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SEPT. 23-30, 2021 VOL. 35 ✦ NO. 819

O T I R R U B

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THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Arts & Lectures’ 2021-2022 Season of World-class Events Kicks off Oct 10 Julián Castro

The Wood Brothers

Sun, Oct 10 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Tue, Oct 12 / 8 PM Granada Theatre

Former presidential candidate and U.S. secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro shares insight from his political journey and actionable ways we can effect change.

Dubbed “masters of soulful folk” (Paste), The Wood Brothers are celebrated for their freewheeling musical experimentation, fluid sound and the unparalleled energy of their live performances.

Arturo O’Farrill and the Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra

Vijay Gupta

Waking Up From My American Dream

Fandango at the Wall with the Villalobos Brothers

with special guest Kat Wright

The Healing Power of Music in Conversation with Pico Iyer Thu, Oct 28 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Fri, Oct 15 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

Inspired by the annual Fandango Fronterizo festival at the Tijuana-San Diego border, Fandango at the Wall fuses the richness of Mexican folk music with the intricate harmonies of jazz.

Violinist, speaker and citizen artist Vijay Gupta is the founder of Street Symphony, an L.A.-based nonprofit that brings music to homeless and incarcerated communities, and co-founder of the Skid Row Arts Alliance.

Media Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

3


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THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


GOES WITH JUST ABOUT EVERYTHING

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman

COVER STORY 23

Indy intern Nicholas Liu has been studying history and the Middle East for a number of years, first at the University of Chicago and now at UC Santa Barbara for a doctorate, which could explain a dependence on the quick sandwich and a love of mayonnaise.

Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin

Welcome to Burrito Week

Copy Editor Tessa Reeg

7 Days of 17 Different $7 Burritos

Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley

by Indy Staff

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 ON THE COVER: Illustration by Ben Ciccati. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 35, # 819, Sept. 23-30, 2021

What made you decide to intern at a newspaper? Last fall, I came to UCSB, moving here in the midst of a pandemic and rarely emerging from a confining world: the student residences, Zoom classes, the tennis courts, and a grocery store. I missed Chicago and the associated experiences. Reading and working for the Independent has helped me connect to Santa Barbara. During the summer I visited the Museum of Natural History and other sites for reviews, learning about flora and fauna and talking to curators and artists. I enjoy writing about issues that matter, and I anticipate broadening my involvement as I move to the newsroom this fall. Does mayonnaise go with everything? The obsession with mayonnaise snuck up on me, unbidden. I did not notice how far I had fallen until a friend raised his concerns. As with many things, I cannot pinpoint the logic behind my fondness for it. Perhaps it is the unassuming smoothness that balances out a roast-beef sandwich or fried seafood — or how it can take form in so many different flavors. But one thing I do know is that my mayo obsession is imbued with happy memories, laughter, condimental jokes, and countless outings with good friends, always disgusted by my asking for extra mayonnaise. Disclaimer: I once tried it on pizza. That is where I draw the line. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

Join Us in Demanding Safe Passage of the Mission Canyon Bridge NOW! “One of the most TERRIFYING experiences I’ve had was in that area, walking my daughter in a stroller.” * -Young City Council Member Imagine trying to walk the area if you are no longer young, or if you are not able-bodied!

Please show your support for these improvements:

ip bersh now! m e join re a m We a n, please izatio organ

• • • • • •

Pedestrian and bicycle bridges on both sides of the Mission Canyon Bridge Compliance with the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act): morally and legally right Realignment of the roadway, away from the historic stegosaurus stone wall Undergrounding of utilities: avoid power outages and wildfires Seismic retrofitting of the Mission Canyon Bridge, built on a fault Creation of safe passage for all in the cultural and historical center of Santa Barbara

If you agree with Safe Passage, please go to missionheritagetrailassociation.org and sign the petition to be presented to both city and county decision makers. Safe Passage/Mission Heritage Trail Association P.O. Box 30545 Santa Barbara, CA 93130 A not-for-profit public benefit organization 501(c)(3) tax-exempt *Meagan Harmon, City Council District 6, during August 10, 2021 City Council Meeting. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


SEPT. 16-23, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CITY ER IC K M ADR I D

Housing Relief for ‘Missing Middle’? Officials See Great Potential in Innovative New Partnership by Tyler Hayden t won’t solve Santa Barbara’s housing crisis, but it could certainly be a start. This Tuesday, in a rare Kumbaya moment at the City Council, all seven members voted to approve a first-of-its-kind housing project for the commuter parking lot at the corner of Castillo and Carrillo streets that will be meant—by virtue of a bulletproof 90-year “affordability covenant” — to provide rental apartments in the price range of nurses, teachers, firefighters, office employees, and other members of Santa Barbara’s core workforce. “I make a motion to move this item forward,” said Councilmember Kristen Sneddon, “with enthusiasm.” The 60-unit, estimated $23 million project is being led by the city’s Housing Authority, a public agency normally tasked with providing subsidized homes for the poor but that in recent years has been given marching orders to address the needs of the “missing middle”— those residents who earn too much to qualify for government benefits but are not wealthy enough to afford Santa Barbara’s sky-high rents. Many wind up commuting to the city from North County or Ventura, or moving out of the area altogether. Housing Authority director Rob Fredericks said it was an “innovative” financing partnership between his agency and an investment entity, which is expecting a 5 percent return, that is making the deal possible, though he noted negotiations are ongoing. “I would really like to see this project as a proof of concept that we could take to other sites in the community,” Fredericks said. He cited other city-owned parking lots as the most costeffective options since pricey land acquisition would be removed from the equation. In an email to the Independent following Tuesday’s meeting, Fredericks identified the likely financier as M3 Multifamily, a private investment firm headquartered on East Canon Perdido Street that currently owns eight apartment complexes in Austin, Nashville, and Tucson. The company’s managing partner and vice president is longtime Santa Barbara resident Jon Martin. Recent Santa Barbara housing projects have purported to serve the missing middle population, only to hike their prices beyond the reach of most working-class residents, Sneddon said. The City Council has attempted to incentivize builders to create more affordable units, as well as passed mandates with the same goal, with varying levels of success. Whatever the council’s strategy, it is almost always met with major

I

resistance — and at times deception —from developers. Even when workforce-priced units are squeezed out of negotiations, they typically only come a handful at a time. The trifecta partnership and the binding agreements between the city, the Housing Authority, and the investor — or what Fredericks described as the “three-legged stool” on which the project is propped — is the only way to ensure the 60 units remain truly affordable, Sneddon explained. “I really like this as a pilot for what is posCORNER LOT: City Housing Authority Executive Director Rob Fredericks stands in the sible,” she said. Carrillo-Castillo Commuter Lot, the site of a proposed 60-unit apartment complex. Ben Romo, a government relations and community engageFredericks admitted the complex will stand ment consultant, summed up the sentiment quite close to Highway 101, but he promised of the meeting’s many public speakers — construction would incorporate the necesincluding a number of employers — who sary air-filtration and sound-dampening syswidely embraced the proposal. “It wasn’t tems to make the living spaces comfortable magic,” Romo said of the three years of dis- and safe. He also acknowledged the property cussions and number-crunching that brought — which city officials say notably underperthe city to this week’s vote. But the end result forms as a public commuter lot — will lose most of the tipuana and jacaranda trees that “sure feels magical.” Rent prices at the site would be determined stand there, though the ones that line the by Santa Barbara County’s household Aver- Mission Creek and Castillo Street sides of the age Median Income, or AMI, and be adjusted property will be preserved. annually. Based on the current household The site is also currently utilized by the city’s AMI of $87,800, that would put studio prices Safe Parking program for homeless residents between $1,600 a month for moderate- living out of their cars. A new location for the income residents (those earning between 12 families that sleep there overnight and the 80-120 percent AMI) and $2,500 for middle- two that live there during the day would have income renters (those making between 120- to be found. But even a representative of the 160 percent AMI). One-bedrooms would go New Beginnings Counseling Center, which for between $1,900 and $2,800 a month, and runs the program, spoke to the council in two-bedroom units would be priced between favor of the development. The loss of the lot $2,200 and $3,200. would be worth the gain of housing, he said, Those figures stand in stark contrast to given it was Santa Barbara’s lack of roofs that today’s market rates — studios are being forced many of their clients into cars in the first rented for as high as $3,100 a month, Fred- place. “We’re in full support of this,” he said. ericks said, with one-bedroom apartments Tuesday’s vote ratifies the project agreeadvertised up to $3,900 and two-bedrooms ment between the city and the Housing frequently reaching $5,000 or more. “So we’d Authority. The plans will now proceed be keeping rents substantially below market,” through the regular design and approval pron cess. he said.

CORONAVIRUS CORONAVIRUS Echoing a similar protest in July, around 75 antivaccine-mandate protesters funneled up State Street from Stearns Wharf on 9/18 as part of the latest “Worldwide Rally for Freedom.” Marchers carried American flags and picket signs and chanted, “No vaccine passports,” “No segregation,” and “Coercion is not consent,” as some onlookers flipped them off or applauded in agreement. Organized by Stand Up Santa Barbara, the march concluded at De la Guerra Plaza, where more than 200 people convened for a Freedom Festival featuring speakers and live music. Full story at independent.com/ rally-against-vaccine-mandate.

BUSINESS Olaplex, the hair-care product company started in an S.B. garage, announced on 9/20 that its initial public offering could net up to $1 billion in sales when it hits the market. The 67 million shares the company said it is offering are expected to be priced between $14 and $15 and will be listed on Nasdaq under the name OLPX, though Olaplex has not announced any potential dates for the IPO. Advent International, which purchased the company from founders Dean and Darcy Christal in 2019 for an undisclosed amount, is expected to maintain majority ownership.

PUBLIC SAFETY A suspicious package left near the City Attorney’s Office on 9/16 — which led authorities to evacuate the nearby area and call in the Bomb Squad to assess the situation using a portable X-ray device — turned out to be “a cardboard box full of clothing,” according to S.B. Police Department PIO Ethan Ragsdale. “Though this particular box was not to be dangerous, we always recommend calling law enforcement officials if you see suspicious packages,” Ragsdale said.

POLITICS In a bold rebuke of the local Democratic Party’s endorsement of Meagan Harmon for reelection to the S.B. City Council, Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez is throwing her support behind Harmon’s challenger, Nina Johnson. Gutierrez said Johnson has the practical chops and personal temperament to more effectively represent District 6, which spans most of State Street and S.B.’s downtown, and navigate the community’s various stakeholders and the city’s bureaucracies to “really move us forward,” especially with respect to the flagging commercial corridor. Full story at independent.com/ gutierrez-endorses-johnson. This week, the S.B. City firefighters’ union endorsed mayoral challenger and former city councilmember Randy Rowse in his efforts to unseat incumbent mayor Cathy Murillo in this November’s election. Justin Kiel, who heads the union’s political action committee, said Rowse displayed “a deeper understanding of the department and on the lives of firefighters” than the other five mayoral candidates. The union also endorsed City Council incumbents Kristen Sneddon, Meagan Harmon, and CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

7


SEPT. 16-23, 2021

CORONAVIRUS

COVID Death Toll Inches Toward 500 58 Outbreaks in County but Case Rate Continues to Drop

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ER IC K M ADR I D

CORONAVIRUS

Sara Miller McCune along with

The Granada Theatre, The Santa Barbara Symphony, and

State Street Ballet Presents

IS IT SAFE? “I haven’t been vaccinated all this time, and it was safe for me to practice,” Dr. Mark Abate said. “Now, all of a sudden after September 30, it’s no longer safe if I’m not vaccinated.”

Meet the S.B. Doctor Who Refuses to Be Vaccinated Dr. Mark Abate Claims Religious Exemption, Speaks Out Against Health-Care Worker Mandate by Ryan P. Cruz or the estimated 10 percent of health-care workers in Santa Barbara County who have not yet been vaccinated against COVID, the state’s new requirement — which mandates proof of vaccination starting September 30 — may force them out of their jobs unless they get the shot or receive an elusive medical or religious exemption. One of those health-care workers is Dr. Mark Abate, a hematologist and oncologist who has practiced in Santa Barbara for more than 33 years with Sansum Medical Clinic, Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, and Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. When the California Department of Public Health announced the Health Care Worker Vaccine Requirement in early August, the state was in the midst of yet another spike in cases due to the quickspreading Delta variant, with case rates increasing ninefold within two months. Health-care facilities are “high-risk settings,” said State Public Health Director Tomás J. Aragón, where COVID-19 outbreaks can have “severe consequences for vulnerable populations,” including hospitalization, severe illness, and death. In an effort to protect both the workers and the patients, the state instituted the requirement and said all health-care workers must get vaccinated by September 30. Abate was one of the first medical professionals in the county to speak out publicly in opposition to the mandate when he gave comments at an August Board of Supervisors meeting. He is currently seeking a religious exemption — one of two options to work around the requirement —and spoke to the Independent about why he is choosing not to be vaccinated and what consequences await when the mandate goes into effect on September 30. “I am personally against the current vaccine and testing mandates that currently affect health-care workers and profession-

F

als in the State of California,” Abate said. “I am personally against any form of vaccine mandate, or passport. I believe that they are divisive and do far more harm than good.” According to the latest estimates from Cottage Health, 90 percent of all employees have already been vaccinated, and 80 percent had voluntarily gotten vaccinated before the mandate had been announced. Abate is one of few practicing doctors of medicine that has been working unvaccinated; current hospital regulations require that he test negative twice a week to be cleared. “I don’t think there are very many doctors that are in this situation. I think the vast majority of the doctors have accepted the vaccination,” Abate said. His choice is based on personal values, both medical and religious. He doesn’t consider himself “anti-vax,” but rather he thinks that each person should have the right to accept or deny the COVID vaccines. “I’m not against the vaccine. I’d say the majority of my friends and colleagues and family have taken the vaccine, but I do think it should be up to the individual person,” he said. “I haven’t been vaccinated all this time, and it was safe for me to practice. Now, all of a sudden after September 30, it’s no longer safe if I’m not vaccinated,” he said Even if Abate is granted a religious exemption — which is at the sole discretion of the health-care facility — he will still be tested twice a week, something he says is “discrimination” toward those who are unvaccinated. “If they truly were interested in safety, everybody should be tested,” he said. As a practicing Catholic, Abate contends that the vaccines used “cell lines and fetal tissues” during development stages, which goes against his religious beliefs. Board-certified infectious disease expert James Lawler, MD, wrote in August: “No, the COVID-19 vaccines do not contain

The Night of a Lifetime

Oct. 23, 2021 at 2:30 & 7:30pm and

Oct. 24, 2021 at 2:30pm The Granada Theatre 1214 State St. • Santa Barbara, CA

Sara Miller McCune Producer

William Soleau

Lonny Price Director

Nir Kabaretti

Choreographer/ Music and Co-Artistic Director, Artistic Director, State Street Ballet Santa Barbara Symphony

Ken Davenport

Executive Producer

Jonathan Raviv as Hajj the Poet

Sherz Aletaha as Lalume

For Tickets, Visit

Ticketing.GranadaSB.org

CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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HEALTH

COU RTESY PHOTOS

SEPT. 16-23, 2021

MAKING BEDS: The strategy of former mental-health director Alice Gleghorn (left) and her interim successor, Pam Fisher, has been to focus on creating new bed space for people experiencing mid- to low-level crises.

Big Increase in MentalHealth Beds But Still Not Enough Acute Care Spaces by Nick Welsh t a time when society’s unmet mentalhealth needs have achieved unprecedented public recognition, the County Board of Supervisors got a crash course in unexpected good news from their administrators about how many new mental-health beds — the key metric for such progress — the Department of Behavioral Wellness has produced and funded over the past five years. As astonishing as even the most critical mental-health advocates agreed the progress has been, the supervisors also heard how it was still not enough. Boiled down, the supervisors heard how in the past five years, the Department of Behavioral Wellness added 206 mentalhealth beds to its infrastructure of care. Another 35, the supervisors heard, are currently in development. And another 132 are still needed. Getting a big shout-out for much of the progress was Alice Gleghorn, the oftenembattled former mental-health director who took over a department on the brink of collapse. At the beginning of her tenure, Gleghorn — who stepped down earlier this year — and her staff took an inventory of all the mental-health beds from most to least restrictive and found them severely lacking. Gleghorn’s strategy — and that of her interim successor, Pam Fisher — has been to focus on creating new bed space for people experiencing mid- to low-level crises rather than more expensive and restrictive acutecare facilities for those deemed a threat to themselves or to others. A night at the county’s lockdown Psychiatric Health Facility (PHF, pronounced “puff ”) costs $2,567, for example, while 23 hours — the maximum stay allowed — on a deluxe recliner in the Crisis Stabilization Unit, where patients can leave if they wish, costs $480. By expanding the care options for people in less acute crisis, the hope has been they won’t need the services offered only in the more restrictive and more expensive facilities like the county’s PHF Unit. Given the growing strain experienced by hospital emergency rooms throughout

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Santa Barbara County caused by people experiencing severe psychiatric turmoil, it’s unclear the extent to which this strategy is working. Longtime mental-healthcare advocates Lynne Gibbs of NAMI and Suzanne Riordan with Families Act both delivered rare praise for the department, but they both insisted that the 16 beds in the county’s PHF unit — where people can be held against their will if need be for up to 72 hours — is nowhere near enough. The reality, however, is that people have been lambasting the limited number of PHF beds — locked in by arcane but immovable licensing requirements — for more than 40 years, and nothing has changed. Fisher talked about creating new space in the PHF by moving out certain patients charged with crimes but deemed incompetent to stand trial. By securing space in other facilities for these patients — who often stay for long periods — better use can be made of the PHF’s admittedly limited number of beds. The supervisors were lavish in their praise. “Extraordinary,” Supervisor Joan Hartmann exclaimed over the magnitude of progress coupled with the brevity of the report. She noted that 150-250 inmates in the County Jail have significant mentalhealth issues. “This is where we really need to invest if we want to keep our jail population lower.” Supervisor Steve Lavagnino praised the department for opening up two new residential care facilities in Santa Maria without triggering an uprising among the immediate neighbors. “I did not get phone calls from people up in arms because the county just crammed something into their neighborhood,” he said. Supervisor Das Williams suggested the county should direct as much of the state and federal emergency funds now available for mental-health needs, even if only available on a one-time basis. Commenting on whether the build-out plans unveiled by department director Pam Fisher would be enough, Williams said, “We’ll never know ’til we build it all.” In the meantime, he said, “We have to take advantage of this time, this moment to n expand.”


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOUSING

R. M. Schindler, Armon House, Los Angeles, 1946-49

The Death of SingleFamily Homes? A

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Critics Say New State Laws Will Worsen, Not Alleviate, S.B.’s Housing Crisis by Jun Starkey

new pair of housing bills were signed into law Friday, with the potential to have great impacts on the already endangered single-family homes in Santa Barbara. Senate bills 9 and 10 have been highly debated by those who would be affected, with proponents claiming this will help curb the ever-growing housing crisis in California, and opponents arguing that it will not only destroy the characteristics of their neighborhoods but also further gentrify towns like Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara is no stranger to gentrification, with developers across the city slowly buying up homes or plots of land to turn them into high-priced student or luxury housing and vacation rentals. SB 9 allows homeowners to split their homes into four separate units, so long as the property is large enough and the owner has lived in the home for at least three years. Proponents of this bill claim it will alleviate California’s persistent housing crisis while allowing homeowners to have a larger stake in the housing market. Opponents argue this will only raise the cost of rent while pushing out many of the families who do not own their homes, as 60 percent of Santa Barbara’s residents are renters. Sharon Byrne, executive director of the Montecito Association and a delegate to United Nations forums, recently spoke at the Little Hoover Commission — an independent state oversight agency that investigates operations and policy to make recommendations to the governor — about reframing the housing crisis as a humanitarian crisis. “You’re not going to see an overnight change,” Byrne said of the bills. Byrne explained that although this new bill is great for homeowners, they are the minority in Santa Barbara. She also argued that creating more dense housing in the city will not stabilize rent prices but only move them up. “If density solved high-rent pricing, New York would be cheap,” she said. SB 9 also has no language outright prohibiting homeowners from turning their new units into vacation rentals, Byrne said. Though vacation rentals have already taken many single-family homes out of the housing market, Byrne said this could further the trend of developers buying homes, evicting residents, and charging high prices for a home that will sit empty much of the year. Vacation rentals are illegal in low-density residential areas, but Byrne said the fines are not enough to discourage developers from continuing to create them. The City of Santa Barbara attempted to ban them completely

ART MATTERS LECTURE Sharon Byrne

in 2015, but the decision was overturned. Byrne said the banning of vacation rentals could be a step in the right direction for creating more housing, as well as creating anti-displacement policies that protect residents from being forced out of their homes with no resources. “City officials should have a vested interest in making sure their constituents aren’t homeless,” Byrne said. Mayor Cathy Murillo, who is up for reelection this November, said housing affordability is a critical issue that needs to be addressed on the state and local level. “Whether or not SB 9 will help increase supply remains to be seen, but it will undoubtedly remake neighborhoods and accelerate gentrification,” Murillo said. Randy Rowse, a former city councilmember running for mayor, said this bill will take away the local control over zoning laws, and the negative effects will be felt most by low-income neighborhoods. “The years of effort and planning that have gone into zoning laws will be gutted if single-family neighborhoods can be converted into lots crowded with multi-unit residences,” Rowse said. “We should and can work to create housing opportunities without sacrificing quality of life.” SB 10, also signed into law Friday, would simplify the process of creating new multifamily housing projects with up to 10 units in “transit-rich areas,” or simply any area within a half mile of a bus stop. Eighty-one percent of Santa Barbara County residents live within a half mile of a bus stop, according to the Santa Barbara County Association of Government Transit Needs Assessment from 2017. It would also simplify zoning requirements under the California Environmental Quality Act, allowing cities to zone for housing projects much faster. The bills will go into effect on January 1, 2022. “To address this, we need to build more affordable housing, but we also need to do it in a sustainable and responsible way,” Murillo said. “SB 9 undercuts our ability to n do both.”

