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INDOOR MASK MANDATE EXTENDED FREE

Santa Barbara

OCT. 7-14, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 821

Gonna b e

WHO’S THE

BOSS? MEET THE MAYORAL CANDIDATES by Nick Welsh

Also inside:

News Rumble in the Riviera

Food Abalone Fishery Comeback? In Memoriam Dave Loveton


Sara Miller McCune along with

The Granada Theatre, The Santa Barbara Symphony and State Street Ballet Presents

The Night of a Lifetime

Oct. 23, 2021 at 2:30 & 7:30pm • Oct. 24, 2021 at 2:30pm The Granada Theatre 1214 State St. • Santa Barbara, CA

Sara Miller McCune

Lonny Price

Ken Davenport

Producer

Director

Executive Producer

William Soleau

Choreographer/ Co-Artistic Director, State Street Ballet

Nir Kabaretti

Music and Artistic Director, Santa Barbara Symphony

Jonathan Raviv as Hajj the Poet

For Tickets, Visit Ticketing.GranadaSB.org

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Sherz Aletaha as Lalume


DEMOCRATIC WOMEN OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY ENDORSES

DEBORAH SCHWARTZ

FOR MAYOR!

Being endorsed by Dem Women is a great honor. Their candidate evaluation process was rigorous and professional - in keeping with their independent, highly-respected reputation. Since 1970 this volunteer organization has been a leading influence in cultivating and supporting women in roles of community building and policy influence.

Paid for by Schwartz for Mayor of Santa Barbara 2021 FPPC ID #1435590 INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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Arts & Lectures’ 2021-2022 Season of World-class Events Kicks off Oct 10 Julián Castro

Danish String Quartet The Doppelgänger Project, Part I

Waking Up From My American Dream

Thu, Oct 14 / 7 PM / Rockwood (Includes a reception with the artists)

Sun, Oct 10 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall Former presidential candidate and U.S. secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro shares insight from his political journey and actionable ways we can effect change.

The Danish String Quartet introduces Doppelgänger, an ambitious four-year project pairing world premieres from four renowned composers with chamber music masterpieces by Schubert. Program:

Schubert: String Quartet in G major, D. 887 Bent Sørensen: Doppelgänger Schubert (arr. Danish String Quartet): Der Doppelgänger

Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra

FREE Paul Hawken

Fandango at the Wall with the Villalobos Brothers Fri, Oct 15 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Regeneration: Ending the Climate Crisis in One Generation Wed, Oct 20 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall FREE (registration required) “The climate crisis is not a science problem. It is a human problem.” – Paul Hawken

Inspired by the annual Fandango Fronterizo festival at the Tijuana-San Diego border, Fandango at the Wall fuses the richness of Mexican folk music with the intricate harmonies of jazz.

Entrepreneur, author and activist Paul Hawken’s visionary new approach to climate change weaves equity, climate, biodiversity and human dignity into a seamless tapestry of action, policy and transformation.

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu 4

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

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Media Sponsor:


KNOW YOUR CANDIDATES

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 35, # 821, Oct. 7-14, 2021

Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY 24 Who’s Gonna Be the Boss?

Meet the Mayoral Candidates by Nick Welsh

ERICK MADRID PHOTOS

Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin

COURTESY

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman

Mayoral candidates clockwise from top left: Cathy Murillo, Randy Rowse, James Joyce III, Deborah Schwartz, Mark Whitehurst, and Matthew Kilrain

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 ON THE COVER: Photo by John Thomas Rose. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

The only election game in town this season is the fight for the dais at Santa Barbara City Council, and one of the best ways to learn which candidate deserves your vote — aside from our reporting, which includes Nick Welsh’s cover story on the mayor’s race on page 24 — is to see and hear these aspiring politicians for yourself. The Santa Barbara Independent is hosting a series of debates about the races, which actually started with the mayor’s race last night, October 6. But the debates continue on October 7, when our senior editor Tyler Hayden moderates a conversation between District 6 candidates Meagan Harmon, Nina Johnson, and Jason Carlton. More online fun follows on Monday, October 11, when news reporter Jun Starkey speaks to District 4 candidates Kristen Sneddon and Barrett Reed. Register to watch these Zoom-hosted discussions by visiting independent.com/discussions. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

Re-elect

KRISTEN SNEDDON for SANTA BARBARA CITY COUNCIL Steady & Experienced Leadership! A proven voting record of:

KRISTEN SNEDDON for CITY COUNCIL Election Day is November 2nd

Your ballot must be postmarked or returned by Nov 2.

Vote-by-Mail between Oct. 4 and Nov. 2!

• Ensuring public health & safety — led efforts to update and fund Community Wildfire Protection Plan • Funding increased repair & replacement of roads and water/sewer lines • Planning for water security • Protecting open space, parks & important views • Preserving neighborhoods from over-development • Supporting economic rejuvenation & leading efforts to revitalize State Street • Alleviating homelessness by working with social services, law enforcement, & housing providers

Re-Elect Kristen Sneddon — for Santa Barbara’s Future.

For more information about Kristen Sneddon, and a complete list of endorsements, please visit www.SBSNEDDON.com

“I ENTHUSIASTICALLY SUPPORT KRISTEN SNEDDON! She understands what it takes to protect the 4th District’s and Santa Barbara’s great quality of life, and she fights to preserve it.”

— Former Mayor Sheila Lodge

“Kristen Sneddon led efforts to update and fund the Community Wildfire Protection Plan and fought for funding for improved dispatch and roadway improvements to help us keep you safe. SHE EARNED THE SUPPORT OF OUR LOCAL FIREFIGHTERS.” — Justin Kiel, Santa Barbara City Firefighters Association

Paid for by Kristen Sneddon for City Council 2021, PO Box 20153, Santa Barbara, CA 93120 • ID #1398099 INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

2022 SEASON

103rd CONCERT SEASON

Sir Simon Rattle

international series

Vasily Petrenko

Welcome Back to Live Classical Music with CAMA!

Elim Chan

at the Granada Theatre

Kirill Karabits

SEASON SPONSOR:

Sir John Eliot Gardiner

SAGE PUBLICATIONS

TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 2022, 7:30PM

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Vasily Petrenko, Music Director Olga Kern, piano

FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 2022, 7:30PM

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC Elim Chan, conductor Igor Levit, piano

CAMA and Music Academy of the West co-present the London Symphony Orchestra in concert in celebration of the Music Academy’s 75th anniversary

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 2022, 7:30PM

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Sir Simon Rattle, Music Director

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 2022, 7:30PM

RUSSIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA

TUESDAY, APRIL 12, 2022, 7:30PM

ENGLISH BAROQUE SOLOISTS Sir John Eliot Gardiner, Music Director

Kirill Karabits, conductor Mikhail Pletnev, piano

masterseries at the Lobero Theatre

SEASON SPONSOR:

ESPERIA FOUNDATION

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2022, 7:30PM

JORDI SAVALL AND LE CONCERT DES NATIONS Jordi Savall, Director & bass viol

FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 2022, 7:30PM

Jordi Savall

Benjamin Grosvenor

Isabel Bayrakdarian

James Ehnes

BENJAMIN GROSVENOR, piano SATURDAY, APRIL 23, 2022, 7:30PM

ISABEL BAYRAKDARIAN, soprano MARK FEWER, violin JAMIE PARKER, piano

TUESDAY, MAY 24, 2022, 7:30PM

JAMES EHNES, violin ORION WEISS, piano

Santa Barbara COVID-19 Live Event Requirement Lobero Theatre and Granada Theatre In an effort to create the safest possible environment for venue guests, please note that patrons of all ages, who plan to attend any CAMA event at the Lobero Theatre or Granada Theatre must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result (taken within 72 hours prior to each event), along with a photo identification, before entering the venue. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. Protocols may differ by venue and are subject to change with local, State and national guidelines; please check venue websites for up-to-date information. This policy applies to venue and presenter staff, audience members and performers.

SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW 805 966-4324

| tickets@camasb.org | www.camasb.org

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA 6

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SEPT. 30-OCT. 7, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COMMUNITY

Thousands March for Reproductive Rights by Caleb Rodriguez s many as 3,000 demonstrators gathered October 2 for Santa Barbara’s Women’s March for Reproductive Rights, which kicked off in De la Guerra Plaza with a dance number to Whitney Houston’s “I’m Every Woman,” followed by a traditional Chumash ritual and women’s song. Saturday’s demonstration up State Street was just one of hundreds across the United States protesting anti-abortion legislation that has mushroomed in 2021. And it was the fifth Women’s March for Santa Barbara, which have taken place annually since the 2017 inauguration of former President Donald Trump. Of particular concern was the Texas law banning abortion after six weeks, a law that took effect on September 1 and has affected as much as 85 percent of abortions in the state, according to abortion advocacy groups. Since then, abortion providers in Texas have been hamstrung, forcing citizens to seek out-ofstate assistance and to travel up to 20 times farther for an abortion than before the law took effect. “You think it doesn’t affect you, but really there are already people coming from Texas needing to get abortions in other states and California,” said UCSB graduate student Kana Yamamoto. “It affects everybody; it’s not just Texas.” According to a July report by the prochoice Guttmacher Institute, 561 abortion restrictions were introduced across 47 states since January 2021, 90 of which have become law. This represents the most restrictions passed since Roe v. Wade in 1973. In December, the Supreme Court is to decide on a Mississippi case banning abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. Jenna Tosh, CEO of Planned Parenthood California Central Coast, emphasized in her speech to demonstrators what is at stake if Roe v. Wade is overturned by that decision: “Twenty-six states would likely ban abortion before the

CALEB RODR IG U EZ

Supervisors Pass Resolution in Support of Constitutional Right to Abortion

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MARCHING IN THE STREETS: Members of the Santa Barbara Women’s Political Committee led the demonstration up State Street on Saturday.

end of next year. Nearly half of U.S. people who become pregnant could lose their reproductive rights overnight. It’s not only outrageous; it’s unacceptable.” Many shared concerns that anti-abortion sentiments may even gain a foothold in California. “We used to live in Texas, so this is very close to home. We’re thankful we live in California, but we don’t want those ideals to end up here,” said Kelly O’Connell, who came to the march with her mother, Cindy. Addressing the attendees before the march, State Senator Monique Limón also expressed urgency for California residents, recalling anti-abortion ideologies revealed by the recent gubernatorial election. “In a moment and in a world where we believe that this could never ever be the scenario of California, we started to see elements that could bring this scenario to become a reality. And that is what is at risk.” Though urgency had its place in the march, a spirit of inclusivity and solidarity

remained at the forefront. Dalia Khan, who said she was a county employee, also underscored that “everybody needs to stand up for everybody else’s rights. Women’s rights are human rights.” Among participants were mothers and daughters, families with children, college students, and activists who took part in hallmark feminist protests of the 1970s. Marchers spanned generations, simultaneously demonstrating how passion for reproductive rights as well as barriers to abortion persist into the present. Just before demonstrators began chanting “My body, my choice” up State Street and to the Santa Barbara County Courthouse, former state senator Hannah-Beth Jackson stood before the crowd and summed up the long arc of feminist activism that, although tiring, remains tireless: “Before January 22nd, 1973, we were here screaming for the right and the dignity to make our own reproductive decisions. It is now October 2021, and to quote a sign out CONT’D ON PAGE 10 

HOUSING

Eviction Moratorium Ends More Tenants Get Walking Papers; Rental Support Still Available by Jean Yamamura mall signals indicate California’s pandemic emergency is lightening up, perhaps none more consequential for Santa Barbara than the end of the state eviction moratorium on September 30. Millions in federal funds have flowed into Santa Barbara to support rent and utility

S

payments, but evictions appear to be on the increase. The state’s vaccination rate three months ago — 54.3 percent of residents fully vaccinated — prompted Governor Gavin Newsom to terminate his stay-at-home order, which had been in effect since March 2020. Tenants who were prevented from working

were presumably employed again and able to pay their rent after June 2021. Unemployment as of Labor Day was 7.5 percent in California, better than it’s been all year but still distant from a pre-pandemic level of 4.3 percent in February 2020. Not everyone was able to return to their same job once the shutdown lifted, Jennifer Smith, the executive director of the Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County, pointed out. Most affected by the pandemic were workers in Santa Barbara’s tourism industry, whether hotels, restaurants, or other visitor-serving enterprises. Some had patched together part-time jobs or are CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

COU RTESY SANTA BAR BAR A ZO O

COMMUNITY

The S.B. Zoo announced 10/4 that two Bennett’s wallabies have arrived at the zoo. The 2-year-old females came together from New York’s Trevor Zoo and are the zoo’s first-ever wallabies. Two male wallabies will also arrive soon and eventually join the females, with a breeding recommendation as part of the Species Survival Plan from the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. The wallabies are set to join the zoo’s upcoming Australian Walkabout, a 15,000-square-foot exhibit designed to re-create the natural wonders of Australia and set to open January 2022. The new library van for Isla Vista was unveiled 10/4 to cheers from a small group of book lovers. When Goleta divorced its library services from Santa Barbara, it hoped to broaden the availability of books to underserved communities like Isla Vista’s families and children. The little library started at I.V.’s Community Center is now bolstered by the mobile one, which will bring books, craft kits, movies, the Library of Things, and Wi-Fi to the community weekdays at parks, kids’ gathering spots, and Friendship Manor. A 51-year-old S.B. resident died in a fatal car collision 10/4 on the 101 near the Arroyo Hondo Preserve. According to a CHP statement, a black Jeep Wrangler was traveling northbound on the 101 when the driver, the vehicle’s sole occupant, veered off the right-hand shoulder of the road, colliding into a dirt embankment. The driver died at the scene. County Fire spokesperson Capt. Daniel Bertucelli said the accident required “heavy extraction” and resulted in traffic restrictions in the area. Anyone with information on the incident can call CHP Officer Sims at (805) 967-1234.

COURTS & CRIME San Marcos High School teacher and tennis coach Jarrod M. Bradley was arrested 10/1 at the school for allegedly sending explicit images to a minor. A juvenile male victim reported 9/30 that he’d allegedly been communicating with Bradley over a location-based social networking app. Bradley allegedly began sending sexual text messages before sending the explicit images. City police and Sheriff’s Office detectives arrested and booked Bradley on the charges of distributing harmful materials to a minor and communicating with a minor with criminal intent. CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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4.583 x 6.166 SEPT. 30-OCT. 7, 2021

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

EDUCATION

UCSB’s Hotel Housing by Jackie Sedley

W

Schedule your appointment by calling one of our convenient locations: Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital (805) 681-6459

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital (805) 879-8500

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital (805) 686-3967

Early detection can save your life. Learn more or schedule your appointment through MyChart at cottagehealth.org/mammo

Art and Objects from the Museum’s Collections Opening October 8, 2021

John and Peggy Maximus Gallery 2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara 805-682-4711 • sbnature.org 8

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

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JAC KI E SEDLEY

Inside the University’s Latest Scramble to Provide Shelter for Students

Make an appointment for a screening mammogram.

hen 22-year-old sociology major Ke i ly Mol i n a decided to transfer to UC Santa Barbara for the 2021-2022 school year, she expected her housing search to go fairly smoothly. She started applying to listings in and around Goleta and Isla Vista in June, and she put her name on UCSB’s University Housing waitlist in July. But by September, she started to worry. Landlords were rejecting her applications left and right, and she hadn’t heard much from UCSB about available UCSB transfer student Keily Molina in her Pacific Suites hotel room dorms. Then, on September 17—six days before the start of classes full course loads? How many athletes rolled — Molina received an email from the uni- over to fifth year?” versity explaining they’d booked her a furPhillips is working tirelessly to help her nished one-bedroom at the Pacifica Suites son find housing around Santa Barbara, and she says she was convinced by the UC houshotel two miles up the road. “I’m not gonna lie, when I first moved in ing department to not even bother putting on Monday, I did cry. I felt overwhelmed,” his name on the waitlist. “They told me they said Molina. “I thought I was gonna have had at least 1,000 people on there,” she said. a roommate, but then it turns out that I’m James Estrada was added to the waitlist at the beginning of the summer. He received alone.” In response to its extreme housing short- an email on August 4 explaining that he age, UCSB has been renting out local hotel needed to fill out a survey by August 6 and rooms for students on the housing waitlist. that if he missed the deadline, UCSB would It’s the school’s latest initiative to increase assume he made other housing arrangeavailability during a pandemic that has ments and remove him from the list. made the region’s already tight housing Estrada didn’t see the email until it was market even tighter. The hotel stays are only too late and was left to find housing on his guaranteed until December 15, however, own. He is currently living in a renovated when the fall quarter ends. After that, stu- Sprinter van, and he paid a one-time $160 dents will have to restart their housing hunt fee to park and sleep in one of UCSB’s faculty lots for the year. He’s making it work or pay for their hotel rooms out of pocket. Molina says she feels lucky that she but says he would have saved thousands of doesn’t have to pay for her hotel stay—her dollars and immense anxiety if he had been room and board fees were covered by a offered a hotel room instead. grant through the CARES Act. The place “Would that have been easier?” he also came furnished and includes basic asked. “Yeah. Would I have been able to amenities like water and power. But Molina study more before I went to campus? Yeah. does have to pay for food since UCSB didn’t Would I have been as stressed? No. Those make any meal plan arrangements for stu- two weeks of working on the van, I was so dents in the hotels. stressed out.” Molina, along with community groups UCSB is not the only California college like Sustainable University Now, blame experiencing a housing crisis. UCs Santa UCSB for allegedly exceeding their enroll- Cruz, San Diego, Merced, and Berkeley ment cap this year and not having enough have all reported similar shortages, though housing for the students it admitted. The UCSB and UCSD are the only two UC camschool claims that “enrollment this year is puses currently offering hotel rooms. at the same level it was prior to the panThe Independent reached out to UCSB’s demic,” although no official figures have Housing Services, Students Affairs departbeen released. ment, and Chancellor’s Office for more Rachel Phillips, a UCSB alumni with information on the school’s housing crisis a son currently enrolled at the university, and ongoing plans to address it. Campus believes the school may not have neces- spokesperson Andrea Estrada said the unisarily overenrolled new students. Instead, versity couldn’t provide further comment she believes there are just too many overall. on the matter “until later in the quarter “How many seniors went to a fifth year?” when the housing and enrollment processes she asked. “How many students are taking are complete.” n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COMMUNITY

Stop the Bleeding: Childcare in Crisis

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anta Barbara County’s private, nonsubsidized childcare industry will bleed to death without $2 million of emergency assistance, the county supervisors were told Tuesday, and with it will wither any chances for the county’s overall economic recovery. It was a stark message, but two supervisors had their doubts. The need, all supervisors agreed, was there, but Supervisor Bob Nelson expressed concerns about the squishiness of the plan. Likewise, Supervisor Das Williams expressed concern that the proposal — pitched by a coalition of childcare advocates buttressed by First Five and the Santa Barbara Foundation — would not fill any currently unmet needs or create any new childcare slots. The answer, from Michelle Robertson with First Five, was starker still. “We can’t expand the number of slots if the program doesn’t exist,” she stated. Childcare operations that pre-COVID were licensed to handle 20 kids up to 5 years old are now only permitted 10-12, she added, because of social distancing and other safety mandates. “It’s about stopping the bleeding,” she said.

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 7 CORONAVIRUS CORONAVIRUS County supervisors voted 10/5 to extend indoor mask mandates to 11/5 or until new COVID infections drop to six per 100,000 people and stay there for two weeks. Currently, the countywide infection rate is 17.8 per 100,000. For those vaccinated, however, it’s only 7.9; for the unvaccinated, it’s closer to 30. Although county death rates continue to climb — hitting 505 by 10/5 — overall the statistical indicators have been moving positively in a downward direction. On 10/4, only 34 new cases had been reported, a drop of 55 percent from two weeks prior.

PUBLIC SAFETY Finalizing the big dig on Montecito’s Randall Road looks to be delayed as property owner Catherine Montgomery — who lost her husband and 22-yearold daughter in the 1/9 Debris Flow and wants

Private providers not eligible for government subsidies, the supervisors were warned, were eligible for only a small fraction — just one-tenth — of the state and federal aid available during the peak of the COVID crisis as subsidy-eligible providers. Supervisor Gregg Hart likened the economic pinch experienced by private care providers to middle-income families who earn too much to be eligible for subsidized housing. In making their case to the supervisors — who soon will have to decide how to slice up $43 million in federal American Rescue Plan Act funds they’re eligible for — childcare advocates stressed how urgently the county’s economic recovery hinged on the availability of reliable childcare. Women, they were told, make up 80 percent of the workers who’ve left the workforce and not returned. Without a stabilized childcare market, many won’t come back, and the worker shortage afflicting so many employers will not improve. Pedro Paz with the Santa Barbara Foundation acknowledged it was hard to determine which operations could be saved with help and which ones couldn’t. Discerning the difference, he stated, was part science and part art. —Nick Welsh

to preserve her property in their memory — has filed for a change of venue in the county’s attempt to take her property via eminent domain. Judge Thomas Anderle agreed on 10/5 to move the case to Ventura County Superior Court. Full story at independent.com/dig-delayed.

COMMUNITY S.B. City Council approved a $93,000 spending proposal on 10/5 to post a full-time social worker in the city’s downtown public library. The Family Service Agency–employed social worker will “proactively engage homeless individuals” and help connect them with existing social services. In addition, the social worker will be expected to respond to calls for assistance from nearby properties and business owners, perform “special assignments” such as homeless counts, observe and report criminal behavior, and work with SBPD’s homeless outreach team.

Southern California was rocked by thunderstorms along the coast 10/4, and in S.B., a rumble of thunder and the sudden appearance of a rainbow unleashed a surprise show in the South Coast skies. According to the National Weather Service, the cluster of storms was registered northeast of Santa Barbara Island around 6:24 p.m., and a warning for the eastern Santa Barbara Channel was in effect through 7:30 p.m. South County experienced the heaviest rainfall, while North County and mountain areas reported thunder and scattered showers. Full story at independent .com/storm-surprises. n

MI KE E LIASON

WEATHER

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CALEB RODR IG U EZ PHOTOS

THOUSANDS MARCH CONT’D FROM P. 7 there: I can’t believe we’re still fighting for this shit.” Following Saturday’s march, the Board of Supervisors passed a resolution on Tuesday affirming their support for abortion rights and Roe v. Wade. Supervisors Joan Hartmann — one of the resolution sponsors — noted that the Texas anti-abortion law that went into effect last month will effectively bar six million Texas women of childrearing age of a medical choice that had been deemed constitutionally protected since 1973. “We can’t go backward to the dark ages,” stated Supervisor Gregg Hart, who also sponsored the resolution. Supervisor Das Williams said the Texas law opens the door to “legal vigilantism,” because it creates a hotline where aiders and abettors of abortion can be reported. A far more effective anti-abortion strategy, he argued, would be for anti-abortion activists to support wider sex education,

Marchers on their way to the County Courthouse

wider access to birth control, and more opportunities for economic improvement. Many anti-abortion activists, he noted, oppose the first two. Supervisor Bob Nelson cast the sole vote against the resolution, explaining he represents a viewpoint and a district that takes “an alternative view of what reproductive rights are.” Nelson added, “I believe since 1973 we have learned so much more about the unborn.”

Nick Welsh contributed reporting to this story. For more photos, see independent.com/ thousands-march.

CANNABIS

$56M Coastal Sale Leads to Lawsuit

C

oastal Dispensary, one of Santa Barbara’s three retail cannabis shops, is mired in a contractual dispute between its owners over a pending $56 million sale of the company to California marijuana conglomerate The Parent Company, famously backed by Jay-Z.

