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SEPT. 2-9, 2021 VOL. 35 ✦ NO. 816

N I E T N A R A y e U s QSc ree n Od ys ✦✦✦ ✦✦✦✦

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I B S E D INSI

+NEWS: VACCINE OR TESTIN

R O W Y T N U G FOR CO

L W O B E H T O E COMES T

N W O R ALLO B G N H O T I S W K C S ET ARTS: JA : GRAHM G WINE


May 11 & 12 The Joffrey Ballet

2021-2022 Season Highlights

Apr 28 Colson Whitehead

Feb 25 Roxane Gay

Feb 26 Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit

Dec 15 Béla Fleck My Bluegrass Heart

Apr 13 & 14 Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

Nov 12 Leonidas Kavakos and Yuja Wang

Dec 2 She & Him - A Very She & Him Christmas Party

(805) 893-3535 | ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu 2

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Series Subscriptions Now on Sale! Buy series tickets and save up to 25% series

NEW!

Includes nine events

Justice for All confronts the inequalities that shape our policies, our institutions and our lives. Our collective awakening demands a just, tolerant, open and socially inclusive world, one which frees us to thrive. In this series public figures, organizers, thinkers and doers expose deeply embedded injustices and call for a more equitable future.

Jan 12 Amanda Nguyen

Feb 2 John Leguizamo

Nov 10 Annette Gordon-Reed

Nov 3 Warrior Women Oct 10 Julián Castro

Soul of America series

NEW!

From jazz to bluegrass and beyond, homegrown marvels illustrate America’s heart and vibrant musical history.

Feb 4 Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

Includes six events

Oct 12 The Wood Brothers

And so much more! View the full 2021-2022 lineup at ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu and order today! Buy with Confidence: With changing public health guidelines, we want to make buying tickets as easy as possible and provide you with the certainty that your investment in Arts & Lectures is one we take seriously. We’ll continue to offer flexible ticket returns and exchanges for the 2021-2022 season.

@artsandlectures INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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THE INDEPENDENT

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Jun Starkey Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designer Ricky Barajas Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Atmika Iyer, Nicholas Liu, Caleb Rodriguez, Holly Rusch, Kat Sophia Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2021 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY 20 The Quarantine Screen Odyssey

Roger Durling’s Pandemic Film Diary + Inside SBIFF Summer Camp by Charles Donelan and Ryan P. Cruz

ENDORSEMENT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . .

14 24 26 29

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 ON THE COVER: Roger Durling. Erick Madrid photo. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

SHOEGAZE, SKA, AND POKÉMON GOTH RUNS Though Caitlin Kelley — whom we all call “Cat” to avoid confusion with our other Caitlin on staff — isn’t from Santa Barbara, her mom’s family is, which is how she decided to attend SBCC years ago. Today, she lives in Buellton and covers global pop, alt rock, and “weird internet trends” for a number of publications, interviewing such artists as Hatchie, Joji, and Stray Kids. We recently added “day job” to her “two-pronged career” by hiring her to work alongside Celina Garcia as part of our web team.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 35, # 816, Sept. 2-9, 2021

Where are you from originally? I grew up in Anaheim so close to Disneyland that I grew desensitized to the wonderment of fireworks because they were always there. I am, unfortunately, so Orange County that I just bought a book about ska: Aaron Carnes’s In Defense of Ska. How’s life in the Santa Ynez Valley? I’m certainly drinking more wine these days. What’s interesting about your job? I love to collect a skill. Working as a web content manager has proven useful in that endeavor. Somehow, my brain is grasping the basic fundamentals of InDesign. How do you spend your free time? I cycle through so many interests, it gives me whiplash. Right now, my entire existence is made up of shoegaze albums, Lord of the Rings, and Pokémon. Let’s just say I’m gearing up for a “goth run”of Pokémon Sword, where I beat the game with only Ghost- and Dark-type Pokémon. Anyway, stan Cocteau Twins. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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Endorsement H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H

Vote No on Recalling Governor Newsom

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alifornia, birthplace of the recall vote, proves yet again that just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. If recent polling is to be believed, the winner of this September 14 election to recall Governor Gavin Newsom could well be the right-wing radio personality and ardent anti-masker Larry Elder, a man totally unqualified to run California. To state the obvious, this year’s recall effort—so flamboyantly ill-conceived—beggars any pretense at self-preservation and common sense. We urge all voters—regardless of party affiliation or ideological inclinations—to vote no. The only reason California faces such a fate is that a group of fringe Republican malcontents, upset that Governor Newsom has done what he said he would do when he ran for office four years ago, were able to raise enough money and garner enough signatures to qualify for this special election, which is estimated to be costing taxpayers at least $276 million. Even if you find Gavin Newsom’s positions objectionable, his term expires in little more than a year. Presumably in the intervening time, the Republicans might find someone with a modicum of competence to run against Newsom then. But not now. To be clear, this election is not about whether you like Newsom or not. He might not be the sort of guy you’d want to sit down to have a beer with—or more precisely, to sit down with at a fancy French restaurant to enjoy a $500-a-plate

birthday dinner celebrating the state’s über-lobbyist, as Newsom did earlier in the pandemic. That, most certainly, was foolish. But it’s also not grounds for impeachment. Or recall. To the extent Newsom deserves blame for mistakes undeniably made, he also deserves credit for the successes for which we’ve all sacrificed so hard. The stakes involved could not be higher. We are urging our voters to vote emphatically no on the recall. It’s not about saving Newsom’s bacon; it’s about saving your own. Polls have been wrong, and winds do change. But as it stands now, Elder—a contrarian and energetic provocateur—is reportedly way ahead of all the other 45 candidates now running to replace Newsom. It’s worth noting at this historical moment that Elder has never held elective office during his 69 years on planet Earth and that he’s pledged to repeal all the mask and vaccination requirements that Governor Newsom has approved. As a Black man, Elder has carved out a successful career as a multimedia pundit trivializing, minimizing, and denying the consequences of racism. Just what we don’t need: a gratuitously selfdestructive incompetent at the helm of the fifth-largest economy on the planet as the worst public health crisis in the past two centuries goes into overdrive. Even those voters who dislike or disapprove of Newsom’s policies should nevertheless be concerned that the man most likely to become governor should they vote for recall will be Elder, whose ex-fiancée accused him of pull-

ing out a revolver in the middle of a heated domestic dispute to ensure that it was loaded. Elder declined—in his words—to dignify such accusations with a response. Unfortunately, he’s also refused to dignify with a response questions posed by any reporter other than a few representing a Chinese news agency. When it comes to essential details—like how he’d handle the COVID crisis — the voters deserve less dignity and more information. Governor Newsom, on the other hand, has proved to be uncommonly effective navigating a host of natural and unnatural disasters. Has he been perfect? Absolutely not. But in his brief tenure, Newsom has been forced to deal with droughts of geologic scale, infernos that rival anything in the Old Testament, and, of course, most immediately debilitating, COVID-19. And until this year, Newsom had no federal partner upon whom it was safe for Californians to rely. No, we are not remotely out of the woods. But look at states such as Texas, Florida, and Alabama — all led by such stridently antimasking governors that their school districts have been forced to rise up in revolt to impose the most rudimentary of safety precautions. Consequently, their hospitals are overflowing with COVID patients, their ICUs engorged with bodies of people who can’t breathe without the aid of a machine. In California, our hospitals have been greatly strained and our health-care workers maxed out. But they are still standing, still caring for our sick.

Although registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by a 2-to-1 margin in the state and no Republican has won a statewide office since 2006, the smart money is betting that Newsom could still lose because of what the pollsters refer to as “the enthusiasm gap” and voter fatigue. Are Democrats and Independent voters really so tired of voting they can’t mail in their ballots? We hope not. By now, any registered voter reading this should have received a large envelope courtesy of the Santa Barbara County Elections Department. In it is enclosed the recall ballot. It asks two questions. The first is whether you support the recall. Fill in the No bubble. The second question on the ballot asks which of the 46 contenders you would select to replace Governor Newsom should he be recalled. As a matter of tactics, strategy, and, above all, simplicity, we urge you to keep the second line blank. If this sounds like a singularly undemocratic process, you are correct. If more voters cast ballots against Newsom than for him, the candidate with the most votes of the 46 in the running will become our next governor. In such a scenario, Newsom will all but certainly have slightly less than half the total votes cast. But the next governor—having had to split votes with 45 other candidates—will have won with far fewer votes than Newsom. Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should. Vote No on the Recall. And be sure to vote. n

Join Us in Demanding Safe Passage NOW! “One of the most TERRIFYING experiences I’ve had was in that area, walking my daughter in a stroller.” * -Young City Council Member Imagine trying to walk the area if you are no longer young, or if you are not able-bodied!

Please show your support for these improvements:

• • • • • •

Pedestrian and bicycle bridges on both sides of the Mission Canyon Bridge Compliance with the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act): morally and legally right Realignment of the roadway, away from the historic stegosaurus stone wall Undergrounding of utilities: avoid power outages and wildfires Seismic retrofitting of the Mission Canyon Bridge, built on a fault Creation of safe passage for all in the cultural and historical center of Santa Barbara

If you agree with Safe Passage, please go to missionheritagetrailassociation.org and sign the petition to be presented to both city and county decision makers. Safe Passage/Mission Heritage Trail Association Foundation P.O. Box 30545 Santa Barbara, CA 93130 A not-for-profit public benefit organization 501(c)(3) tax-exempt *Meagan Harmon, City Council District 6, during August 10, 2021 City Council Meeting. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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AUG. 26-SEP. 2, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by RYAN P. CRUZ, TYLER HAYDEN, JUN STARKEY, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CORONAVIRUS

Vaccine or Testing for County Workers PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Supervisors Say It’s a Choice, Not a Mandate

by Nick Welsh fter 57 speakers weighed in on both sides of the question of mandatory vaccines or testing for COVID-19 — often politely, sometimes angrily, but always intensely — the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 to require all 4,610 county employees to either get vaccinated or to submit to weekly tests beginning September 30. Many supes took pains to stress it was not a mandate but a choice. As of this Monday, county HR officials had verified that 59 percent of all county workers had already been vaccinated. A little more than a third — 34.4 percent — declined to say. As has been the case during CHANGE OF HEART: Leading the charge for the new vaccine and testing requirements was Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, who just last the prior two meetings when week had voted against any such policy. the issue was being debated, the argument against vaccinations was both by the same person. “We also heard the nursing shortage at Marian Hospital in exceptionally heated. Pro-vaccination a lot how government ‘is trying to silence Santa Maria has erupted into a full-fledged supervisors again found themselves com- us,’ ” he added, “three times in the same crisis. In Santa Barbara, Sansum Clinic pared to Nazi Germany. Adolf Hitler, one meeting. We forget what real tyranny looks oncologist Dr. Mark Abate objected to the speaker noted, defended his actions on the like. Here, you get to go to the podium and vaccine on medical and religious grounds. grounds of “the common good.” Another denounce government. Go try that in Iraq Abate — whose wife, Caroline Abate, has speaker noted that the Nazi death camp at or Afghanistan.” frequently spoken out against the vaccine Auschwitz started off as a quarantine center The vaccine is effective, Lavagnino — said he wouldn’t get vaccinated because for the sick. argued, but he said the government should he’s pro-life. He didn’t explain what he For the first time, however, vaccination not force anyone to take it. “But that’s meant by that, but another speaker taking supporters also showed up in substantial not what the county is doing,” he stated. the same tack stated fetal tissue had been numbers — many, but not all, were Dem- Instead, he insisted, county employees have used in the development of the vaccine and ocratic Party activists, urging the super- a choice between getting tested and taking was similarly involved in the development visors to take decisive protective action. the vaccine. of the PCR COVID-19 test. Caroline Abate One speaker noted that nine members of Countywide, the numbers are getting told the supervisors her husband might her family had come down with COVID; somewhat better. According to Van Do- soon find himself forced out of medicine another said her family had 22 cases. Of Reynoso, County Public Health director, after treating people with cancer for nearly those, the two who hadn’t taken the vac- the number of new cases has dropped 33 years. She termed the choice “cruel.” cine, she said, nearly died. The rest got bet- somewhat in the past two weeks, as has Vaccination critics questioned why all the number of people hospitalized. As of county employees were not being required ter in three to five days. Another vaccine supporter — still recov- Tuesday, there were 75 COVID patients to submit to regular testing. With the recent ering from chemotherapy — said she’d been occupying county hospital beds; 18 were ascendancy of the Delta variant, it’s widely yelled at for wearing a mask. She described in an ICU bed. recognized that even vaccinated people can dealing with a health-care worker who The latter — perhaps the most ominous still get infected with the newer variant. hadn’t gotten vaccinated. Another sup- stat — is down 12 percent from the week More critically, they can also pass it along porter — a 34-year county worker awaiting before. Supervisor Gregg Hart recited a per- to others. a kidney transplant — said she had been sonal letter the supervisors received from Many called into question why the test ordered to work in a room with 100 other ER doctor Jason Prystowsky, lamenting, “I wasn’t being universally required. County have put too many people on mechanical Supervisor Bob Nelson — who cast the sole people for 16 hours a week. Leading the charge for the new require- ventilators. Please! We are exhausted. The vote against the new requirements — seized ments was Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, vaccine works. The Delta virus is far more on it himself. “If we know people who are who just last week had voted against any dangerous. We don’t need another surge.” vaccinated can still get and spread COVID, such policy. Lavagnino, a former stand-up The other side had their medical lumi- why wouldn’t we be testing the entire orgacomedian as well as a former Republican, naries as well. At least a couple of registered nization?” he asked county executive Mona noted that he had been compared to Hitler nurses spoke out against the vaccines, one Miyasato. at the beginning of the meeting and then vowing to leave the state if need be to avoid “That’s a good question,” she answered. decried as a Holocaust denier at the end, such coercive measures. She also stated n

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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COU RTESY SANTA BAR BAR A ZO O

COMMUNITY

The Santa Barbara Zoo confirmed 8/27 that two of its endangered female Masai giraffes are pregnant: Adia, 7, is due in January 2022, and Audrey, 13, will be due in July 2022. The zoo’s only adult male, Michael, 15, is the father of both. This will be the second calf for Adia and the seventh for Audrey. The Masai giraffe was classified as an endangered species in 2018 by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and it’s estimated that around 37,000 of them exist in the wild in Kenya and Tanzania.

CORONAVIRUS CORONAVIRUS The S.B. Bowl announced 8/30 it will now require everybody, including children 12 and under, to show proof of completed vaccination or a negative test result from within 72 hours for entry to its events. Proof of vaccination is a government-issued ID and your original vaccination card or a printed copy or photo of it on your phone. Both CDC vaccination cards and California digital vaccine records will be accepted. For more info and updates, check sbbowl .com/covid19.

