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FREE

Santa Barbara

SEPT. 16-23, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 818

The Business of

Social Media

Entrepreneurship Gets the Online Treatment by Celina Garcia and Caitlin Kelley

also inside In Memoriam: Sam ‘Bam’ Cunningham

Newsom Survives Recall • Durand Jones at the Bowl


CREEK WEEK September 18 8 25

ALL WEEK

Storm Drain Chalk Art Contest

Create chalk art and share a pic on Facebook or Instagram tagged with #sbcreekweek for a chance at fun prizes. Pick up free chalk at Art From Scrap Wed-Sat 11am-4pm while supplies last!

Self-Guided Tour of North Campus Open Space at UCSB View the map on your phone with the QR code here, or visit arcg.is/04W4Xr. Site open dawn til dusk at 6969 Whittier Drive in Goleta.

Industrial Cannabis in the Arroyo Paredon Watershed

7pm Join Santa Barbara Urban Creeks Council for an online panel discussion on cannabis production in Carpinteria and its impacts on local water quality. Find details and register for the event at sb-urbancreeks.org.

d WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22 ReSource Center and Landfill Tour

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 Coastal Cleanup Day

9am-12pm Help clean your favorite beach! Learn more & sign up to participate at exploreecology.org/ccd. If you can’t make Saturday, clean up your own neighborhood, favorite park, or the beach anytime this month. Collect and submit cleanup data on the Clean Swell app!

Sweet Water Wise Homes Bicycle Tour

1-5pm Join Sweetwater Collaborative for a guided bicycle tour showcasing Water Wise homes. Find details and purchase tickets at sweetwatercollaborative.org.

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10:30am-12pm Take a guided tour of the new ReSource Center and learn how our waste is converted into resources for our community. RSVP Required to SDickinson@cosbpw.net.

Phelps Creek Walk at North Campus Open Space

5:15-6:45pm Join in a guided tour of UCSB’s North Campus Open Space. Park along the ocean side of Phelps Road in Goleta and meet at Phelps Creek. For more information contact chapman@ccber.ucsb.edu.

Upper Arroyo Burro at Barger Canyon Restoration Tour 5:30pm Tour the City of Santa Barbara Creeks Division’s restoration project. RSVP required to LSmith@SantaBarbaraCA.gov.

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MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 Creek Stewardship: A Panel Discussion

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 23

7pm Join Santa Barbara Urban Creeks Council for an online panel discussion featuring local environmental professionals. Find details and register for the event at sb-urbancreeks.org.

Watershed Art Workshop

4pm Join Explore Ecology for an online art workshop! For more information and to sign up, visit exploreecology.org.

Microplastics in Santa Barbara

6pm Join the City of SB Creeks Division and UCSB grad student researchers for an online presentation on microplastics in SB’s storm water. Register at bit.ly/MicroplasticsInSB.

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24

Household Hazardous Waste Recycling Center Tour at UCSB

12-1pm Join in a tour of the Community Hazardous Waste Collection Center. Age 12 and up, 15 people max. RSVP Required to LuSerra@cosbpw.net. Building 565 Mesa Road on the UCSB campus.

Homelessness and the Environment

7pm Join Santa Barbara Urban Creeks Council for an online panel discussion. Find details and register for the event at sb-urbancreeks.org.

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 Walking Tour of Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve

9-10am Join in a walking tour of the UC Natural Reserve System’s Carpinteria Salt Marsh. Age 8 and up, 15 people max. Meet at end of Estero Rd. in Carpinteria. RSVP Required to AJBrooks@ucsb.edu.

Falcon Demonstration

10-11:30am Learn how working falcons keep the Transfer Station free of seagulls. Meet at parking lot before entrance, 4430 Calle Real. For more information contact Cathleen Garnand at CGarnan@cosbpw.net.

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sbcreekweek.com ~ facebook.com/sbcreekweek 2

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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May 11 & 12 The Joffrey Ballet

Tickets for more than 40 in-person events on sale now! Subscribe and save up to 25%

Apr 28 Colson Whitehead

Feb 25 Roxane Gay

Nov 12 Leonidas Kavakos and Yuja Wang

Oct 10 Julián Castro

Feb 26 Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Oct 14 & Apr 27 Danish String Quartet

Apr 13 & 14 Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

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Feb 4 Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

@artsandlectures SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Atmika Iyer, Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Holly Rusch, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY 22 The Business of Social Media Entrepreneurship Gets The Online Treatment by Celina Garcia and Caitlin Kelley

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 36 ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 ON THE COVER: Edwin Guzman, owner of GadgetFix. Photo by Erick Madrid. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

EYES ON THE FUTURE Westmont College grad Caleb Rodriguez joined the Indy’s intern staff this past month, and right off the mark he pitched an intense and uplifting story concerning Kendra Chan, one of the victims of the Conception boat fire. “I was particularly nervous for this project because of how deeply Kendra’s community loves her and my desire to encapsulate her story accurately,” Rodriguez said of covering the Kendra Chan Conservation Fellowship, which preserves the memory of the wildlife biologist. “But speaking with the various witnesses to Kendra’s life introduced me, in a way, to who Kendra was as a person and helped enormously with the writing process. It was an incredible privilege to have a hand in telling Kendra’s story, and I’ll never forget it.” Originally from Fresno, Rodriguez has a day job in an oncology clinic and just completed a paralegal certificate at UCSB; he’s now considering whether to go into the law or stick with journalism. “In my spare time, I dabble in long-distance running, yoga, thrift shopping, and raising houseplants, especially the ones with fun colors or leaf patterns, like the polkadot begonia.” While double majoring in English and biology at Westmont, a research project placed him on Santa Cruz Island and at Eagle Lake in Northern California catching and ultrasound-scanning pregnant female garter snakes. “It was the longest I’ve ever tent-camped — two weeks — and the longest I’ve been covered in snake poop.”

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 35, # 818, Sept. 16-23, 2021

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REDISTRITACIÓN DE DISTRITOS DE LA CIUDAD DE SANTA BÁRBARA 2021

INDEPENDENT REDISTRICTING COMMISSION

COMISIÓN INDEPENDIENTE DE REDISTRITACIÓN

Redistricting is the process by which City Council District boundaries are drawn every 10 years to ensure each district has substantially the same number of people, including two electoral districts in which Latino voters make up the majority of the voters according to census data.

La redistritación de distritos es el proceso por el cual los límites de la ciudad de los distritos del Concejo Municipal se dibujan cada 10 años para garantizar que cada distrito tenga sustancialmente la misma cantidad de personas, incluyendo dos distritos en los que los votantes latinos constituyan la mayoría de los votantes según los datos del censo.

The City of Santa Barbara will host the first of eight Community Hearings on

La ciudad de Santa Bárbara organizará la primera de ocho audiencias comunitarias el

September 20, 2021 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Community members are invited to attend this hearing to learn about the redistricting process and timeline, and discuss the October release of the preliminary draft maps.

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20 de septiembre de 2021 de las 6:00 p.m. a 7:30 p.m.

Los miembros de la comunidad están invitados a asistir a esta audiencia para aprender sobre el proceso de redistritación y el cronograma, y discutir los mapas preliminaries que seran ubicados en octubre.

Participe a través de Zoom. Escanee el código QR para obtener más información y mantenerse informado.


SEPT. 9-16, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK

NAYS HAVE IT: Santa Barbarans voted down the recall 65 percent to 35 percent, casting ballots by mail and in person at polling places such as SBCC’s Schott Campus (above).

Newsom Survives Recall

gation removed it Tuesday afternoon. Ballots posted in the mail and postmarked before 8 p.m. Tuesday have seven days to arrive in election offices, according to the Secretary of State. Election offices must verify all ballots, which can take 30 days, and the final result will be certified by October 22. Newsom may have received a boost from visits from President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris for his campaign, which raised $83 million to defeat the recall compared to about $45 million raised to support it, according to the Los Angeles Times. More than 20 percent of the people who signed petitions to recall the governor were Democrats, according to Santa Barbara Republican Party chair Gregory Gandrud. “They signed the petition because they were upset,” he said. Republican activist Bobbi McGinnis criticized the governor as insensitive because “he’s out of touch. He was born with a silver spoon in his mouth.” With Newsom victorious, she hoped he would pay attention to what the people wanted and reach out to talk to small business owners.

California’s Mail-In Voters Choose to Stay the Course

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31,643 for “yes.” Among in-person voters, however, the total Wednesday morning was in favor of “yes”: 5,070 for “yes” and 2,281 for “no.” But, like the state results, Santa Barbarans overall voted down the recall 65 percent to 35 percent. Among challengers, Elder led with 26,953 votes. All of the state’s precincts were reporting partial results as of 3 a.m. on Wednesday, and it is expected that totals will mount as California’s 58 counties report in. In Santa Barbara County, votes from about 105,000 of the 238,000 registered voters were cast and counted so far, or about 44 percent. County Democratic Party leader Darcél Elliott, texting from a small celebration at The Cruisery on State Street Tuesday night, observed, “It’s possible the gap will get closer, but I don’t know that there are enough Republicans in the state to close it completely.” She thought that the threat of a conservative governor, Larry Elder, had motivated Democrats to take the recall seriously. The Elder team had cushioned any defeat by using the Trump playbook and announcing fraud even before the first vote was counted, though the website making the alle-

Governor Gavin Newsom

Gavin Newsom was confident an hour after polls closed, making a speech thanking voters and stating that diversity, inclusion, and a woman’s right to decide what to do with her body were on Tuesday’s ballot—“all those things we hold dear as Californians and as Americans.” “I am humble, grateful, but resolved, in the spirit of my political hero, Robert Kennedy,” Newsom said emotionally, “to make more gentle the life of this world.”

Numbers Moving in Right Direction, Supes Told

F

After a week of investigation, County Fire concluded the Caballo Fire — which burned 70 acres 9/6-9/8 in Los Olivos before it was contained — began as the result of an out-of-control, unpermitted vegetation burn in the area. In a statement released 9/14, the department said a “propane-fueled torch” was used to eradicate weeds and vegetation without a fire department permit, and the resulting fire “escaped the control of the operator” and caused the Caballo Fire. Anyone with additional information regarding the fire should contact fire investigators at fireinfo@sbcfire.com.

SPACE FORCE

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95 of 112 in Hospital with COVID Unvaxxed 95 had not been vaccinated. By contrast, 10 of 112 had been vaccinated. (The vaccination status of the other seven, mysteriously, remained unaccounted for.) To put these numbers into further perspective, the median age of the already-vaccinated 10 patients was 80 years old. By contrast, the median age of the unvaccinated patients was 52.5 years old.

Around 200 firefighters, peace officers, community members, and government officials convened at the Courthouse Sunken Gardens on 9/11 for a Flag of Honor Across America Memorial. The event was hosted by the Council of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Teen Court, one of 60 groups chosen nationwide to read the names of the 2,983 people who died in the 2001 attacks and 1993 World Trade Center bombing. Sheriff Bill Brown and Mayor Cathy Murillo both spoke at the event, which concluded with a 21-gun salute.

PUBLIC SAFETY

CORONAVIRUS

by Nick Welsh amously, there are lies, damn lies, and then statistics. But this Tuesday, the County Board of Supervisors received a boatload of new stats on the county’s COVID crises that lent an unusual degree of clarity. Of 112 county residents who got so sick with COVID during the month of August that they required hospitalization,

COMMUNITY

PAU L WE LLM AN FI LE P HOTO

by Jean Yamamura t wasn’t even close. Governor Gavin Newsom sprinted across the finish line within an hour of polls closing, soundly defeating the recall election in a 64 to 36 percent win, which was called by the Associated Press before 9 p.m. Newsom described his victory as a“yes” vote “to science; we said yes to vaccines, and we said yes to ending the pandemic.” The governor’s executive orders to bring the COVID-19 pandemic under control touched off a backlash that gained over 1.5 million petition signatures for the recall attempt. Voters clearly disagreed on Tuesday, with 5.8 million “no” votes counted as opposed to 3.2 million “yes” votes. Larry Elder was the frontrunner in the failed attempt to unseat Newsom and conceded on Tuesday night, spiritedly telling his supporters, “We may have lost the battle, but we are going to win the war.” Elder led the field of wouldbe governors with 2.3 million votes. His nearest competitor, Democrat Kevin Paffrath, got nearly a half million votes. In Santa Barbara County, the mailed-in ballots went against the recall: 65,904 for “no” and

NEWS BRIEFS CALEB RODR IG U EZ

ELECTIONS

GAGE SKI DMOR E

RYAN P. C RUZ

by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

Although the supervisors took no formal action, they devoted a considerable amount of time to mulling over the best way to communicate effectively with those 128,189 vaccine-eligible county residents who have yet to get the shot. Supervisor Bob Nelson argued against “blaming and shaming,” insisting that people should be given the space and respect to CONT’D ON PAGE 15 

In a letter to Secretary of the Air Force Frank Kendall, senators Dianne Feinstein and Alex Padilla and Rep. Salud Carbajal expressed support for Vandenberg Space Force Base to be considered as the permanent location for Space Training and Readiness Command (STARCOM), a CONT’D ON PAGE 8 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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At Santa Maria Superior Court on Tuesday, Vivanco did not enter a plea, according to Santa Barbara County Deputy District Attorney and prosecutor for the case Alexander Harrison. In addition to the two counts of attempted murder, Harrison said Vivanco is also charged with two counts of assault with a semiautomatic firearm and four more special allegations, including “street terrorism, personal use of a firearm, personal and intentional use of a firearm causing great bodily injury, and a prior strike offense.” The charge of “street terrorism” refers to acts committed “for the benefit of or at the direction of or in association with criminal street gang.” According to the criminal complaint, Vivanco is a member of Lompoc’s Southside F street gang. Vivanco is scheduled to appear next for an arraignment at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, September 21, in Santa Maria Superior Court.

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The highest honor a junior faculty member can receive from UCSB’s College of Letters and Science has been awarded to Carolina Arias (pictured), a virologist and assistant professor at the university. She offered the skills of her Arias Lab to the campus and county health officials in the early days of the pandemic, a time when medical professionals were hamstrung in dealing with the virus that causes COVID-19. This year’s Plous Award recognizes Arias’s transformative work in bringing the tools of her trade to CONT’D ON PAGE 12 


COU RTESY

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D EDUCATION

Sara Miller McCune along with

The Granada Theatre, The Santa Barbara Symphony, and

State Street Ballet Presents

UCSB Has Crisis-Level Course Shortage Many Undergrads Looking for Full 12-Unit Load Are ‘Entirely Out of Luck,’ Dean Says by Tyler Hayden lready facing a massive housing shortage that is forcing hundreds of incoming students to live out of cars and motels, UC Santa Barbara is now grappling with a crisis-level shortfall in available class space for the fall quarter. Dean of Undergraduate Education Jeffrey Stopple sounded the alarm in an email sent Friday afternoon to Chancellor Henry Yang and other top university officials. The message was then shared with the Independent by one of the recipients, who wished to remain anonymous. In it, Stopple said academic advisors are “desperately” trying to secure for first-year and transfer students the 12 units they need to achieve full-time status but are finding there simply aren’t enough courses in the catalog to meet demand. With instruction set to begin September 23, many undergraduates are “entirely out of luck,” he said. “We are again in our annual fall enrollment crisis, as we have been every fall since 2015,” Stopple continued. “The campus is perfectly capable of projecting how many units we can generate in the fall, even as early as the previous winter quarter.” Why it consistently fails to do so is clearly a source of intense confusion and frustration for Stopple. “I am discouraged enough that if I were not already stepping down,” he said in reference to a scheduled departure from his position later this year, “I would now.” Stopple — a Fulbright Scholar with a PhD in mathematics who has been at UCSB since 1987, chairing the math department and teaching classes, as well as serving as an administrator—dissected the dilemma for Yang, which goes beyond a simple unit shortage and could have serious long-term financial impacts on both the campus and its students. “Actual data shows fall units per student steadily dropping over time, despite the fact that students may take as many units as they want for a fixed price,” he said. In contrast, available summer units are increasing, even though students are paying then by the unit.  “The inescapable logic of this,” Stopple stated, “is that we are enrolling more students than we can educate on a four-year, three-quarter schedule. This is impacting

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our graduation rates, most notably for students for whom summer is too expensive.” Students who can’t maintain full-time status may also be denied financial aid, he worried. “Regarding the current crisis,” Stopple said, “deans might ask chairs to expand lecture sizes. However, graduate student TAs are in short supply as well.” Left unaddressed in Stopple’s message was why fall units on offer are declining. He explained in a separate email exchange with the Independent that multiple factors contributed to the predicament. Faculty numbers shrank during the 2008 recession and corresponding budget cuts, he said, “and have only slowly recovered.” Plus, many faculty retired or left the university during the pandemic. “Recruiting faculty can take up to two years and can impact a department’s ability to offer certain courses,” he said. UCSB has always had a low proportion of graduate to undergraduate students compared to other major research universities, Stopple went on, and the campus “still has work to do to balance that proportion.” Grad students often work as teaching assistants, or TAs, to professors, augmenting lecture courses with smaller “section” classes. Raw enrollment figures are also contributing to the crunch, Stopple said. UC campuses are under significant pressure to admit more undergrads. “Sacramento and the UC Office of the President have required all UCs to admit more California residents,” he said. “In addition, the UCs face significant penalties if we do not enroll a community college transfer for every two freshman admits.” UC Berkeley, UCLA, and UCSD are all struggling with similar course shortages, he noted. “As you can see, enrollment is a complex issue that we are working to address,” Stopple concluded. “As always, we are trying to expand offerings to meet demand.” Meanwhile, in a reflection of that demand, U.S. News & World Report this week ranked UCSB the fifth best public university in the United States and 28th among all of the country’s colleges. The only public universities ranked higher than UCSB were UC Berkeley, UCLA, the University of Michigan, and the University of Virginia.

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The Vides family home, where the stabbing occurred

Victim Sues Stabber’s Parents

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aguna Blanca School graduate Georgia Avery is suing the parents of former classmate and friend Cora Vides for negligence after Vides tried to kill Avery last February in what attorneys have described as a “mentally deranged” attack. Avery’s identity, not previously disclosed, is revealed in the eight-page civil complaint filed in Santa Barbara Superior Court. She is represented by Los Angeles attorney Robert Stoll, who in 2014 secured a $2.5 million settlement for the family of Mallory Dies after Dies was hit and killed by congressional staffer Raymond Morua in a drunk driving accident. Avery’s lawsuit alleges that Vides’s parents, Joshua and Patti Jeanne, knew of their daughter’s “mental illness and schizophrenic disorder” — which had allegedly manifested in “prior incidents where Cora Vides had threatened and actually used sharp objects on herself and others” — when they gave her a switchblade for her

18th birthday on February 8. Switchblades with blades longer than two inches are illegal to own in California. The blade of Cora’s knife was reportedly three to four inches long. Just a few days later, on February 13, Cora used the knife to stab Avery in the neck, nearly severing her vocal cords. They were both Laguna Blanca seniors at the time and close friends who attended art club together. Avery survived but with “severe, gruesome, and permanent” injuries, the lawsuit states, both physical and emotional. Immediately after the attack, which occurred in the Vides family home while Joshua and Patti Jeanne slept, Cora confessed to police she was compelled to stab her friend by a mysterious “bad feeling” that she was “powerless” to control. Cora was charged with attempted murder and is currently out on $1 million bail. Her criminal case remains in its early stages. —Tyler Hayden

EDUCATION

COVID Higher in Elementary Schools

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hirty-eight students and 14 staff in the Santa Barbara Unified School District have tested positive for COVID-19 so far this year, with elementary school students making up about 30 percent of the total cases. Assistant Superintendent Frann Wageneck said elementary schools have a higher rate of COVID-19 partially due to the kids being too young for vaccination. Although a national shortage of COVID-19 tests have delayed plans to begin testing all students, the district was able to begin testing elementary school students on Monday. By Tuesday, 129 students had been tested with one positive case. Consent is required for testing on students, and out of about 3,300 students, 64 percent of students’ families have given consent, with 36 percent yet to respond. For employees, 86 percent, about 1,400 employees, have been fully vaccinated, and 4 percent, about 70 employees, have no desire to receive the vaccine. The district is still waiting to hear back from 134 employees. Wageneck said it is the responsibility 10

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

of these employees’ supervisors to remind them to get tested weekly while they are unvaccinated. Starting next week, vaccine clinics will be set up at Santa Barbara and Dos Pueblos High School, as well as La Cumbre, Santa Barbara, and Goleta Valley Junior High. The district is also working with Cottage Hospital to create a “GET VAX’d” campaign, which would include a student TikTok competition. Santa Barbara Board of Education Member Laura Capps asked Wageneck if any children from the district have been hospitalized this year. “None of the principals have reported to me any hospitalizations of our students,” Wageneck said. Capps said this was something that needed to be watched closely, and the greatest priority of the board is to keep children safe while allowing them back to school. “We really have to be as militant and protective of these children as possible,” Capps said. —Jun Starkey


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

County of Santa Barbara COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION

CITY

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Embattled Transportation Czar Retires

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ast Friday, Santa Barbara City Hall officially announced the retirement of longtime transportation planning czar Rob Dayton — an enthusiastic, charismatic, and effective proponent of alt-transit programs and infrastructure projects — in the wake of religious discrimination allegations Dayton, an evangelical Christian, had made. Dayton — one of the more public-facing personalities within City Hall — mysteriously ceased showing up for work early this summer after City Councilmember Kristen Sneddon made inquiries with City Attorney Ariel Calonne about Dayton’s involvement with Believer’s Edge, an all-male, faithbased organization dedicated to changing the political culture of the community. Dayton, a 30-year employee of City Hall, was reportedly confronted by at least one planning commissioner about his beliefs, as well; two other councilmembers reportedly discussed the issue. Dayton never made a secret about his religious beliefs, but he also never made a secret about his impatience about moving up the City Hall food chain. He applied for the position of community development director when George Buell retired last year and didn’t get it. Likewise, he had reportedly applied for the economic development director position — and didn’t get that — and subsequently sought a position to oversee State Street’s redevelopment. Dayton played a pivotal role in implementing the State Street promenade in response to the COVID pandemic; he was also the city official most responsible for the rollout of BCycles, the flotilla of electric rental bikes.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING DATE OF HEARING: September 29, 2021 SUBJECT:

PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Rob Dayton

Dayton clashed with members of the Historic Landmarks Commission (HLC) and those in the preservationist community over these changes. Councilmember Sneddon upbraided Dayton from the council dais for going around the HLC. Dayton hired an attorney and threatened legal action, alleging his promotional opportunities had been improperly blocked because of his religious beliefs. Privately, many councilmembers have expressed vexation that Sneddon broached Dayton’s religious beliefs with the city attorney; on the other hand, they noted, Dayton had, in fact, been promoted many times and his religious beliefs had never been an issue. Dayton’s close friendship with highprofile developer Ed St. George, who had threatened to lead a recall campaign against Dayton’s boss, City Administrator Paul Casey, some said, might not have helped his cause. In the end, however, the council approved a settlement deal with Dayton for an unspecified amount that, which when combined with his accrued vacation time, was reportedly in the ballpark of half a mil—Nick Welsh lion dollars.