Enigmatic Architecture: R. M. Schindler’s Los Angeles

Todd Cronan Associate Professor of Art History Emory University

Th u r s d ay, O c t o b e r 7 5:30 pm Mary Craig Auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara Born and trained in Vienna, R. M. Schindler came to Los Angeles in 1920, working in the office of Frank Lloyd Wright. After leaving Wright’s office, Schindler went on to become the most influential modern architect in Southern California. This talk will explore his enigmatic approach as a designer, from his infamous bohemian mecca, the King’s Road house, to his last great “translucent” works, including the remarkable Janson and Tischler houses. In many ways, Schindler’s work remains a mystery, full of seemingly arbitrary shapes, patterns and angles they seem to many like futuristic set designs for early Hollywood film. We will try and unravel some of the mysteries that surround this astonishing body of work. For this in-person event attendance is limited to 50. Please visit www.sbma.net/visit/planyourtrip for more information about the Museum’s mask and proof of vaccination policies. Single tickets: $10 SBMA Members/$15 Non-Members Free to students with valid ID & Upper Level Members Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desk in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters

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denied both, he will not be able to work. “If I’m not granted either exemption, the way the mandate rules, not only can I not practice at Samsun and Cottage; I can’t practice in medicine anywhere in the state.” This blanket mandate represents an overreach, he said. “Government should educate the public in a balanced manner and provide easy access to vaccination to all those that choose, but never mandate, force, or threaten loss of employment.” After September 30, his only option may be legal recourse, something nine healthcare workers in Maine are currently tackling in federal court. In the announcement of the mandate, Chief Medical Officer at Sansum Clinic Dr. Kurt Ransohoff reiterated the safety of the vaccines. “Vaccinations are extremely effective at preventing someone from winding up in the hospital with COVID-19 or dying as a result of that illness,” Ransohoff said. “They are effective at preventing any form of COVID-19 infection, but in preventing the really bad outcomes, these vaccines are n remarkably effective.”

COURTS & CRIME

Fired Jail Guard Alleges Retaliation

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twice-fired custody deputy in the Santa Barbara County Jail is fighting to get his job back, claiming he’s being retaliated against as a “whistleblower.” Robert Kirsch won a partial procedural victory in front of Judge Colleen Sterne, who ruled that he and two other custody deputies — Joshua Lake and Robert Garnica — could be granted access to the personnel records of three of the five deputies Kirsch alleged had been allowed to “engage in chicaRobert Kirsch in Santa Barbara Superior Court in 2013 nery and get away with it.” Kirsch was terminated in December 2020 for allegedly submitting ments will take place only in the judge’s fraudulent time cards. Lake and Garnica chambers; no members of the media or were disciplined but kept their jobs. All public will be allowed. three have claimed their time cards became The convoluted case of Robert Kirsch an issue only after they had filed a sexual demonstrates that firing a law enforcement discrimination complaint against a lieuten- officer with a troubling record is far easier ant for not allowing female custody officers said than done. Kirsch — first hired by the to work in a new arraignment module of Sheriff ’s Office in 2004—was indicted by the County Jail. They also alleged another a federal grand jury in 2014 for his role in deputy had tampered with drug-related beating African-American inmate Charles evidence, another lieutenant of time-card Owens, then in County Jail awaiting trial on fraud, and another lieutenant still of being rape and murder charges. drunk in public and hiding exculpatory Kirsch would be tried two times for evidence. his role in this attack; the first trial ended Judge Sterne ruled the trio could exam- with a hung jury, and in the second, he was ine some of the personnel records sought, acquitted. Kirsch would appeal his termibut not all. Some of the alleged misdeeds, nation to the county’s Civil Service Comthe judge ruled, had no bearing or relevance mission, which in 2016 ruled in his favor. on the case at hand or involved allegations That same year, Owens — who had since the plaintiffs never blew the whistle on. been sentenced to life in prison after being Given the strict protections afforded the convicted of his charges — sued the county personnel files of law enforcement officers for excessive force, and the county settled —Nick Welsh under state law, the review of these docu- out of court for $60,000. PAU L WELLM AN FI LE PHOTO

SAVIN

any aborted fetal cells. However, fetal cell lines — cells grown in a laboratory based on aborted fetal cells collected generations ago — were used in testing during research and development of the mRNA vaccines, and during production of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.” Lawler, also a vocal Catholic, called the description of ongoing fetal tissue harvesting to create vaccines “dishonest sensationalism,” and pointed to the Vatican’s guidance that allows Roman Catholics to receive COVID-19 vaccines that use fetal cell lines in good faith. Abate said the process to apply for the religious exemption was a single form, and he did not have to provide a letter from his priest, although he had prepared to have one ready. As of yet, he has not heard back regarding approval. The administration, he said, has left him hanging. “They won’t respond about the exemptions — how can you get them? Who decides? When will I hear?” If he is denied a religious exemption, he plans to seek a medical one, but if he is


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CORONAVIRUS

COVID Testing Dilemma School Start Increases Need Among the Young by Jean Yamamura hen children of school age show signs of illness like runny nose, headache, fever, or even diarrhea, a parent must now do more than call the school to report their absence. Instead, they must begin searching for a doctor or lab available to test their child in case they’ve caught COVID. It’s not always an easy quest. Since the start of school, Sansum nearly doubled its number of COVID tests for children in the first weeks of September compared to all of last June, said Randi Rossi, who manages the Pediatric Branch. At Cottage Health’s Urgent Care clinics, testing of young patients more than doubled from July 17 to September 16. At Pacific Diagnostic Labs, a subsidiary of Cottage, among those ages 0-17, testing tripled —from 791 to 2,730—with positive results about 5 percent of the time. Cottage releases appointment times online at 8 p.m. for the next day, which fill quickly in the morning. A search for COVID testing labs online can turn up other locations, urgent cares, and pharmacies that offer same-day testing. Costs range from $90-$275 depending on the test, but insurance can sometimes bring that down to zero or a copay. A full lab test can take up to 48 hours to give a result, and rapid tests can return results the same day, if not the same hour. But there’s a catch. Sansum’s Kim Hurley explained that a child who’s been exposed is very different from one with active symptoms. Plus, “COVID is such a gray area; so much is unknown,” she said. The virus incubates for five to seven days, but sometimes for three to five days; a high viral load delivers the most reliable test result; but a delay is sometimes inevitable. Weirdly, Hurley said she’s seen kids test negative who are clearly ill. “For some reason, their body just doesn’t register to the test,” she said. They are known as zebras, “because they’re not part of the usual pack.” So a doctor’s assessment can be vital. Most of the independent labs who responded to a reporter’s call had dealt mainly with people who needed a test to board an airplane or attend a performance, which kept them crazy busy, one said. They hadn’t seen an uptick in young patients, no doubt because

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NEWS BRIEFS

the school districts are advising parents to go through their doctor in assessing their child’s health and COVID status. Public Health’s advice was part of this year’s Santa Barbara Unified school packet. Among many other things, it explained the recommended length of quarantine for those with vaccination or no vaccination and gave the Centers for Disease Control’s advice for a second test to confirm a negative test. The schools also conduct surveillance testing with free but limited supplies from the state; the medical facilities indicated no shortages, but labs reported an inability to obtain kits from some test manufacturers. The Big Kahuna for testing is County Public Health, which conducts free tests at the Goleta Valley Community Center, one of the busiest in the state, and at its testing trailer on Camino del Remedio. A new mini-bus at Direct Relief in Goleta rolls up on September 27. It can take two to three days to get an appointment, and the gold-standard test they offer — which grows coronavirus DNA—can take up to two days for a result. Hurley noted that people who were vaccinated definitely didn’t get as sick, didn’t feel bad as long, and didn’t end up in the hospital. “This is a terrible virus,” she said. “It’s hard to say 100 percent of the time who will test positive, who will test negative. That’s why, I think, too, that we’re struggling to control it.”

4-1-1

VISIT THE VACCINATION BUS Santa Barbara senior and junior highs will host a vaccination bus for children ages 12 and over, and for their family members, free of charge, no appointment needed. Parents or guardians are encouraged to come with their child. » La Cumbre Junior High: Mon., Sept. 27, 4-7 p.m. » Dos Pueblos High School: Tue., Sept. 28, 6:30-10 a.m. » Goleta Valley Junior High School: Mon., Oct. 4, 4-7 p.m. » Santa Barbara Junior High School: Tues., Oct. 5, 4-7 p.m. » Santa Barbara High School: Mon., Oct. 11, 6:30-10 a.m.

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COURTS & CRIME The Sheriff’s Office arrested Goleta resident Juan Diaz-Chevez, 32, on 9/14 for attempted murder after being notified that a man had been stabbed several times before riding his bike to Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital. The alleged stabbing took place near Highway 217, and there are currently no additional suspects, according to Sheriff’s Office PIO Raquel Zick. The victim is expected to recover. Diaz-Chevez is being held in County Jail on $1 million bail.

COMMUNITY The S.B. Community Arts Workshop was buzzing 9/19 for the first-of-its-kind Youth Makers Market. The youth-driven pop-up was created to encourage local kids to create and manage their own small businesses. Sixteen kids ages 6+ participated, selling everything from arts and crafts to homemade honey and jewelry — all made and sold by the kids themselves. “I cannot thank the community enough,” said Cecilia Rubio, who helped organize the event with her daughters, Aaliyah and Bella Rubio. Full story at independent.com/first-youthmakers-market. n

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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CANNABIS

Partial Ceasefire in Carp’s Pot Wars

COU RTESY CAR P G ROWERS

SEPT. 16-23, 2021

Former Foes Sign Pact to Get Rid of Stench by Melinda Burns t’s been nearly four years since the County Board of Supervisors rolled out the red carpet for the cannabis greenhouse industry in the Carpinteria Valley, and still the community is plagued with the “skunky” smell of pot. It greets people when they open their front doors, their car doors, and their washing machines. It wakes them up at night. It lingers at schools, beaches, and freeway exits. Many say the pungent smell has caused them to suffer headaches, sore throats, nausea, and respiratory problems. In recent years, as most of the valley’s cut-flower greenhouses converted to pot, mostly without zoning permits, two citizens’ groups—Concerned Carpinterians and the Santa Barbara Coalition for Responsible Cannabis—have pressed the County Board of Supervisors to rein in the cannabis industry, without much success. Now, in a bow to political realities, the coalition, a nonprofit group with 200 members countywide, has changed tack. On August 20, the group signed an odor-control agreement with its former adversary, the Cannabis Association for Responsible Producers, or CARP Growers, representing the owners of 21 greenhouse properties. “As a result of our extended negotiations, I’ve come to believe that the growers really want to do the right thing,” said Rob Salomon, a coalition boardmember. “They don’t want to be associated with an industry that has stunk up the Carpinteria Valley and made them a pariah in the community. “The contract puts in place a path to technology and protocols well beyond what the county ordinance requires.” At the heart of the pact is a “model odor abatement plan”

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Foothill Road. “It was definitely very close to falling apart. The coalition wanted more than what a lot of the growers can promise. We want to hold to our words. Whatever we promise, we’re going to deliver. “It’s a monumental feat to be able to have accomplished this and come to terms with each other.”

THE TERMS

POT PACT: CARP Growers and the Coalition for Responsible Cannabis signed an odor-control agreement on August 20 to clear up Carpinteria’s worst odor hot spots by the end of 2022. From left are Autumn Shelton, CARP Growers president; Lionel Neff and Rob Salomon, coalition boardmembers; and Tristan Strauss, CARP Growers vice president.

During the past 12 months alone, Carpinteria Valley residents have filed 913 odor complaints with the county. It’s not only the “skunky” smell of pot, but also the “laundromat” smell of the odor-neutralizing greenhouse “misting” systems that they object to. Hot spots for the noxious odors have been Padaro and Cravens lanes, La Mirada Drive and Meadow Circle, the Polo Condos, and the homes nearest the greenhouses on Foothill Road, the stretch between Nidever and Casitas Pass roads that some call “Cannabis Alley.” “I’ve probably sent 60 complaints to the county in the last 90 days,” said Paul Ekstrom, a retired firefighter who lives next to Ever-Bloom, a cannabis greenhouse at 4701 Foothill Road owned by Ed Van Wingerden, a CARP Growers member. CARP Growers holds 299, or 88 percent, of the 338 provisional licenses issued by the state for marijuana cultivation in the valley. Half of the 18 property owners who signed the agreement are Van Wingerdens or Brands, two families that rose to prominence in the cut-flower industry decades ago. In addition to installing “best available” technologies for odor control, CARP Grow—Graham Farrar, CARP Growers member ers will be required to implement a sophisticated network of wind stations throughout that requires the members of CARP Growers to install “best the valley to help anticipate odor episodes and identify available odor control technologies”—widely believed to which greenhouses are causing them. be carbon filtration systems called “scrubbers”—to get rid In an expansion of the county’s rules, the growers also of the smell of pot inside their greenhouses before it can must follow a lengthy set of protocols for responding to and investigating odor complaints—not only from homes but escape through the vents in the roofs. Both parties say they are hopeful that with the scrubbers also parks, schools, churches, and businesses. The model odor-abatement plan will be incorporated in place, the valley’s smelliest hot spots can be cleared up by the end of 2022. The growers with the most odor com- into the county zoning permits for each CARP Growers plaints, they say, will get top priority for new scrubbers. The operation and will run with the land. Some of the odorfirst big shipment, 150 of the latest models, costing $20,000 response protocols will be enforced by the coalition. The county will enforce the growers’ odor-abatement each, is expected to arrive here in mid-November from the plans and will hire a consultant to ensure that odor-control Netherlands. “I’m very excited to see this deal happen,” said Autumn technologies are functioning as promised, Lisa Plowman, Shelton, the CARP Growers president and a co-owner the director of Planning & Development, said. of the Autumn Brands Farm, a nine-acre “grow” at 3615 To date, 82 acres of greenhouse cannabis in the Carpin-

‘The coalition has identified that odor is the issue they want solved, and we’re going to figure out how to solve it.’

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teria Valley have been approved for county zoning permits; 222 acres are under review, and 186 acres will be allowed. Under the county’s permissive rules, the operations of many CARP Growers members have been designated as “legal, non-conforming.” Once they get their permits, Plowman said, “there will be investigations when we get complaints.” “The biggest challenge in this process is trying to figure out where the odors are coming from, because of the proximity of the grows,” she said. The parties’ stated goal under the agreement is to reduce odors so that none are detectible beyond the greenhouse property lines. The agreement outlines a series of steps for growers to follow, working with the coalition, to clear up the smell when no single “grow” is the clear source of a complaint. “It’s a new era for farmer-community relations in Carpinteria,” said Graham Farrar, who co-owns G&K Farms at 3561 Foothill and Mission Health Associates at 5601 Casitas Pass. “The coalition has identified that odor is the issue they want solved, and we’re going to figure out how to solve it.”

THE COMPROMISE

The agreement does mark the end of an era, one in which the coalition was a thorn in the side of the County Board of Supervisors, doggedly—and quixotically—pushing for ordinance amendments that would require stiffer permits for cannabis operations countywide. Simultaneously, the coalition appealed to the board to overturn a dozen cannabis zoning permits in the valley. The coalition and Ekstrom also sued Ever-Bloom and four other Van Wingerden greenhouse operations on Foothill, alleging that the owners failed to give residents “relief from the awful smells and noxious odors.” Now, that lawsuit is on hold. The coalition has pledged not to oppose or appeal any more permits, so long as the growers adhere to the terms of the agreement. “This is not an ideal situation, but I don’t see an alternative,” Salomon said. “We appeal, we appeal, we appeal, we appeal; we lose, we lose, we lose, we lose.” The coalition has withdrawn its appeals of two CARP Growers projects — Autumn Brands and Bosim 1628, a six-acre cannabis greenhouse operation at 1628 Cravens Lane. In all, 12 projects that have been approved for permits,


NEWS of the WEEK

Salomon said the agreement would be posted on the coalition’s website in the coming weeks. But news of the compromise, as outlined in a recent press release, has angered some members of Concerned Carpinterians, a loosely knit grassroots group of about 300 people. Earlier this year, the group parted ways with the coalition over its change in strategy. Paul Foley, a Concerned Carpinterian and an avocado grower, called the agreement “hollow.” His orchard lies next to Cresco California, a CARP Growers business with eight acres of cannabis at 3861 Foothill Road. “It only represents the names of the people who sign it and very few others,” Foley said. “I’d like to see some de facto regulation of the industry — Sheriff’s deputies driving up and down, county cars coming into this driveway. There’s no enforcement.” The Foley family and Sarah Trigueiro, a resident of La Mirada Drive, have appealed to the Board of Supervisors to overturn two cannabis zoning permits that were approved by the county Planning Commission this year. They are the permits, respectively, for Cresco’s operations and Farrar’s proposed cannabis processing warehouse at G&K Farms. Both growers have been required by the county Planning Commission to install carbon scrubbers. If these alone can clear up the smell of pot, Cresco says it will decommission its “misting” system. But the Foleys want guarantees. “I’m finding it very hard to swallow that the CARP Growers are now touting this carbon scrubber system but haven’t been able to produce a reliable odor-control program in the past,” Maureen Foley, Paul’s daughter, told this reporter on a recent weekday, as waves of “skunky” odor wafted into the family’s orchard from the direction of Cresco. In addition to the smell, the appellants want the board to address the potential impacts of industrialscale cannabis on Arroyo Paredon, a major creek, and on Foothill traffic and the electrical grid. “The appeals process is a way for the public to have a voice,” Maureen Foley said. “It’s one of the few mechanisms where there’s an attempt at least at parity, in terms of balancing the voice of the appellant with the voice of the growers. And the projects have become better projects, as a result.”

THE SCRUBBERS

CARP Growers is proud of what it has accomplished. Although carbon filtration has been used for years in sealed buildings where cannabis is grown in other states, such as Colorado, the technologies being developed for the high-humidity, large-scale, open-vented greenhouses in the Carpinteria Valley are brand-new, and CARP Growers is pioneering them.

MELI N DA BU R N S

THE SKEPTICS

The group says it has spent more than $50,000, testing multiple prototypes and settling finally on “regenerative” carbon scrubbers, a model developed by Envinity, a Dutch firm. With 150 scrubbers, a $3 million investment, Ever-Bloom will be the site of the first large-scale test of this emerging technology. By early January, growers say, the greenhouse industry will know how well these new scrubbers work. Cresco representatives told the Planning Commission last month that they have been shown to eliminate up to 87 percent of the smelly gases given off by marijuana plants in a greenhouse setting. Meanwhile, CVW Organic Farms, the first cannabis operation in the valley to commit to using scrubbers, has been using eight locally designed units in a three-acre cannabis greenhouse on Cravens Lane for

The Santa Barbara County SELPA (SBCSELPA) and its member districts actively seek out all individuals with exceptional needs, ages birth through 21, including infants and children enrolled in parentally placed private schools. Special education programs are available to all eligible students with disabilities, ages birth to 21 in Santa Barbara County. If you are concerned about your child’s development or have reason to believe your child needs special education due to a physical, mental, emotional, learning or speech problem, you may contact either the SELPA office or your local school district Special Education Department if you have questions about referring a child for special education services. Santa Barbara County Special Education Local Plan Area Office (SELPA) 5385 Hollister Avenue, Bldg. 7 Mailing Address: 5385 Hollister Ave., Box 107 Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Or phone (805) 683-1424

SE BUSCAN NIÑOS AVISO PUBLICO COU RTESY

including these two and Farrar’s G&K Farms, will be required to upgrade their operations to meet the terms of the agreement. The agreement does not include a dozen cannabis greenhouse properties whose owners are not members of CARP Growers. Salomon said the coalition reserves the right to contest the zoning permits for those projects, if necessary.

CHILD FIND PUBLIC NOTICE

CONT’D

SELPA del Condado de Santa Barbara (SBCSELPA) y los distritos afiliados buscan a todos los niños con necesidades excepcionales entre 0 y 21 años de edad, incluyendo bebés y niños inscritos en escuelas privadas por sus padres. Los programas de Educación Especial están disponibles para todos los estudiantes con discapacidades entre 0 y 21 años de edad en el Condado de Santa Barbara.

ODOR EATERS: Open-vented cannabis greenhouses in Carpinteria are equipped with “misting” vapor systems (above); 150 of these carbon scrubbers (inset) are being shipped from the Netherlands for largescale testing at Ever-Bloom.

the past two months. The scrubbers are run at night, when the vents are nearly closed and the blackout curtains are in place. The “misting,” or vapor, system is turned on during the day, when the vents are open. A year ago, Mike Cooney, the county planning commissioner who represents the Carpinteria Valley, called this combination the “gold standard” for odor control. The CVW scrubbers and vapor systems were designed and engineered by Marc Byers, a Summerland resident who owns Byers Scientific, an industrial odor-management firm. Byers said there have been no odor complaints at CVW since his scrubbers were installed. “This Johnny-come-lately scrubber system from Holland is being pitched as a panacea; that’s maybe not true,” Byers said. “Our scrubber is the most energy-efficient scrubber there is on the market.” The pact does not mention the Byers vapor, or “misting,” systems that remain the frontline odorcontrol technology in cannabis greenhouses throughout the valley. These systems send up a curtain of nontoxic plant oils to neutralize the smell of pot, using perforated pipes that are attached to the exterior of the greenhouses. Spokespeople for both the coalition and CARP Growers say that, as the scrubbers are installed and prove to control the smell of pot, they expect the vapor systems will be phased out. As a sign of things to come, Ed Van Wingerden is applying for a permit to operate exclusively with the Dutch scrubbers and without a Byers vapor system at Roadside Blooms, a four-acre greenhouse operation at 3684 Via Real. “We’re making a leap of faith for these scrubbers,” said Cooney. “… We’re going to do the best we can to n quiet the outrage among our citizens.”

