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May 11 & 12 The Joffrey Ballet

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Apr 28 Colson Whitehead

Feb 25 Roxane Gay

Nov 12 Leonidas Kavakos and Yuja Wang

Oct 10 Julián Castro

Feb 26 Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Oct 14 & Apr 27 Danish String Quartet

Apr 13 & 14 Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

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TABLE of CONTENTS

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin

COVER STORY 20

Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley

The Joy Of Books Planned Parenthood’s Annual Used Book-a-Thon Shines Again by Jean Yamamura

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Atmika Iyer, Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Holly Rusch, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

ENDORSEMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 ON THE COVER: Mary Jane McCord Planned Parenthood Book Sale volunteers. Erick Madrid photo. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

Our Los Angeles–born, Irvine-raised Arts & Entertainment intern Kat Sophia admits that she opted for UCSB when she couldn’t get past the UCLA waitlist, but she’s come to love Santa Barbara’s art scene and looks forward to spending her last year abroad in London. “I’m excited to see the locations of One Direction music videos and Harry Potter/Fleabag scenes,” said Sophia, who’s covered a number of bands big and small during her time with us and dreams of interviewing such artists as Dominic Fike and Phoebe Bridgers. But this young scribe, who’s also an editor at WORD Magazine, may be best known as a singer/songwriter herself, having gigged at Isla Vista’s Tacos & Taproom every Friday night before the pandemic. “I mainly make indie pop/folk music, and my lyrics have the sincerity of Taylor Swift with a dash of sarcasm à la Lily Allen,” said Sophia, who’s also a huge vinyl enthusiast. “My collection’s worth around $10,000, but we don’t need to talk about how much pain I’m in thinking about that.”

COURTESY

OUR SINGER/SONGWRITER INTERN

volume 35, # 817, Sept. 9-16, 2021

What else should we know? “I love shibas,” said Sophia. “If I could eat food that tasted like a song, it’d be ‘Bohemian Rhapsody,’ and I really hope fairies are real. They’re so cute! I’ve also met Barack Obama.” INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

TALK TO ME: T.C. BOYLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 | 2:30 – 3:30 PM VIRTUAL EXPERIENCE VIA ZOOM Bestselling author and Santa Barbara’s own idiosyncratic muse, T.C. Boyle returns to read from his lively and thought-provoking new novel Talk To Me. With an intoxicating mix of humor and profundity, Boyle explores a world where people can really talk to animals as he turns to the questions few of us admit to wondering about. With him in this conversation is award-winning fellow author and Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing, UC Riverside, Susan Straight. Join these two charismatic authors for this special reading, conversation, and Q & A.

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/ $10 NON-MEMBERS PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT TICKETS.SBMA.NET SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART

“Boyle is a writer who chooses a large canvas and fills it to the edges.” —Barbara Kingsolver

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Vote No on Recalling Governor Newsom

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alifornia, birthplace of the recall vote, proves yet again that just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. If recent polling is to be believed, the winner of this September 14 election to recall Governor Gavin Newsom could well be the right-wing radio personality and ardent anti-masker Larry Elder, a man totally unqualified to run California. To state the obvious, this year’s recall effort—so flamboyantly ill-conceived—beggars any pretense at self-preservation and common sense. We urge all voters—regardless of party affiliation or ideological inclinations—to vote no. The only reason California faces such a fate is that a group of fringe Republican malcontents, upset that Governor Newsom has done what he said he would do when he ran for office four years ago, were able to raise enough money and garner enough signatures to qualify for this special election, which is estimated to be costing taxpayers at least $276 million. Even if you find Gavin Newsom’s positions objectionable, his term expires in little more than a year. Presumably in the intervening time, the Republicans might find someone with a modicum of competence to run against Newsom then. But not now. To be clear, this election is not about whether you like Newsom or not. He might not be the sort of guy you’d want to sit down to have a beer with—or more precisely, to sit down with at a fancy French restaurant to enjoy a $500-a-plate

birthday dinner celebrating the state’s über-lobbyist, as Newsom did earlier in the pandemic. That, most certainly, was foolish. But it’s also not grounds for impeachment. Or recall. To the extent Newsom deserves blame for mistakes undeniably made, he also deserves credit for the successes for which we’ve all sacrificed so hard. The stakes involved could not be higher. We are urging our voters to vote emphatically no on the recall. It’s not about saving Newsom’s bacon; it’s about saving your own. Polls have been wrong, and winds do change. But as it stands now, Elder—a contrarian and energetic provocateur—is reportedly way ahead of all the other 45 candidates now running to replace Newsom. It’s worth noting at this historical moment that Elder has never held elective office during his 69 years on planet Earth and that he’s pledged to repeal all the mask and vaccination requirements that Governor Newsom has approved. As a Black man, Elder has carved out a successful career as a multimedia pundit trivializing, minimizing, and denying the consequences of racism. Just what we don’t need: a gratuitously selfdestructive incompetent at the helm of the fifth-largest economy on the planet as the worst public health crisis in the past two centuries goes into overdrive. Even those voters who dislike or disapprove of Newsom’s policies should nevertheless be concerned that the man most likely to become governor should they vote for recall will be Elder, whose ex-fiancée accused him of pull-

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ing out a revolver in the middle of a heated domestic dispute to ensure that it was loaded. Elder declined—in his words—to dignify such accusations with a response. Unfortunately, he’s also refused to dignify with a response questions posed by any reporter other than a few representing a Chinese news agency. When it comes to essential details—like how he’d handle the COVID crisis — the voters deserve less dignity and more information. Governor Newsom, on the other hand, has proved to be uncommonly effective navigating a host of natural and unnatural disasters. Has he been perfect? Absolutely not. But in his brief tenure, Newsom has been forced to deal with droughts of geologic scale, infernos that rival anything in the Old Testament, and, of course, most immediately debilitating, COVID-19. And until this year, Newsom had no federal partner upon whom it was safe for Californians to rely. No, we are not remotely out of the woods. But look at states such as Texas, Florida, and Alabama — all led by such stridently antimasking governors that their school districts have been forced to rise up in revolt to impose the most rudimentary of safety precautions. Consequently, their hospitals are overflowing with COVID patients, their ICUs engorged with bodies of people who can’t breathe without the aid of a machine. In California, our hospitals have been greatly strained and our health-care workers maxed out. But they are still standing, still caring for our sick.

Although registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by a 2-to-1 margin in the state and no Republican has won a statewide office since 2006, the smart money is betting that Newsom could still lose because of what the pollsters refer to as “the enthusiasm gap” and voter fatigue. Are Democrats and Independent voters really so tired of voting they can’t mail in their ballots? We hope not. By now, any registered voter reading this should have received a large envelope courtesy of the Santa Barbara County Elections Department. In it is enclosed the recall ballot. It asks two questions. The first is whether you support the recall. Fill in the No bubble. The second question on the ballot asks which of the 46 contenders you would select to replace Governor Newsom should he be recalled. As a matter of tactics, strategy, and, above all, simplicity, we urge you to keep the second line blank. If this sounds like a singularly undemocratic process, you are correct. If more voters cast ballots against Newsom than for him, the candidate with the most votes of the 46 in the running will become our next governor. In such a scenario, Newsom will all but certainly have slightly less than half the total votes cast. But the next governor—having had to split votes with 45 other candidates—will have won with far fewer votes than Newsom. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. Vote No on the Recall. And be sure to vote. n

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SEPT. 2-9, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

COMMUNITY

COU RTESY

Football Legend Sam Cunningham Dies at 71 S

TROJAN HORSE: As a USC fullback, former Santa Barbara High star Sam Cunningham scored two touchdowns in his first game against Alabama, and three years later, he scored four touchdowns in the Rose Bowl.

am “Bam” Cunningham, the former Santa Barbara High School star athlete and oldest of the four Cunningham brothers — in whose honor Peabody Stadium’s new track was recently named— has died at the age of 71. Cunningham excelled in both football and in track and field for the Dons in the late 1960s and became a powerhouse fullback at USC, where his unforgettable performance in a game at Alabama in 1970 helped integrate Southern football. Only a sophomore at the time, he unleashed a 135-yard, two-touchdown show that led the Trojans to a 41-21 win and changed the face of the traditionally white Southern football landscape. In a recent interview with Santa Barbara Independent sportswriter Victor Bryant, Cunningham discussed the impact of his performance on that night: “I didn’t go into any game looking to change history, even though history has a tendency to be changed by things of that nature,” Cunningham said. “I always tried to play to the best of my ability, and that’s what I

did that evening. I was put in the right spot and got touched by the hand of God.” After earning first team All American honors and a USC national championship in 1972, Cunningham scored four touchdowns and was named the 1973 Rose Bowl MVP. He has since been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and Rose Bowl Hall of Fame. After playing in the NFL for nine seasons for the New England Patriots, he was also named a member of the Patriots Hall of Fame. He is still the franchise’s all-time leading rusher with 5,453 yards. He was the oldest of four Cunningham brothers, followed by Anthony, Bruce, and Randall — who was also a star quarterback in the NFL. The Cunningham brothers were noted in the community for their athletic talent. When Santa Barbara High School unveiled the new Peabody Stadium, Sam was unable to attend the ceremony for health reasons. USC announced Cunningham passed away Tuesday in Inglewood, California. The cause of death has yet to be released. —Ryan P. Cruz

CORONAVIRUS N I C K WELSH

How Much Testing Is Just Right? COVID Testing Undergoes the Goldilocks Treatment by Nick Welsh f people who’ve already been vaccinated can still get — and still transmit — the Delta variant, thus infecting others without knowing it, shouldn’t everyone, vaccinated and unvaccinated alike, be required to get tested to ensure workplace safety? This question was posed last Tuesday, August 31, when the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors adopted a policy mandating all 4,600 county employees to either be vaccinated or be regularly tested. Vehemently opposing this policy was a room full of vaccination skeptics, civil libertarians, and self-styled conscientious objectors. “That’s a good question,” answered Mona Miyasato, the county’s CEO. “That’s a great question,” added Dr. Stewart Comer, head of Cottage Hospital’s Pacific Diagnostic Lab (PDL), just a few days later. But according to both Comer and Miyasato, the answer is that universal testing is not needed at this time. Here’s why: The vast majority of people testing positive, getting sick, and being hospitalized have not been vaccinated. The number of breakthrough cases — in which vaccinated individuals test positive — still remains relatively low. The case rates per 100,000 for the unvaccinated in Santa Barbara County hover about 4.5 times higher than those who’ve gotten their shots. For vaccinated workers, Miyasato said, tests would only make sense if they were exhibiting symptoms of COVID; either way, all county employees would be required to wear masks. In the health sector, however, the rules are more stringent. As of September 30, all health-care providers

I

in the State of California must be vaccinated. Regular testing will not be an option. Dr. Comer, a medical pathologist and 30-year U.S. Navy veteran, finds the question a difficult one to answer. “We know people who are vaccinated are getting infected. We know the vaccine is not fully protective. We know that right now this involves a relatively small number of people. The question then becomes ‘Should everyone get tested?’ ” he asked. “In a way, it comes down to a matter of supply. If everyone got tested, what would happen to the supply chain? Do we have the resources? We’re never going to get to a COVID-zero.” “Is the answer the booster shot?” Comer asked. “At what point do the THE BIG QUESTION: “If everyone got tested, what would happen to the supply chain?” vaccines lose their efficacy and boosters Cottage Health’s Dr. Stewart Comer asked. “Do we have the resources? We’re never going to make sense?” The answer to both is “I get to a COVID-zero.” don’t know.” What worries Comer most, however, is if the virus mutates so many times that the last week’s supervisors’ meeting questioning the accutests are no longer accurate. “But we’re not there yet,” racy of the standard PCR (polymerase chain reaction) he says. “That’s why people are spending so much time test. One speaker argued that as many as 90 percent of the test results were “indeterminate.” on this.” Comer’s immediate concern is Cottage Hospital and “I don’t know where that number comes from. I can all the patients and workers who go in and out. “People tell you it’s not accurate at the hospitals served by our need to have 100 percent confidence we’re protecting lab,” Comer stated. PDL only recorded 53 indeterminate everyone within our four walls,” he said. In that con- readings in the past year. “That’s .03 percent. Every text, Comer addressed several comments he heard at time a case comes up “indeterminate,” Comer stressed, CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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This class is included in SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. with a mental health disorder and is designed to help family members understand and

TWO YEARS LATER: A new lawsuit filed on the anniversary of 2019’s deadly Conception fire alleges the Coast Guard’s inspections of the dive boat overlooked wiring, escape hatch, and fire system violations.

are also family members that know what itown is like to have a lovedbipolar one struggling with a support their one while maintaining their well-being. will also cover information on such as The class willloved also cover information on illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar Theclass class will also cover information onillnesses illnesses such asschizophrenia, schizophrenia, bipolardisorder, disorder, mental health disorder. major depression and other mental health conditions and is taught by trained teachers who disorder, major depression and other mental health conditions and is taught by major depression and other mental health conditions and is taught by trained teachers who The class will also cover information on illnesses such asknow disorder, are family members that know what ititisislike have aaschizophrenia, loved one aa a arealso also family members that know what liketo to have loved oneitstruggling struggling with trained teachers who are also family members that what is bipolar like towith have major depression and other mental health and is taught trained Illness, teacherswhich who is the mental health disorder. The class is offered through NAMI, theconditions National Alliance onbyMental mental health disorder. loved one struggling with a mental health disorder. are also family members that know what it is like to have a loved one struggling with a better lives fo nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building mental health disorder. The isis NAMI, the National Alliance on Illness, which isisthe Theclass class offered through NAMI, the National Alliance onMental Mental Illness, which the The class isoffered offered through NAMI, the National Alliance onwill Mental Illness, those affected by through mental health disorders. Presentation be online via ZOOM or in a nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated totobuilding better for nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated building betterlives lives for which is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to classroom setting depending on COVID allowances. The class is offered through NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, which is the those affected by mental health disorders. Presentation will be online via ZOOM or in a those affected by mental health affected disorders.by Presentation will be online viaNorth ZOOMCounty or in a building better lives for those mental health disorders. nation’s largest grassroots mental healthallowances. organization dedicated to building better lives for classroom setting depending on classroom setting depending onCOVID COVID allowances. presentation be online via disorders. ZOOM.National South County presentation be online This is will included inhealth SAMHSA’s Registry Evidence-based thoseclass affected by mental Presentation will beofonline viawill ZOOM or inPrograms a via This class included in National Registry of classroom setting depending on COVID allowances. ZOOM or is in a classroom setting depending on COVID allowances.Programs and ThisPractices. class is included inSAMHSA’s SAMHSA’s National Registry ofEvidence-based Evidence-based Programs and andPractices. Practices.

This is included includedininSAMHSA’s SAMHSA’s National Registry of Evidence-based This class class is National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices. Programs and Practices.

Grim Conjecture in New Conception Lawsuit

Families Fault Coast Guard for Inadequate Inspections

namisantabarbara.org namisantabarbara.org namisantabarbara.org

namisantabarbara.org Preregistration is required: Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) had namisantabarbara.org Preregistration is required: South Santa Barbara County: Ramona Winner, Family Advocate, rwinner@mentalwellnesscenter.org South Santa Barbara County: Ramona Winner, Family Advocate, rwinner@mentalwellnesscenter.org n the hours following the Conception examined the Conception’s sister ship, the Mental Wellness Center, 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Preregistration required: Wellness Center, 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PreregistrationMental isisrequired: required: 805-884-8440, ext. 3206 dive boat fire, Santa Barbara held its Preregistration Vision, which wasissimilar in layout and 805-884-8440, ext. Ramona 3206 South Santa Barbara County: Ramona Winner, Advocate, rwinner@mentalwellnesscenter.org South Santa Barbara County: Winner, FamilyFamily Advocate, rwinner@mentalwellnesscenter.org Mental Wellness Center, 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 CA 93101 South Santa Barbara County: Ramona Winner, Family Advocate, rwinner@mentalwellnesscenter.org Mental Wellness Center, Garden Street, Santa Barbara, North Santa Barbara County: Maria Perez,617 Family Support Specialist, mperez@t-mha.org breath waiting to learn the fate of the 34 construction, to understand the systems North Santa 805-884-8440, Barbara County: Maria Perez, Family Support Specialist, mperez@t-mha.org ext.ext. 32063206 805-884-8440, Transitions Mental Health Association, 225 E. Inger Dr. #101, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Transitions Mental Health Association, 225 E. Inger Dr. #101, Santa Maria, CA 93454 Mentalwhich Wellness Center, 617 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 people who had bunked down for the aboard the Conception, had sunk 805-441-3325 North Santa 805-441-3325 Barbara County: Maria Perez, Family Support Specialist, mperez@t-mha.org North Santa Barbara County: Maria Perez, Family Support Specialist, mperez@t-mha.org night belowdecks on September 1, 2019, off after burning to 805-884-8440, the waterline. The ext. law- 3206 Transitions Mental Health Association, 225 E. Inger Dr. #101, Santa Maria, CA 93454 *DE FAMILIA A FAMILIA class Mental starts April 6, 2021; Contact Maria mperez@t-mha.org, 805-441-3325 Transitions Health Association, 225Perez, E. Inger Dr. #101, Santa Maria, CA 93454 *DE FAMILIA A FAMILIA class starts April 6, 2021; Contact Maria Perez, mperez@t-mha.org, 805-441-3325 805-441-3325 Santa Cruz Island. It soon became clear suit draws on similar parallels to assert 805-441-3325 that they’d all died horribly after a fierce its claims. *DE FAMILIA A FAMILIA class starts April 6, 2021; Contact Maria Perez, mperez@t-mha.org, 805-441-3325 North Santa Barbara County: Maria Perez, Family Support Specialist, mperez@t-mha.org *DE FAMILIA A FAMILIA class starts April 6, 2021; Contact Maria Perez, mperez@t-mha.org, 805-441-3325 fire broke out above their heads on the Among the direct violations of the Transitions Mental Health Association, 225 E. Inger Dr. #101, Santa Maria, CA 93454 main deck, and it wasn’t until September Code of Federal Regulations asserted was 805-441-3325 11 that the last body was recovered, that of the use of household wiring in some areas Berenice Felipe, whose mother is among of the bunkroom, instead of higher-grade the family members of all the victims who*DEUL boat and marine wiring. class As well,starts the April 6, 2021; Contact Maria Perez, mperez@t-mha.org, 805-441-3325 FAMILIA A FAMILIA have filed a new lawsuit against the U.S. suit states the Coast Guard should have known the ship owners — Truth Aquatics Coast Guard. According to the new lawsuit, brought and Glen and Dana Fritzler — had added by 32 relatives of the 34 individuals who “undocumented and ill-designed” electridied and an injured crew member, one cal outlets for battery charging. The suit person had escaped through the small claims the ship’s electrical system was hatch directly above her bunk, 16-year-old stressed to the point that the oxygen sysBerenice Felipe, who was on the dive trip tem to fill the dive tanks and the galley to celebrate her best friend’s 17th birth- stove could not be operated at the same day. Her friend, Tia Salika, died with her time. mother and father, Diana Adamic and Two other local incidents of batSteve Salika, aboard the Conception. The tery fires are alleged in the lawsuit. One emergency hatch, 22 inches square and occurred aboard the Condor Express, a emerging at the rear of the salon rather popular whale-watching and sightseeing than to an outdoor deck, is among the boat that shares the Sea Landing dock at “glaring deficiencies” listed in the civil Santa Barbara Harbor with Truth Aquatlawsuit that alleges Coast Guard inspec- ics’ boats; the battery-charging station for the Condor’s portable marine radio tions overlooked violations on the boat. The lawsuit, filed on September 1 in the burst into flames in the late afternoon of federal Central District Court, asserts March 9, 2013. The court filing alleges the the Coast Guard, specifically its Marine second incident was reported to Truth Safety Detachment in Santa Barbara, had Aquatics: In October 2018, a passenger inspected the Conception for many years, who was an off-duty firefighter had seen including its electrical systems, fire sys- a fire at a “charging station plugged into tems, and passenger evacuation hatches; a power strip sitting among paperback the last one in 2014 resulted in a com- books atop a shelf ” in the Vision salon pleted Certification of Inspection. Despite and, after smothering it, reported the fire the inspectors’ familiarity with the boat to the ship’s master, who reported it to his and naval inspection circulars starting employers. The fire aboard the Concepin 2013 to warn of shipboard fires due to tion is believed to have started in a similar power strips and rechargeable devices, the location, although the NTSB’s final report lawsuit claims the Coast Guard allowed of investigation did not find lithium batthe ship to operate despite inadequate teries to be the cause, in part because it electrical, fire, and escape systems. After could not review evidence held by the FBI. the fire, inspectors from the National That criminal investigation resulted in

I

by Jean Yamamura

CONT’D ON PAGE 13 

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OVID-19 has taken its toll on individuals and communities in obvious and unseen ways. For many, the combination of a global pandemic, economic instability, and quarantine cloistering has produced a significant psychic hardship. In response, Santa Barbara County is conducting a survey to assess the extent of needed mental-health and substance-use services. Residents throughout the county are encouraged to respond by September 30 to a 10-15-minute online survey that will help the county determine the types of care services needed by the public. Along with the county’s Department of Behavioral Wellness (BeWell) and Community Wellness Team, a broad range of community organizations will also hold in-person interviews with people who are underrepresented in health care, such as Mixteco-speaking individuals and farm-field workers. In response to the mental-health gaps perceived during COVID-19, county supervisors agreed in June to allocate $1.5 million in funds from the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA) for a self-assessment by county residents.