ExxonMobil is proposing a revision to their existing Development Plan to include crude oil trucking from their Santa Ynez Unit (SYU) facilities for a phased approach to restarting oil production at offshore Platforms Hondo, Harmony, and Heritage, and the onshore processing facility at Las Flores Canyon (LFC). The proposal includes constructing a tanker truck loading rack and ancillary equipment within the LFC, and trucking limited crude oil production (approximately 11,200 barrels/day) from the LFC to two receiving terminals, the Phillips 66 Santa Maria Pump Station in northern Santa Barbara County and the Plains Pentland Terminal in western Kern County, for up to seven years, or until pipeline transport becomes available, whichever is sooner. IMPORTANT NOTICE REGARDING PUBLIC PARTICIPATION Based on guidance from the California Department of Public Health and the California Governor's Stay at Home Executive Order N-33-20, issued on March 19, 2020, to protect the health and well-being of all Californians and to establish consistency across the state in order to slow the spread of COVID-19, the County Planning Commission hearings will no longer provide in-person participation. The Department continues to require physical distancing and use of masks based on Cal OSHA’s workplace COVID-19 safety protocols. In order to comply with Cal OSHA workplace safety protocols, the Department will continue to hold public hearings via Zoom until such time the safety protocols are revised. We have established alternative methods of participation in the County Planning Commission hearings, pursuant to the California Governor’s Executive Order N29-20, issued on March 17, 2020, which states:

1.

2.

ExxonMobil Trucking Battle Heats Up

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occur if all negative environmental impacts have been mitigated and the pipeline is no longer feasible. The recent Environmental Impact Report concluded the risk of trucks crashing and spilling their loads into creeks was great, and critics say that, in the past 20 years, 258 truck accidents have occurred along that same route. County planners counter that ExxonMobil safely trucked 2,500 loads of oil in February 2016 without incident. Krop also argued that by allowing trucking, ExxonMobil could restart its Santa Barbara production operations, producing 300,000 metric tons of greenhouse gases a year. County planners argue that ExxonMobil cannot be held to clean-air standards that were not part of the original operating conditions. The Planning Commission has scheduled two days of hearings: September 30 and October 1. But whatever decision is reached there, there will be a long process of litigation before a final conclusion is reached. —NW

Providing an opportunity to “observe and address the meeting telephonically or otherwise electronically,” alone, meets the participation requirement; and

“Such a body need not make available any physical location from which members of the public may observe the meeting and offer public comment.”

The following alternative methods of participation are available to the public:

ENVIRONMENT

ith its first major hearings before the Santa Barbara County Planning Commission two weeks away, ExxonMobil just got a big boost from county energy planning staff, who recommended the commission approve the oil giant’s intensely opposed plans to truck oil from the company’s Las Flores Canyon facility along the Gaviota Coast to an oil processing terminal in Kern County 140 miles away. A coalition of environmental organizations has vowed to stop ExxonMobil, arguing that Highway 166 is too steep and treacherous to safely handle the 78 truckloads a day ExxonMobil is proposing to transport from the three rigs off the coast. The company’s oil has been stranded since the Plains All American Pipeline rupture of May 2015 and county energy planners estimate it will take another four to seven years before the corroded pipeline can be replaced. Linda Krop, staff attorney for the Environmental Defense Center insisted that Las Flores Canyon oil production was initially approved on the condition that it be shipped by pipeline. Trucking, she argued, can only

ExxonMobil Interim Trucking for Santa Ynez Unit Phased Restart

You may observe the live stream of the County Planning Commission meetings on (1) Local Cable Channel 20, (2) online at http://www.countyofsb.org/ceo/csbtv/livestream.sbc; or (3) YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/user/CSBTV20. If you wish to make a general public comment or to comment on a specific agenda item, the following methods are available:  Distribution to the County Planning Commission - Submit your comment via email prior to 12:00 p.m. on the Monday prior to the Commission hearing. Please submit your comment to the Recording Secretary at dvillalo@countyofsb.org. Your comment will be placed into the record and distributed appropriately.  Video and Teleconference Public Participation – To participate via Zoom, please pre-register for the Commission hearing using the below link. When: September 29, 2021 9:00AM Pacific Time (US and Canada) Topic: County Planning Commission 09/29/2021

Register in advance for this webinar: https://countyofsb.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_cNXorqrCQNq2CLH7yyWC7g After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. OR PARTICIPATE VIA TELEPHONE: Dial (for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location): US: +1 213 338 8477 or +1 669 900 6833 or +1 720 928 9299 or +1 971 247 1195 or +1 253 215 8782 or +1 346 248 7799 or +1 602 753 0140 or +1 312 626 6799 or +1 470 250 9358 or +1 646 518 9805 or +1 651 372 8299 or +1 786 635 1003 or +1 929 205 6099 or +1 267 831 0333 or +1 301 715 8592 or 877 853 5257 (Toll Free) or 888 475 4499 (Toll Free) or 833 548 0276 (Toll Free) or 833 548 0282 (Toll Free) Webinar ID: 964 6205 9326 The County Planning Commission’s rules on hearings and public comment, unless otherwise directed by the Chair, remain applicable to each of the participation methods listed above. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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Thus far, the pilot program to relocate dozens of S.B.’s homeless residents from fire-prone encampments to an upper State Street motel has been “remarkably successful,” said Councilmember Kristen Sneddon in a sentiment echoed by her colleagues 9/15. But there was also consensus among the council that there is still much more work to be done to help the unhoused find living space off the streets. Full story at independent.com/bridge-housing.

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COURTS & CRIME LE N WO OD / SANTA M AR IA TIMES

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As part of this year’s Coastal Cleanup Day, Explore Ecology educators invite volunteers to take part in clearing away marine debris from S.B.’s beaches and waterways 9 a.m.noon on 9/18. Each of the 28 locations will have captains leading the effort and providing information and supplies, though participants are asked to bring gloves, buckets, and other reusable cleanup supplies to cut down on the plastics used and to wear facemasks at check-in and check-out. See exploreecology.org/ coastal-cleanup-day.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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Lompoc resident Michael James Culligan, 30, pleaded guilty 9/10 to federal manslaughter for crashing a stolen vehicle on Vandenberg Air Force Base property on 6/16/20, killing one motorist and severely injuring another. Culligan, who fled the scene and was later caught hiding in a drainpipe, admitted in the postarrest interview to being under the influence of drugs and has been in federal custody since June

Police arrested Buellton resident Trey Von Duus (pictured), 21, for allegedly breaking into the Shoreline Drive home of Mike Eliason, County Fire’s public information officer, on 9/12. Though not in town at the time, Eliason allegedly observed the man break in via his home surveillance system and called the police. After Von Duus refused to exit the home, officers with a K-9 unit forcefully detained him. He was treated at Cottage Hospital for minor injuries and booked into County Jail on $50,000 bail for burglary, vandalism, possession of a stolen vehicle, and resisting arrest. SA NTA BAR BA R A POLIC E DEPARTME NT

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Scammers are turning to text messages to retrieve personal or credit card information. “This is absolutely the latest scam going on,” said Sgt. Ethan Ragsdale of the S.B. Police Department. Any city resident who’s been scammed out of money may report it to the SBPD, which recently worked with the U.S. Secret Service on a fraudulent money transfer to Thailand that would have cost a 90-year-old woman $50,000 if it had been successful. The website identitytheft.gov also has a step-bystep process to report such crimes to the Federal Trade Commission.

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A suspected masked burglar was arrested 9/8 after allegedly trying to use power tools to enter a North Milpas Street jewelry store through its roof. When officers arrived, the suspect, Joel P. Morelos, 37, of S.B., attempted to escape through an air vent into a neighboring business, according to police. Officers eventually accessed the roof and arrested Morelos, who was booked into County Jail on $500,000 bail for attempted burglary, looting/theft during a state of emergency, vandalism, resisting arrest, providing a false name, and possession of burglary tools (pictured above).  n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CANNABIS

Pot Price Drop and Market Glut?

A

major glut in cannabis production and a corresponding plunge in pot prices resulted in Santa Barbara County collecting 43 percent less in cannabis revenues in the fourth quarter of 2021 than the same period last year. That’s a drop from $5.5 million to $3.8 million. Even so, county cannabis revenues increased by $3.5 million for the year, growing from $12.2 million last year to $15.7 million. Brittany Heaton, the county’s de facto cannabis czar, told the supervisors at Tuesday’s board meeting that overproduction may have driven the price per pound down. Industry representatives also suggested that 2020 cannabis profits were especially spectacular because so many cannabis customers were in COVID lockdown. What was clear at this meeting is that county staff is still struggling to understand the explosive new industry. Permit applications greatly exceed the number of county personnel needed to process them. And the

Dream Big with

1,575 inland acres of space that supervisors allowed for cultivation is not making things easier. Supervisor Steve Lavagnino wondered why 11 “operators” had not even filed any tax returns with the county and why 43 were not reporting any taxable income. Little wonder that the county tax collector just hired someone to specialize in auditing cannabis operators. Even though greenhouse cannabis, supervisors were told, still fetches $1,200$1,500 on the open market, rather than the $40 per pound for outdoor cannabis, it comes with its own headaches. In the past year, the county received 495 complaints about odors emanating from Carpinteria greenhouses. In all cannabis operations, greenhouse or outdoors, Sheriff ’s deputies made 10 arrests for illegal cultivation, eradicated 6,975 plants, and seized an estimated $6.1 million worth of product. —Nick Welsh

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Candidate Forum for the Santa Barbara City Council – Come Hear Their Views! Wednesday, Sept. 22, from 6 to 8 pm

The City of Carpinteria

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s Carpinteria prepares to hold its firstever district elections for City Councilmembers in November 2022, the actual boundaries of the five districts will be decided with the help of the public, in open-forum meetings starting Monday, September 20. The move from at-large elections to five district races was approved by the City Council on July 26 in a 4-1 vote. Councilmember Roy Lee was the sole dissenter. The mayor will be appointed every two years from councilmembers. The push for the change began in 2017 when Jatzibe Sandoval and Frank Gonzalez sent a letter to the council, according to the city website, saying Carpinteria’s current election process is “characterized by racially polarized voting” and that the city should transition to district-based elections or else face a lawsuit. The city denies that its current system is racially polarizing but eventually agreed to institute district elections by November 2022, in order to allow 2020 census data

to be considered in drafting the district boundaries. An ad-hoc district election committee was formed and ultimately recommended that two of the five districts have a higher percentage of minority voters. “Five districts would allow the Latino community to have a greater chance to elect their ‘candidate of choice’ in seats that are 41% and 48% Latino,” the ad-hoc committee wrote in a staff report. According to city program manager Olivia Uribe-Mutal, elections would be staggered to allow the two districts with more minority representation to vote in years with a presidential election, which have traditionally higher turnout, and the other districts in years with a gubernatorial race. The first community workshops are scheduled for 5:30 p.m. on Monday, September 20; noon on Wednesday, September 22; and 2 p.m. on Sunday, September 26. For more info, visit carpinteriaprojects.com/ district-elections. —Ryan P. Cruz

The League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara will hold a Candidate Forum for Candidates running for seats on Santa Barbara’s City Council in Districts 4 and 6.

Five of the six Candidates – Barrett Reed and Kristen Sneddon (District 4) and Jason Carlton, Meagan Harmon, and Nina Johnson (District 6) – have agreed to participate in the Forum. Each Candidate will be asked a list of questions and provided equal time to answer. Please send your questions to us at League@lwv.santabarbara.org and, time permitting, we will include them. Because of safety concerns related to the pandemic, there will be no live audience. The Forum will be livestreamed on the League’s Facebook page – lwvsb - and recordings of the Forum in both English and Spanish will be posted on our website lwvsantabarbara.org - for later viewing. Sponsored by the American Association of University Women, TVSB, and the Santa Barbara Woman’s Club.

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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SEPT. 9-16, 2021

CANNABIS

Stricter Permits for Outdoor Cannabis? COU RTESY

The County Looks into Tightening Rules for Future Applicants by Melinda Burns n just two weeks, the zoning permit approvals for outdoor cannabis “grows” will likely reach the 1,575-acre cap that was set by the county supervisors in 2019 for unincorporated areas outside the Carpinteria Valley, assuming that growers with permits get their business licenses, authorities say. Aside from those acres, there are 1,560 more, mostly in the North County, also proposed for cannabis cultivation and under county review, but that A cannabis operation outside Buellton won’t be able to make the cap. These projects can be approved for per- implement the latest innovations in odor mits, county Planning & Development control. Director Lisa Plowman told the Board “Our current standards might seem of Supervisors on Tuesday. But, she said, quite dated in the future if we open up these applicants won’t get their business that cap,” she said. Board Chair Bob Nelson of Orcutt, who licenses or be allowed to start operating unless a grower who qualifies for a license represents a portion of the Sta. Rita Hills, under the cap fails to get one. agreed with Hartmann, as did Supervisor In a change from past policy, the board Das Williams, who represents the South voted 3-2 on Tuesday to direct planners Coast from eastern Santa Barbara to the to draw up a cannabis ordinance amend- Carpinteria Valley. ment that would require a more stringent “I agree we should not go past the cap; permit, called a conditional-use permit, it’s too soon for that,” Williams said. for any outdoor cannabis grow that Supervisor Steve Lavagnino of Santa doesn’t make the cap. The amendment Maria and Supervisor Gregg Hart, who would apply to all unincorporated areas represents western Santa Barbara and except the Carpinteria Valley, where can- the Goleta Valley, opposed requiring nabis is grown in greenhouses. conditional-use permits across the board Supervisor Joan Hartmann, who for outdoor cannabis, saying they had represents much of the Sta. Rita Hills, a no intention of lifting the acreage cap in federally designated American Viticul- the first place. Hart said the cap was “the tural Area west of Buellton, proposed smartest thing we ever did.” the change. Zoning permits for 350 acres Last year, the board majority of Hart, of cannabis have already been approved Lavagnino, and Williams voted against there despite complaints from neighbor- a motion by Hartmann that would have ing vintners and Buellton residents about required a conditional-use permit for canpot odors that waft into their neighbor- nabis cultivation throughout the county. hoods and wine tasting rooms at harvest Separately, they also voted against requiring such permits for the Sta. Rita Hills wine time. Applications for 250 more acres of can- region alone. nabis are in the pipeline and under review Back then, the county Grand Jury; for the Sta. Rita Hills. Hartmann raised county Farm Bureau; Santa Barbara Vintthe possibility that the cap on cannabis ners; Santa Barbara County Coalition for cultivation might be lifted in the future, Responsible Cannabis; Concerned Carthough she says she “absolutely” does not pinterians; the cities of Buellton, Goleta, support such a measure. and Carpinteria; and a host of homeownUnder existing permit regulations, ers’ associations urged the board to require most outdoor cannabis growers can’t conditional-use permits for cannabis projbe required to install odor-control ects as a way to rein in an industry they technology or reduce the size of their said was disruptive and out of control. operations. “My office has been working toward “If we look at the Santa Rita Hills, the die this for a long time,” Hartmann said. is pretty much cast,” Hartmann said. “We want to have an opportunity to take Conditional-use permits would require what we’ve learned and apply it to future future cannabis projects to be “compatible permits.” with” and “not detrimental to” surroundPlowman said it would take six months ing neighborhoods. In this way, Hartmann to draw up the ordinance amendment and said, the county could require growers to go through public hearings. n

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

AT-RISK YOUTH: At Tuesday’s board meeting, Supervisor Joan Hartmann expressed exasperation that the unvaccinated would choose to put the health of those around them at risk, revealing that one-third of the students at her 10-year-old grandson’s grade school, including her grandson, had gotten COVID.

make up their own minds. Supervisor Joan Hartmann expressed exasperation that the unvaccinated would choose to put the health of those around them at risk. One-third of the students at her 10-year-old grandson’s grade school had gotten COVID. For the past two weeks, her grandson has been sick with fevers running at 103 and 104 degrees. “His teachers say, ‘Do your homework,’” Hartmann recounted, “but he’s sleeping.” Hartmann noted that in previous meetings, she sought to appeal to the vaccination resisters with an expression of broader community concern only to be told Adolf Hitler had made similar arguments in his call to action, Mein Kampf. “It’s unacceptable,” Hartmann stated. Supervisor Steve Lavagnino recounted how he has given up trying to argue with a family member who is refusing to get vaccinated. “I just show him the slides showing the number of people hospitalized who haven’t gotten vaccinated.” Lavagnino, who grew up in a religious cult in Northern Idaho, sought to inject some levity by noting that the percentage of eligible county residents who have gotten vaccinated has now crept up to 66.6 percent, the Mark of the Beast in certain camps. More significantly, he added, was that 75.1 percent of all eligible county residents have now gotten at least one vaccination shot. That, he noted, is bordering on what was previously thought — before the emergence of the Delta variant — to be herd immunity. To get 75 percent of people to agree on anything, he said — whether his jacket color was black or dark blue, for instance — was an amazing accomplishment. Tuesday’s statistical brain dump, provided by county Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso, indicated that by most metrics, Santa Barbara County’s COVID profile has been moving in a positive direction over the past two weeks. The number of new cases on Monday — 63 — was down from the prior two-week average of 117; the number of active cases dropped from 587 two weeks ago to 563. The number of people hospitalized dropped from 72 to 66; most

critically, the number of occupied ICU beds dropped from 79 percent to 69.7 percent. And the number of cases per 100,000 — a key metric — dropped from 22.8 two weeks ago to 17.1 as of Tuesday. Even so, people are dying. The most recent death was a Santa Maria resident between 18 and 29 years old. Of the 112 unvaccinated COVID patients in August, nine died. Only one of those deaths occurred in the ICU. The total number of COVID deaths countywide is now 489. Thus far this September, there have been 11 deaths. Of those, six were 70 or older, three 50-69, and one 30-49. In August, the county recorded 16 COVID deaths. The big shift, according to Do-Reynoso, is the ages of the infected; they’re getting much younger, she said. Of the 112 hospitalized in the month of August, two-thirds were 64 years old or younger. 20 were 29 years old or younger. Five were under 18. Unlike the prior three supervisors’ hearings, Tuesday’s was not packed with COVID skeptics and anti-vaccination advocates. One speaker called the supervisors and County Public Health officers “fools,” but in general, the tone was cooler. One speaker, Jean Gavin, wanted to know when county health officials thought it would be safe to return to normal. Initially, the goal was to “flatten the curve,” she said, so that hospitals were not overwhelmed. That mission, she stated, had been accomplished. When will it be good enough? she asked. “When will we know when ‘when’ is?” Supervisor Nelson echoed her concerns, especially given the acknowledgement by Dr. Stewart Comer, director of the Pacific Diagnostic Labs, that COVID-zero was not on the horizon. Do-Reynoso answered, “That’s a great question. That’s a question our team asks ourselves,” but always with a cautionary concern about letting up prematurely. She suggested the line in the sand might be when the case rate dips to four new cases a day per 100,000. But even then, she said, she’s not sure. Santa Barbara County is not an island, she cautioned. “People travel to other places n in our country and our state.”

