334‑8353 special financing if qualified. HOME BREAK‑INS take less than 60 SECONDS. Don't wait! Protect your family, your home, your assets NOW for as little as 70¢ a day! Call 866‑409‑0308 HUGHESNET ‑ Finally, super‑fast internet no matter where you live. 25 Mbps just $59.99/mo! Unlimited Data is Here. Stream Video. Bundle TV & Internet. Free Installation. Call 866‑499‑0141

53

HUGHESNET SATELLITE Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1‑844‑416‑7147 (AAN CAN) LONG DISTANCE MOVING: Call today for a FREE QUOTE from America’s Most Trusted Interstate Movers. Let us take the stress out of moving! Speak to a Relocation Specialist, call 844‑857‑1737 (Cal‑SCAN) LONG DISTANCE moving: White‑glove service from America’s top movers. Fully insured and bonded. Let us take the stress out of your out of state move. Free quotes! Call: 855‑606‑2752 LOOKING FOR assisted living, memory care, or independent living? A Place for Mom simplifies the process of finding senior living at no cost to your family. Call 1‑833‑386‑1995 today! LOOKING FOR assisted living, memory care, or independent living? A Place for Mom simplifies the process of finding senior living at no cost to your family. Call 1‑844‑ 741‑0130 today. (Cal‑SCAN) NEVER PAY For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1‑877‑673‑0511. Hours Mon‑Thu, Sun : 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri : 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern) (AAN CAN) NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 866‑951‑7214 NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 1‑855‑667‑0380 (Cal‑SCAN) SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/ year! Call 1‑844‑410‑9609! (M‑F 8am‑8pm Central) (Cal‑SCAN) SAVE MONEY ON EXPENSIVE AUTO REPAIRS! Our vehicle service program can save you up to 60% off dealer prices and provides you excellent coverage! Call for a free quote: 866‑915‑2263 (Mon‑Fri :9am‑4pm PST) STILL PAYING too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order ‑ prescription required. Call 1‑855‑750‑1612 (AAN CAN) THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. We deliver the largest consortium of trusted news publishers in California and beyond. For more info on multi‑market solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. Mark Twain said, “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising”. So why spend your hardearned dollars on social media where you already have an audience? For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing an election is how campaign dollars are spent. Get the best ROI by using our deep relationships in every community in California. Our on‑the‑ground knowledge is indispensable to campaigns that want results. For more info on multi‑market ethnic and non‑ethnic solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. CNPA’s Advertising Services’ power to connect to nearly 13 million of the state’s readers who are an engaged audience, makes our services an indispensable marketing solution. For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

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LEGALS THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1‑855‑270‑3785 UPDATE YOUR HOME with Beautiful New Blinds & Shades. FREE in‑home estimates make it convenient to shop from home. Professional installation. Top quality ‑ Made in the USA. Call for free consultation: 1‑877‑438‑0330. Ask about our specials! (Cal‑SCAN)

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES VICTORIAN MARBLE top dresser, 19th c. Slag green glass table lamp, Thonet bentwood caned rocker & triple‑back settee, bentwood glass table, late 19th c. wooden printer’s cabinet with multiple storage drawers, 1885 painted ship portrait blanket chest, early 20th c. breakfast kitchen hutch, 19th c. pine Settle bench, 18th c. English side table with spiral legs. Contact Karina for details, price & location 646‑472‑9512

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES ESTATE SALE: You are invited to the Irma Cavat estate sale: one of a kind paintings, drawings, sculptures, antique furniture, collectibles and more. This Saturday & Sunday, October 30‑31 from 10:00 am‑ 2:00 pm, in Hope Ranch. Mask required. For additional information please contact Karina at 646‑472‑9512

PLANTS/GARDENING WINE BARREL Planters. Half barrels $35, @ four or more $30. Eye of the Day, 4620 Carpinteria Ave, Carpinteria (no phone). Mon – Fri. 9am to 4pm.