Cottage Health had invested in a similar survey in 2019, and the ARPA funding will underwrite not only in-person assessments and the survey — to which slightly more than 1,200 people have already responded —but also the distillation of the data and rendering of results. By October, results should be reported to the county supervisors along with a suggested slate of program expansions to meet the newly identified needs. “It is critical that necessary supports to address the unique impacts of COVID19 are in place in a timely manner to help our community through recovery,” said Suzanne Grimmesey, BeWell’s chief quality care officer. Identifying and implementing priority services stands as a central goal of the initiative, which is also currently developing an alternate survey evaluating the impacts of the pandemic on children up to the age of 5 years old. The survey is available in English and Spanish on the county’s website at recovery sbc.org/covidrecovery. —Caleb Rodriguez and Nick Welsh

PUBLIC SAFETY

Rocket Launch Ends in Explosion

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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L EN WO OD/ SANTA M AR IA TIMES

ust over two minutes after liftoff from Vandenberg Space Force Base on Thursday, September 2, Firefly Aerospace’s Alpha rocket exploded over the Pacific Ocean, bringing its first test flight to a fiery and abrupt end. In a statement released by Firefly—which is one of the most recent in a wave of New Space industry comFIRE IN THE SKY: Firefly Aerospace’s Alpha rocket exploded over the panies launching mediumPacific Ocean last Thursday. level rockets — the Alpha rocket experienced an “anomaly resulting pect debris should stay “at least 50 feet in an early end of the mission.” The com- away” and report any findings to the Firefly pany added that although the mission was Aerospace hotline at (805) 605-2734. No injuries associated with the anomterminated, there was much that was sucaly, according to both Firefly and Vancessful about the launch. “While we did not meet all of our mis- denberg officials. According to a post on sion objectives, we did achieve a number of Firefly’s Twitter, the failure occurred before them: successful first-stage ignition, liftoff Alpha reached supersonic speeds; when of the pad, progression to supersonic speed, it achieved a supersonic speed, there was and we obtained a substantial amount of too little thrust to control the flight, and flight data.” the range “terminated the flight” using the Witnesses said that after initially Flight Termination System. Both Firefly being delayed an hour, the 95-foot rocket and Vandenberg officials are working with launched at 6:59 p.m. and ascended for two the Federal Aviation Administration to minutes before exploding into a fireball, investigate the incident. leaving a trail of smoke behind it. The $15 million mission—which is the A statement was released by Vandenberg first of many aerospace projects in the works that urged caution in the area due to poten- at Firefly, including two more rockets, a tial rocket debris. “All recreational facilities, “space utility vehicle,” and a lunar lander— including beaches on-base that were closed was intended to reach a low Earth orbit. It’s for the launch will remain closed until fur- not the first failed mission in the New Space ther notice due to the ongoing investiga- sector. Three of Firefly’s competitors in the tion.” A team of investigators determined small-satellite business — Rocket Lab, Virany debris from the rocket could be unsafe, gin Orbit, and Astra — also failed on their —Ryan P. Cruz the statement said, and all who see or sus- first orbital attempts.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

An Empty ‘Field of Dreams’ by Tyler Hayden

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COU RTESY

Beach City’s Grove Is Back, But Where Are the Monarchs?

e rebuilt it, but they did not come. More than three years after developer Ed St. George illegally buzzsawed Santa Barbara’s largest monarch grove at his Beach City apartment complex, and despite extensive restoration and replanting efforts to bring the migratory population back, the butterflies have still not returned. That was the main takeaway from a status report delivered by city staff to the BARE OF BUTTERFLIES: Migratory monarchs have all but disappeared Planning Commission this from Santa Barbara and Goleta’s eucalyptus groves, part of a dramatic week, an official check-in that decline in numbers across the country. was part of St. George’s comeuppance for cutting down the 32 eucalyptus recorded on the East Coast. Last December, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife trees, for which he also paid a $95,000 fine and issued a formal apology. At the time, St. Service declined to add monarch butterflies George said he removed the trees because to the Endangered Species list, citing other they offered cover for nearby homeless priority species. They were instead put on encampments and posed a fire risk. a waiting list to be more fully studied at a Since then, with the guiding expertise later date. Representative Salud Carbajal of local and state biologists, St. George has wrote to the Fish & Wildlife director urging planted 60 coastal live oaks on the sprawling more immediate action “to ensure the monproperty that abuts Honda Creek, as well as arch does not become the 48th species to go 3,000 other plants meant to provide nectar extinct while on the candidate list.” and sustenance for overwintering monarchs. Though other news out of Beach City was The biologists say the oaks, native to the Cen- positive, city planner Tony Boughman did tral Coast, are preferred for this habitat over have some concerns. He noted St. George invasive eucalyptus and have already grown and his team have been slow in reporting considerably. Birds and other riparian spe- their progress to officials; have not planted cies are already enjoying the new environ- vines to screen the sensitive habitat from car ment, they said. headlights, as they’d agreed; and have not “The restoration itself is going extremely installed signs alerting nearby residents that well,” said Lawrence Hunt with Hunt & active environmental restoration is taking Associates Biological Consulting Services. place there. Some of Beach City’s residents, It’s a challenging site, he said, on a 45-degree most of whom are students at Santa Barbara slope with sandy soil, but the greenery is City College right next door, have trudged filling out and will be a comfortable stop- through the area and left trash behind, over for the butterflies, should they return. Boughman said. Also frustrating, Boughman added, was “We are sort of building a butterfly ‘Field of Dreams,’” he said. “If they come back, the that no weeding was carried out last year in habitat is there for them.” order to reduce competition among the new Hunt said that sudden disappearances plantings. “There was an explanation given of monarchs like the one at Beach City and that COVID had something to do with it,” Honda Valley are taking place up and down he said, “but we don’t really think that was a the West Coast. “The monarch butterflies good excuse.” have suffered a catastrophic decline throughPlanning Commissioner Jay Higgins out the western United States,” he explained. asked Boughman what could be done about “There are a lot of factors that are bringing to the large homeless encampments that have bear why we are not seeing any butterflies in recently sprung up along the SBCC side of the Santa Barbara area or Goleta.” Ellwood’s the creek. Some even have their own handfamously abundant population has all but dug latrines, he said. “We’re back to where vanished, Hunt said. we were,” Higgins said of St. George’s origiDuring this year’s Western Monarch nal motivation to clear-cut the eucalyptus Thanksgiving Count, only 1,914 monarchs to discourage illegal camping. “We’re sort of were observed at 246 California sites. That’s in an infinity loop here.” Boughman said he a 99.9 percent freefall since the 1980s, when and city staff are looking into the issue. “It’s millions of the species fluttered about the a tough and continuing problem,” he said. state. As recently as 2017, approximately The commission will receive another sta200,000 were counted, but populations tus report from St. George in two years’ time, began fully collapsing soon after. Scientists after which they asked to be kept updated in believe habitat loss and pesticide use are to the longer term on whether the monarchs blame. Precipitous declines are also being return. n

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SEPT. 2-9, 2021

SBCC

La Playa Stadium Stays Closed to Public

S

A M AN DA JACOBS / SBCC

anta Barbara City College’s La Playa Stadium — with its towering, 84-step concrete bleachers and view of the Pacific Ocean — had a muchneeded face-lift this summer with a $2 million upgrade on the 11-year-old turf field and the damaged drainage system underneath. The college’s new digs are being broken in by PE SBCC’s La Playa Stadium classes, the SBCC football team, and Bishop Diego High School foot- event. The project finished in August just ball. But for now, school officials say, the in time for the start of the football season. stadium is closed to the public, as it has been Prior to the fall semester, the school since the school first locked down in March announced all staff and students working 2020. The stadium, track, and its steps have or taking classes on campus would need to historically been open to the public for daily check in when they arrived, and masks were exercise. required indoors. Bryant said that people are “Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pan- allowed to, and have been, walking through demic, the track will be closed to the public the campus with their dogs or using the many through the remainder of the fall term to help paths and walkways around the school. ensure the health and safety of our student “Members of the public are generally athletes and to enable physical education allowed to be on campus and enjoy SBCC’s classes to proceed with minimal disruption,” outdoor spaces,” Bryant said. “Masks are currently required indoors and effective said SBCC spokesperson Victor Bryant. In December 2020, the Board of Trust- October 1, proof of vaccination is required ees approved the project, and preliminary to enter SBCC buildings, but this does not construction broke ground this May. The apply to outdoor spaces.” old turf had deteriorated, and the more than For the latest info on SBCC’s COVIDtwo-decade-old drainage pipes were dam- 19 policies, visit sbcc.edu/newsandevents/ aged during a 2017 New York Philharmonic covid-19. —Ryan P. Cruz

CANNABIS

Odor Scrubbers Pass Smell Test

Community Forum

Wednesday Sept. 15, 12 to 2 pm

P

People Powered Fair Maps: Why Redistricting Matters

Hear from an expert panel to learn how you can help create positive impacts on your own community for the next 10 years. SPEAKERS David Becker, Executive Director, Center for Elections Innovation & Research, will discuss the redistricting requirements of the Voting Rights Act and local ordinances and factors that must be considered in drawing new maps. Glenn Morris and Megan Turley, Chair and Vice Chair of the Santa Barbara County Citizens Independent Redistricting Commission, will discuss redistricting in Santa Barbara County and the processes to be followed for drawing new maps. Ted Anagnoson, Ph.D., Visiting Professor at UCSB and Professor Emeritus, Cal State Los Angeles, will talk about recent research on redistricting efforts and what Political Science professors are saying. To register for this online event, send an email to Pam Flynt Tambo: VPProgram@lwvsantabarbara.org. Simultaneous Spanish interpretation will be provided. The Forum will also be streamed live on the League’s Facebook page (@LWVSB) and recorded for later viewing. Recordings of the Forum in both English and Spanish will be posted on the League’s website – see lwvsantabarbara.org. 12

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

lans for a new cannabis greenhouse equipped with a state-of-the-art odorcontrol system unanimously sailed through the county Planning Commission on Wednesday, September 1. Even the commission’s two biggest anti-odor critics — Michael Cooney and John Parke — spoke positively of the plan unveiled by Cresco to install carbon filters or scrubbers inside the proposed greenhouse. This new system — proposed last month just hours before the Planning Commission was first scheduled to vote on the project — was unveiled in response to 700 emails of community input. Some expressed concern over the original odor-modifying system — Byers Scientific’s vapor system — that Cresco planned to use. After two years, it’s clear the Byers system has not quieted community or planning commissioners’ concern that the problem has been adequately addressed. Commissioner Cooney, whose district includes Carpinteria, noted growers who violate the odor-control rules cannot adequately be disciplined, because there’s still no technologically reliable way to determine the point of origin for offending smells. In that context, Cooney said, what Cresco is proposing constitutes “progress.”

Unlike other operators who might be out to make “a quick buck,” Commissioner Parke stated, “Cresco’s willing to make the long-term investment needed.” Commissioner Larry Ferini was even more enthusiastic in his praise of the project. “It’s what everyone’s been asking for.” Representing the newly formed Save Arroyo Paredon Watershed, Maureen Claffey argued the commissioners should deny the project because its operations could imperil endangered species endemic to the watershed abutting the project, such as steelhead trout, red-legged frogs, and tidewater gobies. The commissioners disagreed, arguing that the proposal respected the 100-foot creek set-back rule designed to protect environmentally sensitive habitats. Claffey can appeal the commission’s decision to the Board of Supervisors. Should Cresco’s approval stand, the company has been given 12 months to perfect the proposed new carbon-scrubbing technology, still in the prototype development stage. Until it’s been established that the new technology can perform as billed, Cresco proposed that the vapor system initially submitted be installed and kept operational for at least six months as a backup. —Nick Welsh


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COVID TESTING CONT’D FROM P.7

ENVIRONMENT

Undersea Wine-Aging Business Struggles for State Approval by Jun Starkey Santa Barbara–based wine-storage business has patented and begun an innovative undersea aging process, sinking hundreds of bottles to the floor of the Santa Barbara Channel and pulling up bottles encrusted with sea life — but the process of regulating the project has been a complicated one. Ocean Fathoms began deploying the wine containers in 2016, according to a California Coastal Commission staff report. Three cages were initially put down and taken out; later, a 64-cubic-foot cage was put down in March 2019, about 70 feet down and two-thirds of a mile off the coast from Fernald Point in Summerland. After members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers made California Coastal Commission staff aware of the situation in August 2020, Ocean Fathoms was served with a notice of violation in February 2021. The company then filed for an after-the-fact ROUGH SEAS AHEAD: A Santa Barbara–based wine-storage authorization for the initial cages put down. business has recently run afoul of the California Coastal Commission. Although the Coastal Commission never officially met regarding this issue, the staff report recommendation was to deny an after-the“I can’t yet see the environmental impact fact authorization. One of the key arguments in that would be negative,” Williams said. “I don’t the report was that the cages, approximately four assume the addition of strata is bad for an environment.” feet by four feet, would harm marine life. “The facility would adversely affect marine The effect on the environment might not be as biological resources,” the report read, “by dis- much as some worry, but the effect on the taste, turbing, crushing and smothering marine life Hahn claimed, is undeniable. within the facility’s installation footprint, altering Most described the difference in taste as simply the seafloor habitat within that area.” “different,” especially when tasting the normally Emanuele Azzaretto, one of the main founders aged versus the ocean-aged bottles side by side. of Ocean Fathoms, claims if any damage were The taste was also described as having “smoother done to the ocean by the process, it would be edges,” where the lines between sweet, bold, and minimal. tart are blurred. “We’re trying to be as neutral as possible,” he “The process absolutely changes the wine for said. the better,” said Hahn. Azzaretto said he has a passion for animal conThe bottles vary in look depending on the time servation, working in Africa at a wildlife preserve of year they were put down, as well as many other for many years before coming to Santa Barbara. factors that affect marine life. The bottles down “I’ve worked 15 years in game management; I’m during 2018’s 1/9 Debris Flow in Montecito were sure I can work it out,” he said. covered in worms and had a swirling pattern of Azzaretto also said the cages are raised so that debris. Bottles from the beginning of the panthey stand on four feet, allowing any marine life demic, when fewer people were in the water or on the beaches, were encrusted with barnacles. to pass under them. Azzaretto and cofounder Todd Hahn said they Each bottle has a unique character that cannot have wanted to work with local authorities to con- be replicated, Azzaretto said. tinue this project, but since it is the first project Ocean Fathoms’ wine is not available in stores of its kind, it has been difficult to find the proper or at any local wineries, but the company would channel to go through. like to work with local vineyards in the future. “It’s been a push-around for a long time,” “Why take it to another wine community?” Azzaretto said, explaining that he went to the Azzaretto asked. Santa Barbara Harbormaster and the United Williams said the addition of this company States Coast Guard to find the best point to drop could further Santa Barbara’s reputation as a premier wine-tasting destination. the cages. The company has some local support, most “I would love it if Santa Barbara wines got on notably County Supervisor Das Williams, who the map because of this.” said the local benefit of an innovative project is It is currently unknown when the project will worth looking into, and that the environmental be brought before the Coastal Commission again. n impact might not be as distressing as thought.

A

CAR L PER RY

Ocean Fathoms Denied After-the-Fact Permit for Underwater Wine Cages in S.B. Channel

the patient is re-sampled and the genetic material re-tested on a different, independent testing platform. PCR testing is not a simple yesor-no equation. For patients who have not adequately blown their noses beforehand, for example, an abundance of nasal mucus can interfere with the test. With COVID, the virus can take up to seven days to incubate in the body. If a person is tested too soon, a positive person could test negative. And PCR testing is so sensitive that it can pick up even a small remnant of the virus — well after a person is no longer infectious. Complicating matters even more, COVID sheds its viral loads at unpredictable rates. The intensity of infection often has little relationship to the intensity of symptoms displayed. The situation improved significantly in the third quarter of last year with the introduction of the newer, cheaper, and much faster — 15 minutes — antigen home test kit. This registers the presence of antibodies activated by the body

CONCEPTION

CONT’D FROM P. 9

charges of seaman’s manslaughter against the Conception’s captain, Jerry Boylan, who pleaded not guilty in February. The story pieced together in the new lawsuit refers to two crewmembers who were awakened in their top-deck bunks by loud noises and a cry of distress. Second Cook Michael Kohls ran to the stairs leading to the main deck and was met by f lames. According to the complaint, “Apart from passenger Berenice Felipe — whom Kohls had apparently heard cry out as she pushed open the escape directly above her bunk and fled overboard through the fire — everyone else aboard CONCEPTION was trapped down below in the bunk room where they died from the combined effects of fire and asphyxiation after trying to fight the blaze with the fire extinguisher in the cabin.” According to the coroner reports obtained by the Independent, Felipe’s was the last body found. Having been in the ocean for 11 days, it was rapidly decomposing. Toxicology reports indicated a carbon monoxide level of less than 10 percent; humans normally have about 2 percent CO in their blood. Among all but three of the victims in the early coroner’s reports, carbon monoxide levels were 39-75 percent, though the coroner gave smoke INDEPENDENT.COM

to fight the infection. The antigen test, however, fails to pick up very recent infections, so it poses a significant risk of false negatives. But positive results from an antigen test means the person is definitely infectious. When the COVID curtain first descended, Comer said, PDL could test maybe a dozen samples a day. Today, he and his team can handle 2,000. And then there are the pointof-care tests — PCR tests that can be finished in 15 minutes — administered to anyone and everyone entering the Emergency Department whether for COVIDrelated symptoms or something else. Staff members are tested twice a week. And patients are tested every five days as a precautionary measure to ensure they didn’t contract it while under the care of Cottage. The public at large, Comer said, does not see how hard the clinical lab technicians work to keep the testing labs humming seven days a week. “These are the unsung heroes,” he said. n

inhalation as the cause of death for all of them. This included Berenice Felipe and Diana Adamic, who also had a CO level of 10; too little remained of a third victim to conduct blood chemistry tests. No autopsies were performed for the victims. As the enormity of the Conception disaster sunk in on the mainland, the coroner’s determination that the victims had died of asphyxiation and that the extensive burn damage had occurred after death may have been a whisper of comfort for some. However, the plaintiffs’ attorneys have alleged in their Second Cause of Action the extreme fear and anguish among the victims, several of whom were found dressed in outerwear and wearing shoes or boots. This section of the lawsuit seeks to gain pre-death pain and suffering damages, or “survival damages” both pecuniary and nonpecuniary, for the plaintiffs. The lawsuit, filed two years after the fire, is brought against the United States of America as the party responsible for the Coast Guard. Asked for comment on the lawsuit, U.S. Coast Guard spokesperson Kurt Fredrickson said that he “cannot provide any amplifying information at this time as it is Coast Guard policy not to comment on pending litin gation.”

SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Digging the Dog at Toro Creek

OIL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL: Two weeks ago, I razzed Andy Caldwell — the loudest,

longest, hardest-working member of Santa Barbara’s vast right-wing conspiracy — for at times being, well, shrill. In part, I was hoping to demonstrate that the word “shrill” was not inherently sexist. I thought I made my point. Andy responded, telling me I had missed not just the point but also the story. Unfortunately, he was right too. The story involved a slow-moving bureaucratic train wreck of ineptitude by government agencies that allowed about 630 gallons of crude oil to ooze out of a pipeline burned during the 2017 Thomas Fire and into Toro Creek, thus killing 17 small birds, 13 bats, and one squirrel. In addition, 91 small frogs had been so traumatized they had to be sent to animal rehab, where they enjoyed a steady diet of miniature crickets. Mistakes happen. But the real problem here was that the federal, state, and local agencies charged with preventing and cleaning such oil spills instead engaged in a jaw-dropping lassitude of buck passing, which has seriously delayed any cleanup. Back in 1882, the Occidental Mining and Petroleum Corporation drilled 210 feet into the face of Toro Canyon’s steep, treacherous hillside, about 1,600 feet above sea level, between Summerland and Carpinteria. Searching for oil, they stumbled onto something even more valuable — water.

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For the next 60 years, they sold that water to the kooky, spooky community of Summerland, whose early inhabitants famously spoke with the dead and less famously supported such causes as the abolition of slavery and a woman’s right to vote. Along the way, Occidental disappeared, leaving behind an open-pit mining tunnel that was still oozing about 30 gallons of oil a day. By 1992, that oil got into the creek and made its way into the ocean. California Fish and Wildlife intervened, requiring the property owner to install equipment to separate and store the oil from the water. In 1997, a vandal destroyed that device, known as an oil/water separator, allowing 3,000 gallons of crude oil to cascade downstream

four and a half miles to the Pacific Ocean. This got the attention of the EPA and the Coast Guard, who — along with Fish and Wildlife — declared the disaster a Joint Incident Command. The EPA built a quick-and-dirty, low-tech solution — another oil/water separator that could hold up to 6,000 gallons and loudly congratulated itself for its ingenuity. It was so low-tech, in fact, that the EPA, we would learn later, never bothered applying for any of the necessary permits. Ten years later, the EPA passed the buck to the state’s Regional Water Quality Control Board, which in turn contracted with Santa Barbara County Public Works Department

to handle the day-to-day cleanup. That contract expired in 2019.

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All this is important because when a county water-quality ranger first discovered the oil leak on August 3, 2020, it was totally unclear where the proverbial buck stopped and out of whose pocket that buck would come. What we know is this: On August 21, 2020, county employee Cathleen Garnand notified all state emergency response officials that an oil spill — about three feet by five feet and one foot deep — had saturated the ground about 15 feet from Toro Creek. Though she concluded that the oil was not likely to reach the creek, on September 30, county firefighters installed a couple of booms in the creek downstream from the spill site just in case. By January 22, 2021, the situation changed drastically. Garnand was freaking out. “The leaking oil has now reached the creek. The impact grows ever more challenging every day,” she wrote state emergency planners, urgently pleading for help. “Whatever the oil response team has in their toolbox; we may need more than booms right now.” However, cleanup did not begin until July 6, 2021. That’s almost a year after the leak was first detected and more than six months after Garnand’s hair-on-fire red alert. Good thing no one was at risk other than the 17 birds, 13 bats, and one squirrel. County Public Works administrators spent the intervening time haggling with the state’s regional water board, renegotiating the contract and the $140,000 fee for emergency cleanup work.