R. M. Schindler, Armon House, Los Angeles, 1946-49

DAN I EL DR EI FU SS F I LE PHOTO

COVID PATIENTS CONT’D FROM P. 7

ART MATTERS LECTURE Enigmatic Architecture: R. M. Schindler’s Los Angeles

Todd Cronan Associate Professor of Art History Emory University

Th u r s d ay, O c t o b e r 7 5:30 pm Mary Craig Auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara Born and trained in Vienna, R. M. Schindler came to Los Angeles in 1920, working in the office of Frank Lloyd Wright. After leaving Wright’s office, Schindler went on to become the most influential modern architect in Southern California. This talk will explore his enigmatic approach as a designer, from his infamous bohemian mecca, the King’s Road house, to his last great “translucent” works, including the remarkable Janson and Tischler houses. In many ways, Schindler’s work remains a mystery, full of seemingly arbitrary shapes, patterns and angles they seem to many like futuristic set designs for early Hollywood film. We will try and unravel some of the mysteries that surround this astonishing body of work. For this in-person event attendance is limited to 50. Please visit www.sbma.net/visit/planyourtrip for more information about the Museum’s mask and proof of vaccination policies. Single tickets: $10 SBMA Members/$15 Non-Members Free to students with valid ID & Upper Level Members Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desk in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Dogs Just Don’t Recall

HOW DO YOU SPELL R-E-L-I-E-F: I’d like to say I

knew it would play out like this all along. But like a lot of people, I was hugely relieved that what we told ourselves “couldn’t happen” actually didn’t. For a change. Along the way, however, more than $120 million in campaign donations got picked from the pockets of the unholy, and taxpayers will be on the hook for $278 million just to maintain—and no doubt reinforce—the status quo. I’ve never been a huge fan of Gavin Newsom. Maybe it’s the hair, or maybe I can’t get over the fact he was briefly married to Kimberly Guilfoyle —operatic shriek and harridan of the right, not to mention Don Junior’s main squeeze. But the stubborn fact is Newsom’s done a betterthan-decent job trying to navigate a state big enough to be five separate countries through a minefield of insanely impossible disasters —COVID, wildfires, drought, homelessness, and housing—all exploding simultaneously. It’s worth remembering that this recall campaign started in Yolo County at the kitchen table of a retired sheriff’s deputy, angry that Newsom unilaterally declared he would not authorize any executions under his watch. It probably wouldn’t have gone very far had Newsom not been caught at the high-priced restaurant The French Laundry, celebrating the birthday of his über-lobbyist buddy Jason Kinney—whose firm, incidentally, represents Santa Barbara’s most respectable cannabis operators— maskless in the time of pandemic.

Just two days after what will go down as the

most expensive dinner party in the history of

eternity, a judge gave organizers of the recall drive an additional four months in which to collect their signatures. But for these back-toback events—each one the equivalent of an inside-the-park home run on an infield error — the recall would never have qualified. Yet it did. Welcome to California. Making it all more improbable still was the emergence of right-wing radio provocateur Larry Elder, a Black man who in this election would become California’s standard bearer for White Grievance. In some upside-down, Bizarro, Mister Mxyzptlk universe, there’s something perversely politically correct —to use one of Elder’s favorite epithets—that in California, even our racists are diverse. Among Elder’s bigger backers is sometimes-Santa Barbara resident, gazillionaire real-estate tycoon, and bad-boy developer Geoff Palmer, known to cavort about on the polo ponies when not otherwise ensconced in that palatial oceanfront netherworld lying between Summerland and Carpinteria. At last count, Palmer donated $1.2 million to Elder and gave another couple hundred thousand to the recall campaign. Depending on what numbers you use, Palmer—who also calls Malibu, Aspen, and St. Tropez home—either raised or donated more than $10 million for Donald Trump’s presidential aspirations. I’m betting Palmer’s presence here had everything

to do with Elder’s egg-free stopover in Santa Barbara last week. Palmer was born and bred in L.A. — the son of an architect and developer—and today owns or has built anywhere from 11,000 to 15,000 housing units in greater L.A. He is reported to be worth in the ballpark of $3 billion. Not bad. Palmer has a rare genius for infuriating people who care about housing affordability, planning, neighborhood character, taste, preservation, gentrification, and tenants. He has big, white teeth. His massive downtown structures —frequently described as faux Italian fortresses with names like the Da Vinci, the Medici, and the Orsini—are built right up against the nearest freeway, where land is relatively cheap. Critics have dubbed these “black lung lofts.” Some properties feature land bridges that hover above the sidewalks, designed so tenants can move from one building wing to the next without having to mingle with the homeless people on the sidewalks below. When the Los Angeles Planning Commission said no to this, Palmer got the City Council to vote yes. His properties—many of which turn hermetically away from the surrounding neighborhood—usually come jammed with every known amenity: basketball courts, movie theaters, and any goodies that fulfill a young USC student’s dream. When it comes to the politics of housing, Palmer has never pretended to be kind. In rare public statements, Palmer has derided housing

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requirements that set aside a small percent of total units for people who can’t pay market rates as both immoral and un-American. When the City of Los Angeles refused to back off, Palmer took the city to court and won, thus undermining the legal basis by which local governments can mandate such affordability requirements in rental housing. A couple of years back, Palmer and his empire were sued in a sprawling class action lawsuit claiming he systematically strip-mined the security deposits of his tenants, holding on to their money without an adequate accounting for why. Most recently, Palmer just sued the City of Los Angeles for $100 million, charging the emergency eviction protections that Los Angeles—like every city in the state—adopted in response to the pandemic constituted an illegal “taking” by the government without just compensation. One of the ironies here is that Gavin Newsom —the governor Palmer tried to recall—had put $5.2 billion in the state budget to help compensate landlords for lost rent. But those funds were earmarked for landlords of low-income tenants. Palmer, as his critics have been quick to point out, may have hoisted himself by his own petard, having succeeded in keeping lowincome tenants out of his skyline properties. In the meantime, I found it reassuring that 65 percent of my neighbors saw fit to reject the recall. In Ventura County, it went down by 59 percent. In San Luis Obispo, 58 percent voted no. But in Yolo County—where it all started—it was rejected by 75 percent. —Nick Welsh

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year and a half into a war that has claimed more than 650,000 American lives, we are stumbling in our efforts because of those among us who refuse to enlist in the fight. The war has claimed almost 500 residents in our county. These aren’t just numbers or statistics; these are our family members, our coworkers, our community brothers and sisters. I am absolutely heartbroken by the staggering magnitude of these losses. After experiencing a glimmer of hope this summer, our fight against this lethal enemy has lost ground. Some of us feel that more ought to be sacrificed: more children, more seniors, more teachers, and more people with compromised health. I’d like to ask them, “How many more? What is the appropriate number of people to lose before we come together and take the necessary actions to safeguard our community?” I believe it is our moral and ethical duty to do all that is in our power to protect our community from additional death and devastation. As a Goleta City Councilmember, I have supported measures to encourage and even mandate vaccinations and protective masks. Vaccine mandates are a longaccepted tool to protect the public health. Vaccines have helped control, if not eradicate, smallpox, measles, polio, and even chickenpox. They should absolutely be required to combat COVID. We all must accept the personal responsibility we share for the common good. I am sick and tired of those who shout and yell and kick and scream about their individual “rights” but have no sense of responsibility for making things better for our community. What about our collective right to go to work or school and not be subjected to preventable risks to our health? Unfortunately, too many people in our community have refused to accept this responsibility. Because of this, vaccine and mask mandates are necessary to ensure protection — especially for the elderly, sick, and most vulnerable — and bolster the strength of our economy so our jobs and businesses can recover. Those who oppose the efforts to protect our public health are holding us all back. Together we can win this war, but to do so, we will need more people to step up and exercise their responsibility to act with concern and compassion for the well-being of their neighbors. —Kyle Richards, Goleta

True Gratitude

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here are truly no words to express our gratitude to the firefighters who extinguished the Caballo Fire in Santa Ynez/Los Olivos on September 6. Every single member of our community feared the worst. Once we saw the size and intensity of the fire, we never thought the team would put out the blaze without losing a single structure. This outcome is directly attributed to the teamwork, heroics, and culture they displayed in not only fighting a fire but saving a community. Before many of the residents in Rancho Ynesita were even aware of what was going on, the team was on the blaze, a quick-moving fire in some of the driest conditions on record, attacking it head-on, trucks rolling in, boots on the ground, firefighters battling flames, and air tankers carrying out precision strikes. Several units ranging from Lompoc to San Luis Obispo joined the fight; watching the teams lock arms in a coordinated effort was nothing short of inspiring. Beyond this debt of gratitude, perhaps the biggest gift the team of firefighters left us was the sense of being cared for by a broader community. I can’t tell you how many residents have said the firefighters went out of their way to check in with and reassure families that everything would be okay. Desperate moments like this are when you get to see true leadership, and the fire team displayed that every step of the way. On behalf of the Rancho Ynesita Board of Directors and all its homeowners, we simply say thank you for sparing our dreams and saving this community.

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Carlos Platon Tornes

Bruce Jay Coldren

Carlos Platon Tornes, was a devoted and loving husband, father, grandfather, uncle, friend and neighbor. His beautiful smile, wisdom, humor, and care for others will be dearly missed. He passed away peacefully with his family by his side. Born in Georgetown Hospital in Washington D.C., Carlos was the son of Cuban born Carlos P. Tornes I, and pianist Edna Louise Sullivan. He had three sisters, Elena, Talulah and DeeDee. When Carlos turned eighteen he joined the United States Navy. He loved reminiscing about the time he spent in the North Atlantic on the Intrepid AirCraft Carrier. He left the Navy with an Honorable Discharge, and began working at Sears Roebuck in Baltimore, where he met the love of his life, Joan Marie Deinlein. They were married and had three children Christina, Michele and Carlos III. Carlos loved to ride motorcycles, skin dive, play golf, tennis, and chess. He was also a huge patron of the arts, always going to the opera, ballet, and symphony. He was an artist himself; a saxophone player, poet, and abstract painter. Carlos is survived by his wife of 62 years, Joan, his children Christina (Tim Korner), Michele, Carlos III, and his favorite and only grandchild, Ciara Isabella Tolliver (Paul Tolliver, father). In lieu of flowers the family asks that donations be made to Catholic Charities. The memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 18th at 11:30 am. Taking place at Saint Joseph’s Church, 1532 Linden Ave Carpinteria, CA 93013..

Bruce was born to Reg and Joan Coldren in Santa Barbara, CA on December 25th, 1953, and passed away unexpectedly in Springfield, OR on July 12th, 2021, of a pulmonary embolism. During his time growing up in Goleta, CA he played various sports but focused on basketball. He received many accolades and was later inducted into the Santa Barbara Round Table Hall of Fame in 2015. After graduating from Dos Pueblos High School in 1972 he attended the University of Oregon and received his Bachelor of Science in physical education and health. At Oregon, he was a member of men’s basketball team under Dick Harter and was an original Kamikaze Kid. Many people remember Bruce for his 12-14, 24-point performance against #1 ranked UCLA in what was considered “The Lost Weekend” by Sports Illustrated, but he would much rather be remembered as a devoted, kind, and humble teammate. He was inducted into the Oregon Athletic Hall of Fame in 1999 alongside his Kamikaze Kid teammates. He went on to teach PE and Health among many other subjects at Lowell High School from 1977-2008. He was also the athletic director and coached football, basketball, and baseball during his time at Lowell. He had a huge heart and was always a positive force for his students and their families. He touched countless lives as a teacher and a coach over his 30+ year career. In 2016, he was inducted into the Lowell School District Hall of Fame. On August 13th, 1977, Bruce married his best friend, Karen. They were married for 43 years and had two children, Jamie and Ryan. Bruce and Karen enjoyed driving up and down the west coast visiting family in California and Washington, watching all things University of Oregon, and spending time on the back deck of their Fall Creek home. After his retirement in 2008,

8/23/1937 - 8/12/2021

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12/25/1953 - 7/12/2021

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

Bruce stayed involved in school activities and continued to be a substitute teacher. He enjoyed fishing, golfing, BBQing, and keeping in contact with his lifelong friends. But nothing compared to the joy he felt visiting his granddaughters Delainie and Hadlie in California, and grandson, Winlsow in Washington. Bruce was preceded in death by his mother, Joan Coldren and Sister, Lisa Mink. He is survived by his wife, Karen, daughter Jamie (Ryan) Ayers of Newbury Park, CA, son Ryan (Sarah) Coldren of Renton, WA, father Reg Coldren of Goleta, CA, sister Gina (Chuck) Osberg of Lompoc, CA, and 3 grandchildren, Delainie and Hadlie Ayers and Winslow Coldren. A celebration of life is being planned with details that will be forthcoming. The family has suggested making a donation in Bruce’s memory to the Lowell/ Fall Creek Education Foundation. Services in the care of Major Family Funeral Home. Visit www. majorfamilyfuneralhome.com to sign the guestbook or share a favorite memory.

Danny Christian Sutherland

9/21/1951 - 8/5/2021

Long-time Carpinteria resident Danny Sutherland (69) passed away peacefully at his home on August 5 after a courageous six-month battle with cancer. A loving and devoted husband and father, and cherished friend to many, he passed on with the same quiet strength and concern for others that distinguished his life. Danny was born September 21, 1951, in Los Angeles, the son of Eleanor (McCoy) and Wayne Sutherland. A 1969 graduate of the former Daniel Murphy High School, he went on to attend Los Angeles Pierce College. Danny served in the U.S. Navy from 1971-1977. His four years of active duty and two years of reserve duty included service in Vietnam and the Philippines on the USS Sche-

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nectady and the USS Savannah, followed by an Honorable Discharge. In 1971, Danny met the love of his life, Felicia – also born and raised in Los Angeles – at a gathering of mutual friends. Their connection was instant and deep, and the young couple were married at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Montecito (where his parents had moved) in 1975. The newlywed Sutherlands purchased their first home in Carpinteria in 1976. Danny began his career in engineering and special projects at the Aluminum Filter Company in Carpinteria, where he worked for 20-plus years. He subsequently worked at Helix Medical in Carpinteria, in engineering, special projects and production, until his retirement in 2017. Danny loved to fish and looked forward to his annual fishing trip to the quaint town of Bridgeport in the Eastern Sierras, an excursion he thoroughly enjoyed with life-long, dear friends until recent years. He was thrilled to introduce fishing to his young sons, Eric and Andrew, and to more than a few friends through the years, and was always up to give “free” fishing lessons to anyone who was interested. His “perfect peaceful day” was spent taking his boat (a 20-foot Wellcraft, unofficially dubbed The Felicia Ann) out in local ocean waters to fish for halibut. He almost always caught his limit, which he meticulously cleaned and packaged, and then generously shared with friends and neighbors. He was the quintessential DIY guy, highly skilled and capable of building, repairing, and/or retrofitting virtually anything, which kept the Sutherland household humming. He loved to barbecue, and thoroughly enjoyed local restaurant faves The Spot. Danny’s Deli, and Reynaldo’s, where he believed the ambiance and food represent the best of his beloved Carp community. The occasional snacker, he favored pistachios and Snickers Bars with almonds, a “secret stash” of the latter having been recently discovered in his workshop. Danny (or Dan to some) will long be remembered for his love of family, friends, and

community; his humble grace; a humorous side that included a sparkling smile and infectious laugh; and his generosity, concern and caring for all who were fortunate enough to know him. Danny Sutherland was preceded in death by his older sister, Kathleen Sutherland (at age 17); his parents; and his eldest son, Eric Sutherland, who passed away suddenly in 2015. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Felicia Sutherland; his beloved son Andrew Patrick Sutherland; and his adored rescue dogs, Tiffany and Jackson, who are all missing him deeply. A private service celebrating his well-lived life has been held. In lieu of flowers, gifts in his honor may be made to VNA Health Santa Barbara at www.vna.health.

Martina Ritt-Lindert 11/24/1957 - 9/2/2021

Martina Ritt-Lindert was the only daughter of Martin and Adele Ritt of Pacific Palisades. In her childhood, Tina traveled the world with her parents as her father directed many of Hollywoods greatest films. Tina was adventurous, curious, funny and smart. She graduated from Westlake School for Girls. She went on to have her own career in the film industry before having her daughters, Caitlin and Emily. Everyone loved Tina. She was a force of nature. She had a love of the arts, loved to sing and watch films. Tina had a strong passion for animals. She rescued dogs in dire need of finding a forever home because that’s who she was. She had a heart of gold. Tina was taken by cancer far too young. We will miss her forever. Her memory lives on through the friendships she made, the family she built and the stories and memories she left behind. She is survived by her husband Bill and her daughters. In lieu of flowers please donate to the breastcanceralliance.org in Tina’s name.


obituaries William John Pattenaude

1/3/1954 - 9/5/2021

William John Pattenaude, of Goleta, passed away suddenly on September 5, 2021 at the age of 67. He was born January 3, 1954, in New Westminster, British Columbia. He worked for many years as a local tile setter, and later for Fielding University. He is survived by his wife of 45 years, Irene; his son Jeffrey (Ari), his daughter, Lanita (Jeff), three grandchildren, one brother, James, and two sisters, Anita and Teresa. He spent many of his afternoons playing cribbage and dominoes with friends, enjoyed monthly poker games, and shot a mean game of pool! John’s passion was gardening, and many friends and neighbors benefited from his bountiful harvests. He and his wife, Irene, have walked every beach along the South and Central Coast and many more around the world. He was funny (always told a good joke), generous, sincere, and kind. He was loved very much and will be missed by all. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Elks Lodge #613, 805-964-6859 in support of their charities. A celebration of life will be held at a later date.

Gray Roderick Duncan 10/27/1962 - 8/29/2021

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our dear son, Gray. He was a loved son, brother, husband, father and friend, a respected teacher of art and so much more. He was a graduate of Dos Pueblos High School and held degrees in Art from UCSB. He leaves his wife Janis, son Preston and daughter

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Breanna. He will be missed by many students both present and past, many of whom kept in touch. He was a lover of the ocean, an artist, a kind and gentle soul. A Poem for Gray: “For winter’s rains and ruins are over, and all the seasons of snows and sins; The days of dividing loves and lover, The light that loses, the night that wins; And time remembered is grief forgotten, and frosts are slain and flowers begotten, And in green underwood and cover, Blossom by blossom the spring begins.” -Swinburne

Richard Dolson Kalstrom

11/26/1928 - 8/15/2021

Richard Kalstrom passed away in the presence of family prayers Sunday night Aug 15. 92 years. Born in San Diego, CA. At age 7, his mother died in childbirth. His father Lewis moved them to the family dairy in Lakeside, where his grandmother raised him and his sister Marjorie. He enlisted in the Army when he graduated from Grossmont high school. Code technician (cryptography) in WWII Army and reserve, engineer at Raytheon for 35 years, treasurer at Alliance Neighborhood Church, singer in Community Chorus under Charles Gallagher, Camerata Choir (Dr. Harold Dunn) and Santa Barbara Oratorio Chorale. He was a gardener, with 10 food producing trees, grapes, berry vines, strawberries, vegetable garden, and roses. Preceded by wife LaVella, sister Marjorie. Survived by sister-in-law Linda U. (Oregon), brother-in-law Garry A. (Arizona) son John and daughter-in-law Diane (Goleta), cousins Reynold K. (Colorado), Karen T. (Tulare), Robert K. (Valencia).

Memorial at Restoration Church 595 N Fairview Ave: Sat Sep 25 1 pm. Charity: Salvation Army

John Haro

10/4/1950 - 9/5/2021

John Haro passed away from ALS on Sunday, September 5. He was 70 years old. John was born on October 4, 1950 in Lindsay, CA to Clemencia and Nicandro Haro. The oldest of six children, he grew up surrounded by his large extended family at his grandmother’s ranch. He graduated from Lindsay High School and went on to attend Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, where he was one of the first students to graduate with a degree in computer science. After a summer internship at IBM, he was recruited to work in the marketing department at their Santa Barbara office because he enjoyed working with people much more than coding. He would later go on to earn an MBA from Pepperdine University. In 1975 he married his college sweetheart, Patricia Gonzales, at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church in Goleta. Ten years later they welcomed their daughter, Jessica, followed by their son Kenneth in 1988. John shared his love of sports with his son, whom he coached in basketball, soccer and t-ball. He was also a Fiesta dad, having spent at least a decade carrying his daughter’s flamenco costumes and filming each of her performances. John used his marketing skills to contribute to the things his kids loved most by serving on the boards of the United Boys & Girls Clubs of Santa Barbara County and the Flamenco Arts Festival. After a successful career that took him all over the world, he retired from Hewlett-Packard in 2017. Never one to sit still, he found the perfect retirement job pouring at Santa Barbara Winery, which allowed him to share his passion for wine while talking to new people every day.

In his free time he loved to golf, go wine tasting with his close friends from Cal Poly, and vacation with his family, especially in Maui. John is survived by his wife, Pat Haro, and their children Jessica and Kenneth. He also leaves behind his father, Nicandro, brothers Peter and Ruben, and sisters Olivia, Susan and Silvia. A rosary in his memory will be held Thursday, September 16th at 7:00 p.m. at WellchRyce-Hayder on Sola Street in Santa Barbara. The funeral mass will take place at 10:00 a.m. on Friday, September 17th at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church in Goleta, followed by burial at Calvary Cemetery in Santa Barbara. Donations in his memory can be made to The ALS Association Golden West Chapter.