Si usted está preocupado acerca del desarrollo de su hijo o tiene la mínima razón de pensar que su hijo necesita servicios de educación especial debido a problemas físicos, mentales, emocionales, de aprendizaje o de habla, comuníquese con la oficina de SELPA o con el Departamento de Educación Especial de su Distrito Escolar si tiene alguna pregunta acerca de referir a un niño para servicios de educación especial. Condado de Santa Barbara Oficina Local de Educación Especial (SELPA) 5385 Hollister Avenue, Bldg. 7 Mailing Address: 5385 Hollister Ave., Box 107 Santa Barbara, CA 93111 Or phone (805) 683-1424

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Opinions

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BLUE LINES MATTER: Way back in 2007 —

when we still thought we had some innocence left to lose — a social anthropologist named Bruce Caron got the brilliant, if wacky, idea to paint a light blue line throughout much of downtown Santa Barbara, illustrating just how far and high the ocean would intrude into the city if all of Greenland’s ice sheets were to melt. Pushing the idea was then-City Councilmember Helene Schneider. I thought it was an inspired idea, and even the professional fuddy-duddies on the Historical Landmarks Commission thought so, too. But the Real Estate Interests — as they shall henceforth be known — didn’t. In fact, they went positively berserk. They threatened to sue City Hall on the febrile grounds that the Light Blue Line might depress their property values. Forget about the dire realities of a changing climate. ThenMayor Marty Blum quietly intervened and soon-to-be mayor Schneider soon backed off; the now-infamous Blue Line would be consigned to the dustbin of good ideas whose time would never come. I dredge this up because a few weeks ago, downtown commercial real-estate mega-mogul Jim Knell of the SIMA Corp hired political consultant John Davies to conduct a poll that purported to show the majority of respondents believe that City Hall does not have “a substantial role in addressing” climate change. In person, Knell is thoughtful and insightful, but in his emails — with which he regularly car-

pet-bombs City Hall — he’s inclined to scream

and shout. Knell — which, incidentally, is what bells do after someone dies — thinks there are too many homeless people on State Street and wants City Hall to do more about it. Last week, Knell released the poll. In it, Davies, one of Santa Barbara’s right-wing wizards of Oz, describes the city in breathlessly alarmist adjectives such as its “out-of-control homelessness,” and its “growing sense of lawlessness” that “signals a city in decline.” The funny thing is that I’ve never seen more young moms pushing more baby carriages and walking more Labradoodles downtown than I see now. In fact, I’ve never seen more people. And that’s in 35 years. In Knell’s avalanche of angry emails, he almost always mentions human poop on sidewalks, left on doorsteps, and deposited in back alleyways. I agree. It’s a burden shop-owners should not have to shoulder. I have suggested more porta-potties, but to little avail. What, you may ask, does this have to do with the Light Blue Line and climate change? Only everything. Let’s start with the poop. Based on City Hall’s best projections, the city’s sewage treatment system will become seriously impacted by a sea-level rise of only eight inches. At that point, our coastal high tides and tidal surges will begin inundating the gravity-fed sewage pipes that run along Cabrillo Boulevard. When seawater starts getting into these pipes via manholes and private sewer laterals, we can expect eruptions

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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of effluent to ensue with disturbing regularity. It won’t be a good look for our tourists. It will smell even worse. And when the tourists stop visiting our beaches, they sure won’t be shopping on State Street. And that’s just the start. When sea-level rise hits 2.5 feet and ultimately six feet, “projected” to occur in 2060 and 2200, respectively, you can kiss our El Estero sewage treatment plant goodbye. Right now, that sewage plant — its name has been officially changed from “wastewater treatment” to “resource recovery” — processes about six million gallons a day of our effluent soup. The real genius of the Roman Empire was its sanitary engineering. When it gets down to the nuts and bolts of running a city, there’s nothing more basic. Yet Wizard Davies would have us believe otherwise. “Climate change is local,” he says, “but not a local issue.” What? For all of City Hall’s many faults, the council deserves credit for passing meaningful measures — not just purity posturing and virtue signaling — designed to address climate change. Much of it’s wonky and defies simple soundbite summation. One example is its vote-prohibiting natural-gas hookups in most new developments — much to the chagrin of energy companies. Natural gas contains greenhouse-gas emissions 86 times more destructive than carbon dioxide. When the council voted, only one member of the public spoke against it. So much for climate change not being a local issue.

Then there’s the council adoption of the

Clean Energy Initiative, in which our City Hall

joins with other city halls up and down the coast to form partnerships to buy less polluting energy for our residents than what SoCal Edison would otherwise be selling. In this deal, Edison will be tasked with getting this energy from its source to our homes. If there’s any surplus generated by these transactions, the proceeds can be used to, among other things, help create new locally based energy supplies. The hope is that this program will cut carbon emissions from electricity consumed by city residents by 20 percent. That’s not a local issue? While the rest of us were sleeping, the same City Hall that’s reviled for doing nothing quietly created a new Department of Sustainability & Resilience. Running this show is Alelia Parenteau, a wonderfully named badass who, as a young City Hall intern years ago, spent six months riding on the back of trash trucks to track what happens to our recycled wastes. Not to be crassly obvious, but even the skeptics and deniers have been forced to admit that the occasional drought, wildfire, and flood have now been insanely fueled by climate change. How many of those “we-are-heroes” gummy bracelets must future debris-flow victims have to wear? Not a local issue? If not us, then who? Bring back the Light Blue Line. —Nick Welsh


OPINIONS CONT’D JEFF KOTERBA

Letters

I

’ve been a City Council watcher for many years. It’s been an ongoing delight to observe Councilmember Meagan Harmon since she joined the City Council in 2019. It’s no accident that Meagan’s colleagues voted unanimously to appoint her to the State Street Advisory Committee that will shape the future of our downtown area, an obvious nod to her collaborative style and professionalism. Her leadership in creating the State Street Promenade enabled local businesses to stay afloat and revitalized our business corridor, finally breaking the log jam that has fueled State Street’s years-long decline. Meagan has fought unrelentingly to help working families, from pushing for no-cause eviction protection to extended rental assistance during the pandemic to hero pay for grocery and drugstore workers facing extra dangers on behalf of us all. She was a leader in requiring 15 percent inclusionary affordable housing in new development. She has cut red tape and reduced bureaucracy by demanding reforms in the long-troubled Community Development Department, pushing for regulatory flexibility so businesses could stay open during the pandemic, and developing a low/no interest loan program for artist-owned affordable condos. The fact that Meagan has been endorsed by the most credible organizations in our community, like the Sierra Club, Planned Parenthood, city firefighters, and the Women’s Political Committee, is evidence that she’s a talented and valuable public servant. I look forward to her continuing as Sixth District Council member, serving her district and —Lee Heller, S.B. the entire city.

Free to Be a Menace

I

wearing a mask, but the clerk had a friendly chat with her and didn’t say anything to her about the mask mandate. When I spoke to the manager, he said that he puts out wipes every morning but homeless people take them. He said the store can’t order people to wear masks because they might have mental-health issues and thus refuse to wear a mask; however, the woman ahead of me was nicely dressed, friendly to the clerk, and totally coherent, with no apparent mental health issues. “Mask Required” signs on the door should be taken seriously, but they’re not. It’s definitely no fun to wear a mask, but we’re not going to get the pandemic under control if we don’t take reasonable precautions and all do our part.

For the Record

—Kathleen Roig, S.B.

¶ The Planning Commission hearing on trucking ExxonMobil oil described in last week’s news will be held on September 29, not September 30, and on October 1. Also, the permit is for 68, not 78, truck trips per day. HUGH RANSON PHOTOS

Vote for Harmon

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17


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Richard Dolson Kalstrom

Geoffrey Albridge Jewel 11/10/1968 - 11/12/2020

11/26/1928 - 8/15/2021

Richard Kalstrom passed away in the presence of family prayers Sunday night Aug 15. 92 years. Born in San Diego, CA. At age 7, his mother died in childbirth. His father Lewis moved them to the family dairy in Lakeside, where his grandmother raised him and his sister Marjorie. He enlisted in the Army when he graduated from Grossmont high school. Code technician (cryptography) in WWII Army and reserve, engineer at Raytheon for 35 years, treasurer at Alliance Neighborhood Church, singer in Community Chorus under Charles Gallagher, Camerata Choir (Dr. Harold Dunn) and Santa Barbara Oratorio Chorale. He was a gardener, with 10 food producing trees, grapes, berry vines, strawberries, vegetable garden, and roses. Preceded by wife LaVella, sister Marjorie. Survived by sister-inlaw Linda U. (Oregon), brother-in-law Garry A. (Arizona) son John and daughter-in-law Diane (Goleta), cousins Reynold K. (Colorado), Karen T. (Tulare), Robert K. (Valencia). Memorial at Restoration Church 595 N Fairview Ave: Sat Sep 25 1 pm. Charity: Salvation Army

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Jewel, Geoffrey Albridge of Santa Barbara. 19682020, died unexpectedly November 12, 2020. He is survived by his wife Christina, the love of his life, father Raymond Jewel, MD, siblings Marguerite, Carolyn, Mark, and Matthew, parents-in-law Ole and Ellen KerndalHansen of Denmark, and brother-in-law Peter Kerndal-Hansen. Beloved uncle of Nathaniel Jewel, Alexis Jewel, Hannah Bowling, and Christian and Amalie Kerndal-Hansen. His mother Shirley Jewel and nephew Dylan Jewel preceded him in death. Geoffrey made friends the world over and amazed and impressed with his life’s endeavors, his wit, and his humor. His rescue dog Lexie blossomed in her new life with his love and kindness. A graduate of UC Santa Barbara, he was an accomplished pastry chef and cook, birder, photographer, and environmentalist. He worked for UCSB for 25 years and gave his time and expertise to several science related causes. He has left us all bereft. A Celebration of Life will occur when it is safe. In lieu of flowers, please donate to Channel Islands Restoration (cirweb.org).

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

David J. Chapman, PhD, University of California, DSc Santa Barbara in 1994 and 12/12/1939 - 8/19/2021

David J. Chapman, PhD, DSc, born December 12, 1939 passed away from natural causes on August 19, 2021. David was born in Kingston, Jamaica, to Phylis Claire and Valentine Jackson Chapman. He emigrated to England with his family in 1940, and in 1946 the family moved to Aukland, New Zealand where, after the war, his Father, a marine biologist, was on the faculty and head of the Botany Department of the University of Aukland. David received an early introduction to the classics and developed a love of languages. He studied Latin for nine years and Greek for three. He also developed a love of calligraphy, having been taught by the calligraphist to the Queen, and produced many wonderful works until recent years. At the University of New Zealand (now University of Aukland) he received his BSc degree in Botany in 1960. At Scripps Institution of Oceanography, David received his PhD in 1965. His postdoctoral work as a research associate marine biologist was in Brookhaven National Laboratory until 1967, and he subsequently taught at the University of Chicago until 1973, then moved to the University of California, Los Angeles until 1994. He took the position of Dean of Mathematical, Life and Physical Sciences at the

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continued until 2000, after which he continued his full time work in research and guiding his graduate students at UCSB. In all the memorials received since his death, it is clear that he took to heart a saying by Stephen Grellet: “I expect to pass through this world but once: any good thing that I can do, or any kindness that I can show to any fellow creature, let me do it now; let me not defer or neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again”. David was a loving and encouraging husband, father and grandfather. In his work, he put his students and responsibilities first. He was also a philanthropist, freely giving money to the organizations he treasured. David is survived by his wife of 34 years, Claudia Chapman, his daughter, Amanda Shelton, his granddaughter, Carissa Shelton, his step-son, Keith Bussell, his brother, Michael Chapman, and his second wife, Judy Hastings. He is sorely missed by his family, former graduate students, and colleagues, but his good humor, knowledge, and caring, will live forever in all our hearts and memories. David was preceded in death by his youngest brother, Peter Chapman. A memorial will be arranged in the future when the Covid pandemic has ceased. In lieu of flowers, please send a contribution in David’s name to the Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network, 1460 N Fairview Ave, Goleta, CA 93117, or the Nature Conservancy.

Anna Hall

6/18/1940 - 4/30/2021

Anna Jane “Clayton” Hall was born on June 18, 1940. God took her home to heaven on April 30, 2021.  Anna was born in Buell, Idaho to J. Oliver and Rachel Clayton.  Anna left Idaho after graduation from high school and moved to different areas across the country.  She moved to Santa Barbara in 1960 where she ended up settling and calling home.  Anna graduated from Santa Barbara Business College and during her career held various positions at Greyhound, Emco Industrial, Sansum, and H&R Block.   Anna married Willie Hall, who had three children of his own (Billy Hall, Nezzi Person, and Jeffery Hall).  She had a lifelong passion for traveling, adventures, going to the movies, and seeing the country.  She also loved the beach and visiting family.   Anna met her soulmate/ companion William Hill in 1997. They shared a passion for travel and spent many happy years traveling together from coast to coast. She is preceded in death by her Parents. Her husband Willie Hall. Her sisters Carol Fultz, Delores Brawley, and Maxine Turano. Her niece Kathy Villa.  She is survived by William Hill. Her nieces Patti Sorich, Linda Lammers, Cindy Smith-Simmons, and Debbie Williams. Nephews Kim Fultz, Dan Brawley, and Gary Brawley.  Willie Hall’s children and many greatnieces, great-nephews, grandchildren and great grandchildren.    Anna was a wonderful person and loved by many. She is, and will be, forever missed. Continued on p. 20


Opinions

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A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

“My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Rachel, Age 17

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

statestreetballet.com

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

DAVID BAZEMORE

ROSE EICHENBAUM

Cour ag On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa e, Co nfiden Continue reading for details ce & Char acte r

Barbara County!

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.”

“My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me OFcare.” SANTA BARBARA the entire time I was in foster Rachel, Age 17

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with t enhancing our community’s awareness and appr architecture and the built environment.

A public nonprofit charitable organization

And this is

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES YMCA 105 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805.569.1103 • ciymca.org/youthandfamilyservices

Youth and Family Services YMCA operates four core programs that provide a continuum of care to underserved at-risk youth. Youth, young adults, and families that participate in our programs experience greater safety and well-being while they develop skills and lasting relationships to improve their resilience and build a successful, independent future.

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

St. George Youth Center provides critical family, community and afterschool programming to keep youth away from high-risk behaviors.

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

My Home continues the care for youth as they become young adults but still need critical support services as they pursue educational or employment opportunities.

Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

DAVID BAZEMORE

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary a sterling year of performances & events

A CONTINUUM OF CARE

Street Outreach Services provide on the street assistance to youth and young adults who find themselves living on the streets or being at-risk of homelessness.

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Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

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AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

SB Wildlife Insert.indd 1

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

DAVID BAZEMORE

ROSE EICHENBAUM

Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on notion that we are, for better or for worse, different peop different places  places — and — and on the conviction that it is architect task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Bo

2/22/19 3:20 PM

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up healthy,

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Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application. educated independent.

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

statestreetballet.com

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

Noah’s Anchorage is a safe haven for at-risk and homeless youth and provides programs to end the cycle of homelessness.

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

SB Wildlife Insert.indd 1

2/22/19 3:20 PM

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.” Rachel, Age 17

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

OF SANTA BARBARA

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with the goal of enhancing our community’s awareness and appreciation of architecture and the built environment.

A public nonprofit charitable organization

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

SB Wildlife Insert.indd 1

I

War, the victorious Communist party decided to try out one of most ambitious population control programs ever attempted. The idea was simple: have the people police themselves. Reward all who were able to root out even the slightest waft of disloyalty toward the state and lock the culprits up. Of all the social and economic experiments tried by the Communists, this was far and away the most successful. The poster boy for the program was called Stasi. Run by Ministry for State Security in East Germany (GDR), it was one of the most effective and repressive secret police agencies ever to have existed. Their motto was “Shield and Sword of the Party.” Its main task was spying on the population, primarily through a vast network of citizens turned informants. It arrested 250,000 people as political prisoners during its existence. The Stasi employed about half a million people to help root out enemies of the state. It had hundreds of thousands of informers. Every business or plant had a Stasi informant. Spies reported every relative or friend who stayed the night at another’s apartment. Tiny holes were drilled in apartment and hotel room walls through which Stasi agents filmed citizens with special cameras. Schools, universities, and hospitals were extensively infiltrated. It worked. The East Germans never had to worry about being overthrown by their own people because, very soon, none of these potentially dangerous people were left. Texas has now begun to plant the seeds for a Stasi state. Today, its good citizens can be rewarded and made into heroes of the state by turning in other Americans who try and get an abortion, after just six weeks of fertilization. Now these good citizens are turning themselves into the Lone Stasis State. Anecdotal material is beginning to dribble in. For example, I recently was told about Paul “X,” who is said to live just outside of San Antonio. Paul was sure he’d come up with a great idea. It would be the easiest $10,000 he ever made. I mean 10 grand would pay off his car, and he’d still have funds left over to take the old lady to the “Wagon Wheel” for a special dinner. He once again marveled to himself that this was the upside to living in Texas. Last month, Texas law

5/23/19 3:43 PM

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

Texas Abortion Laws Will Lead to Vigilantes BY DAVID OBST AND B I L L B E N E S O N n the immediate aftermath of the Second World

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Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on the notion that we are, for better or for worse, different people in different places — and on the conviction that it is architecture’s task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Botton

INDEPENDENT.COM 2/22/19 3:20 PM

for one cat at a time.

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries George Thomas Glass, Jr. 9/20/1947 - 9/8/2021

On September 8, 2021, Tommy Glass went home to be with the Lord after a short but fierce illness. He knew where he was going and who was going to meet him at the gate so, as was typical, he had no fear. Born in Santa Barbara to George Sr. and Ruby Glass, Tommy attended local schools graduating in 1965 from Santa Barbara High. He was offered a number of football scholarships and accepted one to University of Texas but returned to SB the end of his first year. In 1967 Uncle Sam invited him to an event in Vietnam. He earned three Purple Hearts for being wounded on the battlefield and was also awarded the AMC for Valor and the Distinguished Service Medal. He graduated Cum Laude from UCSB and in short order was involved in politics as a campaign manager and aide to former SB Mayor Don MacGillivray who introduced him to then Governor Ronald Reagan. From there he was swept into the national political arena, which positioned him perfectly for his future career. Tom and Pamela Soto married in 1982. A long history as friends since 2 nd grade, Tommy instantly became a parent to David and Deanna. The family moved to Palos Verdes and eventually Tom opened his own political consulting firm in Torrance. Tom was a huge Gaucho basketball supporter and drove from wherever he 20

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was to all the games. The day March Madness dates were announced, hotel reservations were made, and the days blocked for the annual Vegas trip with his college friend, Gary Burke. In January of 2004 a family crisis changed Tommy’s whole life focus. Dropping to his knees he promised God if you will answer this prayer, I will serve you the rest of my life. The prayer was answered and from that moment, Tom dedicated his life to the Lord. He retired early with Pam at his side, bought an RV, traveled, and pondered what the next chapter would bring. November 2005 our journey as grandparents began. Over the next few years three perfect, beautiful grandsons, Benjamin, Dominick and Jonah were born. And new adventures were at hand including many trips in the RV to the East Coast, National Parks, the Glass Ranch in Texas, and the favorite, Disney World. Sadly, Jonah was too young for that one. During this time, with the blessing of Pastor James Kinzler, Tom started Victorious Life Bible study, aka “The Monday Night Group”, at Coast Community Church of the Nazarene. This became a weekly year-round gathering for more than 10 years. In May of 2021 Tom taught his 594 th lesson before leaving on vacation. A few years ago, Tom started teaching at the SB Rescue Mission, which turned out to be one of his favorite commitments. Tommy was greatly loved and he will be greatly missed but there is no doubt that Jesus met him at Heaven’s Gate and said, “Well done, my good and faithful servant. You have been faithful in handling this small amount, so now

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

I will give you many more responsibilities. Let’s celebrate together!” Tommy is survived by his wife Pam, children David and Deanna, grandsons Benjamin, Dominick and Jonah, mother Ruby, who refers to Tommy as “the smart son”, and brothers Ron and Rick. Tom’s service will be 11:00 a.m. Thursday, September 23rd at WelchRyce-Haider Funeral Chapel on Ward Memorial in Goleta. The family requests Hawaiian attire or bright colors. In lieu of flowers a donation to Ventura Black Sheep c/o Eric Roberts, 120 N. La Cumbre Rd. #1, Santa Barbara, CA 93110 or the Santa Barbara Rescue Mission, 535 E Yanonali St., SB 93103 is requested.

Merrill Tilghman

10/24/1934 - 9/9/2021

With an appetite for good company, deep and long-lasting friendships, Merrill surrounded herself with interesting and diverse people. She was a voracious reader, enjoyed the arts of painting, drawing, pottery, sculpture, music and dance, and took great pleasure in her garden where she grew roses among many other plants and was known to have lively gatherings with friends and family. Helen Merrill McRae

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was born in East Orange, New Jersey to Ruby Carter Adams and Roderick Dhu McRae on Oct 24, 1934. She was raised in Coconut Grove, Florida by her mother and stepfather William Warnock Gibbs. She graduated from Coral Gables High School in 1951. She married William Slocum (Bill) Tilghman in 1952 and was welcomed into the Tilghman family. After a brief period in New York City, the couple moved in 1953 to Santa Barbara, California where Merrill spent the rest of her life, living briefly in Sandyland and Montecito, then a long while in the foothills on Old San Marcos Road where the couple built a house on 10 acres. Merrill and Bill owned and ran the El Tecolote Bookshop in El Paseo for a few years in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Merrill thrived in the artistic bohemian milieu of Mountain Drive during that era. After a divorce from Bill Tilghman, she partnered and had a son, Josef, with Jon Sikelianos and maintained a life-long bond with the Sikelianos clan. She spent the latter part of her life on Olive Street not far from the Santa Barbara Mission, where she was a “grand dame” of the neighborhood. Merrill earned a B.A and an M.A. in English Literature at UCSB, where she attended during the 1960s while raising her family. She was passionate about teaching—not only literature, but art and cooking classes—throughout her life. In addition to her formal education Merrill seriously studied astrology and embraced an eclectic approach to the spiritual side of life including Eastern religions. She had life-long love of animals and often surrounded herself with a menagerie. Always a com-

manding presence, she will be remembered and missed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances, especially creative types, from many walks of life. She died peacefully at home on September 9, 2021, surrounded by loving family members. Predeceased by her parents, a son William Tilghman, a daughter Anna Maria (Amy) Tilghman Goldsmith, ex-husband William. S. Tilghman, ex-partner Jon Sikelianos, Merrill is survived by son Tench Tilghman and wife Robin Tilghman (Fresno, CA), daughter Alison Tilghman Kline and husband Kenneth P. Kline (Woods Hole, MA), son Josef Jon Sikelianos and wife Katherine (Kat) R. White (Oakland, CA), her sister Nora Gibbs Merrill and husband Thomas Merrill (Gainesville, FL), stepsisters Rebecca Gibbs (Cincinnati, OH), Denny Gibbs (Sanford, FL), Eleanor (Robbie) Miller (Flagler Beach, FL), and Emilie Gibbs (Orlando, FL), stepbrother Tucker Gibbs (Coconut Grove, FL), stepdaughters Eleni Sikelianos (Providence, RI) and Pouli Sikelianos (Mora, NM) and stepson Zeke Sikelianos (Berkely, CA), grandchildren Jason K. Musacchia (Falmouth, MA), Moses Tilghman and Ana Tilghman (Fresno, CA), and great grandchildren Judah and Ezra Tilghman (Fresno, CA). In lieu of a funeral, a Celebration of Life is being planned for a later date.