Then the water board insisted the contract get approval from the county supervisors. That date would get delayed. The water board also insisted that all cleanup contracts the county signed be put out to bid first. I’m not making this up. When the supervisors finally got around to approving the deal in early May, oil was still leaking into the creek. When Caldwell pitched a fit two weeks ago, he was, in fact, a little shrill. He likened the Toro Creek spill to the Plains All American Pipeline disaster of 2015, in which 144,000 gallons of oil got into the ocean. He likened it to infamous spills of Greka Oil, such a serial environmental offender that the company had to change its name. Where were all the outraged enviros? he demanded. If an oil company were involved, he charged, you couldn’t have shut them up. He’s got a point. But maybe the bigger point here is that oil rarely ends well. Like, almost never. The sweet, kooky community of idealists, dreamers, and psychics first envisioned by Summerland’s founder, Henry Lafayette Williams, got iced out by the onslaught of big oil. Summerland’s very first well was drilled in 1877. By 1900, 22 companies were drilling 305 wells there. Even back then, 59 wells had been abandoned. Many of those, we now know, never got cleaned up. We are still paying the price today. Good thing I’m a dog and not a bat, a squirrel, or a bird. —Nick Welsh


BJ Stapen 1939 – 2021

Plein Air Artist

B J (Betty Jean) Stapen, the eldest of three children, was born on October 23, 1939 to William and Elizabeth Winstead Lloyd of Raleigh, North Carolina. She passed away on June 12 from complications of head injuries suffered in a fall. Growing up in Raleigh she attended Fred Olds Elementary and Needham Broughton High School, class of 1957. Her numerous lifelong friends remember her as being lots of fun, upbeat, energetic, and extremely talented. One said, “Even when she was ten years old she was innately artistic.” Broughton was known for its outstanding art department of which BJ took full advantage. Extracurricular activities included working on set designs for plays and decorating the auditorium for school dances. In the 5th grade she and some friends signed on as Girl Scouts and remained in their troop all throughout school. After graduating Broughton she attended a liberal arts school, Meredith College, for one year before marrying her high school sweetheart Jerry Truelove with whom she had a son, Jonathan, born April 5, 1960. She worked part time for the Norfolk Southern Railroad and later for Jack Wardlaw, an innovative and highly successful insurance salesman who taught her entrepreneurship. Between 1968 and 1970 she was enrolled in the prestigious North Carolina State University School of Design in Raleigh, where she took classes in art, architecture, and design. B J always marched to the tune of her own drum. While her classmates listened to pop and rock and roll music, she preferred Dave Brubeck and jazz. Her first car, which she bought on her own, was a red MGA British sports car, followed by an Austin-Healey a few years later. When I met her in Denver in 1985 she was driving a 5 speed 1982 BMW 320is that she absolutely loved. That car was replaced by a Pininfarina (successor to Fiat) convertible which she cherished for many years, especially here in Santa Barbara. She liked that it had a trunk big enough to lay flat a 24 x 36 inch canvas and space behind the front seats for supplies. After her marriage to Jerry ended in divorce, she met Daniel Young, a landscape architect with whom she and Jon moved to Muncie, Indiana where he had obtained a teaching position at Ball State University, and where B.J. earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree in painting. They also bought and operated a full scale tree and plant nursery for which B J designed newspaper ads and helped to manage. After eight dreary Indiana winters they relocated to Denver where she enrolled at the University of Colorado, Denver campus, and received a Masters Degree in Interior Architecture in 1981. Looking forward to a new chapter in her life when her marriage dissolved, she leased an apartment in a high-rise overlooking Cheesman Park, and was hired by Gensler and Associates, a global design and architecture firm founded in San Francisco. An enthusiastic team player, her talent was quickly recognized by senior designers and clients. Several prominent developers conditioned their contracts upon her being specified as a designer on their projects. Among her major projects were the Beaver Creek Ski Resort in Avon, Colorado, including The Charter at Beaver Creek Condominiums; the R.J. Reynolds corporate offices renovation in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, numerous commercial office spaces in downtown Denver, building projects for Denver real estate developer Pat Broe, and Realities, a collection of wholesale showrooms, offices, and high end retail shops on South Broadway that brought to America for the first and only time, the Paris based Printemps Department Store. The grand opening gala which we attended together with Art Gensler and Printemps dignitaries was quite the party. She met Joseph Stapen, a Denver psychiatrist and her future husband, at a Wednesday night singles event featuring live jazz music hosted by the Denver Art Museum. Before long they were head over heels in love. Following a trip to New York to meet Joe’s family and a two week trip to Italy in July where they purchased wedding bands at a small jewelry shop on the Ponte Vecchio in Florence and put on each other’s hands that night, they officially wed in the backyard of B J’s house on August 2, 1985.

They had known each other for 3 ½ months. B J continued to work for Gensler while becoming a stepmom to Joe’s two sons, Adam 14 and Joshua 11, for whom he had full custody. Hardly a weekend went by when one of the nights wasn’t spent partying at the iconic jazz club El Chapultepec where there was never a cover charge and people from all walks of life came together for the music and the vibe. We enjoyed getting to know the local musicians whom we befriended, particularly tenor sax player Freddie Rodriguez, Sr. a Denver jazz colossus who headed the weekend ensemble for over 30 years. Nestled 9,000 feet high in the Sangre de Christo Mountains overlooking the San Luis Valley in Southern Colorado, sits what was B J.’s favorite place in the whole world, Valley View Hot Springs, a rustic clothing optional retreat which she and Joe continued to visit regularly after moving to California. B J loved camping. Before meeting Joe she had backpacked and camped at many national parks throughout the country. One of our memorable trips was tent camping around Nova Scotia and Cape Breton. A favorite vacation destination was Santa Fe. We both loved Northern New Mexican cuisine, especially the spicy red and green chile at restaurant La Choza, and liked revisiting galleries on Canyon Road, Paseo de Peralta, and elsewhere in town. BJ didn’t just love nature, it’s where she experienced spiritual communion from the time she spent exploring and playing with neighborhood kids in the woods and creeks near her home, to hiking and backpacking in national parks and forests, and over twenty five years of re-creating in her image the natural environment of the Central Coast. One of the best decisions we ever made, at her urging, was to leave Denver and move to California, arriving in Santa Barbara in 1994. Finally, after having painted and exhibited some in Raleigh and Muncie, but with little time to do so in Denver, B J set to doing full time what she had always wanted to do, which was to paint scenery outdoors. She was adept at watercolors and both acrylics and oils, and though she won First Prize at the Lompoc Brushes and Blues Festival in 2002 with a painting on yupo paper, she preferred to paint only in oils. Her landscapes with lush brushstrokes and vibrant color captured the atmosphere and emotion of scenery in the California Impressionist Plein Air tradition. She began showing her work and gaining notice at the weekly Santa

Barbara Arts and Crafts Show along Cabrillo Blvd. where she enjoyed engaging with onlookers and customers, and continued to exhibit there for many years. Her paintings began appearing on the walls of Gallery 113 and at Santa Barbara Art Association shows at the Faulkner Gallery and other venues around town. Over the years she became a mainstay at landmark events such as Art Walk at the Museum of Natural History where she exhibited both as a juried participant and at an outdoor booth; the Fine Art Santa Barbara show at the Courthouse Sunken Gardens, the Semana Nautica Art Show, the Santa Barbara Mission 4th of July show, and the Los Olivos Annual Quick Draw. She was also a member of Studio Artists, and has been a juried participant in Sonoma and San Luis Obispo Art Festivals. A contributor to the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County, she participated in Arroyo Hondo Preserve fundraisers and was passionate about protecting the land, such as the Carpinteria Bluffs and the Cow Pasture, from real estate development. BJ joined Gallery Los Olivos in 2006, where she occasionally mounted a month long solo artist show in the large front room. She was too modest to ever mention this to anyone, but during one such show she sold at least one painting a day for eighteen straight days, setting a gallery record for the largest monthly gross sales. She experimented now and then with different applications and eclectic styles. Her paintings were recognizable and distinguished by their paint quality and use of color, particularly orange, which in turn influenced other landscape artists. B J loved to paint vineyards and wished she had done more. She had a natural flair for original design and composition and was often able to complete a large painting in little more than two hours on location, sometimes adding finishing touches in the studio. Her work is on permanent display at the original Chumash Resort Hotel and at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. She was honored to be chosen by United Airlines Hemispheres Magazine as the solo featured painter for an article about art in Santa Barbara in their December 2007 issue. She was a member of Oil Painters of America and the California Art Club, and a founding member of SCAPE – Southern California Artists Painting for the Environment. Those who knew her best from many shared years of attending Jim Armstrong’s and later Tony Askew’s Thursday morning Adult Education class at the Schott Center, as well as others with whom she painted on location,remember her for her generosity of spirit, friendship, talent, knowledge, and dedication to her work. She was a loyal and caring friend, quick to offer help in any way. She enjoyed gardening and planting at home, and as a former owner of a nursery, had an impressive knowledge of plants and shrubs. She was ever gracious, beautiful inside and out, and an inspiration to others. Her sweet smile nourished my soul. As much as B J loved painting, love and devotion to the man in her life was paramount above all. She lived a life of purpose, fulfillment, style, beauty, love, happiness and grace. Tony Askew, Westmont College Professor of Art, described BJ this way, “A very creative and talented artist who embraced beauty, celebrated the landscape, and had a unique warmth and hospitality. Greatly loved by other artists, she was a gift to those of us who had the opportunity to know and paint with her. She’s greatly missed. Her beautiful work is a lasting legacy for us all.” Words cannot express the sorrow of her loss. BJ is survived by her husband Joseph, her sister Judy Lumsden (Joe) of Fort McKavett, Texas, stepsons Adam and Joshua Stapen of Denver, niece Molly Lloyd of Atlanta, and nephews Matt Lloyd of Atlanta and Joey Lumsden of Houston. She was preceded in death by her son Jon, her brother Kenneth, and her niece Amanda Lumsden, DVM. Donations in her name can be made to the Land Trust for Santa Barbara and the BJ Stapen Plein Air Art Scholarship Fund (in development) of the Santa Barbara Foundation. A memorial gathering to honor her life and memory will be arranged in the near future. Email memorialbj@gmail.com for information about time and place.

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By JOSEPH STAPEN SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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obituaries Marie L. Christiansen 8/21/1926 - 8/1/2021

Cecia Ohringer Hess

Marie L. Christiansen, a native of Santa Barbara passed away August 1, 2021, in Pleasanton, California. Marie was born August 21, 1926, in Santa Barbara and attended Franklin School, Santa Barbara Junior High, and Santa Barbara High School. Upon graduation in 1944, Marie went to San Jose State College and earned a nursing degree, becoming an R.N. She served in the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corp which took her to the Panama Canal Zone. While in the Canal Zone Marie met Paul Christiansen, the love of her life. They were married in 1952 and celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary last September. Paul and Marie moved from Panama back to Santa Barbara to raise a family. While raising David and Cathy, Marie enjoyed a very successful nursing career in obstetrics at St. Francis Hospital, in psychiatry at Santa Barbara County General, and later in Public Health for Santa Barbara County. Marie retired in 1988, culminating a career as a true professional who deeply cared about every patient she saw. Marie was proceeded in death by her parents Emeterio and Ynez Rios, brother David Rios, and her granddaughter Alyson Christiansen. She is survived by her husband Paul, her son David Christiansen (Kris), her daughter Cathy Wagner (David), and her niece Suzanne Rios Johnson (Hadley). She is also survived by grandchildren Nicholas Christiansen, Jacquelyn Sinclair (Tommy), Jillyn Wagner, Brian Wagner (Autumn), and numerous other family members. A funeral mass will be held Friday, September 24, 2021, at 10:00 AM at St. Raphael Catholic Church in Goleta, California. In lieu of flowers, a donation in Marie’s name may be made to one of the following: Aly Christiansen Memorial Scholarship c/o Bishop Manogue High School 110 Bishop Manogue Drive Reno, NV. 89511 Santa Barbara Humane Society 5399 Overpass Road Santa Barbara, CA. 93111 16

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9/1/1946 - 8/28/2021

Cecia Ohringer Hess, of Santa Barbara, CA, passed away on Saturday, August 28th, 2021 at the age of 74. She is survived by her beloved husband, Milton Hess; sons, Frederick Hess (Joleen Okun) and Sanford (Elizabeth Belber) Hess; brothers, David Ohringer, Lee (Hedy Wertheim) Ohringer, and Jack Ohringer (Jamie Szabadi); grandchildren, Eli, Grayson, and Blake Hess; nieces, Carla Engle and Alison Ohringer; and nephew, Ron Ohringer. She was predeceased by her parents, Sara Rita and Alfred Ohringer; and former husband, Philip Laurence Cohen. Cecia grew up in the Squirrel Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh, PA and attended Taylor Allderdice High School. She went on to receive a BA from Point Park University and a MEd from the University of Virginia. Cecia and Milton met at a Friday evening service at Agudas Achim synagogue in Alexandria, Virginia and were married in June of 1985. She loved working with children during her career as a teacher. Outside of work Cecia had many hobbies, including travel, reading, volunteering, bridge, and Mah Jongg. She served on the Women’s Board of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and volunteered with the Santa Barbara Jewish Federation. Cecia was known for her sense of humor and kindness to everyone, and she cherished her family and friends. Although Cecia was diagnosed with lupus in her teens and lived with it for the rest of her life, she managed her health with care and dignity and lived each day to the fullest. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to the Lupus Research Alliance, 275 Madison Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10016, to help to find cures for this debilitating autoimmune disease. Services at Sol Levinson’s Chapel, 8900 Reisterstown

SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

Road, Pikesville, MD 21208, on Friday, September 3rd, 2021 at 1:00 pm. Interment Baltimore Hebrew Belair Road Cemetery. Please see Levinson’s website for the webcasting link. A reception will follow, then Mr. Hess will be receiving friends at home in Santa Barbara on Sunday and Monday. www.sollevinson.com

Ann Victoria White 12/3/1934 - 8/14/2021

Victoria White passed away peacefully on August 14, 2021. To some she will be remembered by her married name, Victoria Owens, and many will remember her as Corey White. An artist of many talents, she expressed herself as a poet, a painter, an actor, and a director before settling on her role as a playwright. In the magazine Arabesque in 1982, the poet Perie J. Longo asked White, “How did you get into playwriting?” “I wanted to do a feminist play, and I wanted to do it with humor. I didn’t find one that suited me. That got me started. I’d never thought of myself as a writer before... It opened up a whole new world.…Humor gives it that distance.” The first feminist play she wrote was a collaboration with Ellen Geiger and Mary Small, Toni McCarty writing the songs. Ladies, Girls, Chicks, Babes, Dames, Dolls and Bitches was a spoof of women’s roles in film. In December 1975, The Santa Barbara News-Press wrote, “The show is fresh, sassy, bold, bright, compelling and a lot more. In short, it’s a smash.” In April, 1982, Attorney Gail Rappaport produced Victoria White’s Gertrude!, a girl-meets-girl musical about Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas. It played to sold out audiences. It was followed in 1989 by FISSION!, produced by Rappaport and directed by White at SBCC’s Garvin theater. The Santa Barbara Independent reported, “White has fashioned…an engaging portrait of Silkwood…FISSION! is a bold and provocative leap into little-charted

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musical waters.” The Drama Coach, a comedy-drama inspired by her beloved mentor Mary Tarsi, was the first play she wrote using the name Corey White. The LA Weekly wrote, “White’s play continually surprises us with its humor, its handling of a complicated political trauma and its refusal to sentimentalize its heroine’s dilemma.” Corey White was nominated for the L.A. Weekly Theater Award for Playwriting in 1994. She was born Ann Victoria White in Mason City, Iowa, December 6, 1934. Soon she became ”Vicki,” the precocious child of two young artists, Barbara and Robert White. Her mother claimed, "She was dictating stories as soon as she could talk.” When she was seventeen, her talent was recognized in Seventeen Magazine. In January 1952, Seventeen published both her poetry and her powerful paintings of wild horses. The magazine reported, “At seventeen, her work is rich, vivid…It was only last year that Vicki had a one-man show in Los Angeles.” She attended Hollywood High and The Happy Valley School in Ojai. White later studied at the renowned Goodman Theater School in Chicago and earned her B.A. in Theater at UCSB. In the Seventies, she was instrumental in operating Santa Barbara’s Baudelaire’s, an Avant Garde night spot famous for its live jazz and for its weekly improvisational revue. Stagefright! was the improv comedy group with Victoria White and Laezer Schlomkowitz founding members. The Santa Barbara News and Reviews wrote on March 23, 1973, “The company is very well-rehearsed, and it shows, not only in the expert comic timing, but also in the constant influx of new material.” Stagefright! also played the Comedy Club in L.A. White continued painting and writing, delighting friends with her sense of humor and her insightful conversation. She loved a fresh carafe of coffee, (hold the martinis,) a bouquet of wildflowers, a willing horse, jazz devas, a game of bridge, the yellow motorcycle, a coven of cats, some men, and many more women. In the past few years, she experienced dementia, yet managed to maintain her warm spirit and her zany way of looking at things. When

eventually she was ready to go, she simply stopped eating. On Saturday, August 14, 2021, she died, and left us wishing for one more curtain call. Her ashes will be scattered with roses at sea. “The Empress” from Deck, Poems for the Tarot, Corey White (2000) Oh she had grace and elegance that defied Even the wild hogs rutting, even the starved wolf would roll upon its back with a lolling smile. Flocks of birds, at the lift of an eyebrow flew down, horses in the pasture nudged her arm. All of us longed for her company, I did cartwheels on the lawn in hope of a glance. Why, I wasn’t sure, except I knew she loved the world and the world in turn loved her and there was a secret I could learn—if only I could run fast enough to catch her, hold tight to the hem of her honeycolored skirt.

Margery Baragona 11/5/1930 - 8/21/2021

Margery Diane Baragona, born at Santa Barbara’s Cottage Hospital November 5, 1930 to Louis and Lillian Marcus, died August 21, 2021. An active realtor in Santa Barbara and Goleta for more than two decades she loved her family and wide circle of friends, and was renowned for gathering them together. She enjoyed travel, domestic and international and was an avid reader. For the recent decade she wrote and published in the local Genealogical Society’s journal. Margery will rest with Anthony, her husband of more than a half-century. She is survived by her husband James Wilson, sons Marc (Lynn) of Goleta, Paul (Patricia) of Bend, Oregon, Matt (Ai Wah) in Singapore, seven grandchildren, and two great grandchildren. Celebration of Life service to be announced. Here is a link to a file that has a few of Margery’s articles describing her memories of Santa Barbara.


obituaries Deanna Alisa Vazquez 1978 - 1998

Forever in our hearts Mom and Dad

Barbara Joan Kaplan 12/18/1936 - 8/15/2021

Barbara Joan Kaplan passed away peacefully on August 15, 2021, after a valiant struggle with lung cancer, surrounded by her loving and devoted family. Drawn to people in an almost magnetic way, she was a force of nature and an inspiration to everyone who shared her life. Simply said, to know Barbara was to love her, to appreciate her boundless energy, her great zest for life, and her endless ability to share from the heart. She gave and received love deeply and gloried in her family and friends. Barbara was born in Brooklyn, New York on December 18, 1936, to Lottie and Nathan Gradman. Her cherished twin sisters Ilene and Sandy was born April 5, 1939. Unfortunately, the three girls had to overcome a very painful and difficult unsettled childhood when their mother became ill and was frequently hospitalized. The Gradman Girls were separated from each other at times and struggled mightily. But they supported each other, forged an iron-clad bond, and somehow beat the odds. Barbara’s positive energy and undaunted spirit enabled her to charge ahead, and that she did. She married young, became the proud mother of three sons, Lee, Kenny, and Glenn, and eventually moved to California where she raised her boys as a single mother when her marriage ended. Showing remarkable

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strength and determination to achieve her dream of a college education, she attended College of Marin and eventually earned a PhD in Psychology at University of California, Berkeley. Barbara also taught at Antioch University, Santa Barbara in their Clinical Psychology program. Not finished yet, she went on to a post-graduate degree in Behavioral Medicine at Harvard University. From 2005 to 2020 Barbara achieved great success and satisfaction working at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara in the Trauma Center’s Substance Use Evaluation team, and the Addiction Consult service. Her adoring colleagues considered her “one of the most talented, respected and loved members of the Cottage team”. Smart, sensitive and “lovingly direct” she impacted many and helped save lives – a well chosen profession indeed! After two more marriages, she finally found her greatest happiness with a cherished old friend, Len Kaplan, who was the true love of her life. Barbara had an insatiable curiosity that led her on a road to discovery. She always felt comfortable in the natural world and when she discovered the grandeur and beauty of Yosemite – she was hooked. After many trips it became a refuge – a place to renew herself. But there were other adventures and places to discover with Len, and they became ardent travelers and energetic hikers, full of enthusiasm exploring new cultures and making new friends. One of her friends said Barbara gave her “permission to see the wonder of love and the passion of discovery”. For Barbara, every trip was “one of the best ever “. Always drawn to the arts, over the years they acquired an impressive collection of art from the many countries they visited. Barbara was a full participant in a life of giving and sharing. She gave her time and talent to many organizations and was part of a “Women’s Fund”, that enables women to combine their charitable gifts into significant grants to help women. Her love of food translated into her charitable work. She and Len volunteered at Food from

the Heart, a non-profit that prepares and delivers food to those in need. Throughout her life she was a voracious reader, and actively participated in not just one, but two Book Clubs. Movies also captivated her, and Barbara and Len were veteran volunteers at the annual Santa Barbara Film Festival. Barbara always paid attention to the best things life offered her. She treasured her family and friends most of all – they were her lifeline and she was always there to love and nourish each and everyone. Not one to turn away from troubles, if she couldn’t fix things, she offered comfort and support, and when necessary, used her impressive negotiating skills to solve the problem. When engaged in political discourse, she was an informed force to be reckoned with and, surely, converted many of her adversaries. All those who were lucky enough to know Barbara were not only blessed, but more likely to live happy, vibrant, and inspired lives, just as she did – a truly priceless gift. She will never be forgotten. Barbara is survived by her husband Len Kaplan, her son’s Lee Kaplan, Kenny Kaplan and Glenn & Bianca Kaplan, her stepchildren Debbie Kaplan & Jeff Hoffman, David & Julie Kaplan, and Jo and David Gartenberg, her ten grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, her two sisters, Ilene & spouse Leslie Epstein, and Sandy Gradman & spouse Larry McKenna, and two nephews and three nieces. A Celebration of Life Memorial Service was held on August 19 in Santa Barbara. In memory of Barbara, contributions can be made to the Hospice of Santa Barbara and VNA Health Santa Barbara. Her family and friends deeply appreciate the extraordinary care and comfort both organizations provided Barbara and will be forever grateful. Barbara’s Poem So, this is how it all ends, You work, you strive, you do your best You love your family and your friends, You live your life with zest. No matter what, your

time will come, There is no cheating the deadly one So, make your peace and go with grace Who knows, it might be a better place. Barbara Kaplan July 1, 2021

Gail Johnson Beust 9/8/1932 - 7/17/2021

Mother, grandmother, volunteer, animal lover and former real estate agent Gail Johnson Beust passed away on Saturday, July 17th at her home in Santa Barbara. She was 88. Gail was born, raised, and educated in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, attending Mary Baldwin College. The daughter of Gale Lloyd Leap and Rose Toscano Leap of Waynesboro, Virginia. At a very young age Gail developed a love of animals and nature often telling detailed stories about her pets and the time she borrowed her neighbor’s horse. Gail grew up surrounded by animals and was particularly fond of horses. She was fortunate enough to own several horses and was especially fond of “Wink” that she owned while in Concord living in the Annursnac Hill neighborhood. Mother’s Day 2021 was especially memorable, Gail planned a long weekend at The Alisal Ranch in Santa Ynez and Gail, Greg and Jay went on a 2-hour trail ride. Gail moved to Plainfield, New Jersey with her mother, Rose, and sister, Angela, in the late 1950’s. Rose opened a dress shop and Gail had a dream of being a stewardess for United Airlines. She wore glasses which immediately disqualified her for the job but was encouraged to apply for a regional ticket office in Newark. She quickly demonstrated her natural ability for sales and customer service and was promoted to the Manhattan ticket office eventually moving to lower Manhattan. It was in New York that she met and then soon married Raymond Earle Johnson.