Celinda del Carmen Valeur 11/7/1974 - 7/14/2021

Celinda was very loved, and the love she received she sent right back out into the world. She had a wonderful, supportive husband, and a beautiful son both of whom she adored. She had countless circles of friends whom she loved dearly. She was a fun and fiercely loyal person, who strongly believed in the power of intention and manifesting your own reality. By always focusing on the positive, Celinda created the life she wanted. Together with Fredrik, her husband, she set up a comfortable home in Carpinteria where they raised their sweet son, Sebastian, together. It was important to Celinda that Sebastian knew both his Peruvian and Norwegian roots, and she raised him to speak three languages fluently and took him on frequent trips to visit family in her hometown in Peru and Fredrik’s hometown in Norway. Their home was often filled with people as Celinda loved throwing parties and hosting dinners. She loved cooking and entertaining her many friends

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from various walks of life from the Santa Barbara Surfer Girls, to production friends from working in TV and on documentaries, to the many people she met along the way as she danced and traveled her way through life. She was a wonderful host who enjoyed salsa and bachata dancing, book club, and tending to her garden. She was always learning, growing and experiencing new things. Celinda had a great sense of humor and she made a habit not to take anything too seriously. Among her ongoing projects was “The Substandard Poodle”, a hilarious twitter account written from the perspective of her elderly mini-poodle named Chuco followed by his predecessor Mico. During the Covid pandemic her humorous videos earned her a sizeable following on her Tik-Tok account c_estrella. She rarely gave even a hint at the pain and suffering she was going through due to her battle with cancer in these videos – she just kept us laughing. Celinda would have wanted us to know that “Consciousness does not end with the body!” Although she is no longer with us in the physical realm, her spirit lives on. She would not want us to spend too much time mourning, but instead for us to celebrate her life by remembering to celebrate our own lives. On September 25th, 2021 from 11am-1pm we will honor her with a celebration of life memorial paddle out at Ash Avenue & Sandyland Beach (4th Beach) in Carpinteria. For more information go to http:// evite.me/UHE19YexrN This is an informal memorial to celebrate the way Celinda lived. Bring your box of kleenex, but also your dancing shoes, your laughter, your memories of Celinda, and your joy. We hope to host an event that Celinda herself would want to attend, in her honor.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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19


Introducing

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT’S

NICHE NEWSLETTERS Get exclusive content directly to your inbox from our editors

Matt Kettmann’s Full Belly Files serves up multiple courses of food & drink coverage every Friday, delivering tasty nuggets of restaurant, recipe, and refreshment wisdom to your inbox.

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A bi-monthly newsletter from the Santa Barbara Independent exclusively for book lovers.

Every Monday, Tyler Hayden will catch you up on the news of the week and tip you off to upcoming government meetings on the most pressing issues of the day.

Charles Donelan’s Pano captures the full range of arts and entertainment available in our region in one panoramic weekly wide shot every Wednesday.

A Saturday morning newsletter with Nick Welsh’s award-winning opinion pieces.

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In Memoriam

Sam Cunningham 1950-2021

MARK MCDONALD

DICK MARTIN

Formidable and Beautiful

LEGEND: Sam Cunningham was a legend in his hometown and a football Hall of Famer, but his friends and family knew him as a kind and gracious man.

H

BY JOHN ZANT e stood there in jersey number 34, a statuesque

figure (63, 210 pounds) on thick, dark, muscled legs. It was September 3, 1968, my first day as a sports writer for the Santa Barbara NewsPress, the opening day of football practice at Santa Barbara High School, and the first time I laid eyes on Sam Cunningham. I had played football a few years earlier and never saw a player like him. He was scary but beautiful. Scary in the tumult of a football game — he would pummel people with devastating blocks and explosive runs. Beautiful off the field — he was friendly and approachable, as nice a man as you’d want to meet. It was as if his parents, Mabel and Sam Sr., migrants from Tennessee and Texas, channeled Santa Barbara’s gentle sunshine into their formidable son. After scoring 39 touchdowns as fullback and making countless tackles as linebacker for the Santa Barbara Dons, he headed off to USC and became “Sam Bam.” His college career was bookended by two epic performances — his 135yard foray against Alabama in 1970 that changed attitudes in the Deep South, and his four touchdowns on magnificent headlong dives through the Ohio State defense in the 1973 Rose Bowl. Then he played nine seasons in the NFL and set the career rushing record for the New England Patriots. All of that was material for a sports writer to build a heroic profile, but all too often, the person does not live up to the image. The qualities that set Sam Cunningham apart and made him the brightest star in the constellation of sports figures during my lifetime were his genuineness, his honesty, and his decency. His character came to the fore in high school. Gary Daigneault recalled being a diminutive 410 freshman who was so relentlessly picked on and bullied that he dreaded going to school. Then one day, Sam Cunningham — whose locker was fortuitously next to his by alphabetical arrangement — came to his rescue. Daigneault, an award-winning broadcast journalist, described the incident in a posting several years ago: “Drawing himself up to his full height, he announced in a loud

voice, ‘From now on, anyone coming after him [pointing to me] will have to go through me.’ In that second, my life changed. The daily abuse stopped; the bullies stayed away; I was able to sleep, began to like school, and gradually came out of my shell. In that day, in that moment, that man changed my life. Thank you, Sam Cunningham.” Cunningham’s football career landed him in numerous Halls of Fame, but he did not wallow in celebrity. He settled in Inglewood and with his wife, Cine, raised a daughter, Samahndi. He had a landscaping business. Early in the morning, he would ride a bicycle 10 or 15 miles with a neighbor. Sometimes, I called him to plumb his memories. He enjoyed attending USC games on the sideline, but in 2010, the population of former players had gotten out of hand, and they were banned. The night of that year’s USC-Notre Dame game, Cunningham rode his bike across town to be near the Coliseum. He wound up at a Starbucks, listening to the game on his iPod. It was raining when he started to ride home, and he got a flat tire. He sat there in the rain, he told me, and lit up a cigar. He reflected on how miserable the Trojans must feel (they had lost to Notre Dame), and he said, “I thought how lucky I was. My senior year was perfect.” That year, which ended with Sam Bam crashing into the Rose Bowl end zone four times (coach John McKay called his number to reward him for all the blocking he did while USC’s tailbacks got the glory), was indeed perfect for the undefeated Trojans, one of the strongest college teams ever assembled. And it perfectly fit Cunningham’s team-first ethos. He explained it while bantering with friends in 2016 after attending the funeral of his SBHS teammate Dennis Rickard. “The people that know me know what I did was not necessarily anything to do with me,” he said. “People come up and say, ‘Oh man, you so great’ … they don’t even know me. I was taught in elementary school to be a part of a team, not to be a star. If you’re a part of a team and you help your team win, then everybody gets a little bit of shine at the end of the day. That’s what 1972 was all about; we played as a team and won the national championship, not because I could fly over the line or whatever.”

He refused to stoke the myths surrounding USC’s 42-21 demolition of Alabama in 1970, when it was said, “Sam Cunningham did more to integrate Alabama in 60 minutes than Martin Luther King did in 20 years.” It was his first college game. He was not out to make history. “I just did not want to make a mistake,” he said. He ran the football as he was trained to do, with the physical power that he possessed. He helped the Trojans win convincingly, and if it made white folks in the South more accepting of Black football players, he was not sure how much it changed their minds about Black people in general. Perhaps nobody gained more from that game than ’Bama coach Bear Bryant, who had tardily begun recruiting some Black players and now had license to open the gates to players who would help sweep him into the Hall of Fame. It was an oft-told story that Bryant took Sam into the Tide’s locker room and said, “This is what a football player looks like,” but Cunningham repeatedly denied it ever happened. He resisted being chained to that moment, saying, “It’s only football; it’s only a game. It’s not the end of the freaking world. Life goes on, the journey of life.” The last time I saw Sam was two years ago at the 50th reunion of his SBHS 1969 class. He was exceedingly happy to be among friends who knew him as the team player for the Dons, as the big man on campus who shamed bullies and did not need to puff out his chest. When the Cunningham Track was dedicated at Peabody Stadium on July 3 to honor Sam and his younger brothers — Anthony, Bruce, and Randall — he called the night before to say he was hospitalized and would not be able to make it. But his condition did not appear to be grave. When her father died at his home on September 7, Samahndi Cunningham said it took the family by surprise. “He meant the world to me,” Samahndi said. “He was an amazing dad, an amazing person. We were blessed.” Who knows? Maybe Bear Bryant had been stuck outside the pearly gates for all those years and needed somebody n strong and pure to help him get through.

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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The Business of

Social Media Entrepreneurship Gets the Online Treatment

by Celina Garcia and Caitlin Kelley

C

hances are that your iPhone’s weekly screen-time report skyrocketed in the wake of the pandemic. It only makes sense that local entrepreneurs would take their business to social platforms as The New Normal took effect. So we followed the money across the digital footprints that led us back to Santa Barbara. In our Business of Social Media issue, you’ll read about a downtown repair shop taking TikTok by storm, local chocolatiers dishing on the food vendors of the future, and content creators transforming follow counts into dollar signs. Enjoy, and touch glass.

Bringing

Tech Talk

to

TikTok

Behind GadgetFix’s Business Boom

W

hen Edwin Guzman started his TikTok account

in late 2019, there wasn’t a lot of phone-repair content to be found. So he’d post bite-sized walkthroughs of tech wizardry at his shop, GadgetFix, for fun. He’d notice the view counts ramp up little by little with each post. By the time he uploaded his 11th video to the app, he hit more than 750,000 views. He was hooked. Guzman specializes in short clips of the gadgets he, well, fixes at his De la Vina St. shop. In his first viral clip from April 2020, he takes the viewer on a journey … of replacing the back glass of an iPhone. As a fan of the TV show Drugs, Inc., he went for a voice effect similar to the one that masks the anonymous guests on the program. Given the inaccessible nature of Apple repairs, commenters thought he was trying not to get in trouble with the mega-corporation.

22

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

by Caitlin Kelley

“Apparently a lot of people think that you can’t replace those,” Guzman says. “So I think that’s what kind of just got the whole thing going.” Since then, he’s made a routine out of posting content — and the one-man business has reached more than 833,000 followers and counting.

FACE REVEAL: The content creator initially unveiled his face on the internet when his TikTok hit 50k followers.

CLEANLINESS IS NEXT TO VIRALNESS There’s a side of TikTok’s 700 million-strong userbase called “CleanTok.” The hashtag is basically life hack meets visual ASMR content that took off amid the deep-cleaning frenzy necessitated by the pandemic. You can find everything from hyper-disinfected gravestones to poolside pro-tips in there. It’s also the reason why GadgetFix’s reach skyrocketed

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in the past couple of weeks. In mid-August, two “dirty-ass” phones were sent in for repairs, and the downtown repairman dutifully opened their cases up to the world. The before-and-after transformations ended up going mega-viral with more than 20 million views altogether.  “Now I know in the back of my head, if I do get a dirty phone, then I’ll do a video on cleaning that phone,” Guzman notes. “That’s what people like to watch.” 


Making Bank on Social Media

Parlaying Popularity into Sponsorships, Pop-Ups, and Sales

T

ONE TAKE: He likes to keep the editing process simple by recording everything at once.

When GadgetFix opened in 2014, business was a little slow at first. “But word of mouth did play a big role, specifically here in Santa Barbara,” Guzman, who’s lived in town since he was 8, says. “It’s such a small town that word spreads pretty quickly.” Guzman opened the shop with his best friend, Dan Pham. “He was in charge of the computer repair side of the business, and I had the experience with phone and tablet repair,” Guzman says. A year later, Pham left to run his family’s restaurant, Phamous Café in Goleta. “So I’ve been by myself ever since,” Guzman says. While he wasn’t hurting for a local customer base, the turning point in GadgetFix’s online presence happened over a podcast — Gary Vaynerchuk’s The GaryVee Audio Experience, to be exact. “I love the way he speaks,” Guzman says of the social media mogul. “Every morning, people would call in and say, ‘Hey, this is going on with my business.’ And I noticed that every single person that called him, he’s like, ‘Are you doing TikTok? … Dude, get on TikTok. You should do TikTok is unique in that it helps small businesses get the kind of exposure they could never dream of on any TikTok.’ So I kind of took that to heart.” “It’s improved my business a lot,” Guzman other platform. “It’s a really good idea for businesses to continues. “I’ve gotten people shipping cer- get on TikTok,” Guzman says. “The organic reach that it tain things, and I’ll do a video Cont'd on p. 27 on them as well because they will ask me to.” The repairman estimates that he films 10 percent of the phones he works on. Typically, he films his tech exploits by holding his iPhone 11 Pro Max in front of his latest project with one hand. But he’s got a phone clamp set up above his workstation in case he needs to whip up a time lapse or two.  The camera-shy guy lets his hands do the talking under the glare of his workbench’s ring light. He likes to keep the RATE MY RIG: Guzman is regularly complimented on his workspace organiediting process simple by recording everyzation on private forums like Cell Phone Repair Shop Talk on Facebook. thing in one take. “I do stutter a lot. That

BURSTING THE FILTER BUBBLE

ERICK MADRID

SOCIAL MEDIA IS SERIOUS BUSINESS

was one of the reasons why I didn’t want to do TikTok,” he says with perfect enunciation. “I was always scared of, like, ‘Oh, people are gonna make fun of me because I have a weird accent.’” Sometimes he has to redo the same shot over and over and over until he gets it right. Guzman notes that he still handles more local walkins than mail-in orders. But he does get some people who have seen his TikTok videos, or their kids told them about his following. “If kids are seeing my stuff, and they tell their friends or their parents, it helps me a lot,” he says. Dr. Jenna Drenten, acting chair of the marketing department at Loyola University Chicago, points out that the TikTok algorithm revolves around your location. “It’s increasingly geographically based, which is one of the reasons small businesses have really benefited,” she says. “So if you’re someone in Santa Barbara, you’re going to see different content than somebody in Chicago.” Guzman recalls the time a couple came in from Oxnard. They thought their phone wasn’t repairable, then they ended up seeing GadgetFix on TikTok. So they decided to take the 45-minute drive to Santa Barbara — lo and behold, “another day, another gadget fixed.” Naturally, he has a TikTok video about that. “It’s just mind-boggling to me, because there’s a lot of [phone repair] shops everywhere,” he says. “I mean, even in town, right now, we have five, six different shops.” 

by Caitlin Kelley

he average Instagram post is worth a million binary digits. And sometimes that feels like the amount of figures influencers are making. But it’s not just the Addison Raes and Kylie Jenners of the world making a buck on the web. Accounts big and small have found ways to parlay their online reach into real-world success. Yes, there are the fabled sponsorships, where brands pay users to post #ads. But local entrepreneurs are also using social media as a means to bolster their sales through community building. We spoke to three content creators raised in Santa Barbara about how they transform follow counts into dollar signs.

VITAKARI, ARTIST AND OWNER

OF VITAWOOD STUDIO

VARNELL DAYE

ERICK MADRID

It’s not like he was chasing the CleanTok wave, though. The selfdescribed “germaphobe” is so organized, he’s got a whole labeling system for spare parts above his workstation. He doesn’t even charge clients for the sanitizing service: “I kind of just do that because I’m a neat person,” he says. “If you talk to my fiancée, she’ll tell you that everything in my house has to be organized.” The gadget fixer observes that once you hit a certain threshold, engagement becomes a snowball effect. For Guzman, his account gradually built up 400,000 followers over nearly two years. This latest spike in interactions landed him another 250,000 — in one week.

C AITLIN KELLEY

COVER STORY

Followers: 49,000+ on TikTok, 17,000 on Instagram S.B. Connection: Grew up in Santa Barbara, now lives in Los Angeles

On TikTok becoming the hub of her online business: I had a following on Instagram for my music and some of my visual art, and then on TikTok, I NO FILTER: Vitakari with her green explored visual art and monster sculpture at her studio, posted a lot about creVitawood ating the studio and the meaning behind my work, which was inspired by mental health. It kind of blew up on TikTok, to be honest. So now even though I’ve been doing IG for years and years, my platform on TikTok is three times as big at this point. How TikTok affects studio bookings: Pretty much everybody is coming from TikTok. I do get larger-scale bookings from Instagram, like more serious clients. But in terms of my day-to-day people that want to do a photo shoot or video, definitely TikTok. On sponsorships: I’ve definitely been approached to do a couple of sponsored posts on TikTok. I’m very selective with what I do, because I’m blessed that, financially, the studio is carrying me right now. But yes, I’ve definitely had different brands reach out to me for a TikTok video, including an Instagram video or a grid post versus a Story post. On pricing: It kind of depends. Sometimes if it’s just a small artist trying to make stuff happen, I’ll just do it for free. But if it’s a brand and they want a grid post [on Instagram], I’ll charge a rack [a k a $1,000] for that. If it’s a really big company, I would charge closer to $2,500. On TikTok, I haven’t said yes to a sponsorship, but I would assume it would be similar pricing.

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COURTESY PHOTOS

ALL IN FAMILY: Grecia Pizano and Ricardo “Richy” Gonzalez with their children

La Familia Fresa D Lu’s Strawberries Feels the Love espite my on-again, off-again relationship

with Instagram, something that always brings me joy is seeing people on the app starting their own businesses, pursuing their niche passions, trying new things, taking chances on themselves. While social media has a way of unveiling feelings of one’s own inadequacies, on the flip side, I often find myself inspired by those who use the platform to create a loving community. Grecia Pizano and Ricardo “Richy” XXX.XXX.XXXX XXXXX Xxxxxxxx Xx Gonzalez, the couple behind Lu’s Xxxxxxx XX, XXXXX Strawberries, have achieved exactly that. As you might have guessed, their small business, named after their eldest daughter, Lucianna, specializes in the most original and ornately decorated fresas (strawberries) you will find on with withAlonso AlonsoBenavides, Benavides,ph.d. ph.d. the Central Coast. For the time being, their business is conducted solely via 6 - juneor26,Online 2020 In april our Office Instagram. Day and 27 Evening Classes 17 September to December Grecia first began this ven12 sessions $350 and Saturdays 24 sessions $700 One Hour/Week for ture by promoting herself on the Our method calls for small groups (6 maximum) CONVERSATIONAL Private $275 $90 hr. and conversation as soon as it is possible 12 weeks: “UCSB Buy-Sell-Trade” page on Special semester package: SPANISH Two12Hours/Week for$980 one-hour sessions Facebook. After their first big Join us,Details: have fun and find 12 weeks: $550 sale on Father’s Day of last year SPANISH LANGUAGE out how spontaneous spanishschoolsbca.com is when they made the jump to Instagram Private one-on-one INSITUTE SIGLO 21 communication is more at the recommendation of those first clients, and that $80 per hour efficient and effective than Santa Barbara is when business began to blast off. Having recently canned dialogue or Special package for partnered with the popular local foodie account recorded conversations. 12 sessions: $900 @sbgoodeats for a giveaway in celebration of hitting 3.5k Instagram followers, Lu’s is now slowly SIGLO XXI approaching 4,000. However, they speak with just www.sigloxxispanish.com SPANISH LANGUAGE INSITUTE

Learn Learnto to

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24

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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by Celina García

as much excitement recalling when they reached their first 100. Richy likens the process of engaging with their customers via social media in search of new flavors, designs, and textures to working with a tattoo artist to create something personal. They often use the polls feature or simply make a post on their “Stories” asking their followers if they have any requests or cravings to satisfy their sweet tooth. Their “Highlights” section is filled with testimonials and pictures of happy customers, excited to show off their custom orders, and a list of toppings to choose from that is sure to make your mouth water. Fan favorites include their matcha flavor, Fruity Pebbles (which you must try with their fresas con crema!), and De la Rosa candy. If you scroll through their Instagram timeline, you will see designs ranging from Fortnite to Barney, the Pride flag, the Powerpuff Girls, Hello Kitty, 4/20, Baby Yoda, Sailor Moon, Snoop Dogg — you name it! There is nothing Grecia

Cont'd on p. 27


Making Bank

The Wood Brothers with special guest Kat Wright

on Social Media

Tue, Oct 12 / 8 PM Granada Theatre

Cont'd from p. 23

BARBARA MARTINEZ-RIOS,

Followers: 1,200+ on Instagram S.B. Connection: Family moved here when she was 6.

CHER MARTINEZ

JEWELRY DESIGNER AT AHAPPYMUSH

How her collaboration with Olipop, a major soda brand, happened: I tagged their product in one of my stories because of the packaging, and they contacted me about working together. We LIME SODA: Barbara Martinez-Rios worked out a collab in which they in a sponsored post for Olipop Soda would send me their drinks and I’d create rings inspired by their packaging. It was a really amazing project to be part of since I had just started my jewelry business. I had full creative control, and I genuinely loved their brand. I asked my sister Cher, who is a professional photographer, if she could take the photos, and they ended up buying four of them at around $150 each!

She & Him A Very She & Him Christmas Party Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre

Any fave collab experiences? I think my top three have been with Mejuri, WyldeOne, and Olipop because I’ve felt the most in control in terms of full creativity, and the people I was in contact with really took the time to interact with me as me, and not just another content creator.

Usher in the holiday season with the “old-school studiopop sensibility” (NPR) of M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

How do you make sales with AHAPPYMUSH? At the moment, I mostly sell online, more specifically through IG. However, I am starting to get more involved in local markets and pop-ups whenever the opportunity is there. It’s still kinda new to me, but they’re so much fun that I’m trying to apply to as many as I can find.

ELYSIA GUILLÉN, VINTAGE RESELLER

S.B. Connection: Born and raised in Santa Barbara.

JULIA CROWSON

AND OWNER OF LA SEGUNDA GOODS, COFOUNDER OF MUJERES MAKERS MARKET Followers: 3,400+ on Instagram

Dubbed “masters of soulful folk” (Paste), The Wood Brothers are celebrated for their freewheeling musical experimentation, fluid sound and the unparalleled energy of their live performances.

My Bluegrass Heart Béla Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Bryan Sutton featuring music from Béla Fleck’s new album My Bluegrass Heart

Selling in-person versus online: On my Instagram, I do a Story sale at least once a month. But my focus is more on the markets. Of course, if things close back down, I would have more time and energy to just focus on Instagram.

Wed, Dec 15 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre

BASKET LADY: Elysia Guillén On curating the online aesthetic curates La Segunda Goods with of La Segunda: People know me earthy tones. as the “basket lady.” I love baskets. I’m very into earth-tone colors, and I like ceramics, brass — anything you can find in my home you’re going to find in my shop. Everything is very curated. The prices reflect that because I’m taking my time. Sometimes I have to clean and restore stuff.