PAU L WE LL M A N FI LE P HOTO

benefited the other owners while diluting Bierman’s share of the company. The Parent Company — which formed in January, is traded on U.S. and Canadian stock exchanges, and boasts 450 retail outlets in California — announced October 4 it was buying 100 percent of Coastal and its five operating storefronts, one to be opened in Northern California, and two delivery depots in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo. The sale terms included $16.2 million in cash and $40 million in equity “upon completion of milestone events,” among them the transfer of the rights to sell marijuana. The City of Santa Barbara was Coastal Dispensary founders (from left) Julian Michalowski, unaware of the pending sale of Malante Hayworth, and Josh Ginsberg at the Chapala location Coastal and had not received an application to transfer the cannabis S.B. front men Julian Michalowski and retail license, said Tava Ostrenger, with Malante Hayworth shared management of the City Attorney’s Office. “Three differthe company with at least four other people, ent LLCs owned Coastal,” she said, and the among them Adam Bierman, one of the city’s ordinance allows an LLC to file an L.A.-based MedMen, a wildly successful application to request a transfer of the perthen wildly disastrous cannabis company, mit. “We would review the new owner, who as described by Politico last year. would be held to a standard of as good as A suit filed in September by LMAJ or better than the permit holder,” she said. LLC, which lists Bierman and his MedWhether the dispute between the partMen partner Andrew Modlin among its ners at Coastal will delay the sale to The officers, alleges that Coastal arranged its Parent Company remains unknown as sale and loans but left him out of the deci- the attorneys involved did not respond to sion making. The complaint charges the attempts to contact them. The case, first loans underwrote the company until the filed in Orange County Superior Court, “fire sale” of Coastal — the sale is projected was moved to federal court four days after to close in 2022 — and carried terms that it was filed. —Jean Yamamura

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

Endorsed by

Planning Commission Rejects ExxonMobil Trucking Proposal

SANTA BARBARA FIREFIGHTERS “As we work to mitigate the realities of our changing climate, we need to stay vigilant in keeping our firefighting personnel staffed, funded, and equipped with the latest technology. I will ensure our public safety teams have the support they deserve.” - Randy Rowse

I

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Commissioners to Recommend Supervisors Deny Project by Ryan P. Cruz

RANDY ROWSE FOR MAYOR

n the latest chapter of one of Santa Barbara County’s most hotly contested issues — ExxonMobil’s bid to transport truckloads of crude oil from its Las Flores Canyon processing facility to a pump station in Santa Maria and a terminal in Kern County as part of plans to restart three drilling platforms off the Central Coast—the County Planning Commission denied the project in an initial 3-2 vote. Las Flores Canyon processing facility The decision went against the county staff ’s recommendation to approve the project and came just said Linda Krop, chief counsel of the Envidays before an oil spill off the coast of Hun- ronmental Defense Center. “The risk to our tington Beach in Orange County leaked an climate, the Santa Barbara Channel, and the estimated 126,000 gallons of crude oil into safety of our communities justifies denial. the Pacific Ocean. We look forward to working with the county Commissioners Laura Bridley, John as we transition to a clean-energy future.” The latest supplemental environmental Parke, and Vice-Chair Michael Cooney voted for the denial, with Commissioner impact report found several significant red Daniel Blough and Chair Larry Ferini flags that would impact wildlife and the enviopposed, which came unexpectedly on the ronment in the event of an oil spill from one first day of two hearings scheduled for Sep- of the tankers. tember 29 and October 1; the second hearing According to California Highway Patrol, was canceled, and the issue is set to come there were 258 trucking accidents along across the commission again in November the route from 2015 to 2021, resulting in 10 for a formal vote recommending the Board deaths and 110 injuries. In another incident in March 2020, another tanker truck crashed of Supervisors deny the project as well. A coalition of at least 35 groups joined in off Highway 166, spilling more than 4,500 opposition to the project, including the Envi- gallons of oil into the Cuyama River. ronmental Defense Center, the Center for These incidents, and the potential impacts Biological Diversity, the UCSB Environmen- of reopening three offshore drilling plattal Affairs Board, and the Coastal Band of forms, have been a focal point for the groups the Chumash Nation. The groups worry that opposing the project. In a poll conducted in Highway 166 is not prepared to safely handle November 2019, the coalition stated in a letthe 24,800 oil-filled truck trips per year Exx- ter to the commission, nearly three-fourths onMobil is proposing, and they oppose the of county residents were concerned that reopening of three offshore platforms that the project would create problems on the have lain dormant since Plains All Ameri- highway. can Pipeline’s Line 901 ruptured and spilled Commissioner Parke emphasized the thousands of gallons of oil along the coast importance of communicating not only the near Refugio State Beach in 2015. result of the vote to the Board of Supervisors The Planning Commission’s vote to deny but also the specific findings that led to the the project comes after county energy plan- recommendation for denial. ning staff last month recommended the “This is a communication from the Plancommission approve it. County energy ning Commission to the board,” said Parke. planners estimate it could take up to seven “I don’t get to go to the board and argue what years before the stretch of corroded pipeline we did. I want to make sure that they got can be replaced, and they and ExxonMobil the message, and that’s why I want it in the concluded trucking is the only viable option. findings.” “Our community spoke loud and clear At its November 3 meeting, the comagainst this project, and the commission mission will review new documents on the did the right thing in recommending denial administrative and overriding concerns of ExxonMobil’s application to restart its raised in the denial, and the matter will be offshore platforms and truck its oil along sent to the supervisors with a recommendadangerous and scenic county highways,” tion to deny the project. n

+

Randy is also endorsed by the Santa Barbara Police Officers’ Association and the Santa Barbara South Coast Chamber of Commerce

RowseForMayor.com Paid for by Rowse for Mayor 2021 ID #1436925

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D EVICTION MORATORIUM CONT’D FROM P. 7 still unemployed. Some with children at gency rental assistance from the County home attending school remotely felt a of Santa Barbara — and the thousands of need to stay home with their kids or had families who’ve been helped since similar to navigate caretaking issues, said Smith, programs began a year ago. The state, whose nonprofit offers its free services to federal, and county rental assistance low-income persons and families. programs are disbursing more than $29 “We’ve seen a steady increase in evic- million to landlords to cover rental costs tions since last September, when the first for out-of-work, low-income tenants in state eviction moratorium ended,” Smith Santa Barbara County — and another said. Not all evictions are carried out $26 million is on tap from the federal legally, she noted, which by law require Treasury — through the county and the first a notice of unlawful detainer to a state in four separate programs. tenant and later a court order of eviction. “Both the local county and state ERA “Landlords cannot take action into their [emergency rental assistance] programs own hands,” she warned, such as chang- provide eligible tenants county-wide with rental arrears — current and up to ing the locks on an apartment door. The Santa Barbara Tenants Union has three months of prospective rent — for heard its share of “soft eviction” com- a total of up to 15 months,” explained plaints. “Landlords intimidate and pres- Ted Teyber, a housing specialist with sure; they renovate and make noise and the county. Roughly 1,400 households make it look like tenants have voluntarily received assistance in the first countyvacated,” said Max Golding, who helped administered program, most of them at found the Tenants Union just over a year 50 percent of the county’s area median ago. “We’ve witnessed dozens of these income level, and more than 2,000 appliduring the pandemic and usually arrive cations were being processed in the secwhen it’s too late — half the building is ond program, which is being handled by empty, and the other half is scrambling to the state. figure shit out.” Not all unlawful detainer notices lead to eviction, but countywide records tabulated by the Superior Court show the moratorium had an effect. In 2019, 857 unlawful detainers were filed; in 2020, there were 306; in the first nine months of 2021, there were 219. But —Jennifer Smith, executive director of Legal Aid Foundation of S.B. County the proportion of actual evictions may be rising. A count by the Sheriff ’s Office, The United Way of Santa Barbara whose deputies serve most legal papers, County administered the first $13 million found that 410 eviction notices were in funding, according to the nonprofserved in 2019 and 138 in 2020; however, it’s Rent & Utility Assistance webpage for 2021, 129 had been served as of Sep- (unitedwaysb.org/rent), which lists all the tember 30, a monthly average increase eligibility criteria to receive a grant. A over the previous year. county residence is one; another is up to Tenants can fight an eviction, how- 80 percent of the area median income, ever, and Smith said it was important to or less than $70,000 for an individual; as respond immediately to legal papers as well as a measurable effect by COVID-19. The new fund of $14 million is currently the time periods were short. In Santa Barbara’s rental landscape, keeping United Way’s phones deluged a good number of corporate landown- with calls since this week’s announceers and a large contingent of mom ’n’ ment was made. pop landlords are members of the Santa The eviction stakes are high in Santa Barbara Rental Property Association Barbara, said Smith. The ever-present (SBRPA). Laura Bode, the association’s rental squeeze was tightened by an executive director, said they’ve been influx of UC Santa Barbara students, advising their members to file for emer- some of whom had to take motel rooms, gency rental assistance before filing legal she noted. Avoiding eviction through actions. “We do not anticipate SBRPA emergency rental assistance would members filing many evictions as dur- apply to both rent and utility paying the pandemic,” she said of the ter- ments going back to March 2020, she mination of the eviction moratorium. said, encouraging tenants to apply for “Our members have proactively worked assistance. “We’re calling on everybody — tento create payment agreements with their residents and assist them in filing for ants, landlords, housing providers — to emergency rental assistance if needed.” work together to avoid the most serious The stark quality of Santa Barbara’s impacts, which would be an increase in rental crisis is reflected in the new emer- homelessness.” n

‘We’re calling on everybody — tenants, landlords, housing providers — to work together to avoid the most serious impacts, which would be an increase in homelessness.’

Writing as a Tool for Health Everyone has a story of health, illness or a life event. Write about your thoughts to gain a sense of calm and wellbeing. Join us for tips to express your story. Beginners are welcome and journal supplies are provided. This free, virtual program meets October 14 and November 11 from 10 AM to Noon. Sign up today! Co-sponsored by Ridley-Tree Cancer Center and Sansum Clinic.

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Diabetes Conversations Doctors Weight Management Orientation Health Resource Center Healthy Recipes Medicare Seminars by HICAP Prenatal Breastfeeding Program Stress Management Weight Loss Surgery Seminar WomenHeart Support Group Writing as a Tool for Health Resources are free of charge, open to the community, and most can be done from the comfort of home.

For more information:

Visit SansumClinic.org/health-and-wellness Call Health & Wellness Directory, (866) 829-0909 INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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WELCOME BACK to Live Classical Music with CAMA! SPECIAL PRE-SEASON NON-SUBSCRIPTION CONCERT at the Lobero Theatre

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

LES VIOLONS DU ROY JONATHAN COHEN Music Director and conductor

AVI AVITAL mandolin

Tuesday, October 19, 2021 Lobero Theatre, 7:30PM

“Much as Andrés Segovia brought the classical guitar into the concert hall, the Israeli virtuoso Avi Avital is doing the same with the mandolin.”

Works by BACH and VIVALDI Exclusive Sponsor: Marta Babson

Tickets $38, $48 — On Sale Now Lobero Box Office • (805) 963-0761 • lobero.com This is a special, one-time, non-subscription concert at the Lobero Theatre. Subscription seats will not be held. Seating locations will be first-come, first-served. Masks and proof of vaccination or negative Covid test required. For details on the venue’s Covid policy, visit https://www.lobero.org/2021/08/california-public-health-update/

—Los Angeles Times AVI AVITAL mandolin. Photo by Christoph Kîstlin/Deutsche Grammophon.

CO M M UN I TY ARTS MUSI C ASSOCIATION OF SA NTA BA RBA RA, IN C . | C A M A S B. ORG

SAVE DE LA GUERRA PLAZA From Historic Ruination

OPPOSE THE “REVITALIZATION” PLAN

Dear Santa Barbaran,

Historic De la Guerra Plaza is threatened as never before. The center of Santa Barbara civic and social life for 200 years, a misconceived and historically inappropriate “revitalization” plan is being prepared that would transform the existing De la Guerra Plaza beyond recognition. Key components of this plan would include: * LOSS OF ALL LAWN AREA As hard as it may be to believe, it is proposed that millions of dollars be spent to remove all lawn from De la Guerra Plaza. What a loss to our community this would be! It wouldn’t be possible to hold Fiesta Mercado in De la Guerra Plaza any longer. This is a tradition that dates back in its current form almost a century and which preceding activities can be dated back almost two centuries. Similarly, it would no longer be as possible for De la Guerra Plaza to be used for speakers’ and political rallies and events. The proposed “hardscape” surface for De la Guerra Plaza would turn it into a “deadscape.” 1853 MAP * LOSS OF HISTORIC CHARACTER De la Guerra Plaza has evolved and developed over more than two centuries, since the De la Guerra and Carrillo families first built their impressive adobes on either size of the plaza (Casa de la Guerra continues to be located here). To master-plan a completely new style and non-natural surface of De la Guerra Plaza--ignoring the historic uses and design--would not only transform and diminish the plaza, but violate the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). WHAT COMMUNITY LEADERS ARE SAYING ABOUT THE PROPOSED TRANSFORMATION OF DE LA GUERRA PLAZA: “I grew up here, our daughter is a 9th generation Santa Barbaran. Our first Santa Barbara ancestor was a Spanish soldier under the second Commandante of the Presidio, Felipe de Goycoechea, who served here from 1784 to 1802. De la Guerra Plaza has always been an anchor of our Community. It is a historically important place that needs to be preserved in its historic use and configuration.” Russell Ruiz, 8th generation Santa Barbaran “Preserving historic De la Guerra Plaza is essential to Santa Barbara’s future. The proposal to eliminate the existing lawn from De la Guerra Plaza and to introduce non-traditional elements would change the plaza forever and lessen vital historic continuity and civic use.” John C. Woodward, Past Chair, SB City Historic Landmarks Commission

SAVE DE LA GUERRA PLAZA Paid for by: Comm. to Save DLG Plaza, P.O. Box 2635, Santa Barbara, CA 93120

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

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NEWS of the WEEK

SEPT. 30-OCT. 7, 2021

CONT’D

POLITICS

COU RTESY

Rumble in the Riviera Barrett Reed Challenges Kristen Sneddon for District 4 City Council Seat by Jun Starkey wo candidates are competing to represent District 4 on the Santa Barbara City Council this November, as a local developer and planning commissioner takes on an incumbent that has battled through a tough first term. District 4 covers everything from the Foothills to Eucalyptus Hill, as well as the Upper East Side and the Riviera. This area can be considered one of the wealthier areas of the city, with the cost of homes on average ranging from about $1.5 to $6 million. Santa Barbara shifted to district elections in 2015, following a lawsuit against the city that alleged at-large elections often allowed for those in the more affluent areas to run for office, leaving unheard the voices of lower-income and Hispanic residents living in other neighborhoods. ER IC K M ADR I D

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KRISTEN SNEDDON

Kristen Sneddon began serving her first term on City Council in 2017 and has lived in Santa Barbara for about 30 years, moving from Los Angeles when she was 16 years old. Raised by a working single mother, she attended public schools, graduated from UCSB, and became a full-time professor of environmental geology at Santa Barbara City College. She and her husband, Chris Sneddon, have three children who also attended public schools. Sneddon first decided to run for public office when she realized that there were no elected officials with strong science backgrounds serving on the Santa Barbara Council in a time the city was facing complicated environmental issues. When she ran four years ago, she did so without the support of the Democratic Party, despite her deep ties to the District 4 neighborhoods, including her time as president of the Peabody Charter School Board. She won with strong voter support, and this time around, the Democratic Party has endorsed her. Sneddon’s first term on council has been a hectic four years, with the COVID-19 pandemic, concerns of a slowmoving government, and the homelessness crisis all demanding attention and action from the council these past two years. She has also been an outspoken environmental activist, occasionally putting her at odds with other members of the council. Sneddon has been criticized by those who oppose her, including Barrett Reed, of contributing to the “do-nothing” culture of City Hall, a culture that creates more barriers to moving policy forward, often through creating excessive delays. Sneddon admits this culture does exist within City Hall but doesn’t consider herself to be a part of it. Creating com-

mittees to review data or to seek community input is often mischaracterized as delaying the bureaucratic process, she said. “Part of taking decisive action is having data to give us boundaries.” To understand the roots of this “slow-moving culture,” the council hired a consultant to examine the governmental structure. This resulted in the Novak report, brought to the council last year, that suggested a lack of strong leadership and coordination at City Hall, as well as the ways plans for development were handled within city administration. Though many on council felt the report had several holes in its data, a committee was created to access the suggestions of the report and gather community input on how to move going forward. “We had the report, and I formed the committee to make sure action happened, and action is happening,” Sneddon said. Sheila Lodge, a planning commissioner and former mayor of Santa Barbara, has endorsed Sneddon, saying, “Kristen is thoughtful, does her homework, and is an effective member of council.” Homelessness has been a consistent issue in Santa Barbara, made worse by the COVID pandemic, mass unemployment, and landlords illegally evicting tenants who have suffered lost wages. The relationship between the city and its homeless population has not always been positive, but Sneddon said she is hopeful that providing some form of housing, such as a recent program at the Rose Garden Inn for those living on the streets and in camps, is the first step in creating a permanent supportive housing community. Sneddon argued that having a place for homeless people to stay actually allows the city to enforce its ordinances more practically. “The real answer is having shelter and allowing people to get the help they need,” she said. Loy Beardsmore, a Eucalyptus Hill resident and president of the Eucalyptus Hill Association, said she has been disappointed with Sneddon’s leadership and felt she has not given the district the same attention as the rest of the city. “We need a candidate that will not be distracted by issues that are not in District 4,” Beardsmore said. “She seems more concerned with climate change.” Sneddon has been endorsed by the Santa Barbara Democratic Party, Democratic Women of Santa Barbara County, Santa Barbara Young Democrats, and the Santa Barbara Women’s Political Committee, as well as the Santa Barbara City Firefighters Association and officials such as Congressmember Salud Carbajal, State Senator Monique Limón, and Assemblymember Steve Bennett. As of September 18 of this year, Sneddon has raised about $94,000 in campaign donations.

BARRETT REED

Barrett Reed is a local “redeveloper,” as he calls it, taking on the incumbent Sneddon, and he said he aims to be a more decisive voice in a difficult time for the city. Reed grew up in Santa Barbara, attending grade school here, and graduated from USC. He bought a house in Eucalyptus Hill about five years ago and has been living there with his wife, Caitlin Reed, and their child for three years. Reed was appointed to the Planning Commission in 2019. He said that at first, he felt hypersensitive of his connections with many business owners due to his role as a developer, but he no longer feels a need to recuse himself from decisions, unless he has a direct financial connection to a business. His critics, however, say he still benefits from passing ordinances that affect all businesses throughout the city.

Lodge, who serves with Barrett on the planning commission, said, “He seems, as far as his voting, to be more concerned about letting developers do what they want.” One of those businesses is the Miramar Group, a real estate business he cofounded that has many redeveloped properties across town. Many were redeveloped in long vacant storefronts and have creative layouts that often include several businesses in one spot. Some of these include the Waterline bar in the Funk Zone, and Kim’s Service Department on lower State. Through his connections with development, Reed has many supporters among real estate companies and property owners. Reed had never intended to get involved with politics, he said, until moving to Eucalyptus Hill and learning about its fire preparedness. “Until then, I hadn’t given much thought to emergency preparedness,” Reed said. Though the Eucalyptus Hill Association does not endorse candidates, its president, Beardsmore, assisted Reed in his walks through District 4 neighborhoods. “Barrett will create clean, safe, and vibrant neighborhoods,” Beardsmore said. “I feel like he’s motivated and capable of weighing pros and cons.” One of the issues Reed would address on council is the laborious process of approving proposals and permits for development. Reed said although he felt these issues were plainly clear to the council thanks to the Novak report, recommendations are still slow to be implemented. “The response was to push back; more study, more review,” Reed said. “If our city hires an expert, we need to defer to them.” Reed was part of a business advisory task force that brought recommendations to council as part of the Novak report, and he said the issues addressed were being thrown back down the ladder, rather than city leadership truly addressing them and taking action. Another issue Reed has promised to address more headon is homelessness, which has become harder to ignore with the prolonged pandemic. The city should utilize more of its resources within the community, Reed said, and gather funding from many local philanthropic people who would be willing to help. Projects like the Rose Garden Inn, he thinks, are only a Band-Aid solution that will not provide long-term relief. Reed is supported by Mike Jordan, District 2 representative on the City Council, though Jordan has not confirmed this. Reed is also supported by the Santa Barbara Police Officers Association, the South Coast Chamber of Commerce, and the Santa Barbara Association of Realtors, as well as by fellow planning commissioners Roxana Bonderson and Jay Higgins. Reed has been more successful than Sneddon in his campaign donations, amassing about $208,000 as of September 18.

4•1•1

Join Santa Barbara Independent reporter Jun Starkey for a Zoom discussion with the District 4 candidates on Monday, October 11, at 5:30 p.m. Register at independent.com/discussions. Not sure which district you’re in? Check out independent.com/district-map.

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Ever Been Bit by a Dead Dog?

hard line in the sand to draw. Here’s what I know. In the month of August, 95 of the 112 COVID patients hosmark. This past week, Santa Barbara County pitalized in Santa Barbara had not been vacsurpassed 500. As of this morning, it was up cinated. Do the math. And the median age to 506. These are, of course, random and arbi- of those who were hospitalized and been vactrary mileposts. And for the most part, they cinated was 80. So no, the vaccine is not 100 went totally unobserved. percent. It is not a bulletproof vest. But it’s way better than going into battle protected That’s a lot of dead people. by only a raincoat. I get it. There are so many flags flying at halfThis Tuesday would be the last time staff these days, it’s hard to stay focused. And the supervisors automatically scheduled after 18 months, “out of sight, out of mind” an update on COVID. Our numbers have improved that dramatically. For the same is no longer a lifestyle choice but a necessity. If I’d have been drinking, it would have reason, I suppose, firefighters don’t lighten sobered me up. up and enjoy a refreshing smoke while This Tuesday, the Board of Supervisors mopping up the remains of an incident, the engaged in their usual rope-a-dope sessions supervisors voted to extend the indoor mask with the anti-maskers, anti-vaxxers, and mandate ’til November 5. other increasingly agitated members of the Dr. Henning Ansorg, the county’s Public Flat Earth Society who show up with religious Health officer, was especially eloquent. Ansregularity to accuse the supervisors and the org was born in Germany and speaks with a county’s public health officers of Gestapo-like mild German accent. I always wondered what tactics in response to COVID. Big Pharma. he was thinking when all the anti-vaxxers/ Big Brother. Nazis. Hitler. Nuremberg. maskers were making their Nazi allusions. The usual. What he did say was, “If someone repeats a We’re reached a Darwinian crossroads. false claim again and again and again, that The planet’s population — seven billion and false claim does not become reality.” change — has exceeded its tipping point. Ansorg and his boss, Van Do-Reynoso, These people have graciously volunteered have spent the better part of 18 months tryto lighten the load. Except of course, their ing to get the word out. That word — by inalienable rights end where my nostrils necessity of new information and human begin. With a disease that’s spread by the fine fallibility — has mutated over time. Someaerosolized mist of human saliva, that’s a times by as much as118010/4/21 degrees. 2:18 (Initially, MersoLabs-Croptober-Pumpkin-PrintAd-9.375x6.166-v2s.pdf PM ZEN THERE WERE NONE: Sometime in the last two weeks, we as a nation hit the 700,000

Ansorg was skeptical about the value of masks. Now he swears by them.) But with almost 70 percent of the county’s eligible population now vaccinated, they’ve clearly made progress. That number was not quite 50 percent in August. Of the holdouts, about half are described in the literature as “apathetics.” These are people who if they won the lottery could not rouse themselves to cash in their ticket. I’d like to point out the screamingly obvious. The COVID vaccine was not sold like any other pharmaceutical products are sold: with TV commercials. And why not? Instead, public health officials over the planet have had to avail themselves of public service announcements and scrounge whatever free media they could get from reporters attending their press briefings and supervisors’ meeting. Do politicians get themselves elected that way? No, they do not. In the last national election cycle, they spent $8.5 billion on TV, radio, and social media showing pictures of themselves with their partners, their dogs, and their children. Does Pfizer — one of the three licensed manufacturers of the COVID vaccine — sell Viagra that way? No it does not. In 2017, Pfizer spent $232 million on TV commercials pitching the virtues of four-hour erections for men swinging in the back nines of their lives. For the wonderful named Lyrica — Pfizer’s number-one selling drug — the company

spent $246 million that year. The industry as a whole spends about $47 billion a year on marketing and advertising. They wouldn’t spend that much if it didn’t get results, notwithstanding the mandatory disclaimers warning viewers of their drugs’ possible side effects, which often include such harrowing things as suicidal ideation and rectal bleeding. Yet the Flat Earthers worry about side effects from the vaccine? Supervisor Joan Hartmann volunteered an interesting fact in response to Tuesday’s crowd of unconscionable objectors. During the Revolutionary War of 1776, 90 percent of all American casualties were caused not by the Redcoats but by disease, particularly the smallpox virus. Those not killed outright were rendered too sick to fight. George Washington — remember, the guy who could not tell a lie — ordered his troops to be inoculated against the virus. And obviously it worked. If it didn’t, we’d all be speaking with British accents. Maybe that story would get the “apathetics” — yes, it’s a designated category — off their couches. As for the others, to mangle a line from The X-Files, they need not to believe. Ansorg said one more thing that stuck with me. “The fact of the matter,” he said, “we’re all humans.” I still don’t know what he meant by that.

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

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—Nick Welsh


PARALLEL STORIES

Controlling the Narrative: Both/And

(via Zoom)

THURSDAY | OCTOBER 14 | 5:30 PM In a conversation and reading, Emily Rapp Black, award-winning author of Poster Child: A Memoir, Sanctuary, and The Still Point of the Turning World, a New York Times bestseller, explores art and disability in her most recent book Frida Kahlo and My Left Leg. With elegance, tenderness, and zero sentimentality, she deconstructs the mythologies of words like bravery and resilience and recognizes in Kahlo a twin at the art of creating to silence pain. Joining her is colleague Alex Espinoza, Tomás Rivera Endowed Chair of Creative Writing at UC Riverside and author of novels Still Water Saints and The Five Acts of Diego Léon, and the recent nonfiction book Cruising: An Intimate History of a Radical Pastime.

Santa Barbara Museum of Art www.sbma.net

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/$10 NON-MEMBERS Purchase tickets online at tickets.sbma.net.

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series y Join Robin Elander in conversation with Erica Brown (Dylan Star) and Robin Baron Todam ! & Grace Paulette (Salt Boutique) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight. at 3p

Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with t Nexek! e W

DAVID PELLOW UC SANTA BARBARA ELAINE & ALBERTO MORELLO

GUIDO OPPIZZI

OPPI’Z Bistro and Natural Pizza

Olio e Limone Ristorante, Olio Bottega & Olio Pizzeria

Food & Drink: Italian Food Thursday, October 14 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

TALK: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AS REGENERATION THU, OCT 14, 4:00 PM Free Online Event Reservations required: bit.ly/Pellow-IHC

ihc.ucsb.edu @ihcucsb

Live closed-captioning and Spanish interpretation will be provided. Se proporcionarán subtítulos en vivo e interpretación en español. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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obituaries Loretta Christine Verhasselt

Michael Curtis Forster 11/20/1920 - 9/26/2021

1/31/1928 - 8/22/2021

Our beloved mother, sister, wife, and grandmother passed away peacefully Aug 22, 2021 after a visit from Msgr. Stephen Downes, surrounded by close family and the loving prayers of many. Born Jan 31, 1928 on the family farm in DePere Wisconsin, she married Basil Verhasselt on Jan 5, 1949. They moved to Santa Barbara in 1960. Loretta quickly formed deep roots in the community, volunteering extensively at St Raphael‘s Church; Women’s Council, Women’s Auxiliary & Choir.  Additionally, Loretta was a Founding Member of the SB Breast Cancer Resource Center and a member of the Ladies of Charity. She loved to bake for her family and to offer homemade treats to others in a gesture of friendship.  Loretta was a great cook, working in the Goleta Valley Junior High Cafeteria for several years before becoming a school bus driver.  An avid gardener, she enjoyed sharing her love of nature and flowers, competing in various Garden Shows.  Loretta was a loving mother and grandmother, dedicated friend, volunteer & organizer.  Her laughter, joy of life and knack for bringing people together will be greatly missed.  Loretta is survived by her sons Jerome (Susan) Verhasselt, Jim (Sharon) Verhasselt and daughter Karen (Peter) Arnold; four grandsons Adam Verhasselt, Sam Verhasselt, Gregory (Allison) Arnold, Chris (Kristin) Arnold; and great-grandchildren, Micah, Oliver, Amelia & Finn Arnold.  She is also survived by four sisters in Wisconsin: Helen, Alice, Joyce & Judy.  Ever devoted to her family, she was preceded in death by her beloved husband Basil, parents William & Christine and nine siblings Howard, Leo, Harold, Vic, Rita, Mary, Bernice, Aloysius & Vonnie.  A Vigil will be held at Welch-Ryce-Haider Chapel, 450 Ward Dr, Oct 15 at 7 pm, a Funeral Mass on Oct 16 at 9 am at St Raphael’s Church, 5444 Hollister Ave with a reception following in the Parish Hall.  In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to FORCE: Facing Heredity Cancer Empowered     www.facingourrisk.org/donate    18

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Michael Curtis Forster, aged 100, fell on his way to the grocery store in June 2021 and never really recovered. Mike’s family and caregivers assisted him but as the weeks turned into months his strength declined. “I’m at the last stop,” he said. “There’s no one else on the streetcar. Only me.” He accepted the inevitable with inner strength and courage and died peacefully at home on September 26th, 2021. Mike was born in Vienna on November 20th, 1920, and raised by his mother, Mathilde Foerster, and her brother, Ludwig. When Mike was ten years old, his mother secured a job as a scenario writer at UFA films in Berlin. In 1932 she went Hollywood to work on a film with the great German star Pola Negri, leaving Mike in a boarding school in Wickersdorf, Germany. Hitlerism was on the rise, but Mike didn’t know his parents and four grandparents were Jewish- or that he was a “love child”. After the Reichstag burned in 1933, Mike’s mother tried with increasing urgency to get him out of Germany but residency papers in the United States were extremely difficult to get, especially for a single mother without a steady job. Mike’s uncle, Ludwig Foerster, took Mike to the Sudetenland where they lived a hand to mouth existence, reduced to living on potatoes in a farmer’s barn. They eventually made it back to Vienna, relying on the support of the Jewish community as they waited for money and a visa. In 1934, Mike was finally reunited with his mother who met him in Long Beach California after a solo journey on the SS Wyoming from Le Havre, France.  Mike liked to tell the story of his first car trip in California to Yosemite National Park.  He was somewhat surprised when a large brown bear reached through the car window and grabbed his sandwich. Welcome to America, Mike! The next few years were chaotic with Mike tagging after his mother as she tried, unsuccessfully, to re-launch her film career.  They ended up in Brazil where Mike was briefly re-united with his beloved uncle Ludwig. The peripatetic life continued; mother and son moved to New York, and then back to the West Coast.  It wasn’t until he was sixteen that Mike discovered mathematics.  From that point on he excelled in academia and eventually gained a doctorate in applied mathematics from UCLA.