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They loved living in the “Village” and enjoyed all that New York had to offer. Ray was in advertising and was promoted and accepted a position in Houston, Texas. Greg Johnson was born in Houston in 1964 and soon thereafter Ray was asked to move back to the New York office and the family moved to Ridgefield, Connecticut. Jay Johnson was born in 1967. The family then moved to Concord, Massachusetts when Ray was promoted to the Boston office. The family lived in Concord for 16 years enjoying the Annursnac Hill neighborhood and especially all the wonderful friendships that developed over the years. Gail started her 45-year career in real estate at Marden and Patterson in Concord in 1974 and recently retired from Village Properties in Santa Barbara in 2019. She enjoyed all her wonderful business partners at JM Barrett & Company in Concord and her great associates at Sotheby’s and Village Properties in Santa Barbara. Gail moved to Santa Barbara in 1986 and soon thereafter married Walter Beust. They lived above the Mission in the foothills of Santa Barbara. Gail lost Walter to Lymphoma in 2007 and then lost her house in the Tea Fire in 2008. Gail demonstrated great resolve and determination and soon moved to the Riviera in Santa Barbara just above the Mission. Gail and Walter loved the arts and supported the Santa Barbara Symphony and Ensemble Players. Gail joined the Santa Barbara Club in 2009 and really enjoyed all the friendships that she made through the club. Gail is survived by her sister Angela Leap, her sons Gregory Johnson and Jay Johnson and her granddaughter Susannah Rose Johnson who will marry Benjamin York in late October. A Celebration of Life for Gail will be on September 16th at the Santa Barbaa Club. Please contact Greg Johnson for details (greg@ songequity.com). Donations in lieu of flowers can be made to the Poor Clare Nuns of Santa Barbara.

SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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Check Your Mailbox For Your Ballot for the September 14 Gubernatorial Recall Election Questions? 805-568-2200 • sbcvote.com Joseph E. Holland

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Mad About Texas?

E

lections matter. The Supreme Court matters. There is no more heartbreaking evidence of these truths than Texas, where, last week, abortion was effectively banned for the first time since the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973. The Texas legislature’s SB 8 went into effect at midnight on September 1, after the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals canceled a hearing on the law and the Supreme Court stayed silent despite requests to block the Texas law. This extreme law bans abortion at six weeks of pregnancy, before most people even know they’re pregnant. Unlike similar abortion bans in other states, which are designed to be enforced by state officials, this law gives the general public unprecedented authority to enforce the ban. SB 8 gives politicians, neighbors, and even strangers the right to sue those who provide — or just help patients get — abortion care. As further testament to its ruthless cruelty, SB 8 does not include an exception for rape, incest, or fetal diagnoses. As a result of SB 8, there are currently no health centers in Texas providing abortion after six weeks of pregnancy. The inaction by the Supreme Court on this blatantly unconstitutional ban has taken away a crucial right for millions of people in Texas. Additionally, we know that Black, Latino, Indigenous, and other people of color; those with low incomes; and people in rural areas will face the greatest barriers to accessing abortion care. And it won’t stop with Texas — legislatures in other states that are hostile to abortion rights will see this as the green light to enact their own bans on abortion. How did we get here? Tragically, SB 8 is the result of a decades-long nationwide effort to restrict abortion rights. Close to 600 abortion restrictions were introduced in state legislatures this year alone — 90 of which have been enacted. At the federal level, the Supreme Court is set to hear a case from Mississippi that is a direct challenge to Roe v. Wade. With a 6-3 conservative majority now in place, there is no reason to believe that SCOTUS isn’t gearing up to overturn Roe v. Wade entirely. California has long been a leader in the fight for reproductive freedom. But California’s safeguards against these assaults on our constitutional right to control our bodies are also at risk. The gubernatorial

recall risks California ending up with a governor who is an ardent opponent of abortion rights, unless a majority of Californians vote “No” on Question 1. The Planned Parenthood Central Coast Action Fund will never stop fighting to ensure that all people have access to reproductive health care and the ability to make decisions about their own bodies, their lives, and their futures. Today, we must fight where we are — by opening the ballots in our mailboxes and overwhelmingly rejecting this partisan attempt to install an anti-reproductive rights governor in our state. —Jenna Tosh, CEO, Planned Parenthood Central Coast Action Fund

College Housing Crisis

T

he UCSB housing situation is much worse than you reported in June this year, with landlords reporting hundreds of applicants for every rental, many offering to pay up to a year in advance and still getting turned down. Some students are sharing on Facebook that they will sleep in cars, and many are considering deferral. Meanwhile, UCSB’s housing office acknowledged there is a “crisis” but “no plan” and “no intention to allowing online access,” which they claimed was up to admissions, despite the situation. Appalling, to say the least. As a parent who just went through a rollercoaster month to finally land an off-campus apartment for my son and two other students who will be his roommates, I would simply say this — please hold the university accountable and keep this front and center in your publication. —Dean Coza, San Jose

For the Record

¶ In last week’s news story about a Superior Court appeal for a helicopter pad permit, the ruling against Pat Nesbitt was written by Judge Colleen Sterne, not Judge Thomas Anderle, a mix-up for which we apologize. ¶ The correct website for RiseUp Fitness, the mirror-less outdoor gym on Las Positas featured in last week’s paper, is riseupfitnesssb.com. ¶ In the news story on August 26 that City Council endorsements had defied expectations, we clarify that it was Planned Parenthood’s Action Fund that endorsed Mayor Cathy Murillo.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions. 18

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Opens NEXT Thursday 9/16

A Combat Veteran’s Reflections on 9/11 Gut Punch of Terrible Day Sustained Him During

Planned Parenthood California Central Coast

O

COURTESY

BY DAVID GUERRERO n Tuesday, Septem-

USAF/TSGT CEDRIC H. RUDISILL

Firefights in Iraq

ber 11, 2001, I was awakened by my sister running out of her bedroom, crying out, “They’re attacking New York! They’re attacking New York!” I sprang from my bed and rushed to the living room to turn on the television. I saw the image of one of the towers an airplane had hit. The impact had made a crater on the side of the building. Dark smoke was DEADLY DAY: Four jets were hijacked on 9/11, one crashing pouring out of it. My mother, into the Pentagon, killing 184 people. sister, brother, and I gathered around the my mother. She became an American citizen television. We couldn’t understand what we and for 43 years worked as a housekeeper were seeing. We were asking ourselves the in the affluent neighborhood of Montecito, same questions: Was this an accident? How California. Her employers treated her with could a plane fly into such a tall building by respect and paid her above-average wages with benefits. The United States had given accident? We watched the second airplane fly into her the opportunity to make a living and the second tower of the World Trade Center. seek her American dream. Watching the images on the screen, I We gasped in disbelief. This wasn’t an accident; this was deliberate. In the following knew we were going to respond with force as hour, news of two more hijacked commer- a country. I also knew that I had to respond cial planes was confirmed. One had crashed as a citizen. I needed to show my gratitude in an empty field in Pennsylvania, and the for the opportunities that this great country other had been deliberately flown into the has given to my family. So, in April 2003, I Pentagon. enlisted in the U.S. Marines as a rifleman in I couldn’t stop watching the news, and the infantry. I was assigned to 2nd Battalion, by the evening, I had fallen into a mournful 5th Marines, Golf Company, and I deployed state from the tragic images of the day. The to Ramadi, Iraq, in 2004 and 2007. scenes of women fleeing from Ground Zero, During firefights in Iraq, whenever I with their high-heeled shoes in their hands, started to feel sorry for myself, I would contrying to outrun the smoke and ash from jure images from that terrible day, of people the collapsing towers, burned into my mind. who had gotten stuck in the top floors of This country has given my family the the towers because the floors below them opportunity for a better life. My mother had were burning. These were innocent civilians come to the United States from Mexico in who had gone to work that morning, as on 1976 as an illegal immigrant. In 1986, Presi- any other day, never imagining that they dent Ronald Reagan signed the Immigra- would be faced with making the unthinktion Reform and Control Act, which gave able choice of either jumping to their deaths amnesty to undocumented immigrants like or being burned alive. Everyone remembers where they were on 9/11. The generations too young to have experienced the gut punch of that day may not be aware that the attacks were the reason we began a bombing campaign in Afghanistan. On August 31, 2021, the last U.S. service member left Afghanistan, signifying the end of America’s longest war. For me, as a veteran, Memorial Day and 9/11 are days of reflection. They are days when I remember the veterans who made the ultimate sacrifice and the innocent victims and first responders whose lives were lost that Tuesday morning. I will never forget 9/11 David Guerrero and its impact on my life. David Guerrero served in the United States Marine Corps as an infantry rifleman from 2003 to 2007. He earned his AS in Criminology and Liberal Arts from Santa Barbara City College. Guerrero transferred to UCSB in fall 2020 and is currently studying sociology and minoring in applied psychology and education studies. He plans to become a licensed clinical social worker and help veterans improve and maintain their mental wellness.

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9/3/21 10:13 AM


COURTESY

THE JOY OF

BOOKS

Planned Parenthood’s Annual Used Book-a-Thon Shines Again

I

But even though it was shortened to only a few days with a limited number of people allowed in at a time, loyal customers patiently waited for Photos by Erick Madrid hours in lines that snaked around the building for f Planned Parenthood were to write a manual a chance to buy books at very low cost. on How to Run a Used-Book Sale, chapter Pandemic precautions will be in place again one would be titled “Volunteers.” For the past for this year’s sale when it returns to the show47 years, the Santa Barbara branch has held a grounds, this time in the large exhibition hall. All hugely successful autumn book sale through the entrance and exit doors will be kept open, fans help of its dedicated volunteers — roughly 200 will run constantly in the high-ceilinged space, of them. All year long, people work at the non- face masks will be required for volunteers and profit’s Goleta warehouse, offering their time, shoppers alike, and vaccinations are mandatory talent, and muscle to sort, categorize, price, and for the volunteers working there. The McCord Annual Book Sale now puts sometimes reject the thousands of donated used books that members of the community have dropped off at the Red Shed. 100,000 volumes into happy readers’ hands every It’s an enormous project. year and is considered to be the largest used-book The Red Shed, which sits outside the warehouse, is open all sale between Los Angeles and San Francisco. year long to receive the boxes and bags of books — even durBecause more volumes are received than ing the 366 days of the 2020 leap year. The 10-day used-book can be sold, the books are re-donated to Boys sale, which will open on Thursday, September 16, at the Earl & Girls Clubs, American Indian tribes, schools Warren Showgrounds, is highly anticipated by book lovers and libraries in Africa, and even Little Libraries around the Central Coast. in the community. “The book sale gives books a Last year, during the height of the pandemic, the sale was second chance,” said Tia Blickley, one of the three held at the Goleta warehouse under strict health precautions. co-chairs for this year’s book sale. The sale generates about 10 percent of the tri-county group’s $3 million development budget, which supports a new Oxnard Clinic as well as providing health-care services for any man or woman who needs them. Chief among Planned Parenthood’s clinic services in 2019-2020 were health exams that detect early cancers, information about and treatment of sexually transmitted diseases, birth control information and services, breast exams and PAP tests, and hormone therapy for transgender patients. Abortion only made up about 3 percent of Planned Parenthood’s services. Not only books are placed in the Red Shed by the box- and bagful. Games and puzzles were plentiful this year, said Teri Brown, last year’s co-chair and now an online sales coleader, so Earl Warren will have a new games and puzzles section, as well as a boutique of Volunteers Jeanette Mustacich (left) and Sandra Eacret sort and stock used books. 20

by Jean Yamamura

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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The Mary Jane McCord Planned Parenthood Annual Book Sale takes place September 16-26 at the Earl Warren Exposition Hall, 3400 Calle Real, in Santa Barbara. The opening-night preview sale on the 16th from 4-9 p.m. gives a first-choice look at this year’s wares for a $25 admission fee. A celebration with music and a raffle will be held at 6 p.m. The sale opens with free admission on Friday, September 17, at 10 a.m. and runs through 8 p.m. that day. After that, the hours vary as follows: ➤ Sat., Sept. 18: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. ➤ Sun., Sept. 19: Noon-6 p.m. ➤ Mon., Sept. 20: Noon-8 p.m. ➤ Tue.-Thu., Sept. 21-23: Noon-6 p.m. ➤ Fri., Sept. 24: Noon-8 p.m. ➤ Sat., Sept. 25: 10 a.m.-8 p.m. ➤ Sun., Sept. 26 (Half-price day!): 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

craft goods made by artistic volunteers. Woodworkers, jewelry makers, knitters, crocheters, and quilters are among those who donated their handmade items, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the medical-care nonprofit. The sorters occasionally find an item that seems inadvertently left behind in a box, including a high-quality set of German wood-crafting tools that were found in a box one year, and an expensive watch and gold chain. The volunteers always put such items safely aside, in case someone returns to claim them. Alan Kasehagen leads a group known as the “schleppers.” True to their name, the half dozen or so volunteers do the bulk of moving boxes—heavy and light—from the Red Shed to the sorting tables. There, books are placed in broad categories such as biography, fiction, science, and so on. From those roughly sorted boxes, volunteers put them into narrower topic categories. For the last two years, because of the coronavirus, instead of working all together in large companionable groups, the volunteers came in shifts of one to do the sorting work.


C O V E R

WACKY BOOK TITLES

Christina Schowe stacks organized books into a shipping container that will make its way to Earl Warren Showgrounds. The books destined for the sale fill three 40-foot containers, and Mammoth Movers is hired to heft all the boxes, shelving, and tables and take them to the showgrounds. Once there, the “category owners,” one or two people responsible for individual genres, will set up and restock throughout the sale. Before 1974, Planned Parenthood’s annual fundraiser had been a rummage sale held in their parking lot in downtown Santa Barbara. Noticing that many great books were always donated and were popular with shoppers, the volunteer fundraising team decided to take a chance that a book sale could be successful. It turned out to be a great idea, and today, it is only the second Planned Parenthood book sale in the country. The other is a 60-year-old book sale started by volunteers in Des Moines, Iowa. Mary Jane McCord, after whom the tri-county book sale is named, was among that early group of Santa Barbara volunteers. Her dedication and leadership became the heart and soul of the fundraiser until her death in 2002. In the early days, McCord would store the tons of books in her garage, while each year, volunteers had to search out vacant State Street storefronts to house and sort the books and to hold the sale. This plan worked until one year, they could not find a vacant storefront. In 2003, Warren Hall was rented, and a warehouse was donated on Gutierrez Street for year-round sorting and packing. A few years ago, the book donations began to outgrow the capacity of the downtown warehouse, and in 2016, the volunteers and the hundreds of boxes of books moved to Goleta. Aside from the autumn book sale, one of the most fruitful book-selling avenues has turned out to be Amazon Books. Many forget that today’s gargantuan online retailer started out in 1994 as an online bookseller, literally from Jeff Bezos’s garage in Bellevue, Washington. Co-chair Blickley said they stumbled across Amazon as a retail source in a lucky accident. A few years ago, a volunteer noticed a leather-bound copy of a Boy Scout manual on the giveaway/throwaway pile, and com-

Volunteer Alan Kasehagen leads a group known as the “schleppers.”

S T O R Y

Inevitably, the book sale sorters start cracking up over some of the titles they run across. Here’s a selection:

• Everything Happens for a Reson: And Other Lies I’ve Loved • How to Live with a Neurotic Dog • My Cat Loves Me Naked • The Sex of a Hippopotamus: A Unique History of Taxes and Accounting • Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s • The Grass Is Always Greener over the Septic Tank • The End of Self-Help • Confessions of an Economic Hit Man • You Suck: A Love Story • Poetry for Crazy Cowboys and Zen Monks • How to American: An Immigrant’s Guide to Disappointing Your Parents mented, “I’ll bet we could sell that on Amazon.” Sure enough, it sold. Blickley sorts the self-help books, and more than once, she has run across titles that turn out to be from a limited print run and have great online value. “You just can’t judge a book by its cover,” Blickley said, laughing. Now, every bar code on a book is checked against Amazon pricing. But that doesn’t mean Amazon gets all the good books. A favorite location among experienced book-sale browsers is the “specials” table that holds beautifully illustrated books, rare volumes, or books with other attributes that signify extra value. One year, the table held a first edition of The Little Prince, one of 250 copies printed in English in the months before the author, French pilot Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, died while flying a reconnaissance craft during WWII. It sold in the middle four figures, Brown recalled, dinged for a torn dust jacket. And it’s not just the specials table where shoppers can find hidden gems. About a decade back, someone bought a first-edition Hemingway for a few dollars and later sold it for thousands. After legendary clarinetist Artie Shaw died in 2004, the last of his eight wives donated his books to the Planned Parenthood book sale, complete with Shaw’s penciled notations, remembered Kasehagen. They set up an “Artie Shaw” table that year, which became one of the most popular at the book sale. For most salegoers, however, the treasure is the quantity and variety of clean, used hardcovers and paperbacks. Clearly designated tables are neatly packed with cookbooks, children’s books, novels, mysteries, art history, travel, sports, photography, and computer books, and even some foreign-language books — all available for $2-4. But no matter the quantity sold, the volunteers seem to have an endless back catalog of more books to put on the floor. “From opening night on Thursday to the last weekend, about 90 percent of the books held in the back room have been moved out,” Blickley said. “We are constantly replenishing the tables.” She recalled how entire tablesful of books have disappeared at times. When the Claremont colleges were setting up a new architecture school, they bought all the art and architecture books one year. Another time, a Montecito couple bought an entire category to populate the shelves of their new library. And someone once bought all the cookbooks left over after the sale ended, she said. News of the sale spurs more people to donate books, Blickley noted. They have just begun stocking the new donations in the warehouse, getting ready for the next n year’s sale.

• Book Lust: Recommended Reading for Every Mood, Moment, and Reason • The Second-Worst Restaurant in France • Let’s Pretend This Never Happened: A Mostly True Memoir • You’re Only Old Once! A Book for Obsolete Children • Plato and a Platypus Walk into a Bar: Understanding Philosophy Through Jokes • Advanced French for Exceptional Cats

MORE WAYS TO SUPPORT PLANNED PARENTHOOD The Annual Book Sale has a fee agreement with Amazon for access to prime shipping for its supporters and participates in the AmazonSmile (smile.Amazon.com) program. Any purchase made through AmazonSmile can send a half percent of eligible purchases to a charity of the buyer’s choice, funded by Amazon. Planned Parenthood California Central Coast (PPCCC) is among the charities listed. Book donations can be made directly at the Red Shed located at 5726 Thornwood Drive in Goleta. And financial gifts are welcome at ppcccbooksale.com and at plannedparenthood.org/ planned-parenthood-california-central-coast/donate.

EPHEMERA

Only books in good condition are sold, and the volunteers riffle through every volume to make sure pages aren’t missing or marked up. Often, they find bookmarks, usually from the bookstores where the book was originally purchased, some from stores all over the county, and some from stores long gone. These bookmarks are put by the cash registers and offered for free to customers Volunteer Donald Polk works in as they are checking out. The the “special books” section of odd airline boarding pass or the Planned Parenthood book birthday card occasionally warehouse. falls out, likely used as a convenient bookmark, but one time, the sorters found a few carefully pressed marijuana leaves. Another time, they found “quite a stack of dough” in a book of quotations, about $350 altogether, the volunteers said. But the winner of the best left-behind gift had to be the $600 they found in a book about money.