On her Instagram Story takeover for popular home design blog Apartment Therapy: That was probably, like, the first one that I had where they actually paid me. … They reached out to me. And then they said they wanted some videos of what I do as a curator. So I just got in little stories. n

Media Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

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Welcome Back, Cardinals! It’s going to be a great year!

Find Your Strength, Make Your Mark #DiscoverBishopDiego

JOIN US! P DIEG SHO O BI

Visit our website for a full list of admissions events and to RSVP!

www.bishopdiego.org • 805-967-1266

C

OPEN HOUSE October 17 ~ 12-2 p.m.

AR

DINAL

S

Admissions Information & Middle School Science Night September 27 ~ 5:30 p.m.

At Bishop, we believe you should never have to choose between a quality education for your children and making ends meet. 65% of our families receive some level of tuition assistance. Learn more about our Personalized Tuition Model on our website.

I Feel So Alone in My Anxiety September 25 @ 9:00 am - 2:00 pm This workshop provides a look at the journey of anxiety through the eyes of someone who has it and has been diagnosed with a panic disorder. The workshop will give you a chance to not only hear my story but share yours (if you wish) and hear others stories.

Featured Speakers:

Kirsty Kenny, AMFT & Holly Rushing, Yoga Instructor

Join our Virtual Workshop 805-721-6540 thejourneytowellnessworkshops@gmail.com www.thejourneytowellnessworkshops.com 26

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COVER STORY

Open THIS Thursday

Lu's Strawberries

Planned Parenthood California Central Coast

Cont'd from p. 24

can’t create; her strawberry artistry is simply unmatched. After our conversation, I spent the next several hours ruminating over something Grecia had said about working in the service industry versus being self-employed and promoting her work via social media. She mentioned that while working for a restaurant, hotel, or other business, you may sometimes encounter people who “don’t expect anything from you beyond being in service to them.” In contrast, the tremendous amount of love and support she has received from her online following has been an overwhelmingly positive experience. Thanks to their online community, “People see me, and not just what we can do for them,” Grecia explains. “It’s amazing when people tell us that we make their day better. They inspire me to keep going.” “With social media,” Richy agrees, “the great thing is that we are able to connect with them in an instant. Through tagging us, or sharing our content, it really brings a smile to our faces. It means so much that we’ve become a part of their special occasions.”  Instagram has also allowed them to network with other community members who share similar aspirations, from the father-son duo behind The Bagel Boiz to Tommy Chang of Kin Bakeshop (formerly known as Mōr Doughnuts), who kindly brought them dinner when their younger daughter, Valentina, was having surgery. Additionally, Chang even lent

them his coolers and an umbrella when they attended their first Mujeres Makers Market. If it weren’t for his generosity, they wouldn’t have made much of a profit that day. “The people we’ve met along the way are incredible,” Richy says. Grecia nods. “We really have so much love for each other.” During our discussion, I shared a recent article on a Santa Barbara website about 27 restaurants opening in the area in 2021. It was noticeable to me that very few of them were owned by people of color. “Not everybody has those kinds of resources or opportunities,” Grecia says, “but everyone deserves a chance.” The couple hopes to one day transition their family operation from the digital landscape to operating their own shop, where customers may come in and select their own strawberry toppings. In the meantime, they are looking forward to participating in future pop-ups and Makers Markets around town and meeting their virtual clientele face-to-face. “To think that just a little over a year ago I was ready to quit, but thanks to him I didn’t,” Grecia says, giving Richy a little smile. “In the beginning it was only me, but now we are a real team.”

To learn more about creating a custom order of decorated strawberries, check out @Lus. Strawberries on Instagram. Do yourself a favor and scroll through their feed for endless, delicious inspiration.

GadgetFix Cont'd from p. 23 has, I don’t pay for it.” He notes that even his first-ever video got a lot of attention—a sign that the platform works to burst its users’ social media bubbles. It’s an observation backed by the experts who study digital marketing. “TikTok is very unique because of its ability to foster discoverability,” Dr. Drenten says. “It curates by what’s called ‘collaborative filtering,’ where it figures out who likes similar stuff as you do.” The marketing professor adds that the platform works like Spotify in the sense that it makes recommendations based on what other people have liked and what you have previously been interested in. While other social media sites curate content based on what you follow, TikTok’s algorithm learns your interests based on your time spent watching content. Obviously, striking algorithmic gold

depends on a variety of factors, including how you package your product. “There’s a lot of TikTokers out there that are bakers, and they’ll show the process of baking a muffin,” Guzman says. “A lot of people like watching how-tos, so I think businesses will gain a lot of exposure for their brand.” Dr. Drenten notes that how-to content is extremely effective for small businesses. “It gives us this look behind the scenes as consumers that we don’t normally have access to,” she says. “It allows us to see not just the product that’s been marketed but how the product comes to be.” Turns out the secret sauce to TikTok fame … is revealing the secret sauce to your work.

Get your gadget fixed at 1934 De la Vina Street, or send a mail-in via gadgetfixsb .com. Follow GadgetFix on TikTok @gadgetfixsb.

Opening Night

Thursday, September 16 from 4 - 9 pm Celebration at 6pm with a DJ and silent auction $25 admission (opening night only)

DAYS AND HOURS (FREE) 9/17

FRI

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

SEPT.

16-22

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COURTESY

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

COURTESY

zaca-creek.com/the-tavern-2

9/17-9/22: 2021 You Light the Night Virtual 5K Register to run, walk, swim, paddle, or roll five kilometers (3.1 miles) in the location of your choosing through September 26 and bring awareness to the one billion people living in darkness around the world every day. A light or charger will be donated for every $10 and $30 raised. Registration: $15.

9/18:

Visitors can use the online Farm Day Trail Map to build a custom itinerary to navigate between growers and curated tour routes throughout the Santa Maria Valley. Take in a day of agricultural activities, farm tours, and giveaways, and meet the local farmers! Visit the website for a list of participating farms. 10am-3pm. Free. Call (805) 901-0213 or email info@seeag.org. santabarbaracountyfarmday.com

tinyurl.com/Unite2Light

9/17: Evenings at Elings: Don Carlos, Cornerstone Reggae

9/16:

Webinar: Water Solutions: The Charles E. Meyer Desalination Plant The S.B. Maritime Museum will present Malcolm Hamilton and Gaylen Fair in a discussion about the City of S.B.’s water supply and a history of the desalination plant from initial construction through to the recent reactivation of the plant. 7-8:30pm. Free. Call (805) 962-8404 or email info@sbmm.org.

Stone. 7pm. $46-$76. Wed.: The Lumineers. 7:30pm. $45$105. 1122 N. Milpas St. Call (805) 962-7411.

sbbowl.com/concerts

THURSDAY 9/16

9/16-9/22: The Mary Jane McCord Planned Parenthood Book Sale Visit the largest used-book sale in the tri counties and a Planned Parenthood fundraiser with books in categories such as children’s, young adult, cookbooks, literature, and more. Opening night will offer access to books before the general public and music provided by DJ Darla Bea. The sale runs through September 26. Opening Reception: Thu., 4-9pm; $25. Fri.Sat.: 10am-8pm; Sun., Tue.- Wed.: noon-6pm; Mon.: noon-8pm. Warren Hall, Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free. Call (805) 722-1517.

great and lead vocalist for Black Uhuru (1989-1994) Don Carlos will headline this performance at 8pm with S.B.’s Cornerstone and DJ Marco opening the show. Bring food, lawn chairs, and blankets. There will be food and drink for purchase. This show benefits the Elings Park Foundation. 4:30-10pm. Elings Park, 1298 Las Positas Rd. GA: Free$35; $45/door; $10/parking. Call (805) 448-7070. eveningsatelings.com

5-7pm. AFSB Gallery, 229 E. Victoria St. Free. Call (805) 965-6307.

afsb.org/programs/art-gallery

SATURDAY 9/18 9/18: Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Enjoy free entry for two to the S.B. Maritime Museum. Register online to receive a ticket link. 10am-3pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free. Call (805) 962-8404 or email info@sbmm.org.

9/17-9/22: The Architectural Foundation of S.B. Opening Reception: Local Treasures This exhibition honors the

extraordinary quality, diversity, and vital9/16: S.B. Thursday Night Comedy Get out and ity of 30 artists who have exhibited at the

have a laugh every Thursday with stand-up comedians who perform their newtinyurl.com/WaterSolutionsWebinar est material. 7:30-9:30pm. Admission includes one drink. 7:30-9:30pm. The Backstage Comedy Club, 519 State St. $15/in advance; $20/door. Ages 21+. Call (805) 931-6676.

santabarbaracomedynights.com

FRIDAY 9/17 9/17-9/18: Bourbon Heritage Month Taste your way through a series of fantastic bourbons. Fri.: Barrel Stave tasting & Zaca Maker’s tasting seminar and dinner at the Tavern; Sat.: Kentucky Bluegrass

tinyurl.com/FreeSBMMday

AFSB Gallery during the past seven years. The exhibition runs through November 11.

tinyurl.com/BeerSteinWorkshop 9/18: The Good Good Show Enjoy craft beers while yukking it up at this month’s show, which will feature Justin Elliott, Dave Gates, Robby Hoffman, Maggie Hyde, Brian Moses, Joe Praino, and Julie Weidmann. 7:30-9:30pm. Night Lizard Brewing Co., 607 State St. $10. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/GGS18Sep

luncheon will raise funds for New House, which has been serving the S.B. community for more than 66 years by providing a safe and sober environment for men with alcohol and other drug problems. Celebrate volunteer John Cordero for 25 years of service. 11:30am-1:30pm. Hilton S.B. Beachfront Resort, 633 E Cabrillo Blvd. $100. Call (805) 563-9647 or email gordon.guy@sbnewhouse.org.

9/17:

the sound of gongs, bells, and crystal/Himalayan singing bowls in this meditation guided by sound. Bring blankets, a yoga mat, beach chairs, or pillows. 6-7pm. Kineci Health and Movement Center, 22 W. Mission St. $25. Call (805) 284-9449.

tinyurl.com/HeartNewHouse

9/18: Isla Vista Summer Outdoor Concert Series Come see bands Nick

tinyurl.com/AsuraSound

Vaughan, Happy Medium, and Pretty Cheeky each play a 45-minute set. Bring food and drink (no alcohol or glass containers). 3-7pm. Anisq’Oyo’ Park, 950 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista. Free. Call (805) 968-2017. ivparks.org

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Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event.

Clay, glazing, and firing included. 1-4pm. Clay Studio, 1351 Holiday Hill Rd., Goleta. $85. Call (805) 565-2529 or email info@ claystudiosb.org.

9/18: 5th Annual Heart of New House Luncheon This

Meditation with Sound with Asura Enjoy

9/18: Beer Stein Workshop and Home-Brew Demo Use handCOURTESY

9/16-9/19, 9/22: S.B. Bowl Concerts Thu.: John Legend, The War and Treaty. 7pm. $55-$145. Fri.: Haim. 7pm. $45-$105. Sat.: Trevor Noah. 7:30pm. $41-$141. Sun.: Gary Clark Jr., Allen

3rd Annual Santa Barbara County Farm Day

COURTESY

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

Cocktail Hour at the eco-lagoon at The Falls. Seminar: 6-7pm; dinner: 7pm. $95-$125. Zaca Creek, 1297 Jonata Park Rd., Buellton. Ages 21+. Call (805) 688-2412 or email info@ zaca-creek.com.

building techniques to create your own classic beer stein. Area home-brew expert Shane Redman will demonstrate the brewing and fermentation process.

Volunteer Opportunity INDEPENDENT.COM

9/18: Coastal Cleanup Day Become part of the solution to ocean pollution! Visit the website for the more than 27 cleanup sites across S.B. County. Each site will have a Site Captain who will provide instructions and supplies. Bring your own reusable gloves, bags or buckets, and water bottles. 9am-noon. Free. tinyurl.com/CleanupCoast

9/18-9/22: Creek Week This annual opportunity is for community members to learn more about area creeks, watersheds,

Fundraiser

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

Cont'd on pg. 30 ∞

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9/21:

Chaucer’s Virtual Chat with Author and Artist Jaime Cortez Join author Jaime Cortez,

COURTESY

author of Gordo, a collection of short stories about a young, probably gay boy named Gordo set in a migrant workers’ camp near Watsonville, California, in the 1970s that redefines what it means to be all-American. 7pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@ chaucersbooks.com. tinyurl.com/JaimeCortez

sbcreekweek.com

SUNDAY 9/19 9/19: September Food Drive Drop off canned and other nonperishable goods at this pandemic-safe drivethrough to support community families facing food insecurity. All donations will be given to the Foodbank of S.B. County. 3-5pm. Waypoint Church S.B., 3942 La Colina Rd. Free. Email tarikburton9@gmail.com.

waypointsb.com/events

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Micheltorena & Mesa Locations

9/19: Fall Equinox: Medicine Wheel/Mayan Fire Ceremony

2018

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winner

e Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Fre Mesa Locations) (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena &

DAILY $899 LUNCH

SPECIALS 2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863 626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028

and diver Frauke Bagusche for a discussion of her book, The Blue Wonder: Why the Sea Glows, Fish Sing, and Other Astonishing Insights from the Ocean, an intimate account of the beauty, mystery, and amazing science of the ocean. Noon. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com.

tinyurl.com/TheBlueWonder

EVERY DAY!

$

9/19: Chaucer’s Virtual Book Chat: Frauke Bagusche Join marine biologist

Authority on Mayan astrology Abby Isadora Haydon will start with Native American smudging with sage and then facilitate this Medicine Wheel ceremony and end by thanking the guides, angels, and beings of light for their presence. 12:30-1:30pm. Center of the Heart, 487 N. Turnpike Rd., Goleta. Free. Call (928) 451-0890.

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

9/21: Santa Barbara Ski & Sport Club Kickoff Event Join the S.B. Ski & Sports Club, then sign up for this winter’s week-long and weekend trips as well as year-round sports and social activities. 7:30-9:30pm. Chase Palm Park Ctr., 236 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Free.

tinyurl.com/SBSkiClub

WEDNESDAY 9/22 9/22: Family-to-Family Virtual Education Program This eight-session education program on Wednesdays is for family members of adults living with a mental-health disorder and is designed to help family members understand and support their loved one while maintaining their own well-being. Sessions go until November 10. 7pm. Free. Call (805) 8848440 x3206 or email sarah@wavecommsb .com. namisantabarbara.org

9/22: Artist Talk: Remedy Hear from artists in this collective and self-curated exhibition that encompasses a variety of disciples that features S.B. artists. The exhibit will show through September 29. Call for reservations. SBCAW, 631 Garden St. 6pm. Free. Call (805) 324-7443 or email hello@sbcaw.org.

sbcaw.org/upcoming

tinyurl.com/EquinoxMedicineWheel

MONDAY 9/20 9/20: SBCC Music Presents Monday Madness Jazz Orchestra Come listen to a special concert of live jazz provided by the talented musicians from SBCC. Visit the website to make dinner reservations (additional cost). Doors: 6pm; show: 7pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15.

tinyurl.com/JazzMadness

6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806

30

TUESDAY 9/21

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9/22:

Virtual: 9th Annual Heroes of S.B. — The Magic of Caring Join Hospice of S.B to honor local community heroes with keynote speaker and #1 New York Times bestselling author Elizabeth Gilbert. The program will include honorees, an online auction, and more, all to raise funds for Hospice of S.B. 6pm. $50. hospiceofsb.org/heroes

9/21:

S.B. Revels Presents Revels Equinox: A Concert in Celebration of the Changing Seasons This

al fresco evening will draw its selections from three centuries of Spanish and Mexican music of the New World from a diverse ensemble of special musical artists with a discussion led by Luis Moreno, a noted specialist in the music of Early California. Reception: 6pm; lecture: 6:30pm; concert: 7pm. Sola Patio, The University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara St. $30-$35. Call (805) 364-4630 or email info@santabarbara revels.org.

santabarbararevels.org

COURTESY

and the ocean through a series of fun and educational events. Visit the website for a full schedule. Creek Week goes through September 25. Various locations. Free.


16

CHARLES LLOYD QUARTET

with Gerald Clayton (piano) Rueben Rogers (bass) Justin Brown (drums)

mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com

9/18: EOS Lounge Mary Droppinz,

Visit Lobero.org or 805.963.0761

Justin Martin. 4-10pm. 500 Anacapa St. $15. Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410.

9/17: Pali Wine Co. Live music.

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

eoslounge.com

6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1.

Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254. tinyurl.com/PaliSep17 9/18: Andrew Murray Vineyards Nataly Lola. Noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen

@sbindependent

9/18-9/19: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Jim Rankin. Sun.: Tom Ball and

FACEBOOK

tinyurl.com/AndrewMurrayMusic

Brandon Henegar, 1-4pm; About Time, 5-8pm; Jimi Nelson Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sun.: Dewey Roberts, noon-4pm. Wed.: Tales from the Tavern presents Sarah Lee Guthrie, 7:30-9:30pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

NEA Jazz Master, Charles Lloyd, now in his eighth decade, has never sounded better. The depth of his sound reflects a lifetime of experience. His concerts and recordings are events of pristine beauty and elegance, full of intensely felt emotion and passion that touches deep inside the heart.

@loberotheatre

The Bentson Foundation John C. Mithun Foundation

9/19: Island Brewing Co. Cyrus Clarke. Noon-3pm. Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

@sbindynews

Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 686-9604.

TWITTER

9/17-9/19, 9/22: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Sam Mitchell, 5-8pm; Different Strings, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.:

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Sarah Lee Guthrie

LIKE US ON

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SAT OCT

tinyurl.com/IslandBrewingCo

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

@sbindependent

FOLLOW US ON

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org •

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

STAY CONNECTED

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

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Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

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My Life

MICKEY FLACKS JOURNALISM FUND FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE A fund that directly supports the Santa Barbara Independent’s coverage of social justice and environmental issues. In 2020, the Mickey Flacks Fund supported the in-depth coverage of the Lompoc Prison COVID Outbreak, the Force Files, a look into police use-of-force incidents, and many other issues. To make a contribution visit sbcan.org/journalism_fund To read articles supported by the Flacks Fund go to independent.com/ mickeyflacks

COURTESY PHOTOS

Introducing the

I Ran Every Street in Santa Barbara

O

n May 16, 2020, I was out on my usual run through San Marcos Foothill Preserve. I was running west on Foothill Road when, rather than head home, I took a left turn down La Cumbre. Thus began my journey to run every single street in Santa Barbara. Now, more than a year and 498.74 miles later, I am finally finished. My last run was on September 5, which also happens to be my 42nd birthday. It was a typical foggy Santa Barbara morning. Me and a few of my friends, who have been following my journey on Instagram, set out along Cabrillo Boulevard and ended at the Bird Refuge. I’d spent the last 16 months running almost exclusively alone, and as I drifted between my runner friends, chatting about life and school start-

My Feet Have Carried Me Through Addiction Recovery and the Death of My Son by Emily Henderson

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

ing, it felt correct to be ending this project with community. What began as a way to steal some time for myself during lockdown became a source of healing and connection to my city that I never would have experienced had I not seen every bit of it. I began this series by saying running is like sweaty meditation. I lace up my shoes and listen to my feet pound the road, and by the time I get home, I have some clarity on whatever problem I was facing. When in doubt, I always follow my feet. Two years ago, our 17-month-old son, Aiden, was diagnosed with brain cancer, and four months later, he died from complications during surgery. For us, the pandemic was the most normal part of the last two years. My COVID project to run every street was as much about filling time during lockdown as it was about processing my grief. This isn’t the first time I’ve used running to get me through a difficult time. In 2008, I woke up hungover for the last time. A few days later, shaking and filled with anxiety, I signed up to run a marathon. I trained for four months. I went to meetings and tried not to drink. The week before the race, I had swelling and pain in the top of my left foot. I figured it was broken, but I also knew I wouldn’t drop out of the race, so I didn’t tell anybody. At mile seven of the 26.2-mile race, I felt the small bones in the top of my foot clicking. I kept running anyway. Marathons are supposed to hurt. What’s one

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more thing? When you’re running down a closed freeway in the middle of San Diego, the fastest way home is through the finish line. Once, I told this story in a recovery meeting, and the room roared with laughter. I was confused. I thought I was telling a compelling story of perseverance and showing off what a badass I am. After the meeting, people told me to “keep coming back.” My marathon stunt put me in a walking boot for nine weeks. At the time, I was working as a server in two restaurants. The extra tips I got out of sympathy did not outweigh the annoyance of being stuck in that boot. Limping around, I came to understand that I ran that race on a broken foot not because I’m a badass, but because I’m an alcoholic. Humility is something that cannot be sought or chased or acquired; it is delivered. Whether you want it or not. It seems like forever and yesterday since my son died. That day was the worst day of my life, but it was still better than my best day drinking. That might be impossible to believe unless you are an alcoholic in recovery. It boils down to the profound gratitude for the ability to feel anything, whether it is the joy of the day my son was born or the incomprehensible pain on the day he died. You can’t feel one without the other. The pain is the privilege I hold for having known my son, for sheltering my older children through their grief, for holding my husband’s hand through ours.

Emily was joined by friends for the last leg of her journey.

I do my best to listen to my feet. I’ve learned that my heart is too big and my head is too scared to be reliable, but my feet always know what to do. My feet have run me up mountains; they’ve walked me into recovery meetings; they carried me out of the hospital when it was time to say goodbye to Aiden. And now, they have run me through every single street in Santa Barbara. Honestly, I’m a bit shocked I finished this project. I can’t think of a time when I set my sights on a long-term goal and actually completed it. It has me wondering what else I can do. Maybe write a book or run another marathon. I’ll have to wait to hear what my feet have to say. n


Nature

living

Red-necked phalaropes have been plentiful recently at the Andrée Clark Bird Refuge.