PUBLIC SAFETY With about two dozen wildfires burning in California, all national forests in the Pacific Southwest Region, including Los Padres in S.B. County, will be closed through 9/17. Regional Forester Jennifer Eberlien said, “We do not take this decision lightly, but this is the best choice for public safety.” She went on to acknowledge the hardship the closures will cause Labor Day vacationers, though the press release noted reducing the number of people in the forest would decrease the potential for fire starts as well as the potential need to rescue visitors.

ENVIRONMENT The long road to eliminate the pesticide chlorpyrifos from agricultural foods had its final win this August when the Environmental Protection Agency determined no safe level of exposure existed. The pesticide was banned in California at the end of 2020, and state Attorney General Rob Bonta stated the new nationwide ban prevented it from crossing borders on vegetables and fruits from other states. Chlorpyrifos is known to impair brain development in children and vulnerable populations. Among the CONT’D ON PAGE 11 


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

COURTS & CRIME

Lompoc Shooting Ruled Justified

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he Santa Barbara County District Attorney’s Office concluded this week that the fatal shooting of 26-yearold Krys Ruiz by Lompoc police on March 28 was a justifiable homicide. In an eight-page report released Friday, the office describes how Ruiz — who had a history of mental-health problems, including multiple suicide attempts — reportedly rushed at officers while wearing a clown Krys Ruiz memorial mask and holding a knife. It also details a suicide note found in Ruiz’s pocket that identified his next of kin and wishes for who would receive his assets. “I hope my death makes more sense than my life,” the note read. At approximately 8 p.m. that night, the report states, police received an anonymous 9-1-1 call that a person armed with a gun was near the old Lompoc Theater. Investigators later determined it was Ruiz who called. Two officers responded and spotted Ruiz, whom they were unable to identify because of the mask. The report says that when the officers caught up to Ruiz, he began “sprinting” at them with his arms raised, holding a large kitchen knife. The officers ordered him to stop, and when he didn’t they opened fire, striking him three times, including once in the head. The shooting was captured by one of the officers’ in-car cameras. On Ruiz’s

he Long Valley Caldera east of Mammoth Mountain will be among the sources of electrical power for Santa Barbara County after the transition to Central Coast Community Energy (CCCE) takes place in October. The new energy provider has been blanketing the unincorporated South County and the cities of Goleta and Carpinteria to announce its arrival. The consortium already serves 395,000 customers in the counties of Santa Cruz, San Benito, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and northern Santa Barbara and is moving rapidly toward buying its power only from clean, renewable sources by 2030. The Mammoth agreement reached in May with Ormat Technologies, which is building a 30-megawatt geothermal project called Casa Diablo-IV to tap the heat generated by the magma deep beneath the Long Valley region, is one of the ways energy providers like CCCE achieve greenhouse-gas reductions and also encourage industries and jobs in the renewable energy field. CCCE currently buys electricity from solar, geothermal, and storage sources — its first storage project holds 60 megawatts from a solar array in south Monterey County — and the group is contracting for the power to come from wind energy off Morro Bay. The result has been a 60 percent pull from clean energy sources now, well ahead of CCCE’s 2025 goal. The anticipated shutdown of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant requires all power providers to add 2,200 megawatts of energy, said CCCE spokesperson Shelly Whitworth. The 24 Community Choice Energy agencies in California have nearly 6 gigawatts from renewables in their combined pipelines, she said, the equivalent of

three Diablos. For consumers, they’ll get one energy bill, from either PG&E or SoCal Edison, which will continue to charge a fee for the use of their transmission lines; CCCE will charge for the electricity, a cost that had averaged about 2 percent less across the board, Whitworth noted. Such is the rate of return, however, that the group was able to drop its charges by half in May and June 2020 to ease the economic pain brought on by the pandemic — a savings of $22 million for customers. Since forming in 2018 under the name Monterey Bay Community Power, CCCE has invested another $27.5 million in rebates and incentives to ratepayers — both commercial and household — for electric vehicles, electric-vehicle charging stations, zero-emission school buses, agricultural equipment powered by electricity, and other projects. It has earmarked $12 million in equivalent projects for the next year, plus $19 million for charging stations. Several online webinars will explain more about the energy provider and its programs, and the choice to opt out. A Spanish-language seminar takes place on Thursday, September 9, at 6 p.m., and one in English on Tuesday, September 14, at 6 p.m. A seminar for commercial and agricultural customers will be held November 9 at noon. Register at 3cenergy.org/2021-enrollment. The City of Santa Barbara is among the energy purchasers operating a solo cleanenergy program, which also begins in October. It includes several energy-purchase options; for more visit sustainability.santa barbaraca.gov/energy or call (805) 897-1979. —Jean Yamamura

DAVE MI N SKY / LOMPOC R ECOR D

Clean, Green Energy on the Way

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arm was written “Reach in my pocket,” which directed police to the suicide note. An autopsy found “nothing of toxicological significance in his system” at the time. “Lompoc Police Department was familiar with Mr. Ruiz and many officers had numerous contacts with Mr. Ruiz, including calls for service for welfare checks due to Mr. Ruiz’s mental health or Mr. Ruiz attempting suicide or threatening suicide,” the report states. “Lompoc PD generated four reports between 2017 and 2019 where Mr. Ruiz had made suicide attempts or was threatening suicide.” The last call for service was made January 1, 2020, when Ruiz was again threatening to kill himself. —Tyler Hayden

If you are having thoughts of suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255 (TALK) or text TALK to 741741.

EDUCATION

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tarting after Labor Day, Santa Barbara Unified School District will implement mandatory COVID-19 testing for all K-12 students, with consent from parents when necessary. Students under the age of 13 do need their parents’ consent to get tested, while students over the age of 13 do not need parental consent but can choose to share their test results. Any family that would like to opt out of testing will not be allowed to participate in in-person classes, but they may participate in independent study through Alta Vista Alternative High School. The new mandate, announced at Tuesday’s Board of Education meeting, is in response to a rise of COVID-19 cases in the school district since in-person instruction began midAugust. Nine staff members and 22 students have tested positive for COVID as of August 31, with the ages ranging from kindergarten to 12th grade. “If this rate continues, we are looking at over 50 cases of COVID amongst our students and approximately 24 cases for our staff,” said Assistant Superintendent Frann Wageneck at Tuesday’s meeting. During the highest outbreak period of COVID-19 in the district, there were 26 reported positive cases within the entire month of April. Wageneck said none of the cases reported within the first five days of school were transmitted while on campus, compared to one transmission case from 2020.

DAN I E L DR EI FUSS FI LE P HOTO

S.B. Schools Mandate COVID Testing

In early August, the board voted to require all teachers to be vaccinated by the beginning of the school year or submit to weekly testing. So far, 85 percent of regular staff — those who work on the campus or in the district regularly — are fully vaccinated. Eighteen staff members have vaccinations in progress, and 44 are choosing to not be vaccinated. “When we have this much COVID in our community, it’s inevitable that people will be bringing it to school, unknowingly,” said Susan KleinRothschild, former deputy director COVID CASES RISING: “If this rate continues, we are looking at over 50 cases of COVID amongst of the Santa Barbara Public Health our students and approximately 24 cases for our staff,” said Assistant Superintendent Frann Wageneck at Tuesday’s school board meeting. Department. According to Klein-Rothschild, 73 we start our school year, we’re doing it amid a commupercent of eligible residents of the county, anyone 12 and nity that has too much COVID.” older, have had at least one shot, with 64 percent being Other plans considered by the district to fight COVID fully vaccinated. included buying air purifiers for the entire district, about Klein-Rothschild said the county is close to over- 725 classrooms and 300 office spaces, or for select classwhelming its hospital system due to the growing rooms and offices. The plans range in cost from about number of COVID cases. The county currently has 24 $100,000-$200,000. COVID cases per 100,000 residents, as compared to “The sooner we identify someone who is positive and the nine in June. sooner we isolate them,” Klein-Rothschild said, “the sooner —Jun Starkey “It’s really unfortunate and concerning,” she said. “As we stop the spread.” INDEPENDENT.COM

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of Order, which states a time-sensitive item may be moved to action if there is a twothirds majority vote to do so. “That is not in the Brown Act,” Parker said, later asking what Brown Act training the senate receives, prompting Napoleon to list several annual meetings and retreats where senators or senate leadership receive training or hold discussions regarding the Brown Act. Another point of contention, brought forward by Trustee Miller, was Napoleon’s comment to the Independent in a recent article, where she said she wants a board that serves the campus community and not the “greater community.” Miller, who is a retired attorney, posed many questions similar to how a lawyer would question a witness on the stand. “Are you aware that the greater community comprises the seven separate communities that elect the board?” he asked, later asking, “Do you agree that each trustee has an obligation to work for the constituents that elected them as well as working for the campus community?” “Not if those constituents don’t understand the mission and the purpose of our college, no,” Napoleon answered. Napoleon voiced her disappointment at the board’s reaction and said the vote of no confidence is simply a “political move” meant to express dissatisfaction with the board’s leadership. “You were all focusing on technicalities and one statement I made in the press and not the substantive content for which we have presented you,” she said. Napoleon said she plans to bring the vote back to the senate to rectify the board’s complaints regarding the Brown Act. “We’ll revote. We’ll make this legally valid, whatever that means,” Napoleon said. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COUNTY

Census Data Released

P

reliminary 2020 Census data, which provides a first look at the total populations and racial compositions of American cities and counties, reveals Santa Barbara County has grown by 24,334 residents — or 5.7 percent — since 2010. The cities of Solvang and Guadalupe grew the most with 16.8 percent and 13.8 percent increases, respectively, while Santa Barbara and Carpinteria saw the smallest bumps of 0.3 and 1.7 percent, respectively. Over the last decade, the data also shows, the county’s white population has decreased by 9 percent while its Hispanic or Latino population jumped by 15.9 percent. The cities with the biggest drops in white residents were Santa Maria (22 percent) and Lompoc (13.7). The number of Asian residents countywide increased

dramatically by 29.5 percent as the Black population shrank by 10.7 percent. The racial breakdown of Santa Barbara County is now as follows: • Hispanic or Latino: 47.0 percent • White: 41.2 percent • Asian: 5.7 percent • Two or more races: 3.7 percent • Black or African American: 1.4 percent • Other race: 0.5 percent • American Indian and Alaskan Native: 0.4 percent • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander: 0.1 percent Additional Census data, which will be used in upcoming redistricting efforts, is scheduled to be released in late Septem—Tyler Hayden ber.

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 8 insects the pesticide kills are honeybees and other pollinators.

whom wondered if the Hodor’s helipad indicated a military ship.

The campaign to preserve 6.8 acres of agricultural land in Summerland reached a breakthrough moment 8/24 when the Carpinteria school board voted to accept a $2.25 million offer from the Santa Barbara Agriculture and Farm Education Foundation. Founder Leslie Person Ryan called the Minnesota-based Manitou Fund the project’s “funding angel” and thanked the hundreds of individuals who donated and made pledges “to ensure that this land remains green for Summerland forever.” Fundraising continues for legal fees, said Ryan, and the ongoing educational program for schoolchildren will continue.

Santa Barbara has suspended cruise-ship visits through 3/1/22, Waterfront Director Mike Wiltshire announced in a press release on 8/30. Though Wiltshire touted the low impact of cruise-ship visits, which bring millions to S.B.’s economy, he said that for the “health and safety of our community … we have decided to pause the program.” A local increase in COVID infection rates has led to the decision to wait to see what the impacts will be, he noted. The next cruise ship visit is scheduled for 3/10/22.

COU RTESY

SHIPS

COURTS & CRIME Flutes Across the World founder John Edward Zeretzke, who taught at the Wildling Museum and Circle V Ranch in the Santa Ynez Valley, was sentenced 8/26 to 15 years and three months in federal prison for producing child pornography, according to a statement from the U.S. Attorney General’s Office. Zeretzke, 62, of Ventura, pleaded guilty a year ago to one count of production of child pornography, had previously pleaded guilty in Orange County Superior Court to six state counts of “committing lewd or lascivious acts with minors under the age of 14 years old,” and was sentenced in July 2020 to 18 years in state prison, a sentence that will run concurrently with his federal prison sentence.

COMMUNITY Two massive super-yachts appeared in the Santa Barbara Channel 8/26, drawing awe and questions from beachgoers and residents. According to Harbormaster Mike Wiltshire, the two offshore vessels are the Lonian — a 285-foot super-yacht built by Feadship of Florida and the Netherlands — and the Hodor (pictured), its 216-foot companion ship. Both are owned by billionaire Lorenzo Fertitta, former CEO of the Ultimate Fighting Championship. The ships had led to calls to the Harbor Patrol from S.B. residents, some of

The S.B. Coroner’s Bureau has identified the four people who died in two accidents on Highway 101 8/25. The first was Cameron Martinez, 31, of Solvang, struck in the northbound lanes of the 101 at 2:10 a.m. Three died in the southbound lanes around 2:18 a.m., including Daniel Garcia, 25, and Eryka Lopez, 23, both of Santa Maria, and Natalia Stallworth, 28, of S.B. Media reports indicate Stallworth had been driving the Volkswagen Jetta that crossed the center of the highway near Dos Pueblos Canyon Road and hit the Ford Expedition head-on. It remains undetermined if the n two accidents are related. INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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11


AUG. 26-SEP. 2, 2021

CORONAVIRUS

COVID Fact vs. Fiction: Ivermectin by Ryan P. Cruz

There is a flood of new COVID-19 information available online and on social media every day, and not all of it is reliable. In this series, the Independent will try to separate common COVID myths and misconceptions from truth using information from the Santa Barbara County Public Health Department, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and World Health Organization, as well as studies from Johns Hopkins and Yale.

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

COU RTESY WI KIMEDIA FOU N DATION

Does Antiparasitic Drug Help Patients with the Virus?