OCTOBER 7, 2021

After serving in the U.S. Army as a translator, interrogating German prisoners of war, then as a French instructor for U.S. soldiers, Mike worked as an aeronautical engineer, testing missiles at White Sands, New Mexico. He returned to Santa Monica to work at McDonnell Douglas and caught the eye of the chief engineer’s niece, Virginia Anne Johnson. Mike asked Anne for a date, and they ended up driving to Yuma, Arizona. The next morning (setting a record for the quickest courtship ever) they married at the Orange Blossom wedding chapel. Their marriage produced four children born between 1953 and 1965 and lasted 23 years. Mike and Anne moved to Santa Barbara in 1957 when Mike took a research job with General Electric. In 1972, wanting to get out of the defense industry and protect his sons from the seemingly endless war in Vietnam, Mike accepted a senior lecturing position at Auckland University in New Zealand, teaching theoretical and applied mechanics in the Engineering department. Unfortunately, the move was a final straw for Anne, and she returned to Santa Barbara on her own. Mike loved to read poetry and non-fiction, to philosophize, to swim and to play tennis. Like his mother, he avoided topics he didn’t want to discuss such as his life in pre-war Vienna, or his famous father, the Hungarian film director Mihaly Kertesz (aka Mike Curtiz) who made over 100 films for the Warner Brothers.  In his sixties, Mike, after being badgered by his elder daughter, wrote a short but insightful memoir for his children, grandchildren, and future generations. Like his mother, Mike had a gift for words. After returning to Santa Barbara in 1976, Mike and Anne divorced but maintained an amicable friendship. Mike sang with the Unitarian Church choir and was a member of the Montecito Country Club where he played tennis into his mid- eighties. One of oldest members of the Santa Barbara YMCA, he faithfully attended exercise classes well into his nineties. Mike built his own computer and mastered the internet, Zoomed, emailed, and played chess with his grandson in New Zealand. He enjoyed watching old Hollywood movies and followed politics and current events with keen interest. He was proud of his four children, their partners, his six grandchildren, and two great grandchildren, born in Sydney, Australia. “Hitler is dead, “he used to say. “But we’re still here.” Mike is survived by four children, Michelanne Forster, John David Forster, Paul Edward Forster and Susan Carolyn ForsterSaunders. Also, his ex-wife Anne, his longtime ex-partner Barbara McDonald, his grandchildren, Michael Ishi Forster, Mathias John Corwin, Annie Forster, Paisley Anne ForsterSaunders, Kayla Michelle Coy-

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ote ForsterSaunders, and Brightly Loraine ForsterSaunders, his two great grandchildren, Maeva Matilda and August Elisara Forster, his sons-in-law, Nigel Dunlop and Charles Saunders, and his daughter-in-law Leuaina Forster.

Vince Deral

3/25/1944 - 9/14/2021

Vince left this earth suddenly at home on September 14. He was seventy-seven. Born March 25, 1944, in Burbank, CA., he was the only child of Doris Mackenrot Deral and Vincent J. Deral. Vince spent most of his childhood in Santa Barbara, graduating from San Marcos High School in its first graduating class of 1962. Vince‘s thirst for knowledge took him to the University of Denver, Berkeley and ultimately to the University of Oregon where he earned a master’s degree in Water Resource Management. Vince returned to Santa Barbara in the early eighties where he met and married his wife of 38 years, Deborah Talmage. He worked at Maripro in Goleta in many capacities over the years—as an adhesive specialist, an administrative manager and ultimately the IT manager. Vince was truly a Renaissance man whose zest for life affected all who knew him. He had a deep interest in many things and loved sharing his knowledge with anyone willing to listen. Most of all he loved helping others. He was active in Goleta Valley Little League where he coached pitching and hitting and designed the Girsh Park baseball fields. He also designed and constructed the pitching mound for the set of For the Love of the Game. His love of baseball transitioned into an intense interest in golf where he attained a respectable handicap. Ultimately though, he was seduced by the love of our dogs (Lily was Daddy’s girl) and the horses at Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center. He was committed to its mission of providing horse riding therapy to individuals with mental or physical challenges. He sponsored a huge white jumper named Seagull. Vince spent most days there upgrading and repairing the facilities. The day before his death, Vince was busy installing custom ankle protection he had designed for the horse stalls . When he left, he told his friends there, “See you tomorrow.” Vince is survived by his adoring wife, Deborah; his daughter Kirsten Pettey; his five grandchildren Max, Reese, Corden, William

and Simon; and their father Adam Pettey. A CELEBRATION of VINCE’s LIFE will be held at Godric Grove in Elings Park on Friday, October 29 at 3pm. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center at 4420 Calle Real, Santa Barbara, CA 93111.

Ila Vranish

6/9/1921 - 8/23/2021

Ila Vranish passed away in the early hours of Monday, August 23rd, 2021. She was born in Fargo, North Dakota to David and Jane Crawford on June 9, 1921. Living to over 100 years old, Ila was the last surviving member of a family with 5 children. Ila married George Joseph Vranish (Deceased 1983) and moved to Santa Barbara in 1945. They had a family of 5 children; Larry Vranish, Carolyn Vranish Malcheski (Deceased), Steve Vranish (Caron), Marjorie Vranish Hill (Terry) and George Vranish Jr. (Ramona). The family spent 60 years of their lives together with their home on San Antonio Creek Road as the center piece for family activities and parties. Ila for years was an active member of her church, loved to gather with the “Red Hatters” ladies’ group and go to lunch with her many friends but most of all she loved being with her children, 12 grand children and 12 great grand children when ever possible. She was always there for her family. Ila will be most remembered for the daily example she set of caring for family and friends. Thank you mom for being the very best example of how life should be lived with caring, dignity and all enduring kindness. The family wishes to thank a dear family friend Christina Perez for her gentle care of our mom through the past few years. A private burial was held at Goleta Cemetery on September 1, 2021 attended by immediate family. In lieu of flowers, donations in Ila’s memory can be made to the Braille Institute.


obituaries Jeffrey David Wootton 7/8/1946 - 9/25/2021

Jeff Wootton, a loving husband and father, died September 25, 2021 at age 75 as a result of Lewy Body Dementia. He passed away peacefully at home in Santa Barbara. Jeff was born on July 8, 1946 in Auckland, New Zealand to Percy and Dorothy Wootton. It was there that he had his schooling and began a long career in the computer software field that spanned nearly 50 years. While on a week long trip for adventurous singles in Hawaii, he met and was smitten with a woman named Karen Jeffries from California. They married on June 25, 1983 in Riverside, CA and later moved to Santa Barbara in 1989. Although Jeff lived in the USA for the rest of his life, he maintained his New Zealand citizenship and considered himself a “Kiwi.” They welcomed two daughters to the family: Julie in 1988 and Angela in 1990. Jeff ’s life revolved around his family and taking care of them. He and Karen were longtime members of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church. Jeff was a man of few words, but when he spoke, he was kind, wise, and intelligent. Many happy family memories were made on RV “rig trips” around the western United States. He had a knack for skillfully backing the trailer into even the narrowest campsites. He loved boogie boarding in the ocean with his kids, and enjoyed it even more than they did! He is survived by his wife of 38 years, Karen Wootton, daughters Julie Wootton-Greener (Cody) and Angela Wootton (Ava), brother Alan Wootton(Heather), parents in-law Stan and Marion Jeffries, and a grandchild due in March 2022. We remember Jeff ’s brilliant blue eyes, his willingness to give anyone a ride (even in the middle of the night), his quiet, humble nature, and his admirable cuppa tea making skills. Donations in his memory may be made to Food From the Heart in Santa Barbara or VNA Health and Hospice. A private family memorial gathering will take place in the future.

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Helene Beaver 9/11/2021

Helene Beaver – wife, mother, grandmother – died on September 11 at age 82, after a long bout with a lung disease. A longtime resident of Santa Barbara, Helene was a World War II refugee who immigrated to the U.S. in 1951. She was an active volunteer in our community for many years: she served on the Santa Barbara City Council and was foreman of the County Grand Jury, and was also president of the Santa Barbara Symphony, the Santa Barbara Cancer Center, the Downtown Organization, the county Red Cross, the Junior League, the Mission Canyon Association, and several other organizations. Helene greatly missed her husband Jerry after his death in 2018, but enjoyed time with her sons David (Renee), Philip (Kim) and John (Candace), and her grandchildren: Elaine, Elizabeth, Lauren, Rachel, Anna, and Alexander. Private family services will be held. Donations in Helene’s name may be sent to the Santa Barbara Symphony, or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Eric David Scheinberg 1/18/1984 - 9/11/2021

Eric Scheinberg passed away from a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. He will be missed greatly by his parents, Pauline Maxwell and Richard Scheinberg, his step parents Nora Scheinberg and Jack Maxwell, as well as his siblings John Scheinberg, Conor Scheinberg, Madelynn Scheinberg, Michael Reyes, Alexis Andrews, Dania Maxwell, Alex Maxwell and Kari Compana as well as his many aunts, uncles and cousins. He will equally be missed by his many friends from growing up surfing and fishing in Santa Barbara. Eric was born and raised and educated in Santa Barbara. His

passions were surfing, fishing, dirt biking and skiing. His early years revolved around surfing with his friends at Hammonds Meadows. Later he worked for his dad’s medical business and ultimately became focused on agricultural pursuits which he was doing at the time of his untimely death. His family and friends will miss his easy laugh, his adventuresome spirit and his love of partying and having good times. Eric had a good heart and loved many things but especially his cats. He was never without his Hurk and Stitch, his cats. There will be a private memorial service for Eric at Hammonds Beach.

Dr. Randy Rodman 7/13/2021

With shocking abruptness on the evening of Tuesday, July 13, 2021, a sudden heart attack took Randy Rodman from his world, his friends, and his family. As a child, Randy discovered a talent for creativity and a love of intricate detail. With these to motivate him and a degree from USC Dental School, he turned these into a long career as a dentist, painter, pianist, teacher, and sculptor. He was a gentle soul who shared his talents in helping to raise five children. In his marriage to Carol Akin, Randy found new friends and activities, and shared his sense of adventure with her and traveled frequently to Maui, Mexico, and Chloride, Az. Randy, a longtime member of the Pismo Beach Church of First Presbyterian, is lovingly remembered by Carol, his wife of a short 7 years, his son Lachlan, younger brother Jeff, and a family rich in cousins, nieces, nephews, stepchildren, grandchildren, loyal patients, neighbors, and many dance friends. Celebration of life will be Oct 9, 1:00pm at the First Presbyterian Church of SB 21 E. Constance Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 If desired, donations in memory of Randy can be made to the Chloride Baptist Church, established in 1860. It can be sent to: c/o Pastor Ralph Wells P.O. Box 65 Chloride, Az. 86431

Margie Chelini

7/14/1925 - 7/9/2021

her husband Ray Sawhill, Melissa Frost and her mother Chris, a step-son Remy Chelini, his wife Anne and their three children

Robert Charles Michaels 1/29/1943 - 6/26/2021

Margie Chelini passed away in Santa Barbara on July 9th, a few days before her 96th birthday. She was beautiful, smart, witty and stylish her whole life and her last days were no exception. Margie had a talent for connecting with people of all ages and backgrounds and inspiring them, for making life seem magical and full of possibilities. She brought this into her life as a mother of two, Polly and Daniel Frost (deceased), and as a grandmother to Melissa Frost. She also brought it into her work as a painter. Margie’s canvases continue to make viewers smile with their explosive energy, color, and the spiritual life she captured in her subjects. She also brought it into her work as an art teacher at the Boys and Girls Club, and as a docent at the Santa Barbara Art Museum. Margie and George Chelini were wed in 1975. It was a second marriage for both of them. George was well-known and beloved in Santa Barbara for running the Boys and Girls Clubs in the county for 37 years during which time he set up many important community programs and helped many kids get on the right track in their lives. When George retired they bought a second home in Sedona, Arizona where they quickly became a popular part of that community. They enjoyed exploring the region together and became avid and knowledgeable collectors of Southwestern art. Margie and George were known everywhere they went as a legendarily romantic couple, admired for their long-lasting love, respect and admiration for each other. George called her “Babe” until he passed away in June 2020. And Margie called him “Papa.” In their final time together they lived in a lovely apartment at Vista del Monte surrounded by Margie’s paintings and their Southwestern art collection. After George’s passing everyone worried how she’d do with her great loss and the isolation of the lockdown. But in typical Margie style she savored each day the way her practice of Buddhism had taught her and made two close new friends, 22 year-old Mikayla Payette and Nancy Cuellar. Margie’s family is deeply grateful to the excellent, caring staff at Vista del Monte and to the wonderful Right at Home Santa Barbara agency run by Tina and Larry Kreider. A celebration of Margie and George’s life will be held in a few months. She is survived and will be loved forever by numerous friends, and by Polly Frost,

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Robert Michaels was a caring and honorable father and husband. He passed away on June 26th, 2021 at 12:05 am in Hermosa Beach, CA- loved by all who knew him. His battles with serious medical issues in recent years showed his great endurance and sense of humor in defiance of incredible obstacles. He was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts on January 29th, 1943 to Stanley and Mary Michaels. After graduating Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, he moved his first wife Jean and three sons to Santa Barbara to continue his career in mechanical engineering. He was an inventor and authored several patents. He later married his current wife Barbara in Santa Barbara in 1986. Bob loved spending time with his family on trips to the outdoors. He was skilled in ocean sports with a fishing pole, a kayak and a wave ski. He was somewhat skilled with dad-jokes and had a great sense of humor that he passed onto his sons. He had a knack for repairing cars and fixing things around the house and at work. He enjoyed playing his acoustic guitar and dancing with the ladies; when he always had a big smile on his face. He also volunteered with the Blues Society and the Hospice Organization where he delivered flowers to many. He is survived by his sons Ken and his wife Hollie; Darren and his wife Kelly and Matthew and his wife Holly. He is also survived by his two granddaughters and one grandson and his former wife Jean. He is preceded in death by his current wife Barbara. A memorial will be held on Friday November 12 at 3 pm at the Santa Barbara Cemetery Association, 901 Channel Dr, Santa Barbara. A celebration of Bob’s life to follow the memorial at approximately 5:30 at The Kimpton Goodland, 5650 Calle Real, Goleta.Our mother had a huge heart and was often the first person at your door ready to help with food in times of struggle or despair. She adored her students and would do anything for them. Her intelligence and her creativity combined made her a wonderful teacher. Mom, we hope you’re in a peaceful place and can rest easy.  Know that we appreciate all that you’ve done for us. We love and miss you.

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 7, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


In Memoriam

Dave1958-2021 Loveton The Sporting Life

BY J O H N Z A N T

n his 40 years writing sports stories

and press releases, Dave Loveton could always be counted on to produce detailed, straightforward reporting. That fact-filled style resonated in an email he sent to his friends on January 22, 2018:

NATE STEPHENSON

I

VOTE!

ENDORSEMENTS FOR ENDORSEMENTS FOR NOV. NOV. ENDORSEMENTS FOR NOV.233 GENERAL ELECTION GENERAL ELECTION ELECTION GENERAL CITY OF SANTA BARBARA

JOE BIDEN AND KAMALA HARRIS - PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT

JOE BIDEN AND KAMALA HARRIS - PRESIDENT AND VICE-PRESIDENT SALUD CARBAJAL - US CONGRESS, DISTRICT 24

City Council, District 4 24 SALUD CARBAJAL - US CONGRESS, DISTRICT MONIQUE LIMÓN - CA STATE SENATE, DISTRICT 19

SNEDDON MONIQUE KRISTEN LIMÓN - CA STATE SENATE, DISTRICT 19 City Council, District 5 CA PROPOSITIONS ERIC FRIEDMAN

CA PROPOSITIONS YES SchoolsandCommunitiesFirstPROPOSITION15

City Council, District 6 MEAGAN HARMON

YESEnding SchoolsandCommunitiesFirstPROPOSITION15 YES the ban on affirmative action PROPOSITION 16 Restoring to peopleaction on parole PROPOSITION YES YES Endingthe theright bantoonvote affirmative PROPOSITION 16 17 NOthe Criminal PROPOSITION 20 right toSentencing vote to people on parole PROPOSITION 17 YES Restoring YES Rent ControlPROPOSITION21 NO Criminal Sentencing PROPOSITION 20 the No mayoral candidate received NO App Based Drivers PROPOSITION 22 YES Rent ControlPROPOSITION21 2/3 majority vote of the Board to earn an Drivers endorsement. NO App Based PROPOSITION 22

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★★★

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It’s been Good News & Bad News for me. The Good: I changed my eating habits from bad food to good food on Aug. 1 (no alcohol, no diet soda, no bad snacks/ desserts … and eating many more fruits/ vegetables) … I’ve lost 80 pounds in the last 5 1/2 months and now weigh 240. Yeah for me!! Dave Loveton covering a soccer match at La Playa stadium in 2019 The Bad: In the last 10 days, I was diagnosed with kidney cancer. I have a pretty good-sized tumor in my left kidney. … I’m going for headlines and captions. We had a complete sports biopsy surgery on Friday, Jan. 26, to figure out what section to put out every day of the year. It’s hard to type of cancer and how to attack it with treatment. I’ll describe how frenzied a Friday or Saturday night on be at home recovering for 4 days after the outpatient the sports desk could be, and Dave was cheerfully in the middle of the action, like a honeybee in a clover surgery. … I remember Lance Armstrong beat testicular, lung field. When the first edition rolled off the press, Dave was expert at spotting a misspelled word or a misand brain cancer, and he’s a 20-year survivor. placed punctuation mark. Let the Battle begin .... Despite the chores that often lasted past midnight, Cancer ultimately won that battle on April 28, we had a good time and did good work for more than 2021, but Dave scored victories in ways that deeply two decades. Dave’s interment at Goleta Cemetery mattered to him. He earned the respect of his col- in May brought us all together again — Mark Patleagues, and he felt the appreciation of the people ton, Dan Shiells, Barry Punzal, Chic Perkins, Mike whom he covered with more care than any other Traphagen, and me. All but Patton had long since left reporter. the News-Press, and Mark was about to be the last to When he came to work in the so-called “Toy turn out the lights. Department” of the Santa Barbara News-Press in Dave left the paper in 1995 but didn’t go far. SBCC 1981, Dave met the foremost requirement: He loved hired him as sports information specialist, a partsports. He had basketball in his DNA, having played time job to which he devoted full-time energy for 16 with distinction at Glendale High School as a good- years. He was able to reside in Santa Barbara because sized (almost 64) point guard. He continued to play Punzal offered him a room; he stayed even after recreationally. One of his nicknames was “Twine,” Barry got married. which he uttered when his shots landed in the net. Community college athletics can be underappreDave developed his talent for writing as sports ciated. They don’t have the hometown feeling of prep editor at UCSB’s Daily Nexus. He was a meat-and- sports and fall short of being big-time. Dave had 19 potatoes writer, telling the story of a game without teams to cover at SBCC, and he did so with such letting flourishes get in the way. It took some of us thoroughness— highlighting as many names as he several paragraphs to get to the final score; with Dave, could—that he projected value into their experience. it was always front and center. He also served as public address announcer at many His beats were Westmont College and Santa Bar- home games. bara City College. He covered their sports with as Vaquero coaches, athletes, and administrators much enthusiasm as when he got to cover the Lakers showed their appreciation on February 7, 2018, when in the NBA Finals, or the U.S. Open golf tournament, they presented Dave with an “Everyday Hero Award.” or Super Bowl XXII. Later it was announced that Dave would be the sole March Madness was one of Dave’s favorite times, member of the Vaqueros Hall of Fame Class of 2021. when he made many trips with the Westmont WarRocco Constantino, the last SBCC athletic direcriors to the NAIA Basketball Championships in Tulsa tor to work with Dave, said the news of his death was or Kansas City. Coaches Chet Kammerer and John “incredibly heartbreaking.” The coaching staff felt Moore grew fond of their beat reporter and visited his loss deeply, including women’s basketball coach Sandrine Krul, who said, “Dave was an example of him during his final days at Serenity House. SBCC football was another sport that got Dave what I try to teach my athletes: to be caring, hardexcited. He was so proud when he wrote about the working, and most importantly, inspirational. I will Vaqueros’ miraculous victory over L.A. Valley in miss him dearly.” 1996, the winning touchdown coming on a Hail Mary During the last year of Dave’s life, he had no games pass from J.T. Stone to Ryan Capretta, and he also to report on. SBCC sports were shut down for the thought up the big headline: “Hail Yes!” entire 2020-21 school year. On March 15, he sent out There was more to the job than covering games. his last press release, announcing that four Vaquero Everybody in the sports department had to answer teams — women’s soccer, water polo, tennis, and the phones — primarily to take results from coaches, men’s cross-country—had won statewide academic but we also fielded numerous demanding questions awards. He threw in a did-you-know tidbit that typibecause we were the Internet in those days — and fied his attention to detail: “SBCC’s previous record everybody pitched in to help edit wire copy and write for State Scholar teams was three, set in 2017-18.” n

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21


Letters

OCTOBER IS

Vote for Johnson

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e are joining other Santa Barbarans in enthusiastically supporting Nina Johnson for City Council in the 6th District. We know that with Nina’s experience in city government and focus on the arts that she will be able to provide the leadership necessary to make the hard decisions ahead of us. Nina knows how the city works and who to call to get things done. This will speed up a transformational recovery. Nina understands that making Santa Barbara a livable city with a repurposed downtown that includes much more housing and developing mixed-use neighborhoods that support families as well as a thriving creative community must be our vision. The Historic Cultural Landmarks District is part of the 6th District. Restoring lost housing and building economically diverse neighborhoods requires collaboration. The city will need downtown schools, a vibrant community arts center, and affordable housing. We desperately need a voice on City Council that elevates the arts and ensures that they are accessible to all of us. We appreciate that other candidates may talk the talk, but we know that Nina has the experience, skills, and network to get it done. With so many critical decisions ahead, we trust Nina to get it right. Vote for Nina Johnson in the 6th District.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month!

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The ir

First observed in October 1981 as a national “Day of Unity,” Domestic Violence Awareness Month (DVAM) is held each October as a way to unite communities across the nation in their efforts to end domestic violence. Join Domestic Violence Solutions as we honor survivors, remember those who have lost their lives, and raise our collective awareness about domestic violence to end abuse for good.

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13th Annual Luncheon SUNDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2021 11:00 AM - 1:30 PM

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Outdoor Members’ Lawn

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at

Montecito Club 920 Summit Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108

ing t hen a

Keynote Speaker: Rickie Houston

Learn More JenniEliseR@DVsolutions.org

Director of Training, A Call to Men

—Patrick Davis, Retired Exec. Dir., S.B. County Arts Commission; Claudia Bratton, former Exec. Dir., S.B. Summer Solstice Celebration

Thank You, School Board

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hank you, Santa Barbara school board, for making the right decision regarding vaccinations for all employees. Just as George Washington mandated his troops be inoculated (for smallpox), the school board members acted in the interest of the common good. A 1905 Supreme Court ruling affirmed: “But the liberty secured by the Constitution of the United States to every person within its jurisdiction does not import an absolute right in each person to be, at all times and in all circumstances, wholly freed from restraint. There are manifold restraints to which every person is necessarily subject for the common good.” As part of a group, we respect certain restraints. We don’t drive through red lights; we take a driver’s test before operating a car; we don’t yell “Fire!” in a crowded theater. In a pandemic, we don’t jeopardize others — for the common good. Thank you. The children are —Dolores Pollock, S.B. safer for your decision.