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Fred Louis Arredondo 4/2/1956 - 8/17/2021

to donate in his name to Bishop Garcia Diego High School – Scholarship Fund. (https://www.bishopdiego. org/alumni/ways-to-give)

Sue Crispin

1/29/1944 - 9/16/2021

It is with sadness to write that Fred Louis Arredondo: Father, Brother, Uncle, and Friend, unexpectedly passed away on August 17, 2021. He was born on April 2, 1956, in Santa Barbara to Isabel and Marcus Arredondo. He attended Dolores School and graduated from Bishop Garcia Diego High School in 1974, where he played football, was on the wrestling team, and was a weight lifter with a bench press record. For over thirty years, he was an Insurance Salesman. His best role in life was being a father to his only child, Marissa. He was an AYSO coach for his daughter’s soccer team, enjoyed helping with math homework, going to the movies, bookstores, Disneyland, and camping trips. He was an avid outdoorsman, taught by his father since he was a child. He loved the fresh air of the mountains, where he would hike, fish, and hunt with family and friends. June Lake was a favorite annual destination trip. He leaves behind his daughter, Marissa Aldana Arredondo, siblings: Eloise Arredondo Gomez, Albert Arredondo, Isabel Arredondo, and Darlene Arredondo James; his Uncles, Reyes Lopez and Leo Lopez London and numerous cousins, nieces, and nephews. He will be greatly missed by his family and friends. A graveside service will be on Friday, September 24th, 2021 at 1 pm at the Calvary Cemetery in Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers, please feel free

Sue was born in Cranston, Rhode Island to Carl Malmborg and Lillian Smith. She was brought up on a rural farm with lots of dogs, cats, ducks, and chickens that she chased around. The big change in her life came when her aunt took and her cousin to Europe during one summer when she was in high school.  That is when she discovered her love of travel.  She quickly learned the ropes and became a professional travel agent.  During  her forty plus years in the industry she traveled to every continent save one and enjoyed every minute. In 1965 Sue went on an adventure motor trip with good friends to Santa Barbara and never went back to Rhode Island.  The most wonderful thing in her life happened because of that.  She met her future husband and best friend Gary.  They had many great adventures and he was the love of her life. Sue loved to cook and entertain.  For three or four years she arranged elaborate events and feasts for companies and friends that she was close to.  Sue was admired for her knowledge and her attention to detail in any project that she undertook.  She was the utmost friend and confidant to many in Santa Barbara.

She leaves behind her beloved ninety year old brother Avery , her niece Carlene Plaziak, her great niece and great nephew Jill and Daniel Plaziak.  She is predeceased by her parents and her nephew Eric Malmborg. A special thanks to dear friends Linda Love and Don and Kathleen Scott for their tireless work in time of need.  A very special thank you to Dr. Fred Kass for extending Sue’s life.  Sue was eternally in love with all of her cats and would appreciate donations to ASAP or K-9  Pals. https://www.asapcats. org/    https://www.k-9pals. org/

Larry D. Drake

5/29/1952 - 8/18/2021 Larry was born in Sacramento on May 29, 1952, to the late Harold Drake and Dorothy Quam. He passed on August 18, 2021, after a short illness. Larry is survived by his mother, son Daniel S. Drake (Nicole), sister Linda Acosta (Ron) and his grandchildren Dannel, Moriah and their mother Cindy de La Fuente, Alina. Darnny and their mother Priscilla. He also leaves behind nieces Christina Jare (Peter) and their sons; Leanna Crum (Craig) and their five daughters; Nephew Matt (Brynda) and their son. Special thanks to the Ladies of Casa Serena for being so good to him and watching over him. Also, a thank you to John Gonzales who he said was his “Big Brother” he never had, Ron Acosta for being his

little brother he never had and longtime friend Sam Castillo. A celebration of life will be at Sacramento National Cemetery. Family and friends are welcome to attend.

Sylvia T. Louda

1/17/1947 - 9/2/2021

Sylvia T. Louda passed away peacefully on September 2, 2021. She will be greatly missed by her two grown children, Josh and Eva, their spouses, her granddaughter, family, and friends. Sylvia was born in Boston, MA, and spent her childhood in the city (often calling herself a street kid from Boston) and on the coast of Maine with her cousins. After graduating high school, she headed to the west coast to visit her cousins, John and David, in Santa Monica. When she set her toes in the Pacific Ocean, she knew she had found a new home. During this time, she also discovered her true passion, early childhood education and development. She graduated from a progressive teaching program at Pacific Oaks College. She excelled in her studies and was a source of expertise and support for those around her. Sylvia arrived in Carpinteria in the late 70s with her future husband and great friend; they rented the brown house on the corner of Walnut Ave. and 8th Street, dubbing it the “5195 Club”. Carpinteria became their adopted home, and they followed their dreams by purchasing a plot of land in Gobernador Canyon. Dragging two trailers into the avocado

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trees and building outdoor kitchens and bathrooms, they embraced the back to the land movement. Our mother had a huge heart and was often the first person at your door ready to help with food in times of struggle or despair.  She adored her students and would do anything for them. Her intelligence and her creativity combined made her a wonderful teacher. Mom, we hope you’re in a peaceful place and can rest easy.  Know that we appreciate all that you’ve done for us. We love and miss you.

Kim Rene’ Selberg (Szafranski) 1955 - 2021

Kim Rene’ Selberg (Szafranski) passed away unexpectedly on Friday February 19th, 2021 at the young age of 65. She was born in Pomona, CA in 1955 and moved to Pasadena shortly after. In 1966 she moved to Santa Barbara where she attended San Marcos High School and met her future husband Jim. She graduated in 1973 and married her husband Jim in 1974. In 1973 she attended SBBC where she became a Secretary to Detectives at the SBSO until 1975. She then worked at Cottage Hospital until she moved to Ventura in 1985. In 1986 she worked at CMH as a Unit Secretary on the 5th Floor until her retirement in 2016. Since her retirement she has enjoyed many activities such as making flower pens, spending time with her Grandchildren and animals Roxy, Harley, Chloe, Toby, TB, Spunky, Deacon and Caine. She was a loving Wife, Mother, Grandmother and Friend. She is survived by her loving husband of 46yrs Jim, Children-Kristina, Kelly, Daniel and Geniveve, Grandsons Weston and Travis. She will be reunited with her father Edwin, mother Jeannine and brother Mark. She will be greatly missed by many. A graveside service will be held on Thursday March 4th at the Santa Barbara Cemetery at 3pm. In lieu of flowers you can make a donation to The Hospice of Santa Barbara.

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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O T I R R U B

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EL ZARAPE: BREAKFAST

PASILLA PEPPER BURRITO

For many years, my solution to any problem was duct tape, hydrogen peroxide, and whatever squirts out the heated end of a hot glue gun. I have since seen the light and have expanded this list to include the mighty and wondrous pasilla chile. Few meals are not vastly improved by the addition of a blackened pasilla chile, which, if I bothered to check, are probably bursting with antioxidants, able to retard the aging process, and a cure for cancer. But in the meantime, I’m happy just to glory in their sublime combination of heat and light. In this vein, I was thrilled to learn El Zarape — which for 20 years has anchored the flourishing commercial ecosystem epicentered at the intersection of San Andres and Micheltorena streets—has just added the Pasilla Breakfast Burrito to its morning menu. One of the great things about El Zarape over the years has been the size of its breakfast burritos: Unlike many on the market, they are not as large as a watermelon or even a football. When it comes to size,

they are just right. Nor are they designed to provide the owners a handy disposal route for excess rice and potatoes. The restraint shown has long been appreciated by Westside residents looking for a breakfast that’s quick, cheap, and tasty. The Pasilla Breakfast Burrito comes equipped with eggs, potatoes, pasillas, and for good measure, avocado, served in a lightly crisped tortilla. For those looking to blow their heads off, try the super-hot habanero salsa. For those looking for a quieter way to start the day, I’d suggest the green tomatillo salsa or the red ajillo.

NICK WELSH

hether you’re a NorCal kid who grew up on rice-stuffed logs developed in San Francisco’s Mission District, an L.A. dweller who chased down cheesy and refried-bean-soaked bites, or a SoCal settler who prefers the crunch of French fries in your San Diego spin, the burrito occupies one of the tallest thrones in the pantheon of California cuisine. Santa Barbara sits squarely in the middle of this tortilla-wrapped landscape. We are home to countless restaurants serving traditional Mexican-style burritos—which offer reliable, belly-stuffing comfort, thanks to the usual inclusion of rice and beans—as well as establishments whose modernized versions amplify veggies over meat, completely ditch the customary carbs, or veer into other global cuisines with just a nod to the burrito’s basic architecture. In celebration of this burrito bounty, the Santa Barbara Independent is launching our first-ever Burrito Week, which we plan to make an annual affair. For seven days, from September 23 - 29, 16 participating restaurants will be serving $7 burritos (17 of them, in fact, because one location is serving two). To give a sense of what to expect, we sent out our hungry team to sample these burritos, snap some smartphone pics, and return with a report on what you can expect. There are nine burritos that fall more into the traditional camp, and then three breakfast, one veggie, one vegan, and one featuring South Asian flavors. And, as is becoming a tradition in our annual Burger Week, dessert is on the table too, with two sweet burritos to try, as well. So dig in, tag your photos #sbindyburritoweek on Instagram, and celebrate Burrito Week 2021! Follow along at independent.com/burritoweek. —Matt Kettmann

—Nick Welsh

Available 7-11 a.m., Mon.-Fri., and all day, Sat-Sun. 1435 San Andres St.; (805) 899-2711; elzarapesantabarbara.com INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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THE SWEETEST LITTLE BURRITO

THE NATURAL CAFÉ:

BUDDHA BURRITO

Available after noon daily. 1106 State St.; (805) 962-5085; andersenssantabarbara.com

Available at State Street, Hitchcock, and Camino Real locations. thenaturalcafe.com

KALE ME SWEETHEART BURRITO

SARAH SINCLAIR

Imagine this sweet and spicy rainbow: A red tomato tortilla stuffed with roasted orange sweet potatoes, finely sliced purple and green cabbage, creamy avocado slices, and crunchy kale that’s been tossed with a vegan chili mayo sauce featuring a touch of cilantro, green onions, and Thai basil. This hefty mélange of vegan and glutenfree goodness was created by Blue Owl owner Nadia Ajlouni especially for Burrito Week. “I wanted to offer something fun, colorful, and healthy,” explained Aljouni as we sat in the cozy window booth at Blue Owl watching the sun set outside. She could almost be describing the restaurant itself, with its vibrant, plant-filled, boho vibe. The Kale Me Sweetheart burrito will fit right in. This is no faux-meat-substitute burrito. The veggies proudly assert themselves as substantial chunks of sweet potato balance the crunchy cabbage and kale, and the spicy sauce provides the kick that one expects in a burrito. Carnivores will find plenty of meaty options on Blue Owl’s menu, like the Pork Banh Mi and Thai Basil Cheeseburger, but this week, it’s the Kale Me Sweetheart burrito that takes the spotlight. —Sarah Sinclair

Available after 3 p.m. 5 W. Canon Perdido St.; (805) 705-0991; theblueowlsb.com

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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Little Kitchen’s tikka masala curry burrito is a delightful fusion of a Mexican-food concept with an Indian-food flavor profile. Instead of eating them one at a time, or spooning some on top of the other, jasmine rice and tender dark-meat chicken in a warm, rich, creamy tomato curry sauce are unified within a tortilla. This is a delicious, comforting entrée on its own, but it’s served with a raita sauce made of yogurt, cucumber, red onion, cilantro, and spices. Add a spoonful of this light and fresh tasting sauce with a little squeeze of lime juice to really complement the deep, savory flavors from the burrito and give your mouth something to remember. —Ricky Barajas

Dinner hours only. 17 W. Ortega St.; (805) 770-2299; littlekitchensb.com

No restrictions. 1201 State St.; (805) 845-2600; benchmarkeatery.com

THE BLUE OWL:

TIKKA MASALA CURRY BURRITO

RORI’S ARTISANAL CREAMERY:

FUDGY CHOCOLATE BURRITO

ELIO CRUZ

Benchmark Eatery’s bar is back open, offering a view that overlooks their iconic patio at the corner of State and Anapamu—you know, the one that makes you feel like you’re on vacation every time you take a seat. This week, pair your beverage with the Burrito Mojado, which may just be the biggest, fattest, and wettest burrito in town. Its large flour tortilla is swaddled around tender, bite-sized chunks of carne asada black beans, green rice, pico de gallo, and cheese sauce, then doused in a house-made enchilada sauce that’s perfectly red in color, thick not watery, and smoky not hot. With stripes of more cheddar cream sauce aesthetically placed across the top and then sprinkled with pico de gallo, this is an edible work of art. This is way more than a grab-’n’-go burrito; it’s a complete Mexican dinner. —Tonea Songer

LITTLE KITCHEN:

Lile Kitchen NICHOLAS LIU

BURRITO MOJADO

TONEA SONGER

Just when I thought I had tried everything there is when it comes to burritos, Andersen’s “Sweetest Little Burrito” took my taste buds by storm. Created by Charlotte Andersen especially for your enjoyment to commemorate our inaugural Burrito Week, their “tortilla” made of a chewy marzipan almond meringue drizzled with an Earl Grey tea icing “crema” is rolled to perfection. Inside is a fluffy layer of a mocha cream as the frijoles, shreds of kiwi and strawberries for bell peppers, and little chocolate chunks for a surprise crunch. Not only is this sweet treat playful and gluten-free, it also is garnished with a caramelized jalapeño which unites all the flavors together in a scrumptious way. This little burrito would be excellent with a nice cup of hot chocolate, champurrado, or un cafecito. I will definitely be coming back. ¡Provecho! —Celina Garcia

As a veggie entrée, the Buddha Burrito at the Natural Café is the real deal. Stuffed — and we do mean stuffed — with brown rice, pinto beans, onion, squash, and a rainbow of yellow, green, and red peppers, this whole-wheat wrap satisfies the soul and calms the conscience of anyone seeking to feast a bit lower on the food chain. The toppings of guacamole, sour cream, cheddar cheese, and ranchero sauce are artful, and the milk-based ones can be easily subbed for vegan choices made with soy, as our cheerful server Heidi Zamora informed us. A green salad comes as a side, though it, too, exceeds expectations, replete with red cabbage and onion, carrots, tomatoes, and sprouts. Altogether, the Buddha Burrito and its buddies make a generous plate that’s scripted to be shared or enjoyed after a long, hard, hungry day. —Jean Yamamura

BENCHMARK EATERY:

24

JEAN YAMAMURA

THE ANDERSEN’S DANISH BAKERY:

CELINA GARCIA

O T I R BUR

WEEK!

Rori’s Artisanal Creamery now has five locations scattered across Southern California, and a menu consisting of flavors that often include founder Rori Trovato’s own creative input. Although the menu is now largely fixed, Trovato always finds excitement whenever there is an opportunity to make something new. One day, she might cater to a Levant-themed occasion by utilizing regional flavors such as sumac; another day she might use a farmer’s gift of fresh cherries before they spoil. For Burrito Week, Trovato designed the Fudgy Chocolate Burrito, in which a sweet crepe encloses Rori’s Serious Dark Chocolate ice cream, a delicate poof of whipped cream, and a drizzle of the brand’s popular honey hot fudge sauce. The experience offers three distinct tastes and textures that accentuate each other well. The whole creation is frozen solid, so that one can enjoy it free of mess. —Nicholas Liu

At S.B. Public Market, Coast Village Road in Montecito, and Linden Avenue in Carpinteria locations. rorisartisanalcreamery.com


COMMUNITY BURRITO

SARAH SINCLAIR

SUPER CUCAS:

I sat on the sunny patio at Super Cucas on Micheltorena Street, soaking up the neighborhood vibe and trying not to drool. I knew what to expect because Super Cucas has been my family’s go-to burrito spot for years. It’s not the first bite of a Super Cucas burrito that hooks you, as the flaky tortilla gives way to offer just a hint of the deliciousness inside. It’s not even the second bite, as you get a true taste of the spicy, savory meat. You know you’re hooked by the third bite, when the juicy filling blends completely with the rice and beans, and your taste buds’ expectations are exceeded. Super Cucas is not fancy, nor are their burritos. The Community Burrito contains rice, beans, onions, and cilantro, plus your choice of meat—carne asada, pastor, pollo, or carnitas—all wrapped in a humongous flour tortilla. I chose carnitas and probably could have been satisfied without any salsa. But mild green, medium red, and spicy-hot habanero salsa options begged to be sloshed on as I plowed through my beautiful burrito. I gobbled as much as I possibly could and then enjoyed the Super Cucas bonus: a burrito for lunch means there’s half a burrito left over for dinner, too. —Sarah Sinclair

z d e R a Yon Birria

q u e s o ta c o s

Come Experience our

Special Burrito also serving Quesotacos , taquitos de papa & nachos , Our Delicious Consome AND MORE!!

TAQUERÍA SANTA BARBARA:

AL PASTOR BURRITO

RYAN P. CRUZ

One burrito per customer. At Micheltorena and Mesa locations. supercucasrestaurant.com

Taquería Santa Barbara may be a newcomer to the scene, operating for just over a year at its prime location on State Street, across from the from The Granada Theatre and right next to McDonald’s. But father-anddaughter owners Lalo and Eva Umejido are serving up some seriously authentic al pastor in tacos, tortas, and yes, burritos. The Al Pastor Burrito comes packed with the marinated, freshly cut, spit-roasted pork; Mexican rice; refried beans; cheese; cilantro; and onion. The meat is the star of the show, and watching the man wielding a footlong shawarma blade slicing the amber-colored bits of pork straight off the rotating grill is enough to get anybody’s mouth watering. They offer a variety of house-made salsas, but their specialty is a unique, creamy pineapple-based salsa that’s sweet, smoky, and offers a silky-smooth contrast to the bold flavors of the meat, rice, and cheese. Paired together, the al pastor and pineapple salsa make for a combo that’s tough to beat and a can’t-miss burrito for Santa Barbara. —Ryan P. Cruz

✦ (8 05) 324-4039 532 State Street yona_redz instagram.com/

YONA REDZ:

BIRRIA BURRITO

I’ve eaten plenty of burritos in my day, but the bright-orange tortilla encasing Yona Redz’s birria burrito set it apart from any I’ve ever had before. Prepared in the same way as their classic quesatacos, their burrito begins with the tortilla taking a dip into the same pot where the meat was cooked. After that, it is filled with Monterey Jack cheese, peruano beans, cilantro, onions, freshly prepared jasmine rice, and their signature succulent beef birria. After the burrito is rolled, it takes a trip back to the grill to get a nice, crispy outer layer and to melt the cheese. Be sure to try dipping your burrito in their consommé—the rich, warm broth rushes into your mouth when you take a bite and really takes the entire experience to the next level. Stop by on a weekend to taste their birria made of goat’s meat, which is the traditional Mexican way. —Ricky Barajas

Served all day. 532 State St.; (805) 324-4039; yonaredz.com

ELIO CRUZ

Served all day. 1213 State St., Ste. A; (805) 869-6618; taqueriasb.com

$7 Creekside Burrito Special Sept 23 to Sept 29 Choice of: Grilled Chicken, Tri-Tip or Grilled Veggies | Shredded Cheese, Black Beans & Mexican Rice, Pico De Gallo, Sour Cream & Guacamole

Available from 11:30am to 4:30pm Dine In Only. Sorry, No Take Out Orders 4444 Hollister Ave., Santa Barbara • 805-770-3200 • TheCreeksideSB.com INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

25


September 23-29 • $7! NFL Sunday Football Open at 9am Breakfast Burrito • $2 Hot Dogs $5 Mimosas & Bloody Marys

9/21 Tuesday Karaoke • 9/24 Friday 7pm DJ Skip Stecker 9/25 Saturday 7pm Bad Habits

UptownLounge805.com

3126 State Street • 805.845.8800

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with y Todam ! Andrea Steward (Rudy’s Fresh Mexican Food) and Jonathan Estrada (Yona Redz) p 3 at in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with t Nexek! e W

CHARLES DONELAN

UPTOWN BURRITO

LOS AGAVES:

BURRITO ESPECIAL

All three Los Agaves locations are offering three options for burrito week: a vegetable “garden” version, an al pastor, and a carnitas. The al pastor I tasted at Los Agaves on De la Vina revealed the sophistication and depth of flavors that you will find across the entire Los Agaves menu. The burrito came wrapped in a fresh, thin tortilla that never got chewy, even at the folds. Los Agaves marinates its al pastor for 18 hours in a Yucatán-style achiote, adds diced onions and pineapple, and then blends the tender pork with delicious guajillo-flavored pinto beans before seasoning the burrito with guacamole, crema, and a dusting of shredded lettuce. The result is a marvel of concentrated flavor and texture, each ingredient distinct yet in perfect harmony with the whole. —Charles Donelan

All Santa Barbara/Goleta locations. los-agaves.com

HOME PLATE GRILL: G-TOWN WRAP & TRAIN WRECK WRAP

At Home Plate, one of the only true allAmerican diners left in Santa Barbara County, you can now find two delicious breakfast burritos on the menu. It’s a classic little restaurant with photos of baseball greats on the wall, mainly Yankees, which made me love the place from the get-go. But even if the walls were covered in Red Sox memorabilia, I could not deny how much I enjoyed eating these two burritos. The G-Town Wrap stuffs two scrambled eggs, grilled tri-tip slices, Italian sausage, Ortega and grilled jalapeño chilis, cheddar cheese, avocado, and a spicy green salsa into a large, nicely sauteed flour tortilla. The Train Wreck Wrap takes two scrambled eggs mixed with crispy bacon, tater tots, cheddar cheese, and a fabulous homemade sausage gravy, also wrapping them in a perfectly sauteed flour tortilla. I ordered both burritos for take-out, and the friendly, efficient staff cut them in half, wrapped them tightly, and when I arrived home 20 minutes later, they were still piping hot. My husband and I shared each burrito and couldn’t decide which was the most delicious. They both were home runs. —Marianne Partridge

MARIANNE PARTRIDGE

Come try the

W O T I BURR

Served daily until 2 p.m. 7398 Calle Real, Ste. C, Goleta; (805) 845-3323; homeplategoleta.com

GABRIELLA & SEAN LARKINS

Villa Wine Bar & Kitchen

ZACHARY FELD & BREANNA KROMER Crush Bar & Tap

Food & Drink: Wine Bars Thursday, September 30 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

Don’t let the fact that they’re a “chain” — with five locations throughout Santa Barbara, Carpinteria, and Buellton—fool you. For 45 years now, Rudy’s has been serving up some of the best Mexican food around, which, for a region that’s known for the cuisine, is really saying something. The family operation reintroduces its Original Chile Colorado Burrito for Burrito Week, a throwback to its early restauranting days and an homage to a traditional Sonoran recipe of tender beef chunks, homemade salsa roja, refried beans, and cheese all wrapped cozily in a flour tortilla. The beauty is in the simplicity with this one, with the hearty meat morsels exhibiting a perfect salt-spice tang and stealing the show.