OVID has become a deep-seated part of everyday life. It’s no surprise that the uncertainty and sheer amount of cases have sent people searching for anything that could help prevent and treat symptoms of the virus. With a segment of the population still hesitant to get vaccinated—the latest numbers estimate 26.1 percent of eligible residents in the county have yet to receive any vaccine—some unconventional treatments have popped up on the internet. In the beginning, it was the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine, which former President Donald Trump touted as potentially effective in treating COVID. According to a study published by the National Institutes of Health in November 2020, “hydroxychloroquine was unlikely to offer any benefit” in treating patients hospitalized with COVID. The latest unorthodox “antidote” to make the rounds is ivermectin, an antiparasitic drug intended to be used for horses, cows, and sheep to prevent worms. The drug’s popularity grew after some doctors in South Africa — desperate for anything to alleviate the crisis in the country, and against warnings from the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) condemning its use — began prescribing it to COVID patients, claiming anecdotal evidence that the drug could help patients with the virus. The word spread, driving the drug’s price up from $5 per tablet to as much as $34 per tablet on the country’s black market. Sales of veterinary forms prescribing the drug have also skyrocketed. The drug is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating COVID in humans, and according to the FDA website, it can cause serious harm if ingested without a prescription. An overdose of ivermectin can cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, hypotension (low blood pressure), allergic reactions (itching and hives), dizziness, ataxia (problems with balance), seizures, coma, and even death. “There seems to be a growing interest in a drug called ivermectin to treat humans with COVID-19,” the FDA website says. “Ivermectin is often used in the U.S. to treat or

prevent parasites in animals. The FDA has received multiple reports of patients who have required medical support and been hospitalized after self-medicating with ivermectin intended for horses.” Numerous social media posts encourage the purchase of the ivermectin paste, which was never intended for human ingestion, and some are even shown eating unmeasured doses on video. Village Veterinary Clinic Doctor of Veterinary Medicine Connie Ganter said she’s surprised to see the antiparasitic drug go viral on the internet, since it was never intended for use against the virus. “There’s no proof that it does anything with COVID,” Ganter said. “There’s no proof that ivermectin works.” She added that even with animals, doses are measured precisely in milligrams depending on their size, and she would never prescribe it to an animal unless it was necessary. Any drug used inappropriately, she said, could have adverse effects. “If they take the wrong dose, it could be bad.” The differences between the ivermectin prescribed to animals and the tablets sometimes prescribed to humans — at very specific doses for some parasitic worms—are a higher concentration in the levels found in the version intended for horses and fewer regulations in the inactive products that may not be safe for humans. Merck, the drug’s manufacturer, also released a statement warning against using it for COVID infections. The company found “no scientific basis for a potential therapeutic effect against COVID-19,” and a “concerning lack of safety data in the majority of studies,” that claim it could be effective. The bottom line, according to the FDA, is that ivermectin is not an antiviral—a drug for treating viruses—and taking large doses of this drug is dangerous and can cause serious harm. Health officials at the county, state, and federal level agree that the most effective ways to prevent infection and spread of the coronavirus are vaccinations, masks, and social-distancing measures. If you are feeling sick, stay home and isolate yourself until symptoms subside. For more info, visit countyofsb.org/phd. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

COURTS

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HELIPAD PROBLEMS: Pat Nesbitt claimed county supervisors wrongfully denied his bid to install a helicopter landing pad on his Summerland property last year.

Do Horses and Helicopters Mix? Judge Rules Against Sod-Farming Polo Patron by Nick Welsh n Monday, Judge Thomas Anderle rejected a claim by Pat Nesbitt — the South Coast’s most outspoken sod farmer, a high-flying hotel developer, and a famous polo patron — that the Santa Barbara County supervisors abused their discretion by relying on what he claimed was unproven evidence when denying his bid to install a helicopter landing pad on his property on the outskirts of Summerland last year. Nesbitt’s proposal to install a helipad on his property had been denied by both the Board of Supervisors and the county’s Planning Commission, and both by narrow 3-2 votes. In both instances, the majorities relied on testimony from 300 and 200 correspondents, respectively. Critics contended that the loud, percussive audio assault of helicopters taking off and arriving — up to two times a week — could spook horses and pose a safety hazard to users of the equestrian trails that run alongside Nesbitt’s property. Nesbitt, charismatic and combative, has used his 20-acre estate over the past 20 years for polo tournaments, gala charity events, and political fundraisers, many of which have featured star-powered celebrities, such as Arnold Schwarzenegger. Nesbitt said his helicopter pad would be used by guests and also as a staging area for first responders in cases of fires and other natural disasters. His acoustical experts provided a study stating that the ambient noise of traffic on nearby Highway 101 was significantly greater than the sound of his helicopter. In addition, he marshalled notable support from several neighbors and some equestrian enthusiasts who use the nearby trails. The supervisors, however, were persuaded by the overwhelming number of

O

Santa Maria

Rotary Centennial Park October 2, 2021

Santa Barbara Chase Palm Park November 6, 2021

countervailing arguments that the pounding din of the chopper blades would be jarring for the surrounding community. To issue Nesbitt a permit, they argued, would set a bad precedent, one that would make it impossible to refuse other requests they believe would inevitably follow. Why open that can of worms, they asked, when the Santa Barbara airport is just 20 minutes away? The volume of complaints regarding helicopter traffic along the South Coast was already a growing problem, they noted; why add to it? In ruling against Nesbitt, Judge Anderle said the courts are required to give elected local officials wide latitude and discretion in balancing conflicting evidence. Only in egregious cases, Anderle ruled, can such determinations be subjected to judicial reversal. Given that the supervisors accurately cited applicable planning policies, this case, he said, was not egregious. Among Nesbitt’s many arguments was that the board decision intruded on the state’s right-to-farm law that bars regulatory interference with agricultural operations. Nesbitt had managed to bypass the county’s design review process when he first built his estate and polo fields more than 20 years ago by representing them as sod farms. While this legal strategy prevailed at the time, it was also proved extremely controversial. When Nesbitt argued his helicopter pad should be similarly protected — as part of an agricultural operation — he got no purchase with Judge Anderle. “These provisions are of no help to the petitioner,” Anderle wrote, “as the proposed project concerns the operation of a helicopter on petitioner’s property for the personal use of Mr. Nesbitt rather than an agricultural use.” Nesbitt can appeal the ruling, but it is currently unclear if he plans to do so. n INDEPENDENT.COM

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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13


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Ruth Kimsey

11/5/1944 - 8/22/2021

Ruth R. Kimsey, age 76, passed away peacefully on August 22, with her family by her side. She loved Jesus and believed joyfully in his promise: “God will wipe away every tear from their eyes; there shall be no more death, nor sorrow, nor crying. There shall be no more pain, for the former things have passed away” (Revelations 21:4). Ruth was born on November 5, 1944, in East St. Louis, Illinois, to James and Josephine Matthews. Her family lived in California and Arizona for most of her childhood; one of her fondest memories was her time spent at the Children’s Country School in Los Gatos. She and her brother, Jim, older by two years, were close throughout their growing-up years and maintained a lifetime bond. While attending Scottsdale High School, she was selected by the Scottsdale Chamber of Commerce to join the Howdy Dudettes, the city’s official welcoming committee and goodwill ambassadors. Ruth worked in the hotel industry and as an executive secretary. She met her husband, Gary, in Phoenix in 1967, when a friend of his introduced them, telling Gary that he had found the woman Gary had been looking for all his life. The friend was right, and Ruth and Gary married one year later. They moved to California, and their daughter, Stacey, was born in 1973. Ruth was a devoted homemaker and mom, as well as an active school volunteer and Mary Kay Cosmetics skincare consultant. Beautiful inside and out, Ruth always had a heart for taking care of others, including her stepdaughter, Kimberly, and her mother, Jo, whom she cared for in their home through 14

THE INDEPENDENT

a long illness. Many others were welcomed into their home over the years, including several international exchange students from Japan. She warmly hosted friends and family members for home-cooked meals, game nights, Bible studies, and a slice of her famous key lime pie. Throughout nearly 53 years of marriage, Ruth and Gary enjoyed travels in the U.S. and around the world, visiting 36 states and 16 countries together. They especially loved driving along the California and Oregon coasts; viewing lighthouses and fall foliage in New England; visiting national parks such as Yosemite, Sequoia, Yellowstone, Zion, and Bryce Canyon; riding the rails across Canada; and vacationing in special places like Monterey, Sedona, Hawaii, and Puerto Vallarta. Following Gary’s retirement, they moved to San Clemente in 1999, and then in 2016 moved to the Maravilla senior living community in Santa Barbara in order to be closer to Stacey and her husband, Ray. Ruth loved the ocean, and she and Gary could often be found having lunch at the harbor or pier, watching sailboats and listening to the waves roll in. Ruth was actively involved at Calvary Chapel in Costa Mesa, Ocean Hills Community Church and Calvary Chapel in San Juan Capistrano, and Calvary Chapel and Anthem Chapel in Santa Barbara. Known for her warm and ready smile, her generous spirit, and her deep and abiding faith, she was a mentor to many, and an encourager to all. She will be forever remembered and greatly missed by her husband, Gary; their daughter and son-in-law Stacey and Ray Janik; their son-in-law Mark Culver; their two grandchildren, Alexis and Samuel Culver; her brother and his wife, Jim and Gail Matthews; as well as nieces, nephews, cousins, and many dear friends. She was preceded in death by her stepdaughter, Kimberly Culver.

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

Karen (King) Woosley

Born Karen King, Karen was especially proud of the fact that she was a seventh generation Santa Barbaran. Karen attended twelve years of Catholic school, graduating from Bishop High with –as she liked to brag – a perfect attendance record for all twelve years. Karen developed lifelong friendships with most of her classmates, and especially with best friends, Karen, Swaneagle and Mary. After graduating, Karen married her first husband, Andy Kawiecki, with whom she attended school (separating the boys from the girls did not seem as effective as the church may have desired) and promptly had a son, Drew. Karen began her professional career as a legal secretary for a local attorney named John Haas. On Karen’s first day of work, she hung a photograph of John F. Kennedy on the wall behind her desk. Mr. Haas quickly had her remove it. It was the first time Karen realized that not everyone was a Democrat! Karen met her husband, Eric Woosley, about 37 years ago while when they worked together in the same firm. They were married for 35 years. It was Karen’s idea for her husband to go to law school and become an attorney. Karen loved the law, and even worked as a police matron for the Santa Barbara Police Department for a period of time. Karen loved courtroom action and attended all of her husband’s trials. She would use each as an opportunity to purchase an entirely new wardrobe of what she called “court clothes,” thus ensuring her husband was properly motivated to win his cases. Karen became friends with many of the courthouse staff and was particularly fond of Judge Anderle and his secretary Marilyn

INDEPENDENT.COM

Karen loved Fiesta and leaves behind countless fiesta dresses that she loved to wear when attending events. Strikingly beautiful, Karen would love to have been chosen as Saint Barbara, but often joked that she would never qualify for the “Saint” prerequisite Karen will be missed by her family, husband Eric, son Drew Kawiecki (Andrea), granddaughter (and future attorney) Alexia, her sister Elaine Bateman (Will) and her brother Patrick King (Jennifer). Having come from a good Catholic family, Karen had 32 cousins (who I will not list) and remained very close with her last remaining Uncle and Aunt, Phil and Roseann King. Anyone wishing to pay their respects may do so at the Old Mission where Karen’s ashes will be placed. It seemed particularly apropos given her proud heritage.

Cathy Louise Armstrong 11/9/1960 - 7/25/2021

It is with great grief and gratitude that we share the news of Cathy Armstrong’s passing. After a courageous 4 year battle with stage 4 metastatic breast cancer, she spent the final week of her life in her home, surrounded by the love of her family and community, with her husband Scott by her side. Born and raised on the Mesa, Cathy grew up taking advantage of all the beauty and activity this city has to offer. From a young age she developed a love of taking her dog to the beach, biking around town, and swimming in any body of water available to her. She went on to swim competitively all throughout her school years, graduating from SBHS in 1978. Kicking off a lifetime of countless adventures and global connections, Cathy saved up to travel around Europe after high school. A few years later she joined her brothers on a hang

gliding trip in British Columbia, Canada, where she met the love of her life and future husband of 40 years. Their first project of many was converting Scott’s 1956 GMC city transit bus into their first home, which they eventually drove back down to sunny Santa Barbara. After 11 years of working hard and playing harder, they welcomed their daughter Torrie into the world in 1992. Cathy always created a warm and supportive environment for Torrie and her friends, from starting a home day care when she was an infant, to volunteering in the classrooms at Washington Elementary School, to running the student store at Santa Barbara High School, she offered acceptance and support to the entire community. Cathy’s warmth reached beyond the local community as well, as she hosted foreign exchange students for 19 years, welcoming them into the family and creating lifelong connections. She also managed their rental properties that housed local students, professionals, as well as Airbnb travelers. Cathy radiated love, light, and wisdom that was felt by everyone who was fortunate enough to meet her, human and animals alike. She had a strong presence and an ability to encourage those around her to believe that anything is possible. She embodied that mentality, living her life to the fullest and bringing others up around her. We are forever grateful to have been touched by her perpetual light, as she will live on in the impacts that she’s made in all of our hearts. In lieu of flowers we ask that you donate to those in need, as she continually supported Planned Parenthood and animal rescues throughout the course of her life. There will be a celebration in honor of Cathy’s life on Sunday afternoon, October 10th 2021, at the picnic area at the west end of Ledbetter Beach. There will also be a paddle out for Cathy as well. We love you forever Torrie and Scott. If you can make it please RSVP to SACC 805@gmail.com Continued on p. 16


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Tall Tail Chasing the Dog

DUH ECONOMICS: Last week, I was alerted that a Leave It to Beaver–vintage ranch-style house

on Palermo Road in Hidden Valley—a lowslung, quintessential middle-class neighborhood with the obligatory portable basketball hoop punctuating every cul-de-sac—went for $2.02 million. If you think that’s a lot, it is. It’s also $271,000 over the asking price, a now-common phenomenon that’s still both astonishing and depressing and pretty much par for the course. Admittedly, it’s four bedrooms on a corner lot, and the architect, apparently overdosing on his kid’s stash of Ritalin, spared not a single bell or whistle on the inside. A masterpiece of showroom interior design. No matter where one sits, you don’t belong. It’s that nice. On my way to check it out, I passed dense thickets of feral vegetation intended to obscure the railroad tracks and freeway that run along Modoc Road. If I were homeless, I thought, maybe I could pitch a nice camp there. But then the powers that be would start calling it “an encampment.” The lingo intrigues me. The word “encampment” is infused with notso-subliminal militaristic connotations that foment the notion we’re in a not-so-subliminal state of siege. Which, given the intrusive realities of poverty, drugs, and fire, we kind of are. The number of such encampments, I learned at this Tuesday’s Board of Supervisors meeting, had increased by 34 percent from

the year before. Maybe Hidden Valley homes fetching $2.02 million might be more than tangentially related. Sales like that will push the market even further out of reach for people whose calves are terminally cramped from standing on their tiptoes to keep their nostrils above the water level. We’ve all heard about fire risks posed by these camps—I think I prefer that term— not to mention the mountains of garbage, untreated human sewage, stuff, and dirty needles. Crimes against people. Crimes against the environment. Calls for service. It ain’t Huck Finn floating down the Mississippi. This week, the supes voted to spend $1.5 million to hire an Encampment Response Coordinator at $160,000 a year to lead the county’s Encampment Response Team while executing its Encampment Response Protocol. The hope is to “assess” 20 camps a year — for the next three years — and “to resolve” 15 of them, meaning that 60 percent of the residents will find alternate temporary housing, and of those, another 60 percent will find permanent supportive housing. This is happening because the county finds itself suddenly awash in state and federal funds to help people without housing. It’s also a case of flying the plane before you’ve attached the gas tank yet; it’s a three-year plan with a year’s worth of funding. Beating the bushes to relocate our growing legion of urban campers will be 10 outreach workers —many formerly without homes

themselves—working under the auspices of the increasingly ubiquitous nonprofit CityNet. The $22 million question is: Where will all this alternate housing come from? Right now, if an urban camper agrees to come in from the wild, CityNet workers have no place to house them. We’re at capacity. That’s the bad news. The good news, as Supervisor Gregg Hart relentlessly highlighted, is that capacity has dramatically expanded over the past six months. Translated, we now have 339 rapid response units, 46 permanent housing units, 215 long-term vouchers, and 137 temporary beds we didn’t have six months ago. That ain’t nothing. “We need to pause, recognize and celebrate,” Hart stressed. Between April and June, 275 homeless people managed to move from the streets into something with a roof overhead and perhaps a door that could be locked. Of those, only 8 percent went back to their old ways. In Isla Vista, 27 of 41 former tent city occupants have since transitioned into some variant of the great indoors. None of this is remotely apparent to the naked eye or the casual observer. The not-so-good news is that this is just a small fraction of all the housing that’s needed. Housing is ridiculously expensive to build, and providing the necessary services isn’t much cheaper. For every federal dollar now flooding the county coffers, the supes were told, there are demands and plans —from competing county agencies—on how they can spend $2.