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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21


COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA FISH AND WILDLIFE COMMISSION PRESS RELEASE

CALL FOR GRANT REQUESTS As determined  by the Fish  and  Wildlife Code  of the State of  California, all fines monies derived from code violations shall be equally  divided  between  the  Department  of  Fish  and  Wildlife  and  the county in which the violation occurred. In 1975 the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors established the Santa Barbara County Fish and Game Commission (SBCFGC) and charged that body with  recommending  to  the  Board  how  those  funds  should  be  distributed. State law requires that grants of such monies must be utilized for the protection, conservation, propagation, preservation, or education as they pertain to fish and wildlife. Interested  non‐profit  organizations,  clubs,  other  such  groups,  or  individuals should contact Sharon Foster, Santa Barbara County Planning and Development Department via telephone at (805) 568‐2026 or email at sfoster@co.santa‐barbara.ca.us to request grant application  materials.  These  grants  are  awarded  on  a  continuing  basis and current grantees must renew their applications. Grant requests must meet the criteria listed on the Santa Barbara County Fish and Game Commission website at: http://countyofsb.org/plndev/hearings/fwc.sbc The Santa Barbara County Fish & Wild Life Commission will review Grant requests received and recommendations will be forwarded to the Board of Supervisors for final consideration.

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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C O V E R S T O R Y

Indy Staff’s Favorite Planned

Parenthood Books

E

very holiday season, Santa

Barbara Independent Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge gifts many members of our staff with books as her Christmas present tradition. Here are some of our favorites from over the decades.

Tanya Spears Guiliacci, office manager: Two books that Marianne has gifted me over the years have really resonated with me on so many levels that I’ve read them several times over. Children of the Dream, by Laurel Holliday, covers 38 African-Americans from all over, sharing their stories of what their childhood was like growing up Black in 20th-century America. These stories are moving, sad, emotional, shocking, familiar, relatable. Yet, today in 2021, nothing has changed. The Heart of a Woman is one of Maya Angelou’s many autobiographies. I’ve met Miss Angelou and seen her live several times. When I listen to her, I immediately feel comfort. Reading this book about her, I learned so much that I didn’t know. Miss Angelou as a whole is truly the “Heart of a Woman.” I’m so proud to be a Black woman in America. Jackson Friedman, associate editor: Schott’s Original Miscellany, by Ben Schott. Sure, I was familiar with “a murder of crows,” “a pride of lions,” and “a gaggle of geese.” But “a murmuration of starlings,” “an exaltation of larks,” and “a business of ferrets”!? For a curious editor endlessly enamored of such obscurities, this eclectic grab bag of factual odds and ends was the perfect present and, to coin a noun of assemblage, a trove of trivia. Caitlin Fitch, creative director: Tall Blondes: A Book About Giraffes. She got it for me because at the time I was slightly obsessed with the livestream of April the Giraffe’s pregnancy. I very unfortunately missed the birth, but it’s probably better that way. Emily Lee, marketing and promotions manager: Cooking with Italian Grandmothers. The cookbook is just as charming as it sounds, filled with recipes, secrets, and stories straight from the dinner tables of 12 Italian grandmothers all across Italy. But my most favorite parts of the book are where thank-you

notes, postcards, and Post-its have been left to mark some of the most loved recipes in the book. I feel like I have a part of Marianne’s kitchen in mine.

Sarah Sinclair, advertising director: The first book was so long ago that I don’t remember the title, but I do remember that it was a novel written from a dog’s perspective. I had just started at the Independent. My dog was a puppy at the time and made frequentenough visits to the office that Marianne knew how enamored I was of her. The novel was a perfect gift. The most recent book that Marianne gifted me is one of my favorites: The New Sunset Western Garden, which she gave me on Christmas the year that I bought my house. Knowing that I’d need all the help I could get with planting and caring for my garden, this nonfiction hardback guide is a frequent source of information and inspiration.  Tyler Hayden, senior editor: Marianne and I both love a good Sourdough Jack from Jack in the Box, and we both hate government waste. We both also enjoy gardening. The Sunset Western Garden Book she gave me a few years back is now my single best resource for identifying plants and figuring out how to keep them alive. Brandi Rivera, publisher: The New Yorker Book of Baseball Cartoons. Even though Marianne is a Yankee fan and I am a Dodgers fan, we can agree that baseball is the best sport.  A few years later she followed that up with Wait Till Next Year, by Doris Kearns Goodwin, a memoir about growing up a Dodger fan in the 1950s. Spoiler alert: mainly misery at the hand of the Yankees.  Matt Kettmann, senior editor: Amid The Secrets of Jesuit Breadmaking (matched my education, but not much of a baker) and an illustrated 1926 version of Jules Verne’s The Mysterious Island (maybe that one’s worth some real money?), the most meaningful book was A Captive of the Caucasus, by Andrei Bitov. It came right before my own monthlong sojourn to the war-torn Nagorno-Karabakh Republic and prepared me for an ancient land of both transcendent beauty and constant n destruction. 

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Enjoy our extended front & back patios Open Sunday at 9am Also showing * Monday Night Football * Breakfast Burritos happy hour until 8pm * $2 Hot Dogs * Thursday Night * $5 Mimosas Football * $5 Bloody Mary’s * College Games * Tuesday Karaoke & Live Music Friday & Saturday

UptownLounge805.com 3126 State Street 805.845.8800 INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

SEPT.

9-15

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

THURSDAY 9/9

tinyurl.com/IVConcertSep11

SUNDAY 9/12

Chaucer’s Virtual Discussion: Kat Chow

This show will feature the greatest hits of two classic California groups, Jan and Dean and The Beach Boys, with Dan Torrance carrying the torch for Jan Berry, who passed away in 2004. You will hear such hits as, “Surf City,”“The Little Old Lady from Pasadena,”“Dead Man’s Curve,” “California Girls,”“Good Vibrations,” and more. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $32-$62. Call (805) 963-0761.

9/12:

Fire Stations.

tinyurl.com/SBCountyFireDepts 9/11: Coffee & Classics The Community Hot Rod Project Inc. and South Coast Church in Goleta invite all ages to learn about how to build, restore, and fabricate classic cars and off-road race vehicles in S.B. 8-10am. South Coast Church, 5814 Cathedral Oaks Rd., Goleta. Free. Call (805) 967-8802.

tinyurl.com/Coffee-Classics

SATURDAY 9/11 9/11: 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony The S.B. County Fire Department will hold remembrance ceremonies to honor the first responders and the nearly 3,000 lives lost on 9/11, along with the military members who fought following the attack. Social distancing and masks required. 9am. All S.B. County

Festival Over 30 wineries, craft breweries, and spirit companies will offer samples as you go in search of your favorite chili and salsa and vote for the best. There will be two playgrounds for the kids, the Santa Ynez Valley Botanic Garden’s willow maze, a butterfly garden, and a wishing tree as well as live music and mega-sized beer pong. Noon-4:30pm. River View Park, 151 Sycamore Dr., Buellton. GA: $55; under 21 or no alcohol: $20; brew bus: $20. Ages 21+ Call (805) 688-7829.

9/12: SBMA Studio Sunday: Watercolor A teaching artist will assist you in

9/10: Flow - Outdoors Lisa

divinitreesantabarbara.com/ outdoor

2021 Buellton Wine & Chili

buelltonwineandchilifestival.com

tinyurl.com/Jan-DeanBeachParty

Moak will lead you through a creative and energizing breath-to-movement practice that builds heat, endurance, flexibility, strength, mental focus, and self-awareness. All levels are welcome. Pre-registration is required. 5:30-6:30pm. La Mesa Park, 295 Meigs Rd. Outdoor: $24; virtual: $17.

creating a bird using watercolors inspired by a ceramic vessel made by the Nazca people of ancient Peru. 1:30-4:30pm. Family Resource Ctr., S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@ sbma.net. sbma.net/events

9/11:

S.B. Mariachi Festival Presents ¡Viva Mexico! ¡Viva el Mariachi! It’s time for “el grito” (the yell) as you get energized by fifth-generation mariachi José Hernández and his group Mariachi Sol de México; America’s first all-female mariachi ensemble, Mariachi Reyna de Los Ángeles; and the dynamic all-female powerhouse mariachi ensemble Mariachi Nuevo Mujer 2000. 5:30pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $39-$89. Call (805) 962-7411. sbbowl.com/

concerts

9/12: Explore Ecology Beach Cleanup Bring your own supplies or use the buckets, plastic bags, and reusable gloves provided for your self-guided cleanup. Sign in at the Watershed Resource Center. Mask required for ages 2+. 10amnoon. Arroyo Burro Beach, 2981 Cliff Dr. Free. Call (805) 884-0459.

exploreecology.org/calendar/list

9/12: SBMA Virtual Author Event: T.C. Boyle: Talk to Me Join S.B.’s own best-selling author T.C. Boyle for a special reading, conversation, and Q&A about his thought-provoking new novel, Talk To Me, in which he explores a world where people

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 24

THE INDEPENDENT

October 10. 1-5pm. Marcia Burtt Gallery, 517 Laguna St. Free. Call (805) 962-5588.

artlacuna.com

scapes painted by S.B. artists Ellen Yeomans, Morgan Green, and Carrie Givens will show through September 30. Thu.Tue.: 10am-5pm. Gallery Los Olivos, 2920 Grand Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 6887517. gallerylosolivos

9/9-9/14: S.B. Fine Art Michael

tinyurl.com/KatChow

9/10: Long Man Production Presents Jan and Dean’s Beach Party! Featuring Dan Torrance

9/9-9/14: Gallery Los Olivos: Three Viewpoints California land-

.com/events

Author Larissa Pham will be in conversation with NPR reporter Kat Chow to discuss Chow’s memoir, Seeing Ghosts, the story of grief that follows her extended family as they emigrate from China and Hong Kong to Cuba and America. 6pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@ chaucersbooks.com.

FRIDAY 9/10

The Artist’s Way

SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Enriquez’s A Sense of Place and Terri Taber, Linda Mutti, Morgan Artist Michael Enriquez at S.B. Fine Art Green, and Kris Buck’s 9/10: Artist Reception and Pastel will show through November 2. Thu., Mon., Tue.: Noon-5pm; Fri.: Exhibit: Vicki Andersen Enjoy a noon-8pm. S.B. Fine Art, 1321 State St. glass of wine as you look at works that Free. Call (805) 845-4270 depict vineyards and wine-related santabarbarafineart.com themes by artist Vicki Andersen. The exhibit shows through September 30. 4-6pm. Flying Goat Cellars Tasting Rm., 9/9-9/12: Marcia Burtt Gallery: Coastal Influence The lure of the shore 1520 E. Chestnut Ct., Lompoc. Free. Call (805) 588-3459. tinyurl.com/Vicki animated these paintings and photographs of the coastal experience created Andersen by the gallery artists on view through can really talk to animals and asks questions such as, what does it mean to be human? 2:30pm. $5-$10. Call (805) 963-3464 or email info@sbma.net. sbma.net/events

9/12: S.B. Jazz Society: Jeff Elliott Trio Stellar trumpet player and composer

or email czeamer@sbnature2.org.

tinyurl.com/DocentOpenHouse JAMIE HALL

9/9:

Lizard’s Mouth, Loc Dawgs, and Stillwater perform their own set. Bring food and drink (no alcohol or glass containers). 3-7pm. Anisq’Oyo’ Park, 950 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista. Free. Call (805) 968-2017.

COURTESY

Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

9/11: Isla Vista Summer Outdoor Concert Series Come see bands Exporter,

Jeff Elliott will be joined by bassist Randy Tick and drummer Darrell Voss for the first half of the show with area musicians and singers joining for a jazz jam for the second half. Doors: 12:30pm; show: 1-4pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776 x6. $10-$35. sbjazz.org

MONDAY 9/13 9/13: Monthly Virtual Garden Talk with UC Master Gardener: Harvest & Storage The UC Master Gardeners of S.B. County invite you to learn useful, interesting, and research-based home gardening information with gardeners of all experience levels. 7-8pm. Free. Call (805) 893-3485 or email anrmgsb@ucanr.edu.

ucanr.edu/sbmg

9/13: Virtual Docent Open House The S.B. Museum of Natural History will host this online open house for people of all ages and backgrounds to join the corps of volunteer educators. 10-11:30am. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 x168

9/13:

Science Pub from Home: The Cascading Impacts of the COVID19 Pandemic on Wildlife Join

National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis and UCSB Postdoctoral Researcher Kaitlyn Gaynor, PhD, as she discusses the complex socio-ecological dynamics linking people, wildlife, and ecosystems experiencing the shock of the COVID-19 pandemic. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 or email scoleman@sbnature2.org.

tinyurl.com/SciencePub-Wildlife

Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser


COURTESY

TUESDAY 9/14

9/14:

Rodrigo y Gabriela Mexican acoustic guitar

virtuosos and Grammy Award winners for their fifth studio album, Mettavolution, Rodrigo y Gabriela are celebrating the release of their Jazz EP, which includes distinctive covers of Snarky Puppy’s “Lingus” and more. Irish singer/songwriter David Keenan will open the show. You can also livestream the show. 8pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St, $37-$62.

thearlingtontheatre.com

WEDNESDAY 9/15 9/15: Virtual Class: Music: Restoring Harmony in Times of Transition SBCC School of Extended Learning Instructor Jeanne Martin, PhD, will teach this five-session class about ways to transform the role of music in your life to help you find inner peace and harmony. Classes are on Wednesdays and go through October 13. 10-11:30am. $60. Call (805) 698-7507 or email jeannelmartin.phd@ gmail.com. tinyurl.com/MusicTherapeutic

Shows on Tap COURTESY

9/10: M.Special Brewing Co. Super Bitchin’. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

9/10: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

tinyurl.com/PaliLiveMusic 9/11: Andrew Murray Vineyards Ray Fortune. Noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 6869604. andrewmurrayvineyards.com

Spoonful

9/10: Topa Topa Brewing Co. Spoonful. 7-9pm. 120 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call (805) 324-4150. topatopa.beer/pages/happenings

9/11-9/12: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Bobby Fin & Dave. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

9/10-9/12: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Dewey Roberts, 5-8pm; Flannel 101, 9pm-midnight. Sat.: Randy LeDune, 1-4pm; Brian Kinsella, 5-8pm; The Molly Ringwald Project, 9pm-midnight. Sun.: Robert Heft and Dave Wilson, noon4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

9/11: Island Brewing Co. King Bee. 6-9pm. Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

islandbrewingcompany.com

mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org ●

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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25


Surf Crown for Our Hometown?

O

ne of our own is surfing for the Conner Coffin world championship this week. Conner Coffin, born and raised on the coast of Santa Barbara, is in the finals of the World Surf League’s (WSL) 2021 campaign. Known for his smooth and powerful surfing, Coffin is very much in the mix for glory in this year’s new, fiveperson, one-day-only, winner-take-all final event. The trophy is the most prestigious award in all of surfing, a goal Coffin has been working toward since he was a towheaded grom with a bowl cut hustling for scraps at Rincon. “It’s surreal, for sure,” buzzed Conner last week from his home on the South Coast, “I’m just pumped for the opportunity. It feels really good to be here.” After COVID threw a curveball into the last part of the WSL’s contest schedule, a decision was made to cancel the annual tour stop in Tahiti and conclude the season here in California at one of Orange County’s holy lands of surf— Lower Trestles in San Clemente. The move marked the third time this

Santa Barbara’s Conner Coffin Vies for World Title by Ethan Stewart year an event was taken off the schedule due to COVID, the other two coming in South Africa and Portugal. The end result is that the typically 10-stop XXX.XXX.XXXX tourXxxxxxxx has becomeXx a seven-stop affair. XXXXX The cancellations have not been without controXxxxxxx XX, XXXXX versy. Only heightening this criticism is the WSL’s new format for crowning a champion. Historically, a winner has been named in both the men’s and women’s divisions based on their combined performance from every event on the tour. This year, however, the cumulative performances from the season only matter in that they decide who will be competing in the finals and how those surfers will be seeded. Only the top five from the season make the final event, which is run as a winner-take-all playoff with one-on-one knockout rounds along the way. Coffin, who placed in the Top 10 six different times this season, has the No. 4 seed in the men’s draw. If he wins four consecutive matchups (the first starting with No. 5 seed Morgan Cibilic from Australia, and the last coming against the current No. 1–ranked men’s surfer in the world, Gabriel Medina from Brazil), he goes home world champion. “It’s a little weird because now the champion will be based on whoever is the best surfer of the day instead of whoever was the best surfer of the 26

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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WORLD SURF LEAGUE

Sports

living

year,” explained Coffin. “But I also think it’s a really exciting way to do things. Gabriel has smoked everyone all year, but now he has to beat us one more time and all in one day. Anything could happen out there.” Coffin cemented his place in the season finale with a quarterfinals showing at the Corona Open in Mexico last month. Thus far, his best result all season— which is also the best finish of his sixyear WSL career— was a runner-up finish at the Rip Curl Narrabeen Classic in Australia back in mid-April. If the 28-year-old regular foot wins at Trestles this month, he will not only stand atop the podium of a WSL event for the first time but also win a world championship in the process. Not only is this a recipe for serious high-stakes surfing, but it also represents a very clear path for Coffin to turn a long-simmering fantasy into a hard-won reality. Regardless of outcome, the event should make for some excellent athletic theater. After all, any time a person has a legitimate chance to realize one of his or her childhood dreams, we should all be paying attention. The opportunity alone is an invocation to hope. And, speaking of hope, there is legitimate south swell in the forecast for the contest’s waiting period, which runs September 9-17. Whatever day the waves are best, the champion will be crowned. The bigger the surf is, the better for Coffin and his personal brand of power-based surfing. “I wish I could do a couple big airs,” he said, alluding to the fact that his more classical approach to wave riding doesn’t feature as many high-flying aerial antics as his fellow competitors.  “But I think I’ll just stick with what got me here in the first place and see how it goes,” he said. “No matter what, it’s going to be a great experience. I mean, getting to surf Lowers with only one other guy— that never sucks.”

4•1•1

The World Surf League Finals sponsored by Rip Curl is on call for September 9-17 at Lower Trestles in San Clemente. For more info or to tune in to the live webcast, go to worldsurfleague.com.


Business

living

Mom and Daughters Organize

Youth Makers Market

S

Fall Prevention

First Event September 19 at Community Arts Workshop

C ARL PERRY

mall businesses, artists creAaliyah Rubio ating handmade wares, and ghost kitchens have boomed over the past two years, with many people turning their hobbies into an extra source of income. With this growing trend, public markets like the Mujeres Makers Market have cropped up alongside traditional swap meets to become a place to find one-of-a-kind crafts and support local entrepreneurs. The Youth Makers Market is the newest community pop-up, created as a way to give young people experience as creators and sellers and to empower them to become independent business owners. Its first event will be held 11 a.m.-2 better. Cecilia has since transitioned to p.m. at the Santa Barbara Community Arts working with honey and honeycomb, Workshop on Sunday, September 19. which she is excited to learn more about. “The concept behind Youth Makers What started as just an idea earlier in Market is to bring together all Santa Bar- the summer became a mission to make the bara County youth 17 and younger,” said market a reality. Cecilia previously worked with Linda Vega Dance Studio and recently has been working as a photographer, but she had never had any experience with the bureaucratic red tape of running an event. She wasn’t sure how to get started, so she by Ryan P. Cruz reached out to the community for help. “I’ve never done organizer Cecilia Rubio, who started the something this big,” she said. “I just started grassroots effort with the help of her two sending emails.” daughters, Aaliyah and Bella. “We want Luckily, she says, the Santa Barbara this market to assist young entrepreneurs community, including city officials, was to cultivate their reasoning, problem- helpful in walking her through the process solve, evaluate, and enhance their crafting of registering as a nonprofit and finding skills.” a place to hold the market. “It was not as La Colina student Aaliyah, 13, and her hard as I thought,” she said. “They were younger sister Bella, 11, started crafting very helpful.” after seeing others on social media making After reaching out to a couple of potenhandmade goods. They thought it would tial venues, Cecilia said the Community be a good way to stave off boredom during Arts Workshop seemed like a perfect quarantine. “I got really bored, and when I fit. The workshop, located at 631 Garden saw a TikTok of somebody making things, Street, is a project of the Santa Barbara Arts I wanted to do it,” said Bella, who attends Collaborative. Peabody Charter School. She makes hair There are currently 17 youth makers products: brushes and clips cast out of signed up for the first market, selling resin, which she customizes by adding everything from jewelry to clothing to glitter to the mixture or inlaying flowers. homemade baked goods. Cecilia hopes Aaliyah makes beaded jewelry: brace- this event draws enough support to lets, necklaces, rings, and anklets. She’s encourage more youth to participate and currently looking for materials to make allow the young entrepreneurs to feel like her first pair of earrings. Cecilia learned they can be self-starters. “To make them alongside her daughters, finding starter feel creative, empowered,” she said. “I want kits online and helping them with the people to come, to just buy one or two basics. Working with resin, she said, was things and let them know they are seen no easy task at first. “It was a lot of trial and and heard.” error,” Cecilia said. After a few tries and a couple of batches that set unevenly — “We Sunday, September 19, 11 a.m-2 p.m., at the learned our patio was slanted,” she laughed Community Arts Workshop (631 Garden St.) — the resin products started to come out See facebook.com/youthmakersmarket.

Talk with the Experts Do you have concerns about falling? Falling doesn’t have to be a part of aging. Cottage Health providers will share how falls are caused and provide simple steps you can take to prevent falls.

FREE VIRTUAL INFORMATIVE DISCUSSION Thursday September 23, 2021 Noon–1 p.m. REGISTER AT: cottagehealth.org/ fallprevention For more information, please call Molly Hawkins at (805) 569-7478.