Vote for Sneddon

dvsolutions.org/13thAnnualLuncheon

Rickie Houston (he/him/his)

opinions cont’d

805.963.4458 x1109 CONNECT WITH US:

24-Hour Crisis & Info Line: 805.964.5245 dvsolutions.org • info@dvsolutions.org

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oung people in Santa Barbara need leaders who take action to protect our city and future generations against the threat of climate change. In the race for District 4, Councilmember Kristen Sneddon is the best choice for the future of our city because she believes in climate science and has acted with urgency to address this crisis. On the City Council, Sneddon has leaned into her expertise as a scientist and educator, centering environmental justice and equity in her decision making. She championed the creation of the city’s Sustainability and Resilience Department, the establishment of the Santa Barbara Clean Energy program, and is leading the charge to make Santa Barbara fossil-fuel free by 2035. As our community confronts the increasing consequences of climate change, we need qualified and visionary leadership at City Hall that will treat this issue with the seriousness it requires. The Santa Barbara Young Democrats urge District 4 constituents to support local climate action by voting to reelect Councilmember Kristen Sneddon on November 2.

—Ian Baucke, Dir. Advocacy and Policy, S.B. Young Democrats

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Get

w w w.D owntownSB.org

Vaccinated.

Join us for an evening of art and culture in Downtown SB. FREE! Music by The Cover Alls. * Masks required *

publichealthsbc.org/vaccine

1st THURSDAY TONIGHT! OCT 7, 5-8PM

A Love Letter to a Woman in the Arts

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n August, after more than 36 years of service, Kathy Koury retired as Executive Director of the Children’s Creative Project (CCP). For those who may not know, Kathy’s the person who brought the art of street painting to the Western Hemisphere in the form of the I Madonnari Italian Street Painting Festival, our beloved festival at the Old Mission every Memorial Day weekend. I Madonnari has become the model for street painting festivals all over the U.S., North America, and Mexico. It’s a major fundraiser for art programs that provide art experiences for thousands of children in our local schools. With Kathy’s leadership, the CCP has grown into a program that serves 100 public schools and 50,000 students in Santa Barbara County every year, with a comprehensive catalog of touring and resident artists and free performances by major artists at the Arlington Theatre and the S.B. Bowl. Kathy’s vision and passion for the arts, for children and artists, and


STEVE SACK

children who will become artists, and actors, and dancers, and musicians, has been an immeasurable gift to our community. She’s single-handedly facilitated lasting friendships among artists from all parts of the world, especially the street painting community, “The Tribe.” She leaves her legacy in the capable hands of Kai Tepper, the CCP staff, and Board of Directors. Kathy, we are forever grateful for all you have given us. I know I speak for all of the street painters in saying that we hope you’ll be our I Madonnari Maestra forever. —Ann Hefferman, S.B.

No Vax? No Thanks

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eet the S.B. doctor who refuses to be vaccinated? No, thanks. He’s not vaccinated. I am, to protect myself and those around me. This physician has chosen to expound his religious beliefs and possibly political ones as well on those he has taken an oath to heal. His agenda seems to be more important to him than taking advantage of the best that medical science has to offer. Can it be, then, he is against vaccines that protect against smallpox, polio, shingles, and countless other vaccines, all of which rely on testing for safety and efficacy in humans? Is he against the courageous people who get the vaccine to help eradicate the diseases and the human suffering they cause? This physician is not willing to protect his patients, his family, or his colleagues. As a medical professional, he should know that his self-proclaimed resistance to this catastrophic virus does not apply to everyone. As the mother of a physician, I cannot imagine such carelessness and callousness toward the loved ones of the 700,000 American souls lost. —Antonia Powell, S.B.

County District Drawing

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he right to vote is one of our most foundational rights as Americans — we all have the right to be equally represented. Santa Barbara County is currently redistricting, a process that relies on community members weighing in on what the five supervisor districts should look like. The process assesses the district boundaries and will redraw all of them based on the federal 2020 Census. Changes in the county’s population require new districts,

and the result must comply with the California Fair Maps Act. County Measure G requires that this process be led by the nonpartisan Citizens’ Independent Redistricting Commission. This commission’s mission is to determine the supervisorial district borders based on community-submitted maps and feedback to not only satisfy the state’s legal requirements, but most importantly to accurately represent and enfranchise our diverse communities. The commission’s top priority is to get our diverse communities engaged in this process. Having residents in every community share their thoughts on what supervisorial districts should look like creates better county government and ensures that each member of our community has an impact on local policy The final map will decide a great deal — including how residents vote, which communities they vote with, and which supervisor will represent them following the June 2022 election and in all elections for the next decade. We cannot accomplish our goal of creating the most fair and equitable county district map without your help. More about maps and how to submit your thoughts are at drawsantabarbaracounty.org. They are due by October 18 and can also be submitted via email at redistricting@countyofsb.org. (For the full letter, see independent.com/redistricting.)

—Glenn Morris, 5th Dist., SBCIRC Chair; Megan Turley, 2nd Dist., Vice Chair

Why Does the Chicken Line Cross the Road?

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wo very large signs posted at the entrance to Chick-fil-A say that it is illegal to block traffic on State Street if cars and customers are unable to enter the driveway. On Tuesday night at 5:30 p.m., five cars were waiting to get into the driveway, causing a severe traffic backup on State Street. This is extremely unsafe and is getting worse every day. —Catharine Arnold, S.B.

Ruin of Hollister Beach

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pening up Hollister Ranch is a terrible idea; it will ruin the area. Surfers are the biggest threat, leaving trash and disrespecting the landowners. We don’t need more people and out-of-town surfers wrecking this place. —Brad Blue, S.B. INDEPENDENT.COM

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COVER STORY

GETTING TO KNOW THE

MAYORAL CANDIDATES An Inside Look into Who They Are and What They Think by N I C K W E L S H • Photos by E R I C K M A D R I D

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s Americans grow more disconnected from our state and federal governments, we increasingly look to our mayors to take care of business. The word “mayor” comes from the Latin maior, meaning the biggest and the best, but technically most mayors are really just one among equals. They run the meetings, help set the agendas, and herd cats. Since Santa Barbara voted for district elections, the mayor remains the only council position elected citywide. It’s a tough post. The city charter does not give the mayor much actual power. An effective mayor requires imagination, audacity, stamina, patience, and a sense of the moment — all the ephemera for what’s usually described as “leadership.” In its 171 years as a city, Santa Barbara has had 50 mayors. In the early days, there were four De la Guerras and three Carillos, founding families subsequently memorialized by downtown street names. During the Great Depression, we had Edmund O. Hanson, a proto-Trumpian megalomaniacal populist whack job who was criminally prosecuted and bribed to leave town. Some of our mayors were genuinely gifted in the arts of governance. In the 1950s, Jack Rickard (a De la Guerra descendant) figured out how to annex land in the Goleta Valley to create our airport. Rickard’s imaginative thinking proved so crafty that the state legislature outlawed anyone else from trying it. Our current mayor, Cathy Murillo, the first Latina to hold the office, assumed the reins in one of the rockiest four years in memory. Sworn in the very day the Montecito debris flow claimed 23 lives, she has since presided over a city in nonstop crisis: drought, fire, pandemic, racial reckoning, an uncertain retail core, and a housing market increasingly inaccessible to all but the fortunate few. Murillo, now seeking a second term, is being challenged by five candidates all convinced they can do a better job. The perennial issues are housing, the homeless population, and the condition of downtown. But the real issue animating this election is leadership. Who knows how to wield it? That is important because the current six councilmembers, who have met almost exclusively via Zoom since the pandemic, have displayed an animosity toward one another that is palpably jarring. Add the turnover among the city’s top executives — the next council will hire a new police chief and new city administrator — and it’s little wonder there’s a sense of apprehension over at City Hall. Whoever wins will be the mayor of a city with 91,000 residents and many thousand more daily commuters and tourists, as well as about 1,000 employees, with its own police force, its own commercial harbor, its own airport, its own waste disposal operation, its own water agency — with a desalination plant and two dams — and countless beaches and parks. By any reckoning, Santa Barbara is a very big little city. All the candidates are interesting. All have something to say.

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CATHY MURILLO To understand who Cathy Murillo is, you need to know what Maria Hurtado Delgadillo meant — and still means — to her. Only everything. Murillo grew up in Boyle Heights, the middle child in a wildly chaotic and alcoholic household. Her mother would marry three times. Her father was a gang member and drug dealer who served eight years in Folsom prison. Murillo remembers getting dressed up on Easter Sunday to go visit him. Of her parents — both now dead — Murillo would say, “They taught me resiliency.” Murillo’s Rock of Gibraltar through all this was her grandmother Maria Hurtado Delgadillo. She was a garment worker, a stalwart with the International Ladies Garment Workers Union. As Murillo tells it, the union is why her grandmother could afford the duplex where Murillo spent much of her childhood and why her grandmother received a pension check “that allowed her a dignified retirement.” It’s little surprise then that Murillo has been the most ardently pro-union mayor and councilmember the city has ever had. Shortly after Murillo was first elected to the council in 2011, she cast the deciding vote against a proposed ballot initiative to limit the city’s pension obligations.  This past year, Murillo played a pivotal role pushing the Project Labor Agreement (PLA) the council recently adopted. This requires union workers be hired for any City Hall capital project valued at more than $5 million. Critics — and there are many — contend this will hurt local contractors, most of whom are not unionized. The fact that Murillo is now receiving tens of thousands of dollars in campaign donations from trade unions benefiting directly from this arrangement, critics contend, smacks of pay-to-play politics. Murillo is unfazed. In fact, she cites the PLA as one of her proudest accomplishments.  For most Santa Barbarans, Murillo insists, life is pretty good, especially those who own their own homes and have jobs. But as a councilmember, Murillo was all about underdogs: Steelhead trout. Pit bulls. Homeless people. People living in vans. At-risk teens. Renters.

CONT’D ON P. 27


RANDY ROWSE

At age 67, Rowse finds himself riding the tail end of the Baby Boom comet. He grew up in suburban Southern California — West Covina — where the air was choked with burning smog. Even so, Leave It to Beaver still reflected what passed for real life. Rowse’s father, a soft-spoken World War II vet, ran an auto parts supply shop. His mother ran the family-owned swim school. Rowse worked at both as a kid. He played high school football; though small, he was tough and just a little bit sneaky, and his team made it to the CIF finals. Rowse is now running for mayor just two years after retiring from the council on which he served for nine years and after selling the Paradise Café, over which he held court for nearly 30 years. The explanation for Rowse’s political comeback? “I cannot remain playing cello on the passenger deck as the Titanic charges toward the iceberg,” he said. When Rowse graduated from high school, acceptance to a UC campus was not as difficult as it is today. In 1972, Rowse was admitted to UCSB, then famous — or infamous — as a beach party school. Eventually he decided to study environmental studies. “I wasn’t that political in high school, but I cared about the environment,” Rowse explained. “Remember the smog? We couldn’t breathe.” Despite that, Rowse never got the activist itch to save the world. Instead, he played rugby and intramural football and enjoyed the youthful exuberance of belonging to the Lambda Ki Alpha fraternity. Life was fun. He learned to sail. Does all this background help answer the core questions that have dogged Rowse since he first stumbled onto the City Council more than 10 years ago? Is he a liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican? Who and what is Randy Rowse? Rowse, for the record, insists he’s never been a Republican, though both his parents were. He was a registered Democrat for most of his life, he said, voting for Barack Obama in 2008. But by 2012, he’d switched political streams, re-registered as a Declined to State, and voted for Mitt Romney. The rest, as they say, is mystery. And Rowse likes it that way. His political leanings were informed by his experiences as a former bartender, where he learned how to see much, say little, and always have a good-humored quip at the ready.  A fierce proponent of pothole politics, Rowse has grown impatient with what he terms the intrusion of national issues and party politics into the City Council. Rowse believes the local Democratic Party machine holds undue sway over the City Council. And he is especially incensed over the growing influence of labor unions, calling the Project Labor Agreement “a low-water mark in local politics.” As councilmember, Rowse was moderate by temperament and cautious in his votes. When the council regained a progressive majority, Rowse consistently sought to apply the brakes. On environmental issues — such as the plastic bag ban — he preferred appealing to the public’s better angels rather than imposing legislative solutions. On homelessness, Rowse favored a stronger enforcement presence in response to what he termed “aberrant behavior.” He fought to fund all 142 positions of the police department and worked hard to build public support for a sales tax increase — Measure C — that would fund the construction of a new police headquarters as well as other unfunded capital projects. About the present council, Rowse asks, why not use the existing Police and Fire Commission, rather than creating police civil review board, which, he suggested, looks like a national solution in search of local problem? He opposed the council’s recently adopted natural gas ban on new development, as well as the rental relocation assistance package, arguing the latter exceeded the deal hammered out by landlord and tenant advocates. “I always choose mediation over legislation,” he commented.  Rowse, who has raised $233,000, is now enjoying generous support from downtown property owners, developers, and business interests, not to mention the firefighters’ and police officers’ unions and the Chamber of Commerce. But even many in the business community have expressed cautious concern about Rowse’s skepticism of the downtown’s new promenade and other proposals designed to aid the retail economy.  When Rowse first announced his candidacy, he questioned the State Street promenade and how its supporters were comparing it to Santa Barbara’s profound physical transformation after the 1925 earthquake. To him, he said, “It’s closer to a neutron bomb.” Today, he says closing of State Street was “the right thing,” but bristles at being described as “a curmudgeon” just because he’s “not getting giddy at the next pep rally.” His more immediate and simple solution for downtown? “Clean the living youknow-what out of it and light it generously.”

JAMES JOYCE III “How does a 65 Black man disappear in a town like Santa Barbara?” asks James Joyce III, the former chief of staff for then-State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson. “It was my job to be invisible, and I was good at it,” he said. But not anymore. Joyce is running to be the city’s 51st mayor, and the first Black mayor in city history. For nine years, Joyce was Jackson’s right-hand man, running her Santa Barbara offices and working with federal, state, and local officials who were supposedly working together but often weren’t. He was at such meetings during some of Santa Barbara’s worse catastrophes: Elliot Rodger’s deadly Isla Vista rampage, the Refugio Oil Spill, the Thomas Fire, the 1/9 Debris Flow, the drought, the Conception’s fatal boat fire, and, of course, the COVID pandemic. Joyce said he was notably underwhelmed by Mayor Murillo in many of these situations. “Why are you here?” he remembers wondering sometimes. For instance, he said, City Hall should have reached out more aggressively to local businesses during the economic meltdown following the COVID lockdown. “It’s easy to play armchair quarterback, but we should have been walking these folks through the application process to get their PPP loans.” More underwhelming was Murillo’s response to the Black Lives Matters march last May in the wake of the George Floyd murder, when she showed up behind a phalanx of police officers, all holding body shields. It was then that Joyce’s name as a potential mayoral contender first surfaced.  Joyce was born and raised in Westminster, Maryland, a suburb of Baltimore. His father, James Joyce Jr., was a Marine combat engineer who saw action in Vietnam. “He didn’t know how to be a father to children,” Joyce said. It was his mother, Charlotte Brown, a former model and social worker, who raised Joyce and his sister. In his 8th grade class, Joyce wrote a report on “Do You Understand the Black Man in Your Community?” Westminster was largely white. His work impressed the teacher. “Have you given any thought to journalism?” the teacher asked. “What’s that?” Joyce replied. “It seems like it comes naturally to you,” the teacher said. Good grades and an athletic talent for running high hurdles got Joyce into Ohio University. Joyce worked for the NAACP, joined the oldest Black fraternity in the country, wrote for the school newspaper, and participated in the student senate. “The best way to be successful is to surround yourself with successful people,” he said. Out of college, Joyce got a job with a paper in Marion, Indiana, infamous for being the site of the last lynching north of the Mason–Dixon Line. While there, Joyce interviewed an elderly man who miraculously survived a public lynching. “That real-life conversation happened in my lifetime,” James exclaimed. “We’re not that far removed no matter how much of a bubble we’re in.” From there, he took a reporting job in Yakima, Washington, where so many Latinos worked harvesting crops that it had a direct bus line to Tijuana. Joyce learned Spanish in Yakima, and, four years later, he joined a paper in Toledo, Ohio, where the Tea Party was in full flower of angry insurrection. Joyce was initially apprehensive about interviewing the crowds rallying outside the auditorium where Barack Obama and John McCain were about to hold a debate. “It wasn’t what I was expecting,” he said. “They were nice.”  In the recession of 2008, romance brought him to North Hollywood, but a community organizing job with CAUSE took him to Oxnard. That’s where he connected with Das Williams, then a state assemblymember. He hired Joyce first as a campaign organizer and then as administrative staff. In 2012, HannahBeth Jackson offered Joyce a staff job, and, with Williams’s blessing, he took it.  When Jackson got termed out last year, Joyce focused on the business he started in 2016, Coffee with a Black Guy, a format that offered a safe space for people to talk about race. Conversationally, Joyce is both low-key but definite.

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COVER STORY

DEBORAH SCHWARTZ If political pedigree and years of experience counted, Deborah Schwartz would be a slam dunk to become the city’s next mayor. But if recent polls are to be believed, Schwartz, now in her 12th year on the city’s Planning Commission, is struggling to get her message out. Schwartz, the first challenger out the gate, was genuinely formidable as a fundraiser, having raised $149,000, largely from architects, commercial real estate owners, and developers. But those downtown business interests who initially backed Schwartz because of her brisk efficiency running meetings and outspoken impatience over City Hall red tape now think another pro-business candidate, Randy Rowse, has the more approachable personality needed to connect with mainstream voters. Schwartz talks about “a great hollowing out of our community” with high housing prices severing the bonds that used to define the Santa Barbara where she was raised. Had her parents moved to Santa Barbara today — as opposed to the 1960s — they could never afford to buy a home. Schwartz’s father, an acclaimed linguistic professor, moved his family here from Harvard when he accepted an appointment at UCSB. Her mother, Naomi Schwartz, eventually became one of the most revered figures of Santa Barbara’s progressive movement, serving on the California Coastal Commission, as State Senator Gary Hart’s chief of staff, and for many years

JAMES JOYCE III He’sClub not Branch about diversity training or dissecting (800) Local 741-1605 Your Auto micro-aggressions, he said. It’s about separating intent from impact and figuring out how to integrate these concepts into one’s life. The Joyce campaign has been a work in progress. Many admirers worry it’s been too low-key to be viable. Despite much favorable media coverage, Joyce has raised only $51,000 in the last campaign report; the mayoral frontrunners are posting in excess of $200,000. On the issues, Joyce has called for campaign finance reform by limiting the amount of money donors can contribute and requiring a time gap before elected recipients can vote on issues benefiting their donors. He’s called for a vaccine mandate for city workers and has suggested City Hall issue bonds — requiring a vote of the people — to underwrite the cost of new affordable housing.  Joyce takes a dim view of Ed. St. George’s proposed four-story development on Milpas Street — recently approved by the council — say-

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as 1st District county supervisor. Schwartz was in 4th grade when the family moved to Santa Barbara, first settling in the horse-friendly haven of Arbolado Road in Noleta. The family later bought a fixer-upper on Middle Road in Montecito for less than $100,000. Because of that address, Schwartz said, she would be inaccurately tagged as a rich kid at Santa Barbara Junior High School, then equal parts white, Latino, and Black.

After graduating from UCSB, Schwartz moved in 1984 to San Francisco, where she lived for 21 years. There she worked for a large national telecommunications company as a governmental affairs lobbyist dealing with the Public Utilities Commission. But when she was assigned to Dallas, Texas, she cashed out and moved back to Santa Barbara, where she started her own land-use-permitting firm, Mesa Consulting.

CONT’D ON P. 28

CONT’D FROM P. 25 ing it will gentrify one of Santa Barbara’s oldest neighborhoods. He would not have approved the construction of a new police station at the site of the current farmers’ market until the farmers’ market had found a new location. As for the State Street promenade, he would have voted to make that permanent and has faulted City Hall for failing to address the fate of the historic brown pride murals in Ortega Park. As far as homelessness goes, James stressed, individualized plans should be crafted and followed up on to help these people off the streets. “You really think these people would prefer to be a nuisance in the park if they had a pathway to success?” he asked.  In the meantime, the former high hurdler finds himself running for office while recovering from surgery from a torn quadricep that for many months made it almost impossible for him to even walk. “There’s a need for leadership,” he said. “Someone needs to be the conductor of the orchestra, to set the tone and to set the pace.” 


Thank You

CATHY MURILLO

CONT’D FROM P. 24

Murillo was the first and most vociferous councilmember to oppose the gang injunction. Today, she takes pride that the city is poised to create a police civilian review board. Murillo is a blunt force in a community more accustomed to mayoral finesse. Fellow councilmembers — including those who supported the PLA—reportedly felt her wrath when they objected to even small details of the plan. When the council adopted a tenant relocation assistance package for renters displaced through no fault of their own, landlords objected—with some cause—that Murillo had changed the rules to push it through. As mayor, Murillo has yet to convincingly reach out beyond her own base and the Democratic Central Committee. She famously refused to participate in the Chamber of Commerce’s annual State of the City event, citing that oil companies had co-sponsored the event. The Chamber also opposed Murillo in her first mayoral race. She was conspicuously absent at Hal Conklin’s memorial service, a large public event in front of the Old Mission; Murillo explained she had a cold. Conklin ran against Murillo for mayor four years ago and, had he not been stricken with brain cancer, might have done so again. From the day Murillo was sworn in as mayor, a blistering and disruptive feud began between her and Councilmember Jason Dominguez. (He, it should be noted, started it.) Murillo then moved heaven and earth to help Alejandra Gutierrez defeat Dominguez. But today, Murillo’s relations with Councilmember Gutierrez are almost as toxic as they’d been with Dominguez.  The level of personal and political acrimony among all councilmembers is as high as it’s ever been. District elections and Zoom meetings haven’t helped. But many around City Hall contend Murillo has the memory of an elephant when it comes to who has not supported her. Theses tensions have been exacerbated by an exodus of high-ranking city officials, the pandemic, a stream of natural disasters, the dramatic bump in the number of visibly homeless people, and the future health of State Street.  Murillo, a theater arts major at UCSB and a former journalist with the Santa Barbara Independent, has been conspicuously absent from the bully pulpit during these catastrophic eruptions. Her critics have been quick to cry, “Where’s Cathy?” Murillo, however, said, “The emergency is not about me. The focus should be on the first responders.” As for downtown, Murillo noted the council hired an economic development czar, created an ombudsperson position to help businesses caught up in red tape, and is embarking on an ambitious collective reimagining of State Street. In the meantime, she is almost giddy about the new promenade. “Every time I walk State Street, there are people, young people, moms with strollers, dog walkers,” and she hopes one day downtown will have a dance floor “so people my age can have a place to dance.” Murillo’s ace in the hole is her willingness to work harder than anyone else walking precincts. She’s been doing it since 2009. When people open the door, she said, she often knows them from past campaigns. “I’m doing pretty well at the doors,” she said. She’s also been doing pretty well in her campaign coffers, having raised $190,000. Win, lose, or draw, it’s been a long road for a girl from Boyle Heights. “To be in this place in history,” Murillo said, “I never expected to be here.” 

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COVER STORY Growing up in Des Moines, Iowa, Mark Whitehurst played the starring role in the Secret Life of Walter Mitty, about the imaginary adventures of a gentle man living an uneventful life. Since then, Whitehurst has sought to live a life of adventure. His entry into this year’s mayoral race — which caught all political observers flatfooted — would be a case in point. “Fun, Nick,” he told me. “I’m having fun.” Throughout his many incarnations as an itinerant newspaperman, he wandered from Oregon, throughout the Midwest, and eventually to Santa Barbara. During that time, he earned degrees in education, government administration, and, here in Santa Barbara, mythology from Pacifica Institute. Whitehurst has spent 27 years in the trenches of Santa Barbara community journalism, first running Casa — a real estate shopper — and more recently Voice Magazine, a print megaphone for those toiling to create a downtown arts scene. During this time, Whitehurst served 14 years on the board of the Downtown Organization, where he helped create 1st Thursday, the monthly downtown art and wine crawl. Whitehurst favors the new State Street promenade. “It has to be professionalized and Santa Barbarized in terms of circulation and architecture, but I love it. We need to figure out places for musicians and places where kids can play. But it’s wonderful,” he said. The promenade, he noted, was an emergency response to the pandemic; it was not, as it should be, the by-product of deliberate vision and leadership. “Big energy needs big ideas,” he said. “I know how to follow the energy.” As far as homelessness goes, Whitehurst parts company from many in the business commu-

nity. “I don’t think the homeless are the cause of our economic decline. Of the city’s 900 homeless people, maybe 40 of them are downtown…. I think these people need mental-health beds instead. They need meds. Some need to be institutionalized.”

The quixotic nature of Whitehurst’s candidacy — he was the last to enter the race and has not raised enough money to warrant filing financial disclosure reports — has some questioning whether he’s a spoiler, designed to take votes from Randy Rowse, the pro-business candidate more likely to prevail against incumbent Cathy Murillo. “I’m not a spoiler,” Whitehurst insisted. “I’m running my own campaign on my own issues. I see a clear path to victory.” That’s what Walter Mitty would have said.

DEBORAH SCHWARTZ Schwartz ran for City Council 13 years ago as a competent, business-minded professional but lost. Shortly after, she was appointed to the Planning Commission. Supporters praise her performance there as smart, businesslike, efficient, and painstakingly thorough. Critics, however, contend that she’s condescending, rough on staff, talks too long, and tilts toward pro-development. As Schwartz sees it, the City of Santa Barbara is in serious need of leadership. Of incumbent Mayor Cathy Murillo, she stated, “I don’t see her as a match for the requirements of the job. In ordinary times, a more modest skill set would be sufficient. But these are not ordinary times.” The city has failed to reform its convoluted land-use-permitting process and has no comprehensive plan for economic development, Schwartz said, and the effort to reconfigure State Street should have included the Mesa, Milpas Street, and outer State Street. “There’s a leadership vacuum,” she said, “and someone has to step into the void.”

28

THE INDEPENDENT

OCTOBER 7, 2021

CONT’D FROM P. 26 Schwartz takes issue with most of what the council has accomplished: Its vote for 15 percent of inclusionary housing in new rental housing was too much. The council’s ban on natural gas in new developments was too abrupt. The tenants’ relocation assistance program giving three months’ rent goes too far. And instead of the city commission now drafting recommendations for a police civilian review board, Schwartz thinks an audit of the city’s hiring, training, pay, and promotional practices would be best. Of Schwartz’s three brothers, one — a mathematically brilliant former rock drummer — is now living on the streets in Northern California. “He would have benefited with some form of mental-health intervention in his early teens,” and his plight, she said, underscored the urgency for City Hall to craft a more comprehensive plan to address homelessness. “What Santa Barbara was, we can’t go back in time and get,” Schwartz said. “But we can do our best in rebuilding an economically diverse and vibrant sense of community.”