For Birds and Birders, Fall Is Here

F

all migration is a huge event for birds and birders alike. For the myriad young of neotropical migrants, the season marks their first migration, which for some is a southward journey of many thousands of miles for which they’ve received no guidance save the information in their genes. September and October gives us the opportunity to see many species unknown to our area at other times of the year. Unsurprisingly, some of these firsttime travelers get lost, and it is these birds that often spark excitement for birders in coastal California. Fall is often the only time we get to see rare eastern North American birds, known as vagrants, that have taken a wrong turn in their migration. Why would the coast attract more than its fair share of these wayward birds? The theory goes that these nocturnal migrants, whose compasses have somehow failed them, head west instead of south and find themselves over the open ocean as dawn arrives. Tired and hungry, they turn around in search of the first point of land. This theory is borne out by observations from boats that are often circled by land birds; these birds will frequently come aboard. Recently, a birding boat that was far offshore in Santa Barbara County had a black-throated green warbler, a vagrant from the east, land on the deck to the delight of the passengers, whose main focus was on finding seabirds. As of the time of writing, land-bird migration has been pretty slow in the county. To make up for it, shorebird migration has been quite good. Shore-

Pectoral sandpiper, a scare migrant at the Andrée Clark Bird Refuge

birds tend to migrate earlier than land birds. One of the best spots in recent weeks for observing these travelers has been the Andrée Clark Bird Refuge. Because of the drought, the water level has receded significantly, leaving areas of soft mud for shorebirds to probe for invertebrates.

Most of these birds breed in the Arctic and are stopping here for sustenance before continuing their migration south. The bulk of the shorebirds have been the western and least sandpipers, tiny birds colloquially known as “peeps.” Mixed among them have been a handful of semipalmated sandpipers, which have a more eastern distribution. Larger shorebirds at the refuge include pectoral and Baird’s sandpipers, greater and lesser yellowlegs, short- and long-billed dowitchers, and American avocets. One of the special treats this fall season has produced has been the large numbers of red-necked

Shorebird Migration Especially Rich This Year

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by Hugh Ranson, Member of the Santa Barbara Audubon Society phalaropes at freshwater sites along the coast. Usually these birds, which are adept swimmers, are found far out to sea; indeed, they winter in the tropical oceans. It is unknown why so many have been seen away from the usual ocean haunts. Phalaropes are known for spinning on the surface of the water; this stirs up the water and brings invertebrates to the surface. A couple of weeks ago, I counted more than 100 of these graceful birds swimming and spinning in loose groups in the brackish waters of the bird refuge. Red-necked phalaropes only have the red throat in the spring and summer months; they lose the color in the fall, but they are still very elegant in their gray, black, and white plumage. Phalaropes, of which there are three species, are unusual in that the sex roles are reversed. Females are larger and more brightly colored than the males. After she has laid her eggs on the shore of an Arctic pond, he incubates the eggs and takes care of the young while she will often find a new mate to raise a second brood. If you choose to go birding at the bird refuge, please watch your step. Recently, a woman walked out onto the mudflats and fell through the mud, up to her knees in the ooze below. Her husband and a birder couldn’t extricate her from the mud, so the Fire Department had to be called to get her out.  n

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ick Luckhurst appears to be Ted Lasso in reverse. Lasso, played by Jason Sudeikis in the fictional TV show, is an American mid-major college football coach who moves across the Atlantic to become coach of an English soccer team, even though he knows nothing about the international version of football. Luckhurst grew up playing soccer in England, came to the United States to attend college, and was recruited to play American football as a placekicker. The first time he practiced, he used the kneepad from his football pants as a kicking tee. “As little as [Lasso] knew about English football, it would be a good Bishop Diego senior Michael Luckhurst and his dad, Mick Luckhurst race to see if I knew less about American football than he did sochave been split by Luckhurst’s long attempt. In the cer,” Luckhurst said. Although he had a productive career as a kicker at right situation and with perfect execution by long Cal and with the NFL’s Atlanta Falcons, Luckhurst said snapper Marcus Chan and holder Hunter Boeddeker, he is still somewhat mystified by the complex formula- a Luckhurst milestone could happen. Incidentally, the state prep record for the longest tions of offense and defense in a game broken up by field goal is 64 yards, set by Erik Affholter of Oak Park numerous timeouts. High against visiting Carpinteria on October 16, 1982. Like Affholter, who was an outstanding receiver at USC, Michael Luckhurst is an exceptional athlete. He does not take to the air often, but when he does strike, it’s for big yardage — 242 yards on 10 completions, five going for touchdowns. In the winter season, Luckhurst plays soccer, which happens to be coached at Bishop Diego by his father. Despite his British accent, Mick Luckhurst seems more like Ted Lasso than a typical English coach. “I by John Zant believe in ‘Believe,’ ” says Lasso, who displays the word on a sign in the locker room. “I love the motivational things Lasso says,” coach But he does know how to attack a ball with a foot, Luckhurst said. “I try to remind the boys, in both socand he’s taught the skill to his three sons. For that, cer and football, that everything we do on the field is Bishop Diego High head football coach Tom Crawford relatively unimportant, but that in no way takes away from your competitiveness. Anybody who’s watched is grateful. For the past seven years, Crawford has not worried me knows I’m competitive, but as soon as the final about the kicking game, because the Luckhurst boys whistle’s gone, win or lose — what did we learn? What have been booming kickoffs, punts, conversion kicks, do we take from that? And we move on. “I’m a strong believer in attitude,” he added. “A and field goals. The two older boys are both at South Carolina — positive attitude goes a long way. The first thing I told Jack Luckhurst (2019 Bishop grad) a redshirt kicker the soccer team — you’ve got to have each other’s back. after transferring from Arizona State; Adam Luck- It’s not a matter of who’s the best or the worst player; hurst (2020) a sophomore forward on the soccer team. it’s your team. Walking around campus, have a great Michael Luckhurst has entered his senior year at attitude.” Michael Luckhurst said, “Ted Lasso reminds me of Bishop as the family’s most complete football player. He is the starting quarterback on a team that has Dad. At Bishop, we might not know the most about outscored its first three opponents, 133-17, and he has soccer or be the best at soccer, but we’re going to give it to them. We’ll play with the biggest hearts out there.” shown a powerful leg. Michael (63 and 179 pounds) enjoys roughing it Although he has yet to make a field goal as long as Jack’s 51-yarder or Adam’s 44-yarder, Michael up in both football and soccer. “Football is really physicame close from 60 yards in Bishop’s season opener cal maybe 10 times a game for a person,” he said, “but against Oxnard. He drove the ball high enough and soccer is physical 35 times. I don’t know which one I far enough, but it drifted wide of the left goalpost at like more, but I want to play football in college.” Bishop’s football team, ranked No. 26 in the CIF SBCC’s La Playa Stadium, where the Cardinals play Southern Section and No. 44 in California, is schedtheir home games. That’s significant, because the college posts are uled to host the Galena Grizzlies of Reno, Nevada, at 186 apart. High school posts have a width of 234 La Playa Stadium on Saturday, September 25, at 2 p.m. ■ — almost five extra feet of room that probably would

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The Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara (USSB) seeks a creative Music Director with strong musical and interpersonal skills who has experience with a broad range of musical talents and interests. The Music Director develops and implements a comprehensive music program for worship and other events in the life of USSB and the community. The ideal candidate will be creative, collaborative and experience joy in working with a socially-conscious and energetic congregation. USSB values a diverse workforce; people with disabilities, people of color, and those who identify as L/G/B/T/Q are strongly encouraged to apply. Apply by September 20, 2021. For more information visit: https://ussb.org/worship/music/ SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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FOOD&DRINK

CLAIRE HARTNELL PHOTOS

GS REOPENIN

Corazón Reboots Menu, Vibe at The Project

S

Santa Barbara Public Market in 2014 after a series of sold-out pop-ups inside of Three Pickles. In the summer of 2019, Velasquez teamed with Captain Fatty’s Brewery to open The Project between State Street and the Funk Zone, serving more upscale, sitdown-friendly Mexican dishes to both establishments. That worked well until COVID-19 showed up, and the half-year closure forced Velasquez to reconsider his menu. “This is more shared-plate, family-style,” general manager Louis Bristol explained of the scaled-back menu. “But we’re also trying to bring out more of what we grew up with, like black-eyed peas and heirloom corn and the ancho chicken we know from childhood barbecues. It’s more village-centric.”  The regional representations span from the seafood-rich regions of Nayarit and Sayulita to Chef Ramon Velasquez and Team Opt for the heavier spices of Oaxaca to the endless creativity of Mexico City, where so many global traShared Plates, ‘Village-Centric’ Cuisine ditions converge. “I am from Guadalajara, but I love Mexico City,” said Velasquez, who likes to BY MATT KETTMANN quote Anthony Bourdain’s comment that if Spain and New York City had a baby, it would be MexThese flourishes, equal parts visual, textural, and ico City. “You can eat at a Michelin-starred restaurant flavorful, are the hallmark of Chef Ramon Velasquez, and one block away are the best tacos in the world,” he the Guadalajara-born Santa Barbara High grad who explained.   was the first non-Japanese chef to work the sushi bar at At Corazón, those broad influences could be found Arigato. He stayed for nearly a decade before opening in my tuna tostada, topped with a Baja-inspired ponzo the Latin America–exploring restaurant Cielito in La and the ever-popular salsa macha, with nuts and chiles Arcada Plaza in 2012. Then came the Mexican-street- chopped up together; in the mashed avocado guacafood-focused Corazón Cocina, which opened in the mole, with a pistachio version of salsa macha as well as

p.36 zaa’tar; and in a standout mushroom quesadilla. I could barely see its bright-orange taco shell for all the blooming squash and white herb flowers on top, but once unearthed, it spilled forth shiitake, oyster, and maitake mushrooms as well as Oaxacan and tangy goat cheese, all tied together in a poblano crema. The clams y chorizo was equally extravagant, its tomato broth fired up by house-made chorizo and chunks of earthy nopales, its shellfish a mix of clams and Hope Ranch mussels. “That’s our Santa Barbara in a bowl,” said Bristol, as I slurped from the bowl after dusting the charcoal-charred Oat Bakery sourdough wedge. “For $25, we think it’s a steal.” The cocktails impressed as well. The Piña Picosa was, as advertised, a spicy pineapple-flavored mezcal drink, more acidic and refreshing than sweet, despite the sugared rim. The Fur de Lance paired the chili-flavored Ancho Reyes with gin, while the Mariposa, a mix of vodka, creme de cassis, and mint, showed that mouthfeel can play a major role in mixology. If beer is more your thing, head to Captain Fatty’s next door and sip on their suds while enjoying another menu from Velasquez, including birria grilled cheese with consommé, wild shrimp quesadillas, and The Project burger with homemade chorizo. And he’s not done with making menus. Opening soon on East Victoria Street will be his new Corazón Guisados, serving the single-pot stews preferred by the working class in large cities around Mexico. It’s in part a response to his accountant mentioning that Velasquez was making his food “too pretty” — “I think you’re right,” he agreed with a laugh. Whatever the reason, Corazón Guisados, which will also serve tamales and churros con chocolate, will bring the down-home style of his homeland to downtown Santa Barbara.

pindly sprouts reaching out like green and pur-

ple fronds from the jungle. Radish slices commanding attention toward their fluorescent hues of fuchsia and violet. Crushed nuts and toasted seeds promising a satisfying crunch. Flowers, so many tiny flowers, beckoning your camera lens as much as your fork. During a recent tour through the revamped menu at the Corazón location inside The Project — which was closed from December until late July due to the pandemic and its many challenges — every dish looked vibrant and alive, from the kampachi crudo swimming in a bright-green sauce of yuzu, jalapeño, and grapefruit to the banana-leaf-wrapped ocean trout, served atop a vividly yellow, aji-powered corn sauce.

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Ramon Velasquez

Across his menus, Velasquez is trying to serve the food that modern visitors to Mexico will encounter, not the rice-and-beans menus that dominate so many Mexican restaurants north of the border. “This really represents the Mexico we all know and love,” said Bristol. “It’s more of what’s inside Mexico and not so much of the Americanized Mexico.” Explained Velasquez, “It’s authentic to us.”

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GRAD TO GRAPES: Upon graduating from Carpinteria High in June, Mercy Torres will be studying wine and viticulture at Cal Poly, thanks to a scholarship from Delicato Family Wines. She toured the company’s Manteca facility earlier this year.

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years old, Mercy Torres is walking bravely into a life of wine, heading to study wine and viticulture at Cal Poly this week with the support of a full-ride scholarship aimed at BIPOC students. The Carpinteria native and Carp High grad— who grew to appreciate the culture of wine while working for the past two years at Corktree Cellars on Linden Avenue — is the first of two students to benefit from Delicato Family Wines’ Winemaker Scholarship Program. Nearly 100 students from across California applied for the four-year scholarship, which also comes with professional mentorship, summer internships, and post-graduate work for the Manteca-based wine company. “I thought I was too late — I got super stressed,” said Torres, who was told about the scholarship by Cal Poly’s financial aid office. “But I was able to get everything done. It was a lot of hard work, but obviously so rewarding and amazing. It’s like a big fat miracle.” The other scholarship winner is Ariana Godina, who grew up in Madera, participated in Future Farmers of America throughout high school, and will also be attending Cal Poly. “Coming from a family of Mexican immigrants, I am excited to break cycles in my family and push the expectations set for me,” she said.

The scholarship is one of many across the wine industry that came in the wake of 2020’s Black Lives Matter and related equity movements. The aim is to increase diversity in the wine business, which has historically been dominated by white men. “This scholarship program represents Delicato’s continued commitment to helping the next generation of leaders pursue their dreams,” said Delicato’s CEO Chris Indelicato. “We are excited to be a part of their BY MATT KETTMANN bright futures, and we look forward to the innovative contributions these students will make to our industry.” The next round of scholarship applications will open in February 2022. Torres is taking an unlikely path. “My parents are actually not wine drinkers or drinkers at all — both are dry,” she explained, but her work at Corktree revealed another perspective. “That’s where my interest developed. I began to appreciate people’s relationships and traditions with wine drinking.” As part of the application process, Torres visited the Delicato headquarters. “That was so cool to see their big facility in Manteca, and just being able to ask all kinds of questions and learn so many things in my short stay there,” said Torres. Her parents are supportive, though initially they figured this was just one of her many whims. “When I first applied for wine and viticulture, they thought it was funny,” she said. Their opinions changed when the scholarship got serious. “They both are Christians,” she said. “When I got the scholarship, they took it as a sign that this was what I was meant to be doing.” Torres is moving up to San Luis Obispo on September 14, with Cal Poly classes starting up the next week. “This is a clear pathway,” she said. “I’m super n thankful. It’s something to keep me going.”

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D

MARTIN SCHUMANN / WIKIMEDIA FOUNDATION

FUNK AND SOUL TOGETHER FOREVER

urand Jones & The Indications return to the Santa Barbara Bowl on Thursday, September 23, opening for My Morning Jacket. They’re on a 19-city tour supporting their new record, Private Space. Prior to their 2019 debut at the S.B. Bowl, they successfully sold out SOhO twice. The West Coast is a big part of the multiracial quintet’s nine-year history of touring the U.S. and other places throughout the world. This has manifested into the development of a commitSAY IT LOUD: Durand Jones & The Indications will open for My Mornted Chicano fan base in Southern California, ing Jacket at the S.B. Bowl on September 23. built on the 2018 hit “Is It Any Wonder?” The new album shows the band’s growth and This deliberate direction is found in the album’s maturity with a consciously groove-oriented set of second track, “Witchoo.” Its funky groove uses the tracks. It’s a clean departure from the classic soul band’s commitment toward producing their oldmusic that made school flavor, but this time, they put it all on the the band popu- dance floor. It works. lar. Private Space “It’s going to be interesting to see how people takes listeners will vibe to these new tunes. We’ve been all over the away from the world, and we’ve had our share of ups and downs, band’s earlier so this record is definitely more mature,” said lead kickback sound vocalist Durand Jones. into the vibes of a downtown nightclub. No doubt the band’s loyal following will be “So much of our crowd is also down with funk waiting. “We are definitely looking forward to being back music. Soul and funk are two sides of the same coin. I feel there is space within our Chicano fan base for on the West Coast. We love and appreciate our the direction we took,” said drummer and co-lead Chicano fan base very much,” said guitarist Blake Rhein. singer Aaron Frazer. —Mark Moses Alvarado

DURAND JONES & THE INDICATIONS AT THE SANTA BARBARA BOWL

I AM ANOTHER

O

ne of Santa Barbara’s not-so-hidden strengths as an arts community is the range and accomplishments of the young theater artists trained at UCSB, SBCC, and Westmont College. Westmont in particular, thanks to the leadership of professors John Blondell and Mitchell Thomas, has been home to a brand of contemporary performance that’s both avant-garde and grounded in the canon, global in its influences and local in its orientation. This weekend, September 16-19, one of the Westmont program’s most intriguing graduates, Diana Lynn Small, brings her latest play, Oh, Thank You, to the performance space at the Community Arts Workshop on Garden Street. As a playwright, Small’s star has risen steadily since she left the West Coast for a graduate degree from the prestigious Michener Center for Writers at the University of Texas, Austin. Frankly feminist in approach, her work explores the ways in which women’s lives are shaped by gendered expectations that often lie beneath the surface of seemingly mundane concerns and situations. In Oh, Thank You, Small puts three young women in a classic fight for survival. Lost in the woods, they must become new beings in order to save their lives. One character chooses to become a Woman, another selects the identity of an Animal,

38

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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JAMES HAPKE

DIANA LYNN SMALL’S OH, THANK YOU REIMAGINES COMING OF AGE

CASTAWAYS: Heather Johnson, Paige Tautz and Marie Ponce in Oh, Thank You

and the third takes on the role of a Sibyl. Redescribing the standard female coming-of-age experience as a choice, rather than a “natural” course of action, Oh, Thank You offers actors and the audience an opportunity to consider what lies outside the gendered roles women typically play, both onstage and in real life. The cast — Paige Tautz, Marie Ponce, and Heather Johnson — all have experience with the Lit Moon Theatre’s daring style of physical theater, so you can expect a dynamic production full of surprises. Artist James Hapke contributes the design of the piece. Performances are at 8 p.m., Thursday-Sunday, September 16-19. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit sbcaw.org. —Charles Donelan


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

OJAI MUSIC FESTIVAL REBOUNDS FROM PANDEMIC



The Arlington Theatre 

L I F E

   

U

nder present circumstances, the joy of hearing great live music outdoors compares favorably with almost anything, especially when that joy involves gathering with the contemporary classical music world’s foremost leaders in Ojai. This twice-postponed 75th edition of the august Ojai Music Festival promises to be a memorable one, as it unites music director John Adams, the greatest living American composer, with Rhiannon Giddens, the MacArthur Award–winning vocalist, banjo player, and pioneering music historian whose work excavating African-American contributions to country and bluegrass has changed HOME RUN: Rhiannon Giddens and Francisco Turrisi with perform music from the way that we think about AmeriThey’re Calling Me Home on Saturday, September 18, at the Libbey Bowl in Ojai. can music history. The festival begins with a “prelude” concert in Libbey Bowl at 9 p.m. on Thurs- Salonen and the West Coast premiere of Samuel day, September 16. The program begins with a work Adams’s Chamber Concerto. As with every Ojai Music Festival, the opportuniby Igor Stravinsky, who famously graced the Ojai stage in the early years of the festival, and leaps from ties for listening, learning, and discussion continue there into distinctly contemporary territory. Vio- nonstop throughout the weekend. Highlights include linists Miranda Cuckson and Amy Schroeder will a solo piano recital on Saturday at 10:30 a.m. by virbe joined by an all-star cohort for compositions by tuoso Víkingur Ólafsson; a Saturday-night concert festival composer-in-residence Gabriela Ortiz, Timo of music from Giddens and Francisco Turrisi’s most Andres, Carlos Simon, and Samuel Adams, the son recent album, They’re Calling Me Home; and a truly of festival music director John Adams. Friday’s per- stunning series of performances on Sunday stretchformances begin with Chumash stories told by elder ing from early in the morning until the finale at Julie Tumamait-Stenslie at 8 a.m., followed by an 11 5:30 p.m. with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra a.m. concert in Libbey Bowl featuring Rhiannon joining all the festival principals for works by John Giddens and the Attacca Quartet. On Friday night, Adams, Gabriela Ortiz, and Carlos Simon. For more John Adams conducts the Ojai Festival Orchestra in information and to arrange tickets, visit ojaifestival a spectacular program featuring work by Esa-Pekka .org. —CD ANDREW HENKELMAN / WIKIMEDIA FOUNDATION

FOR NAOMI OSAKA It doesn’t really matter if you can’t handle a lefty’s serve or miss an easy volley, if your topspin’s off, and your footwork’s slow, and you’re stranded, again, in no-man’s land, no, what counts is if you’re kind and contemplative and stand up for those who are suffering and weak, and you are, Naomi, and you do. —David Starkey

Naomi Osaka

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Metro 4 • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Sept 17 - 23, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

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Blue Bayou* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:15, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 2:30, 5:15, 8:00. The Eyes of Tammy Faye* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:50, 4:40, 7:30. The Card Counter (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45.