TREASURE HUNT ($100 OR LESS) FREE PIANO. Upright with bench. Very good condition. Call 805‑964‑6161

WANT TO BUY WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: BUNNIN CHEVROLET CADILLAC at 301 S Hope Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Believe Automotive Inc. 9230 Olympic Blvd #203 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 01/29/2020 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2020‑0000326. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Bunnin Chevrolet Cadillac (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 1, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30, Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: BUNNIN CADILLAC at 301 S Hope Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Believe Automotive Inc. (same address) The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 05/09/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0001416. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Believe Automotive Inc. (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 6, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E18, Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: US HISTORIC TOUR at 2575 Treasure Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tirzah E. Riley (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Tirzah Riley, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002899. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROOTED SANTA BARBARA COUNTY at 1111 Chapala Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Founation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jackie Carrera, President & CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002925. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CENTRAL COAST HEALTH INFORMATION TECNOLOGY INCORPORATED at 758 Via Miguel Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Central Coast Health Information Technology Incorporated (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Michiel De Bruin, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E.

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Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002923. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CONRAD COLLECTIVE at 1671 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Julane Conrad (same address) Kevin Conrad (same address)This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Julane Conrad Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002892. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BROWN AND WILMANNS ENVIRONMENTAL at 850 Cathedral Vista Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Brown And Wilmanns Environmental, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Michael S Brown, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002847. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002848. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOT SPRINGS CANYON RANCH at 5000 Highway 154 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael A Taras, Jr 3120 NE 57th Street Fort Lauderdale, Fl 33308; Sharon J. Taras (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Michael A. Taras JR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002875. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MANZO TILE at 279 San Napoli Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; Jesus Manzo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jesus Manzo Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002854. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DAKOTA RAE DESIGN at 215 Bath St B11 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Dakota Rae Taylor (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Dakota Taylor, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002843. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HASHING2HEATING at 864 Highland Dr. #5 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jonathan A. Heffner (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathan A. Heffner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002906. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY at 215 Pesetas Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Sansum Clinic 470 South Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Jennifer Rose, Executive Assistant Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002866. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: OLIVE STREET DESIGN at 1509 Olive St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tara E. Dees (same address)This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Tara Dees Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002885. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TINO’S ITALIAN GROCERY at 210 W. Carrillo St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; M&Z Italian Grocery 111 S. Voluntario St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Deanna Morinini, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002744. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DJ’Z ELECTRONIC REPAIRZ at 280 N. Fairview Ave Unit 2 Goleta, CA 93117; Jonathon Zayha (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jonathon Zayha, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CREEKSIDE STORIES at 902 Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jan Dewitt (same address) Charlene M. Huston (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Jan Dewitt, Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002901. Published: Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GROW YOUR REPUTATION at 7041 Armstrong Rd. Goleta, CA 93117; Michael J Shierloh (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Michael Shierloh Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E.

OCTOBER 28, 2021

Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002841. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE ADULT STORE at 405 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; S.B. Books Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Donovan Green, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 05, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002810. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BERNIE BAGGS VO LLC, BERNIE BAGGS VO, BERNIE BAGGS at 290 Main St Los Alamos, CA 93440; Bernie Baggs Vo LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Bernard Baggarly, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002818. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TRUTH IN RECRUITMENT at 1111 Chapala St Ste 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jackie Carerra, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002960. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COLORS WINE CELLARS at 206 South C St. Lompoc, CA 93436; Christopher M. Rogers (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Christopher Rogers, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002874. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OROZCO PLASTERING at 635 E. Maple St. Oxnard, CA 93033; Moises Orozco Hernandez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Moises Orozco Hernandez, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002884. Published: Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 154 TECH LLC at 3814 Connie Way Santa Barbara, CA 93110; 154 Tech LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Nicole M. Costa, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002738. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