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DAVID MATTHEW ‘BOAT RAT MATT’ KILRAIN David Matthew Kilrain exudes the fevered intensity of Old Testament prophets who walk too long in the desert. During an early-morning interview, Kilrain forcefully jabbed with his index finger, loudly denouncing the “corruption and crookedness” of City Hall. “I can’t handle any more oppression and tyranny,” he said. Kilrain has clashed frequently with City Hall and claims it was he who successfully pressured Paul Casey — among other city officials — to resign. Kilrain, a boat dealer by trade, is running a classic outsider’s campaign. His yard signs are handpainted, and his nickname, “Boat Rat Matt,” is certainly unforgettable. “In Santa Barbara,” he explained, “a ‘rat’ is like a ‘bro,’ a cool person.” During forums and interviews, Kilrain espouses a “four cornerstones” platform. His first cornerstone is to make Santa Barbara a safer community for children. Child abuse, he said, is not merely tolerated in Santa Barbara but encouraged, pointing to “transvestite hookers” walking the same early-morning streets as junior high school students and to young girls forced to share public restrooms with sexually fluid individuals endowed with male genitalia. He said he “knocked up” a woman — his son’s 1st grade teacher at the time — who got an abortion without notifying him. If elected, he’d push an initiative to give would-be fathers some say to stop “spontaneous pregnancy terminations.” And he would propose an anti-discrimination initiative to protect those who have smoked pot and those who have refused vaccination shots. Now 60, Kilrain moved to Santa Barbara at age 24. His own father — Joseph “Duffy” Kilrain — was murdered in 1979 after being arrested with 200 pounds of marijuana. Kilrain described his father as “the greatest entrepreneur in history” and someone who helped create the nightclub scenes in Miami and Atlanta. Kilrain’s mother died when he was still in 1st grade.  In Santa Barbara, Kilrain has run a car detailing business and valet parking operation and brokered the sale of many boats, claiming such sales have saved hundreds of people from lives of homelessness. Kilrain also said he invented the electric bike in 1993. At the first in-person forum held this season, Kilrain’s fellow candidates were astonished to learn that he had not been vaccinated. When he was asked to put on a mask, Kilrain delivered a tirade against masks. The forum ended abruptly, however, when a woman in the audience had a stroke, so the issue was never resolved.  If elected, Kilrain would be the first man since 1993 to be elected mayor. “This town is run by women,” he said. “Men get no choice in this town; they do what the women say.”

COURTESY

MARK WHITEHURST


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29


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit. Downtown, 29 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 565-6051.

10/9: Housing Santa Barbara Day 2021 This annual free public event is for

tinyurl.com/ExamineCannabis

10/7: Bear Cave Comedy Laugh with an A-list lineup who have played the Comedy Store and HaHa Comedy Club alongside S.B. comics opening the show. Wine, beer, and food will be available for purchase. 7-9pm. Old Town Coffee, 5877 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $13-$18.

tinyurl.com/BearCaveOct7

10/7-10/10, 10/12-10/13: Tenderly: The Rosemary Clooney Musical This personal and poignant

10/7-10/8:

An Evening with Los Lobos with Nancy Sanchez Grammy

Award–winning band Los Lobos will bring their eclectic sound to S.B., combining son jarocho, norteño, Tejano, folk, country, doo-wop, soul, R&B, rock ’n’ roll, and punk. Jazz vocalist Nancy Sanchez will open the show with Mexican folklórico, jazz, latin alternative, and pop. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $59-$106. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/events

THURSDAY 10/7 10/7: Zoom Live Downtown Business Spotlight: Downtown Boutiques Join Robin Elander (executive director, Downtown Organization) in conversation with Erica Brown (Dylan Star) and Robin Baron and Grace Paulette (Salt Boutique) in this week’s virtual interview. 3pm. Free.

independent.com/extra

10/7-10/9, 10/12-10/13: Maker Challenge: Protect Your Martian! | Desafio de la Creatividad: ¡Desafío Para Proteger Tu Marciano! Take home this kit to make a Martian and then experiment with how you can protect your alien from the sun. Learn about UV rays with this fun UV bead activity! Visit the website for times and locations. Llévate a casa este kit para que hagas un Marciano y luego experimenta cómo puedes proteger a tu alienígena del sol. ¡Aprende acerca de los rayos UV con esta actividad divertida de abalorios UV! Visite el sitio web para

conocer los horarios y los lugares. S.B. Central Library, 40 E Anapamu St.; Eastside Library, 1102 E. Montecito St. Free/gratis. Call/ llama (805) 962-7653. Email youthservices@ santabarbaraca.gov.

10/7: Talk to Examine Cannabis Benefits, Harms Ronald See, Westmont professor of psychology and neuroscience and researcher at the forefront of creating experimental models of drug relapse and addiction, will deliver a lecture titled Lost in the Weeds? A Neuroscience Perspective on Cannabis. 5:30pm. Outdoor Patio, Westmont

/8 FRIDAY 10

tinyurl.com/YourMartian-TuMarciano 10/7: Virtual Discussion: Global TV: The Hollow Crown This stunning

television series comprises feature-length adaptations of Shakespeare’s plays about the civil war that inspired Game of Thrones. Stream Season 2, Episode 3 of The Hollow Crown in advance (Amazon Prime), and then join writer Ben Power in a virtual discussion with James McNamara (Film and Media Studies, UCSB). 4-5pm. Free. Call (805) 893-4903.

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This interactive art experience will offer fall cocktails, beer, and Halloween-inspired crafts. 5-8pm. Museum of Contemporary Art S.B., 653 Paseo Nuevo. Free. Email sjong@mcasantabarbara.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM

10/9: Ted Nash: The Sound of Art As part of his two-week stay as S.B. Museum of Art’s artist in residence, Grammy Award–winning musician and composer Ted Nash worked with SBCC students and fellow musicians to create music influenced by the transformation of space at the SBMA. 2:30pm. Front Terrace, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@sbma.net. sbma.net/events

10/9, 10/13: S.B. Bowl Concerts Sat.: Foreigner: The Hits Orchestral. $41$135. Wed.: Brothers Osborne, Travis Denning, Tenille Townes. $45-$75. 7pm. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411.

sbbowl.com/concerts

SUNDAY 10/10

10/9: Ann Sweeten Solo Piano Performance Take in the new age/classical/jazz sound of Ann Sweeten, whose album A Change in in the Wind was released in June. 7:30pm. Logan House, Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts, Logan House, 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. Call (805) 646-3381. $25.

tary of housing and urban development and presidential candidate will share insight from his political journey and his 2018 memoir, An Unlikely Journey: Waking Up from My American Dream. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: Free; GA: $25. Call (805) 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

MONDAY 10/11 10/11: SBUSD Mobile Vaccine Clinic | Clínica móviles de vacunación To help keep your child safe, children age 12+ can now receive the COVID vaccine at school. The vaccine is free, no appointment

In-Person, One-Woman Opening Reception: Avanti! Oil paintings,

collage, and assemblage pieces will be featured by Italianborn fine artist Angela Ferraro. The reception will include the rising stars of State Street Ballet. The exhibition will show through December 2. 5:30-7:30pm. S.B. Tennis Club, 2375 Foothill Rd. Call (805) 451-3351 to RSVP. Free.

10/7: In-Person: Curated Cocktails

OCTOBER 7, 2021

housingsantabarbara.org

10/10: Arts & Lectures Presents Julián Castro: Waking Up from My American Dream The former U.S. secre-

SATURDAY 10/9

10/8:

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“Final Encore,” Angela Ferraro

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 30

etcsb.org

beatricewood.com/ schedule.html

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bio-musical of the legendary song stylist stars Lina Purl as Rosemary and includes characters such as Frank Sinatra, Jose Ferrer, and Bing Crosby and will feature a live, onstage band performing songs such as “Hey There (You with the Stars in Your Eyes),”“Tenderly,”“Come On-A My House,” and more. The show previews on October 7 and 8, opens on October 9, and runs through October 24. Thu.: 7:30pm; Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2 and 7pm; Tue.: 7pm. The New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. Preview: $25-$47; GA: $25-$67. Call (805) 965-5400 or email boxoffice@etcsb.org.

community members to connect with local nonprofit agencies and service providers and participate in housing-related workshops, affordable housing trolley tours, music, food, and more. 10am-2pm. De la Guerra Plaza, 15 E. De la Guerra St. Free.


OCT.

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COVID-19 VENUE POLICY Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

with Gerald Clayton (piano) Rueben Rogers (bass) and Justin Brown (drums)

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Whitney, Renée Reed Whitney (Max

Kakacek and Julien Ehrlich) will bring new songs and sounds as well as a stripped-back lineup to S.B. with a focus on being in the moment. Opening the show will be guitarist Renée Reed, who combines “off-kilter folk with authentic Cajun soul.” 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $46-$51. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on

Getting to Know You

10/7: Virtual Discussions with the Candidates: S.B. City Council District 6 Join S.B. Independent Senior Editor Tyler Hayden as he sits down for a Zoom discussion with candidates Meagan Harmon, Nina Johnson, and Jason Carlton. Register in advance. 5:30pm. Free. independent.com/discussions

10/7: 2021 S.B. Mayoral Candidates Virtual Forum The Colleges of Law will host this public panel that will be broadcast on Zoom and Facebook Live with all six candidates present. Join for questions on local housing and State Street business development with an audience Q&A. Noon-1:30pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/MayoralCandidatesForum

10/11: Virtual Discussions with the Candidates: S.B. City Council District 4 Join S.B. Independent reporter Jun Starkey as she sits down for a Zoom discussion with candidates Barrett Reed and Kristen Sneddon. Register in advance. 5:30pm. Free. independent.com/discussions

OCT 22

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31


OUR

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Science Pub from Home: Beetles of Western North America Join entomologist, photographer, and Smithsonian Research Associate Art Evans, D.Sc., for an introduction to his latest book, Beetles of Western North America, the only color photographic guide to the beetles west of the Continental Divide. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Email scoleman @sbnature2.org. COURTESY

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DIRECTED BY

is needed, and any parent, family member, or person living with you is eligible. Para ayudar a mantener a su hijo(a) seguro, los niños mayores de 12 años pueden ahora recibir la vacuna contra el COVID en la escuela. La vacuna es gratuita, no se necesita cita, y cualquier padre/madre, miembro familiar o persona que vive con usted es elegible. 6:30-10am. S.B. High School, 700 E. Anapamu St. Free.

A ComEDY BY

Katie Laris

David Lindsay-Abaire

OCTOBER 15-30, 2021 PREVIEWS OCT. 13 & 14

805.965.5935 www.theatregroupsbcc.com at the Garvin Theatre

Thank you to our season sponsor:

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TUESDAY 10/12 INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

10/12: Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion: Sharon Cameron Ther

Winter Gardening & Cooking Classes

WE ARE ALIVE AND OPEN!! COME VISIT THE CLUB... YOU’LL LOVE WHAT YOU SEE...AND HEAR!! 10/8 - 8:30

MASHUGANA

celebrated YA author of The Light in Hidden Places will talk about her 2021 book, Bluebird, which follows Eva, who leaves Berlin for N.Y.C. in 1946 and who holds the key to a deadly secret Project Bluebird, a horrific experiment of the concentration camps. 7pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com.

Check out our classes during school holidays and half days

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DAY 10/13

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DONNA GREENE & THE ROADHOUSE DADDIES

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CLEAN SPILL W/ SPOOKY MANSION & FRENCH CASSETTES JOSE LOBATO

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1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 32

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

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This online webinar will feature experts who will explain the roles of a fiduciary, help you determine if you need one, and how to go about naming a fiduciary in your estate planning. Register in advance. Noon-1pm. Call (805) 682-4711 x110 or email sclement@sbnature2.org.

10/13: Lavender Dry Shampoo Virtual Workshop Learn about your hair and scalp and how to make a custom formula of powdered dry shampoo for yourself or to give as a gift. Register to receive a shopping checklist and instructions prior to the live demo with holistic aesthetician Ivy Meyer. 6pm. $65.

tinyurl.com/LavenderShampoo

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10/12: Arts & Lectures Presents The Wood Brothers, Kat Wright Brothers Chris (bassist) and Oliver (acoustic and electric guitars), along with multi-instrumentalist Jano Rix, will bring their soulful folk and blues funk to S.B. with soul music’s sweet, sultry, powerful Kat Wright to open the show. 8pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. Students: $16; GA: $41-$51. Call (805) 893-3535.

tinyurl.com/WoodBrosA-L

10/13:

Beach Cleanup with the Sea Center: East Beach

Register in advance to join in collecting and categorizing marine debris! Bring reusable cleanup supplies, if you can, and the Sea Center will provide plastic bags and gloves. All participants must complete a waiver and bring it with them. Earn Community Service hours. Meet on the east side of Stearns Wharf, on the grassy area between the beach and the public restrooms. 2:30-4:30pm. 195 Stearns Wharf. Free.

tinyurl.com/CleanEastBeach

HOT 70’S FUNK !! 10/10 - 1:00 SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY PRESENTS:

WE CAN’T WAIT TO SEE YOU!

10/12: Lunch & Learn Webinar: Fiduciary Planning for Peace of Mind — Do I Need a Fiduciary?

Art by Jose Lobato


The Artist’s Table

Shows on Tap

ART SHOW

10/7: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) DJ Chowder, 8-10pm. 634 State St. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

tinyurl.com/MSpecialSB 10/8: Draughtsmen Aleworks at Mosaic Locale Erinn Alissa Selkis. 5pm. 1131 State St. Free. Call (805) 259-4356.

tinyurl.com/ MosaicLocale

10/8-10/10: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Different

COURTESY

Strings, 5-8pm; Paradise Kings, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Dave Bernal, 1-4pm; Randy LeDune, 5-8pm; Flannel 101, 9pm-midnight. Sun.: About Time, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

10/9: Island Brewing Co. Soulcial. 6-9pm. Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

tinyurl.com/SoulcialIBC

10/9: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Youngsters. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call

10/8: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

(805) 968-6500.

tinyurl.com/PaliWine

tinyurl.com/MSpecialGoleta

10/9-10/10: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Green Flag Summer. Sun.: Tom

10/13: The Red Piano Live Music Wednesdays. 5-9pm. 519 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 798-9079.

Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

Ralph Waterhouse, Sunset at Douglas Preserve, 36x36

OCTOBER 2–10

FEATURED ARTISTS INCLUDE: Jannene Behl Ann Shelton Beth Steve Curry Nancy Davidson Rick Delanty Karen Fedderson Ellie Freudenstein Rick Garcia Derek Harrison Wyllis Heaton Ray Hunter Linda Mutti Craig Nelson Garrett Speirs Ralph Waterhouse

10:00 AM–5:00 PM Come enjoy the beautiful works of 15 celebrated local artists and support Museum exhibits by taking art home with you. Art will be for sale in Fleischmann Auditorium (Wed–Sun) and online at sbnature.org/artshow

tinyurl.com/RedPiano

coldspringtavern.com

10/13: Topa Topa Brewing Co.

10/9: Eos Lounge A-Trak. Doors: 4pm. 500 Anacapa St. $20. Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410.

Ted Lennon. 6-9pm. 345 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai. Free. Call (805) 798-9079.

topatopa.beer/pages/ojai

eoslounge.com

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

WEDNESDAY

SATURDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

2559 Puesta del Sol Sa nta Ba rba ra , CA 93105

Media sponsor Noozhawk

Lost in the Weeds? A Neuroscience Perspective on Cannabis Ronald See, a researcher at the forefront of creating experimental models of drug relapse and addiction, speaks on the benefits and harms of cannabis.

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 7, 5:30 P.M.

29 W. ANAPAMU

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

SPONSORED BY THE WESTMONT FOUNDATION INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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33


DIRECT ROUTE: Alaskan cruising is made easy to with daily flights from Santa Barbara to Seattle.

Music COURTESY PHOTOS

COURTESY PHOTOS

Travel

Cruising the Last Frontier W

ould you go on a cruise right now? That’s the question my wife and I were confronted with as we were invited aboard the inaugural post-pandemic Celebrity cruise to Alaska in late July aboard the newly renovated Millennium. But we were reassured when we heard that all guests and crew aboard would be vaccinated, guest capacity would be limited to 60 percent, and all crew members were required to wear masks at all times. Our Veranda stateroom was impressive, complete with cashmere bedding, a bottle of red wine, brand-new cabinetry, and well-appointed furnishings, including a lit vanity, glass shower door, and

our guide led us on a brief woodland nature walk before we returned the way we came. In downtown Ketchikan, we grabbed lunch at Ketchikan Alaska Fish House, trying their salmon, cod, and halibut sampler washed down with Alaska Agave Gold and Single Engine Red beers from Denali Brewing. Arriving in Alaska’s capital city the next morning, we were invited up onto the Millennium’s helipad to gaze at Juneau’s picturesque beauty straddling the Gastineau Channel. In town, we happened upon the Mount Roberts Tramway, a six-minute gondola ride whisking visitors up to 1,800 feet, where we ambled along a two-mile nature trail and were rewarded with breathtaking views. At the Sled Dog Summer Camp, we Fine Dining, Dog Sledding, climbed aboard our custom sled, while our and a Grizzly Bear Named Kitty musher, Elke, gathered her huskies. Speeding off down a dirt track, Elke shouted commands at her pack all while telling us about her and by Gareth Kelly her individual dogs’ stories, even sharing with us how huskies go potty while racing — they balcony. We dined in the ship’s elegant Metropolitan don’t stop! A visit to the puppy kennel gave everyone restaurant — one of nine dining options aboard. the chance to hold and cuddle eight-week-olds, who Our dinner menu came from Luminae — the ship’s seemed just as excited for the extra attention. At our final port, Skagway, another shore excurmodern and eclectic cuisine restaurant exclusively sion beckoned. A half-hour ferry ride to Haines and for guests of The Retreat. The other eateries included Oceanview Café, a a short bus ride delivered us to Kroschel Wildlife buffet serving cuisine from all over the world; Café Refuge, where we were enthralled as its owner, Steve al Bacio & Gelateria, an espresso coffee bar; the Spa Kroschel (himself quite the character), introduced to Café, with lighter, healthier dishes; Tuscan Grille, us his family of animals. The climax of the visit was an Italian-inspired steakhouse; Sushi on Five; and, undoubtedly Kroschel’s grizzly bear, Kitty. Kroschel finally, Le Petit Chef at Qsine, where a collection of coaxed Kitty out into her enclosure to devour a tasty animated chefs from around the world prepare their fruit pie before being summoned back into her cage signature dishes in a mix of show, art, and culinary by the sound of banging on a porridge bowl. We felt safe and secure throughout the entire extravaganza. We awoke our first morning to the knock of room trip, but there were three positive COVID cases service delivering our hot breakfast. On our balcony, aboard. In each instance, the captain made a shipwrapped in our complimentary robes, we were greeted wide announcement assuring us of the patient’s by snow-topped mountains, lush green forests, and a care and that contact tracing had been deployed. turquoise ocean as an assortment of icebergs drifted by. Celebrity took all its COVID protocols seriously, Arriving at our first port of call, Ketchikan, con- and the impressive cleanliness of the ship contribsidered the entry point to Alaska’s famous “inside uted to our overall sense of comfort. So would you go on a cruise right now? We did, passage,” we mustered ourselves below and prepared for our first shore excursion — a backcountry Jeep and and we loved every minute of it. Thanks to all the efforts by Celebrity and their staff, we can’t wait to canoe safari. With a Wrangler all to ourselves, we drove go again. There’s still time to hop aboard an Alaskan cruise through the lush Tongass National Forest along offroad trails before arriving at a giant Tlingit-warrior- this year with direct daily flights from Santa Barbara inspired canoe. Embarking on a gentle paddle across to Seattle. For more information on all Celebrity n Lake Harriet Hunt, we arrived at an outpost, where Cruises, visit celebritycruises.com.

34

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

HERE and QUEER

K

with a Gift for Your Ears

eep your ears tuned and hearts open—we’ve got a new Gay Men’s Chorus in town, and they’re getting ready to give us a show. Led by UCSB’s Director of Choral Music Nicole Lamartine, whose conducting experience stretches nationally and internationally, the Santa Barbara Gay Men’s Chorus (SBGMC) is a tenor-based group, meaning it is composed of people with lower, deeper voices. And I say “people” intentionally. Despite its name, the SBGMC aims to be inclusive and welcomes anybody who can hold a tune in tenor, baritone, or bass. I’ve always loved music. I was one of the first among my high school friends to get their driver’s license, and it made me giddy to refuse to by Ricky Barajas move the car until my passengers sang with me. But I don’t think I can say I was ever good at singing. I just really loved watching people try their hardest to keep up to Whitney Houston’s “I Have Nothing” as we drove with our windows down. When I first learned about the new men’s choir, I considered joining but was, admittedly, a little apprehensive. But one thing that Nicole and boardmember and singer Bob Nieder really emphasize for those curious is that it’s a non-audition choir. So if you’re like me and have always wanted to learn how to sing but also get anxious at the idea of bombing an audition, you don’t have to worry. Bob described Nicole as “the most inviting and welcoming person…. She is the most patient of teachers.” After our conversation, I couldn’t shake the curiosity, so I figured one night of embarrassment was not the worst thing that could happen to me, and I went. Everybody who loves music knows the visceral power contained within the notes, and how sometimes it’s all you need to get through a hard time. Even though you can never see it, you can feel it. The day I went, it was really a spectacle to listen as, one

S.B. Gay Men’s Chorus Prepares for First-Ever Concert


living



The Arlington Theatre 

ALL TOGETHER NOW: Left, Director Nicole Lamartine leads members of the chorus in practice at the First United Methodist Church. Below, Members of the chorus gather at S.B.’s newest queer bar, Crush.

by one, the voices joined in until the entire room was buzzing, and you could feel your own voice resonating in your chest. “I was quite literally brought to tears by the physical feeling of people singing together in a room,” reminisced Bob of the group’s first post-lockdown meeting. I really understand how he was moved so deeply. We’ve all had to square off with the shape of our own loneliness these past couple of years, and music helps sand the edges down. For me, trying to learn how to read music and sing it at the same time had my brain swirling. Toward the end of my first session, though, I felt like I had started to pick up some things, and I must say it does feel nice to be in a position to learn something new. Especially to learn and apply what I’m learning within the same

window of time. Some of the more experienced members of the choir answered whatever questions that I had and made me feel much more at ease about singing than when I had first arrived. Rehearsals will take place at the First United Methodist Church at 305 East Anapamu Street on Mondays from 7-9 p.m. (doors open at 6:30 for you early birds out there). Though the official stance of the Methodist church is that homosexuality is incompatible with Christian teachings, First United has visibly aligned themselves with the LGBTQIA+ by painting their doors in a rainbow pattern, and the SBGMC has been embraced by First United, who “show the way that Christianity should be practiced,” Bob told me. He was raised Roman Catholic and grew up feeling like there was no place for him in the church, but he wanted to assure anyone who might have adverse feelings about stepping into a church that the SBGMC will provide a comfortable experience for them. The SBGMC is preparing for their first-ever recital at the First United Methodist Church on Monday, December 13. n

    

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Arlington • Paseo Nuevo • Camino

Fiesta 5

     

 

  

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Metro 4 • Camino

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Oct 8 - 14, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com

METRO 4

FA I R V I E W

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

The Addams Family 2 (PG): Fri: 5:15, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 12:45, 3:00, 5:15, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:00. The Many Saints of Newark (R): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:00, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:00, 8:00. Thur: 5:00. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. The Last Duel* (R): Thur: 8:00.

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

No Time To Die* (PG13): Fri: 12:30, 1:45, 3:00, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:30, 8:45, 10:00. Sat: 11:30, 12:30, 1:45, 3:00, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:30, 8:45, 10:00. Sun: 11:30, 12:30, 1:45, 3:00, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:30, 8:45. Mon-Thur: 1:45, 3:00, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30, 7:30, 8:45. Venom Let There Be Carnage* (PG13): Fri: 1:00, 2:00, 2:30, 3:20, 4:20, 5:00, 5:40, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 9:00, 9:40, 10:20.Sat: 11:40, 12:10, 1:00, 2:00, 2:30, 3:20, 4:20, 5:00, 5:40, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 9:00, 9:40, 10:20. Sun: 11:40, 12:10, 1:00, 2:00, 2:30, 3:20, 4:20, 5:00, 5:40, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 9:00.Mon-Wed: 2:00, 2:30, 3:20, 4:20, 5:00, 5:40, 6:40, 7:20, 8:00, 9:00. Thur: 2:00, 2:30, 3:20, 4:20, 5:00, 5:40, 6:40, 9:00. Halloween Kills* (R): Thurs: 7:20, 8:00, 9:50.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

No Time To Die* (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun, 12:30, 4:00, 7:30. INDEPENDENT.COM

Venom Let There Be Carnage* (PG13): Fri: 3:20(LP), 4:15, 5:55(LP), 6:40, 8:20(LP), 9:10. Sat: 1:00(LP), 1:55, 3:20(LP), 4:15, 5:55(LP), 6:40, 8:20(LP), 9:10. Sun: 1:00(LP), 1:55, 3:20(LP), 4:15, 5:55(LP), 6:40, 8:20(LP). Mon-Thur: 4:15, 5:55, 6:40, 8:20. Titane (R): Fri: 3:10, 5:40, 8:10. Sat/Sat: 12:40, 3:10, 5:40, 8:10. Mon-Wed: 5:40, 8:10. Thur: 5:40. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (PG13): Fri: 5:00, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:05, 5:00, 8:00. Mon-Thur: 5:00, 8:00. Halloween Kills* (R): Thur: 8:10, 9:10.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

I’m Your Man (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:30, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. The Addams Family 2 (PG): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:15, 5:15, 7:00. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 5:15, 7:00. Thur: 4:15, 8:00. The Many Saints of Newark (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45. Dear Evan Hansen (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 7:30. Sat/Sun: 2:05, 7:30. Thur: 4:30. Free Guy (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:20. Sat/Sun: 1:55, 4:40, 7:20. The Last Duel* (R): Thur: 7:30.