All locations. rudys-mexican.com 26

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

TYLER HAYDEN

RUDY’S: ORIGINAL CHILE COLORADO BURRITO

—Tyler Hayden


THE UPTOWN LOUNGE:

UPTOWN BURRITO

TYLER HAYDEN

! K E E W

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Maybe it was watching Clayton Kershaw put on a show on the back patio TVs. (I’m a Giants fan but can appreciate good pitching when I see it.) Maybe it was hearing the crack of pool balls and the cackle of laughter inside, and feeling the cool cocktail in my hand. Or maybe it was wolfing down the flavorsome Uptown Burrito—tri-tip, rice, black beans, bell peppers, mozzarella cheese, and homemade salsa—that truly made me forget about life for a while. Most likely, it was the full package. But if you’re not in the mood for a burrito, the Uptown Lounge serves some very tasty wood-fired pizza, too. —Tyler Hayden

3126 State St.; (805) 845-8800; uptownlounge805.com

THE CREEKSIDE: CREEKSIDE BURRITO

A longtime hangout on Hollister Avenue in the heart of Noleta, The Creekside ditched a somewhat dicey drinking- hole reputation from years past when it reopened as a family-friendly restaurant—but still with that bustling bar—back in 2017. It’s best known for grilled, roadhouse-style cuisine, such as hamburgers, baby back ribs, chicken, and tri-tip roasted over red oak, but it’s always flirted with Mexican cuisine as well, via mayo-slathered street corn, nachos, quesadillas, and burritos. They’re serving up the Creekside Burrito as this week’s special, a hearty, stick-to-your-ribs affair full of rice, black beans, shredded cheese, pico de gallo, sour cream, guacamole, and your choice of grilled chicken, tri-tip, or veggies. It being a grill spot, I opted for tri-tip, and the smoky chunks were heavy in the mix, framed primarily by that fluffy rice and aided with side salsas and the highly recommendable Cadillac Margarita. My wife went the veggie route and approved. “It’s good,” she said, “and a little messy.” —Matt Kettmann

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LOS ARROYOS:

RUNAWAY BURRITO

MAT T KET TMANN

Available dine-in only, 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Limit one per person per day. 4444 Hollister Ave.; (805) 770-3200; thecreeksidesb.com

If your downtown Santa Barbara life stretches back about two decades, then Los Arroyos will forever claim a soft spot in your heart as the most popular fast-casual Mexican joint in town upon its 1999 opening on West Figueroa Street. Mastermind Tony Arroyo steadily expanded the menu and locations over the years, but the Runaway Burrito remains a staple at every restaurant. Meant to be eaten in your hands, the Runaway is appropriately packed with the right balance of brown beans, cheese, guacamole, and your choice of grilled chicken or al pastor pork, offering just enough food to be stuffed but not so much that you regret that final bite. This was an easy one for me to dive into, as it’s what I usually order, unless I’m feeling like pozole. To me, the Runaway is simply a bean and cheese burrito with bonus meat, and it serves as a blank slate for enjoying the restaurant’s fresh salsas. This time around, I opted for a spoonful of the chopped habanero atop a slug of that fresh, soothingly green avocado-tomatillo salsa. Wash that all down with sips of cerveza or horchata, and you’ve got the perfectly sized meal. —Matt Kettmann

Available during lunch and dinner, all locations. losarroyos.net

SaNtA SaNtA BaRbArA BaRbArA InDePeNdEnT’S InDePeNdEnT’S BuRrItO BuRrItO WeEk WeEk SpEcIaL SpEcIaL

RuDy̕S OrIgInAl

ChIlE CoLoRaDo CoLoRaDo ChIlE BuRrItO BuRrItO FrOm ThE StAtE Of SoNoRa, WhErE RuDy’S WiFe AlMa WaS BoRn

For a limited time, we are bringing back one of our original burritos, the Chile Colorado. Tender chunks of beef simmered in our homemade Chile Colorado sauce, wrapped in a flour toilla with beans and cheese.

–————— SePt –—————

OnLy

7

$

–————–—— 23–29 –————–——

RuDyS-MeXiCaN.CoM Y AlL 5 LoCaTiOnS Z

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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K E E W O T I R R U B T R O P S S A P

Lile Kitchen

SNAP

SHARE

WIN

We're giving away $25 gift cards to participating Burrito Week restaurants all week!

TO ENTER: SNAP A PIC OF YOUR BURRITO WEEK BURRITO SHARE IT ON INSTAGRAM USING #SBINDYBURRITOWEEK There will be 14 winners total and all winners will be notified on Instagram. 28

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Planned Parenthood California Central Coast

FINAL WEEKEND!

September 25, 2021

El Presidio De Santa Barbara State Historic Park

10 AM 5 PM

40+ Vendors

Live music from 3 PM - 5 PM

Mask Required

Ozma of California, Loq, Carly Home, Klapp Ceramics, Parker Clay, Olivia Rust, Hammies Shorts, La Segunda Goods, Cache Cache, Colibri Love, Ortega Vintage Goods, A Happy Mush, S-crafted, Shroomi, Character Supply, Kaibae, She Wore Lore, Val Arts, Sol Vintage Y Mas, Montecito Collective, Aura SB , Blue Blossoms, Happy Organics, Shand LA, UA Atelier, Noahs Garden Creation, Jolly Boy, Danielle Morgan Jewelry, Do Your Planet a Solid, Blue Hour Goods, Sew Cal Designs, Loud Flower Art Co, Know Your Alphabet, Poppies By The Sea, Amorita, The Lower Lodge, Jeanne Ceramics, Domecil, Wild Moon Collection, Adorn By Alexandra Riley, Reunion Ojai, Fold, Kala Handmade With Love, Andie Bronstad, Katy Caballero

FREE ADMISSION

HARVEST MARKET Thursday 9/23

Noon - 6 pm

Friday 9/24

Noon - 8 pm

S a t u rd a y 9 / 2 5

10 am - 8 pm

Sunday 9/26

10 am - 5 pm

(50 % OFF)

www.jakeandjones.com | ig: @shopjakeandjones 10% off at Jake & Jones with proof of12:42 Harvest Market purchase Ind.21.AIASB Arch Ads FA.pdf 1 9/8/21 PM

Candidate Forum for the Santa Barbara Mayor’s Race – Come Hear Their Views! Thursday, Sept. 30 from 6 to 8 pm C

M

Y

CM

The League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara will hold a Candidate Forum. Each Candidate will be asked a list of questions and provided equal time to answer. Please send your questions to us at League@lwv.santabarbara.org and, time permitting, we will include them.

MY

CY

CMY

K

Candidates Cathy Murrillo, Randy Rowse, Deborah Schwartz, and Mark Whitehurst will participate.

The Forum will be livestreamed on the League’s Facebook page – lwvsb; and available for later viewing on our website lwvsantabarbara.org. Videos of the Forum in both English and Spanish will be posted later on the League’s website – see www.lwvsantabarbara.org. Sponsored by the American Association of University Women, TVSB, and the Santa Barbara Woman’s Club.

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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29


SAT OCT

16

CHARLES LLOYD QUARTET

with Gerald Clayton (piano) Rueben Rogers (bass) Justin Brown (drums)

NEA Jazz Master, Charles Lloyd, now in his eighth decade, has never sounded better. The depth of his sound reflects a lifetime of experience. His concerts and recordings are events of pristine beauty and elegance, full of intensely felt emotion and passion that touches deep inside the heart. Sponsored By The Robert Guttman Family

Visit Lobero.org or 805.963.0761 LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

@loberotheatre

The Bentson Foundation John C. Mithun Foundation

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

SEPT.

23-29

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

9/27:

by DJ Gavin Roy with songs by Marvin Gaye, Smokey Robinson & The Miracles, the Supremes, The Four Tops, Temptations, and more. Doors: 5:30pm; dance: 6pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $10. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events/motown-monday

FRIDAY 9/24 9/24: Sacred Sound Meditation with Brandon Meditate and relax your body with a variety of soothing and restorative tones from the gong. 6-7pm. Kineci Health and Movement Ctr., 22 W. Mission St. $25. Call (805) 284-9449.

Livestream: Friends of the Library Present: Olof Krarer the Eskimo Lady: One of America’s Greatest Female Impostors Join Dr. Inga Dóra

9/24-9/25: California Wine Festival

9/23-9/26: The Mary Jane McCord Planned Parenthood Book Sale Visit the largest used-book sale in the tri counties and a Planned Parenthood fundraiser with book categories including child, young adult, cookbooks, literature, and more. On Sunday, books are 50 percent off! Thu.: noon6pm; Fri.: noon-8pm; Sat.: 10am-8pm; Sun.: 10am-5pm. Warren Hall, Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free. Call (805) 722-1517. ppcccbooksale.com

9/23: S.B. Thursday Night Comedy Have a laugh as stand-up comedians perform their newest jokes and comedy live to prepare for stand-up comedy specials and concerts. Admission includes one drink. 7:30-9:30pm. The Backstage Comedy Club, 519 State St. $15/in advance; $25/door. Ages 21+. Call (805) 931-6676 or email luis@thinktti.com.

santabarbaracomedynights.com

9/23-9/24, 9/28: S.B. Bowl Concerts Thu.: My Morning Jacket, Durand Jones and the Indications. 6pm. $47-$76. Fri.: H.E.R., Niki, Tone Stith. 6:30pm. $55$95. Tue.: Lord Huron, Allison Ponthier. 7pm. $40.50-$65.50. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411.

sbbowl.com/concerts

SATURDAY 9/25 9/25: Isla Vista Summer Outdoor Concert Series Come see Wookpack play

tinyurl.com/AnxietyVirtual Workshop

9/25-9/27: Exhibition Opening: Sharing the Light: Ansel Adams & Alan Ross This exhibition will explore

Bjornsdottir to learn about Ólöf Sölvadóttir, an Icelandic achondroplastic dwarf who emigrated to North America in 1876 and pretended to be an Eskimo from Greenland called Olof Krarer. She gave more than 2,500 lectures in the U.S., telling fantastic tales that were included in a textbook and taught in American schools until WWII. 2pm. Free.

the American West through the lenses of both Ansel Adams and Alan Ross and also includes selections from Ross’s international photography projects. The exhibition shows through March 20, 2022. 10am-5pm. The Wildling Museum of Art and Nature, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free-$5. Call (805) 688-1082 or email info@wildling museum.org.

tinyurl.com/Ansel-Adams-Alan-Ross

tinyurl.com/EskimoLady

9/25: Buckles ’n’ Brews Invitational Taste a variety of

9/25: 9th Annual An Evening in Bloom — A Roaring 20s Affair Do you have the moxie to put your

beverages, including craft brews, seltzers, ciders, and wines, as well as mouthwatering BBQ. All proceeds benefit the Kiwanis Club of S.B. 4-8pm. S.B. Carriage and Western Art Museum, 129 Castillo St. $55; designated driver: $15. Ages 21+.

glad rags on and dip your bill all to celebrate 50 years and support the programs of the Girls Inc. of Carpinteria? Whoopee! 5pm (VIP: 4pm), Girls Inc. of Carpinteria, 5315 Foothill Rd., Carpinteria. GA: $100; VIP: $150. Call (805) 684-6364 or email jamie@girlsinc-carp.org.

tinyurl.com/BucklesBrews2021

9/24-9/26: 11th Annual SLOPOKE Art of the West

This exhibition celebrates the scenery, wildlife, ranch life, and history of the American West through painting, sculpture, and photography. Fri.: 5:30-7pm; Sat. 10am-5pm; Sun.: 10-4pm. Flag Is Up Farms, 901 E. Hwy. 246, Solvang. $25. Call (805) 773-8057.

the-slopoke.com

“Rising Moon in Joshua Tree” by Naomi Brown

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event.

TUESDAY 9/28

9/28:

Bianca del Rio: Unsani-

tized She’s vaxxed, she’s waxed,

and she has more attitude than ever! Winner of season six of RuPaul’s Drag Race, Bianca del Rio (a k a Roy Haylock), a self-professed “clown in a gown,” will bring her new comedy tour Unsanitized to S.B. Visit the website to learn about VIP packages. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $59.75-$77.75; VIP: $152.75-$242.25. Call (805) 9630761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org.

lobero.org/events

MONDAY 9/27

girlsinc-carp.org their experimental music. Bring food and drink (no alcohol or glass containers). 3-7pm. Anisq’Oyo’ Park, 950 Embarcadero Del Mar, Isla 9/25: Virtual Workshop: I Feel So Alone in My Anxiety Attendees will have Vista. Free. Call (805) 968-2017. ivparks a better understanding of anxiety and the .org

9/27-9/28: SBUSD Mobile Vaccine Clinics/Clínicas móviles de vacunación To help keep your child safe, COURTESY

THURSDAY 9/23

californiawinefestival .com/santa-barbara

effects it can have on one’s life at this first seminar in this virtual series, The Journey to Wellness. 9am-2pm. $75. Call (805) 3980399 or email thejourneytowellness workshops@gmail.com

9/26:

tinyurl.com/Meditation WithBrandon

Enjoy the Sunset Rare & Reserve tasting on Friday and the Beachside Wine Festival on Friday to taste fine wines, craft brews, and a variety of food. Proceeds benefit Foodbank of S.B. Fri.: 6:30-9pm. Carousel House, Chase Palm Park, 223 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $99; gate price: $140. Sat.: 1-4pm (VIPs: noon). Chase Palm Park Field, Oceanside, 236 E. Cabrillo Blvd. GA: $75-$99; gate price: $85. Ages 21+.

Motown Monday Dance to the Motown sounds provided

MATT CROCKETT

COURTESY

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

COURTESY

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

6

SUNDAY 9/2

children age 12+ can now receive the COVID vaccine at school on the following day. The vaccine is free, no appointment is needed, and any parent, family member, or person living with you is eligible. Visit the website for future clinics. Para ayudar a mantener a su hijo(a) seguro, los niños mayores de 12 añospueden ahora recibir la vacuna contra el COVID en la escuela en los siguientes días. La vacuna es gratuita, no se necesita cita, y cualquier padre/madre, miembro familiar o persona que vive con usted es elegible. Visite el sitio web para conocer las futuras clínicas. Mon.: 4-7pm. La Cumbre Junior High, 2255 Modoc Rd.;

Volunteer Opportunity INDEPENDENT.COM

Tue.: 6:30-10am. Dos Pueblos High School, 7266 Alameda Ave., Goleta. Free. tinyurl.com/VaccinationsSBUSD

WEDNESDAY 9/29 9/29: Jazz at the Lobero Presents Pat Metheny Side-Eye with James Francies and Joe Dyson Guitar virtuoso Pat Metheny will perform in his new playing environment called “Side-Eye,” which features a rotating cast of new and upcoming musicians. This edition will feature James Francies on keyboards and piano and drummer Joe Dyson. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $74-$79; VIP: $131. Call (805) 963-0761 or email boxoffice@lobero.org.

lobero.org/events

Fundraiser

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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31


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DISCUSSIONS CANDIDATES with the

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Santa Barbara City Mayor

Wed., October 6 @ 5:30pm | Moderated by Nick Welsh

CATHY MURILLO

JAMES JOYCE III

RANDY ROWSE

DEBORAH SCHWARTZ

MARK WHITEHURST

DAVID MATTHEW KILRAIN “Boat Rat Matt”

Santa Barbara City Council: District 6

Thurs., October 7 @ 5:30pm | Moderated by Tyler Hayden

MEAGAN HARMON

NINA JOHNSON

JASON CARLTON

Santa Barbara City Council: District 4

Mon., October 11 @ 5:30pm | Moderated by Jun Starkey

BARRETT REED

KRISTEN SNEDDON

Visit independent.com/discussions ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ 32

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


COURTESY

Shows on Tap

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

Party Favor

9/24: Eos Lounge Party Favor. Entry 4-6pm:

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

$25; Entry after 6pm $45. VIP $70. Ages 21+; Thee Mike B, 9pm. 500 Anacapa St. Call (805) 564-2410.

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

9/24-9/26: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Leo Fig-

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

eoslounge.com

uora, 5-8pm; The Mighty Cash Cats, 8:30-11:30pm.

Sat.: Brandon Henegar 1-4pm; Sam Mitchell, 5-8pm; 33 Thunder, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Randy

LeDune, noon-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

9/24: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254. tinyurl.com/PaliSep24 9/25-9/26: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Fort Taylor. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com 9/25-9/26: Island Brewing Co.: Sat.: The Kicks, 6-9pm. Sun.: Rick & Jenny, 1-4pm. Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org •

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

islandbrewingcompany.com/calendar

COURTESY

9/26: Fiddlehead Cellars Jamie Drake. Noon, 1:30pm, and 3pm. 1597 E. Chestnut Ave., Lompoc. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 735-7728.

tinyurl.com/FiddleheadMusic

Stop, Shop, and Drop 9/25:

(800) L7 Your

Karen Clark, Tideline Visions: The Art of Seaweed, A Pop Up Show & Sale The

ESCAPE COUPON PACKAGE

S.B. Maritime Museum (SBMM) Store will partner with photographic artist Karen Clark to present a one-day, one-woman show and sale. 11am-2pm. S.B. Maritime Museum Patio, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free. Call (805) 456-8747 962-8404 or email info@sbmm.org.

Rooms from

$209

Suites from

tinyurl.com/Karen ClarkPopUp

$259

9/25: CosmeCon 2021 Join this one-day event that will feature masterclasses with big brand reps, multi-sensory product demonstrations, swag bags, samples, and tons of coupons for shopping! Text the word BOLD to 89881 to sign up. Noon-4pm. Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Call (805) 963-7147.

cosmecon2021.com/paseonuevo

9/25: Harvest Market This pop-up will offer goods from more than 40 vendors, such as Olivia Rüst (jewelry), Ortega Vintage Goods, Jeanne Ceramics, and more! The first 100 attendees will receive a loaded tote bag. Masks are required. 10am-5pm. El Presidio de Santa Bárbara State Historic Park, 123 E. Canon Perdido St. Free. tinyurl.com/SepHarvestMarket

9/26: S.B. Arts & Crafts Show Shop for fine and contemporary arts and crafts from nearly 150 artists and artisans. The unvaccinated are asked to wear masks. 10am-6pm. Between Cabrillo Boulevard from Stearns Wharf to Calle César Chávez. Free. Call (805) 560-7557. tinyurl.com/arts-crafts-sb 9/26: Vinae Rivera Presents CAW Art Pop This arts and crafts pop-up, masterminded by artist Vinae Rivera, will offer handmade and vintage goods as well as a bevy of arts and crafts from more than 25 vendors with food and the perfect soundtrack from DJ Darla Bea. 11am-5pm. S.B. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. Free. sbcaw.org/upcoming

PLAN YOUR FALL GETAWAY!

Includes two dinner entrées & a bottle of house wine plus breakfast!

Visit cambriapineslodge.com to learn about everything we’re doing to keep our guests safe.

Package only bookable by phone at 800-966-6490

Special Code SBSO

Not valid with other promotions, subject to availability, not available on holidays. Does not apply to groups. Must mention this coupon when making reservations and present at check-in. Does not include tax. Valid 9/12/2021 - 11/18/2021. Sunday-Thursday nights. No Friday & Saturday availability. 800-966-6490 • 805-927-4200 • 2905 Burton Dr., Cambria, CA 93428

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

33


BEER FEST

CHUCK GRAHAM PHOTOS

Outdoors

living

SEA SOARING: The 4-year-old male eagle, tagged A-03, who hatched on the west end of Santa Cruz in 2017

Where Eagles Dare

Two Baldies Take Up Residence at Scorpion Anchorage by Chuck Graham

Saturday September 25th NEW EVENING TIME

Now 4 - 8 pm! Santa Barbara Carriage Museum Live Music by The Dusty Jugz / Rincons

USE PROMO CODE “INDY” TO SAVE $5 on TIX!!!

Bucklesand Brews.com 34

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

T

he common murre never stood a chance. The steely gaze of a bald eagle zeroed in on the unsuspecting seabird from the honeycombed cliffs fortifying Scorpion Anchorage on the southeast fringe of Santa Cruz Island. Within seconds, the baldie took flight and snatched the murre effortlessly from the choppy seas before returning to a craggy boulder to feast. In recent years, this has become a more regular scene from the seat of a kayak at the largest isle in the Channel Islands National Park. Long-running restoration efforts — coupled with pier reconstruction and a silver lining of the COVID-19 pandemic, which temporarily halted visitation — opened the door for these iconic raptors to reclaim historic habitat. Virtually every day, a majestic 4-year-old male bald eagle, fitted with blue shoulder tags, can be seen antagonizing flocks of western gulls over Scorpion Rock, plucking fish from the cobalt seas, and preening his brilliant feathers. He’s known as A-03, and he’s a prime example of bringing the Northern Channel Islands, or NCI (Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, Anacapa, and San Miguel) back to a natural balance. “A-03 hatched at the Fraser Point nest on western Santa Cruz in 2017,” said Dr. Peter Sharpe, a wildlife biologist with the Institute for Wildlife Studies (IWS), who has been instrumental in returning these raptors to the islands. “We’ll have to keep an eye on the Scorpion area next year.” What Sharpe means is that A-03 is not alone. Over the last seven months, the raptor has been keeping company with a subadult eagle with mot-

INDEPENDENT.COM

A-03’s companion and potential mate

tled feathers, which makes it more difficult to spot against the multicolored cliffs. Currently, not a lot is known about this young raptor. Researchers initially thought it might be the offspring of A-03. But after examining recent photos, it has been determined that the anonymous youngster is too old. So, it’s possible the two eagles might be prospective mates. “The Scorpion area is wide open for a pair to move in,” continued Sharpe. “The closest nests are eight miles away on the north shore, and 3.5 miles away on the south shore.” Bald eagles disappeared from the NCI by the 1950s due to egg collecting, hunting, and the effects of DDT that was dumped into the pelagic food web. Since 2002, the National Park, The Nature Conservancy, and the Institute for Wildlife Studies have worked diligently to bring them back. Bald eagles are monogamous birds, coming together to breed, nest, and raise eaglets year after year. In 2021, there were 12 known breeding pairs on the NCI that produced 14 fledglings. There are at least another 10 individuals that are young or non-breeding birds. As I sat in my kayak watching A-03 gaze across a thick canopy of giant bladder kelp, I waited patiently for him to take flight and extend his impressive wingspan toward potential prey. Soon he was soaring overhead. I followed him with my zoom camera lens until he was a mere speck through my viewfinder, the vast ocean realm his to command. n


Celebrating

5 years!