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Cry Macho* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:45, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30. Mon-Thur: 2:05, 4:55, 7:30. Copshop* (R): Fri-Sun: 2:05, 4:55, 7:30, 10:00. Mon-Thur: 3:00, 5:30, 8:05. Malignant (R): Fri-Sun: 1:55, 9:35. Mon-Wed: 2:45, 5:20. Thur: 2:45.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

(PG13): Fri: 2:15, 3:45, 5:15, 6:45, 8:15, 9:45. Sat/Sun: 12:45, 2:15, 3:45, 5:15, 6:45, 8:15, 9:45. Mon-Wed: 2:15, 3:45, 5:15, 6:45, 8:15. Thur: 2:15, 3:45, 5:15, 8:15. Candyman (R): Fri-Sun: 4:45, 7:20. Mon-Wed: 7:55. Thur: 5:20. Free Guy (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:25, 5:05, 7:45. Dear Evan Hansen* (PG13): Thur: 7:00, 8:30.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580 INDEPENDENT.COM

Cry Macho* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:00(LP), 4:30(LP), 7:00(LP), 9:30(LP). Mon-Thur: 2:45(LP), 5:15(LP), 7:45(LP). Copshop* (R): Fri-Sun: 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40. Mon-Thur: 3:05, 5:40, 8:15. Malignant (R): Fri-Sun: 4:45, 7:20. Mon-Thur: 3:15, 8:05. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings

(PG13): Fri, Sun: 3:00, 6:20, 9:20. Sat: 12:30, 3:25, 6:20, 9:20. Mon-Thur: 2:30, 5:30, 8:30. Candyman (R): Fri-Sun: 2:30, 9:55. Mon-Thur: 5:50.

F I E S TA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Blue Bayou* (R): Fri-Thur: 2:30, 4:50, 8:10. The Eyes of Tammy Faye* (R): Fri-Thur: 2:00, 5:15, 7:30. The Card Counter (R): Fri-Thur: 2:45, 5:25, 8:00. Free Guy (PG13): Fri-Wed: 2:20, 5:00, 7:40. Thur: 2:20, 5:00, 7:50. The Alpinist (PG13): Fri: 3:15, 5:35, 7:50. Dear Evan Hansen* (PG13): Fri: 7:40. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30.

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

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ARTS LIFE CONTINUED LUC SCROBILTGHEN

GEORGE

AND EDIE, A BALANCING ACT

M

any of you will remember the 14-foot stainless-steel sculpture that stood on the State Street steps of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art on and off beginning in 1999 and continuously from October 2007 until August 2017. It looked like an exploded palm tree constructed with parts from a jet aircraft. As the shining brushed-metal surfaces of its long, angular blades oscillated in the breeze, George Rickey’s “Six Random Lines Excentric III” radiated silent, Zen-like strength. At UCSB, in the space between the Art, Design & Architecture Museum and the lagoon, another large stainless-steel sculpture by Rickey, Annular “Eclipse VI,” is still on view. It moves with a similar smooth authority, its lofty steel circles intersecting and overlapping in graceful, uncanny patterns, throwing circular shadows on the scene below. These spare, abstract works of art do not, at least on first glance, offer much in the way of personal information about their creator. Yet for those who had the good fortune to know George Rickey and his wife, Edie, they evoke many

CHARISMATIC COUPLE LED INTERNATIONAL LIVES THAT TOUCHED MANY IN SANTA BARBARA by Charles Donelan great memories of this charismatic couple. As frequent guests of the Dole and Cavat families, the Rickeys spent a significant amount of time in Santa Barbara from the 1960s through the 1990s, forming friendships, creating art, and inspiring others to become artists. Now, thanks to Belinda Rathbone’s excellent new biography, George Rickey: A Life in Balance, and to an extensive two-part show in New York City organized by the Paul Kasmin Gallery, the rest of us have an unprecedented opportunity to learn more about this important and influential artist, and to appreciate the extraordinary international network that George and Edie Rickey cultivated. Despite its worldwide acceptance by museums, corporations, and municipalities, the kinetic-sculpture movement in modern art remains somewhat neglected, at least in comparison to other tendencies that sprang up alongside it, including abstract expressionism, pop, and minimalism. Steeped in the history of art and fluent in the theoretical discourses of cubism, constructivism, and the Bauhaus, George Rickey brought the mindset of an engineer to the task of creating a new form of sculpture. As a member of the team that created rotating gun turrets for the B-29 bomber during World War II, Rickey realized he had an aptitude for solving puzzles related to mechanical movement, but he only switched from painting to making sculpture after he met his second wife, Edith Leighton, in New York City following the war. Edie was 17 years younger than George, and, at six feet tall, was noticeably taller than her husband. With an outgo-

ing personality, a vivid imagination, and a bohemian sense of style, she contrasted sharply with her more logical and deliberate spouse, but it was the meshing of these opposites that would spark his career. From the beginning of their relationship, Edie took control over their domestic and social lives, cooking thousands of memorable meals, often with little in the way of kitchen equipment, and entertaining a wide range of acquaintances with delightfully daring repartee. Like many wives of artists in the 1950s and 1960s, Edie worked tirelessly to advance her husband’s reputation, making connections with dealers, collectors, and other artists and keeping the couple’s busy social calendar. George too made and kept many close friends, several of whom became faculty memCOLLABORATORS: George and Edie Rickey made an excellent team. bers at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He met the art historian Alfred in Berlin, where George flourished among a younger genMoir at Tulane when they were both teaching there, eration of European artists eager to explore the potential of and he met legendary UCSB professor of art William kinetic art. Intensely curious about the culture and history Dole even earlier when Dole was an undergraduate of Europe since his youth in Scotland, George had been at Olivet College, where Rickey had been his men- friends with Jean-Paul Sartre and had contributed to Sartre’s tor while serving as an artist in residence. The Dole family journal Les Temps Modernes when he was still in his thirties. would go on to become extraordinarily important in the Rickey’s piece for Sartre’s publication described the new way lives of both George and Edie, offering shelter and compan- of living based on the automobile then being established ionship and introducing them to the vibrant Santa Barbara in America and highlighted a distinctly Californian pheart scene of the 1960s and 1970s. nomenon, the four-leaf-clover highway interchange, as an In 1985, the painter Irma Cavat invited George and Edie example of revolutionary design. to live on her property in Hope Ranch. With the help of When Ala Story, the director of the Santa Barbara contractor Tom Bortolazzo, they converted a wing of Cavat’s Museum of Art from 1952 to 1957, met the Rickeys in 1970, home into their Santa Barbara “nest in the west,” a place that she was moved to organize a touring exhibition titled Conallowed them respite from the cold winters of East Cha- structivist Tendencies based on 84 works from their collectham, New York, their principal home. Tom’s brother Ken, tion. The couple had assembled these objects while George an aspiring sculptor in metal who was a lobster fisherman at was researching Constructivism: Origins and Evolution, the time, became one of George’s studio assistants, a gig that the book he published in 1967. One can only imagine the eventually led him to a successful career of his own. Three of excitement that this influx of cultural sophistication caused Ken Bortolazzo’s impressive kinetic sculptures are on view among similarly inclined Santa Barbara residents at that right now at Sullivan Goss. time. The attraction was clearly mutual, and also intergenIn September 1988, a contingent of Santa Barbarans flew erational, as Rickey’s son Stuart attended UCSB, where he east at Edie’s expense to work on a project involving the doc- studied filmmaking. Rathbone’s marvelously readable biography succeeds in umentation of her extensive collection of unique clothing and jewelry. Edie met Hilary Dole Klein; her mother, Kate bringing the Rickeys and the world in which they lived into Dole; and photographer Richard Ross at the East Chatham timely focus. Meticulously researched yet free of academic compound dressed in a peapod costume hand-painted for jargon, the book offers 21st-century readers a rare glimpse her by Karina Cavat Katchadorian, who, along with Santa into a moment and a movement that’s overdue for fuller Barbara artist Marge Dunlap, had decorated the building understanding and appreciation. With George Rickey’s Edie called her “maisonette.” work on display this month on Park Avenue and at the Paul Santa Barbara was just one of the far-flung locations in Kasmin Gallery in New York, the time is ripe for those of us which the Rickeys made an impact. Through a series of who have lived with his legacy here in Santa Barbara to learn grants from the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst more about the lives of George and Edie, and the balance (DAAD) program, they spent part of several crucial years between them, in life and in art. n

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 16

ARIES

Join us in reading September’s book of the month! SEPTEMBER’S THEME: BOOKS WRITTEN BY LATINX AUTHORS

DI S CU SS I O N :

Wednesday, October 6, 6pm Municipal Winemakers

BO O K O F T H E M O N T H :

Dominicana

by Angie Cruz

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): “Books are mirrors: You only see in them what you already have inside you,” wrote author Carlos Zafón Ruiz. Let’s take that a step further: “Other people are mirrors: You only see in them what you already have inside you.” And even further. “The whole world is a mirror: You only see in it what you already have inside you.” Have fun playing with these meditations, Aries. The coming weeks will be a fertile time to explore how thoroughly your experiences reflect the activity transpiring in your own brain.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): Some spiritual teachers say things like “I am not my body” or “This body is not me.” I don’t understand that. It’s an insult and disparagement. It’s dismissive of our bodies’ sublime beauty and our bodies’ inspired role in educating our souls. I agree that we are not ONLY our bodies. I agree that a part of us is eternal, not confined to flesh and blood. But hell yes, I am my body. You are your body. It’s a glorious aspect of who we are. It’s a miraculous creation that has taken millions of years to evolve into the masterpiece it is. So yes, you are your body, and yes, this body is you. I hope you love your body. Are in awe of it. Are pleased to be inside it. If anything is lacking in this department, now is an excellent time to make corrections.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): “I know someone who kisses the way a flower opens,” wrote poet Mary Oliver. I’d love for you Geminis to have that experience. The astrological omens suggest it’s more likely than usual to occur sometime soon. Other experiences with a better-than-average chance of unfolding in the coming days: allies who speak of intimate subjects in ways that resemble a flower opening; partners who co-create with you in ways that resemble a flower opening; spiritual helpers who offer guidance and help in ways that resemble a flower opening.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): “I lie to myself all the time, but I never believe me,” writes Cancerian author S.E. Hinton. Ha! As a Cancerian myself, I confess to the same crime. But I am looking forward to a shift in the coming weeks. I suspect we Crabs will be inspired to cut way back on the fibs we try to get away with. You know what that means, right? We’ll be more inclined to trust ourselves since we’ll be more likely to tell ourselves the truth. Our decisions will be shrewd, and our self-care will be rigorous. Hallelujah!

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): My object in this horoscope is to stimulate your imagination in ways nobody else in your life will. You need an influence like me, from outside your inner circle, to administer friendly, playful shocks to jolt you out of habitual ways of thinking. Here we go. (1) If you were to stow seven parts of your soul in seven objects, what objects would they be? (2) If you could change one thing about your past, what would it be? (3) If you were a character in a fairy tale or a movie, who would you be? (4) If you could travel to a place that would teach you what you most need to know, where would it be? (5) If you had a magical animal as your special ally, what animal would it be? (6) If you could sing a song with uncanny healing power for someone you care about, what song would it be? (7) If you could improve your relationship with some part of your body, what would it be?

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “There’s nothing wrong with reading a book you love over and over,” writes Virgo author Gail Carson Levine. Adding to that encouragement, I offer you the following authorizations: There’s nothing wrong with seeking a pleasure you love over and over; or doing a necessary task you love over and over; or performing an energizing ritual you love over and over; or expressing key truths you love over and over. And these permissions will be especially crucial for you to exult in during the coming weeks, dear Virgo: because it’s a time when mindful repetition will be one of your strengths and a key to stimulating the deepening experiences you need.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “If I’m a bitch and a fake, is there nobody who will love a bitch and a fake?” Libra author Graham Greene wrote that in his novel The End of the Affair. Here’s my extrapolation: I believe that every one of us, including me, is a bitch and a fake now and then. We all go through periods when we are not at our best, when we fail to live up to our own high standards. Is it possible that you have recently flirted with such a phase? If so, the cosmos has authorized me to absolve you. You are free to reclaim your full exquisite beauty. And if you haven’t been a bitch and a fake, congratulations. It means you have weathered a gnarly storm.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Poet Yves Olade writes, “I’ve started thinking of people as wounds that don’t heal.” To me, that idea is idiotically cynical. Moreover, I think it’s wrong for most of us. The truth is, humans have a natural instinct for healing. They are predisposed to attract experiences that might aid their recovery from difficulties — that might teach them the healing lessons they need. I believe this will be especially true for you in the coming weeks. (PS: Dr. Andrew Weil writes, “Any level of biological organization that we examine, from DNA up to the most complex body systems, shows the capacity for self-diagnosis, for removal of damaged structure, and for regeneration of new structure.”)

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Research suggests that most people think everyone else has more fun than they do. But I’m guessing that only a small percentage of Sagittarians feel that way. You tend to be extra alert for fun, and you have intuitive skill at tracking down fun. In addition, you often take the initiative to precipitate fun. You understand you have a responsibility to generate fun, and you have a talent for generating it. All these capacities will serve you well in the coming weeks. I recommend you raise your mastery of the art and science of having fun to a new level. Be the Champion of Fun and Games for your entire circle.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I’m not engaging in empty flattery when I say that you are unlike anyone else who has ever lived in the history of the world. Your absolute uniqueness is a fundamental fact. Maybe you don’t reflect on this truth very often. Perhaps you feel that it’s not helpful to think about or that it’s irrelevant to your daily decisionmaking. But I propose that in the next three weeks, you give it a central place in your understanding of your destiny. Allow it to influence everything you do. Make it a major factor in your decision-making.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Welcome back from the underworld, Aquarius. I hope your time wandering through the maze-like twilight brought you as many fascinating mysteries as confusing questions. I trust you took advantage of the smoky riddles and arresting dilemmas to fortify your soul’s wisdom. I suspect that although your travels may have at times seemed hard to fathom, they have provided you with a superb education that will serve you well in the immediate future.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): In Oscar Wilde’s novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, the lead character says to a friend, “You filled me with a wild desire to know everything about life.” Is there a person who might inspire you like that, Pisces? Maybe a person from your past with whom you’ve fallen out of touch? Or is there a person hovering on the outskirts of your life who could stimulate you to have such feelings? Now is a favorable time to seek these influences. I advise you to be bold in your quest to associate with allies who will stimulate your lust for life and teach you crucial lessons. (PS: For extra credit, make abundant use of another theme from Wilde’s book: “The search for beauty is the real secret of life.”)

HOMEWORK: Tell me why you HAD to do the thing that some people question or misunderstand. Newsletter@freewillastrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 42

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EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

https://www.sbccfoundation.org/ grant‑support‑specialist‑position/

COMPUTER/TECH

PROFESSIONAL

SENIOR SOFTWARE Engineer (Santa Barbara, CA): For native display & video advertising tech, create & update s/w that powers the cmpny ad content platform. Telecommuting optional 100%. Master’s in CS or rltd + 2 years’ exp as S/w Eng or rltd req. Resumes: Storygize, Inc., careers@ storygize.com, Ref. Job 632.

EDUCATION COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1‑855‑554‑4616 (AAN CAN)

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

HEALTH & FITNESS LOWEST PRICES on Health Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 1‑888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN)

Patient Services Representative Sansum Clinic is the leader in healthcare in Santa Barbara, with 100 years of excellence. As one of the first points of contact for our patients you be expected to provide high quality customer service in terms of appearance, demeanor and interactions with patients and their families. This candidate will work directly with patients, members of our healthcare team and physicians. Duties will also include data entry, scheduling, providing instructions/ directions and completing necessary paperwork. Qualified candidates will have a 1 year of customer service and clerical support experience. Preferred candidates will have medical office experience as well as knowledge of medical terminology. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, as well as 403b retirement plan. Interested candidates can apply online at https://www.sansumclinic.org/ employment to position #2995.

NONPROFIT

Grant Support Specialist Part‑Time Temporary. Telecommute negotiable.(Approximately 400‑500 hours through 6.30.2022) For more information, go to

Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/20/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #23410

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

SOUTH HALL ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Organizes, plans, coordinates, and manages the department’s Academic Personnel activities such as faculty recruitment, UCPath payroll, and academic merit and promotion review process. Reqs: Ability to understand, interpret, and apply complex academic personnel policies and procedures on matters such as recruitment, preparation of appointment, merit and promotion advancement cases, faculty leaves, etc. Must possess excellent written and verbal communication skills and the ability to analyze an issue, research the procedures and policies, and use good judgment to implement policy. Working knowledge and familiarity with computers and the ability to learn and utilize new systems, software, and programs. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $24.6‑$25.77/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 21108

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND CAPSTONE COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Supports Academic Programs for the new Master of Environmental Data Science program, including course scheduling, curriculum planning, Master’s Projects, and general student advising, among other duties. Maintains databases/records, produces digital/print outreach materials, plans/hosts events. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in environ. science, data science, social science, related field, or equivalent experience. 1‑3 years of experience working with students. Knowledge of advising and counseling techniques. Strong communication, active listening, and interpersonal skills. Ability to work with diverse populations, multicultural competencies. Good organization skills. Strong analytical and critical thinking skills. Ability to identify and resolve problems. Exceptional attention to detail. Creative, strategic, and able to conceptualize both long and short‑term projects. Efficient and able to prioritize tasks easily. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $23.66‑$26.71/hr. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR

MATERIALS DEPARTMENT Responsible for high‑level administrative duties including front office management, graduate program support, access control, faculty administration, and financial assistance for the Materials Department. Reqs: High level of administrative and organizational skills and ability to handle multiple tasks with frequent interruptions, as well as meet deadlines with minimal supervision. Strong interpersonal skills working with a diverse group of people. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Ability to act professionally at all times, including when dealing with sensitive issues. Ability to think creatively when finding solutions to problems. Must be able to establish priorities, perform effectively under pressure and adapt to changing needs and issues. Must be detail‑oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $24.61‑$26.98/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins on 9/24/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23750

ASSISTANT CATERING CHEF

CAMPUS DINING Ensures that high standards of food quality, service, sanitation, and safety are met according to Dining Services, University, and Federal guidelines. Trains full‑time and student cooks in new culinary techniques, food and sanitation guidelines. Maintains efficient food preparation methods. Serves as a backup in the absence of the Department Head. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalency and three years progressively more responsible culinary experience in a high‑volume culinary environment with one year in a supervisory capacity; or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Knowledge of and experience with advanced culinary techniques, including but not inclusive of sauteing, grilling, frying, steaming, preparing sauces, and stocks. This includes experience working with commercial kitchen equipment and preparing large quantities. Communication skills sufficient to direct the work of others and interact successfully with a large staff. Notes: Ability to lift up to 50

pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per shift. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $18.23‑$20.94/hr. Days/Hours: Will vary, including nights and weekends. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22548

ASSISTANT STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES ADVISOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Provide free non‑attorney‑client privileged legal education and information to currently registered undergraduate and graduate UC Santa Barbara students and student organizations. Coordinates and advises the internship program as well as other internal projects agreed upon with the Student Legal Services Advisor, the Legal Resource Center Committee and the A.S. Executive Director. Secondary and tertiary advisor for the Legal Resources Center(AS LRC); and the AS Isla Vista Tenants Union (AS IVTU), respectively. Main functional areas for the Assistant Student Legal Services Advisor include Student Guidance and Education; Coordination of the Legal Resource Center Intern Program; Management and Support of the area’s Assessment. Reqs: JD from an American Bar Association‑approved law school. 3‑7 years experience using professional concepts to provide a variety of legal counsel including but not limited to campus students. Must demonstrate abroad knowledge of multiple legal disciplines including but not limited to landlord /tenant law, interpretation involving the rental or leasing of housing property, immigration law, personal injury, dissolution, consumer complaints, sexual harassment, student/police relations, and other civil matters, and on criminal and traffic matters. Must have worked on complex issues where analysis of situations or data requires an in‑depth evaluation of variable factors. Must be able to demonstrate judgment and considerable independence in selecting methods, techniques, and evaluation criteria for obtaining results. Must have experience working successfully in a collaborative manner with a diverse group. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $59,500‑$78,937.50/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 09/20/2021. Apply online at

https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #23359

AUTOMATED PARKING SERVICES TECHNICIAN

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES Analyzes automated parking systems user requirements and programs system configurations. Designs, plans, and implements hardware and software upgrades. Works directly with system vendors and manufacturer representatives on warranties and parts exchanges. Maintains all security access and departmental key issuance. Works with Facilities Management Small Projects unit, Communication Services, and outside vendors in completing various parking‑related projects. Ensures security and inventory of equipment. Applies professional business/ technical support concepts to resolve hardware, software, and networking issues as they relate to the automated parking systems where analysis of the situation or data requires a review of a variety of factors. Within defined procedures and practices determines appropriate action. Reqs: 5 years of experience working with hardware and software systems as well as secure data and revenue systems or equivalent education. Ability to perform technical tasks associated with installation, maintenance, and repair of field‑based hardware (and related software packages) permit dispensers, EMV credit card readers and communication systems both wired and wireless including an informational/emergency AM radio station. Experience in maintaining private and public networks functionality and security. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license,

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a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $26.86/hr ‑ 34.86/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/14/21. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22139

CONTRACTS & GRANTS ANALYST

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Responsible for managing successful contract and grant proposal submission and administration as part of a team. Prepares detailed budgets and all necessary University and agency forms and works closely with Principal Investigators to ensure submission deadlines are met. Shares responsibility for the financial administration of research funds in which duties include but are not limited to ensuring that all expenses charged to extramural funds are appropriate and allowable according to all agency and campus policies and that adequate funds are available; analyzing expenditures and spending patterns; advising faculty, staff, and students of campus policies for employment, purchasing, and travel; disseminating financial reports. Reqs: Excellent organizational skills with the ability to maintain a high level of accuracy. Ability to work under pressure of strict deadlines while using independent judgment.