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(CONT.)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA LIVING REAL ESTATE at 2309 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Joanne Schoenfeld (same address) Steadfast In Commitment, Inc. 5114 Mecca Ave. Tarzana, CA 91356 This business is conducted by an Copartners Signed: Joanne Schoenfeld, Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002749. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002746. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002655. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002756. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002792. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HONEYGLUE SOLUTIONS LLC at 5477 Parejo Drive Goleta, CA 93111; Honeyglue Solutions LLC 1401 21st Street Ste R Sacramento, CA 95811 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Melissa Cohen, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VICTORIA PAIGE STUDIO at 4000 Green Heron Spring Rd. Carpinteria, CA 93013; Victoria Bleeden (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Victoria Bleeden, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002732. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JMK DESIGN & CO. at 201 West Montecito Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; JMK Design & Co. LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Jonathan Kosorek, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MOSBY SPIRITS at 9496 Santa Rosa Road Buellton, CA 93427; Gary R. Mosby 1800 Sequoia Drive Santa Maria, CA 93454 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Gary Ray Mosby, Sole Proprietor Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002786. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HASTINGS EVENT PRODUCTION at 208 W De La Guerra Street, Apartment 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Riley H Leonard (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Riley Leonard, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002759. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CUSTOM LEATHER CONCEPTS at 910 N N Pl Lompoc, CA 93436; Misael Reyes (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Misael Reyes, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: TBI FINANCIAL at 331 Cooper Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Tilman Brisendine, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Tilman Brisendine, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002685. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUILDING HOPE, LLC DBA GARDEN STREET APARTMENTS at 617 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Building Hope, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Annmarie Cameron, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002833. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021.

ORDINANCE NO. 21-__ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADOPTING AN AMENDMENT TO TITLE 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO ALLOW CERTAIN ENTERTAINMENT AND RECREATION SERVICES RELATED USES IN THE GENERAL COMMERCIAL ZONING DISTRICT On November 2, 2021, at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) will consider the second reading and possible adoption of a proposed ordinance that would allow Indoor Sports and Recreation in the General Commercial (C-G) zoning district. If adopted, the Ordinance will be effective 31 days from the date of adoption. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, October 28, 2021

ORDINANCE NO. 21-10 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADOPTING DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING ON NON-RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT, IN-LIEU FEES FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING ON RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT, AND VARIOUS AMENDMENTS TO TITLE 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE On October 19, 2021, at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) conducted the second reading and adopted Ordinance No. 21-10 that would allow the City to apply the recently adopted Residential “In-Lieu” Fees and Non-Residential “Development Impact Fees,” which implement the City’s General Plan Housing Element policies HE 2.8 and HE 2.2(b), respectively. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 21-10 at a regular meeting held on the 19th day of October, 2021, by the following roll call vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND RICHARDS NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

TEMPORE

KYRIACO,

The Ordinance will be in full effect on January 3, 2022. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, by emailing cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by calling (805) 961-7505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish: 54

Santa Barbara News-Press, October 28, 2021

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OCTOBER 28, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DEL PLAYA BREW CO. at 130 N. Calle Cesar Chavez #F Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Anthony R Simentales 3742 Venitia Lane #A Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Anthony Robert Simentales, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002708. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ASTRO CONSULTANTS, ARCAIOS CONSULTANTS, PATAGONIA ARCHAEOLOGY, HERITAGE ARCHAEOLOGY at 903 West Mission Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ignacio Requena (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Ignacio Requena Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002826. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLUCLEAN MAID SERVICES at 1445 Harbor View Dr #127 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Susana Soto De Magallanes (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Susana Soto De Magallanes Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002801. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GREYWEATHER at 990 N Patterson Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Teagan Ross Giffin (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Teagan Ross Giffin, Sole Proprietor Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 01, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GI SERVICES at 4825 San Gordiano Ave. Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Alfonso Gonzalez Flores (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Alfonso Gonzalez Flores, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002731. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MARIPOSAS SB at 404 W Padre St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Juanita Reveles (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Juanita Reveles, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002734. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LEGACY SERVICES at 7th Street Apt. B Carpinteria, CA 93013; Alexis Olaya Torres (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Alexis Olaya Torres, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002717. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AIKU APOTHECARY at 27 West Anapamu St #488 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Aiku LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Tobias Levi Brown‑Heft, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002781. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OFFGRID at 421 N Milpas St Santa Barbara, CA 93103 Edec Digital Forensics LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Eric Ryan, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002839. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov

4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DATA TECHNOLOGY CONSULTING at 4521 Vieja Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Steven Davis (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Steve Davis Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002769. Published: Oct 14, 21, 28. Nov 4 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KRISTEEN LEIGH GO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03463 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KRISTEEN LEIGH GO TO: KRISTEEN LEIGH ALATRISTE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Nov 22, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 15, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF HEATHER ELYSE CARASTRO HAGEN TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03962 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: HEATHER ELYSE CARASTRO HAGEN TO: HEATHER ELYSE FLEMING THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Dec 07, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 13, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior

Court. Published. Oct 21, 28. Nov 4, 11 2021.

SUMMONS S U M M O N S (PARENTAGE‑Custody and Support) NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name)(Aviso Al Demandad (Nombre): ALJAN DECKA YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. Read the information below and on the next page (Lo han demandado. Lea la informacion a continuacion y en la pagina siguiente). PETITIONER’S NAME (Nombre del demandante): LINDSAY MCCARTHY You have 30 calendar days after this summons and petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120 or FL‑270) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your right to custody of your children. You may also be ordered to pay child support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www. courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org) or by contacting you local county bar association. Notice: The restraining order on page 2 remains in effect against each parent until the petition is dismissed, a judgement is entered, or the court makes further orders. this order is enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement office who has received or seen a copy of it. Fee Waiver: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de sesta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120 or FL‑270) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerio. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion de los hijos, honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encontrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO: La Orden de proteccion que aparecen en la pagina 2 continuara en vigencia en cuanto a cada parte hasta que se emita un fallo final, se despida la peticion o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier agencia del orden publico que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas orden puede hacerla acatar en cualquier lugar de California. Exencion de Cuotas: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. CASE NO: 21FL01260 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es) SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT,1100 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. ANACAPA DIVISION The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is :


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PHONE 805-965-5205

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Drew Maley (288050) The Maley Firm, PC 740 State St., Suite 203 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑724‑2900 DATE: July 22, 2021. By Jasmine Franco, Deputy Published Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): DAVID H. SHOR, an individual, JUDI B. SHOR, an individual, and DOES 1‑25, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JAMES L. HUDGENS, EXECUTOR OF THE ESTATE OF MICHAEL W. MCCANN NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal

requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifor nia. org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas

advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 21CV03593 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Raymond Chandler 15 W. Carrillo St. Ste 220 Santa Barbara, CA 93101, (805) 965‑1999 (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Law Offices of Raymond Chandler, 15 W. Carrillo St., Ste 220, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 965‑1999;DATE 9/8/2021 Deputy Clerk; Terri Chavez. Published. Oct 28. Nov 4, 11, 18 2021.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, November 9, 2021 at 3:00 P.M. ATTENTION: The Virtual Meeting is held pursuant to Assembly Bill (AB) 361. The meeting will be Virtual because meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees. The public may only view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://tinyurl.com/Goletameetings and not in Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review 120 S. Patterson Avenue (APN 065-050-030) Patterson Place Apartments Remodel Case No. 21-0024-DRB Preliminary Review New Rehabilitation Center at GVCH 351 S. Patterson Avenue (APN 065-090-022) Case No. 20-0002-DP Hollipat Permanent Parking Lot 334 S. Patterson Avenue (APN 065-090-028) Case No. 19-080-DPAM IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice are new items. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

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Santa Barbara Independent, October 28, 2021

NOTICE OF ZONING ADMINISTRATOR HEARING (Held Electronically and Telephonically) Monday, November 8, 2021 at 9:00AM Johansen Rear Addition and Modification 425 Arundel Road; APN 069-321-004 Case Nos. 20-0024-LUP/21-0001-MOD ATTENTION: The Virtual Meeting is held pursuant to Assembly Bill (AB) 361. The meeting will be Virtual because meeting in person would present imminent risks to the health or safety of attendees. The public may only view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings and not in Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Zoning Administrator will conduct a public hearing on merits of the proposed Land Use Permit (LUP), the associated Modification (MOD) to allow a rear yard setback reduction and the design component of the project. The date and time of the Zoning Administrator hearing is: DATE/TIME: Monday, November 8, 2021 at 9:00 AM LOCATION:

Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically)

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: The Zoning Administrator hereby finds the proposed Land Use Permit (LUP), and Modification (MOD) are categorically exempt pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et seq.; “CEQA”) and CEQA Guidelines (14 Cal. Code Regs. §§ 15000, et seq.). Specifically, the project is categorically exempt from environmental review pursuant to CEQA Guidelines § 15301(e) (Additions to Existing Structures). The existing development is located within an urbanized area within residential land use and zoning designations (described in Project Location). The LUP and MOD proposes a rear yard addition with an encroachment into the rear yard setback by 5.375 feet. Consistent with CEQA Guidelines § 15301(e) (Additions to Existing Structures), the project will not result in an increase of more than 50 percent of the floor area of the structures before the addition, or 2,500 square feet, whichever is less. The property will continue to be served by existing streets and driveways and will not change the demand on the existing services. Further, the project is not located in an environmental sensitive habitat area. Therefore, given the minor nature of the improvements, the project will not have a significant effect on the environment. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Liz Hughes, architect on behalf of Jennifer Johansen, property owner, has requested approval of a LUP and associated MOD for a rear yard setback reduction to construct a 390-square foot rear yard addition for a new family room at the rear (western portion) of the existing residence. A 64-square foot covered patio is also proposed to be attached to the proposed addition. Per Section 17.62.030(C) of Title 17, stand-alone LUP’s do not warrant review and approval by the Zoning Administrator, unless the project is proposing an associated MOD. In this case, a request for a MOD and its accompanying permit/entitlement must be reviewed, heard, and acted upon in the same time frame and by the same Review Authority. The Design Review Board (DRB) reviewed the project on July 13, 2021 and unanimously recommended approval of the project to the Zoning Administrator. The Zoning Administrator will be the decision maker for this project, unless its decision is appealed to the City Council. PROJECT LOCATION: The site is located at 425 Arundel Road; Assessor’s Parcel Number 069-321-004. The zoning designation for the property is Single Family Residential (RS). The proposed addition would be located along the rear portion of the lot. Access to the residential unit would continue from Arundel Road. NEXT STEPS: After the Zoning Administrator decision, the project will return to the DRB for final design review if not appealed. If granted, the LUP will be issued. After LUP issuance, the applicant will proceed to the Building Division for building permit submittals and issuance. APPEALS: The Zoning Administrator’s decision may be appealed by an applicant or an aggrieved party, pursuant to Goleta Municipal Code Section 17.52.120 as part of an appeal of the Review Authority’s action on the entire project. Appeals must be filed, and associated fees must be paid, within 10 calendar days of the appealable decision. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control TSC in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: Staff reports, project plans and related materials for the Zoning Administrator hearing will be posted on this website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting. https://www.cityofgoleta.org/ city-hall/planning-and-environmental-review/zoning-administrator-hearings. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY PURSUANT TO AB 361, written comments may be submitted as instructed above or via email to: Mary Chang, Supervising Senior Planner at 805-961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org. ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION: Please register for Zoning Administrator Hearing on November 8, 2021, at 9:00 AM at: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN__mZEsf0OQqiIUTHg4GEYDg Webinar ID: 952 5860 7141 After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. You will be connected to audio using your computer’s microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. You can also select the option to use your telephone, but you must use the Zoom software to interact with the meeting. Select “Use Telephone” after joining the webinar in order to use your telephone. Oral comments during a meeting may be made by electronic participation only. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the City Planning and Environmental Review Department, Monday and Wednesday from 8:00am – 12:00pm at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or can be obtained by calling Mary Chang, Supervising Senior Planner at 805-961-7567 or mchang@ cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact City staff at 805-562-5500 or espanol@cityofgoleta. org. Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this Project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to the City on or before the date of the public hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b) [2]). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent on October 28, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 28, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT OCTOBER 28, 2021

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