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series

y Todam ! at 3p Join Robin Elander in conversation with Andrew Gonzalez (805 University) and Ashley Fox (The Vintage Fox) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

Join Robin Elander in conversation with t Nexek! We

JOSH PARKHURST

Golden Eagle Body Piercing

SOFIA

Energy Tattoo & Body Piercing

Tattoo & Piercing Thursday, September 16 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

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of this week’s Independent with The Indy, a podcast, and hear straight from our journalists about the cover story and more.

Full Belly Files

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independent.com/theindy or wherever you listen to podcasts!


Sal Perez:

living C ARL PERRY

People

WWII Vet, Family Man, Tequila Lover



The Arlington Theatre 

            ­

S

alvador Perez has stories for days. He sits in a chair in his sala and, over the hum of the television, draws you into tales about hopping freight trains as a child, the woes and triumphs of his time at war, and building his home and family in Santa Barbara. Technically, Perez—who goes by Sal—has stories for decades. He just turned 102, but the detail and depth of his stories, and the spirit and humor in his voice, belie common assumptions about the capabilities of most centenarians. So does 102 years old feel? “The same as when I was born,” Sal said cheekily from his chair Sunday morning, eliciting laughs from his daughter Yolanda; her partner, Ray; and his niece Katherine. While he’d typically be playing poker and gambling on slot machines in Vegas for his birthday, he celebrated this year at home, receiving family visitors and carrying out his normal routine. That routine includes exactly three shots of tequila a day—one in the morning, one in the afternoon, and one before bed. Sal’s as proud of his current pace of living as he is of the numerous adventures, challenges, and sometimes death-defying accomplishments that have marked his life. Born in Arizona in 1919, he and his family moved back to their native Jalisco, Mexico, soon after

102-Year-Old Has Many Stories to Tell by Camille Garcia his birth, toward the end of the Mexican Revolution. He returned to the States sometime around 1927, crossing through El Paso, Texas, and eventually making his way to Oxnard, California. At around 12 years old, Sal was on his own. With other abandoned kids, he traveled throughout the West by hopping freight trains and made money by shining shoes, picking fruit, and eventually joining a conservation corps in 1937. He made it back to Santa Barbara, where he joined the army in 1940, lured by a $21/month salary and the possibility to travel to China. Most of Sal’s stories are about serving in the U.S. military, particularly in World War II. Training was grueling, as was sailing to war on a food-rationed ship. As a paratrooper, Sal dropped into various locales around Europe, including Normandy, at the height of the conflict. The images of each jump are still fresh in his mind. “It was a Sunday, a bright day, and people were coming out of church,” he said about parachuting into Holland for a mission. “It was beautiful.” Sal was one of the only Mexican-American members of the 101st Airborne Division, widely known and revered for the D-Day landings and for beating the odds by holding a perimeter against unrelenting German soldiers who vastly outnumbered them for weeks in Bastogne, Belgium, during the Battle of the Bulge. He remembers the ensuing celebration with his division, where the champagne and liquor flowed.

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Metro 4 • Camino

Fiesta 5 • Fairview

  

Sal Perez

Sal would go on to serve in the military for 30 years and was stationed in places such as Alaska and Venezuela, among other locales. In England, he met Queen Elizabeth II, who during that time was a princess in her twenties and an ambulance driver, he said. Sal made it back to Santa Barbara around 1945. He frequented various pool halls, restaurants, and bars on the city’s Eastside, including the iconic Rose Café on Haley Street. There, he met his late wife, Mela, who was in town from Durango, Mexico, to visit her aunt, María Alvarez, the café’s original owner. Sal and Mela were married in 1946 and bought their current Eastside plot for a mere $1,000. People teased Sal for purchasing what was then a holey tract of land surrounded by nothing, on what is now Alameda Padre Serra. But Sal had a vision; he built every part of his hillside compound, which includes a beautiful flowered courtyard, a separate hot tub unit, and a roomy two-story house with idyllic Santa Barbara beach views. Today, he’s one of the only original homeowners on his Eastside block. Sal lovingly reminisces on his life as a family man with two daughters and five grandchildren. Flowing between English and Spanish, he talks about working as a baker at Cottage Hospital, a cook for a county facility, and even overseeing operations at comedian Steve Martin’s Santa Barbara home for over a decade. He has many tales about blowing off steam with his drinking buddies at local watering holes, such as the Santa Barbara Inn, and about the delicious sights and smells that more fully populated Haley Street and the surrounding area back in the day. He’ll tell you about being a skilled poker player, as well as a dedicated churchgoer. Among his loved ones, whose pictures he has all over his home, he’s known to host wonderful family gatherings, sometimes with homemade filet mignon. Today, Sal has a few simple pleasures, such as watching the Los Angeles Angels play—and drinking his tequila. “[My doctor said] it’s not doing me any harm,” he said, “and maybe it’s doing me some good.” n

Fiesta 5

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Sept 10 - 16, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

The Card Counter* (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:10, 7:45. Sat/Sun: 2:15, 5:10, 7:45. Paw Patrol (G): Fri: 7:00. Sat/Sun: 4:50, 7:00. Mon-Thur: 4:50. Respect (PG13): Fri: 4:20. Sat/Sun: 2:00. Mon-Thur: 7:00. Jungle Cruise (PG13): Fri: 4:10, 7:30. Mon-Thur: 4:40, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:50, 4:40, 7:30.

Malignant* (R): Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45. Mon-Thur: 2:45, 5:20, 8:00.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings*

(PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:30(LP), 3:30, 5:30(LP), 6:30, 8:30(LP), 9:30. Mon-Wed: 2:30(LP), 3:30, 5:30(LP), 6:30, 8:30(LP). Thur: 2:30(LP), 3:30, 5:30(LP), 8:30(LP). Candyman (R): Fri-Sun: 2:20, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15. Mon-Fri: 3:20, 5:40, 8:15. Copshop* (R): Thur: 7:45.

CAMINO REAL

F I E S TA 5

7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Malignant* (R): Fri-Sun: 2:00, 4:35, 7:20, 10:00. Mon-Thur: 2:00, 4:35, 7:20. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings*

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education

Full-Frontal

FARMING

COURTESY PHOTOS

FOOD &DRINK

p.31

Get Up Close with Ag on Second-Ever S.B. County Farm Day BY MATT KETTMANN

T

hough many Americans are becoming more famil-

ous best practices and regulations that all growers, including small and mid-sized growers, must adhere to,” explained Maranville, who said that the lack of knowledge became far more apparent during the pandemic, triggering “a crisis of consumer confidence” as people wondered whether food was safe to eat.

“The situation clearly demonstrated the need for consumers to better understand how their food is produced, particularly on a local and regional level, so that they can feel confident in purchasing from small and midsized local and regional growers,” said Maranville. “Farm Day bridges the gap between the community and growers so they ask questions that will hopefully lead to more trust and confidence in our local food supply chain.” Alexandra Allen, who owns and operates Santa Maria’s Main FARM-TO-YOU: Get up-close and personal with farms large and small — such as Babé Farms Street Produce with her husband, (above) — by taking free tours during the second-ever Santa Barbara County Farm Day on Paul Allen, knows this disconSeptember 18. nect firsthand. “The public really wants to know where their food is coming from, especially with the increased interest with this highly regarded local retail chain to offer our in food security as a national security issue,” she said. specialty vegetables to the people of the Central Coast, “Without an event like Farm Day, it’s almost impos- who have been requesting a place to purchase them for sible for people to get such an up-close and informative quite a while.” look at how our farmers do it, and to understand the Those who visit Babé Farms on Farm Day will find challenges we face.” a farmers’ market setup, with staff on hand to tell the Another partici- family’s story, explain the operation, and answer quespant is Santa Maria’s tions. Bonus: “There will be a special appearance from Babé Farms, owned Kelly Barretto with Amazing Grazing, who will demand operated by onstrate how she builds her famous grazing boards cofounder Judy Lun- using Babé Farms vegetables,” said Lundberg. Then dberg-Wafer and her attendees can take home some veggies as well. son Jeff Lundberg. Allen, from Main Street Produce, will use the The specialty vegeta- opportunity to share how much the industry gives ble-focused company back to the community, noting that 2020’s $1.8 bilstraddles the fence lion total represents mostly “new” money coming into between large and Santa Barbara from outside, not just dollars trading small, distributing hands here. their produce nation“The vast majority of that money went right back ally while also selling into the community in the form of wages for not only their produce directly farmworkers, but also for administrative employees to Central Coast and accountants and lawyers and crop scientists and consumers. insurance companies and housing for employees and “While it’s true caterers who provide meals and vendors selling the that Babé Farms is a wide array of inputs and equipment we need to prolarge producer with duce our crops,” said Allen. “I don’t think that most distribution nationwide and even into Canada, it is folks realize the importance of all of those ‘new’ dollars important to us to remain grounded as a fixture in our to our local economies, but I sure wish they would.” local community,” said Lundberg, whose social media outreach led to parking-lot sales at the California Fresh Santa Barbara County Farm Day is Saturday, SeptemMarkets in Pismo Beach and San Luis Obispo and ber 18, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Call (805) 901-0213 or see santa El Rancho Market in Solvang. “It feels great to work barbaracountyfarmday.com.

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

FOOD & DRINK

iar with boutique-level agriculture due to the ongoing farm-to-table zeitgeist— an interest that the pandemic only sparked brighter— few of us are ever able to really visit the sort of large-scale operations that grow and distribute food across the country. That’s even true in Santa Barbara County, where agriculture is our number-one industry— more than $1.8 billion from crops in 2020 alone!— and numerous farms, particularly in the Santa Maria Valley, are critical contributors to the nation’s produce aisles. This is one wall that the second-ever Santa Barbara County Farm Day aims to tear down. Organized by Mary Maranville, a dairy farmer’s daughter who founded Students for Eco-Education and Agriculture (SEEAG) in 2008, the September 18 event offers free tours, tastings, and giveaways at 14 farms, vineyards, packers, and other businesses both large and small. It follows the country’s inaugural Farm Day in 2019 and is modeled after a Ventura County Farm Day that Maranville started in 2013. (That one happens on November 6.) “Even with the rich agricultural heritage of California’s Central Coast, a surprising number of consumers fail to understand the food supply chain or the rigor-

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BOURBON BOY: Zaca Creek’s co-owner Stephen Villa (below) is a big bourbon fan and even collaborated with Maker’s Mark on a special reserve bottling.

BOURBON Comes to Buellton The Tavern at Zaca Creek Rings in Bourbon Heritage Month BY ALEX WARD

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FOOD & DRINK

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the amber restorative have a place to celebrate on the Central Coast. Zaca Creek, Buellton’s storied inn and tavern, will mark the occasion over two weekends, FridaySaturday, September 17-18 and 24-25. Both Fridays kick off with a tasting seminar, in which guests will sample a variety of delicious drams, explore a range of distinctive flavor profiles, and come to appreciate the finer points of smallbatch bourbon production, from stave selection to time spent in the barrel. “I want people to have that educational experience to really understand the intricacies of why these decisions were made and how they lend themselves to the final product,” says Zaca Creek’s co-owner and general manager, Stephen Villa. “This can open your eyes and expand your palate to something completely different.” Saturdays start with a bluegrass cocktail hour featuring live music and an inventive collection of bourbon-based tipples. And as a tribute to the spirit’s Kentucky roots, all four evenings are capped off by a decadent Southern-themed dinner, served either in the tavern’s dining room or poolside near the property’s stunning rock waterfall. “We want to bring people together and bond over the common enjoyment of great bourbon,” explained Villa. “So we’re trying to bring that Kentucky feel to the Santa Ynez Valley.” Zaca Creek, which boasts one of the most expansive and impressive spirits lists in the county, is pleased to offer guests the opportunity to taste its very own branded bourbon, born from a collaboration with Maker’s Mark. “We came up with our own unique style,” said Villa, “which I wanted to be able to drink neat with a cube and maintain full flavor, but also, when you add it to a cocktail, it doesn’t disappear.” Event attendees wishing to stay at the inn will enjoy a special room rate of $300 (not inclusive of tax and gratuity) per night. Guests who book both nights will be gifted a bottle of Zaca Creek bourbon. “Tomorrow, you can get on the Peloton or hit the gym,” Villa said, “but tonight’s about enjoying yourself. It’ll be an evening to remember.”

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS


Dine Out

Chef Peter Cham

TAKE OUT

JOINS ROBLAR WINERY

WOODY’S TO CLOSE: Last April, I broke the news

that Woody’s BBQ at 5112 Hollister Avenue in Goleta (Magnolia Center) is planning to open a restaurant across town at 10 Winchester Canyon Road, the former home of Timbers restaurant. The eatery will be called Timbers Roadhouse. Reader Elise says she was dining at Woody’s BBQ on Monday, September 6, and was told by staff that Woody’s is closing down in two weeks. On Tuesday, I confirmed that the restaurant, which wins the “Best BBQ” award literally every year in

Fun atmosphere, friendly service, delicious food & tasty drinks! Mon - Thurs. 3pm - 11pm Friday 3pm - 1am Saturday 12pm - 1am Sunday 9a - 11pm | Open early for NFL Football Happy Hour Mon-Fri 3-7p | Sat 12-4 Kitchen Opens at 4pm Daily (805) 845-8800 • 3126 STATE STREET • UPTOWNLOUNGE805.COM

Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

FOOD & DRINK

joined the Gleason Family Vineyards Santa Ynez Valley portfolio, which includes Roblar Winery and Refugio Ranch Vineyards, as executive chef and head of culinary operations. Based at Roblar Winery, Cham is crafting seasonal menus utilizing fresh produce and herbs grown just steps away from the estate’s tasting room and vineyards, on the property’s organic FARM-FRESH BITES: Chef Peter Cham is now cooking straight from the farm at Roblar Roblar Farm. Winery in the Santa Ynez Valley. The menu, which is available Friday to Sunday, includes refined California this newspaper, is indeed closing after 37 years cuisine in the form of plates like smoked-salmon in business. The new Timbers will not offer the deviled eggs with pickled shallots, crispy capers, Woody’s menu, so it’s just vanishing. chives, and espelette peppers; wood-fired wild mushroom pizza with confit garlic and kale pesto; FOLEY BUYS HOTEL CALIFORNIAN: The Foley Enteror charred Roblar Farm broccoli with bagna tainment Group, which formed just last July, has càuda, grilled lemon, parmesan, and aleppo pep- announced the purchase of Hotel Californian in per. The Bites Menus are available Friday through the Funk Zone. Included in the transaction is the Sunday to enjoy with Roblar’s variety of wines. hotel’s signature restaurant, Blackbird, an 88-seat, Cham also recently launched “Birds ’n’ Bubbles” indoor/outdoor restaurant known for Executive every Thursday, which features fried chicken Chef Travis Watson’s culinary offerings and a alongside Roblar sparkling Blanc de Blanc, and dedicated space that will serve as the future home of a Foley Food & Wine Society tasting bar, which a Sunday brunch, served 10 a.m.-4 p.m. A Santa Barbara native raised in a Cambo- will open this fall. dian household, Cham’s early interest in cook“We are thrilled to welcome Hotel Califoring sprouted by his grandmother’s side in the nian to the Foley Entertainment Group famkitchen. In 2006, Chef Cham headed to San ily,” said Foley Entertainment Group co-CEO Francisco to study and explore the culinary Randy Morton. “Hotel Californian has embraced arts, landing work at Radius Restaurant & Café, the incredible opportunity of being part of the a food business in tune with his own kitchen renaissance of lower State Street and the growth ethos. He also spent time as stagiaire at other of Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone. We look forward to legendary and Michelin-starred San Francisco innovative collaborations with the Foley Food & establishments, such as Coi Restaurant, Quince, Wine Society and other FEG entities to enhance and Fifth Floor. the guest experience even further.” Cham relocated to Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 2013, taking up work at West Bridge LA PALOMA OPEN MONDAYS: La Paloma Café, which under Chef Matthew Gaudet, named a Best New opened at 702 Anacapa Street last November Chef by Food & Wine that same year. When Cali- in the former longtime home of Paradise Café, fornia’s bounty of local produce and provisions has announced that they are now open on Moncalled once again, Cham returned to Santa Bar- days. “Join us on our sunny patios and enjoy bara as head chef at the well-regarded, now-shut- oak-grilled, ranchero-inspired favorites from tered seafood house The Hungry Cat, where he Chef Jeremy Tummel,” the eatery says. Signature continued to reinforce relationships with local dishes at La Paloma include Burnt Ends Bowl farmers and fishermen. (brisket and tri-tip, red rice, pinquinto beans, In 2016, Chef Cham moved to Finch & Fork cheddar cheese, cilantro slaw) and Huevos Ranrestaurant at Santa Barbara’s Kimpton Canary cheros (house-made chorizo, pinquinto beans, Hotel, where he eventually became executive golden soft tortilla, red chili salsa, fried eggs, chef. smoked queso fresco).

SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY-AT-HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS

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A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday.Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm | Sunday Prix-Fixe 5 - 7:30 pm 1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

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ENTERPRISE BUILDING UPDATE: The Enterprise Fish

Company building at 225 State Street sold twice in the past two years, last selling for $3.5 million, or about $6 per square foot. I have received word that the next tenant is not a restaurant but the corporate headquarters for Silver Air. Silver Air manages a comprehensive fleet of luxury aircraft from light to long-range heavy jets and a global network operating around the clock, 24 hours a day. Silver Air hopes to open by the end of the year or early next.

Need support? 805.964.5245 info@dvsolutions.org dvsolutions.org

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

MIKE DAWSON’S S.B. HOMECOMING Longtime Deejay Returns with The Smokin Kills to Play SOhO

L I F E

Y

COURTESY

PAGE 34

tickets to see Shooter Jennings at The Troubadour, and my friend bailed on me. So I put out on Twitter that if anyone wants to go to the show, just buy me a beer. I said, “I’ll be the guy outside who looks like me.” Drummer Tyler Kershaw answered. As we were chatting over a pre-show beer, I saw Ted Russell Kamp walking around the floor. After some small talk, Ted asks both of us, “So, are you two in a band?”   There are times in your life where it can feel like the entire universe is trying to point you in a certain direction. When you feel those moments happening, roll with it. I looked at Tyler and said, “Well, are we?” That was the night the band started. Tyler grabbed some good friends to join us on bass and guitar, Tim Hutton and Kevin Fosmark.   The funny thing about trying to put a band together in Los Angeles is you quickly learn that there are two types of musicians here: Those that are available and not very good, and those who are good and not very available. With this band, I lucked out. What can listeners expect from the album? Side one is destruction. Side two is redemption. It’s like Merle Haggard joined The Black Crowes. The theme throughout is “California cowboy-troubadour Buck Owens in a black T-shirt in post-millennial Los Angeles.” There are themes of being a Northern California kid in a Southern California world all over the place and, of course, there are a lot of references to drugs and alcohol. No surprise there. I like songs of “substance.” S IM M D AV E

ONS

DARIUS MF REED

How did The Smokin Kills begin? About five years ago, I had two

DARIUS MF REED

MONA DAWSON

ears ago, when terrestrial radio the dream of becoming a radio still ruled our listening lives, a jock. So I kept my job as manager gruff voice would hit the airwaves at Italia Pizzeria in Goleta and, of KTYD every night from 7 p.m. until every Monday morning, I knocked midnight, introducing rounds of rock ’n’ on the door of all the radio staroll as Santa Barbarans rolled the streets or tions in town with my résumé in sucked down beers on porches. That was the hand. Eventually I met Peter Bie, hauntingly distinctive voice of Mike Daw- who was the program director for son, who left our city 15 years ago to work as a technical producer—later adding engineer and announcer to his title — for Adam Carolla’s syndicated morning show, where he’s been ever since. Dawson never stopped playing music himself, and he just released The Last Honky Tonk Hero, a raucous and raw — though slickly produced — album with his band The Smokin Kills. Dawson’s voice pairs to the gritty rock music like rolled cigarettes with lukeDJ DAZE: Mike Dawson used to be the voice of KTYD more than 15 years ago. warm bottles of Coors Banquet, and they’re sure to put on a wild show at SOhO on September 16.  101.7 K-Lite. He hired me on the spot as the Dawson fills us in about his life and board operator for Casey Kasem’s Top 40 music below. See a longer version online Countdown and Jim Brickman’s Weekend at independent.com/smokinkills.  Morning. Those gigs started at 4 and 5 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday, so my weekends When did you start playing music? I was gifted were shot, but I didn’t care. I had my foot in my grandfather’s guitar when I was 15 the door and my first job in radio. From there I learned everything I could years old. I still have it and play it often. about radio, production, and promotional My grandfather “Papa” loved Waylon Jennings. I’d listen to him play and always events. Thanks to folks like Rick Barker, wanted to be like him. He died when I was Dayna Birkley, Keith Royer, and David in 3rd grade, so learning to play on his gui- Perry, I acquired my own air shift from tar was the closest I was able to get to him. 7 p.m. to midnight on 99.9 KTYD. I also became music director/assistant program Remind us of your legendary Santa Barbara his- director and was responsible for adding a tory. I graduated from UCSB in 1997 with lot of the music you still hear there today.

LEFT THE ROOM: Light Elephant roams the streets of Santa Barbara until September 22.