Demonstrated professionalism. Ability to work independently and as part of a team. Excellent communication skills. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel. Reqs: Excellent organizational skills with the ability to maintain a high level of accuracy. Ability to work under pressure of strict deadlines while using independent judgment. Excellent communication skills. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel. Starting at $54,500/ yr., commensurate with experience. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/27/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23554

CONTRACTS AND GRANTS MANAGER

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Responsible for overseeing the Gevirtz Graduate School of Education (GGSE) Contracts & Grants Unit pre‑ and post‑award operations and supervising the work of the Contracts & Grants Analysts. This includes all aspects of contracts & grants administration in the GGSE. Serves as an expert and resource concerning the many aspects, complexities, and often unique issues of proposal preparation and award administration to GGSE Leadership, faculty, staff, and students. Provides support for GGSE outreach

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EMPLOYMENT goals, working with the Associate Dean for Research and Outreach, local school districts and the GGSE Director of Outreach as necessary. Reqs: Familiarity with Contracts & Grants policies and procedures and demonstrated ability to learn and adapt to new policies, applications and procedures. Demonstrated ability to analyze, interpret and provide guidance to faculty and researchers regarding policies and guidelines. Demonstrated competence in the use of spreadsheet and database software in financial analysis, fiscal management and financial reports. Excellent organizational skills with ability to maintain a high level of accuracy. Excellent communication skills. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. Starting at $61,700/yr., commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/27/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23861

POLICE OFFICER

POLICE DEPARTMENT The ideal candidate will have demonstrated detailed and fundamental knowledge of modern police methods, practices, and techniques with particular emphasis on the university environment; skills in working as part of a diverse team; ability to motivate others to effectively achieve department goals and objectives; ability to establish and maintain cooperative working relationships with department members, neighboring agencies, and the campus community; possess excellent interpersonal skills and organizational skills; the ability to effectively communicate, orally and in writing to all levels of the organization; knowledge of relevant university‑wide police policies and procedures; a strong commitment to cultural, gender and racial diversity, professional ethics and integrity, and understanding of and commitment to community oriented policing, a self‑starting and self‑motivated work ethic, and a reliable attendance record. Reqs: Must be a high school graduate or possess a GED (score of 40 or higher on individual sub‑tests and a total score of 225 or higher). Demonstrated ability to analyze situations and take quick, effective, and reasonable action to prevent injury, loss of life, or destruction of property. Proficiency in the use and care of a variety of weapons (i.e. firearm, rifle, baton, OC, etc.). Ability to maintain PC 832 Arrest qualifications. Knowledge of Police operating rules and regulations. Knowledge of basic law enforcement terminology and concepts. Experience in the exercise of defensive tactics. Skill to safely handle an automobile in high speed and emergency situations. Knowledge of pertinent case law. Ability to use vehicles, computer systems, weapons, and other technologies and tools employed by police agencies. Understanding of modern policing issues, philosophies, practices, and trends as applied within the University environment Skill in speaking and writing clearly, using appropriate vocabulary to provide information, and prepare written reports. Speak confidently in public settings. Demonstrated ability to work effectively as a member of a team. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. Work at any time of the day or night and in periods of disaster and civil disorder. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse Mandated reporting req of Dependent Adult Abuse UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action

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Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #11423

PRODUCTION COORDINATOR

ARTS & LECTURES OFFICE Works independently to coordinate, plan, procure, and oversee all necessary backstage goods and services, onstage properties, and provide basic support for all Arts & Lectures public performances, lectures, and special events, at both on and off‑campus venues. Coordinates Artist residency logistics, including hotel accommodations, hospitality/catering services, and transportation. Responsible for procuring, contracting, and managing hospitality sponsorships. Compiles data and maintains event‑related departmental databases for analysis and planning. Recruits, trains, and supervises Arts & Lectures event related student employees. Provides administrative support for special projects as requested by Arts & Lectures senior management. Hours are variable and include evenings/ nights and occasional weekends. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience and training. Ability to always represent the University professionally and positively in the community, often under significant pressure. Ability to interact professionally with various levels of talent. Ability to creatively supervise and motivate numerous (~15) student employees. Demonstrated experience in event planning and organization, or transferable skills and ability. Ability to successfully provide support in the coordination of a high volume of catering, hospitality, and travel/ logistics. Knowledge of or experience in some areas of performing arts, such as familiarity with theater backstage protocols, performing arts language, technical terminology. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. Ability and willingness to work frequent evenings/nights and weekend hours. $24.61‑$28.90/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/20/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #23578

PUBLIC SAFETY DISPATCHER

POLICE DEPARTMENT We are interested in ethical, intelligent, creative, and motivated candidates who possess the desire and talent required to address the unique challenges of our urban campus environment. We offer a wide variety of assignments and a public service experience, unlike any other agency. Reqs: Read, write, speak and understand English fluently. Proficient typing/data entry, familiarity with computer operations, excellent communications and Customer Service skills, ability to deal well with stress and stressful situations. Strong multitasking abilities, and ability to type 35 wpm. Be at least 18 years of age at the time of appointment. Have the legal right to work in the United States on a permanent basis. Meet all other requirements for public safety dispatchers as established by

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law and the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting req of Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. Ability to work rotating shifts on days, nights, weekends, and holidays. $30.01‑36.47/hr. Days/ Hours: Mon‑Fri, Saturday, Sunday, Shift includes Day, Evening, Weekend. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #11439

RECYCLING & COMPOSTING COORDINATOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Supervises, mentors and educates students in the areas of Recycling, Department of Public Worms, and other services as assigned. Advises the AS (Associated Students) Zero Waste Committee and serves as an advisor to the Sustainability Coalition. The goals include reducing landfill waste through the management of campus‑wide recycling, and composting programs, purchasing recycled materials and educating the campus and surrounding community on waste reduction principles. Establishes operating procedures, supervises student staff. Oversees the annual AS Recycling and Department of Public Worms budget. Serves as a liaison with the Department of Facilities Management, other campus waste management entities, and, when needed, the local community. Responsible for further development of the recycling and composting program, working with a team of staff to develop funding and management for new initiatives developed by staff and students. Reqs: Must have 2‑5 years of relevant experience and knowledge of recycling techniques and have the ability to communicate the recycling program effectively. Must be able to demonstrate excellent interpersonal skills, and the ability to communicate both orally and in writing with a diverse campus population including faculty, staff, students, city officials, and university neighbors on sustainable solid waste management and recycling issues. Must have relevant experience in producing reports on the recycling program and to interpret institutional policies, plans, objectives, rules, and regulations, and to communicate the interpretation to others is also required. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. Available to work occasional weekend or evening events. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $23.66‑ $26.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins on 09/28/2021. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22486

STUDENT HEALTH PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT

STUDENT HEALTH Responsibilities include evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of acute illnesses and injuries, providing brief mental health interventions, prescribing medications under the

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

legal scope of practice, and arranging follow‑up care. Procedures such as laceration repair, extremity splinting, incision and drainage of abscesses, wound care, and management of IV fluids will be performed depending on training, experience, and privileging by UCSB Student Health administration. Reqs: Current and valid Physician Assistant license for California. DEA registration schedules 2‑5. Notes: Credentials verification for the clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Criminal history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11 month, per‑year position with 4 weeks of furlough that must be taken during quarter breaks or during the summer. Scheduling will be reviewed annually and set for the upcoming academic year. A flexible work schedule to allow afternoon time off is dependent on clinic staffing needs and can be subject to change. The weekly schedule may include Thursday evening hours if the need arises. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins on 09/24/2021. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23863

STUDENT HEALTH PHYSICIAN

STUDENT HEALTH Provides direct clinical services in Primary Care Family Medicine OR Primary Care Internal Medicine and Immediate Care for all eligible patients at UCSB Student Health. Also provides consultation on a per case basis if needed, for all members of the professional staff to assist them with diagnosis and treatment of their patients. Provides supervision for the Physician Assistants when the Primary Supervisor is unavailable as assigned by the UCSB SHS Executive Director and/or Medical Director. Reqs: Must have a current CA Medical, DEA License, and Board Certification at all times during employment in order to practice and function in this clinical role; credentials are renewed periodically. Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioners. Mandated reporting requirements of Child & Dependent Adult Abuse. Criminal history background check. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA/FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Salary commensurate. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins on 9/28/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23923

TALENT ACQUISITION & TRAINING ANALYST

HUMAN RESOURCES Performs a wide range of services

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related to staff employment and recruitment, diversity and outreach, and training. Manages recruitments, advertises vacancies, and assists University staff and external applicants. Manages learning activities in the UC Learning Center (UCLC) for HR Training and Development unit. Serves as a TAM and UCLC system liaison. Uses professional employment and staffing techniques and concepts for employment, sourcing programs, and policies for the organization. Recruitment and employment efforts are of moderate scope and complexity. Works on staffing/ employment for skilled operational and technical and professional level positions. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Working knowledge of recruitment, screening, interviewing, and referral processes. Ability to exercise judgment within defined employment procedures and practices to determine appropriate action and recommendations. Ability to manage a large volume of recruitments and other work in a fast‑paced environment. Effective written and verbal communication skills. Ability to research, analyze and problem solve. Ability to establish productive, cooperative, and mutually beneficial working relationships with clients, coworkers, peers, and management. Ability to conduct presentations to small groups of employees. Knowledge of common software used within employment and other areas of HR, and how they work together. Basic knowledge of employment law. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $26.65/hr. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 9/21/21. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23705

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62 Came up short 64 “___ just not, please?” 1 11th graders’ exam (abbr.) 65 “___ please the court ...” 5 “Now, ___ from our sponsor” 67 Protester’s forum 10 Hill’s high point 70 Wine valley 14 “It’s ___ Quiet” (Bjork 71 Spanish footballer Sergio remake) 72 Miners’ quarries 15 Doritos flavor 73 Acceptability, for short 16 Any of the three “Survivor” 74 Painter Gustav who often motto words used gold leaf 17 Place to make a vinyl 75 Rodeo item that I can’t purchase seem to properly get 19 He’ll give you a ride, on around the theme answers “The Simpsons” 20 Muse for Keats 21 Norse pantheon chief 1 Read carefully (over) 23 Oedipus ___ 2 “The Jungle Book” tiger ___ 24 “Scarface” director Brian Khan 27 Mushroom with white buds 3 Music licensing org. 29 Second side in a game, 4 Greet with a honk perhaps 5 “What next?” 31 Cherry ___ (Ben & Jerry’s 6 Existed offering) 7 Eight, in El Salvador 34 “Can’t Fight This Feeling” 8 Half a state name band ___ Speedwagon 9 Olympic athlete’s violation 37 A little above the pitch 10 Guac ingredient, casually 39 Drum kit cymbal stand 11 Scent after the first rain in 40 Stumbles a while 42 “... the bombs bursting ___” 12 Mononymic Art Deco 44 ___ speak (as it were) designer 45 Start a meal 13 Microsoft system launched 47 Shoelace tip in 2001 49 “Shiny Happy People” 18 Acting jobs group 22 “The Daily Show” host 50 Casino worker Trevor 52 Camera that gets strapped 25 Half a Hawaiian fish? on 26 Kitchen appliance 54 Name, in Latin manufacturer 56 Vacationing traveler 28 Khloe’s mom 60 Ray gun sound 30 “Thatcherites” singer Billy

Across

Down

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32 “... can’t believe ___ the whole thing!” 33 Tiniest speck 34 “SNL” cast member Chris 35 Lake on four states and a province 36 Component of some church instruments 38 First show 41 Grain storage tower 43 Govt. auction auto, perhaps 46 “Finding Dory” fish 48 It may be called 51 Edit considerably 53 One who talks the talk 55 Tibet’s neighbor 57 Opening notes 58 Win all the games 59 Brief 60 Most of a penny’s makeup 61 From a long way 63 Singer Lovato who announced their new pronouns in 2021 66 Lincoln’s son 68 Chow down, slangily 69 Amphibious WWII vessel ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1049

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

SEPTEMBER 16, 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

45 45


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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: SYDNEY H. SMITH CASE NO.: 21PR00326 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of SYDNEY H. SMITH, SYDNEY HOWLAND SMITH, SYDNEY SMITH A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: NICHOLAS J. SCHNEIDER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: NICHOLAS J. SCHNEIDER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicits, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicits are avaialbe for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court

should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 10/28/2021 AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: 1332 Anacapa Street, Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑0669 Published Sep 16, 23, 30 2021. NOTICE

OF

PETITION

TO

ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PAUL R. LOPEZ Case No.: 21PR00381 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of PAUL R. LOPEZ, PAUL RENE LOPEZ AN AMENDED PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SHANEE ASCARRUNZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: SHANEE ASCARRUNZ and RENE PAUL LOPEZ be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 10/07/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division.

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SEPTEMBER 16, 2021

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James P. Griffith, Esq. Howell Moore & Gough LLP, 812 Presidio Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 962‑0524 x6. Published Sep 16, 23, 30 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELISABETH M AUF DER HEIDE aka ELISABETH M AUFDERHEIDE, ELISABETH AUFDERHEIDE, LISL AUF DER HEIDE, & LISL AUFDERHEIDE Case No.: 21PR00402 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELISABETH M AUF DER HEIDE aka ELISABETH M AUFDERHEIDE, ELISABETH AUFDERHEIDE, LISL AUF DER HEIDE & LISL AUFDERHEIDE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: ERIK AUF DER HEIDE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: ERIK AUF DER HEIDE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 10/28/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters

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to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman, O’Gorman & O’Gorman, LLP 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215 Published Sep 16, 23, 30 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DUTCH GARDEN RESTAURANT at 4203 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Dutch Garden LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Matthew English, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002450. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACHIEVING AWESOME at 5403 Tree Farm Lane, Unit 103 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hannah M Kafer Jenner (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Hannah Kafer Jenner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002403. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SYV SANDBLASTING at 1684 Laurel Ave Solvang, CA 93463; Kevin S Serritslev (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kevin Serritslev, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002392. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISA BIRD, ISA BIRD DESIGN, ISA EATON DESIGN, ISA HENDRY EATON DESIGN, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE DESIGN, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND STYLING at 960 Andante Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Isa Bird, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Isa Eaton, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002356. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 UNIVERSITY, 805 U, 805U, 805U BRANDS, 805U CLOTHING COMPANY, 805U CLOTHING CO., 805U SCREEN PRINTING & EMBROIDERY, 805U LOGISTICS CO., 805U DISTRIBUTION

& MANUFACTURING, 805U LICENSING, 805U SOCIAL MEDIA CO., 805U SALES & MARKETING, 805U MANAGEMENT at 920 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 805 University Enterprises LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Steven Fuentes, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002376. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUREGE ELECTRIC & UDERGROUND UTILITY LOCATING, SUREGE ELECTRIC at 2890 Foxen Canyon Rd. Los Olivos, CA 93441; Sergio Medina (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Sergio Medina, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002311. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SALAMANDER FABRICATION at 7500 San Julian Rd Lompoc, CA 93436; Isaac W Baer (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Isaac Baer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002227. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE LIFE YOU WRITE at 79 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103;Taylor L Ross (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Taylor Ross, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021‑0002401. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: VIDA CONSULTING SERVICES at 506 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Maria (Mari) G Hernandez (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Maria (Mari) Hernandez, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002389. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHAPALA UNIT F CO‑OWNERS at 1933 Cliff Drive Ste 26 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Carlo Sarmiento (same address) This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Carlo Sarmiento, General Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002319. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOUISES KITCHEN TABLE, LLC, MOMMY MEALS, CULINARY CREATIONS at 1210 Mission Drive, Suite 110

Solvang, CA 93463; Louise’s Kitchen Table 1678 B Eucalyptus Drive Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Victoria Louise Smith, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002337. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAWKHOUSE FALCONRY at 5511 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hannah J Atkinson (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Hannah Atkinson Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002230. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIANESMITHCOUNSELING at 428 Los Verdes Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Diane C Smith (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Diane C. Smith, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002355. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THINGSTODOINSANTABARBARA. COM at 4067 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Andrea M Plackett 141 Valdivia Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Justin S. Plackett (same address) This business is conducted by an Married Couple Signed: Andrea M. Plackett, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 11, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002330. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MUJERES MAKERS MARKET, LLC at 1217 Laguna St Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mujeres Makers Market, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Leah Ortega, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002472. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOWE’S at 935 E Betteravia Road Santa Maria, CA 93454; Lowe’s Home Centers, LLC 1000 Lowes Blvd, Mooresville, NC 28117 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: David R Green, Vice President Tax Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002519. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 CLASSIC MICHELADA at 519 N Milpas Santa Barbara, CA 93103; George Trujillo 579 Carlo Dr Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed:


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George Trujillo, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002540. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAXMAR PRODUCTIONS at 430 Evonshire Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Maxwell S Martin (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Maxwell S Martin Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002508. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HUMAN POTENTIAL PSYCHOTHERAPY at 5266 Hollister Ave, Office #101 Goleta, CA 93111; Derrick Selb 502 Asilomar Way #105 Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Derrick Selb Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002545. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AURALITE ACUPUNTURE at 1725 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Chelsea E Kelley 2008 Mountain Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Chelsea Kelley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2021‑0002570. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EARTHCOMB at 1417 Las Positas Place Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Andrew Velikanje (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Andrew Velikanje, Founder Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002408. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OBSTACLE SOLUTIONS at 81 David Love Place, Ste 217 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Leighann Ruppel 5230 Califa Court Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Leighann Ruppel, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002446. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: WADE DAVIS DESIGN at 512 Brinkerhoff Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wade Davis Architects Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Akiko Wade Davis, CFO County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002596. Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑

(s) is/are doing business as: SOULS & SMILES at 317 Arden Rd Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Vanessa A Reyes (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Vanessa Reyes, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002517. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: ATLAS PROPERTIES at 2135 Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; James B Akers (same address) Jayla H Siciliano (same address) This business is conducted by an Married Couple Signed: James B Akers, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 7, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0002563. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO REFRIGERATOR REPAIRS, SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO & VIKING, SANTA BARBARA SUB ZERO, SUB ZERO VIKING REPAIR MONTECITO at 4704 Park Granada, Unit 195 Calabasas, CA 91302; Krupo, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Vladyslav Frolov, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 3, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002552. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA MYGYM at 2801 De La Vina, Suite C Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Santa Barbara Children’s Fitness 1300 Barger Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Charles Fossett‑Lee, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002592. Published: Sep 16, 23, 30. Oct 7 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF BRENDAN PIERCE LETT TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02936 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: BRENDAN PIERCE LETT TO: IBRAHIM ABDUSHAKUUR SIRI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 08, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Civil, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation,

printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 19, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG AKA RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02828 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG aka RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO: NINA R. SCHOOLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Sep 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, ANACAPA DIVISION SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated July 30, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KELLY JEAN SHORT & ANGELINA CRISTA TORRES TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02991 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KELLY JEAN SHORT TO: KELLY JEAN SHORT‑DE LUNA FROM: ANGELINA CRISTA TORRES TO: ANGELINA CRISTA DE LUNA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 20, 2021 8:30 am, Dept THREE, CIVIL, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 312 ‑ C East Cook Street Santa Maria, CA 93454. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 27, 2021. by Timothy J. Staffel. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES THE ISLA VISTA Community Services District is seeking proposals for an Isla Vista Community Mobility Plan. Requests & Clarifications Deadline: Monday, September 13, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT) Submittal Due Date/Time: Monday, September 27, 2021, at 10:00 AM (PDT)

ORDINANCE NO. 21-__ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADOPTING VARIOUS AMENDMENTS TO TITLE 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE On September 21, 2021, at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) will consider the second reading and possible adoption of a proposed ordinance that would include several “clean-up” amendments to Title 17 of the Goleta Municipal Code to address General Plan and State law consistency, remedy issues identified during early implementation of Title 17, and provide clarity to the regulations adopted. The topics for the proposed amendments include: • General Plan and State law consistency related to Electrical Vehicle Charging Stations, Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs), Required Parking for Single-Unit Dwellings, and Noticing • Director Determinations • ADU Design and Historic Resources • Telecommunication Facilities • Application Fee Refunds • Zoning Exemptions for ADA Improvements • Permitting of Carports, Gazebos, Canopies, and Pergolas Associated with Solar Energy Systems • Processing of Applications in the Coastal Zone • Additional Definitions • Revised Definitions to Setbacks • Other Clarifying Revisions If adopted, the Ordinance will be effective 31 days from the date of adoption. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by calling City Hall at (805) 9617505. Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, September 16, 2021

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, September 28, 2021 at 3:00 P.M. ATTENTION: The Governor’s Executive Orders N-29-20 and N-08-21 suspend certain requirements of the Brown Act and authorizes local legislative bodies to hold public meetings via teleconferencing. The regular meeting of the Design Review Board for September 28, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. Design Review Board Members will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review Google Site Improvements 301 Mentor Drive (APN 071-140-079) Case No. 21-0017-DRB Building 5 & 12 and Site Improvements 5385 Hollister Avenue (APN 071-140-075) Case No. 21-0018-DRB Aeluma Wall Sign 27 Castilian Drive (APN 073-150-004) Case No. 21-0021-DRB Conceptual Review New Rehabilitation Center at GVCH 351 S. Patterson Avenue (APN 065-090-022) Case No. 20-0002-DP IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice are new items. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, September 16, 2021

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September 16, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 818

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September 16, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 818

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