PA S E O N U E V O 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451

No Time To Die* (PG13): Fri/Sat: 1:30, 2:45, 5:00, 6:15, 8:30, 9:45. Sun-Thur: 1:30, 2:45, 5:00, 6:15, 8:30. Lamb (R): Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30. Mon-Thur: 3:15, 5:45, 8:15. Venom Let There Be Carnage* (PG13): Fri/Sat: 2:30, 5:10, 7:30, 9:55. Sun-Thur: 2:30, 5:10, 7:30.

OCTOBER 7, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

35


SI

NCE

19 3

6

THIS

Y

S AT U R D A

with special guest

Kikagaku Moyo

Saturday November 6th at 7pm 36

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

10/4/21 2:20 PM


living

RYAN P. CRUZ

Sports

“A BONA FIDE CINEMA CROWD-PLEASER!” – SCREEN INTERNATIONAL

BOXING BOYS: Eddie Huerta, Adolfo Dorado (little guy), Josh Inda, Isaak Huerta (other little guy with gloves), Jairo Gonzalez, Eduardo Lindo, Zico Gonzalez

T

Preaching the ‘Sweet Science’

wo brothers, Jairo and Zico Gonzalez—both members of the former Primo Boxing gym—have created Five Directions Community Club, a new space for the next wave of young fighters to train and learn the “sweet science” of boxing. Jairo was training friends and family in backyards around Santa Barbara prior to the pandemic, and when schools shut down, he noticed many kids were growing bored and restless. “We saw kids stuck at home, on their video games, on their tablets, on their computers, not really being active,” he said. The idea of opening an actual gym seemed farfetched at first, Jairo said, especially given the tim-

Five Directions Boxing Club Opens to Young Fighters by Ryan P. Cruz

ing. But after some encouragement, he decided to go for it. “At first it was scary, ’cause of the times, and the virus,” he said. “But something in my heart just told me to do it; there’s a need for it.” From the beginning, it was important that the gym, its trainers, and the equipment be accessible to all families, regardless of income, Jairo explained. Kids train free every day at the space, which is near the Santa Barbara Airport, tucked behind Casey’s Garage on Aero Camino. Soon after opening, word spread about the free classes. On a recent Wednesday, during the kids’ session, Jairo’s wife, Dolores Torres, corrals a group of 20 to 30 children as young as 6 and leads them through a gauntlet of skills stations. Some kids strap gloves on and get one-on-one time on the pads with Jairo and Zico, others practice footwork in the ring, and a few punch the bags for speed and power. After three minutes, the bell goes off. The students have one minute to catch a breath, swill some water, and switch stations before the next round begins. It’s a coordinated, familiar dance, and the children listen to the trainers’ instructions with focused attention. In recent years, youth participation in high-contact sports has dwindled. Especially boxing, which

fell out of favor to martial arts, and gyms that did offer instruction were often priced toward uppermiddle-class clients with disposable incomes. Community gyms, and the grassroots boxing pipeline, nearly faded away. “It became commercial. Almost like a luxury,” Jairo said. “Everywhere you go, it’s like a car payment just to get your kid involved.” Five Directions recently featured a few fighters at an amateur event in Santa Maria, and many of the kids and their families drove up to attend. Two fighters, Eduardo Lindo and Josh Inda, came home with championship belts. Zico and their youngest fighter, Isaak Huerta, lost in tough decisions, but they are taking the losses in stride and using them as opportunities to grow. “Luckily, we don’t come back to the drawing board empty-handed,” Zico said. “We got a lot of things we can work on.” Growth is key to the culture at Five Directions. Jairo works with nonprofit Generation Red Road, which promotes generational healing and revitalization in Indigenous communities, to provide group sessions, called “circles,” where participants are given the chance to process personal issues. “You sit in circle, you get some of that stuff off your chest, get rid of the clutter, and you start to feel amazing,” Jairo said. Even the name of the club is a nod to Aztec folklore and the directions of the compass with the addition of the central point. “The heart,” Jairo said. “You can’t forget the center.” “What we’re trying to work on is balance,” Jairo explained. “Mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual. That goes a long way in the ring.” And it goes a long way in life. Parents have told the brothers that, under their training, their children are making big strides outside the ring. One particular student was acting out aggressively at home and at school, Zico said, but after daily training sessions, he has learned to better manage his anger. It’s providing him the same outlet Zico and his brother found at Primo when they were young. “Being able to see kids reenact what I went through and better themselves—it feels amazing,” Zico said. “It’s a feeling that can’t be described. Boxing is beyond just fighting—it’s a beautiful sport.”

OCTOBER 7 - 10 THURS & FRI: 5:15pm, 7:30pm SAT: 3:00pm, 5:15pm, 7:30pm SUN: 12:45pm, 3:00pm, 5:15pm

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© Near Media, LLC 2021. All Rights Reserved.

See fivedirectionsclub.org. INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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37


welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls Buellton Juniper Noelle DePalma, 8/18/2021 Gaviota Leire Mae Giorgi Mallea, 8/7/2021 Los Alamos Margaret Elizabeth Jacksen, 8/26/2021 Santa Barbara Julia Lucie Francoise Marie Winssinger, 7/11/2021 Sophia Navarro, 7/20/2021 Samara Margarita Alvarez, 7/29/2021 Arantxa Polanco-Rodriguez, 8/9/2021 Caroline Isabella Fisher, 8/11/2021 Stella Alicja Herrera, 8/11/2021 Isla Dantz Garrison, 8/22/2021 Maleah Charlotte Beltran, 8/24/2021 Emilia Elena Burrey, 8/24/2021 Isla Ray Kallenbach, 8/24/2021 MariaBelen Lopez Leon, 8/30/2021

Lucy and Lia

Santa Barbara

Ventura Eliana Eva Anne Fierro, 8/8/2021

Baby Boys Carpinteria Santiago Rey Cardenad, 8/5/2021 Grayson Maxwell Appel, 8/13/2021 Julean MarioEnrique Lemus, 8/17/2021 Goleta Ryan Matthew Reyes, 8/17/2021

“I knew my babies were in the best hands in the Cottage NICU. I can’t imagine having them at any other hospital.” Carina, Lucy and Lia’s mother

Identical twins Lucy and Lia were born six weeks early. They spent more than two weeks in the Haselton Family NICU. As preemies, they learned how to eat and successfully gained weight. Their parents credit the tips they learned in the NICU for a very smooth transition home. The girls are now almost three months old and are growing and smiling.

Cottage Children’s Medical Center cares for more than 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and eleven specialized outpatient clinics. Learn more at cottagechildrens.org.

Lompoc Julian Fernando Barragan, 8/24/2021

health e baby

Are you expecting or do you have an infant? Sign up for our free newsletter specific to your due date or your baby’s age. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

Santa Barbara Gael Perez, 7/10/2021 Máximo Rodriguez Murillo, 7/26/2021 Christian Anthony Campos Coronado, 8/4/2021 Cassius James Westover, 8/5/2021 Robert Anthony Adan Jr., 8/7/2021 Noah Sebastian Garces, 8/7/2021 Jael Felix Miranda, 8/12/2021 Junior João Veloso, 8/17/2021 Luka Ezequiel Hernandez-Alqudsi, 8/18/2021 Efrain Jai Cid, 8/20/2021 Michael Bosco McDonald, 8/20/2021 Mark Mahaffey Adams, 8/22/2021 Bodie Bean Baranoff, 8/30/2021 Santa Maria Gabriel Anthony Serrano, 8/2/2021 Angel Alexander Lopez, 8/14/2021 Ventura Leon Russell Russo, 8/3/2021 Luca Rae Cordero, 9/2/2021

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FOOD&DRINK

p.39

Will the Abalone Fishery Return

TO SAN MIGUEL ISLAND? C ould flattened and fried slices of freshly caught

Channel Islands abalone once again grace restaurant menus? Will abalone divers return to the Santa Barbara Harbor, where those underwater snail seekers were once the heart and soul of the commercial fishing industry?

Commercial Fishermen Eager to Harvest OnceDecimated Shellfish Await October 14 Decision BY MATT KETTMANN

example—and the studies stalled around 2010. For the past two years, the aging population of former ab divers — led primarily by Baldwin and Morro Bay–based rabble-rouser Steve Rebuck, who tout videos and other anecdotal evidence of booming ab populations—have filed the proper paperwork to trigger the commission

into initiating a study of San Miguel Island’s stocks. In an age of uncertainty when it comes to the changing climate and all that means for complex ecosystems —particularly those under the ocean that scientists are only starting to understand—the potential of reopening a fishery that was previously hit with both disease and human harvesting may seem far-fetched. Throw in the surprise collapse of Northern California’s red abalone population in 2017, the continuing extinction march of the white abalone in Southern California, and dwindling kelp growth statewide due to the warmwater-fueled spread of purple urchins, and the notion grows increasingly pipe-dream-ish. But it’s not impossible, say state regulators, and there may be multiple creative paths to at least letting some of these divers return to their favorite hunting grounds. “We are very much interested in looking at the island,” said Sonke Mastrup, the DFW’s environmental program manager for marine invertebrates. His staff is tasked with determining whether to advise the commission that further analysis is appropriate, which could be one way that the October 14 meeting could go, or if the state has more pressing issues and should keep this idea on the back burner. When we spoke a month ago, Mastrup was leaning toward suggesting that the studies commence, but his official recommendation was not public as of this writing. Last week, via email, Mastrup said that recently obtained data from 2019 showed poor kelp conditions, increased urchin barrens, and declining abalone abundance. Though he couldn’t confirm the staff ’s recommendation, Mastrup did offer, “What I can say is we are always open to investigating an issue when the circumstances make it possible and justified.”

The analysis, if approved, would help Mastrup and everyone else cut through the two competing narratives: the more dismal one, supported by the Channel Islands National Park Kelp Forest Monitoring Program and other scientific studies, and the more optimistic outlook, as evidenced in the underwater videos and personal observations by ab divers. “We are getting extremely conflicting stories,” said Mastrup. “We will not support a fishery until we have this thing figured out.” Were the studies to start, Mastrup imagined it would take more than a year, probably at least two, to determine if a fishery were warranted or not. But he’s not convinced that this specific approach, which was first outlined in the prior round of analysis under the heading Appendix H, is the only option for ab divers to get back out there. “Is San Miguel Island red abalone the best target?” he asked. “I don’t know how to answer that.” Green abalone populations, which exist from Point Conception to San Diego, are doing well, for instance. “That may be a better potential fishery than red abalone tucked on one side of one island off the coast,” said Mastrup. The ab divers could also apply under the state’s new Experimental Fishing Permit program, which is currently being used to catch box crab. “That would create a legal structure to do this and do it in a measured way,” said Mastrup. “The goal is science, but you’re gonna be able to make some money—not a lot, but enough to cover costs and maybe then some.” Abalone is a particularly difficult species to manage because they take a decade or more to mature. “It’s a really long lag, which makes responding to a problem really difficult,” said Mastrup. “By the time you realize there’s a problem, a lot of damage has been done to the stock.” Fishermen like Baldwin, however, believe that they are the ideal folks to track as much. “We could end up being the stewards. We’re their eyes. We’d make sure nobody cheats,” said Baldwin. “Us older guys want the abalone to be there for your kids and my kids and our grandkids. We don’t want to overharvest it, but we want to manage it. Managing it is not just closing it. That’s not management. It’s just bad behavior as far as I’m concerned.”

FOOD & DRINK

“I’m diving urchin out there, and I’m seeing more abalone than urchin everywhere, and they’re starting to die of old age,” says veteran fisherman Jeffrey Baldwin, one of many former ab divers who are pushing for the California Fish & Game Commission to consider reopening the fishery off of San Miguel Island. “We don’t want to harvest them all. We’re asking for very little abalone.” The potential for studying the issue is on the commission’s October 14 agenda. It’s the second time that the state is being asked to investigate since the entire commercial abalone industry was shut down in 1997 due to concerns over disease and overfishing. The first reexamination was 15 years ago, when the state, with the help of fishermen, studied the San Miguel Island stocks rigorously, but the commission ultimately determined that more research was needed. (See independent.com/abs2008 for a detailed report on that saga.) Then came a surge of more pressing issues for the state’s Department of Fish and Wildlife (DFW) — the entire collapse of two other abalone populations, for

BRING BACK THE ABS? Abalone harvesting has a long history on the Channel Islands, including fishing camps such as these set up by Japanese settlers (above). The industry was shut down in 1997, though some divers would like the state to consider reopening it.

The California Fish & Game Commission will decide on whether to study the potential for a San Miguel 4·1·1 Island abalone fishery during the meeting on Thursday, October 14. See fgc.ca.gov for the agenda and meeting details.

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FOOD & DRINK

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with your morning coffee? Or a meat-stuffed torta that will stuff your gut from lunch ’til beyond dinnertime? Or a beautifully constructed custom cake layered with edible flowers and psychedelic designs? These are all specialties at Los Tarascos Bakery & Deli on East Haley Street, where Enoch Rojas serves more than 40 types of torta and even more variations of pan dulce. “We have the largest selection of tortas in Santa Barbara,” said Rojas, whose most popular is the Cubana Torta, superfluously stacked with ham, cho- TORTA KING: Enoch Rojas sells more types of tortas than rizo, chicken, chicken hot dog, anyone in Santa Barbara at Los Tarascos, which is also a popular breaded skirt steak, bacon, egg, place for pan dulce and beautiful custom cakes. beans, mayo, avocado, cheese, and jalapeño, smashed into bolillo bread, some reason, Mexican bread is cheap, and then grilled a-la-plancha style to and there is a lot of work in it,” he said. meld everything together. Served with a Some recipes and techniques — side salad dressed in Rojas’s quite special including the grilled, panini-style torchipotle ranch, it’s a stunning amount of tas—are inspired by his upbringing in Michoacán, where he was raised in the food for $9. historic city of Pátzcuaro. “Los TarasEnoch Rojas Sells More Than 40 Types cos” is also the nickname for people from that state. His journey north was of Sandwiches and Pastries triggered by his passion for basketball BY MATT KETTMANN and desire to get a Michael Jordan jersey in the late 1980s. His cousin was The other tortas range from more the first in his family to move to the traditional Mexican flavors, such as United States and promised to bring carnitas, chicken mole, and chorizo; to Rojas a Jordan jersey but was robbed ones influenced by Italian, Hawaiian, on the way across the border. “I never and typical American breakfast and got it,” laughed Rojas about the coveted lunch dishes; to a range of vegetarian uniform. options that rely on zucchini, bell pepInstead, the cousin invited Rojas pers, and mushrooms as the base. Los north, and that’s how he landed in Santa Tarascos also serves burritos, salads, full Barbara in 1992, when he was just 14 years plates, and a full menu of fresh juices, old. He eventually attended SBCC, actusmoothies, and licuados. But those ally getting newspaper coverage upon his pan dulce and dessert racks attract the graduation for his American-dream tale, most immediate customer attention, and worked for 20 years at Café del Sol, so stacked as they are with colorful cre- though he always wanted to start his own restaurant. He took entrepreneurial cues ations by Rojas and his team of bakers. “I had no experience in baking,” said partly from his grandmother and mom Rojas of when he took over the bakery in Mexico, who had run their own fruit and deli in 2007 after years of work- stands when he was young. ing as a waiter at Café del Sol, a onceWhen a basketball friend wanted popular, since-closed Montecito spot by to sell his East Haley Street business in the Andrée Clark Bird Refuge. “But I’ve 2007, Rojas leaped at the chance, recalways been curious about a lot of stuff.” ognizing that a flexible deli and bakery He spent nearly two years working on combination made a lot of sense. A baking techniques and now uses about couple of years later, he expanded Los 50 different recipes for the pan dulce, Tarascos into a second location on Calle which include familiar pink-crusted Real in Goleta, but the sitdown concept conchas and cinnamon-laced versions was much more work and only lasted as well as more unique ones, such as the until 2015. He’s now considering opengordita de nata, a circular disc stuffed ing another spot in Lompoc. with clotted cream. “My idea is definitely to grow,” said Rojas expressed a little frustration Rojas, whose daughters both attend the that people expect to pay less for Mexi- University of Utah. “I’ve been doing a can bread — his sell from $1 to $2.75 little better each year.” —even though it takes more work and ingredients than some of the European- 314 E. Haley St.; (805) 564-2497; style loaves that are so trendy now. “For lostarascosbakeryanddeli.com


2021

COURTESY

BRINGING TIMBERS BACK: Timbers Roadhouse owner Gino Stabile is bringing back the longtime restaurant’s old sign and many photographs while also updating the outdoor area with games and fire pits.

best

THE SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT’S

of

Timbers Roadhouse Opening Soon

L

ast April, I broke the news that the

SCAVENGER

HUNT!

DUTCH GARDEN UPDATE: In July 2020, I wrote

that the Dutch Garden restaurant at 4203 State Street, which had just closed the month before after 75 years in business, will reopen in September 2020 under new ownership. That didn’t happen, but I was told they did get funding. I have visited the eatery periodically to see the progress. I visit often because I am told that when it reopens, there won’t be any notice given to anyone. Even The Restaurant Guy will be in the dark. They will just open the door as if they never closed. Because Oktoberfest has been on many people’s minds, including that of reader John P., who told me about his longing for the return of his favorite restaurant, I decided pay a visit again this week. The outdoor area has been extensively remodeled and looks ready to go. The dining room with bar stools near the front door of the eatery appears to be dusty and in a state of suspended animation, looking a lot like it did last year. I am guessing that there is a lot of work still to be done in this area. I saw people coming and going to the kitchen area, so things are definitely moving along, though how long is a good question. Conclusion: the Dutch Garden won’t be opening anytime soon, but my fingers are crossed that they can help Santa Barbara ring in the New Year. WINGSTOP IN ISLA VISTA: In June, I wrote

that Wingstop, which opened next to La Cumbre Plaza in February, will be opening a second area location at 888 Embarcadero del Norte, Suite C, in the former home of Subway and, decades ago, Taco Bell. Isla Vista Subway closed earlier this year. I stopped by this week, and it appears that the interior is mostly completed. I don’t know the status of the kitchen, but if the backroom is anything like the front room, we should be munching on wings well before Halloween. It appears that Wingstop should have customers-o-plenty. I was told that there has been a line all day every day at the Habit Burger immediately next door. If just a fraction of those beef lovers are chicken lovers, Wingstop should do quite well. Wingstop is now hiring for all positions for their upcoming Isla Vista eatery.

PRESENTED BY

DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENTED BY

TAK ING PLAC E

FOOD & DRINK

former home of Timbers Restaurant, at 10 Winchester Canyon Road, will be reopening as a steakhouse called Timbers Roadhouse. Remodeling is underway, and they are in the home stretch. I stopped by and spoke with owner Gino Stabile, who owned the recently closed Woody’s BBQ in Goleta since 2005 and operated it for eight years as manager prior to that. Apparently, I am not the only person curious enough to pay a visit to the steakhouse-in-progress. Stabile says future customers stop by frequently, asking when the big day is. So it was no shock when he heard that question from me for the umpteenth time. Given the enormity of the project, it’s hard to know when the hammering stops and the sizzling starts. Stabile tells me that the opening is “a few weeks out” and will likely be in late October or early November. I am told that all the licensing, including the liquor license, is done. I was given a tour of the property, starting with the event room (which was a temporary storage room during my visit), followed by the main dining hall and the bar area. “We’re trying to get it back to where it used to be, back in the day,” said Stabile. He is also adding a play area in the back and has already installed an outdoor pool table, recently donated by a fan of the restaurant, and a jumbo Connect Four outdoor game. A foosball table, cornhole, and other entertainment items are on the way. Every corner of the outdoor area in the rear of the property will have a fire pit with furniture around it. Adding to the outdoor ambiance is the original Timbers sign that was on the indoor fireplace when the restaurant was first opened by Tex Blankenship in the early 1950s. Rather than repaint the sign, and destroy its historic value, it was left in its well-worn state with just a clear coat to protect it from the elements. The sign had been hanging for decades on the fence at the Blankenship family’s backyard in Santa Barbara until Stabile recently paid them a visit. The family generously offered original Timbers signs, photos, and other mementos. Stabile is also working with the Goleta Historical Society, which is trying to locate old photos of the property to display throughout the restaurant.

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John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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’s ! ara e c ret b r a ls ta B usica n a S m e pt k t b es

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BE GENTLE Linda Purl is Rosemary Clooney in Tenderly

T

Clooney’s extensive catalog. For director Jenny Sullivan, the show offers something we probably EVERY MAN: In Tenderly, David Engel plays a range of characters in relation to all need right now Linda Purl’s Rosemary Clooney. — “a play about survival.” Clooney’s story begins with a — novelty songs such as the Italian dialect broken home; when she was just 13, her number “Come On-a My House,” which mother remarried and bailed on Rose- were pushed on her by producer Mitch mary and her sister, Betty, leaving them Miller. These were songs that Rosie hated, with their dad and his alcohol problem. but that the public loved. The girls discovered a gift for singing, The 1960s were not kind to Rosemary became “The Clooney Sisters,” got on the Clooney. She found her outstanding craft radio, and hit the road as featured vocal- as a singer rendered dated and seemingists in a touring big band led by Tony Pas- ly irrelevant by the rise of rock and roll. tor, all while they were still in their teens. When her close friend Robert Kennedy ran Within three years, Betty had had enough for president in 1968, she met him at the of the life, but Rosemary was hooked. In Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles for what 1949, when Betty returned to Cincinnati, should have been a victory celebration. Rosie moved to New York and signed a Clooney was just steps away from Kensolo recording con- nedy when he was assassinated. Within a tract with Columbia period of months, she was sidelined with Records. depression and an addiction to prescription The whirlwind medication, conditions that would prevent success that Cloo- her from performing until her comeback ney experienced next in the 1970s. had all the schizoLinda Purl knew Rosemary Clooney, phrenic qualities of and she has vivid memories of Clooney the American music performing in her comeback period. She business in the 1950s. describes the songs in the show as “like She recorded some of little one-act plays.” In the course of telling the most sophisticated Clooney’s story, Purl will sing such clasjazz albums of the era, sics as “I Remember You,” “Sway,” “I Get including the clas- Along Without You Very Well,” and “Have sic 1956 collaboration I Stayed Too Long at the Fair?” If you have with Duke Ellington ever been thrilled by the vocal stylings of and his Orchestra, Diana Krall, Barbra Streisand, or Celine Blue Rose. Yet what Dion, you owe it to yourself to hear Purl made her famous sing Rosemary Clooney. Tenderly will give enough to merit you a new feeling for where that sound co-headlining with and musical tradition comes from, and Duke Ellington was what it cost the people who created it. TALKING CURE: The play begins in Clooney’s therapist’s office. another thing entirely —Charles Donelan

NEON NIGHT ART SHOW AND SALE

“Memento Mori” by Chris Gocong

L I F E PAGE 43

BRIAN KUHLMANN PHOTOS

he monolithic image of the 1950s as a period of relative stability in American culture may have some validity when the decade is viewed from a distance, but get close to anyone who lived through it, especially a talented, high-profile performer like the great singer Rosemary Clooney, and that stable image starts to dissolve. In Tenderly, the two-person play with music that opens Ensemble Theatre Company’s 2021-22 season on Saturday, October 9, we learn just how difficult, lonely, and disruptive the Eisenhower Era could be even for those who would seem to embody it. The superb actress and singer Linda Purl stars as Rosie, with David Engel as her therapist and every other character in this musical journey through Clooney’s extraordinary life story. There will be a jazz combo onstage with the performers, the better to fuel Purl’s vocal flights into the heady atmosphere of

On Saturday, October 9, two Santa Barbara–based artists who have been working with neon are having a show together for the first time. Artists Rod Lathim and Chris Gocong invite the public to join them at Commen Unity, an art space located at 223 Anacapa Street in the Funk Zone. The event runs 5-9 p.m. and includes a deejay, refreshments, and a raffle, along with the opportunity to see and purchase neon works of art. Lathim will be familiar to many as the founding artistic director of Access Theater and chair of the board of the Marjorie Luke Theatre. Gocong, a graduate of Carpinteria High and Cal Poly, played linebacker in the NFL for six seasons, three with the Philadelphia Eagles and another three with the Cleveland Browns. —CD

INDY BOOK CLUB SEPTEMBER SELECTION:

LEAVE THE WORLD BEHIND BY RUMAAN ALAM

Rumaan Alam’s third novel, Leave the World Behind, is not a traditional horror story. The monsters are well-meaning but oblivious white people, and the macabre details that flirt at the edge of the story are existential and mostly unknown to the characters. Yet it is the most unsettling novel I’ve read in my recent memory. The narrator follows Amanda, an account director (a job that mostly consists of emails); her husband, Clay, a professor of media studies (Amanda doesn’t even really know what that is); and their two teenage children as they take a respite from New York City at an upscale Airbnb with a pool and hot tub. The house’s owners, G.H. and Ruth, an older Black couple in their sixties, come to the door one night seeking respite from a disaster that has knocked out power on most of the East Coast. Amanda and Clay have nothing more than a headline from a Times push notification to confirm this account of what is going on in the outside world. When their internet and phones go down, they still have electricity, and the family carries on uneasily, unsure if they should believe that G.H. and Ruth really do own the house. Meanwhile, strange occurrences fail to give any insight into what kind of disaster the rest of the world is facing. Birds fall silent; an intense and unidentifiable sound breaks some windows; thousands of deer pass through the yard. As climate change, political upheaval, and the lingering pandemic make impending disaster a normal part of life, this book will prompt readers to reflect on how they’ll behave at the end of the world. As we increasingly tolerate the absurd while clinging to normalcy, what can still actually cause us to panic? Join the Indy Book Club group to discuss existential dread and the casting of the Netflix adaptation of Leave the World Behind on November 3, 6 p.m., at Municipal Winemakers, 22 Anacapa Street. —Molly Wetta