Light Elephant Gets Out If you are out and about in Santa Barbara over the next several weeks and you think you see an elephant, it’s not necessarily the DTs. “Light Elephant,” a 16-foot-tall “site reflective” inflatable public artwork, is part of a multimedia art project that’s the brainchild of Iman Djouini, artist and professor at UCSB’s College of Creative Studies and Department of Art, and Jonathan Taube, artist/architectural designer. When I spoke with Djouini by Zoom on September 2, she acknowledged that the rollout of this project has been somewhat mysterious by intention, saying that “we don’t want to dictate what’s going on” with how people interpret the project. Expect to see the elephant at various sites over the next several weeks until it settles down for a nap in the gallery at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara on September 22. Part of the impetus for the project stems from a class that Djouini will be offering this fall through the College of Creative Studies. The class, Social Print Lab, examines the ways in which print and social media both capture and transform people’s attention to public spaces. By placing something — in this instance, an inflatable elephant — in various public spaces and allowing people time to photograph and respond to it, students will learn about how social networks operate and how they influence our perceptions. Djouini and Taube encourage everyone to follow #lightelephant and #lightelephantsb along with the main feed, @lightelephantsb, on Instagram in order to participate in the project. Each week in September will be devoted to exploring a specific one of the following themes: Public Bodies, Public Relations, Public Spaces, and Public Histories. The project’s Instagram provides prompts that solicit reactions from individuals. For example, when the light elephant appeared at the Lobero Theatre, the prompt question turned on the theatrical tradition of the “ghost light,” and asked viewers to respond to the question, “who are you leaving a light on for?” —Charles Donelan

—Matt Kettmann

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 34

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SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

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ARTS LIFE

CONT’D

The Wood Brothers

REVIEW

TWELFTH NIGHT COURTESY

W

with special guest Kat Wright

hen Naked Shakes’ new production of Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night returns to UCSB’s beautiful C ommencement Green in October, AMPHIBIOUS CRAFT: The cast of Twelfth Night get there early and with their boat at UCSB’s lagoon fight the impulse to plunk down your lawn chair or spread out your picnic blanket too close to the stage. This sprawling, effervescent show fills the large open space leading to the lagoon with energy and excitement. Thanks to an imaginative production design, impeccable vocal performances, and the use of handheld microphones, no matter where you are, you will hear Shakespeare’s dialogue crisp and clear. What a more distant vantage point for this show allows is something that could change your experience of theater forever: the realization that the old boxes we have relied on for so long — be they traditional indoor theater spaces or the stacked tiles of a Zoom screen — can explode, leaving the PRESENTED BY UCSB’S NAKED plays they purport to contain miraculously SHAKES ON THE COMMENCE- vital and intact. The young cast mixes experienced BFA MENT GREEN. SAT., SEPT. 4. RETURN ENGAGEMENT FRI.- students with non-majors, some of whom SUN., OCT. 1-3. are appearing in their first play, in a way that’s bold and persuasive. Double casting of the key roles Viola (Lana Spring, first half; Taylor Kirk, second half) and Olivia (Kirsten Høj, first half; Hailey Turner, second half) not only gives more students great opportunities to perform but it also deepens the play’s thematic exploration of doubling and shifting identity. This principle extends even further in the case of Feste, the fool, a role that is portrayed by a chorus of three in this production — Rae Farnum, Andalyn Honselaar, and Caroline Ware. This choice enables director Irwin Appel, who composed the show’s original songs, to bring the iconic sound of voices harmonizing with an acoustic guitar (played by Brandon Statner, who also sings) into the mix. Any production of Twelfth Night depends for its success on finding an effective Malvolio, and Catherine Ballantyne delivers a hilarious and thought-provoking version of the pompous steward here. The skills she applies from her dancer’s training lift the performance out of pathos and into a sublime comic spectacle full of hilarious surprises. As Orsino, Duke of Illyria, Angel Villalobos commands the open playing space, his voice always distinct and recognizable, even when he’s horsing around with his pal Cesario. Cyrus Roberts, Harut Simonian, and Megan Brown handle the roles of Sir Toby Belch, Sir Andrew Aguecheek, and Maria with gusto, creating a merry chaos below stairs that overflows its origin and floods the adjacent upperclass society with confusion. The most striking aspect of this Twelfth Night is how effectively these performers translate Shakespeare’s magic and mystery to a large outdoor setting in full daylight. When Sebastian, Viola, and their crew arrive by inflatable boat, putt-putting across the UCSB lagoon, it’s an unforgettable image that would not be possible under other circumstances. And it’s not a one-off gimmick, as the players run around the green together between entrances and hide behind a large tree while observing the love-madness of Malvolio. Every aspect of the show’s design partakes equally of this glorious accidental freedom. Don’t miss this opportunity to witness Shakespeare like you’ve never seen him before when Twelfth Night returns on Friday, October 1. —Charles Donelan

Tue, Oct 12 / 8 PM Granada Theatre Dubbed “masters of soulful folk” (Paste), The Wood Brothers are celebrated for their freewheeling musical experimentation, fluid sound and the unparalleled energy of their live performances.

She & Him A Very She & Him Christmas Party Thu, Dec 2 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre Usher in the holiday season with the “old-school studiopop sensibility” (NPR) of M. Ward and Zooey Deschanel as they celebrate the tenth anniversary of their album A Very She & Him Christmas.

My Bluegrass Heart Béla Fleck, Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, Stuart Duncan, Edgar Meyer and Bryan Sutton featuring music from Béla Fleck’s new album My Bluegrass Heart Wed, Dec 15 / 8 PM Arlington Theatre

Media Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 2

Join us in reading September’s book of the month! SEPTEMBER’S THEME: BOOKS WRITTEN BY LATINX AUTHORS

DI S CU SS I O N :

Wednesday, October 6, 6pm Municipal Winemakers

BO O K O F T H E M O N T H :

Dominicana

by Angie Cruz

ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): “We need to become more unreasonable, but in an intelligent way,” says Aries politician Jerry Brown. Yes! I agree! And that’s especially true for you right now, Aries. To Brown’s advice, I will add this message from Aries fashion designer Vivienne Westwood: “Intelligence is composed mostly of imagination, insight — things that have nothing to do with reason.” Here’s one further suggestion to help you take maximum advantage of cosmic rhythms, courtesy of Aries historian Arnold J. Toynbee: “The supreme accomplishment is to blur the line between work and play.” TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): “I have become whole and complete, like a thundering cloudburst in summer,” wrote Taurus poet Miklós Radnóti. I love that metaphor for fullness: not an immaculate icon of shiny, sterile perfection, but rather a primal, vigorous force of nature in all of its rumbling glory. I hope you like this symbol as much as I do, and I hope you use it to fuel your creative spirit in the coming weeks. P.S.: Keep in mind that many Indigenous people welcome rainstorms as a source of fertility and growth. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Pandiculation” is a word that refers to when you stretch and yawn at the same time. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, you will benefit from doing a lot of pandiculations in the coming days. I also recommend gazing lazily out the window and looking at the sky a lot. Keep your shoes off as much as possible, get a massage or three, and let yourself sleep more than you customarily do. Did you know that sighing deeply is good for your lungs’ health? Here’s your homework: Dream up all the things you can do to relax and renew yourself. It’s prime time to indulge in generous acts of self-healing. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The ancient Roman author Pliny’s 10-volume Natural History, written in the first century, was a monumental encyclopedia of the natural world, unprecedented in its own time and for centuries afterward. It offered compilations of facts about astronomy, geography, zoology, botany, mineralogy, and many other subjects. There was one big problem with it, however. It contained a great deal of erroneous information. For example, Pliny described in detail many nonexistent animals, including dragons, flying horses, and giant serpents that swallowed bulls and snatched birds out of the sky. My reason for telling you this is to inspire you to be extra discerning in the coming weeks. Be especially skeptical of authorities, experts, and other know-it-alls who are very confident despite being inaccurate or erroneous. It’s time for you to increase your trust in your own authority. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “There are those fortunate hours when the world consents to be made into a poem,” writes Leo poet Mark Doty. That’s great for a poet. But what about for everyone else? My variation on Doty’s comment is this: There are fortunate hours when the world consents to be made into a holy revelation or a lyrical breakthrough or a marvelous feeling that changes our lives forever. I expect events like those to come your way at least twice in the immediate future. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Between 37 and 41 bce, Virgo-born Caligula served as third Emperor of Rome. To do so, he had to disprove the prophecy of a renowned astrologer, Thrasyllus of Mendes. Years earlier, Thrasyllus had predicted that Caligula, despite being well-connected, “had no more chance of becoming emperor than of riding a horse across the Bay of Baiae” — a distance of two miles. Once in power, Caligula arranged to have a series of pontoon boats arrayed across the bay, enabling him to ride his favorite horse, Incitatus, from one shore to the other across the Bay of Baiae. I foresee the possibility of a comparable turn of events for you, Virgo. Is there a curse you want to undo? A false prophecy you’d like to cancel? Someone’s low expectation you would love to debunk? The coming weeks will be a favorable time.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): College student Amelia Hamrick studied the right panel of Hieronymus Bosch’s 15th-century painting “The Garden of Earthly Delights.” It depicts a hellish scene. Cities are on fire. Weird beasts devour sinful humans. There are demons and torture chambers. Hamrick did what no one in the history of art had ever done: She transcribed the musical score that the artist had written on a man’s naked hindquarters. Her work inspired a composer to create a recording titled “500-Year-Old Butt Song from Hell.” In the coming weeks, I invite you to perform feats comparable to Hamrick: (1) Explore the past for useful, overlooked clues. (2) Find or create redemptive transformations out of stressful situations. (3) Have fun telling stories about your past misadventures. SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Born on one of the Galápagos Islands, Diego is a giant tortoise who has lived for more than 100 years. He’s a member of the Hood Island species, which had dwindled to a population of 15 by 1977. That’s when he and his tortoise colleague, whose name is E5, became part of a breeding program with 12 female tortoises. E5 was reserved in his behavior, but Diego was a showboat who vocalized loudly as he enjoyed public mating rituals. Together, the two males saved their species — producing more than 2,000 offspring in subsequent years. According to my astrological analysis, you could be as metaphorically fertile as Diego and E5 in the coming months — even if you prefer to adopt an approach more akin to E5’s.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The meaning of my existence is that life has addressed a question to me,” wrote psychologist Carl Jung. “Or, conversely, I myself am a question that is addressed to the world, and I must communicate my answer, for otherwise, I am dependent upon the world’s answer.” These are superb meditations for you Sagittarians during the coming weeks. Between now and October 1, I invite you to keep a journal where you write about two subjects: (1) What is the main question that life asks you? (2) What is the main question that your life asks the world?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): North Korea’s Capricorn leader Kim Jong-un has an amazing résumé. Official reports say he learned to drive at age 3 and was an accomplished sailor at 9. As an adult, he developed the power to control the weather. He’s a skilled musician and artist, as well as a scientist who developed a miracle drug to cure AIDS, Ebola, cancer, heart disease, and the common cold. Most impressively, Kim is an archaeologist who discovered a lair where magical unicorns live. Is it possible you have unexpressed powers like these, Capricorn? If so, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to identify them and start tapping into their potential. It’s time to develop your dormant talents. AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian author Toni Morrison testified, “I think of beauty as an absolute necessity. I don’t think it’s a privilege or an indulgence. It’s almost like knowledge, which is to say, it’s what we were born for.” I urge you to adopt her perspective during the next four weeks, Aquarius. In my astrological opinion, a devoted quest for beauty will heal exactly what most needs to be healed in you. It will teach you everything you most need to know.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Poet and translator Anne Carson periodically joins with her husband, Robert Currie, to teach a workshop called EgoCircus. It’s an ironic title, because the subject they teach is the art of collaboration. To develop skills as a collaborator, of course, people must lay aside at least some of their ego’s needs and demands. In accordance with current astrological potentials, I encourage you to stage your own version of EgoCircus in the coming weeks. The time is ripe for you to hone your creative togetherness and synergistic intimacy.

HOMEWORK: Tell me the most important lesson you’ve learned since 2021 began. Newsletter@freewillastrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 36

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PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND CAPSTONE COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Supports Academic Programs for the new Master of Environmental Data Science program, including course scheduling, curriculum planning, Master’s Projects, and general student advising, among other duties. Maintains databases/records, produces digital/print outreach materials, plans/hosts events. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in environ. science, data science, social science, related field, or equivalent experience. 1‑3 years of experience working with students. Knowledge of advising and counseling techniques. Strong communication, active listening, and interpersonal skills. Ability to work with diverse populations, multicultural competencies. Good organization skills. Strong analytical and critical thinking skills. Ability to identify and resolve problems. Exceptional attention to detail. Creative, strategic, and able to conceptualize both long and short term projects. Efficient and able to prioritize tasks easily. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $23.66‑$26.71/hr. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/20/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #23410

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER

CAMPUS DINING Serves as the Payroll Administrator and subject matter expert regarding payroll/personnel and timekeeping for Residential Dining Services. Utilizes a solid understanding of payroll/ personnel and time reporting systems, UC Policies and Procedures, and collective bargaining agreements. Researches and resolves a wide range of complex payroll issues. Oversees the hiring for all Residential Dining students, career, and limited employees. Provides support to the Office Managers and Assistant Office Managers in each of the four dining units. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. 3 years of experience using UC systems. High level of competency in written and verbal communication. Demonstrated proven ability to maintain strict confidentiality of privileged information; excellent interpersonal skills to interact and collaborate with personnel at all levels. Working knowledge of Word/ Excel/Publisher/PowerPoint/Goo‑

gle Workspace. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.09‑ $32.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/13/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23264

ASSISTANT EVENT MANAGER

CAMPUS DINING Provides support in event planning, employee scheduling and training, ordering & confirming rentals & linens. Responsibilities include invoice processing & post event labor & billing reconciling; maintaining storage unit and inventory of non‑food items. Assists with loading of trucks, driving and safe transportation of catering equipment and staff. Reqs: Working knowledge in food service and sanitation regulations. Working verbal and written communication skills, including active listening, dynamic flexibility, critical thinking, and ability to multi‑task and ensure productive time management. Working knowledge to make decisions and solve problems. Working skills to provide effective interpersonal and work supervision guidance to other personnel and work effectively in a team. Intermediate computer application skills. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Able to lift up to 50 pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per day. Hours/days may vary and include nights/weekends. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $22.46‑$25.79/ hr. Hours/days may vary and include nights/weekends. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/20/21 thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23477

ASSISTANT STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES ADVISOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Provide free non‑attorney‑client privileged legal education and information to currently registered undergraduate and graduate UC Santa Barbara students and student organizations. Coordinates and advises the internship program as well as other internal projects agreed upon with the Student Legal Services Advisor, the Legal Resource Center Committee and the A.S. Executive Director. Secondary and tertiary

advisor for the Legal Resources Center(AS LRC); and the AS Isla Vista Tenants Union (AS IVTU), respectively. Main functional areas for the Assistant Student Legal Services Advisor include Student Guidance and Education; Coordination of the Legal Resource Center Intern Program; Management and Support of the area’s Assessment. Reqs: JD from an American Bar Association‑approved law school. 3‑7 years experience using professional concepts to provide a variety of legal counsel including but not limited to campus students. Must demonstrate abroad knowledge of multiple legal disciplines including but not limited to landlord /tenant law, interpretation involving the rental or leasing of housing property, immigration law, personal injury, dissolution, consumer complaints, sexual harassment, student/police relations, and other civil matters, and on criminal and traffic matters. Must have worked on complex issues where analysis of situations or data requires an in‑depth evaluation of variable factors. Must be able to demonstrate judgment and considerable independence in selecting methods, techniques and evaluation criteria for obtaining results. Must have experience working successfully in a collaborative manner with a diverse group. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $59,500‑$78,937.50/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 09/20/2021 thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #23359

detail with a high degree of accuracy. Excellent verbal and outstanding written communications skills with the ability to write and edit memos and letters. Ability to maintain integrity and sensitivity in confidential matters. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job# 22982

AUTOMATED PARKING SERVICES TECHNICIAN

TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING SERVICES Analyzes automated parking systems user requirements and programs system configurations. Designs, plans, and implements hardware and software upgrades. Works directly with system vendors and manufacturer representatives on warranties and parts exchanges. Maintains all security access and departmental key issuance. Works with Facilities Management Small Projects unit, Communication Services and outside vendors in completing various parking‑related projects. Ensures security and inventory of equipment. Applies professional business/ technical support concepts to resolve hardware, software, and networking issues as they relate to the automated parking systems where analysis of the situation or data requires a review of

a variety of factors. Within defined procedures and practices determines appropriate action. Reqs: 5 years of experience working with hardware and software systems as well as secure data and revenue systems or equivalent education. Ability to perform technical tasks associated with installation, maintenance, and repair of field based hardware (and related software packages) permit dispensers, EMV credit card readers and communication systems both wired and wireless including an informational/emergency AM radio station. Experience in maintaining private and public networks functionality and security. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $26.86‑34.86/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/14/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22139

BIKE SHOP LEAD MECHANIC

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Responsible for organizing the day to day technical and repair aspects with the student mechanics of the A.S. Bike Shop. The Lead Mechanic implements the training for student employees, outlined in the AS Bike Shop training

manual, to student employees for the repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types and other rolling stock. Responsible for ensuring staff’s adherence to safety standards in all repair procedures. Will endeavor to maintain the A.S. Bike Shop in accordance with its mission statement to provide high quality bicycle repair and safety education to the students, faculty, and staff of UCSB. Reqs: Broad knowledge and technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. Must be able to communicate about processes clearly and effectively to customers and staff in a fast paced work environment. Ability to complete mechanical tasks left uncompleted by Student Mechanics. Knowledge of inventory control, systems and storage related to merchandise stocked within the Bicycle Shop. Understanding or experience with community based bicycle spaces. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act and Satisfactory criminal history background check. $20.66‑ $22.50/ hr. Full Benefits. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job#17781

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for processing all types of

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ASSISTANT TO THE DEANS

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Coordinates Deans’ appointments and workflow. Maintains and prioritizes multiple, complex calendars and makes arrangements which require coordination of multiple schedules and facilities. Arranges travel and entertainment schedules. Oversees timely receipt and distribution of correspondence, reports, and responses to inquiries for the Deans. Compiles information, analyzes and organizes data, updates databases, prepares reports, and drafts correspondence. Assists with visitors regarding Bren School space, computing, internal communications, and other resources. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and work experience in a higher education setting. Experience as an assistant to high level executives or academics. Excellent computer skills, including experience with databases, spreadsheets, word processing. Demonstrated ability to independently prioritize, edit and proofread materials, organize and multi‑task with frequent interruptions and meet critical deadlines with a high degree of professionalism. Possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills, assertiveness and diplomacy, and critical attention to

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EMPLOYMENT reimbursements including supplies, entertainment, memberships, and travel. In addition, the Financial Administrator serves as department buyer for Gateway purchases and is responsible for the purchasing of supplies and equipment on departmental and extramural funding. Receives all merchandise. Contacts the end‑user to pick‑up items, and prepares invoices for payment. Reqs: Ability to organize, coordinate and prioritize workload and work independently under pressure of deadlines. Ability to interpret and comply with complex policies and procedures. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Must possess strong problem solving skills. Ability to work collaboratively with a diverse pool of faculty, students and staff and provide excellent customer service. Demonstrated experience multi‑tasking with frequent interruptions. Excellent time management skills. Demonstrated experience with accounting, purchasing and office management procedures. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.16/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/13/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22778

MANAGER OF TICKETING OPERATIONS

ARTS AND LECTURES OFFICE Responsibilities include management of Art & Lectures income accounts. Prepares and analyzes a wide variety of financial reports, as well as monitoring and analyzing all income processed by the Ticket Office. Responsible for managing all business processes and operations for the Ticket Office. Is the department’s primary resource and expert for fraud management and credit card compliance/Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI DSS). Manages Arts & Lectures proprietary computerized ticketing system using Tessitura software, and identifies, implements, troubleshoots, and maintains software specifications to support ticketing operations. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience and training. Minimum of 3 years of professional experience in ticket office operations and customer service. 3 years of progressive management experience. Proven experience in problem solving and staff management. Extensive professional experience with database management (Tessitura preferred). Excellent interpersonal and communication skills. Ability to work frequent weekends and evenings. Experience with ADA accessible seating and ticket sales requirement and PCI security standard. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $62,550 ‑ $67,550/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #22314

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ONDAS STUDENT CENTER PROGRAM ASSISTANT

LETTERS AND SCIENCE ACADEMIC ADVISING Assists in the administration of the ONDAS Student Center. The Program Assistant supports the daily operations and administrative tasks of the ONDAS Student Center. This position provides daily support to students, center staff, and physical space along with assisting with essential programming and overseeing Center marketing. Assists in the hiring and training of student staff positions. Reqs: Strong verbal and written communication skills. Attention to detail. Ability to manage workload, prioritize tasks and work on multiple projects under the pressure of tight timelines. Knowledge of Google Suite: Email, Drive and Calendar. Strong interpersonal skills. Ability to respond and have frequent communication, in person and virtually, with Center stakeholders: students, parents, administrators, prospective students and family, etc.$24.61 ‑ $25.16/hr. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22995

support and financial and travel processing in compliance with UC policies and procedures. Provides expertise and guidance in the full‑range of staff and academic personnel policies and procedures. Provides authoritative advice on graduate division policies and bargaining unit agreements. Manages sensitive and confidential information and interacts with a broad range of personnel and visitors. Posts monthly payroll expenses, creates tracking reports and produces bi‑weekly and monthly payroll reports. Serves as a Timekeeper for the Kronos timekeeping system. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and work experience in a higher education setting. Proficient in personnel payroll and timekeeping systems. Excellent computer skills, including experience with databases, spreadsheets, word processing. Demonstrated ability to independently prioritize, edit and proofread materials, organize and multi‑task with frequent interruptions and meet critical deadlines with a high degree of professionalism. Possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills, assertiveness and diplomacy, and critical attention to detail with a high degree of accuracy. Excellent verbal and outstanding written communications skills with the ability to write and edit memos and letters. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $24.61‑$26.32/ hr. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job# 22981