I wanted to reach out to thank you for your incredible resources and work on behalf of our young people in town. I visited your site briefly, and for the first time as a principal, I feel that I have the ability to send desperate families to a thorough, well-curated resource. What a relief! -School Principal


No one should suffer in silence. WHY PREVENTION & EARLY INTERVENTION [PEI]? According to the Mental Health Services Oversight and Accountability Commission... Left unaddressed, mental health needs can escalate over time, requiring higher levels of support and potentially leading to negative long-term outcomes that impact not only individuals themselves, but also the families and communities that support them. There is a need for services to recognize the challenges and strengths of their communities while increasing accessibility and awareness. Strategies that advance PEI have the potential to reduce negative mental health outcomes, reduce disparities, and improve the collective wellness of communities. The last few months have felt lonely at times, but taking time to connect with others helps and makes you realize how much we all have in common with each other. Learning about mental health has made me a more compassionate person and I feel prepared to help others who are struggling and to help myself. -Student

MENTAL MENTAL HEALTH HEALTH

STATS & FACTS

1 in 6 youth aged 6-17 experience aa mental eachyear year mental health health challenge disorder each 50 % ofof all 50% all adults adults with with mental mental illness illness experienced experienced 14 & 75% by symptoms by age & by age age 24 symptoms by age 70% of youth in the juvenile justice system of youth in the juvenile justice system 70% have at least 1 mental health condition have at least 1 mental health condition 50% of youth aged 6-17 with a mental health treatment yearhealth 50%condition of youthreceive aged 6-17 with aeach mental condition receive treatment each year Suicide is 2nd leading cause of death among 10-34 2ndages leading cause of death Suicide is the among ages 10-24 90% of individuals who die by suicide 90% of individuals die by suicide had an underlyingwho mental illness had an underlying mental illness Lesbian, gay and bisexual youth are Lesbian, andto bisexual are 4x moregay, likely attemptyouth suicide 4x more likely to attempt than straight youthsuicide than straight youth

BENEFITS of PREVENTION & EARLY INTERVENTION • Less intense treatment • Fewer and less severe continuing symptoms • Reduces risk factors • Strengthens protective factors • Reduces risk for suicide • Can improve outcomes for youth and families • Reduces family disruption and distress

PARTNERS

• Reduced disruptions to school attendance. Health and wellness contributes to student academic success. • Access to appropriate resources and supportive social networks can increase a person’s resilience. • Learning positive coping tools for managing stress and emotions can build social and emotional skills.

SERVICE PROVIDERS… AHA!, CADA, CALM, Carpinteria Children's Project, Children’s Medical Clinic, Casa Pacifica/SAFTY, Children & Family Resource Serivces, Promotores Network, Community Counseling and Education Center, Domestic Violence Solutions, Evolve Treatment Centers, Family Service Agency, Hospice of Santa Barbara, IV Youth Projects, Just Communities, Mental Wellness Center, Mission Harbor Behavioral Health, New Beginnings Counseling Center, Noah’s Anchorage [YMCA], Pacific Pride Foundation, Sanctuary Centers, SB CAMFT, SB County Behavioral Wellness, SB County Psychological Association, SB Neighborhood Clinics, SBPAL, STESA, St. George Teen Center, SYV People Helping People, Transitions Mental Health Association, What Is Love SCHOOLS, DISTRICTS & COLLEGES… Bishop Garcia Diego High School, Buellton Union School District, Carpinteria Unified School District, Goleta Union School District, Homeschool community, Hope Elementary School District, SB City College, SB County Education Office, SB Middle School, SB Unified School District, SYV Union High School District, UCSB, Westmont LAW ENFORCEMENT… SB County Sheriff’s Department, SB County Probation Dept.

Thank you to our funders and private donors over the past 5 years… Deckers Brands, Cottage Population Health,


It’s OK to ask for help. FIND RESOURCES ON YOUTHWELL.ORG

It can be overwhelming to know where to start when a young person is struggling with a mental health challenge. YouthWell works with our community partners to reduce stress for families by simplifying the process of connecting to resources in Santa Barbara County. Find helpful tips and resources at YouthWell.org.

COMMUNITY CALENDAR View the YouthWell.org calendar to find community support groups for parents and youth as well as educational workshops and Youth Mental Health First Aid trainings.

WELLNESS WORKSHOPS YouthWell provides monthly virtual Wellness Workshops for youth (ages 10-25), parents, grandparents, and those working with youth, in order to eliminate stigma and open up conversations about teen mental health. *Spanish interpretation is provided. Workshops are designed to empower parents and youth with a strength-based approach providing tools that promote connection, wellness, and self-care in order to build resilience so that we are better equipped to cope with stress and challenging situations.

YOUTH & FAMILY MENTAL HEALTH & WELLNESS

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

An online directory to help youth, ages 0-25, and families access appropriate and available mental health and wellness services that can be viewed in English and Spanish at YouthWell.org. Find therapists, support groups, treatment programs, crisis resources, and postvention resources for those in recovery. Find tips to learn about mental health disorders, how to choose a program, questions to ask a therapist, insurance terms, screening tools, and more to help you navigate. Find a list of books, articles, and videos to help you on your journey. Find videos of past Wellness Workshops. Find useful handouts for youth, caregivers, and teachers that help with managing self-care, improving communication, and recognizing the signs of emotional distress.

SB Foundation, Towbes Foundation, Mosher Foundation, Williams Corbett Foundation, Hutton Parker Foundation


You are not alone. LET’S ALL PRIORITIZE LET’S ALL PRIORITIZE

EARLY INTERVENTION EARLY INTERVENTION As a community, we have achieved our goals when...

As a community, we have achieved our goals when... • We normalize the conversation around mental health so that youth and caregivers do not feel shame asking for help. • We treat mental health challenges with the same respect and care we show someone who has a physical illness or injury. • Families feel supported and informed and know where they can go to find mental health services in the community and on their school campuses. • We remove the barriers that keep youth and families from accessing services and ensure they are connecting to appropriate resources through a warm handoff. • Schools are incorporating wellness practices for students on campus.

GET INVOLVED Help YouthWell address the need for increased early intervention efforts in our community so that our youth don’t have to wait until they are in crisis to get help. DONATE:

Your contribution supports the online resource directory and monthly wellness workshops.

BE INFORMED:

Learn to recognize the signs and symptoms of mental health challenges. Attend Wellness Workshops, take Youth Mental Health First Aid, visit the YouthWell resource directory for great books and articles, and learn what is available in our community.

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT:

You don't have to have all of the answers. You just need to be willing to lean in, listen, and show compassion.

CONTACT US • Email us... Info@youthwell.org • Follow us... on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter - @YouthWell • Register for YouthWell Wellness Workshops at YouthWell.org/workshops

• Stay informed. Subscribe to the YouthWell Newsletter for monthly mental health community updates • Visit YouthWell.org to access the online Youth & Family Mental Health & Wellness Resource Directory and Community Calendar

YouthWell Team Rachael Steidl, Executive Director ● Elise Fields, Community Liaison ● Dee Dee Conrad, Social Media & Outreach Specialist


COURTESY

Healing with Bienestar Latinx

Health 

The Arlington Theatre

New Group Offers Culturally Relevant Support and Services



 

  

      

  

­€   ‚ ƒ‚„…

by Camille Garcia

S

ince Bienestar Latinx launched earlier this year, one thing has become very clear: There is a strong desire for culturally relevant, holistic health care for Santa Barbara Latinxs. This isn’t news to local therapist and Latinx mental-health advocate Ali Cortes. She observed a particular need for Spanish-language outreach and resources while assisting community organizations at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic. People needed basic information about financial assistance and how to stay virus-free beyond pamphlets and flyers, Cortes said, as well as a safe alternative to in-person meetings. The community was also hungry for mental-health assistance and a supportive space to express their emotions, fears, and goals. Cortes seized the opportunity to connect people to the right services. “Even though I’m really shy, I started doing [Facebook and Instagram] lives,” she said. The bilingual “broadcasts,” as Cortes calls them, ran the gamut. When alcohol sales spiked during the stay-at-home orders, for instance, she hosted an educational session encouraging alcohol alternatives, such as kombucha or sparkling water. When money pressures grew, she brought in financial coaches. Whatever the topic, Cortes facilitated conversations with residents about the challenges they were facing and hosted meditations and workshops on psychology, stress management, and breath work. The broadcast viewership and participation increased, and Bienestar Latinx was born. The organization, whose name translates to “Latinx well-being,” is fiscally sponsored through the Santa Barbara Response Network (sbresponsenetwork.org). Part of fulfilling their mission means “addressing the stigma of mental illness” in Latinx communities, Cortes said. She herself was diagnosed with depression and anxiety as a child and is very familiar with the shame often felt around seeking mental-health support “[Bienestar Latinx is] promoting the concept that it’s okay to get help,” she said, “and we need it.” The team believes true generational healing can be achieved with a holistic — and fun — approach, as well as decolonizing health and educational systems. It’s deconstructing limiting ideas around identity and self-worth and celebrating the nuances of culture and history. Cortes and the organization’s other co-founders, René García-Hernández and Ignacio Moreno — all first-generation Mexican Americans — reflect this well-rounded approach. Cortes is a seasoned mental-health practitioner with a master’s degree in clinical psychology, while García-Hernández — who grew up in Santa Barbara — holds a master’s in education and works for a local nonprofit advocating for liberated education, racial equity, and social justice. Moreno, raised in Santa Maria, is an experienced content producer who has worked on local projects, including the Ortega Park mural preservation effort.

†  ‡ ˆ‰ € Š‹ 

   

      Bienestar Latinx creators René García-Hernández, Ali Cortes, and Ignacio Moreno

For García-Hernández, growing up “DACAmented, queer, and brown” meant he wasn’t “reflected in textbooks or the stores I read.” Throughout his life, he’s been empowered through storytelling and has led Bienestar Latinx’s “Relatos con René” broadcasts. “We learn from storytelling, and it’s one of the ways that we survive,” he said. Moreno is particularly passionate about building community with other Latinxs, especially those who have roots in other countries and have struggled with feeling that they are “de aquí y de allá” — “from here and from there.” In elementary school, his nonLatinx teacher shortened Moreno’s name to “Nash” since he couldn’t pronounce his given name, Ignacio. That experience stuck with him. “You can feel alienated and like no one else is going through [being a first-generation student],” he said, “so I appreciate that aspect of telling our stories and sharing them … that it’s okay to be firstgeneration and growing up and figuring it all out.” Thousands have tuned in to the Bienestar Latinx broadcasts, including people in Latin America. Numerous Santa Barbara neighbors have reached out with stories of how the virtual events have inspired them. “We’ve heard people have left toxic relationships, and others have told us, ‘I applied to my dream job and got it!’ because we’ve discussed manifestation and vision boards,” Cortes said. “And people have even started meditating — including my suegros [in-laws]!” After wrapping up its first slate of programming, Bienestar Latinx launched its “second season” on September 15, honoring the start of Hispanic Heritage Month. Their social media pages detail the coming guests and topics for their broadcasts, which will tackle everything from hair care to financial wellness to cultural pride. For this next phase, the team plans to expand its network of therapists and health-care providers; continue the live broadcasts on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube; and begin offering life-coaching sessions and youth mentorship. “This is about celebrating our survival, yes,” Cortes said. “And now we’re also healing for the next generation.”

See bienestarlatinx.com and @bienestarlatinx on Instagram.

 

         

    

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Metro 4 • Arlington • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Arlington • Camino

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Sept 24 - 30, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Dear Evan Hansen* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Blue Bayou (R): Fri-Sun: 2:40. Mon-Wed: 8:00. The Eyes of Tammy Faye* (R): Fri-Sun: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 4:45, 7:45. The Card Counter (R): Fri-Sun: 5:20, 8:00. Mon-Wed: 5:20. The Addams Family 2* (PG): Thur: 4:20, 6:45.

Cry Macho (PG13): Fri-Wed: 2:00, 4:45, 7:15. Thur: 2:00, 4:45, 7:30. Copshop (R): Fri-Wed: 2:30, 5:00, 7:45. Thur: 2:30(LP). Malignant (R): Fri-Thur: 5:25.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

(PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:15(LP), 5:15(LP), 8:15(LP). Candyman (R): Fri-Wed: 3:10, 8:00. Venom Let There Be Carnage* (PG13): 5:00(LP), 7:15(LP), 9:30(LP).

CAMINO REAL 7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Dear Evan Hansen* (PG13): Fri-Wed: 2:15, 3:45, 5:15, 6:45, 8:15. Thur: 2:15, 5:15, 8:15. Blue Bayou (R): Fri-Thur: 3:00. The Eyes of Tammy Faye (R): Fri-Wed: 1:40, 4:30, 7:20. Thur: 1:40, 4:30. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings The Card Counter (R): Fri-Thur: (PG13): Fri-Wed: 2:30, 4:00, 5:30, 8:00. 7:00, 8:30. Thur: 2:30, 5:30, 8:30. Free Guy (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:25, Candyman (R): Fri-Thur: 5:50. 5:05, 7:405. Free Guy (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:20, The Alpinist (PG13): Fri-Thur: 5:45. 5:05, 7:45. The Addams Family 2* (PG): Thur: Venom Let There Be Carnage* (PG13): Thur: 4:30, 5:40, 7:00, 8:15, 4:00, 6:15, 8:30. The Jesus Music* (PG13): 9:20. Thur: 7:20. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings ARLINGTON (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 4:15, 7:15. Sun: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15. Thur: 4:15. 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA Venom Let There Be Carnage* (PG13): 805-963-9580 Thur: 8:15.

Cry Macho (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:10, 4:45, 7:30. Copshop (R): Fri-Wed: 3:05, 5:40, 8:15. Thur: 3:05. Malignant (R): Fri-Sat, Mon-Thur: 3:30, 8:05. Sun: 8:05.

INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

35


MLK Jr. Committee of Santa Barbara & Gateway Educational Services Present

UPLIFTING OUR YOUTH Town Hall Webinar on the state of education and African American students in Santa Barbara County

Presentation by Gateway Educational Services. The following districts have been invited to participate: Santa Barbara Unified School District Lompoc Unified School District Moderator: Dr. Anna Everett, Emeritus Faculty UCSB Goleta Union School District and SBCC Trustee Santa Maria Bonita School District

October 20

6-7:30 PM

Zoom Pre-Registration Required

https://bit.ly/3nbelff

Gateway Educational Services: info@gatewayeducationalservices • Isaac Garrett, MLK Jr Committee: igarrett@bhhscal.com 36

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


living

COURTESY

Cars

Stay up to date

on everything the

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

is doing beyond our pages.

BOXY and BEAU TIFUL ORIGINAL COOL: Vintage BMWs are experiencing a resurgence in popularity thanks to trend-setting musicians.

Speedshop Breathes New Life into Classic BMWs by Ryan P. Cruz

A

dam Reynoso is a certified gearhead. In the 2nd grade, the Santa Barbara native gave a detailed class presentation on the differences between the ‘67, ‘68, and ‘69 Chevy Camaro. As a freshman at Dos Pueblos High School, Reynoso wrote an essay about his future goals. “I literally wrote, ‘I wanna have a shop building hot rods and doing custom work,’ ” he said. Now Reynoso is living his dream, running his own business, Speedshop, in Old Town Goleta. Speedshop specializes in performance and customization, custom vinyl wrapping, and restoration of classic cars — including the immediately recognizable vintage BMWs, which have experienced a renaissance in the past couple of years. The business started slowly, initially as a side project for Reynoso, who worked a day job at Prestigious Auto Body and used the space to work on personal projects at night. When the pandemic forced an almost complete shutdown, he found himself with a lot more free time, which he dedicated to running his new venture. After a few weeks, business picked up. Reynoso was one of the first in town to offer vinyl wrapping services, a faster and more affordable alternative to painting that has boomed in popularity as both the quality and accessibility has increased. And since any design can be incorporated, the possibilities for customization are endless. “After the first couple full wrap jobs is when the word of mouth started spreading more,” Reynoso said. Reynoso has another specialty that sets him apart — his collection of restored vintage “Bimmers,” ranging from late ’60s to early ’90s with their unmistakable rectangular body shapes and low-to-the-ground stances. These early-era BMWs have found new life in the last decade, starting with musicians like Frank Ocean, who used a tangerine-colored 1990 E30 as the cover for his debut mixtape Nostalgia, Ultra (2011). Since then, the German cars have popped up in music videos like Khalid’s “Better” and have been immortalized by musician and rally car enthusiast Tyler, the Creator in a song titled “Bimmer.”

For Reynoso, his love for BMWs started when, after driving a newer model in 2008, he found the flashy style didn’t fit him, and he traded it two years later for a 1989. “I just got into it,” he said. “It was just so much cooler than every brand-new M3 that I saw on every corner in L.A.” The model, one of the brand’s most popular among collectors since the E30 debuted in 1986, has skyrocketed in price in the past five years. The M3 version, Reynoso said, can reach prices up to a quarter of a million dollars. Even the base-model 300-series BMWs, which would sell for less than $5,000 a couple of years ago, have tripled or even quadrupled in price. “Something happened where the market just shot up,” he said. “It went from regular cars to just through the roof.” Reynoso currently owns a small pack of BMWs, including his own personal ride: a 1972 forest-green 2002 that serves as the shop car, a testament to the level of detail he puts into a performance vehicle. He mostly drives it on the track in Santa Maria but occasionally takes it up into the mountains, where he says the car shows its true potential. “They just feel like they’re glued to the floor, to the point where you can just drive through really twisty roads,” he said. Driving the smaller, nimble cars changed his perspective on speed. “Fast is relative, if you’re going 25 miles an hour through a turn that most people are taking at five — that’s fast.” Reynoso hopes that his shop can continue to build a profile, and that he can continue to work on cars that he loves. His latest venture is a raffle, where one lucky winner will take home a 1991 five-speed BMW 318i convertible for just $100. He has sold 70 tickets so far and will choose a winner when 100 are purchased. The raffle has built some excitement through the shop’s Instagram account, @speedshop, and Reynoso is looking forward to using the money from the raffle to invest back into his shop. “Everything I make goes back into this,” he said. “This is my home, my spot.”

Sign up for our weekly

EXTRA!

NEWSLETTER. Independent.com/newsletters

See speedshopgoleta.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

37


FOOD&DRINK TAKE OUT s

opening

GOOD PLOW Gives Carpinteria

THE

SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY-AT-HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS

COURTESY

Dine Out

FARM-TO-TABLE COOKING

Fun atmosphere, friendly service, delicious food & tasty drinks! Mon - Thurs. 3pm - 11pm Friday 3pm - 1am Saturday 12pm - 1am Sunday 9a - 11pm | Open early for NFL Football Happy Hour Mon-Fri 3-7p | Sat 12-4 Kitchen Opens at 4pm Daily

Farm Cart Organics Founders Open Restaurant in Former Fosters Freeze

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BY GEORGE YATCHISIN Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

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I

f you ask Katie Lesh — who owns The

GOOD PLOWERS: Ever since taking over Farm Coast Organics in 2012, Good Plow in Carpinteria with her husJason and Katie Lesh have wanted to open a restaurant that shared band, Jason Lesh — to describe her new their food with even more people. The Good Plow is that establishment. restaurant, she puts it this way, “Sexy fast-casual farm-to-table.” And then her chef, that.” She stressed that their family farm and connecPedro Garcia, emphatically adds, “It’s fucking tions to other organic purveyors helps them get ingregood food!” Given that a meal rarely rises above its dients from the source, keeping prices lower than ingredients, these emphatic Good Plow claims usual. “Why pay for three markups?” asked Lesh, are bound to ring true: For almost a decade, whose menu items tend to cost around $10. Katie and Jason have run Farm Cart Organics For his part, Chef Pedro Garcia, a native of Ecuaas a farm stand and CSA delivery service, and dor, couldn’t be happier at The Good Plow. While he she’s the daughter of the revered farmer Tom had lived in Santa Barbara previously, leading the Shepherd. One of the first farmers to get his food efforts at Cottage Hospital—“he transformed name onto fine-dining menus — thanks, John Cottage from bad cafeteria food to farm-to-table,” is Downey! — Shepherd started farming organi- how Lesh put it — he was working in Georgia when cally in Carp in 1973, blessing Katie with the he connected with the Leshes online and decided heartiest of, uh, roots. to visit. “He literally cooked us dinner at our house, While Farm Cart Organics grew and pivoted and, by the end of the evening, I offered him a job,” over the years — thanks to the pandemic, about said Lesh.  half its business is now delivery rather than inSince that job is located within the former Fosters person retail — Katie was constantly plotting Freeze on Carpinteria Avenue, The Good Plow is this restaurant. “There’s such a need for this selling organic frozen yogurt from the to-go window. concept in Carpinteria,” she explained. “The The Leshes had to fight to take over that coveted lease, food scene isn’t really up-to-date.”  but Katie is overjoyed. “It’s such a great spot to have,” Prior to opening, Lesh told people that the she said, “with so much open space, an open kitchen, menu was “just going to be veggies, veggies with and a huge patio.”  sauces,” used “food with lots of flavor, really To finally reach their restaurant dream, they clean, really colorful” as the driving descriptors, turned to their fans to raise $50,000 via Kickstarter, and insisted to Garcia that there be “bowls and which went toward the patio, outside tables, invensuper fun tacos.” That’s translating to items like tory, to-go ware, and other small equipment. “Conthe Korean fried tofu tacos, which are buried in struction costs went through the roof,” Lesh said. “But a savory mix of red cabbage, pickled cucumbers, I knew people would help us if they could, and that basil, spicy tahini, and poke sauce and served on gave us the last push.” a homemade corn tortilla. Building that kind of community spirit is critical But in hoping not to offend Carpinteria, for both Katie and Jason, who’s also a Carp native. which she recognizes as less trend-following Since the beginning of Farm Cart Organics, they’ve than Santa Barbara, Lesh explained, “We didn’t sponsored efforts such as the Better Bucket, which want to be labeled a vegan restaurant,” despite redirects customers’ food scraps toward composting, the menu’s plant-based lean. Indeed, for the first and have donated food boxes to people who need few weeks since The Good Plow’s August 20 them via nonprofit organizations.  opening, the two most popular items have been And today, they’re serving fresh, creative food to the “Real Burger” (made from Rancho San Julian a hungry audience of all ages. So when Lesh says “we beef ) and the fish tacos starring grilled flesh just feel so lucky” about getting to open The Good fresh from the Santa Barbara Channel. Plow in the iconic Fosters Freeze spot, she’s talking “People ask me what’s my favorite thing on the for everyone. menu,” Lesh explained, “and I honestly can’t answer 5205 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria; goodplow.com

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ITSUKI TO IHOP: The Japanese restaurant Itsuki will become IHOP on Hollister Avenue.