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 7, 2021

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43


POP, ROCK & JAZZ

PAT METHENY SIDE-EYE

REVIEWS

DAVID BAZEMORE



A

t this point, it feels a little inadequate to call Pat Metheny a virtuoso or a master of the guitar. He’s both, and a lot more. With this excellent new band, he’s a mentor, a talent scout, and a visionary. Side-Eye originated a few years ago when Metheny decided he wanted to work with younger musicians in order to play a role similar to that of such legendary musicians as Art Blakey and Duke EllingPresented by Jazz at ton. As a result, he the Lobero. At the found the truly amazLobero Theatre, Wed., ing keyboard multiSept. 29. instrumentalist James Francies, and, as we can all hear on the recently released live Side-Eye recording, a talented young drummer named Marcus Gilmore. Since that recording in 2019, the drum chair has passed to another outstanding young player, Joe Dyson, and on Wednesday night at the Lobero, he was mesmerizing. Whether he was urging the other two on with the ride cymbal or happily meshing with the mechanized clatter of Metheny’s Orchestrion Jr., Dyson rocked the house. Francies’s playing was equally impressive, as he

& ENTERTAINMENT

easily shifted between tossing off spirited hard bop runs at the piano and piloting an array of other keyboards to introduce vamps, samples, and drones to the mix. Metheny played as only he can, coaxing delicate melodies out of his familiar hollow-body guitar and then switching to an electric guitar synthesizer to unleash eerily trumpet-like solos. The one-of-akind Pikasso guitar, an instrument that few others could conceive of, never mind play, made its appearance late in a morethan-two-hour set that included plenty of material from early in Metheny’s career, including “Bright Size Life” and “Better Days Ahead.” This show was a treat from beginning to end and augured great things to come for the Jazz at the Lobero series. —Charles Donelan

THEATER

CRUZAR LA CARA DE LA LUNA

L

COURTESY

ook no further for a sign that life has returned to our grand performance venues than Opera Santa Barbara’s thrilling production of Cruzar la Cara de la Luna. Propelled by a fabulous cast and a great story, this mariachi opera made a powerful impression on the enthusiastic audience. The initial 75-minute performance of the opera was followed immediately by another 45 minutes of concertizing by the Grammy Award–winning group Mariachi Los Camperos, a sequence that

FAMILY: The finale of Cruzar featuring, from left, Jessica Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Daniel Montenegro, Efrain Solis, and Raphaella Medina

LOBERO THEATRE • OCT 29 & 31 805-963-0761 lobero.org 44

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

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reinforced the success of the narrative and the crucial role of mariachi music and culture in the show. In classic opera fashion, the plot of Cruzar focuses on a seemingly intractable dilemma. Laurentino (Bernardo Bermudez) faces a terminal illness with something weighing on his conscience. Before he fathered Marc (Efrain Solis), his American son, he had a wife and a child in Mexico. Renata (Jessica Gonzalez-Rodriguez), the mother of Rafael (Daniel Montenegro), died on the journey to join her husband in the north, leaving her young son an appar-

ent orphan. After decades of never talking about Mexico — this according to his American granddaughter, Diana (Raphaella Medina) — now, at the end Presented by Opera of his life, Mexico Santa Barbara. At The and his lost wife Granada Theatre, Fri., and son are all he Oct. 1. talks about. Reluctant at first to contact Rafael, Marc nevertheless yearns to connect with his Mexican identity, and, after much crisscrossing of the years between Laurentino’s courtship of Renata and his current situation in Los Angeles, the entire clan comes together for Laurentino’s passing, celebrating his life as analogous to the migration of the monarch butterflies he loves. There were multiple memorable turns for every major character, and some brilliant ones as well for supporting couple Lupita (Kelly Guerra) and Chucho (Sergio González). Thoughtful, articulate, and musically convincing, this was entertainment for adults. The complexity of Laurentino’s fate was never reduced to platitudes, and the emotional conflicts on both sides of the border were fully developed. Most strikingly, the story led the audience to a deeper understanding of the soul of mariachi music. As in all great opera, giving personality and motivation to the different voices in the music helped everyone to feel the score as something with human meaning. Congratulations to Opera Santa Barbara, stage director Octavio Cardenas, conductor David Hanlon, the cast, and the magnificent Mariachi Los Camperos for bringing this delightful production to Santa Barbara. —CD


The Wood Brothers BOOKS

with special guest Kat Wright Tue, Oct 12 / 8 PM Granada Theatre Dubbed “masters of soulful folk” (Paste), The Wood Brothers are celebrated for their freewheeling musical experimentation, fluid sound and the unparalleled energy of their live performances.

WHAT A LITTLE MAGIC CAN DO

D

avid Starkey spoke with Central Coast author Tracy Shawn for theIndependentafter her debut novel, The Grace of Crows, was published in 2013. Her second novel, Floating Underwater, has just been published. We don’t want to give away too many plot twists in your new novel, Floating Underwater, but can you tell potential readers what the book is about? Fearing that her premonitions not only predict the future but may also change its very course, Paloma Leary is caught in a world between what she thinks is real and what she tells herself can’t possibly be. After her latest vision foretelling a third miscarriage comes true, Paloma questions her own sanity. But when a life-changing vision reveals a tragic secret from her past, Paloma learns to accept her gifts and embraces a far different future than she ever could have imagined.

She & Him A Very She & Him Christmas Party Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre Usher in the holiday season with the “old-school studiopop sensibility” (NPR) of M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

My Bluegrass Heart Béla Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Bryan Sutton featuring music from Béla Fleck’s new album My Bluegrass Heart

Magical realism is a notable element of Floating Underwater. Can you talk about why that narrative strategy — where the world is mostly as we know it until suddenly something fantastical happens — was important to the story you wanted to tell? I believe that loss and grief can make reality too hard to fathom without the hope that something otherworldly and, in a sense, magical is just beyond our everyday realm. That is why I created these extraordinary experiences for my protagonist — as well as for my readers — for don’t we all need a little magic?

Wed, Dec 15 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre

I was drawn to the women’s friendships in the novel, and the crucial but vexed relationship between mothers and daughters. That’s clearly a theme close to your heart. Yes, you’re quite right, David! Mother and daughter relationships (as well as the closest of women’s friendships) can be a complicated maze of love, disillusionment, hurt, and, hopefully in the end, understanding. It’s a theme that helps me create deeper psychological insights into my characters — as well as a cathartic exercise for me! What would your ideal reader say after finishing Floating Underwater? What I hope readers would say after finishing Floating Underwater is that they loved reading it and that it made them feel as if everything in this crazy world (or beyond!) will somehow, — David Starkey someday be okay.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF OCTOBER 7

ARIES

Join us in reading October’s book of the month! OCTOBER’S THEME:

HORROR

DI S CU SS I O N :

Wednesday, November 3, 6pm Location: TBD

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries poet Anna Kamieńska said her soul didn’t emanate light. It was filled with “bright darkness.” I suspect that description may apply to you in the coming weeks. Bright darkness will be one of your primary qualities. And that’s a good thing! You may not be a beacon of shiny cheer, but you will illuminate the shadows and secrets. You will bring deeper awareness to hidden agendas and sins of omission. You will see, and help others to see, what has been missing in situations that lack transparency. Congratulations in advance!

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): “There is something truly restorative, finally comforting, in coming to the end of an illusion — a false hope.” So declared author Sue Miller, and now I’m sharing it with you, Taurus — just in time for the end of at least one of your illusions. (Could be two, even three.) I hope your misconceptions or misaligned fantasies will serve you well as they decay and dissolve. I trust they will be excellent fertilizer, helping you grow inspired visions that guide your future success. My prediction: You will soon know more about what isn’t real, which will boost your ability to evaluate what is real.

GEMINI

BO O K O F T H E M O N T H :

Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam

(May 21-June 20): Afghan-American novelist Khaled Hosseini writes, “People mostly have it backward. They think they live by what they want. But really what guides them is what they’re afraid of — what they don’t want.” Is that true for you, Gemini? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to meditate on that question. And if you find you’re motivated to live your life more out of fear than out of love, I urge you to take strenuous action to change that situation! Make sure love is at least 51 percent and fear no more than 49 percent. I believe you can do much better than that, though. Aim for 75 percent love!

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): “Sometimes dreams are wiser than waking.” Oglala Lakota medicine man Black Elk said that, and now I’m passing it on to you. It’s not always the case that dreams are wiser than waking, of course, but I suspect they will be for you in the coming weeks. The adventures you experience while you’re sleeping could provide crucial clues to inform your waking-life decisions. They should help you tune into resources and influences that will guide you during the coming months. And now I will make a bold prediction: that your dreams will change your brain chemistry in ways that enable you to see truths that until now have been invisible or unavailable. (PS: I encourage you to also be alert for intriguing insights and fantasies that well up when you’re tired or lounging around.)

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): “Don’t hope more than you’re willing to work,” advises author Rita Mae Brown. So let me ask you, Leo: How hard are you willing to work to make your dreams come true, create your ideal life, and become the person you’d love to be? When you answer that question honestly, you’ll know exactly how much hope you have earned the right to foster. I’m pleased to inform you that the coming weeks will be a favorable time to upgrade your commitment to the work and therefore deepen your right to hope.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “To be truly visionary, we have to root our imagination in our concrete reality while simultaneously imagining possibilities beyond that reality.” This shrewd advice comes from author bell hooks (who doesn’t capitalize her name). I think it should be at the heart of your process in the coming days. Why? Because you now have an extraordinary potential to dream up creative innovations that acknowledge your limitations but also transcend those limitations. You have extra power available to harness your fantasies and instigate practical changes.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Some people are crazy drunk on rotgut

sobriety,” wrote aphorist Daniel Liebert. I trust you’re not one of them. But if you are, I beg you to change your habits during the next three weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have a heavenly mandate to seek more than the usual amounts of whimsical ebullience, sweet diversions, uplifting obsessions, and holy amusements. Your health and success in the coming months require you to enjoy a period of concentrated joy and fun now. Be imaginative and innovative in your quest for zest.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scottish Poet Laureate Jackie Kay, born under the sign of Scorpio, writes, “It used to be that privacy came naturally to everybody and that we understood implicitly what kind of things a person might like to keep private. Now somebody has torn up the rule book on privacy and there’s a kind of free fall and free for all and few people naturally know how to guard this precious thing, privacy.” The coming weeks will be a good time for you to investigate this subject, Scorpio — to take it more seriously than you have before. In the process, I hope you will identify what’s truly important for you to keep confidential and protected, and then initiate the necessary adjustments. (PS: Please feel no guilt or embarrassment about your desire to have secrets!)

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “All our Western thought is founded on this repulsive pretense that pain is the proper price of any good thing,” wrote feisty author Rebecca West (1892-1983). I am very happy to report that your current torrent of good things will NOT require you to pay the price of pain. On the contrary, I expect that your phase of grace and luck will teach you how to cultivate even more grace and luck; it will inspire you to be generous in ways that bring generosity coming back your way. As articulated by ancient Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu, here’s the operative principle: “Opportunities multiply as they are seized.”

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “If you don’t ask, the answer is always no,” declares author Nora Roberts. In that spirit and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you to be bold and lucid about asking for what you want in the coming weeks. In addition, I encourage you to ask many probing questions so as to ferret out the best ways to get what you want. If you are skilled in carrying out this strategy, you will be a winsome blend of receptivity and aggressiveness, innocent humility and understated confidence. And that will be crucial in your campaign to get exactly what you want.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Few persons enjoy real liberty,” wrote poet Alfred de Musset. “We are all slaves to ideas or habits.” That’s the bad news. The good news is that October is Supercharge Your Freedom Month for you Aquarians. I invite you to use all your ingenuity to deepen, augment, and refine your drive for liberation. What could you do to escape the numbness of the routine? How might you diminish the hold of limiting beliefs and inhibiting patterns? What shrunken expectations are impinging on your motivational verve? Life is blessing you with the opportunity to celebrate and cultivate what novelist Tim Tharp calls “the spectacular now.” Be a cheerful, magnanimous freedom fighter.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): The brilliant Piscean composer Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) wrote, “I wish I could throw off the thoughts that poison my happiness, but I take a kind of pleasure in indulging them.” What?! That’s crazy! If he had been brave enough and willful enough to stop taking pleasure in indulging his toxic thoughts, they might have lost their power to demoralize him. With this in mind, I’m asking you to investigate whether you, like Chopin, ever get a bit of secret excitement from undermining your own joy and success. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to dissolve that bad habit.

HOMEWORK: Describe the status quo situation you’re tired of, and how you’re going to change it. Newsletter@freewillastrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 46

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ACADEMIC SERVICES COORDINATOR

EARLY ACADEMIC OUTREACH PROGRAM Responsible for overseeing and coordinating the effective delivery of comprehensive academic development programs, services, and activities throughout Ventura County “partnership school clusters,” that are composed of EAOP partnership high schools and their respective feeder middle schools. The related services will consist of study skill workshops, testing strategies, test preparation services, tutorial services, study group formation, academic enrichment academies, assisting with the coordination of campus tours, and academic retention and support services for EAOP pre‑college participants. Implement a number of academic development models that are related directly to increasing college readiness, academic achievement, and competitive UC eligibility for participating students. Assist in the development and implementation of an EAOP study skills curriculum, test prep models, study group formation, and the establishment of academic enrichment activities. Reqs: Experience in conducting classroom, or similar, presentations and effective utilization of effective classroom management techniques. Demonstrate effective verbal and written communication skills. Experience in event coordination of small and large‑scale events. Knowledge and skills in the area of Test Preparation and an array of academic success skills. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. Frequent travel within Ventura, and travel to Kern County. Willingness to work evening and weekend hours and to work a flexible schedule as required. $23.66‑$23.94/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21074

ASSISTANT DEAN FOR BUDGET & FINANCE

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING The Assistant Dean for Budget and Administration serves as the chief financial and operations officer in the College of Engineering. The position assumes a Business Officer role by taking direct responsibility for the management of the Office of Dean, CoE Machine Shop, Undergraduate Programs, Marketing Office, Space and Construction, and the Corporate Affiliates Program (CAP). The Assistant Dean assists the Dean in management and administrative leadership in all areas under Dean’s jurisdiction, currently comprised of six academic departments, one academic program, and twenty research units, including: the Materials Research Lab, the Institute for Energy Efficiency, and other centers and facilities, Science and Engineering Development, and the Engineering Computing Infrastructure (ECI ‑‑ a college‑wide computing support function). Represents and acts on behalf of the Dean at campus‑wide meetings dealing with resources to the College, and has authority to make commitments on Dean’s behalf. Works directly with the Dean on new initiatives affecting the College and cross‑divisional units (e.g., CNSI, ICB, CBE, ML&PS Division, and MESA). Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent experience or training. Experience managing a department or unit in a university setting. Demonstrated flexibility, resourcefulness, and creative approaches to unique situations, while understanding the broad institutional context in which they must be addressed. Excellent critical and innovative thinking to address complex issues. Strong interpersonal skills and demonstrated ability to build and work successfully in teams. Exceptional communication skills. Management, leadership, and coaching skills to create and foster effective working relationships. Ability to operate with minimal supervision. Political acumen. Extraordinary sensitivity to constituents and ability to respond to situations with tact, compassion, and diplomacy. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $94,100 ‑ $164,600/yr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/12/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23388

ASSISTANT DEAN, HUMANITIES & FINE ARTS

COLLEGE OF LETTERS & SCIENCE Serves as the chief financial and operations officer for the Division of Humanities and Fine Arts. Assumes direct responsibility for the management of the Office of Dean. Plays a key role in resource management, organizational development, short‑and‑long‑term academic planning, and operational strategies to support the academic and research missions of the campus and the division. Assumes direct responsibility for managing the divisional office and assists the Dean in management and administrative leadership in all areas under Dean’s jurisdiction, currently including 22 Departments and Programs that offer 29 undergraduate

degrees and twenty‑eight graduate degrees (including 4 administrative support centers organized to support 17 of the academic units), 2 Centers (Carsey‑Wolf Center and the Walter Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion, and Public Life), the University Art Museum, the Humanities, and Fine arts Development unit and one divisional research center (Interdisciplinary Humanities Center). Responsible for budget oversight, financial and resource allocations for the division. Represents and acts on behalf of the Dean at campus‑wide meetings dealing with resources to the Division and has authority to make commitments on Dean’s behalf. Works directly with the Dean on new initiatives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Excellent ability to establish metrics for department and employee goals. Excellent skills to work collaboratively and act persuasively in sensitive situations; skills in conflict management techniques. Excellent interpersonal skills to effectively lead, motivate and influence others and to develop and maintain high standards of customer service. Excellent project management skills, including the capability of managing capital projects. Very strong ability to quickly evaluate complex issues and identify multiple options for resolution. Thorough knowledge of common organization‑specific and other computer application programs. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $94,100 ‑ $120,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 10/8/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 24427

COMMUNICATIONS AND SPECIAL EVENTS ASSISTANT

COMPUTER SCIENCE Helps develop the Computer Science department’s outreach and communication. Assists in planning and implementing departmental conferences, colloquia, and special events including the annual CS Summit and the weekly Theory seminar series. Maintains the department website and social media presence. Assists in development efforts. Reqs: Strong written and verbal communication skills, active listening, and critical thinking. Thorough knowledge of the fundamentals of writing, grammar, syntax, style, and punctuation. Thorough skills to write clear, lively, engaging, and compelling copy in a variety of styles appropriate to target audiences and/or the broader public while ensuring adherence to the location’s message. Ability to organize, coordinate and prioritize workload and work independently under the pressure of deadlines. Ability to interpret and comply with complex policies and procedures. Must be detail‑oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Must possess strong problem solving skills. Ability to work collaboratively with a diverse pool of faculty, students and staff and provide excellent customer service. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check.

$24.61‑$25.16/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 10/18/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 24725

EMPLOYEE & LABOR RELATIONS MANAGER

HUMAN RESOURCES Responsible for the management and oversight of the Employee & Labor Relations unit. Serves as a key advisor and subject matter expert for senior campus leaders and managers on employee and labor relations matters to provide guidance to all levels of the organization, resolving highly complex issues in creative and effective ways. Proactively assesses risk and advises management on best practices and procedures to protect organizational assets. Responsible for making employee and labor relations decisions that have a significant effect to the organizational operations and that are legally enforceable. Leads a team of HR professionals providing consultation and resolution of employee and labor relations issues that promote fair treatment and the consistent application of organizational policies and applicable federal/state laws. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in a related field or equivalent combination of education and experience. Progressive recent experience leading a labor relations function for a complex organization. Advanced knowledge of the principles of advocacy, labor/ employment law, including applicable and continually updated state and federal laws, court decisions regarding employment‑related matters and techniques of labor negotiations. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Occasional evening and weekend work may be required. Occasional travel may be required. In the event of an emergency, the employee in this position may be required to report to duty in support of the campus’ emergency operations plan and/or the department’s emergency response and/or recovery plans. During or immediately following a designated emergency, the employee will be notified if assistance is needed and to mobilize other staff members as needed. $123,740‑$137,928/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/12/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24311

EOP COUNSELOR/ COORDINATOR

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY PROGRAM Utilizes advanced skills gained at the

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Master’s degree level in counseling fields (student affairs and/or higher education); exhibits culturally inclusive active listening skills (e.g., appropriately establishing interpersonal contact, perception checking) and provides counseling services for personal, social and academic issues, including but not limited to cultural identity, educational, relationship, family, sexuality and sexual identity issues. Focuses on working with the African American EOP student population. Designs, implements and evaluates cultural, academic and programmatic services for the African diasporic Cultural Resource Center (AdCRC). Develops program designs and tools to assess quality of programs and events offered. Assists in campus efforts to recruit and retain underrepresented students. Plays a key role in the Division of Student Affairs Initiative to build bridges for EOP students and the AdCRC. Reqs: Experience in providing in‑depth, wide‑ranging and complex academic advising and holistic services to undergraduates. Working knowledge of MS Office products and Google Connect/Drive applications. Master’s degree in counseling or related area or years of equivalent experience/training. Ability to coordinate and present educational programs and present educational, academic, social, cultural events/programs and workshops. Experience with social media management on multiple platforms, updating department website, and Emma applications. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $57,000.00 ‑ $63,975.00/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/25/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24544

EQUIPMENT ENGINEER

ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING‑NANOFABRICATION FACILITY Ensures the continuing development of equipment and process resources of the 400‑user nanofabrication research cleanroom for the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Additionally, supervises the day‑to‑day laboratory operation of the cleanroom. Vacuum deposition and etch, thermal processing, wet processing, and photolithography systems professionals. Utilizes a broad spectrum of engineering disciplines to provide these process capabilities to users of the Nanofabrication Facility, which consists of numerous engineers, technicians, postdocs, visiting scholars, graduate students, and other UCSB staff. Under general supervision designs and implements novel equipment modifications to enhance equipment capabilities in new and unique ways. In conjunction with senior‑level R&D engineers, provides technical advice and guidance to users and develops appropriate safety measures and lab policy. Interfaces with equipment vendors technical staff to develop engineering solutions to equipment and process problems or requirements,

and implements those solutions. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience or training. Strong oral and written communication skills with proficiency in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Strong knowledge of electronics, mechanics, and computers. Works well both within a team and independently. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 10/13/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24549

EVENTS OPERATION ASSISTANT

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS Under the supervision of the Assistant Athletics Director for Events & Facilities, the Operations Assistant will act as a point person for UCSB Intercollegiate Athletics home sporting events. Reqs: AA Degree, or a combination of education and work‑related experience. Experience in event operations in any of the following areas: athletics, concerts, conferences or conventions. Be self‑motivated and show a willingness to work. Goal and task‑oriented. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Demonstrated ability to work within a team. Requires the ability to work independently, problem‑solve, and take initiative. Must be knowledgeable of and comply with NCAA, Big West Conference and University rules, policies and regulations applicable to the performance of this position. Notes: This is a limited appointment, 6 month position. Days/Hours: Wed. ‑ Sun., hours depend on the events schedule. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must be able to work nights, weekends and holidays on a frequent basis to attend assigned sporting events. $18.96/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 10/8/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 24417

JUNIOR SPECIALIST IN THE NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH INSTITUTE

The Neuroscience Research Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara invites applications for a full‑time Junior Specialist, to conduct studies exploring the mechanisms

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EMPLOYMENT regulating retinal development. Responsibilities will include maintaining the mouse colony (including genotyping samples to guide complex breeding strategies), neurohistology (including tissue dissection, sectioning, immunofluorescence), gene expression analyses (including qPCR, in situ hybridization, in vitro luciferase assay, etc), microscopy and analysis, and some routine lab management duties. A bachelor’s degree (or equivalent degree) or have 2 years equivalent research experience in cellular or molecular neuroscience or in molecular, cellular or developmental biology at time of application is required. For the full position and recruitment details and to apply, please visit https://recruit. ap.ucsb.edu/JPF02057 The University of California is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

LABOR RELATIONS SPECIALIST

HUMAN RESOURCES Serves as a subject matter expert and facilitator of UCSB’s response and compliance efforts regarding contracting out for UC services and functions that can be performed by University staff, including covered/ union staff. Provides guidance to and counsels university management in the analysis, review, and options related to outsourcing/insourcing labor at UCSB. Coordinates and facilitates management meetings to discuss plans for addressing outsourced work. Collaborates with Office of Procurement to review requests for exceptions. Performs classification analysis to identify covered (union) work. Functions as management advocate in grievances related to outsourcing. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and /or equivalent experience/training. Solid knowledge of labor/employment laws, including applicable state and federal laws and court decisions regarding employment related matters. Demonstrated leadership and interpersonal skills to partner with other departments and subject matter experts to deliver collaborative and successful outcomes on complicated issues. Ability to exercise a high degree of judgment in recommending and developing solutions, programs, and strategies related to employee & labor relations and to understand the interrelationship of such programs in other areas of human resources and the organization. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $67,000‑$78,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/13/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24772

MANAGER FOR FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Responsible for a full range of management functions encompassing finance, employment and payroll, gifts, and compliance. Works as part of the senior management team to develop and implement operating policies and procedures as they relate to overall GGSE goals and objectives, interprets policy for Department Chairs / Directors, faculty and staff. Serves as liaison to other campus academic and administrative units. Provides direct

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input for short‑ and long‑term strategic planning. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Minimum of 1 year of supervisory experience. Administrative experience working in a higher education setting. Ability to work effectively with all levels of the University community. Professional orientation and strong leadership skills. Excellent technical and analytical abilities, initiative, problem‑solving ability, and judgment. Capacity to organize and handle a wide range of responsibilities. Thorough knowledge and understanding of University personnel, financial, and purchasing policies. Thorough knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Solid understanding of financial and resource planning concepts as well as how to control organizational budgeting. Advanced knowledge of financial transactions and financial systems. Knowledge of Fund Accounting principles and practices, budgeting and reporting techniques, accounting, and bookkeeping. Ability to conduct thorough budget oversight, monitor complex financials, and produce regular financial reports. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Starting salary: $87,750/year. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #24269

MASS SPECTROMETRY FACILITIES MANAGER

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY Independently operates and maintains mass spectrometers in the Mass Spectrometry Facility for the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry using appropriate mass spec operational procedures to perform, evaluate and critique results for faculty, students and researchers. Performs routine maintenance, orders parts, request service/maintenance assistance from vendors as needed and process campus recharge fees for services performed and instrument usage. Finally, it is expected that the successful applicant will work with faculty to create new research instrumentation proposals for appropriate agencies in efforts to fund new equipment for the Mass Spectrometry Facility. Reqs: Experience in the field of Chemistry/ Biochemistry or closely related field in which Mass Spectrometry is required expertise. Must have the ability to advise and support academically supervised research and teaching in the field of Physical Sciences where Mass Spectrometry is required. The incumbent will perform and or supervise all Mass Spec instrumentation activities in the Mass Spectrometry Facility. A minimum of 2‑3 years of experience with the operation and application of mass spectrometry techniques, including but not limited to GC/MS and MALDI. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $64,275.56‑$75,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 10/18/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 24790