Supervisor Das Williams kept hammering away on the need for more parking lots where people can park their cars at night and sleep safely. He kept asking for 14 lots, just 14 lots, imploring anyone with a spare parking lot lying around to step up and be counted. In the context of Tuesday’s conversation, Williams was ordering something decidedly not on the menu. But he had a point. When you think of cost-effective, easy-tobuild “housing” that people would actually live in—as opposed to shelters, which many people will absolutely shun— parking-lot housing is the low-hanging fruit. Yes, there is the NIMBY response, but that—like the parking lots themselves—can be managed. New Beginnings has been doing precisely that for nearly 20 years. Last week, the state legislature passed a couple of bills that will allow fourplexes to pop up on any parcel of land no matter what the zoning, with no affordability protections even mentioned. It’s a great bill if you subscribe to the magical thinking of trickle-up economics. But in the meantime, the State of California could help by allowing New Beginnings to lease some of the many large parking lots it owns in Santa Barbara to provide four-wheeled housing. Right now, the state’s not returning New Beginnings’ calls. What I noticed most at the Palermo Road house that just sold? No one was playing bas—Nick Welsh ketball.

TALK TO ME: T.C. BOYLE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 | 2:30 – 3:30 PM VIRTUAL EXPERIENCE VIA ZOOM Bestselling author and Santa Barbara’s own idiosyncratic muse, T.C. Boyle returns to read from his lively and thought-provoking new novel Talk To Me. With an intoxicating mix of humor and profundity, Boyle explores a world where people can really talk to animals as he turns to the questions few of us admit to wondering about. With him in this conversation is award-winning fellow author and Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing, UC Riverside, Susan Straight. Join these two charismatic authors for this special reading, conversation, and Q & A.

$5 SBMA MEMBERS/ $10 NON-MEMBERS PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE AT TICKETS.SBMA.NET SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART

“Boyle is a writer who chooses a large canvas and fills it to the edges.” —Barbara Kingsolver

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Author photo by Jamieson Fry, 2021

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Jimmy Pena

Carmen Pat Garcia

6/30/1953 - 8/16/2021

12/3/1923 - 8/6/2021

In lieu of flowers please consider donations in Pat’s name to Sarah House.

Domitila “Tillie” Rose Mendoza 1/2/1926 - 8/13/2021

In loving memory of Jimmy Pena, a Legend in Goleta, especially, Goleta Beach. Despite his personal challenges, his free spirit, giving and loving nature, always making people laugh and cooking will be remembered by all. He is survived by his loving mother Carmen, brother, Richard, and sisters, Anne, Suzie, Rosanne, several aunts, uncles, nephews and nieces. Goleta Beach will never be the same. Please join us in a Celebration of Jimmy’s life, to be held October 2, 2021, Goleta Beach, Area A. Any questions to annepena@ yahoo.com

William “Bill” Ray Gross 12/21/1953 - 9/4/2020

Last year an announcement was made in the Santa Barbara newspapers that William “Bill” Ray Gross passed away on September 4, 2020. Due to COVID, his memorial service has been delayed until this year. On Saturday, September 18, 2021 at noon, the family will be having a memorial service gathering, for Bill at Manning Park, 449 San Ysidro Road, Montecito, Area 6. Coming from the 101, turn left on School House Road before the park entrance. Look for signs and balloons. This will be a day of remembrance for Bill, where those who knew him can come together and be a part of this special day. We also invite you to share a funny story, heartfelt memory, or adventure that you experienced with Bill. Lunch will be provided. Attending? Please email: brendaaltavilla@yahoo.com. 16

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Pat was a native of Santa Barbara. He will be best remembered for his strong, devoted faith and love for his family. He enjoyed working in his garden as much as he enjoyed helping others in theirs. He loved talking with everyone he met, and his sense of humor set him apart. His smile matched his love of storytelling, and he always had a kind word to share with those around him. Pat was patriotic. He served in the Army in WWII where he received many decorations and citations as well as a Purple Heart. Pat was preceded in death by his wife of 57 years, Ruth Garcia. He had a son, David (wife, Debra) and daughter Carolyn. He leaves grandchildren, Jason and Erik Scheu, and Daniel Garcia as well as great grandchildren, Markis Scheu, Parker and Carli Garcia. We were blessed to have a kind and caring father who was also a dear friend to his children and the father figure to his grandson’s Jason & Erik. Pat was preceded in death by his father and mother, Carmen, and Pilar Garcia and 9 siblingsNat, Teresa Morin, Ruben, Luz Aguirre, Nunie, Lydia Ayala, Moses, David and Emmet. Pat will be greatly missed until we meet again in heaven! Carolyn and Erik wish to give special thanks to the Sarah House family and Assisted Hospice staff and the whole Assisted team. This devoted group of professionals gave our dad loving care and so many of them formed relationships with him that were unexpected and greatly appreciated. There are too many to name, but you all touched our hearts. Pat’s faith assured him of his path and accompanied him on his journey home. He told us more than once-“See you tomorrow! If I’m not here, you know my new address”

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

Domitila “Tillie” Rose Mendoza, lifelong resident of Santa Barbara, CA passed away on August 13, 2021 at the age of 95. Our much loved matriarch, Tillie, was born on January 2, 1926 in Santa Barbara, CA to Erlinda Luera Lopez and Pedro Lopez. She grew up and attended the local schools, Lincoln Elementary, Santa Barbara Junior High School and Santa Barbara High School. In 1939, Tillie met Elisio “Lee” Hidalgo Mendoza. After three years of courting, Lee and Tiliie were married on November 27, 1942, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Two months after their marriage, Lee was drafted by the U.S. Army. Three months later, during WWll, he was ordered to serve in North Africa. In 1945, he was sent to Italy. They exchanged love letters throughout the war. Lee returned home from WWll in August 1945 and one year later, Lee and Tillie began their family. Together, they raised three sons and a daughter. In 1959, they started Lee’s Plumbing & Heating, a plumbing and heating business at 806 East Haley Street in Santa Barbara. In 1973, it became Lee & Sons Plumbing & Heating, Inc. It still operates today in its original location and has been responsible for training many family members in the trade. Tillie took charge of the administrative duties of the business while raising her family. She sat at her office desk and welcomed all who came in with a big smile and a friendly, cheery “hello”. Then, in the next moment, she headed back to her house (located and attached to the “shop”) where she tended to whatever household duties life required.

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In the mid 1950’s, Lee and Tillie purchased a plot of land on Sycamore Canyon Road. During the 1980’s, they spent many years building their new home and were very grateful to all family and friends who helped. Lee and Tillie happily partied with friends and family on “The Lot” for many years. The home was finally completed in 1987 and embodied the years of hard work and love for family. It was a source of pride. Tillie worked alongside her husband in business until his health matters shifted her duties. For the next 10 years, Tillie devoted herself to caring for her husband. She made sure Lee was included in all their activities and adventures. For Tillie, there were no limits for Lee and her. With the help of their dear family and friends, they continued to take their favorite bus trips to Las Vegas. Tillie’s devoted and loving care continued until Lee’s death on May 30, 2009. Together, they had celebrated 66 1/2 years of marriage. As a widow, she continued to live life to its fullest. She cooked an abundance of food for family and friends to enjoy. She graciously entertained all at her home, enjoyed restaurant dining, attended Taco Tuesdays at the Moose Lodge with the Fragosa Family, traveled, and rarely missed a party. Tillie did this all with a big smile and open heart. During these last couple of years, Tillie had a helper and personal driver, Elias Espinoza. He chauffeured her throughout town during the day. The Fragosa Family lovingly chauffeured her for her night activities. Cecilia “Sally’ Solomon, her loyal cousin, was there for her, day or night, for everything she needed and to share in the fun. Tillie never slowed down. She kept all who loved her very busy. “We are family” was the theme of her life. She treated her friends as family and opened her heart and home to everyone. “Family” was her top priority. Her love and loyalty was felt and seen with all whom she came into contact. She was not afraid to speak her mind and always got her way because, well, she was “Mom” or “Grandma TiTi.” Family and

friends wanted to make her happy because she deserved it. There are very few souls that have the same energy and bright light that she possessed. She was a very special woman with the sweetest smile. She will be greatly missed by her 4 children, Richard Mendoza (Susan), Linda Mendoza Cantu (Ralph), Andrew Mendoza (Jody), and Michael Mendoza (Sonya), her 10 grandchildren, Lee Cantu (Jeanette), Marlies Mendoza Horton (Conan), Matthew Mendoza (Maureen), Shelly Cantu, Linnea Mendoza, Aaron Mendoza (Caysi), John Mendoza (Ashlie), Joseph Mendoza (Rebecca), Nathan Mendoza (Jamie), and Liana Mendoza, her 23 great grandchildren, her 3 greatgreat grandchildren, her cousin and “partner in crime” Cecilia “Sally” Solomon, and many beloved cousins, nieces and nephews. There are numerous family and friends who feel this deep loss and are recognized for how important they were in her life. Tillie was preceded in death by her husband, Lee Mendoza, her parents, Erlinda “Nana” Lopez and Pedro Lopez, and brothers Joseph Wesley and Efraim Lopez. The viewing will be held on Thursday, August 26, 2021 from 3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church located at 1300 East Valley Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. The Rosary Service will follow at 6:00 p.m. at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. A Funeral Mass will be held on Friday, August 27, 2021 at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church at 10:00 a.m. Interment will follow at Calvary Cemetery located 199 North Hope Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. Arrangements by Welch-Ryce-Haider.


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Jessie Espinoza Salvador 12/11/1928 - 8/20/2021

Arrangements are under the direction of JOSEPH P. REARDON FUNERAL HOME & CREMATION SERVICE, 757 E. Main Street, Ventura.

Donna Peddicord

12/2/1930 - 8/18/2021

Jessie Espinoza Salvador, 92, of Carpinteria, CA, left this world peacefully to join her Lord and Savior on August 20, 2021, at home with her children at her side. Jessie was born, the sixth of seven children to German Santiago Espinosa and Irinea Torres de Espinosa, in Colton, CA on December 11, 1928. Jessie and her husband, Roman “Roy”, settled in Carpinteria in 1948 and raised their family. They were proud members of the American Legion and Filipino Community Club in Santa Barbara. Jessie worked at the Carpinteria packing house and Santa Barbara restaurants before joining the staff at La Cumbre Golf and Country Club from 1962-2018. During these years she became known for her words to live by, “One day at a time…Just keep going…Don’t stop” and her homemade quesadillas for the club’s annual Cinco de Mayo event. Jessie is survived by her children, Lino (Mary), Juan (Rosalie) and Pene (Steve); her grandchildren, Roman (Ailene), Nicolas (Victoria), Sharon (Alex), Owen (Kelly), Aaron (Lindsay) and great grandchildren, Stella, Santinolino, Sia, Milan, Gian, Ty, Austin, Bryce, Logan and Mirabel and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband, Roman, grandson Gabriel, parents, German and Irinea, and siblings, Sabino, Encornocion, Guadalupe, Carmen, Felipe and Ruth. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to VNA Health at 512 E Gutierrez St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. The family extends their sincere gratitude to Msgr. Martini and St. Joseph Parish, Fr. Tom and Mission San Buenaventura and  VNA Health, especially the team members, Elisabeth S., Chris M., Carolyn PB., Viridiana M. and Marcela T. for their professional and spiritual support during Jessie’s journey. According to Jessie’s wishes, there will be no funeral services.

Donna Peddicord was born Donna Mae Tripp on December 2nd, 1930, in Belvidere, Illinois. She was the daughter of Anna Tobyne and Ivan Tripp. She had an older brother named Gerald. She was a good student in school and took bookkeeping, typing, and dictation classes as a backup for her future career. She grew up on a small farm in Northern Illinois and helped her parents take care of the animals on the farm. Donna had a tough childhood due to the childhood illness of her brother. The family struggled to make it during the depression. In high school, Donna was a popular student with an active social life and lots of young men showing interest in the dark-eyed young woman with beautiful dark hair. She met her future husband Pat through her brother Jerry. Jerry loved to ride motorcycles and one day brought home a young WWII veteran who was now a hard hat diver with the Merchant Marines. After a few visits, Pat asked her if she wanted a ride with him. She went along and they soon became close as Pat took her to the senior prom. Shortly after high school, she married Pat at her local church and over one hundred people attended. After a couple of years, Pat and Donna had their first son, Tim. Escaping the hot, humid heat of Illinois, they moved to California. Pat got a good job with Standard Oil as a roughneck, and they began to slowly build their family. Donna helped run their first successful business on the side as she also worked as a housewife. During this time Donna started painting China. Within a few years, she became one of the best China painters in the country. She would later paint a tea set that was given to Queen

Elizabeth and is now in Windsor Palace. Donna had three more sons, Michael, Terence, and Gerald. In her mid-fifties, Donna went to Santa Barbara City College where she was on the dean’s list and got her AA degree in art. She changed her interest in art to watercolors and painted beautiful pictures of wildflowers and landscapes of California and then later of rural England and Tuscany, Italy. Donna was a wonderful mother and grandmother always offering unconditional love and great advice when asked. She was a great wife to her husband Pat for forty-seven years until his death. Donna is survived by her sons Tim (Karen), Mike (Karen), Jerry (Paul), and Terry (Lynda) and five grandchildren, Brian (Roxana), David (Anat), Sean (Ronald), Aaron, and Kellen.

Floyd “Maurie” Shook 11/29/1925 - 8/5/2021

from Alhambra High School Maurie entered the Navy on November 26, 1943. He was honorably discharged on May 28, 1946, married his high school sweetheart, Charline Allen on June 15, 1946, and enlisted in the Air Force Reserves. Maurie was called to duty on August 10, 1950, where he proudly served in Korea in the 452nd Bomb Wing until he was discharged on September 13, 1951. After the Korean Conflict and a move to Santa Barbara, Maurie worked at his family business, Shook’s Van & Storage Co. (Mayflower), first as manager and eventually as owner until his retirement. He was a Master Mason, Magnolia Masonic Lodge, a member of the Quiet Birdman, he served in the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Areo Squadron for 38 years and was Captain in 1976. In addition, he enjoyed many years as a pilot for Aero Medicos, a member of the Goleta Lions Club and a member of the Elk’s, Lodge #613. Preceding Maurie in death are his parents, Floyd Maurice Shook, Sr., Lillian (Johnson) Shook and his sister Nora Lee (Shook) Crezee. Maurie is survived by his wife of 75 years, Charline (Allen) Shook, his daughters Wendy Edmunds and Terri Paige (Chuck), his grandchildren Tara Penke (Jaime), Ashley Eberz (Sean), Nick Paige (Jessica), Brittany Murphy (Brian) in addition to 9 great grandchildren. A life well-lived and loved, he will remain in our hearts forever.