PAYROLL MANAGER

MOLECULAR, CELLULAR, DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Responsible for analyzing, coordinating, and managing payroll processing and complex payroll issues in MCDB with over 35 research labs, and a highly active teaching program. The individual is responsible for student and staff payroll transactions in UCPath, talent acquisition management, timekeeping, and records maintenance for auditing for international research scientists, lab managers, technical positions, lab assistants, graduate student researchers, readers, student workers and all other staff positions. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and the ability to communicate with a diverse group of individuals. The ability to understand and analyze complex situations is critical. General knowledge of payroll and timekeeping processes is required. Must have a positive attitude and be willing to work in a fast‑paced environment. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Pay Rate/Range: $24.62‑ $26.99/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 8/20/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23284

PAYROLL/PERSON­ NEL/TRAVEL COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Supports the department with administration, personnel/payroll

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PLUMBER

MAIN ‑ RESH LODGING MAINTENANCE Performs a variety of skilled tasks in connection with the installation, maintenance and repair of plumbing systems and related equipment for the University owned Residence Halls, apartments, dining commons and related buildings to accomplish the operational needs of the department. In compliance with Housing, Dining, & Auxiliary Enterprises goals and objectives, affirms, and implements the department Educational Equity Plan comprised of short and long‑term objectives that reflect a systematic approach to preparing both students and staff for success in a multicultural society. Works in an environment, which is ethnically diverse and culturally pluralistic. Works effectively in a team environment. Reqs: Journey level plumber as evidenced by completion of accredited apprenticeship program, or equivalent documented training and work experience, with a minimum of 5 years performing journey level plumbing tasks. Work experience demonstrating the ability to design, troubleshoot, install, repair and maintain plumbing fixtures of all types including plumbing associated with commercial food cooking equipment, steam boilers and HVAC systems. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $37.56/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23137

SKILLED CRAFTS & TRADES SUPERINTENDENT ­ PM CREW

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Responsible for Facilities Management Preventative Maintenance Area. Supervises crew comprised of HVAC Mechanics, Skilled Trades Mechanics and Sr. Building Maintenance Workers. May supervise other Skilled Trades workers, such as Electricians, Plumbers, Carpenters, Painters and Locksmiths, as necessary to complete the assigned tasks of the PM Crew. Carries out inspections of work assignments and communicates work requests to trades staff. Works to train staff in correct technical practices, safety, efficiency and professionalism. Responsible for correct execution of campus maintenance projects. Has full management responsibility for achievement of operational, personnel, and customer satisfaction objectives for all assigned staff. Reqs: Journey level HVAC, plumbing or electrical certificate or contractor’s license. Min. 5 years of experience in the HVAC, plumbing or electrical trades. Ability to effectively communicate with a diverse clientele and work group. Excellent organizational skills. Computer skills, including the use of GMAIL. Google Calendar, Word and Excel. Ability to work in a service oriented environment subject to frequently changing priorities. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Pay Dependent Upon Qualifications. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/20/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23406

UCSB FRONT HOUSE PERSONNEL SUPERVISOR

CAMPUS DINING The Front House Personnel Supervisor is responsible for aiding the Personnel Manager in all aspects of hiring, training, scheduling, and supervision of all student employees. Responsible for overseeing a catering program during the summer season. Reqs: Ability to work effectively in a fast paced, high volume operation with a large team of managers, full‑time and student staff. Minimum two years of supervisory experience. Ability to work with a diverse staff. Ability to effectively and clearly communicate directions to employees and customers. Excellent customer service skills. Ability to work independently and exercise initiative while also acting as a team member. Ability to communicate, analyze and troubleshoot situations as they occur. Experience with Excel and Word. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $42,900‑$48,900.28/yr. Days/Hours: Sunday 6 am – 2:30 pm, Wed‑Fri 1:30 pm – 10 pm, Saturday 11 am – 7:30 pm (may vary). The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified

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applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 09/14/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #23352

UCSB POLICE LIEUTENANT

POLICE DEPARTMENT Responsible for planning, directing and managing the assigned activities of a division or unit of the department. Initiating administrative and command leadership when such action is necessary to fulfill a functional police responsibility. Disseminating orders, policies, and procedures to all assigned personnel. Ensuring the adherence to these policies and procedures and the proper performance of duties by each member of a division or unit. Making recommendations concerning the hiring, disciplining and terminating of employees of the department. Enforcing rules and regulations among assigned personnel. Reporting violations of policies and procedures. The immediate relief or suspension from duty of any employee of the department when it is necessary to protect the welfare of the employee, the integrity of the department, or the safety of the campus community as provided for in these regulations and in accordance with applicable University Policies. Performing related duties as assigned by the Chief of Police. Reqs: Sworn Police Officer as certified by the California Commission on Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). Three years of non‐probationary UCPD Police Sergeant or higher classification experience or five years of non‑probationary Police Sergeant or higher classification experience with a non‑UCPD law enforcement agency. CA POST Advanced and Supervisory certificates. Ability to pass medical and psychological examinations and an extensive background investigation. High school graduate; Bachelor’s degree preferred. All qualifications must be met before the time of hire. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting requirements of Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $79,400‑$182,900/yr. Monday‑Thursday or Tuesday‑Friday from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. with occasional nights and weekends. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/20/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu.Job # 22540

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High

Low

Thu 9

High

Low

High

5:38 am 0.6

11:58 am 5.2

6:06 pm 1.0

Fri 10

12:12 am 4.8

6:10 am 1.1

12:34 pm 5.4

7:06 pm 0.9

Sat 11

1:12 am 4.2

6:44 am 1.7

1:15 pm 5.5

8:16 pm 0.8

Sun 12

2:33 am 3.6

7:22 am 2.3

2:08 pm 5.5

9:41 pm 0.7

Mon 13

4:32 am 3.3

8:17 am 2.8

3:17 pm 5.5

11:12 pm 0.4

Tue 14

6:34 am 3.5

9:56 am 3.1

4:39 pm 5.5

Wed 15

12:27 am 0.0

7:42 am 3.8

11:44 am 3.1

5:57 pm 5.7

Thu 16

1:25 am -0.2

8:24 am 4.1

12:58 pm 2.7

7:02 pm 5.9

13 H

20 D

28

6D source: tides.net

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Day

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Across

1 Italian pies, if you’re a Scrabble player (and trapped in the 1980s) 4 Backtalk 8 Fastener with a slotted head 13 Kappa preceder 15 Hardly any 16 TV intro music 17 Election Day day (abbr.) 18 Scruff of the neck 19 Gulf of Aden country 20 Disinfected / Completely wasted attempt to make angry? 23 Hospital section 24 “Star Wars” character who kills Jabba 25 Yodeler’s mountain 26 Jigsaw puzzle starting point, often 27 Furious state 29 1970s guerrilla org. 31 Positively 33 Catch a wave 35 Toy racer on a track 38 Electric car company 40 Yes, in France 41 Total prize money 45 Blogger’s personal bio section 48 Floating harbor marker 49 Bed grower 52 ___ Paulo, Brazil 54 “Catch ya later!” 55 Bowling alley rental 56 Group with the #1 hit “Butter” INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

59 Abbr. on a letter to Spain 61 Like some coffee or tea 62 Stabilizing, with “up” / Got out a piece of jewelry? 66 Horse noise 68 Japanese sashes 69 “Is that ___ or nay?” 70 English royal house after York 71 Delhi garment 72 Sleep in a tent 73 Bridge measurements 74 Biblical garden 75 Foot feature 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Down

Trouble spots for teens August, in Paris Pittsburgh players Some beachwear To the ends of the earth Old photo tinge Hunky-dory Pig pen Angelic figure / Ate the spice mix before preparing the meat? 10 Did a cover of 11 Come into existence 12 Proceeded 14 “... long ___ both shall live” 21 Ice, in a Berlin bar 22 Huge, story-wise 27 Suffix for art or humor 28 Regret deeply 30 Surname of three baseball brothers 32 A few Z’s 34 Drinking vessel at Renaissance Fairs / Imperfect geometric shape?

36 Gay and lesbian lifestyle magazine 37 Curry and Rice, for two 39 Homer’s father, on “The Simpsons” 42 Omar Khayyam’s poetry collection 43 ___ latte 44 Needle opening 46 Spheres 47 Enters carefully 49 Fire-striking stones 50 Tie, as sneakers 51 Flatware company named after a New York tribe 53 Airport code for O’Hare 57 “___ Were the Days” 58 “It’s ___ it’s good” 60 ___Fone Wireless (prepaid mobile phone provider) 63 Down to the ___ 64 Lost fish in a Pixar film 65 Open-mouthed stare 67 Divs. of days ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1048

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

SEPTEMBER 2021 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER 9,9, 2021

39 39


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 805-965-5205

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E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: DUTCH GARDEN RESTAURANT at 4203 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Dutch Garden LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Matthew English, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002450. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PALISADES PRODUCTIONS LLC at 220 Palisades Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Palisades Productions LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Emily Caitlin Rosen Hay, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002353. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: THE HR MENTOR at 605 W Canon Perdido St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ashley R Jones (same address) This business is conducted by A Individual Signed: Ashley Jones County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002289. Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: BIOMED

LIFE LLC at 211 E Anapamu St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Biomed Life LLC (same address) This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company Signed: Leslie Valle‑Montoya, Medical Doctor County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002320. Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: LOU ANN SMITH ART at 468 Camino Laguna Vista Goleta, CA 93117; Lourdes A Smith (same address) This business is conducted by A Individual Signed: Lourdes Ann Smith County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002317. Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: J+K VINEYARD at 1051 Croft Lane Solvang, CA 93463; J & K Vineyard, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Kristen Carlson, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002335. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARBORGRAPH, ARBORGRAPH VINEYARD at 1051 Croft Lane Solvang, CA 93463; J & K Vineyard, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Kristen Carlson, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002336. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND FISHING at 5527 Pembroke Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Robert G Cathcart (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Robert Cathcart, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002265. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: LOUISE K. MIZOTA & ASSOCIATES at 136 East Carrillo Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Louise K Mizota (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Louise K. Mizota, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002122. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: THE LIFE YOU WRITE at 79 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103;Taylor L Ross (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Taylor Ross, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021­0002401. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VIDA CONSULTING SERVICES at 506 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Maria (Mari) G Hernandez (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Maria (Mari) Hernandez, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 17, 2021. This

NOTICE INVITING PROPOSALS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that proposals are invited by the City of Goleta, California for the completion of Landscape Architectural Services for Stow Grove Park Renovation in strict accordance with the requirements listed in the Request for Proposal (RFP). The City of Goleta is seeking a design team for the planning and renovation design of historic and treasured Stow Grove Park, located in the City of Goleta. This project involves extensive public outreach and public participation components to engage the public in the design process for the purpose of determining the types of recreational and natural amenities desired by residents. The selected Consultant will provide landscape architecture, park planning, design and engineering services including, but not limited to: preparation of conceptual site plans, layout and design of recreational amenities and play areas, native species enhancement or restoration, construction cost estimates for the project if constructed all at once, or divided into separate phases to be completed as funding allows. Proposal forms and requirements are available on the City’s web site at https:// www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities and must be submitted in person to City of Goleta at 130 Cremona Drive, Goleta CA 93117 OR via email to jplummer@cityofgoleta.org up to but not later than, Thursday, September 16, 2021, at 3:00 p.m. The City reserves the right to reject any and/or all proposals received. Contact Information JoAnne Plummer Parks and Recreation Manager (805) 562-5505 E-mail: jplummer@cityofgoleta.org DISCLAIMER: The City does not assume any liability or responsibility for errors/ omissions in any document transmitted electronically. Dated: August 16, 2021 /s/ Deborah S. Lopez Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk 40

THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 9, 2021

statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021­0002389. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHAPALA UNIT F CO‑OWNERS at 1933 Cliff Drive Ste 26 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Carlo Sarmiento (same address) This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Carlo Sarmiento, General Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002319. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: ISA BIRD, ISA BIRD DESIGN, ISA EATON DESIGN, ISA HENDRY EATON DESIGN, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE DESIGN, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND STYLING at 960 Andante Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Isa Bird, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Isa Eaton, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002356. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 UNIVERSITY, 805 U, 805U, 805U BRANDS, 805U CLOTHING COMPANY, 805U CLOTHING CO., 805U SCREEN PRINTING & EMBROIDERY, 805U LOGISTICS CO., 805U DISTRIBUTION & MANUFACTURING, 805U LICENSING, 805U SOCIAL MEDIA CO., 805U SALES & MARKETING, 805U MANAGEMENT at 920 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 805 University Enterprises LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Steven Fuentes, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002376. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: SUREGE ELECTRIC & UDERGROUND UTILITY LOCATING, SUREGE ELECTRIC at 2890 Foxen Canyon Rd. Los Olivos, CA 93441; Sergio Medina (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Sergio Medina, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021­0002311. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: SYV SANDBLASTING at 1684 Laurel Ave Solvang, CA 93463; Kevin S Serritslev (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kevin Serritslev, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002392. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACHIEVING AWESOME at 5403 Tree Farm Lane, Unit 103 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hannah M Kafer Jenner (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Hannah Kafer Jenner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002403. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SALAMANDER FABRICATION at 7500 San Julian Rd Lompoc, CA 93436; Isaac W Baer (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Isaac Baer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002227. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAWKHOUSE FALCONRY at 5511 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hannah J Atkinson (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Hannah Atkinson Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002230. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MUJERES MAKERS MARKET, LLC at 1217 Laguna St Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mujeres Makers Market, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Leah Ortega, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002472. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THINGSTODOINSANTABARBARA. COM at 4067 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Andrea M Plackett 141 Valdivia Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Justin S. Plackett (same address) This business is conducted by an Married Couple Signed: Andrea M. Plackett, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 11, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002330. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOUISES KITCHEN TABLE, LLC, MOMMY MEALS, CULINARY CREATIONS at 1210 Mission Drive, Suite 110 Solvang, CA 93463; Louise’s Kitchen Table 1678 B Eucalyptus Drive Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Victoria Louise Smith, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002337. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIANESMITHCOUNSELING at 428 Los Verdes Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Diane C Smith (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Diane C. Smith, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002355. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAXMAR PRODUCTIONS at 430 Evonshire Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Maxwell S Martin (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Maxwell S Martin Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002508. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 CLASSIC MICHELADA at 519 N Milpas Santa Barbara, CA 93103; George Trujillo 579 Carlo Dr Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: George Trujillo, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Sep 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002540. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOWE’S at 935 E Betteravia Road Santa Maria, CA 93454; Lowe’s Home Centers, LLC 1000 Lowes Blvd, Mooresville, NC 28117 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: David R Green, Vice President Tax Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 31, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021­0002519. Published: Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021.

NAME CHANGE AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF CONSUELLA AGUIRRE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04337 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CONSUELLA AGUIRRE TO: CONNIE SPEAR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 05, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in

this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 13, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ANDUIN ROSE BRIDGES and DANIEL CHARLES BRIDGES TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03173 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CALEB ASH BRIDGES TO: EVAN OCEAN BRIDGES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 05, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 13, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF BRENDAN PIERCE LETT TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02936 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: BRENDAN PIERCE LETT TO: IBRAHIM ABDUSHAKUUR SIRI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 08, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Civil, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 19, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG AKA RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02828 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa


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Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG aka RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO: NINA R. SCHOOLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Sep 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, ANACAPA DIVISION SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated July 30, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KELLY JEAN SHORT & ANGELINA CRISTA TORRES TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02991 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KELLY JEAN SHORT TO: KELLY JEAN SHORT‑DE LUNA FROM: ANGELINA CRISTA TORRES TO: ANGELINA CRISTA DE LUNA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 20, 2021 8:30 am, Dept THREE, CIVIL, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 312 ‑ C East Cook Street Santa Maria, CA 93454. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 27, 2021. by Timothy J. Staffel. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 9, 16, 23, 30 2021.

SUMMONS SUMMONS ‑ (Family Law) NOTICE TO REPONDENT: HELEN BIRD AVISO AL DEMANDADO: Petitioner’s name is: EDGAR RICHARDSON Nombre del demandante: CASE NUMBER: (Numero de caso) 20FL01943 You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120) at the court and have a copy

served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE‑RESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON PAGE 2: These restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. They are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerto. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion, y honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encountrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO‑LAS ORDENES DE RESTRICCION SE ENCUENTRAN EN LA PAGINA 2: Las ordenes de restriccion estan en vigencia en cuanto a ambos conyuges o miembros de la pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la peticion, se emita un fallo o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier autoridad del orden publico que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas ordenes puede hacerlas acerlas acater en cualquier lugar de California. EXENCION DE CUOTAS: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. 1.The name and address of the court are (El nombre y direccion de la corte son): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: (El nombre, direccion y numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Edgar Richardson 761 Camino Pescadero Goleta, CA 93117; 805‑335‑7508 Dated Nov 30, 2020. Darrel E. Parker, Execcutive Officer; Clerk, by (Secretario, por) Nicolette Barnard, Deputy (Asistente) Published Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021.

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INDY TODAY! Independent.com/newsletters Notice Date: September 9, 2021 NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE Cabrillo Business Park Revised Project Clearance September 20, 2021 at 5:00 P.M. Cabrillo Business Park Lot 6 Building 6765 Navigator Way; APN 073-610-039 Case No. 21-0032-PCR-RV-OSP NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Director of Planning and Environmental Review of the City of Goleta intends to issue a Revised Project Clearance pursuant to the Cabrillo Business Park (CBP) Specific Plan (City Ord. 13-04) for the following Individual Project described below, on September 20, 2021 at 5:00 P.M.: ORIGINAL PROJECT DESCRIPTION SUMMARY (19-120-PCR-RV-OSP): The permit authorized the reconfiguration of the parking lot and circulation system located on the north side of the previously approved building to provide interconnected circulation between the adjacent buildings. The parameters of the previous approval of the research and development/office building on Lot 6 included: • A 16,750-square foot 34’ tall two-story building before the roof mounted mechanical equipment. • The floor area of the building was broken into 4,650 square feet of manufacturing; 4,600 square feet of research and development space; 4,650 square feet of warehouse space; and 2,850 square feet office space. • Four-foot-tall screening for roof mounted mechanical equipment resulting in a maximum height of 38 feet. • Building Lot coverage of 25.09 %. • Forty-nine (49) parking spaces (13 compact spaces, 3 ADA spaces and 33 standard parking spaces). • A trash enclosure located along the southern property line screened by landscaping. • Customer pick-up and shipping/receiving access located in the loading area along the southwestern portion of the site with employee/visitor access located along the north elevation. • Landscape islands located within the north, south and east parking lots, with a landscaped employee/lunch area adjacent to the west elevation of the building. • A decomposed granite pedestrian path located adjacent to the north elevation of the building which provides pedestrian access through to Lots 5, 7, and 9, Navigator Way, and Coromar Drive. • Drainage system of bioswales and storm drains which directs flows to an off-site detention basin (approx. 0.42 acres) located in the southern portion of Lot 19. REVISED PROJECT CLEARANCE SUMMARY (21-0032-PCR-RV-OSP): The applicant proposes revisions to the existing approved Project Clearance (Case No. 19-120-PCR-RVOSP). No new additional square footage is proposed; however, the internal usage within the building is being modified as explained below. The revisions include the following: Exterior 1. The addition of one 3-foot x 7-foot glass / aluminum door in the previously approved storefront opening along the west elevation. 2. The extension of the 4-foot decomposed granite pathway from the new door location to the approved lunch patio area (approximately 25 linear feet) along the west elevation of the building. Interior (Ground Floor) 3. An interior tenant improvement to partition the building into two tenant spaces. 4. Revision of previously approved ground level interior office improvements per Montecito Bank and Trust tenant requirements along with eastern side of the building. 5. Expansion previously approved restroom to allow for future secondary tenant. 6. Revision of previously approved ground level interior office improvements for unknown secondary tenant along the west side of the building. Interior (Second Floor) 7. The re-design of the 2nd floor interior office improvements for the Montecito Bank and Trust tenant requirements. 8. The addition of second floor shower to the previously approved restroom. 9. The re-configuration of the stairway to provide secure existing for tenant. Uses 10. A decrease in R & D floor area from 4,600 square feet to 0 square feet. 11. A decrease in Manufacturing floor area from 4,650 square feet to 0 square feet. 12. An increase in warehousing floor area from 4,650 to 10,700 square feet. A net increase of 6,050 square feet. 13. An increase in office floor area from 2,850 to 6,050 square feet. A net increase of 3,200 square feet. As approved under Case No. 14-132-LUP, drainage will remain to be handled by a system of bioswales and storm drains and will be directed to an on-site detention basin (approx. 0.42 acres) located in the southern portion of Lot 19. The revisions do not increase the total PM Peak Hour trips associated with the CBP Lot 6. All approval findings, consistency analyses, and conditions of approval from 19-120-PCR-RV-OSP, 16-162-PCRRV-OSP, 16-160-LLA-VTA would remain in effect. The revised project was filed by Troy White on behalf of RAF Pacifica, property owner. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: The project falls within the scope of the CBP Specific Plan approved earlier as part of the CBP Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR). The CBP Final EIR adequately describes the project for the purposes of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). No new effects would occur as a result of the project revisions and no new mitigations would be required as the project falls within the scope of the project covered by the CBP Final EIR. The project is also found to be consistent with the Environmental Thresholds Checklist in the CBP Specific Plan; therefore, no further environmental review under CEQA is required. (CEQA Guidelines Sections 15162 and 15168). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please contact the project planner, Kathy Allen, Supervising Senior Planner, at (805) 961-7545, or via email at kallen@cityofgoleta.org. The project plans and submittal may be reviewed at the City of Goleta website; https://www.cityofgoleta.org/city-hall/planning-and-environmental-review/directordecisions APPEALS PROCEDURE: The action of the Director may be appealed to the City of Goleta Planning Commission within ten (10) calendar days following final action. If you challenge the City’s final action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to Planning and Environmental Review prior to final decision-maker action (Government Code § 65009(b)(2)). Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, September 9, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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September 9, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 817

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September 9, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 817

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