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OCTOBER 7, 2021

PAYROLL/PERSON­ NEL/TRAVEL COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Supports the department with administration, personnel/payroll support, and financial and travel processing in compliance with UC policies and procedures. Provides expertise and guidance in the full range of staff and academic personnel policies and procedures. Provides authoritative advice on graduate division policies and bargaining unit agreements. Manages sensitive and confidential information and interacts with a broad range of personnel and visitors. Posts monthly payroll expenses, creates tracking reports, and produces bi‑weekly and monthly payroll reports. Serves as a Timekeeper for the Kronos timekeeping system. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and work experience in a higher education setting. Proficient in personnel payroll and timekeeping systems. Excellent computer skills, including experience with databases, spreadsheets, word processing. Demonstrated ability to independently prioritize, edit and proofread materials, organize and multi‑task with frequent interruptions and meet critical deadlines with a high degree of professionalism. Possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills, assertiveness and diplomacy, and critical attention to detail with a high degree of accuracy. Excellent verbal and outstanding written communications skills with the ability to write and edit memos and letters. Ability to maintain integrity and sensitivity in confidential matters. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$28.90/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job# 22981

SR. GROUNDS SUPERINTENDENT

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Under the general direction of Assistant Director of Grounds and Landscaping, the incumbent is responsible for all Grounds maintenance tasks on State‑maintained portion of campus This includes more intensively maintained main campus landscaping, sports turf, non‑roadway paved areas including walkways and plazas, areas of seasonal weed abatement, and road medians. The incumbent has responsibility for 40 acres of turf, 20 of which is athletic turf, with high expectations from campus users. Within this athletic turf workload, Harder Stadium, the baseball field, and women’s softball are NCAA venues with complex maintenance needs and scheduling. The incumbent carries out a routine inspection of the campus landscape and communicates work requests to the appropriate unit; such as relevant Grounds Zone Team, the Irrigation Specialists, the Grounds Equipment Operators, the skilled trades units of FM, or contracted pavement maintenance managed by the FM Asset Manager. Supervises and evaluates all Grounds personnel as directed. Responsible for correct execution of landscape renovation and new installations as directed. Works to train all staff in correct horticultural practices, safety, efficiency, and professionalism. Supervises Grounds Equipment Repair Shop and staff and ensures that all equipment is maintained and used in a safe and professional manner. Decides when equipment needs to be replaced, and evaluates new equipment prior

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to purchase, and makes purchase recommendations. Maintains accurate records of man‑hours and materials costs for specified tasks, either for budgetary purposes or for recharge accounting. Reqs: 5 years of experience in the landscaping industry. Knowledge of irrigation systems, landscape maintenance, and installation, and tree maintenance. Experience in dealing with regulatory agencies, specifically water districts and municipalities. Computer skills, including the use of Gmail, Google Calendar, Word, and Excel. Ability to work in a service‑oriented environment subject to frequently changing priorities. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $67,500.00‑$104,600.00/ yr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review date begins 10/18/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24749

STUDENT HEALTH MEDICAL DIRECTOR

STUDENT HEALTH Responsible for all Student Health Service (SHS) clinical care and protocols, and the medical and legal oversight of all licensed non‑behavioral health professionals. Assists the Executive Director in assuring the quality and cost‑effectiveness of medical care at Student Health, compliance with all regulations and accreditation standards, controlling liability risk, and acts on behalf of the Executive Director in their absence. Provide both individual clinical services and consultations for patients in Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Gynecology & Urgent Care (as qualified) to support staff with the diagnosis and treatment of complex patients, and will provide a liaison to the local medical community, and respond to all campus public health emergencies. Reqs: Must have a current CA Medical, DEA License, and Board Certification at all times during employment in order to practice and function in this clinical role; credentials are renewed periodically. Must have 3+ years minimum of experience as a medical or associate director, or chief medical officer in a healthcare facility. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioners. Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent Adult Abuse. Student Health requires that clinical staff must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment and date of hire. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Must have a current CA Medical License and DEA license during employment. Must have and maintain current Board Certification in Family Practice, Internal Medicine or Pediatrics or Emergency Medicine throughout employment. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/13/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24397

STUDENT HEALTH PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Working under the required Delegation of Services Agreement with the physician supervisor, the Physician Assistant works in a collaborative and collegial relationship with physicians, Advanced Practice Providers, and other clinical staff at UCSB Student Health. Responsibilities include evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute illnesses and injuries, providing brief mental health interventions, prescribing medications under the legal scope of practice, and arranging follow‑up care. Procedures such as laceration repair, extremity splinting, incision and drainage of abscesses, wound care and management of IV fluids will be performed depending on training, experience and privileging by UCSB Student Health administration. Reqs: Current and valid Physician Assistant license for California. DEA registration schedules 2‑5. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioners. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11 month, per year position with 4 weeks of furlough that must be taken during quarter breaks or during the summer. Scheduling will be reviewed annually and set for the upcoming academic year. Flexible work schedule to allow afternoon time off is dependent on clinic staffing needs and can be subject to change. Weekly schedule may include Thursday evening hours if need arises. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23863

consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23923

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

STUDENT HEALTH Under the general direction of the Student Health Medical Director, provides direct clinical services in Primary Care Family Medicine OR Primary Care Internal Medicine and Immediate Care for all eligible patients at UCSB Student Health. Also provides consultation on a per case basis if needed, for all members of the professional staff to assist them with diagnosis and treatment of their patients. Provides supervision for the Physician Assistants when the Primary Supervisor is unavailable as assigned by the UCSB SHS Executive Director and/ or Medical Director. Reqs: Must have a current CA Medical, DEA License, and Board Certification at all times during employment in order to practice and function in this clinical role; credentials are renewed periodically. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioners. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA/FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: LEOTTA E. SCHWEIGER Case No.: 21PR00423 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of LEOTTA E. SCHWEIGER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: JEANNE BATESOLE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: JEANNE BATESOLE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 11/04/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Erin Riswold, 11990 Heritage Oak Pl., #1A Auburn, CA 95603; (530) 885‑7538. Published Sep 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ETHEL MARLENE SHEEHAN aka E. MARLENE SHEEHAN NO: 21PR00388 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ETHEL MARLENE SHEEHAN aka E. MARLENE

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SHEEHAN A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: DENISE M. SHEEHAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): DENISE M. SHEEHAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s to will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 10/28/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote, Esq. 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1204. Published Sep 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MAYBELLE GIER aka MAYBELLE M. GIER NO: 21PR00437 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of MAYBELLE GIER aka MAYBELLE M. GIER A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: LYNNE CESCON JENSEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): LYNNE CESCON JENSEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s to will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition

and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 11/18/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Connor C. Cote, Esq. 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, P.O. Box 20146, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146; (805) 966‑1204. Published Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHAEL B. KIROUFF NO: 21PR00436 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of MICHAEL B. KIROUFF A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: MATTHEW KIROUFF in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): MATTHEW KIROUFF be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s to will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 11/18/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Probate. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney

knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Adrienne K. Miller; Attorney at Law, APC, 1633 Erringer Road, Suite 205,Simi Valley, CA 93065; (805) 522‑1640. Published Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JEANNE L. MUDRICK Case No.: 21PR00451 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JEANNE L. MUDRICK A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: JANE H. MUDRICK in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: JANE H. MUDRICK be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 11/18/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: Five SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Barnes & Barnes;1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PEGGY JANE ASHKINS NO: 21PR00456 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of PEGGY JANE ASHKINS A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: LORNA ASHKINS STUDDARD in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, Anacapa Division THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): LORNA ASHKINS

STUDDARD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s to will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 12/02/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of

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the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote, Esq. 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, P.O. Box 20146, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146; (805) 966‑1204. Published Oct 7, 14, 21 2021.

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“It’s All There For You” -- at least I think so.

58 2021 Billie Eilish song titled for a legal document 59 ___ mater 60 They’re low in the pantheon 64 Fly (through) 65 Oceanic ring 66 Ocho ___ (Jamaican seaport) 67 “Devil Inside” rock band 68 Some marching band members 69 Therefore (or the word hidden in the four theme answers)

29 The bird that gets the showy feathers 31 Grammy-winning rock 1 ___ weevil (plant pest) producer Brian 5 Makes “turn” look like 32 Sudoku constraint “tum,” say 34 “M*A*S*H” ranks 10 Amorphous lump 35 Sixth sense, familiarly 14 “Caprica” actor Morales 37 They’re like “Eureka” but 15 Get from the ASPCA shorter 16 Uncontrolled fury 38 Society column word 17 Former second lady 39 Handful while hiking who crusaded against 44 “Days ___ Lives” obscenity in music lyrics 46 Of concern, in “Among Us” 19 “Jane ___” (Bronte novel) 49 “Dance at Le Moulin de la 20 Mythical beast Galette” painter 21 Levi’s competitor 50 1993 De Niro title role 22 Puzzler’s precaution 52 Book that’ll show you the 24 B complex component world 1 Support with a wager 26 Best-selling Japanese 53 Caroler’s repertoire 2 Bearded Egyptian deity manga series 54 “Ted ___” (Apple TV series) 3 Pet for a sitter? 28 ESPN tidbit 55 “Now then, where ___?” 4 Trash talk 29 Gumshoes, for short 56 Verve 5 Pejorative name The 30 At no time 57 Enchanted getaway Guardian called 2020 “The 33 New album, e.g. 61 Greek vowel Year of” 36 “Biggest Little City in the 62 “Red” or “White” follower 6 Sidle World” 63 Aspiring M.A.’s hurdle 7 “Winnie-the-Pooh” ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For 37 Poker pot answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. marsupial Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. 40 Lisbon’s river Reference puzzle #1052 8 “Ask Me Another” airer 41 Branch out LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 9 Take the wheel 42 Roll call response 10 Selfless concept to work 43 2-in-1 component, maybe toward 45 Comapny that sold the 11 Takes a break on a journey DieHard brand to Advance 12 Fairy tale monster Auto Parts in 2019 13 Tap output 47 Before, poetically 18 High-society group 48 IRS paperwork 23 Skedaddle 51 Lizard kept as a pet 25 Job interview subjects 53 Proposal rejection phrase 26 Falls on many honeymoon 55 Defeated team’s lament trips 57 “Pay you later” note 27 Take for granted

Across

Down

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STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO REFRIGERATOR REPAIRS, SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO & VIKING, SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO, SUB ZERO VIKING REPAIR MONTECITO at 4704 Park Granada, Unit 195 Calabasas, CA 91302; Krupo,

Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Vladyslav Frolov, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 3, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)

by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002552. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: ATLAS PROPERTIES at 2135 Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; James B Akers (same address) Jayla H

NOTIFICACIÓN DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA CONSEJO DE LA CIUDAD 19 de octubre, 2021 a las 5:30 P.M. Contrato de Servicio de Energía para un Sistema de Energía Renovable ATENCIÓN: conforme con la Orden Ejecutiva N-29-20 del Gobernador con fecha del 17 de marzo, 2020 y la Orden Ejecutiva N-08-21 con fecha 11 de junio, 2021 que autorizan a las jurisdicciones locales sujetas a la Ley Brown a realizar reuniones públicas electrónicas y por teléfono en respuesta a la pandemia COVID-19, la reunión regular del Consejo de la Ciudad el 19 de octubre, 2021 se realizará electrónicamente y por teléfono. Se transmitirá en vivo en la página web de la Ciudad y en el Canal 19 del Cable de Goleta. Las Cámaras del Consejo no estarán abiertas al público durante la reunión. Los miembros del Consejo participarán electrónica y telefónicamente y no estarán presentes físicamente en las Cámaras del Consejo. POR LA PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA que el Consejo de la Ciudad de Goleta realizará una audiencia pública para considerar iniciar un contrato de servicio de energía solar (acuerdo de compra de energía a tercera parte) para la implementación de ciertas mejoras relacionadas con la energía, incluido pero no limitado, a la instalación de un sistema solar fotovoltaico en las instalaciones de la Municipalidad, en 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, APN 073-330-102, conforme con las provisiones de la Sección 4217.10, y siguiente del Código de Gobierno de California. La fecha, hora y ubicación de la audiencia pública del Consejo de la Ciudad se establecen a continuación. El orden del día para la audiencia también se publicará en la página web de la Ciudad: http://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. FECHA Y HORA:

martes, 19 de octubre, 2021 a las 5:30 P.M.

LUGAR:

instrucciones detalladas para la participación se incluirán en el orden del día publicado

REVISIÓN AMBIENTAL: la iniciación de un contrato de servicio de energía para un sistema de energía renovable no está sujeto a la Ley de Calidad Medioambiental de California (CEQA por sus siglas en inglés), conforme con la Sección 15301, la Sección 15303 y la Sección 15304 de las Guías de CEQA (Título 14, Capítulo 3 del Código de Regulaciones de California) y la Sección 21080 del Código de Recursos Públicos. COMENTARIO PÚBLICO: se anima a todas las personas interesadas a que observen la reunión y provean comentarios escritos y/u orales. Las cartas/comentarios deben dirigirse a la Secretaria de la Ciudad cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Las cartas deben ser recibidas por la Secretaria de la Ciudad en o antes de la fecha de la audiencia o pueden entregarse durante la audiencia. CONSIDERANDO LA NECESIDAD DE LA CIUDAD DE REALIZAR LAS REUNIONES PÚBLICAS EN INTERNET O POR TELÉFONO DURANTE LA PANDEMIA DE COVID-19, los comentarios escritos también pueden ser presentados como se instruye arriba por correo electrónico a cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org o por otros medios electrónicos durante la Audiencia Pública (fecha y hora indicados arriba) siempre y cuando se reciban antes de la finalización de la porción del comentario del público de la Audiencia Pública. Habrá instrucciones disponibles sobre cómo entregar comentarios escritos o llamar durante la audiencia en la página web de la Ciudad: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/governmentmeeting-agendas-and-videos PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN: hay información adicional en los registros de la Municipalidad de Goleta, Departamento de Planeamiento y Revisión Ambiental, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Por favor comuníquese con la Gerenta de Sustentabilidad, Cindy Moore llamando al (805) 961-7547 o en cmoore@cityofgoleta.org para más información sobre el proyecto. Para preguntas en español, por favor comuníquese con un miembro del personal de la Ciudad que hable español llamando al (805) 562-5500 o por correo electrónico: espanol@ cityofgoleta.org. INTERPRETACIÓN SIMULTÁNEA. Si usted requiere servicios de interpretación para la audiencia, por favor comuníquese con la oficina de la Secretaria de la Ciudad llamando al (805) 961-7505 o por correo electrónico a: cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org por lo menos 72 horas antes de la audiencia. Por favor, especifique para qué idioma requiere interpretación. Una notificación por lo menos 72 horas antes de la reunión permitirá asegurar que se pueden hacer arreglos razonables para ofrecer acceso a la audiencia. Nota: conforme con la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades, si usted necesita asistencia especial para participar en esta audiencia, por favor llame a la Oficina de la Secretaria Municipal al (805) 961-7505. Una notificación por lo menos 72 horas antes de la audiencia permitirá al personal de la Ciudad hacer arreglos razonables. . Nota: si usted denuncia la acción final de la Ciudad sobre este proyecto en los tribunales, usted podría estar limitado solamente a aquellos asuntos que usted o alguna otra persona mencionaran en la audiencia pública descrita en esta notificación o en la correspondencia escrita entregada a la Ciudad en la fecha de o con anterioridad a la audiencia pública (Sección del Código de Gobierno 65009[b][2]). Fecha de publicación: Santa Barbara Independent, 7 de octubre, 2021. 50

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Siciliano (same address) This business is conducted by an Married Couple Signed: James B Akers, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 7, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021­0002563. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021.

Way #105 Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Derrick Selb Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002545. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: SOULS & SMILES at 317 Arden Rd Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Vanessa A Reyes (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Vanessa Reyes, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002517. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EVERGREEN CAPITAL MGNT at 336 Pacific View Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jerry Jackintell (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Jerry Jackintell, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002661. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EARTHCOMB at 1417 Las Positas Place Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Andrew Velikanje (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Andrew Velikanje, Founder Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021­0002408. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THE GOODLIFE YOGA AND PILATES at 6710 Calle Koral, Apt 309 Goleta, CA 93117; Shannon Krahn (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Shannon Krahn Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002516. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AURALITE ACUPUNCTURE at 1725 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Chelsea E Kelley 2008 Mountain Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Chelsea Kelley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021­0002570. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RK GUNNING BUSINESS WRITING WORKSHOPS at 560 Ricardo Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Richard A Kallan (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Richard Kallan, Director Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002645. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OBSTACLE SOLUTIONS at 81 David Love Place, Ste 217 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Leighann Ruppel 5230 Califa Court Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Leighann Ruppel, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002446. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: KIDDY KORNER DAYCARE at 976 Barcelona Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Susan L Becker (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Susan Becker, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002631. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: WADE DAVIS DESIGN at 512 Brinkerhoff Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wade Davis Architects Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Akiko Wade Davis, CFO County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002596. Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA MYGYM at 2801 De La Vina, Suite C Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Santa Barbara Children’s Fitness 1300 Barger Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Charles Fossett‑Lee, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002592. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: HUMAN POTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY at 5266 Hollister Ave, Office #101 Goleta, CA 93111; Derrick Selb 502 Asilomar

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARAMOUNT PROPERTIES at 1342 Virginia Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Pamela R Peterson (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Pamela Peterson, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002595. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BIEN NACIDO AND SOLOMON HILLS ESTATES at 2900, 3100, 3248 Rancho Tepusquet Road Santa Maria, CA 93454; RTV Winery, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Stephen T. B. Miller, CO‑Trustee Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002487. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: HEARTS ALIGNED at 1111 Chapala St Ste 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Jackie Carerra, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of

Santa Barbara County on Sep 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021­0002656. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CARL PERRY PHOTOGRAPHY at 5020 Calle Sonia Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Carl II Perry (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Carl Perry Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2021­0002589. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: VISTA CO. at 14000 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117; Christian A Vences (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Christian A. Vences Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002622. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FOXY SAGE at 1821 Chino Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Danielle Elese Kunkleman (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Danielle Elese Kunkleman Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 9, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021­0002584. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: MISSION PARK HEALTHCARE CENTER at 623 W. Junipero Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Mission Park Health Center, LLC 4550 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 206 Los Angeles, CA 90010 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Aaron Mayer, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002604. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BELIEVERS INTERNATIONAL CHURCH at 4430 Hollister Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93110; West Coast Believers Church of Santa Barbara (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: David W. Breed, Pastor Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002668. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE BROW LOUNGE at 5276 Hollister Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Celeste Almanza 5595 Armitos Ave Unit C Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Celeste Almanza Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 09, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002582. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE DUBEY COLLECTION at 921 Isleta Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Olivia M. Dubey (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Olivia Marie Dubey Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed

in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002723. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: W. MURPHY & CO. LLC at 2360 Foothill Road, Unit 5 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; W. Murphy & Co. LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: William D. Murphy, Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 21, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002703. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: LOS CARNEROS HOLDINGS at 1933 Cliff Drive, Suite 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Mij Pacifica LLC (same address) Sanders Family Pacifica LLC 311 E. Carrillo St., Ste C Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Limited Partnership Signed: Morris M. Jurkowitz, Manager of Mij Pacifica, LLC, General Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002727. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: CLASSIC COLLISION GOLETA at 5901 Hollister Ave Goleta, CA 93117; Classic Collision LLC 7475 Roswell Road Sandy Springs, GA 30328 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Toan Nguyen, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002673. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: CLASSIC COLLISION SANTA BARBARA at 301 E Gutierrez St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Classic Collision LLC 7475 Roswell Rd Sandy Springs, GA 30350 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Toan Nguyen, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002674. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: EXCUSE MY FRENCH CLASS at 715 West Valerio Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wanda M. Gardette (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Wanda M. Gardette Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002621. Published: Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JMK DESIGN & CO. at 201 West Montecito Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; JMK Design & Co. LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Jonathan Kosorek, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002655. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HASTINGS EVENT PRODUCTION at 208 W De La Guerra Street, Apartment 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Riley H Leonard (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed:


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Riley Leonard, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002759. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CUSTOM LEATHER CONCEPTS at 910 N N Pl Lompoc, CA 93436; Misael Reyes (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Misael Reyes, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002756. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: TBI FINANCIAL at 331 Cooper Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Tilman Brisendine, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Tilman Brisendine, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002685. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 154 TECH LLC at 3814 Connie Way Santa Barbara, CA 93110; 154 Tech LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Nicole M. Costa, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002738. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MOSBY SPIRITS at 9496 Santa Rosa Road Buellton, CA 93427; Gary R. Mosby 1800 Sequoia Drive Santa Maria, CA 93454 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Gary Ray Mosby, Sole Proprietor Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002786. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VICTORIA PAIGE STUDIO at 4000 Green Heron Spring Rd. Carpinteria, CA 93013; Victoria Bleeden (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Victoria Bleeden, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002732. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HONEYGLUE SOLUTIONS LLC at 5477 Parejo Drive Goleta, CA 93111; Honeyglue Solutions LLC 1401 21st Street Ste R Sacramento, CA 95811 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Melissa Cohen, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002746. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA LIVING REAL ESTATE at 2309 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Joanne Schoenfeld (same address) Steadfast In Commitment, Inc. 5114 Mecca Ave. Tarzana, CA 91356 This business is conducted by an Copartners Signed: Joanne Schoenfeld, Partner Filed with the

County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002749. Published: Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF BERNARDO CRUZ and MARIA ESQUIVEL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03710 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: ALEJANDRA ESQUIVEL TO: ALEJANDRA CRUZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Nov 08, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, ANACAPA DIVISION SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Sep 22, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. October 28, 2021 at 3:30 PM Julian Hayes Personal Items, Bed, Electronics, Bags, Boxes, Clothes, Shoes, Sports Equip. Larry Cates Bike, Bags, Roll cart, Cooler, Cart, Clothes Niccola Camacho Tools, shelves, clothes, bed, chairs, dishes, electronics, Jars The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

SUMMONS SUMMONS ‑ (Family Law) NOTICE TO REPONDENT: JULIO MARTINEZ LOAEZA AVISO AL DEMANDANDO: Petitioner’s name is: YESENIA LEYVA GATICA Nombre del demandante: CASE NUMBER: (Numero del caso) 21FL01351 You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting

your local county bar association. NOTICE‑RESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON PAGE 2: are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerto. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion, y honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encountrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO‑LAS ORDENES DE RESTRICCION SE ENCUENTRAN EN LA PAGINA 2: valen para ambos conyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la peticion, se emita un fallo o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas ordenes puede hacerlas acerlas acater en cualquier lugar de California. EXENCION DE CUOTAS: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. 1.The name and address of the court are (El nombre y direccion de la corte son): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Yesenia Leyva Gatica 129 Nectarine Ave Goleta, CA 93117; (805‑291‑2443) (El nombre, direcion y numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Dated August 3, 2021. Darrel E. Parker, Execcutive Officer; Clerk, by (Secretario, por) Nicolette Barnard Deputy (Asistente) Published Sep 30. Oct 7, 14, 21 2021. SUMMONS (PARENTAGE‑Custody and Support) NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name)‑ (Aviso Al Demandad (Nombre): ALJAN DECKA YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. Read the information below and on the next page (Lo han demandado. Lea la informacion a continuacion y en la pagina siguiente). PETITIONER’S NAME (Nombre del demandante): LINDSAY MCCARTHY You have 30 calendar days after this summons and petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120 or FL‑270) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your right to custody of your children. You may also be ordered to pay child support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org) or by contacting you local county bar association. Notice: The restraining order on page 2 remains in effect against each parent until the petition is dismissed, a judgement is entered, or the court makes further orders. this order is enforceable anywhere in California by

any law enforcement office who has received or seen a copy of it. Fee Waiver: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de sesta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120 or FL‑270) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerio. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten

la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion de los hijos, honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encontrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO: La Orden de proteccion que aparecen en la pagina 2 continuara en vigencia en cuanto a cada parte hasta que se emita un fallo final, se despida

la peticion o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier agencia del orden publico que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas orden puede hacerla acatar en cualquier lugar de California. Exencion de Cuotas: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. CASE NO: 21FL01260 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es) SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT,1100 Anacapa Street Santa

Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. ANACAPA DIVISION The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is : Drew Maley (288050) The Maley Firm, PC 740 State St., Suite 203 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑724‑2900 DATE: July 22, 2021. By Jasmine Franco, Deputy Published Oct 7, 14, 21, 28 2021.

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING (Electronically and Telephonically) October 19, 2021 at 5:30 P.M. General Plan and Zoning Amendments to Allow Entertainment and Recreation Services in the General Commercial Land Use Designation and Zoning District Case Nos. 21-0001-GPA, 21-0003-ORD ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 and Executive Order N-08-21 dated June 11, 2021 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings electronically and telephonically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council on October 19, 2021 will be conducted electronically and telephonically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. The City Council will be participating electronically and telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing to consider adoption of General Plan and Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) Amendments (Case Nos. 21-0001-GPA, 21-0003-ORD). The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday, October 19, 2021 at 5:30 P.M.

Teleconference Meeting; Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda)

PROJECT LOCATION: The amended regulations would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The proposed amendment to the General Plan would allow Entertainment and Recreation Services in the General Commercial (C-G) land use designation within Table 2-2 of the Land Use Element. The associated proposed Title 17 amendment would allow Indoor Sports and Recreation in the C-G zoning district, in Table 17.08.020 of the GMC. The Planning Commission considered the proposed General Plan amendment to Table 2-2, amendment to Table 17.08.020 of the GMC, and associated environmental documentation at a public hearing on September 13, 2021. At that hearing, the Planning Commission adopted Planning Commission Resolution No. 21-07, recommending to City Council adoption of the General Plan amendment, Title 17 amendment, and environmental documentation. Environmental Review: An Addendum to the General Plan Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) was chosen for the amendments in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and CEQA Guidelines. According to CEQA Guidelines Section 15164(a), an addendum to a previously certified FEIR is the appropriate environmental document in instances when “some changes or additions are necessary but none of the conditions described in [CEQA Guidelines] Section 15162 calling for the preparation of a subsequent EIR have occurred.” Because the impacts associated with the proposed amendments do not exceed those impacts identified in the General Plan FEIR, a subsequent EIR pursuant to Section 15162 is not required. Therefore, this Addendum is the appropriate environmental document under CEQA. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/comments should be addressed to City Clerk cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by the City Clerk on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted via email to Deborah Lopez, City Clerk e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendas-andvideos. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Andy Newkirk, Senior Planner, at (805) 961-7544 or anewkirk@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact City staff at (805) 5625500 or espanol@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 69009[b][2]). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent, October 7, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

OCTOBER 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT OCTOBER 7,7, 2021

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Santa Barbara Independent 10/7/21  

October 7, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 821

Santa Barbara Independent 10/7/21  

October 7, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 821

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