Dorothy Parker

9/5/1931 - 8/2/2021 If there is one thing that could be said about “Maurie”, it is that he loved to fly. When he was growing up in San Gabriel, California he built model airplanes, after the Korean War he used his GI Bill to learn to fly and then spent his entire adult life flying single engine planes. When eventually he became too old to fly, he spent his retirement RV traveling the Western United States with his wife of 75 years, Charline. During their travels, whether by small plane or RV, Maurie always had a camera with him. He was an early student of photography at Brooks Institute and he always had a “dark room”. Born on November 29, 1925, in Mt. Calm, Texas, his family moved to California shortly thereafter. Upon graduation

Dorothy Parker passed away on Monday August 2, 2021, after succumbing to complications brought on by Alzheimer’s disease. She is survived by her sister Barbara (Bob); five children; Danny (Nancy), Janet (Joe), Susan, Bill (Katherine) and John ( Shawna). Her four grandchildren; Joey, Katie, Matt and Kevin; and honorary daughter and caregivers Tammy (Eva). She is pre-deceased by her husband Jack, and sister Mary. Dorothy will be remembered

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for her kind heart, welcoming hugs, generosity and sense of humor. Her door was always open to family, friends and neighbors. She welcomed people into her home and treated them like family. Dorothy was born in Detroit Michigan, and graduated from Harper Nursing School in Michigan. After graduation, she and her girlfriends took a road trip to California to attend the Rose Bowl to watch Michigan State verses UCLA. Once in California, they decided to drive up the coast to San Francisco before going back to Michigan. They had so much fun in California, that only one of the gals went back to Michigan. The others stayed in San Francisco, where Dorothy met her soon to be husband, Mervin “Jack” Parker. Jack and Dorothy moved to Santa Barbara in the early 1960’s when Jack was offered a promotion and opportunity to transfer to Crocker Bank in either Chino or Santa Barbara. They relocated to Santa Barbara where Dorothy joined the nursing staff at Cottage Hospital. She spent her career at Cottage Health Systems in various roles, where she retired as Director of Nursing after thirtythree years. Dorothy earned her bachelor’s degree in Management while working full time at Cottage Hospital and raising her children. In her spare time, she also worked part-time for the Santa Barbara Visiting Nurses Association. After retiring, Dorothy enjoyed traveling with her friends, volunteering at Direct Relief, taking the dogs to the “dog park” and spending time with her family and especially her grandchildren. She said that had she known how wonderful grandchildren were, she would have had them first. A private service will be held on September 3, 2021. In lieu of flowers, you may memorialize Dorothy by donating to your favorite charity, or one of Dorothy’s favorites: Food Bank of Santa Barbara. Santa Barbara Rescue Mission. Planned Parenthood of Santa Barbara. Visiting Nurse and Hospice care of Santa Barbara. Direct Relief International. Alzheimer’s Association. Friendship Center of Santa Barbara.

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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Letters

OPINIONS CONT’D

LEARN TO PLAY BRIDGE It’s Fun! It’s Challenging!

Beginning Bridge Lessons at the Santa Barbara Bridge Center Tuesdays, Sept. 14-Nov. 16, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Tuition for the ten classes is $200, which includes textbook and materials. Pre-registration is strongly encouraged. Call instructor Nancy Trotter, 805-687-0130, to reserve your space. Participants must be fully vaccinated and proof of vaccination shown at the first class.

Santa Barbara Bridge Center, 2255 Las Positas Rd., Santa Barbara, CA 93105

Justice for Child-Abuse Victims

I

t was heartbreaking to read about possible child sex crimes by a teacher at Cate. Though Da’Jon Tyrik James has now been arrested, I’m glad the newspaper included contact information for the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Office. Everyone who might have seen, suspected, or suffered crimes by James—or anyone—should call law enforcement immediately. Often a seemingly small or insignificant fact or suspicion turns out to be critical in convicting a predator. But a high burden of proof, overworked and underfunded police and prosecutors, and other factors sometimes present overwhelming barriers that thwart a criminal case. Here in California, however, victims of childhood sexual abuse, no matter their age, have an unusual opportunity to seek justice in civil courts, even for horrors that took place decades ago. Lawmakers have temporarily lifted the civil statute of limitations on child sex abuse. In practical terms, this means that if you were sexually violated here as a child, you can sue—and publicly expose—those who committed and concealed the crimes. This in turn can protect other kids, deter future cover-ups, and, for many survivors, bring healing and closure. I hope James did not hurt any Cate students or other kids. If he did, I hope they reach out to the Sheriff ’s Office and tell their stories, and that they are praised by their community for their courage. And no matter what happens in the criminal realm, I hope they consider civil litigation while they have the chance. California’s civil window for child sex abuse closes in less than 17 months, on December —Timothy C. Hale, S.B. 31, 2022.

Beyond the Pale

I

n regard to your recent article “Mandatory Vax Debate Gets Personal,” I rarely agree with Das Williams; however, he was spot-on in his response to the folks who likened possible mandates to Nazism, tyranny, and genocide. Groups who make these comparisons obviously have no clue of the horrors experienced by the victims of such practices. It not only belittles the pain and suffering of such victims, but it is an affront to the victims of the Holocaust and others who have survived genocides —Bruce Bailey, S.B. County and tyranny.

www.santabarbarabridge.com

Learn Learnto to

The Fine Print

R

In addition to classes, Santa Barbara Bridge Center offers games sanctioned by the American Contract Bridge League (ACBL). Visit the club’s website for information about games and classes.

egarding the horoscope section, please enlarge the font size (for us old people). —Mary Lynn Autrey-Smith, Lompoc

Editor’s Reply: Oh my! The font has been way too small for years. We are making Astro a larger space this week.

The Bike Life

Our cover story on S.B.’s Bike Life evoked Facebook memories and comments: Laurel Morrissey Johnston I love seeing these kids zipping around town. It reminds me of being a kid in the ’70s. • James Gonzales We rode all around town in the ’70s and ’80s. Used to ride out from Sycamore Canyon all the way out La Cumbre Plaza. • Justin Ooms I have been pissed off trying to learn to manual. Maybe I should have them teach me. Nicole McRoberts Willingham We started walking down State Street two years ago every Sunday, watching these kids ride their bikes doing wheelies is awesome. • April Reeves Better them outdoors in the sunshine, being active, and breathing fresh air, than zombies in front of a screen. • Jeff Mendoza Best way to get around town. • Caitlin Kendall Jennings I wish they would wear helmets! Rich Abbott The wheelie kids blew it. They just put themselves under the radar. All eyes were will be watching now! Enjoy!

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¶ Last week’s news story about the anonymous gun buyback misstated gun homicides: They are 37 percent of gun deaths, not 37 percent of U.S. homicides. Also, in the “Fact vs. Fiction: Masks” story, states without mask-wearing policies or mandates reported higher COVID-19 rates than states with, not without, such a policy or mandate. ¶ In the Board of Supervisors exchange discussed in last week’s Angry Poodle Barbecue, Andy Caldwell claimed Mona Miyasato would cost the county $450,000, not $403,000.

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¶ This week’s Endorsements corrects a slip of the pen made last week. The “No” bubble in the recall should be filled in, not circled, to be counted.

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The Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara (USSB) seeks a creative Music Director with strong musical and interpersonal skills who has experience with a broad range of musical talents and interests. The Music Director develops and implements a comprehensive music program for worship and other events in the life of USSB and the community. The ideal candidate will be creative, collaborative and experience joy in working with a socially-conscious and energetic congregation. USSB values a diverse workforce; people with disabilities, people of color, and those who identify as L/G/B/T/Q are strongly encouraged to apply. Apply by September 20, 2021.

You are not alone!

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For more information visit: https://ussb.org/worship/music/

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The Year of

SCREENING DAILY ROGER DURLING’S NEW BOOK DOCUMENTS HIS QUARANTINE SCREEN ODYSSEY

L

ike so many of the pandemic-driven routines

that shaped our lives over the past two years, the process by which Roger Durling wrote his new book, Cinema in Flux: A Year of Connecting Through Film (Assouline Publishing), began casually enough. On Friday, March 13, 2020, schools across California closed in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19, and on Sunday, March 15, Durling sent an email to people who subscribed to the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. It started this way: Dear Cinephiles, I hope this note finds you well. Since we’re spending time at home, we thought of sending you daily movie recommendations — accompanied with a study guide (below) with fun facts. The first film is one of our favorites, David O. Russell’s Silver Linings Playbook. We all need to remain positive, focused at this moment, and I love that this movie inspires that.

No one in those early days of the pandemic could possibly have anticipated just how fully at home we would be over the next many months, or how persistent the need for positivity and focus would become. What Durling in particular could not have known was something more personal, and, in retrospect, quite spectacular. Before he would be through composing these 350 movie recommendations, begun so casually on that fateful day in March, he would end up documenting them in an ambitious, beautifully illustrated coffeetable book. As an avid reader of Durling’s daily email recommendations, I sensed early on that they had the makings of a potential book, but who could have predicted the scale would become so massive? The project, which lasted 12 full

months, would have run to a thousand pages if every essay were included. The completed book takes 124 essays of approximately 800 words each and intersperses them with timelines that blend a chronology of all Durling’s recommendations with contemporaneous news briefs. The result is a fascinating hybrid of multiple genres. From one angle, Cinema in Flux is a film studies reference work; from another, it’s a pandemic quarantine screening diary. Perhaps most important of all, thanks to the quality of Durling’s writing and the extravagance of the book’s striking graphic design, it’s an immersive experience of cinematic companionship, activating film’s potential to provide healing, wisdom, distraction, and solace during a prolonged episode of overwhelming global challenge. Films chosen in the early days alternate between sweet, lovable comedies, such as two films featuring an unmoored and confused Bill Murray in Groundhog Day and Lost in Translation, and more ominous reflections on isolation and loss, such as Julian Schnabel’s The Diving Bell and the Butterfly and Spike Jonze’s Her. A brief reflection on the terms of our engagement through digital media by way of The Social Network leads to Durling’s first acknowledgement that the COVID crisis could in fact be a global catastrophe — Stanley Kubrick’s apocalyptic fantasy, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Durling’s not afraid, in these early moments, to issue some grand pronouncements. Some of them came as a surprise, at least to me. I’d agree that Dr. Strangelove is Kubrick’s best film, but is it “the boldest and funniest movie ever made”? Well, Durling felt that way on a certain hectic day in early March of 2020, and who can blame him? As we were all trying to learn to stop worrying and love the crisis, his high praise of Kubrick’s anti-fascist farce reminds us that the majority of

ALONE IN THE DARK: Roger Durling had the luxury of screening some of the movies he wrote about at the Riviera Theatre.

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BY CHARLES DONELAN PHOTOS BY ERICK MADRID

these essays were written when the White House was occupied by a figure who could have stepped out of a Peter Sellers film. The book’s first panel of news items and simple film listings kicks in on March 18, 2020, with John Madden’s The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel. Directly beneath that entry, two headlines rendered in telegram-style Courier font announce the twin perils we were all facing at that time: “California Statewide Shelter-in-Place Ordered; Trump Begins Referring to the Coronavirus as the ‘China Virus.’ ” When full-length essays start up again, after an April 18-20 run of Toy Story 4, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers’s glorious Top Hat, and the epic 1969’s Easy Rider (for 4/20), it’s Alfonso Cuarón’s Gravity that’s under discussion, and the entry begins with an unforgettable injunction from the author: “It’s time to see things differently.” In 2018, Cuarón asked Durling to help put together a coffee-table book commemorating his landmark film Roma. It was through this project that Durling first met the design and production team at Assouline Publishing. Beginning in July 2020, even while he was still writing new entries, Durling and Assouline designers began collecting images and thinking about the look and feel of the finished product. “I wanted an expansion of the visual experience of the book to happen as it progressed,” Durling told me, “because as it [the quarantine] went on, we were all getting used to the changes that were happening in our lives.”

THE COVID EYE The routine Durling followed for more than a year remained remarkably consistent. Every afternoon or early evening, he would choose the film he wanted to address in the next day’s message. Control of the remote at the Goleta home he shares


C O V E R with his husband, Dan, became a dictatorship. However, as director of the film festival and the Riviera Theatre, Durling enjoyed some advantages over the rest of us. For example, sometimes he would take his dog to the Riviera and watch a film in an empty theater, where he could remember the experience of seeing a film on a large movie screen. One thing that did not vary was his strict writing schedule. Every day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. (with occasional Saturdays off), he would sit down at his desk in the film festival’s office and write, inspired or not. After the first few films, when it became apparent that this isolation would be going on for some time, Durling made the rule that he wouldn’t write about a film without rewatching it. This pledge led him to discover what he now refers to as his “COVID eye”—the realization that the global pandemic offered, even to deeply informed cinephiles such as himself, a different, often enlightening perspective on films that may have been seen many times before but now could be understood in new ways. “COVID eye” as a concept goes a long way toward defining what’s most salient in these critical essays, toward explaining how cinema came to function as a refuge from the encroaching turmoil of the outside world, and as a way of understanding and even seeking to transform it. Take the way Durling responded to John Huston’s 1951 classic The African Queen. Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn must navigate the Congo River together in order to save themselves and evade capture by German forces during World War I. Shot on location in East Africa, the film depicts nature as something both beautiful and potentially engulfing. At one point, Bogart and Hepburn are forced to drag their becalmed boat through a deep swamp teeming with mosquitoes. Seeing the two stars up to their chests in slime, pulling their rickety craft behind them, touched off new insight. Here’s how Durling described it to me: I’ll never forget that Sunday watching the film and seeing them drag the boat through the mud, and understanding that that’s where I was. And the rest of the country—it was like we were stuck in the mud. Just from watching that, I got very inspired. I knew then that we needed to drag that boat through the mud. No matter what, we just had to keep moving forward.

BLACK FILMS MATTER Perhaps the most evocative section of the book begins in June 2020 in the weeks following the death of George Floyd. As Black Lives Matter protests started up all over the country and eventually the world, Durling dove into the emergent canon of African-American film. The book reprints 12 of these essays in full: Fruitvale Station, Selma, Queen & Slim, Moonlight, The Hate U Give, Black Girl, Da 5 Bloods, Loving, Hollywood Shuffle, Boyz n the Hood, Eve’s Bayou, and Mudbound. Durling describes this nearly month-long stretch of viewing AfricanAmerican films every day as the hardest period of the project because it involved recognizing the limits of his own experience. “I was educating myself and trying to seek answers. I don’t think I’ve articulated this before, but this made me realize that in the arts, we have been complicit and biased,” he told me. “I discovered … that I had not paid enough respect or taken enough time to seek out African-American films and to understand what they were trying to convey.”