L O C A T I O N S

Cava Closes After Quarter Century

A

fter a quarter century serving

IHOP MOVING TO WESTERN GOLETA: Last

April, I wrote that IHOP at 4765 Calle Real in Goleta will be closing its doors and reopening in the University Plaza shopping center, home to Albertsons and the DMV. Follow-up rumors suggested that the new home of IHOP might be Itsuki restaurant in the plaza, but Itsuki was still alive and well — that is, until now. Reader Roger tells me (and I confirmed) that there is a new sign on the door at Itsuki that reads: “To our valued customers, Itsuki Japanese Restaurant permanently closed. We would like to thank all of our loyal customers who have supported us

throughout the years. We are sorry to say that we must close our doors.” Itsuki restaurant moved to the plaza at 7127 Hollister Avenue from its longtime home at 4020 Calle Real in October 2012, replacing Baja Fresh. Reader Phil sent me a copy of a Radius brochure that confirms Itsuki will indeed be replaced by IHOP. A glance at Google Maps suggests the new University Plaza space is about half the size of the location on Calle Real that it is replacing. DUNE COFFEE COMING TO CALLE REAL: Last

May, I broke the news about an unknown coffee shop that is coming to 5915 Calle Real, Suite A, in the former home of Pizza Hut, which is across the parking lot from Zodo’s Bowling. The only clue that the new tenant is going to be a coffee shop is the coffee-themed painting on the window. Reader Brianna thinks the new java joint will be Dune Coffee (formerly The French Press): “Believe this is going to be a Dune Coffee, based on the logo which was on the window at one point. The same logo is now on some of Dune’s to-go coffee tumblers.”

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upscale Mexican cuisine on Coast Village Road, Cava Restaurant & Bar closed on September 15. “It has been a tremendous run these past 25 years and our family is beyond grateful to our wonderful community for all of the unwavering support,” wrote owner Carlos López-Hollis. “We have experienced some challenging years of late on Coast Village Road, starting with the Thomas Fire, the subsequent debris flow event, and on through to the pandemic. We are very proud of our team for staying the course through such trying times. It is gratifying to end Cava’s long run on a positive note, with heads held high, as we do right by employees, customers, and vendors alike — we realize this is incredibly rare in our industry and we feel fortunate to be doing so.” López-Hollis encouraged fans to visit his sibling restaurants: Carlitos Café y Cantina, which opened in 1978 across from the historic Arlington Theatre on State Street, and Dos Carlitos Restaurant & Tequila Bar, which opened in 2009 in Santa Ynez. “You will undoubtedly see many of the familiar smiling faces from Cava’s beloved staff at one of our other locations,” said López-Hollis. 

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you from reader sbmizzou: “I honestly don’t know if it has been like this for years, but driving by the old Outback Steakhouse, I noticed that it has a ‘leased’ sign on it. It might have been like this for years and I either never noticed or heck, it wouldn’t surprise me if I reported it years ago. I searched the archives and nothing came back about it being leased.” I believe the leased sign is new! BELCHING DRAGON COMING: This just in

from reader Brendan: “An alcohol license sign is up on the window of the recently closed Starbucks at the corner of State and De la Guerra. The eye-catching business name is ‘Belching Dragon Tavern,’ and the business type is listed as ‘general eating place.’ ”

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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PRESENTS

THE MARIACHI OPERA

Cruzar la Cara de la Luna STARRING

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM In an attempt to do justice to the range and quality of the programming, the Indy sent two reviewers to Ojai this year — Charles Donelan and Joe Woodard. What follows nevertheless captures only some of the musical abundance that was shared in this 75th year of the Ojai Music Festival.

MUSICAL REGENERATION ohn Ad ams of her original/tra-made an ideal ditional material on music director Saturday night. She’s for this homecomingcarved out a distincthemed edition of the tive place in the music Ojai Music Festival, world, combining and his decision to classical chops, acause the occasion to demic scholarship, highlight the work and lived experience of a new generation as a working musician of composers was and a person of color. brilliantly on target. The result is breathFriday morning’s taking — imagine 11 a.m. concert with Nikole Hannah-Jones the Attacca Quartet singing like Aretha and Rhiannon GidFranklin. The careful dens offered a major ways in which GidBANJO HERO: Rhiannon Giddens and Dirk Powell performed on Saturday night, September 18. dens introduces and work from the Pulitzer Prize–winning composer Caroline Shaw. in the work of Shaw and the other younger contextualizes the music she plays never cloy Plan and Elevation, a five-part string quartet composers on the program. The freshness or over-inform. Her skill with words equals composition, was written while Shaw was of the works by Paul Wiancko and Gabriella her facility as a player of violin and banjo. in residence at Dumbarton Oaks. Perhaps Smith in particular felt like a pure emanation The concert on Saturday night resonated this is simply the joy of hearing great music of this new spirit. with all of the pain and struggle we have performed in person again, but during this Rhiannon Giddens was an inspired experienced over the last two years in a way Friday daytime concert, I felt like I was hear- choice to anchor the festival with multiple that was at once healing and grounding. ing the sound of a new approach to music appearances, including a rousing concert —Charles Donelan

A Return to Form for the Ojai Music Festival

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PAGE 41

SQUEEZE ME: Master bandoneon player Hugo Satire will perform at LaLoCA Milonga on Friday, October 1.

TANGO TIME ON HALEY STREET

MUSIC IN THE AIR andemic-waylaid, the Ojai Music Festival finally erected its contemporarymusic-geared Big Top with one of its strongest programs of late. The worldrenowned festival’s 75th anniversary was boldly led by America’s great composer John Adams, who last appeared here as music director in 1993. Adams opted to eyeball the future, showcasing such inspiring younger composers as his gifted son Samuel Adams, Dylan Mattingly (remember that name), and my own personal “discovery,” the potently conceptual and idiomatic border-crossing Gabriella Smith. Brilliant outlier/resident artist Rhiannon Giddens showed her roots but also integrated beautifully into arrangements with the Attacca String Quartet and on operatic turf in Adams arias. Music by women and people of color abounded, including festival framing by Mexican composer Gabriela Ortiz — the Berio-esque solo flute piece Huitzitl (featuring Emi Ferguson, unfortunately accompanied by a car alarm) and La calaca, the suitably celebratory orchestral finale. The festival’s dawn concerts rewarded with challenging fare. Saturday’s special had a Mexican/Latin American focus, including Ortiz’s music and Javier Álvarez’s virtuo-

L I F E PATRICK ALCERRO

TIMOTHY TEAGUE PHOTOS

J

75th Ojai Music Festival Focuses on the Future

sic maracas/electronics treat “Temezcal” (with percussionist Lynn Vartan, live and vivid). Early Saturday, prominent pianist-composer Timo Andres presented delicious miniatures from the “I Still Play” tribute to retired Nonesuch Records head Bob Hurwitz (in the house), and closed with Smith’s sensesseizing “Imaginary Pancake.” Violinist Miranda CuckCONCERTO SOLOIST: Violinist Miranda Cuckson and John Adams son’s solo recital was a stuncame together for the Samuel Adams’s Chamber Concerto. ner, bridging the sometimes electro-acoustic worlds of Objets Trouves, putting Teng Li in the spotAnthony Cheung, Dai Fujikura, Bach, and light for this first concert performance. Kaija Saariaho. One Ojai epiphany came with Sunday’s Icelandic pianist Víkingur Ólafsson world premiere of Mattingly’s Sunt Lacritapped his new Mozartean project and mae Rerum (“these are the tears of things”), merged Baroque Rameau with Debussy, a deceptively simple yet powerful work with Philip Glass tossed in (his mechani- scored for two harps and two pianos slightly cal minimalism sounding especially stiff detuned to create a mesmerizing betweenhere). Given this festival’s forward-leaning the-tonality-cracks texture. Call it a microlegacy, the mostly “dead white male” parade tonal minimalist jewel. The unofficial theme song of Ojai 2021? felt contextually alien, however profound its delivery. Giddens’s fervent gospel strains of Sister On living composer terrain, heroic Esa- Rosetta Tharpe’s “I Hear Music in the Air.” Pekka Salonen dazzled with his orchestral The rich and fresh smorgasbord of music in piece FOG, dedicated to Frank Gehry’s Dis- the Ojai air proved transformative. ney Hall, and the probing solo viola piece —Josef Woodard

La LoCA Milonga, the tango event co-hosted by Alejandra Folguera and Geraldine Freitag at Buena Onda on Haley Street, is back on Friday, October 1, with live music by bandoneon virtuoso Hugo Satorre and tango pianist Winnie Cheung. You will want to score tickets in advance and get there early for this exciting evening, as it was filled to capacity last month. From 7 to 11 p.m., the lovely courtyard at Buena Onda will be adorned with festively dressed patrons of all ages, many of whom will take to the dance floor when the music hits. The devoted following these nights have earned both here and in Los Angeles stems from the high quality of the music and the fascinating, immersive experience of tango dancing, which, while associated, of course, with Argentina, has now spread all over the world. Wordless communication never looked so enticing as when these tangueros navigate the large dance floor, their steps tracing graceful figure eights as they gaze into one another’s eyes. When I visited the milonga in August, I was immediately struck by the range and sophistication of the crowd. You don’t have to be an expert dancer to participate. Despite the presence of some exemplary dancers, tango is not about showing off or calling attention to yourself. What matters here is to be fully in the moment; the rapt quality of attention lavished on every number by dancers and spectators alike left the strongest overall impression. If there’s anything that can cure the pandemic blues, it’s the sight and sound of 20 or more couples moving together under the stars to this enchanting live music. —CD

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ccompanied by an eight-piece band and three backup singers on Thursday, September 16, at the Santa Barbara Bowl, John Legend showed that he belongs right up there alongside such lowercase legends as Sam Cooke, Al Green, and Luther Vandross —as a songwriter, as a musician, and, most of all, as an emotionally riveting, deeply intuitive interpreter of great songs. The Bigger Love Tour’s multilevel set gave Legend room to explore a new look and configuration whenever he chose to shift from the dancefloor to his natural home in the boudoir. A master of piano-driven pillow talk, Legend had the predominantly female crowd swooning and singing along to all his greatest come-ons, from “PDA” and “Ready to Go” to “Love Me Now” and of course “All of Me.” Presented by Goldenvoice. At His taste in covers is impeccable, and after “Feeling the Santa Barbara Good” went down smoothly, “A Little Help from My Bowl, Thu., Sept. 16. Friends” made a great choice for him to bring out Santa Barbara’s own Will Breman, a terrific young singer who landed on Team Legend during season 17 of The Voice. Beyond the utterly persuasive way that Legend told his story from the piano, the night’s most revealing moment came during “Stardust,” a new song written during the pandemic. All in all, it was a deeply satisfying night of soul music outdoors in the moonlight. —Charles Donelan

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ary Clark Jr. opened Sunday night’s show with a short instrumental before launching into “Bright Lights, Big City,” the Jimmy Reed classic that has been his signature tune since he burst on the scene in 2011. Beyond his extraordinary guitar prowess and his commanding voice in both natural and falsetto registers, it’s Clark’s sophisticated yet intuitive mastery of accelerating and Presented by Goldenvoice. At the decelerating tempos that gives his massive grooves Santa Barbara Bowl, their infectious staying power. The band, driven by Sun., Sept. 19. JJ Johnson’s powerhouse drumming and featuring King Zapata’s guitar work, Jon Deas’s keyboards, and Elijah Ford’s titanic bass, builds a platform on which Clark relies for his magic. He escalates the music’s tension and excitement in carefully staged intervals until & ENTERTAINMENT the whole thing combusts, bright lights and all. —CD

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 23

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Aries author Steve Maraboli says, “The best way to love someone is not to change them, but instead, help them reveal the greatest version of themselves.” If that strategy appeals to you, the next eight weeks will be an excellent time to put it to maximum use. You’re entering a phase when you can have an especially beneficial effect on people you care for. You’ll be at peak power to help them unleash dormant potentials and access untapped resources.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): It’s a good time to ruminate about things you wish could be part of your life but aren’t. You will be wise to develop a more conscious relationship with wistful fantasies about impossible dreams. Here’s one reason why this is true: You might realize that some seemingly impossible dreams aren’t so impossible. To get in the mood for this fun exercise, meditate on a sample reverie: “I wish I could spend a whole day discovering new music to love. I wish I owned a horse and a boat and a vintage brown and orange striped bohemian cardigan sweater from the 1970s. I wish I knew the names of all the flowers. I wish I felt more at ease about revealing my hidden beauty. I wish I could figure out how to eliminate unnecessary stress from my life.”

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Poet, essayist, and translator Anne Carson calls her husband, Robert Currie, the “Randomizer.” His role in her life as a creative artist is to make quirky recommendations that help her avoid being too predictable. He sends her off in directions she wouldn’t have imagined by herself. Here’s an example: At one point in her career, Carson confessed she was bored with her writing. The Randomizer suggested, “Let’s put dancers into it.” In response, she repurposed the sonnets she had been working on into a live theatrical performance featuring many dancers. I think you would benefit from having a Randomizer in your life during the coming weeks. Know anyone who could serve? If not, look for one. Or be your own Randomizer.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): If you so desired, you could travel to Munich, Germany, and eat beer-flavored ice cream. Or you could go to Rehoboth, Delaware, and get bacon-flavored ice cream. If you were in Taiwan, you could enjoy pineapple shrimp ice cream, and if you were in London, you could sample haggis-flavored ice cream, made from sheep innards. But my advice right now is to stick with old reliables like chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry ice cream — which are still delicious even if they’re not exotic. What’s my reasoning? In general, the astrological aspects suggest that during the coming weeks, you’re most likely to thrive on trustworthy standbys and experiences you know and trust.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Celebrated novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817) wrote, “Sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in.” People who aren’t as articulate as Austen experience that problem even more often than she did. But the good news, Leo, is that in the coming weeks, you’ll be extra skillful at expressing your feelings and thoughts — even those that in the past have been difficult to put into words. I invite you to take maximum advantage of this grace period. Communicate with hearty poise and gleeful abandon.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “When you know what’s important, it’s a lot easier to ignore what’s not,” writes author and life coach Marie Forleo. Let’s make her thought the basis of your work and play in the coming weeks. Get vibrantly clear on what is of supreme value to you, which influences bring out the best in you, and which people make it easy for you to be yourself. Then compose a second list of trivial situations that are of minor interest, influences that make you feel numb, and people who don’t fully appreciate you. Next, Virgo, formulate long-term plans to phase out the

things in the second list as you increasingly emphasize your involvement in the pleasures named in the first list.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Happy Birthday sometime soon, Libra! As gifts, I have collected six useful mini-oracles for you to meditate on during the rest of 2021. They’re all authored by Libran aphorist Yahia Lababidi. (1) Hope is more patient than despair and so outlasts it. (2) Miracles are proud creatures; they will not reveal themselves to those who do not believe. (3) A good listener is one who helps us overhear ourselves. (4) One definition of success might be refining our appetites, while deepening our hunger. (5) With enigmatic clarity, life gives us a different answer each time we ask her the same question. (6) Temptation: seeds we are forbidden to water, that are showered with rain.

Join us in reading September’s book of the month! SEPTEMBER’S THEME: BOOKS WRITTEN BY LATINX AUTHORS

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Pioneering psychologist Carl Jung wrote, “I must also have a dark side if I am to be whole.” But it’s important to add that some dark sides tend to be destructive and demoralizing, while other dark sides are fertile and interesting. Most of us have a share of each. My reading of the planetary omens suggests that you Scorpios now have extra power to upgrade your relationship with the fertile and interesting aspects of your dark side. I hope you will take advantage! You have a ripe opportunity to deepen and expand your wholeness.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian poet Rainer Maria Rilke was a complicated person with many mysterious emotions and convoluted thoughts. And yet, he once wrote that life occasionally brought him “boundless simplicity and joy.” I find it amazing he could ever welcome such a state. Kudos to him! How about you, dear Sagittarius? Are you capable of recognizing when boundless simplicity and joy are hovering in your vicinity, ready for you to seize them? If so, be extra alert in the next two weeks. I expect there’ll be a visitation or two. Maybe even three or four.

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CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Baltasar Gracián was not a 21st-century New Age self-help teacher. He was a 17th-century Jesuit philosopher born under the sign of serious, diligent Capricorn. I hope you will be extra receptive to his advice in the coming weeks. He wrote, “Know your key qualities, your outstanding gifts. Cultivate them. Redouble their use.” Among the key qualities he gave as examples were disciplined discernment and resilient courage. I bring his thoughts to your attention because the coming weeks will be a rousing time to heed his counsel. It’s time for you to identify and celebrate and give abundant expression to your key qualities.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): After studying the genes that create feathers in birds, scientists found that humans have all the necessary genes to grow feathers. (I read about it in National Geographic magazine.) So why don’t we grow feathers, then? Well, it’s complicated. Basically, the feather-making genes are not fully activated. Who knows? Maybe someday, there’ll be technology that enables us to switch on those genes and sprout plumage. I bet my Aquarian friend Jessie, whose body has 30 tattoos and 17 piercings, would take advantage. In the coming weeks, it might be fun for you to imagine having bird-like qualities. You’re entering a high-flying phase — a time for ascension, expansion, soaring, and seeing the big picture from lofty vantage points.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Are there sensual and erotic acts you’ve never tried and are curious about? Are there experimental approaches on the frontier of your desires that would be intriguing to consider? Might there be lusty experiences you’ve barely imagined or don’t know about — but that could be fun to play with? According to my analysis of the astrological omens, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to explore such possibilities. Be safe and prudent, of course. Don’t be irresponsible or careless. But also be willing to expand your notions of your sexuality.

HOMEWORK: It’s time for Brag Therapy. Send me your proud and shiny boasts. Newsletter@freewillastrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Patient Services Representative Sansum Clinic is the leader in healthcare in Santa Barbara, with 100 years of excellence. As one of the first points of contact for our patients you be expected to provide high quality customer service in terms of appearance, demeanor and interactions with patients and their families. This candidate will work directly with patients, members of our healthcare team and physicians. Duties will also include data entry, scheduling, providing instructions/ directions and completing necessary paperwork. Qualified candidates will have a 1 year of customer service and clerical support experience. Preferred candidates will have medical office experience as well as knowledge of medical terminology. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, as well as 403b retirement plan. Interested candidates can apply online

44

at https://www.sansumclinic.org/ employment to position #2995.

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE REGISTERED NURSES We are now accepting applications for our Registered Nurse ‑ Transition to Acute Care Training Program which begins November 29, 2021. This program is designed for Registered Nurses looking to transition to the acute care hospital setting. Applicants must possess a valid California RN license and BLS certification from the American Heart Association. At least one year of recent (within the last 3 years) Registered Nurse experience is also required. For consideration, please visit our website at www. cottagehealth.org and complete an application. EOE, Including disability/vets

NONPROFIT

Grant Support Specialist Part‑Time Temporary. Telecommute negotiable.(Approximately 400‑500 hours through 6.30.2022) For more information, go to https://www.sbccfoundation.org/ grant‑support‑specialist‑position/

Infrastructure (ECI ‑‑ a college‑wide computing support function). The Assistant Dean for Budget and Administration represents and acts on behalf of the Dean at campus‑wide meetings dealing with resources to the College, and has authority to make commitments on Dean’s behalf. The Assistant Dean works directly with the Dean on new initiatives affecting the College and cross‑divisional units (e.g., CNSI, ICB, CBE, ML&PS Division, and MESA). Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent experience or training. Experience managing a department or unit in a university setting. Demonstrated flexibility, resourcefulness, and creative approaches to unique situations, while understanding the broad institutional context in which they must be addressed. Excellent critical and innovative thinking to address complex issues. Strong interpersonal skills and demonstrated ability to build and work successfully in teams. Exceptional communication skills. Management, leadership, and coaching skills to create and foster effective working relationships. Ability to operate with minimal supervision. Political acumen. Extraordinary sensitivity to constituents and ability to respond to situations with tact, compassion, and diplomacy. Note: Satisfactory completion of a criminal background check. $94,100‑ 164,600/yr.The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/12/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23388

PROFESSIONAL SECURITY ENGINEER (Santa Barbara, CA): For cloud‑based insurance platform provider monitor, evaluate, & maintain security sys to protect critical info assets. Raise security awareness w/ trng sessions. Master’s in IT or rltd + 1‑year exp as S/w Eng, Analyst or rltd req. At least 6 mnths of exp must have incl dealing w/ comp security issues. Resumes: Clariondoor, Inc., applicants@clariondoor.com

ASSISTANT DEAN FOR BUDGET & FINANCE

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING The Assistant Dean for Budget and Administration serves as the chief financial and operations officer in the College of Engineering. The position assumes a Business Officer role by taking direct responsibility for the management of the Office of Dean, CoE Machine Shop, Undergraduate Programs, Marketing Office, Space and Construction, and the Corporate Affiliates Program (CAP). The Assistant Dean assists the Dean in management and administrative leadership in all areas under Dean’s jurisdiction, currently comprised of six academic departments, one academic program, and twenty research units, including the Materials Research Lab, the Institute for Energy Efficiency, and other centers and facilities, Science and Engineering Development, and the Engineering Computing

THE INDEPENDENT

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

GEOGRAPHY Serves as the Communications Manager for the Spatial Pattern Analysis and Research Lab in collaboration with the Department of Geography. Plans, launches, produces, coordinates, edits, and administers the “Earth + Humans” podcast. Manages the podcasting facility and oversees programming, production, scheduling, training, digital and/or analog editing, accounting, and organizing related events. Organizes and manages large Zoom events for the Lab. Responsible for management of the website and social media content and updates for the Lab. Identifies, tracks, and engages donors and alumni as well as businesses/industry partners. Builds and maintains a database tracking alumni and donor engagement. Provides support for grant proposal development. Promotes citizen science projects. Creates graphic designs for marketing posters. Writes press releases on research activities. Builds relationships between academic and industry partners. Reqs: Willing to support building an inclusive culture. Ability to work as an active team member and collaboration on projects. Bachelor’s degree in related area and/ or equivalent experience/training. Thorough knowledge/understanding of relevant technology, including methods of broadcast operations. Thorough knowledge of various types of programming. Thorough written, research, editing, presentation, and

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

interpersonal communication skills. Thorough organizational skills. Thorough creative skills. Requires expertise in geography and GIScience. Develops and manages branding, logos, and templates. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $61,200/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. The application review date begins 10/4/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24187

CONTRACTS & GRANTS ANALYST

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Responsible for managing successful contract and grant proposal submission and administration as part of a team. Prepares detailed budgets and all necessary University and agency forms and works closely with Principal Investigators to ensure submission deadlines are met. Shares responsibility for the financial administration of research funds in which duties include but are not limited to ensuring that all expenses charged to extramural funds are appropriate and allowable according to all agency and campus policies and that adequate funds are available; analyzing expenditures and spending patterns; advising faculty, staff, and students of campus policies for employment, purchasing, and travel; disseminating financial reports. Reqs: Excellent organizational skills with the ability to maintain a high level of accuracy. Ability to work under pressure of strict deadlines while using independent judgment. Demonstrated professionalism. Ability to work independently and as part of a team. Excellent communication skills. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel. Reqs: Excellent organizational skills with the ability to maintain a high level of accuracy. Ability to work under pressure of strict deadlines while using independent judgment. Demonstrated professionalism. Ability to work independently and as part of a team. Excellent communication skills. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel. Starting at $54,500/yr., commensurate with experience. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/27/21. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23554