S T O R Y

SUMMER CINEMA CAMP in SANTA YNEZ SBIFF FILM CAMP PROVIDES GUIDANCE FOR ASPIRING FILMMAKERS

S

TEXT & PHOTOS BY RYAN P. CRUZ ummer camps have set the scene

creative goals with whatever they have around for many classic horror films, from them. It used to be that aspiring directors didn’t Friday the 13th to Netflix’s Fear Street: have access to expensive equipment until much Part Two—1978. It’s something about later in their lives, but technology has flipped the the seclusion, being in the wilderness script in recent years, and smartphone cameras and away from the distractions of home life, that and free editing software have leveled the playing gets the imagination going. field. “With just a smartphone, you can make a movie This summer, the Santa Barbara International Film Festival’s Film Camp returned to Camp Whittier after being canceled the previous year due to the pandemic. The camp set the scene for the aspiring filmmakers to write, shoot, and edit their own short films with the help of film industry professionals such as Joe Medjuck, executive producer for Ghostbusters; and visual effects artist Leslie Ekker, who received an Oscar nomination for his HAPPY CAMPERS: Students received editing equipment and software free of work on Apollo 13. charge at the camp. “We’re excited to have them back,” said SBIFF Education Coordinator Claire Waterhouse, who runs at any time,” Waterhouse said. The campers are broken into three groups, and each group is prothe film camp program. The camp started just over five years ago as an vided with an iPhone and a Macbook with iMovie, extension of the festival’s 10-10-10 competition, which which they use to shoot and edit their films. Using allows local student filmmakers and screenwriters to free editing software and phones that most teenagcollaborate on 10-minute films each year. There are ers have available is important, Waterhouse says, so usually about 30 teenagers that get to make the trip, they can continue making movies at home. Aside from daily lessons with local film-indussponsored by SBIFF and community donations, but after a year off, the camp returned with a scaled-back try pros, the campers also get to enjoy an old-fashversion with 13 campers from Boys & Girls Club ioned sleepaway camp experience with hikes, pool locations between Goleta and Carpinteria. time, archery, zip lines, and a ropes course that The program aims to make filmmaking acces- serves as a way to encourage teamwork. “To be in a film crew, you have to be a team sible to youth and empower them to pursue their player,” Waterhouse said. And of course, this being film MENTORSHIP MATTERS: Professionals camp, the teens get nightly screengave the students plenty of time and ings of classics such as Holes, Space attention. Jam, The Goonies, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, and Hook. During filming, guest filmmakers help the teams plan their shots and find their locations. One of the guests is Santi Bailey-Musacchio, a former camper and winner of two SBIFF 10-10-10 awards. “That was really special to see, for us to have him here and watch him grow,” Waterhouse said. Two of the teams decided to do their takes on a campsite slasher flick. One group calls their film

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Shadow Slayer; the other is called Camp Killer. Vincent Perez and Andres Corrales were part of the Camp Killer crew. Filming everything in a couple of days meant they had to adjust to obstacles. “The filming itself was challenging,” said Perez. “We had to improvise a lot.” Having no dialogue in the film really tested their ability to tell a story with visuals and other sound effects. NOT JUST MOVIES: Campers also enjoyed the advantages of a summer “You have to add more movewilderness experience. ment,” Corrales said. The group couldn’t get the gyroscope mount to work on their iPhone, but instead of worrying the room what they are doing, while rolling their about the stability of the camera, they adjusted and eyes at their elders’ ignorance. let the shaky movement “add more depth” to the It’s not that hard, they say. They are adding sound, and becoming amateur foley artists, recordscenes, as Corrales put it. They took inspiration from old horror flicks, ing screams and slammed doors in the cabin, and from Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining to Tommy Lee laughing between takes. Wallace’s 1990 adaptation of the Stephen King clasStinson, who worked as a screenwriter and what sic It, which the teens preferred to the 2017 remake. he calls a “script doctor” for Hollywood studios Kaiser Orduna, one of the teens on the Camp like Warner Brothers, joined the campers for the Killer team, is a fan of the old-school monster clas- day to teach them about story structure, themes, sics, especially Godzilla. Orduna created a Tik- and the elements that make a film connect with Tok account dedicated to many iterations of the an audience. Godzilla story. The account, @kingzilla_official, The campers have already filmed all their explores the history of the destructive sea monster scenes, and with a day left at camp, they are deep in editing mode. Stinson explains the three-act and compares classics to the remakes. “I started watching them when I was about 4 or story arc, which he says every film should have, 5,” he said. Making the informative Godzilla videos regardless of whether it runs for two hours or two helped Orduna learn to edit and create content, minutes. and the account — which he started on February He asks the three groups to define the elements 7 as a way to stave off boredom during the pan- of the structure: the genre, the hero, the obstacle, demic — already has more than 13,600 followers, and the plot points which pivot and direct the characters to the story’s climax. The kids comply, except for one of the groups whose film, Uncharted, is a time-traveling sci-fi thriller that defies normal story structure. “He just doesn’t get it,” says one of the campers, who goes by the nickname Zero. The group and Stinson find a middle (800) Local 741-1605 Your Auto Club Branch ground, with the core creative idea staying but a few editing adjustments made to  —MichaelStinson,SBCCfacultymemberinfilmandmediastudies help the film’s flow. The finished product is a fun, experimental, avant-garde short and his videos have received more than 161,000 in which the characters find themselves jumping likes. through time and space to alternate-universe sumThis new generation of content creators is so mer camps. familiar and comfortable with technology and the Overall, all three groups’ films are successful, latest applications, said Michael Stinson, a profes- each with its own unique take on their week at sor of film and media studies at Santa Barbara City camp. Some are technical and serious, while others College, that the sky’s the limit to what they can are just plain fun. The three-to-five-minute shorts achieve. provide a glimpse into what they’ve learned, as well “The thing that’s amazing — I would lug 150- as their creativity, which they already had before 200 pounds of camera equipment,” he said. “Now they came to camp. The summer-camp experience in itself is fun, they’re shooting on smartphones. Everybody can be a filmmaker nowadays. Everybody has that in but when the youth show interest in something like filmmaking and they can spend a week with their their pocket.” With the quality of phone cameras improving so peers learning and making their own short films, much, Stinson said, the barrier is lowered. “They’re the experience is even more fulfilling. Most of all, living in a very exciting time to be media makers.” Waterhouse said, it instills a sense that a future in When they’re editing, this grasp of modern filmmaking is not too far off from their grasp. media is evident. The kids are quick to figure out “It’s not Hollywood in the distance,” she said. how to rip audio from YouTube into files they can “It’s not out of reach. You can do anything you want throw into iMovie, even explaining to the adults in to.” n

‘Now they’re shooting on smartphones. Everybody can be a filmmaker nowadays. Everybody has that in their pocket.’

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C O V E R

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ROGER DURLING



The Arlington Theatre 

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            ­

FILM SNOB DEMISE

€ˆ„   ŒŠ  Ž ‘­

The COVID eye disclosed other blind spots that might not have been detected without such extraordinary circumstances. One of the book’s most personal moments comes when Durling admits that the film snob in him was reluctant to accept the film When Harry Met Sally… when it came out.

€­†‡„   Š  ‹ €‚ƒ„   ­…

This may come across as sacrilegious to some of you, but I was not a fan of this film when I first saw it. The purist cinephile in me was turned off by the fact that it felt like a distilled version of a Woody Allen comedy, a more mainstream version of Annie Hall and Hannah and Her Sisters, even using similar title cards, utilizing the great American songbook MOVIES MADE ME: Durling has grown into a major figure in the film as its soundtrack and New York City as its world through his directorship of SBIFF. backdrop. The curmudgeon in me couldn’t get past that—and Meg Ryan, as Sally, mental rules of narrative cinema in the service of his always felt to me like she mugged too much. own vision revealed the genius of this picture to me What a mush I have become. If anything, COVID as never before. Whether he’s discussing technical has taught me to look at the glass as half-full. questions of camera placement in a black-and-white I’m done looking for defects. I look at the things Japanese film from the 1950s or the color of a charthat work. I’m all about admiring the positives. acter’s suit or dress in an American film from the And there are quite a lot of them in When Harry 21st century, Durling offers insights that shift one’s Met Sally… perspective in such a way as to see the film anew. That he can make filmmaking interesting while Fortunately, Durling eschews the Warhol style of entry that documents every meeting and meal as talking about movies from such disparate times and though it were part of world history, so you won’t places is one of his signature strengths. I was continuhear much about what he had for breakfast or where ally impressed by how wide his range of reference was, he went for dinner. Of course, since it was written and how natural and complete his recall of relevant during quarantine, there might not have been much cross-references could be. There are many different to that anyway. The personal material that does come kinds of films in here—movies released last year and through tends to be in relation to specific people and movies made in the Golden Age of Hollywood, as well events in the larger world. He mourns the deaths of as documentaries and even animated features. The Christopher Plummer and Chadwick Boseman in sheer number of female directors had me reflecting real time, and he writes about the film Loving on the on how comprehensive his knowledge of the art form day that the Supreme Court decides another impor- is and on how radically the industry has changed in tant case concerning marriage, this time one allowing just the past couple of decades. same-sex couples the rights accorded in the Loving Cinema in Flux: A Year of Connecting Through Film case to couples of mixed race. is now available for pre-order through the SBIFF website (sbiff.org/book) and will ship this month, with all proceeds from its sale going to support the Santa Barbara International Film Festival, which has taken a two-year hit from COVID, just like so many of our It’s Professor Durling, the experienced Santa Barbara city’s other great arts events and organizations. It will City College lecturer, who makes the most frequent also be available in bookstores in October. When we spoke about the mission of the SBIFF cameos, and they are, to this reader at least, uniformly useful and even charming. In the entry on in January 2020, before the pandemic had taken Paul Thomas Anderson’s Punch-Drunk Love, for over our lives, Durling expressed his gratitude for example, Durling embellishes Adam Sandler’s great- the chance to keep his staff employed year-round est role by providing advice on how to notice and and celebrated that the festival had finally become a interpret the film’s judicious use of symbolic color. continuous operation, capable of functioning as an His essay on Yasujirō Ozu’s Tokyo Story, a classic educational resource every month of the year. What film which has earned the acclaim of professionals we didn’t know was that this year-long model would all over the world, contains a miniature dissertation be tested in quite the way that it was, or that Durling on the director’s complex, idiosyncratic aesthetic. would take up the task of making it happen so much n Reading about how Ozu breaks some of the funda- on his own.

FILM SCHOOL IN SESSION

€†‚‡ˆ   ‰ 

        



 

  

 

Arlington • Metro 4 • Camino

Fiesta 5

Fiesta 5

Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Sept 3 - 9, 2021 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes”

www.metrotheatres.com METRO 4

FA I R V I E W

618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection

225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800

Paw Patrol (G): Fri, Tues-Thur: 4:45, 7:00. Sat-Mon: 1:45, 4:45, 7:00. Respect (PG13): Fri, Tues-Thur: 4:20, 7:30. Sat-Mon: 1:30, 4:20, 7:30. The Protégé (R): Fri-Thur: 5:05. The Suicide Squad (R): Fri, Tues-Thur: 7:40. Sat-Mon: 2:00, 7:40.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings*

(PG13): Fri-Sun: 2:30(LP), 3:30, 5:30(LP), 6:30, 8:30(LP), 9:30. Mon-Thur: 2:30(LP), 3:30, 5:30(LP), 6:30, 8:30(LP). Candyman (R): Fri-Sun: 2:20, 4:45, 7:00, 9:15. Mon-Thu: 3:20, 5:40, 8:15. Jungle Cruise (PG13): Fri-Thur: 2:15, 5:05, 8:00.

CAMINO REAL

F I E S TA 5

7040 MARKETPLACE DRIVE GOLETA 805-688-4140

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings*

(PG13): Fri: 1:40, 2:45, 3:45, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, 7:45, 8:45, 9:50. Sat-Mon: 12:45, 1:40, 2:45, 3:45, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, 7:45, 8:45, 9:50. Tue-Thur: 1:40, 2:45, 3:45, 4:45, 5:45, 6:45, 7:45, 8:45. Candyman (R): Fri-Sun: 2:20, 4:35, 7:15, 9:40. Tues-Thur: 3:15, 5:30, 8:15. Free Guy (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:50, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30. Tues-Thur: 2:30, 5:20, 8:00. Jungle Cruise (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30, 4:20, 7:30.

ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

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916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455

Flag Day (R): Fri, Tues-Thur: 5:30, 8:00. Sat-Mon: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00. Ma Belle, My Beauty (NR): Fri, Tues-Thur: 5:50, 8:15. Sat-Mon: 2:50, 5:50, 8:15. Together (R): Fri-Mon: 5:15. Un Rescate de Huevitos (NR): Fri-Thur: 7:30. Paw Patrol (G): Fri: 4:45. Sat-Thur: 2:30, 4:45. Free Guy (PG13): Fri: 5:00, 7:45. Sat-Thur: 2:20, 5:00, 7:45. Respect (PG13): Fri: 7:00. Sat-Thur: 2:40, 7:00. Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings* (PG13): Fri, Tues-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Sat-Mon: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30.

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

SEPT.

2-8

T HE

by

TERRY ORTEGA

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY Patrons of all ages must show proof of being fully vaccinated or supply a negative COVID-19 medical test result from within 72 hours, along with an official photo ID, before entering the Lobero, Granada, Center Stage, and New Vic theaters and the S.B. Bowl. Masks are currently required indoors, regardless of vaccination status. The venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols before attending an event.

9/2:

Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion: Christine French Cully The editor in

the Child,”“T’ain’t Nobody’s Business If I Do,” “Crazy He Calls Me,” and “Easy Livin’. ” 8pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $35-$50. Adult themes and language. Call (805) 922-8313. Read more on p. 35.

9/2: Zoom Live Downtown Business Spotlight: Food & Drink — Cold Treats Join S.B. Independent Senior Editor Matt Kettman in conversation with James Haskins (Tondi Gelato), Michael Palmer (McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams), and Rori Trovato (Rori’s Artisanal Creamery) in this week’s virtual inter-

9/3:

more than 30 small business of talented local makers and women creatives, artisans, bakers, and vintage resellers. 11am-4pm. Corner of Milpas and Cota sts. Free. Call (805) 280-1939 or email info@ mujeresmakersmarket.com.

9/4: Foresters 2021 Championship Celebration! All are

tinyurl.com/Sep5MMM

COURTESY

Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $60; patron: $110; VIP: $135. Call (805) 963-0761.

tinyurl.com/ToadWetSprocket

SUNDAY 9/5

9/3-9/4:

view. 3pm. Free.

independent.com/extra

Naked Shakes Summer Class Presents Twelfth Night Shake-

9/2: SBMA Art Matters Zoom Lecture: Ashes to Dust: American Art and the Dreadful Thirties This talk with University of Maine Professor of Art History Justin Wolff will examine paintings, prints, and photographs representing two catastrophes unfolding during the 1930s in the U.S.: one actual (the Dust Bowl) and the other hypothetical (the end of the world). 3-4pm. Free-$15. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@sbma.net.

tinyurl.com/LectureAshes-Dust 9/2-9/5: Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill Don’t miss your last chance to step into Emerson’s Bar and Grill and witness one of Billie Holiday’s (Karole Foreman) last performances. Songs include “God Bless

SOhO Grand Reopening Party: Soul Majestic S.B.

band Soul Majestic will bring their roots reggae mixed with hip-hop, R&B, rock, pop, and folk sound to SOhO’s reopening party. Doors: 7:30pm; show: 9pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St., Ste. 205. $17. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776. tinyurl.com/SoulMajestic

COURTESY

Market Shop and support

SATURDAY 9/4

speare’s delightfully comic tale of mistaken identities takes on a new life carried on by the students of Naked Shakes. Fri.: 5pm; Sat.: 1 and 5pm. UCSB Commencement Green. Free.

tinyurl.com/UCSB12thNight

9/5: Zoom Webinar: S.B. Tenants Mayoral Candidate Forum Join the CAUSE Action Fund, S.B. Tenants Union, and other community partners to find out how the candidates for S.B. mayor think about the housing crisis in a city where 60 percent of residents are renters, as well as their thoughts on ecological disasters, the pandemic, and more. 6pm. Free. Call (805) 455-5976 or email frank@causenow.org.

tinyurl.com/MayoralCandidateForum

MONDAY 9/6

9/6: S.B. County Democratic mance by La Boheme Dance Group. Proceeds Party Labor Day Picnic: Honorgo to the Foresters and Hugs for Cubs. ing Care Workers Join endorsed candi3-8pm. S.B. Carriage and Western Art dates Mayor Cathy Murillo and Museum, 129 Castillo St. $30 (at the door). councilmembers Kristen Sneddon, Eric Friedfacebook.com/SBForesters/ man, and Meagan Harmon, along with many other elected and labor leaders, at this picnic 9/4-9/5: Toad the Wet Sprocket, that will have traditional BBQ fare. Funds will Summercamp See S.B.’s hometown go toward the fall campaigns. 2-4pm. Tucker’s band Toad the Wet Sprocket, whose platinum album, Dulcinea, came out 27 years ago Grove, 4800 Cathedral Oaks Rd. GA: $25; student: $15; drink ticket: $5. Call (805) 965and whose new album is set to be released 8030 or email info@sbdems.org. this year. S.B.’s alternative rock band Sumtinyurl.com/SBDemsPicnic mercamp will open the show. 8pm. Lobero COURTESY

assist you in creating brightly colored abstract geometric collages inspired by Eamon Ore-Giron’s “Infinite Regress LXV” (2019). Afterward, enjoy the galleries until 8pm. 5:30-7:30pm. Family Resource Ctr., S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@ sbma.net. sbma.net/events

Mujeres Makers

pcpa.org/plays/LadyDay

tinyurl.com/DearHighlights

9/2: Family 1st Thursday: Geometric Collage A teaching artist will

9/5:

welcome to celebrate the S.B. Foresters’ ninth national title from the National Baseball Congress World Series. Meet the team, take a photo with the champs, enjoy Santa Maria BBQ, drinks, live music, and a perfor-

chief of Highlights magazine will talk about her new book, Dear Highlights: What Adults Can Learn from 75 Years of Letter and Conversations with Kids, a collections of letters, emails, drawings, and poems revealing inspiring 75-year conversations with America’s children. 7pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com.

THURSDAY 9/2

COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

9/7-9/8:

Storywalk in the Park/Cuentos en el Parque Join outside to enjoy a picture book, Daniel Finds a Poem. Participate in activities with your children, and then take home a free activity kit. Únase afuera para disfrutar el libro ilustrado, Daniel Encuentra un Poema. Participe en actividades con sus hijos y después lléve sea casa un kit de actividades gratis. Tue./martes: 1:30-3:30pm. Sunflower Park, 1124 E. Mason St. Wed./miercoles: 10:30am-noon. MacKenzie Park, 1124 E. Mason St. Free/gratis. Call (805) 962-7653 or email youthservices@santa barbaraca.gov.

tinyurl.com/SunflowerPark tinyurl.com/MacKenzieStory

9/3-9/6:

S.B. Studio Artists’ Open Studios Tour The Central

Coast’s largest studio tour will feature the works of 28 studio artists, along with exclusive access to the artists in their studios. Tickets, tour maps, and a preview of the tour will be available at the S.B. Community Arts Workshop (SBCAW) all weekend. Proceeds will benefit the Foodbank of S.B. Opening Reception: Fri.: 5-8pm. SBCAW, 631 Garden St. Tour hours: Sat.-Sun.: 11am-5pm; Mon.: 11am-2pm. Free-$25. Call (805) 280-9178 or email fscor1973@gmail.com.

santabarbarastudioartists.com Lisa Crane

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 24

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser


WEDNESDAY 9/8 9/8: Lobero Live and Earl Minnis Presents An Evening with The Wallflowers Check out The Wallflowers as they play their timeless and purposeful sound as well as music from their new album, Exit Wounds. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $57-$67; VIP: $106. Call (805) 963-0761.

tinyurl.com/TheWallflowers

9/8:

Hone Your Elevator Pitch and Practice It!

Tune up your 30-60-second elevator pitch with tips from storyteller, speaker coach, and 2019 AWC-SB Woman of Achievement honoree

Indy Book Club: August Book Discussion Join the

S.B. Independent and the S.B. Public Library for a discussion about the August read, Convenience Store Woman by Sayaka Murata 6-7pm. Municipal Winemakers, 22 Anacapa St. Free.

Kymberlee Weil

tinyurl.com/IndyBookClubAug

Member Spotlight: Lauren Bianchi Klemman

AWC Members Free $10 Non-Members

Shows on Tap 9/3: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

tinyurl.com/PaliSep3 9/3, 9/6, 9/8: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Fri.: Grand Reopening Party with Soul Majestic. Doors, 7:30pm; show: 9pm. $17. Ages 21+. Mon.: Jazz Jam with Sandy Cummings. Doors: 5pm; show: 7pm. $10. Wed.: Detar Studios Band Showcase. Doors: 5pm; show: 7pm. Free. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776 x6.

sohosb.com

9/4: Andrew Murray Vineyards Loren Radis. Noon-3pm. 5249 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 686-9604.

RSVP at AWCS B.O R G Zoom Event

9/4-9/6: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Salt Martians, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:30-4:30pm. Mon.: Tina Schlieske and the Graceland Exiles, 1:304:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

Wednesday Sep 8, 5:30 p.m.

coldspringtavern.com

9/4: Island Brewing Co. Cadillac Angels, 6-9pm. Island Brewing Co., 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. (805) 745-8272.

tinyurl.com/IBCSep4 9/4: The Lark S.B. Live deejay. 9pm. 131 Anacapa St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 284-0370.

tinyurl.com/TheLarkSB

tinyurl.com/AndrewMurrayMusic

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series

y Todam ! at 3p

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

FRIDAY

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with James Haskins (Tondi Gelato), Michael Palmer (McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams), and Rori Trovato (Rori’s Artisanal Creamery) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

Join Robin Elander in conversation with t Nexek! e W

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org ●

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

ANDREW GONZALEZ 805 University

ASHLEY FOX The Vintage Fox

Relocating and Expanding Retail Thursday, September 9 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

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living

Health COURTESY

p. 26

CHUCK GRAHAM PHOTOS

Close Escapes

Addie Clarke, Kyle Visin, and Emily Foley

RiseUp Fitness Is For Anyone, Even Me C

redit goes to my friend Jessica for getting me off my butt and exercising again. And credit goes to RiseUp Fitness for keeping me moving. I used to be in crazy-good shape. I rowed in high school with 5 a.m. trips to the gym followed by afternoon practice on the water. Lean and mean, our eight-man boat team won state championships and looked darn good in suits at graduation. But that was nearly 20 years ago. There’s been a lot of pasta and couch-lounging since. So I fully expected my first RiseUp class — held with all the proper COVID precautions under an awning behind their Las Positas Road studio — to not go well. In one respect, it didn’t. I was so slow and clumsy during the 50-minute session that I

Workout Class Kick-Starts Personal Journey Back to Physical Health by Tyler Hayden got pretty down on myself. But in another and much more important respect, it was a success because I realized — after many fits and starts with other programs — I’d finally found a place I could put in the work to lose weight and feel good about my body again. Opened in the summer of 2018 by business partners and longtime trainers Addie Clarke, Kyle Visin, and Emily Foley, RiseUp Fitness has a simple but effective approach of offering guided, tail-kicking classes to people of various ages, shapes, and sizes in a comfortable setting that’s all about encouragement and not competition. The circuit is divided into six stations — four types of cardio and two with weights or bands—with printed placards that give time and distance goals, depending on your ability level. Think of the personalization of a one-on-one trainer with the fun and energy of a group class. The stations face away from each other, and there are no mirrors on the walls, which 26

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gives you space and privacy. That was a big selling point for me. The staff, who quickly get to know you by name, are down to earth but upbeat. Their voices over the mic are motivating without being obnoxious. And they have great taste in music. I especially appreciate the ’90s hip-hop mixes. The diverse backgrounds of the three founders also contribute to RiseUp’s allinclusive atmosphere. Addie was trained in classical ballet, while Emily played team sports like soccer and basketball. Kyle is a triathlete and actually just took first place in the Santa Barbara Triathlon Long Course. How many local instructors can say that? Next month, RiseUp will open a second location in North Goleta in the University Plaza Shopping Center. While the City of Santa Barbara is silly with gyms, that part of the South Coast is conspicuously lacking in options. The team also regularly organizes fundraisers, recently helping the Isla Vista Youth Project, which was hit especially hard during the pandemic. They’ve raised money for the Humane Society and breast cancer research, as well. Physical fitness is, of course, always important, Emily said. But it’s especially important now, as the pandemic drags on and the mental strain of the last 18 months continues to take its toll. “It’s just so critical these days for people to get out and exercise,” she explained, recalling private testimonials from clients who say (and I believe it) that the classes changed their lives or saved their relationships. “We have the plan,” Emily said of their carefully designed workouts. “All you have to do is show up.” I’m still in the early stages of my get-backin-shape journey. I started off strong with RiseUp a few months ago but slipped in recent weeks. But that’s okay. I can at least see the road now and have met the people who will help me along it. And that’s huge. I haven’t had that since my rowing days. I just need to keep showing up.

2273 Las Positas Rd.; (805) 225-3223; riseupfitness.com.

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

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FURRY FLOATILLA: The slough is home to the highest concentration of sea otters in California.

EBB AND FLOW OF ELKHORN SLOUGH THE

A

s my kayak gently sliced through the silky smooth waters beneath Highway 1 and into Elkhorn Slough, its many inhabitants enjoyed the tranquil setting surrounded by pickleweed and separated by a maze of serpentine-like channels. The second-largest tidal slough in California (after the San Francisco Bay) provides sanctuary for more than 700 species of marine mammals, invertebrates, plants, and algae.

Visit Slap-Happy Seals and Voracious Sea Otters by Chuck Graham

Located in Moss Landing inside Monterey Bay, Elkhorn Slough is one of the prime places in North America for viewing wildlife. Best explored from a kayak or stand-up paddleboard, the seven-mile-long tidal marsh is one of the easiest places to go paddling with southern sea otters, frolicking harbor seals, and a throng of birdlife — more than 340 avian species foraging the mudflats and wading through aquatic vegetation. It’s a paddling experience that guarantees intimate encounters in a biologically rich wetland flanked by a power plant, Highway 1, and a dairy farm. The name Elkhorn Slough is derived from the native tule elk that once inhabited the region. Paddling on, I wove my way through a gauntlet of slap-happy seals smacking their tails on the water’s surface and rolling and jostling with each other in the shallows. The eel grass waved with the ebb and flow of the tide. In contrast, the slough’s sea otters — the highest concentration of the species in California — took their play more seriously.

TAKEOFF: Brown pelicans are just one of 340 bird species found at the slough.

More than 120 of these marine mammals with the densest fur in the animal kingdom breed and pup in the area. They spend their days satisfying their insatiable appetites, consuming 30 percent of their body weight every 24 hours. Clams, crabs, innkeeper worms, and other invertebrates are on their menu. If you don’t have your own kayak, renting one is simple through Kayak Connection (kayakconnection.com) or Monterey Bay Kayaks (montereybaykayaks.com). Both are located in the harbor in Moss Landing. Launching and landing is easy, too, for all levels of paddlers. Just mind the tides and northwest winds, which can challenge anyone. To learn more about the inner workings of Elkhorn Slough, visit the Elkhorn Slough Foundation, where restoration and education are the nonprofit’s priority.

See elkhornslough.org.


living

Fashion

f you look around downtown, you can see Apple and lululemon. They’re both big and successful companies, so there’s something there with fruit names,” joked Athena Wang, a UCSB student and the founder/designer of Watermelon Apparel, when I asked how she came up with the name for her brand. “Watermelons are also a fruit, and I’m very superstitious, so I hope there’s some truth there.” Watermelon Apparel is Wang’s clothing brand, which features cute and comfortable clothes like oversized T-shirts and crewneck sweatshirts. Last spring, Wang was managing her own online shop when inspiration struck as her mind wandered during an accounting class. “We were talking about business,” she said, “and I just thought, ‘Well I have a business. It would be cool if I could do it in person.’ ” Wang has a strong entrepreneurial spirit which she attributes to her father, who is the inspiration behind

UCSB Student Athena Wang Creates Watermelon Apparel Brand by Ricky Barajas the name of the brand. Her father, who now runs his own technology incubator, grew up in rural China and worked as a watermelon salesman. His family was very poor and often had trouble finding enough food to eat. He would rise before the sun every day for years to sell watermelons at the market. “I named it Watermelon Apparel to be a constant reminder of the work it took for my family to move from the rural side of China to the capital city of China,

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SPECIALS and then from China to America and California, which is amazing,” Wang told me. She looks up to her father and admires his success and dedication and tries to emulate that for herself and her community. Right after that accounting class, Wang began looking into temporary leases for commercial spaces. She contacted a few real estate agents, selected locations to visit, and then set out to find the perfect pop-up spot. After touring her selections and signing a contract at the end of June, her next task was preparing the store for its July 17 opening. Wang hired a small group of women to help her, one of whom convinced her to start posting TikToks as a form of marketing for her brand.  The idea worked. I actually discovered Watermelon Apparel on TikTok when a post that has since amassed 1.6 million views with almost 200k likes showed up on my “For You” page. The description in the video says, “when 5 college students are allowed to open and run an entire clothing store,” and shows Wang and crew painting the walls, assembling mannequins, and preparing the 3,000-square-foot location for its first customers.  Intended to be size and body inclusive, Watermelon Apparel has taken to posting videos of how their clothing fits on models of different heights and body shapes. Wang also has plans to expand the types of clothing they offer with their next drop.  Watermelon Apparel is only open until September 17, so make sure to stop by and check it out at Paseo Nuevo before it’s gone.