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS MANAGER

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Responsible for overseeing the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education (GGSE) Contracts & Grants Unit pre‑ and post‑award operations and supervising the work of the Contracts & Grants Analysts. This includes all aspects of contracts & grants administration in the GGSE. Serves as an expert and resource concerning the many aspects, complexities, and often unique issues of proposal preparation and award administration to GGSE Leadership, faculty, staff, and students. Provides support for GGSE outreach goals, working with the Associate Dean for Research and Outreach, local school districts, and the GGSE Director of Outreach as necessary. Reqs: Familiarity with Contracts & Grants policies and procedures and demonstrated ability to learn and adapt to new policies, applications and procedures. Demonstrated ability to analyze, interpret and provide guidance to faculty and researchers regarding policies and guidelines. Demonstrated competence in the use of spreadsheet and database software in financial analysis, fiscal management and financial reports. Excellent organizational skills with the ability to maintain a high level of accuracy. Ability to work under pressure of strict deadlines while using independent judgment. Demonstrated professionalism. Excellent communication skills. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel. Note: Criminal history background check required. Starting at $61,700/yr., commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified

applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/27/21. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23861

FINANCIAL MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING Oversees the day‑to‑day essential financial and administrative operations of the department. Sets workflow for the management, purchasing, and reconciliation of eight budgets totaling 5.5+ million, including equipment purchasing and inventory. Sets workflow and provides approval for all hiring, personnel, and payroll‑related transactions supporting the 67 FTE, 350+ student staff. Independent problem solving requiring a wide variety of campus, state, and federal policies is necessary. Directly supervises 2.0 FTE processing all departmental hiring, payroll, & personnel administration and financial transactions. Requires a high level of judgment, confidentiality, and independence. Reqs: High level of initiative, problem‑solving ability, independence and judgment, a strong professional orientation, and the capacity to organize and handle a wide range of responsibilities accurately and consistently. Ability to prioritize and work under deadlines. Demonstrated strong oral and written communication skills. Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Skill in leading and working as a member of a team. Minimum 2 years office experience working in payroll or financial‑related

positions. Demonstrated supervisory skills. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Salary commensurate upon experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/04/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #24213

FINANCIAL SERVICES ANALYST 3

MATERIALS DEPARTMENT Responsible for full oversight of all financial and accounting operations for the Materials Department which includes five departmental centers. Collaborate with the MSO to develop and implement financial systems and procedures; monitors departmental budget of $10M and extramural and gift funding of $60M. Prepares cost projections and analyzes for both departmental and extramural fund accounts. Oversees bi‑weekly and monthly payroll. Provides direction and support to departmental Financial Assistant and Contracts and Grants Analyst in all accounting areas. Prepares and/or updates recharge packages annually and monitors recharge activity. Uses a thorough working knowledge of University Accounting Policies pertaining to all accounting areas for extramural funding as well as state funding. Has working knowledge of all policies pertaining to extramural funding


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and /or equivalent experience/ training. Strong background and knowledge of fund accounting in the public sector with an emphasis on extramural accounting. Ability to interpret federal policies pertaining to contracts and grants from multiple agencies, including DoD, DOE, NSF, as well as private industry contracts. Thorough knowledge of financial data management and reporting systems. Strong analytical skills. Strong critical thinking abilities and attention to detail. Sound judgment and decision‑making. Strong problem‑solving skills. Advanced communication skills, both written and verbal, to convey complex information in a clear and concise manner. Advanced interpersonal skills. Ability to work in a highly collaborative manner, assess complex challenges, and recommend effective solutions. Ability to manage competing deadlines with multiple interruptions while paying close attention to detail. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $61,200‑$78,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21096

POT WASHER

CAMPUS DINING Washes pots used for cooking by the kitchen production staff, and bowls used to serve food that are too large for the dish machine. Performs essential daily cleaning and sanitation of kitchen equipment, counters, walls, floors. Must follow strict safety and sanitation rules to include the use of proper chemicals and high temperatures in the cleaning process. Will be required to work alongside other students and full‑time staff and constantly train new workers. Reqs: Minimum Knowledge of safety and sanitation regulations regarding proper cleaning of pots, safe lifting, and ability to train others in this area. Ability to understand, read and write English for the purpose of reading and understanding special project lists. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $17.87‑ $18.96/hr.Days/Hours: Monday‑Friday 11:00am‑8:00pm . The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22554

PRODUCTION MANAGER

CAMPUS DINING Ensures quality standards for food production, product freshness, sanitation, safety and customer satisfaction within strict budgetary parameters. Acts as the primary leader for up to 35 professional production career staff producing a wide variety of products for the UCSB on‑campus residents. Coordinates staff schedules to maintain deadlines for ordering, receiving, preparing and serving products on a constant seven‑day a week schedule of 19 meals. Reqs: College or University degree, or equivalent education/ experience in restaurant or institutional foodservice operations. Excellent communication and customer service skills including ability to actively listen and effectively convey information,

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policy and procedures both orally and in writing. Ability to effectively work in a high‑volume operation with continuous personnel actions. Ability to effectively work with other managers and full‑time staff as a team. Ability to utilize computers, learn new software and to work with MS Word. Notes: Days/Hours: Monday, 6:00am‑2:30pm, Tuesday‑Friday, 9:30am‑6:00pm. Days and hours may vary, including nights and weekends. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $52,000 ‑ $72,000/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22466

RECYCLING & COMPOSTING COORDINATOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Supervises, mentors and educates students in the areas of Recycling, the Department of Public Worms, and other services as assigned. Advises the AS (Associated Students) Zero Waste Committee and serves as an advisor to the Sustainability Coalition. The goals include reducing landfill waste through the management of campus‑wide recycling, and composting programs, purchasing recycled materials and educating the campus and surrounding community on waste reduction principles. Establishes operating procedures, supervises student staff. Oversees the annual AS Recycling and Department of Public Worms budget. Serves as a liaison with the Department of Facilities Management, other campus waste management entities and, when needed, the local community. Responsible for further development of the recycling and composting program, working with a team of staff to develop funding and management for new initiatives developed by staff and students. Reqs: Must have 2‑5 years of relevant experience and knowledge of recycling techniques and have the ability to communicate the recycling program effectively. Must be able to demonstrate excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to communicate both orally and in writing with a diverse campus population including faculty, staff, students, city officials, and university neighbors on sustainable solid waste management and recycling issues. Must have relevant experience in producing reports on the recycling program and to interpret institutional policies, plans, objectives, rules and regulations, and to communicate the interpretation to others is also required. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. Available to work occasional weekend or evening events. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $23.66‑$26.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins on 09/28/2021. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22486

SRA 2 ‑ YI LAB

ECOLOGICAL BIOLOGY Performs a wide variety of laboratory procedures and supervisory duties with only minimal supervision, and often independently. Oversees several

consortia projects that Yi lab is serving as the main investigator lab. The overarching goals of the projects are to understand how genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptomic variation found in extant primates illuminate the molecular basis of some human traits, some of which are shared between human and nonhuman primates while some others are viewed as human specific. As such, the projects involve several institutions and scientists across multiple disciplines, encompassing molecular biology, anthropology, primate behavior, neuroscience, and evolutionary genetics. Manages communications between different institutions to organize sample shipments, protocol exchanges, and data transfer, and keeps the projects on track of the projected timelines. Performs molecular biology experiments, to generate next‑generation sequencing libraries for genomic, epigenomic, and transcriptomic experiments. Works on single‑cellular resolution analysis. Reqs: Undergraduate degree in Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Neuroscience, or other related disciplines, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Strong record of molecular biology lab experience. Several years of prior research experience and outcomes (i.e. publications) are necessary. Good organization skills and communication skills are essential. Experienced with molecular biology methods. Able to work with minimal supervision. Strong organization and communication skills. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $26.30‑$26.82/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 10/1/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 24005

STUDENT HEALTH PHYSICIAN

STUDENT HEALTH Under the general direction of the Student Health Medical Director, provides direct clinical services in Primary Care Family Medicine OR Primary Care Internal Medicine and Immediate Care for all eligible patients at UCSB Student Health. Also provides consultation on a per case basis if needed, for all members of the professional staff to assist them with diagnosis and treatment of their patients. Provides supervision for the Physician Assistants when the Primary Supervisor is unavailable as assigned by the UCSB SHS Executive Director and/or Medical Director. Reqs: Must have a current CA Medical, DEA License, and Board Certification at all times during employment in order to practice and function in this clinical role; credentials are renewed periodically. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioners. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Criminal history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA/FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins on 9/28/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23923

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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STUDENT HEALTH PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

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11:34 am 5.0

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STUDENT HEALTH Working under the required Delegation of Services Agreement with the physician supervisor, the Physician Assistant works in a collaborative and collegial relationship with physicians, Advanced Practice Providers, and other clinical staff at UCSB Student Health. Responsibilities include evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute illnesses and injuries, providing brief mental health interventions, prescribing medications under the legal scope of practice, and arranging follow‑up care. Procedures such as laceration repair, extremity splinting, incision and drainage of abscesses, wound care and management of IV fluids will be performed depending on training, experience and privileging by UCSB Student Health administration. Reqs: Current and valid Physician Assistant license for California. DEA registration schedules 2‑5. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Criminal history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11 month, per year position with 4 weeks of furlough that must be taken during quarter breaks or during the summer. Scheduling will be reviewed annually and set for the upcoming academic year. Flexible work schedule to allow afternoon time off is dependent on clinic staffing needs and can be subject to change. Weekly schedule may include Thursday evening hours if need arises. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23863

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSIONER The City of Santa Barbara has two vacancies for Civil Service Commissioner. This is a volunteer position appointed by the City Council to serve on a panel of 5 commissioners. The Civil Service Commission hears and determines appeals involving the suspension, removal or dismissal of classified City employees. Though duties are primarily related to disciplinary hearings, the Commission may also advise the City Council and City Administrator on administration of personnel activities, including the adoption, amendment or repeal of personnel rules and regulations. Commissioners must be qualified electors of the City of Santa Barbara, may not be paid City employees, and will not be eligible for paid employment with the City for one year after ceasing to be a member of the Commission. Interested candidates may apply through the City Clerk’s Office before October 8, 2021. Application and additional information regarding this exciting opportunity is available through the following link: https://www.santabarbaraca.gov/gov/ brdcomm/app.asp

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Sun 26

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crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Free Up Space” -- another themeless, for these times.

43 “___ Poetica” (Horace work) 44 Lesson at the end 46 Imperfection 1 Skids laterally 47 Leaders of the bunch? 10 Indifferent individual 50 Paleontologist’s big find 15 1968 album whose first 52 Fake (like with lip-synching or single was “Think”/”You air guitar) Send Me” 53 Flee, in a way 16 Decoy customer 54 Embarrassed 17 Comic commentator on acknowledgement both the U.S. and Australian versions of “Holey Moley” 55 Small, but cute 18 “O Pioneers!” author Cather 56 PBS series of programs for 19 Anna Mill/Luke Jones 2018 at-home education graphic novel about robotic cities 21 Room 204, at the Roman 1 ___-CoV-2 (virus that causes Holiday Inn? COVID-19) 22 Lying beneath 2 “Confederacy” of Native 23 Gp. that supports summer American peoples reading 3 Explained as false 24 ___ kama (imitation crab 4 Web-based stock follower, used in California rolls) maybe 25 One-liner, e.g. 5 Hobbits’ home, with “The” 26 Drive out on the prairie? 6 Red Stripe is one 28 San Francisco Bay structure 7 “Splendor in the Grass” 29 “Percy Jackson: The Battle Oscar winner William of the Labyrinth” author Rick 8 With “The,” Dallas indie-pop 31 “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid group that often has up to 27 Test” stuff members 32 “Right?” 9 Tiny candy brand with the 33 Culatello or Black Forest, slogan “Be Both” e.g. 10 London-to-Madrid dir. 36 Sponge cake seen on “The 11 Get set Great British Bake-Off” (and 12 Early carrier tank on the named for an Italian city) tracks 37 Streaming service that 13 “Fighting” NCAA team sounds like a Haitian religion 14 His Final Jeopardy response 38 Microsoft hybrid product was “Who are three people announced in 2001 who’ve never been in my 41 30-miles-per-hour runners kitchen?” 42 Regional butter substitute (I 20 Shaw who sang “Puppet swear nobody calls it this on on a String” for the U.K. at the West Coast) Eurovision 1967

Across

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

Down

25 Research ctr. that co-manufactured the Curiosity Rover 27 2021 role for Mayim 29 Go off on 30 Rubbing alcohol variety 32 Small, but cute 33 Focus of much genetic research 34 Flatterer 35 Letters before nus 36 Well-rounded positive makeovers 37 Supervillain who’s queen of the Skrull Empire, in the Marvel Universe 38 Heath bar ingredient 39 Alternative form of a gene 40 Long jump gold medalist Bob 44 Skill demonstrated on the U.K.’s “Countdown” (that isn’t seen much on U.S. game shows) 45 “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” reporter April 48 Reporter’s assignment 49 Scattered, as seed 51 WWE wrestler Mysterio ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1050

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

45 45


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 805-965-5205

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: SYDNEY H. SMITH CASE NO.: 21PR00326 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of SYDNEY H. SMITH, SYDNEY HOWLAND SMITH, SYDNEY SMITH A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: NICHOLAS J. SCHNEIDER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: NICHOLAS J. SCHNEIDER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicits, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicits are avaialbe for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however,

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the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 10/28/2021 AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in

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California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: 1332 Anacapa Street, Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑0669 Published Sep 16, 23, 30 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELISABETH M AUF DER HEIDE aka ELISABETH M AUFDERHEIDE, ELISABETH AUFDERHEIDE, LISL AUF DER HEIDE, & LISL AUFDERHEIDE Case No.: 21PR00402 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELISABETH M AUF DER HEIDE aka ELISABETH M AUFDERHEIDE, ELISABETH AUFDERHEIDE, LISL AUF DER HEIDE & LISL AUFDERHEIDE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: ERIK AUF DER HEIDE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: ERIK AUF DER HEIDE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 10/28/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a

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LEGALS (CONT.) copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman, O’Gorman & O’Gorman, LLP 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215 Published Sep 16, 23, 30 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PAUL R. LOPEZ Case No.: 21PR00381 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of PAUL R. LOPEZ, PAUL RENE LOPEZ AN AMENDED PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SHANEE ASCARRUNZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: SHANEE ASCARRUNZ and RENE PAUL LOPEZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 10/07/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code

Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James P. Griffith, Esq. Howell Moore & Gough LLP, 812 Presidio Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 962‑0524 x6. Published Sep 16, 23, 30 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DUTCH GARDEN RESTAURANT at 4203 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Dutch Garden LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Matthew English, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002450. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIANESMITHCOUNSELING at 428 Los Verdes Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Diane C Smith (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Diane C. Smith, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002355. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MUJERES MAKERS MARKET, LLC at 1217 Laguna St Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mujeres Makers Market, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Leah Ortega, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002472. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOUISES KITCHEN TABLE, LLC, MOMMY MEALS, CULINARY CREATIONS at 1210 Mission Drive, Suite 110 Solvang, CA 93463; Louise’s Kitchen Table 1678 B Eucalyptus Drive Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Victoria Louise Smith, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002337. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAWKHOUSE FALCONRY at 5511 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hannah J Atkinson (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Hannah Atkinson Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002230. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THINGSTODOINSANTABARBARA. COM at 4067 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Andrea M Plackett 141 Valdivia Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Justin S. Plackett (same address) This business is conducted by an Married Couple

Signed: Andrea M. Plackett, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 11, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002330. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAXMAR PRODUCTIONS at 430 Evonshire Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Maxwell S Martin (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Maxwell S Martin Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002508. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 CLASSIC MICHELADA at 519 N Milpas Santa Barbara, CA 93103; George Trujillo 579 Carlo Dr Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: George Trujillo, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002540. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOWE’S at 935 E Betteravia Road Santa Maria, CA 93454; Lowe’s Home Centers, LLC 1000 Lowes Blvd, Mooresville, NC 28117 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: David R Green, Vice President Tax Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002519. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AURALITE ACUPUNTURE at 1725 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Chelsea E Kelley 2008 Mountain Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Chelsea Kelley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002570. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO REFRIGERATOR REPAIRS, SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO & VIKING, SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO, SUB ZERO VIKING REPAIR MONTECITO at 4704 Park Granada, Unit 195 Calabasas, CA 91302; Krupo, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Vladyslav Frolov, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 3, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002552. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ATLAS PROPERTIES at 2135 Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; James B Akers (same address) Jayla H Siciliano (same address) This business is conducted by an Married Couple Signed: James B Akers, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 7, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland,


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LEGALS (CONT.) County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002563. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SOULS & SMILES at 317 Arden Rd Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Vanessa A Reyes (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Vanessa Reyes, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002517. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EARTHCOMB at 1417 Las Positas Place Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Andrew Velikanje (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Andrew Velikanje, Founder Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002408. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OBSTACLE SOLUTIONS at 81 David Love Place, Ste 217 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Leighann Ruppel 5230 Califa Court Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Leighann Ruppel, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002446. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: WADE DAVIS DESIGN at 512 Brinkerhoff Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wade Davis Architects Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Akiko Wade Davis, CFO County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002596. Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA MYGYM at 2801 De La Vina, Suite C Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Santa Barbara Children’s Fitness 1300 Barger Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Charles Fossett‑Lee, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002592. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HUMAN POTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY at 5266 Hollister Ave, Office #101 Goleta, CA 93111; Derrick Selb 502 Asilomar Way #105 Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Derrick Selb Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002545. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: FOXY SAGE at 1821 Chino Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Danielle

Elese Kunkleman (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Danielle Elese Kunkleman Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 9, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002584. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EVERGREEN CAPITAL MGNT at 336 Pacific View Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jerry Jackintell (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Jerry Jackintell, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002661. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE GOODLIFE YOGA AND PILATES at 6710 Calle Koral, Apt 309 Goleta, CA 93117; Shannon Krahn (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Shannon Krahn Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002516. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KIDDY KORNER DAYCARE at 976 Barcelona Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Susan L Becker (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Susan Becker, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002631. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CARL PERRY PHOTOGRAPHY at 5020 Calle Sonia Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Carl II Perry (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Carl Perry Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E20. FBN Number: 2021‑0002589. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BIEN NACIDO AND SOLOMON HILLS ESTATES at 2900, 3100, 3248 Rancho Tepusquet Road Santa Maria, CA 93454; RTV Winery, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Stephen T. B. Miller, CO‑Trustee Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002487. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MISSION PARK HEALTHCARE CENTER at 623 W. Junipero Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Mission Park Health Center, LLC 4550 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 206 Los Angeles, CA 90010 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Aaron Mayer, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 13, 2021. This statement expires

five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002604. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: VISTA CO. at 14000 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117; Christian A Vences (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Christian A. Vences Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002622. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HEARTS ALIGNED at 1111 Chapala St Ste 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Jackie Carerra, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002656. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RK GUNNING BUSINESS WRITING WORKSHOPS at 560 Ricardo Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Richard A Kallan (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Richard Kallan, Director Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002645. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021.

BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated July 30, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KELLY JEAN SHORT & ANGELINA CRISTA TORRES TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02991 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KELLY JEAN SHORT TO: KELLY JEAN SHORT‑DE LUNA

FROM: ANGELINA CRISTA TORRES TO: ANGELINA CRISTA DE LUNA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 20, 2021 8:30 am, Dept THREE, CIVIL, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 312 ‑ C East Cook Street Santa Maria, CA 93454. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this

county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 27, 2021. by Timothy J. Staffel. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021.

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PUBLIC NOTICES AT&T MOBILITY, LLC is proposing to modify an existing wireless telecommunications facility on an existing 72.5ft building located at 27 East Cota St, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Co., CA 93101. The modifications will consist of the replacement of antennas at a top height of 72ft with an FRP screen wall. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 6121006471 ‑ MW EBI Consulting, 6876 Susquehanna Trail South, York, PA 17403, or via telephone at (678) 481‑6555.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL October 5, 2021 at 5:30 P.M. Case No. 21-0004-ORD Adoption of Affordable Housing Fees and associated Goleta Municipal Code Title 17 (Zoning) Ordinance Amendments ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20, dated March 17, 2020, and Executive Order N-08-21, dated June 11, 2021, authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council for October 5, 2021, will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. Councilmembers will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing to consider adopting new affordable housing in-lieu fees and development impact fees and adoption of associated Title 17 Amendments (Case No: 21-0004-ORD). The date, time, and location of the City Council public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website here: http://www.cityofgoleta. org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. DATE AND TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday, October 5, 2021, at 5:30 P.M.

Detailed instructions for participation will be included on the posted agenda

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARAMOUNT PROPERTIES at 1342 Virginia Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Pamela R Peterson (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Pamela Peterson, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002595. Published: Sep 23, 30. Oct 7, 14 2021.

PROJECT LOCATION: The housing fees and Title 17 regulations would apply citywide, including areas within the Coastal Zone.

NAME CHANGE

PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters / comments should be addressed to City Clerk cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by City Clerk on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG AKA RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02828 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG aka RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO: NINA R. SCHOOLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Sep 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, ANACAPA DIVISION SANTA

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The City’s General Plan Housing Element includes policies and programs intended to support the creation, maintenance, and preservation of affordable housing in the City. One of the critical barriers to the development of affordable housing identified in the Housing Element is funding. By adopting and implementing a new affordable housing fee program for all new development, including redevelopment, the City would have the ability to uniformly calculate and collect both residential in-lieu fees and nonresidential development impact fees to be used to subsidize or fully-fund creating more affordable housing throughout the City. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: Adoption of the affordable housing fees and the associated amendments to Title 17 are not subject to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) pursuant to Section 15060(c)(3), Section 15061(b)(3), Section 15183, and Section 15267of the CEQA Guidelines (Title 14, Chapter 3 of the California Code of Regulations)and Public Resources Code Section 21083.3.

IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above via email to cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by other electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit a comment or to call in during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendasand-videos FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at Goleta City Hall, Planning and Environmental Review Department, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Please contact Senior Planner J. Ritterbeck at (805) 961-7548, or jritterbeck@cityofgoleta.org for more information regarding the project. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact a Spanish-speaking City staff member at (805) 562-5500 or via email at espanol@ cityofgoleta.org. SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing. NOTE: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. NOTE: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]). Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, September 23, 2021. INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 23, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER 23, 2021

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Profile for SB Independent

Santa Barbara Independent 9/23/21  

September 23, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 819

Santa Barbara Independent 9/23/21  

September 23, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 819

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