COME ON IN: Athena Wang cuts the ribbon to her new downtown store.

2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863 626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028 6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806

Visit watermelon-apparel.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, UBS Financial Services Inc. offers investment advisory services in its capacity as an SEC-registered investment adviser and brokerage services in its capacity as an SEC-registered broker-dealer. Investment advisory services and brokerage services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate arrangements. It is important that clients understand the ways in which we conduct business, that they carefully read the agreements and disclosures that we provide to them about the products or services we offer. For more information, please review the PDF document at ubs.com/relationshipsummary. For designation disclosures visit ubs.com/us/en/designation-disclosures. Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards, Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, Certified finanCial PlannerTM and federally registered CFP (with flame design) in the US, which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. © UBS 2021. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. Exp.: 08/31/2022 is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. CJ-UBS-12167625 28

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FOOD &DRINK

p.29 TJ TAMBELLINI

Randall Grahm’s The Language of Yes Legendary Vintner Teams with Gallo, Sources Wine from S.B.

T

S

M AT T

KET TM

ANN

TJ TAMBELLINI

BOTT & BALRERSEL

But Grahm was never known as the best salesman or a financial genius, and he frequently ran into money troubles, which led to the sale of the majority of Bonny Doon in early 2020. And that’s how I found myself eating lunch with Grahm last week in King City, to learn about how this iconoclastic, independent-minded wine legend is now partnering with the FROM DOON TO YES: Randall Graham recently sold off most of his Bonny Doon brand all-powerful Gallo family on a but is now making The Language of Yes wine in partnership with Gallo. new project called The Language of Yes. Given that he’s sourcing grapes from Gallo’s Rancho Real Vineyard — also known as Murmur, starting a joint venture that combined Grahm’s mind which lies alongside 101 just south of Orcutt — Grahm is with the Gallo family’s sales and logistical force. “If we wanted to be active in the Rhône space,” explained now a Santa Barbara County story as well. “In a slightly tangential and somewhat unexpected Gallagher of what motivated Gallo, which makes a lot note, you may (or might not) have heard of my recent of wines but not many Rhônes like syrah and grenache, joint venture with E & J Gallo Wine Company, a small “who else do we talk to?” For Grahm, who was told that he could do his wacky outfit out of Modesto, CA,” wrote Grahm in an August 11 email to fans, his verbiage as subversively humorous things and let Gallo handle the rest, “This was quite as ever. “Yes, I know, it’s a bit of a Bambi Meets Godzilla interesting on a number of levels.” (The Bambi versus scenario, but so far, so good, and there are some really Godzilla joke came up again a couple of times — Graastonishing wines arising therefrom and it has been a ham showed us this hilarious short film (tinyurl.com/ great experience.” bambiversusgodzilla) — but Gallagher asked, “Who is We decided to meet at the Cork & Plough (thecorkand Bambi and who is Godzilla?”) plough.com), where I found Grahm and Gallo’s marketing So with Gallo’s backing, Grahm grafted the guru Lon Gallagher with a rosé already popped. A very tibouren onto Creston Ridge Vineyard in Paso Robles light (some may just call it “white”) rosé of the pale-red and sourced syrah and grenache for red wines from Provencal grape tibouren, with 25 percent of the Rhône Rancho Real. The tibouren is fantastic, tons of texgrape cinsault, this was the first wine to be released under ture and restrained fruit flavors, while the syrah and The Language of Yes banner. It sold out in just over an grenache — which will be released in October — are hour when the Grahm-Gallo partnership was announced. also unique expressions, in part because Grahm dried The partnership emerged out of Grahm’s Bonny the grapes outside for a couple of days before pressing Doon sale, when he got a call from Joe C. Gallo about them. In addition to the three wines, they plan to add perhaps another wine each vintage, including a possible Amarone-style cinsault co-fermented with syrah, if the timing works out this harvest. As our conversation veered into a gaggle of Old World grapes that I’d never heard of, Grahm grew a bit more introspective about this new project. “The Bonny Doon wines were very stylized,” he explained of how he actively made those in the cellar to be a certain way. “These wines are more soulful and thoughtful, more vineyard-derived than conceptually derived.” As to the name, Grahm explained his deep dive into finding words from a Provençal dialect that extends from the Pyrenees to Piedmont before settling on The Language of Yes. He explained, “The name seems very welcoming for these times in which we live.” See languageofyeswine.com.

FOOD & DRINK

here are few winemakers more important to the Central Coast wine industry than Randall Grahm, who founded his Bonny Doon Vineyard to pursue pinot noir in the Santa Cruz Mountains 40 years ago. Within a few years, he’d shifted course to Rhône varieties such as syrah, grenache, and roussanne, launching the label Le Cigare Volant three years later to showcase blends of these grapes. BY MATT KET TMANN That name is a nod to the hilarious 1954 law banning UFOs from landing in the vineyards of France’s Châteauneufdu-Pape region — home to the world’s best-known grenache-led blends — and is evidence of the colorfully creative character that Grahm would embrace for the rest of his life. He was splashed across the cover of Wine Spectator in 1989 as the “The Rhône Ranger,” and went on to make dozens of different wines from countless undiscovered vineyards across California, mentoring an entire generation of vintners along the way. Though I’d known his wines for years, I didn’t meet Grahm in person until 2015, when he took me around his Popelouchum Vineyard outside of San Juan Bautista. Perhaps his most ambitious project ever, and one that won’t likely bear the right fruit until long after he’s gone, the vineyard is Grahm’s attempt to develop California’s own grape by planting numerous varieties and rootstocks to trigger hybrids that will work for the state’s climate.

A version of this story was published in the Full Belly Files newsletter last Friday. Sign up for that free weekly service at independent.com/newsletters. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Dine Out

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SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY-AT-HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS

Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus.

A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday.Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm | Sunday Prix-Fixe 5 - 7:30 pm 1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

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A

s your nose is lured by the

ALEXANDRA DEFURIO

TAKE OUT

Transportive Ambiance and Classic Italian at Tre Lune familiar smells of Italian dishes from Puglia and Piedmont to Rome and Liguria steadily wafting out from the bustling kitchen at Tre Lune, your eyes will likely turn to the Montecito ristorante’s decor to enjoy another sort of trip. Outside, on the patio that was expanded during the pandemic to nearly double the restaurant’s volume, there are photographs from across Italy, bringing scenes of Sorrento, Capri, and elsewhere to the sidewalks of Coast Village Road. “It just adds this special ambiance,” explains restaurant manager Leslee Garafalo of the strategy. “Our whole concept was MASSIVE MENU: Tre Lune serves what seems like the entirety of Italy on its sprawling menu as well as an ever-changing wine list. that if people couldn’t travel to Italy, we’d bring Italy to them.” Inside, the black-and-white photos of Hollywood During my lunch, I counted 24 pasta dishes, 16 A-listers during past golden ages provide a differ- meat and fish options, and five specials, as well as ent sort of transportive experience: that one is sur- the more than one dozen options on each of the pizza, salad, and antipasti sections. This is to say nothing of the cocktail or wine list, which is completely Italian except for one Santa Barbara County rosé. As Garafalo served me her smoked tuna salad, that truffle gnocchi, and more, she poured single-ferment prosecco from Le ConBY MATT KETTMANN tesse, gavi by Villa Sparina, the Mysterium barbera by Tenute Montemagno, and higheraltitude pinot nero from Abbazia di Novacella rounded by glitz and glamour while tucking into that in Alto Adige. (We didn’t get into the reserve cellar tortellini and tiramisu. In fact, you may be graced by of Tignanello and Sassicaia — it was just lunch, after the presence of real-life celebs too, though many of all.) To me, such deep wine and food menus seem the restaurant’s moneyed clientele don’t recognize, or like a constant challenge for cooks to nail each dish care, that a Kardashian is seated to their left. every time and for servers to speak knowledgeably But what drew my eye were the elf-sized seats about so many things. But the Tre Lune model apparthat lined the top of the interior walls, each adorned ently works. “We looked at scaling back during the pandemic,” with someone’s name, or nickname. “We have close to 300 chairs on the wall for our customers who love said Garafalo, noting that cacio e pepe and the eating here and who’ve been eating here for years,” salmon with lemon and capers remain top favorsaid Garafalo of these tiny odes to loyalists, many of ites. “But everything sells. It’s unbelievable.” She also whom started coming when the restaurant opened ensures that the ever-changing wine list is supported, in 2003. “We like to thank our customers, and they explaining, “It’s really important that my staff tastes and enjoys every wine, so that they can sell it.” get a kick out of it.” Keeping the quality consistent is a dedicated staff How does one achieve such honor? Garafalo said that the formula is not set in stone, but that Tre Lune’s led by Chef Luis DeLeo, including many who have owner, Gene Montesano — the blue-jeans mogul worked there for more than a decade. “Everyone turned restaurateur who also started Lucky’s Steak- who works at Tre Lune has this passion, and it deephouse a few blocks away on Coast Village Road and ens over the years,” said Garafalo, who was raised in owns D’Angelo Bakery and Joe’s Café in downtown Westlake Village but worked in Denver restaurants Santa Barbara as well — claims one primary criteria: for many years before coming to Tre Lune in 2014. “If you’re cool.” “We’re united and a family here.” I don’t make it down that way enough to qualify That family was given a serious compliment the for such judgement myself, but I could immediately night before I visited, when an out-of-town cussee why so many return repeatedly to Tre Lune for tomer had returned with extremely high hopes for lunch, dinner, and the Friday-to-Sunday brunch, the meal, fearing that he was remembering his past billed as “Montecito’s best breakfast.” The menu is Tre Lune experience a bit too fondly. He was more sprawling, offering a bit of Italy for every palate, from than pleased, reporting to the staff that the evening’s those seeking simple salads and pizzas to vegetar- meal exceeded his lofty expectations. “Your food is ians and vegans to those ready to splurge on dishes just as good as food on the Amalfi Coast,” he told the that remind of pre-pandemic vacations: delicate veal staff, “if not better.” doused in a tangy, caper-studded Milanese sauce; addictive gnocchi swimming in savory truffle cream; 1151 Coast Village Rd., Montecito; (805) 969-2646; fettucine with lobster and porcini in a saffron-laced trelunesb.com tomato base.

Montecito Mainstay Expands Patio but Stays the Course


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HULA FOR ALL: ParadICE is hosting performances and lessons by Hula Anyone this Sunday to celebrate the third anniversary of this Hawaiian shave ice store in the Paseo Nuevo mall.

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

ParadICE’s Third Anniversary Party sary on Sunday, September 5, at their shop in Paseo Nuevo with live dancing by Hula Anyone from 2-4 p.m. The shave ice shop was opened in 2018 by longtime friends Lee Jacobs and Marek Nold, who wanted to bring an authentic taste of Hawai‘i to the mainland. ParadICE’s flavors are made in-house with real fruit, organic sugar, and purified water and come with an optional scoop of ice cream on the bottom as well as toppings on the top. The shop also operates as Hustle & Grind Coffee Company, which the two men launched in October 2020. Hustle & Grind caters to the morning hours, while ParadICE serves up the treats in the afternoon. During Sunday’s event, Angelita Eller and Hula Anyone will be performing hula and teaching those interested. Hula Anyone is dedicated to the preservation of Hawaiian hula and Tahitian dance traditions by providing a nurturing platform to learn traditional dance forms. “Hula Anyone is a source of positive energy,” said Jacobs. “We had them at our first anniversary and are stoked to have them back for the celebration!” See paradiceshaveice.com. DRAUGHTSMEN HONORED: Assemblymember Steve

Bennett has selected Draughtsmen Aleworks as the 2021 Small Business of the Year for the 37th Assembly District. Draughtsmen Aleworks opened its first taproom in Goleta in 2015, focusing on craft beer. Since then, the brewery has expanded locations and offerings to include cider, hopped tea brews, and even wine. Building community is also a top priority, as the brewery partners with efforts focused on education, the environment, and social justice. This is reflected through their ongoing “good karma tap,” where a percentage of the sales goes to a nonprofit dedicated to these causes. VEGANGREENGO IS GONE: While taking the Restau-

rant Kid for an emergency scoop of chocolate ice cream at Baskin-Robbins on upper State Street, I noticed that its neighbor, Vegan GreenGO, was closed during business hours. I’m sad to report that

the eatery, which opened at 3613 State Street in May 2018, then survived the arrest of its founder, Tyler David Beerman, in 2019 for activities unrelated to the restaurant, has closed. Management confirmed that the restaurant did close on August 27. Those with outstanding gift card balances can email vegangreengo@gmail.com. MONTECITO VONS BECOMING PAVILIONS: As we reported

earlier this year, Montecito’s Vons is scheduled to be remodeled this fall and will remain open during construction. Reader Darvin tells me the reason behind the remodel: It is being rebranded as Pavilions, which are under the same corporate umbrella but are more upscale and feature a larger selection of organic food, wine, and other specialty foods. Vons opened at 1040 Coast Village Road in Montecito in 1968 after the company bought land from a family that used the funds from the sale to turn the rest of the property into what is now known as Montecito Country Mart. The Montecito Vons is the only grocery store that the Restaurant Guy has a memory of while growing up, as we moved nearby a few months after its grand opening. BUELLTON WINE & CHILI IS BACK: The 2021 Buellton

Wine & Chili Festival returns on Sunday, September 12, noon-4:30 p.m., featuring more than 30 wineries, breweries, and spirit companies as well as chili and salsa cook-offs. The event will take place at River View Park in Buellton, just down the street from Flying Flags, where the festival has taken place in the past. There will be music by the Dusty Jugs and the VineYard Byrds, shopping from vendors, lawn games such as cornhole for all ages, and megasized beer pong for adults. The Hot Chili Ticket ($55) is for all guests 21+ and includes a souvenir wine glass and unlimited wine, craft beer, and chili tasting. For guests under 21 years old, the Mild Chili Ticket is $20 and includes unlimited samples of chili and salsa but no alcohol. The Brew Bus will be doing pickups in Santa Barbara, Goleta, Santa Maria, and Lompoc for those who’ve purchased tickets in advance. See buellton wineandchilifestival.com.

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John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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AN UNENDING COMMENCEMENT UCSB MFA’S SHOW AT THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SANTA BARBARA

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nending, on view at the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) through Sunday, September 12, expresses the thoughts and emotions of the participating artists about the state of contemporary culture, and those feelings are often derived from their personal struggles. Though largely of unconventional inspiration, some works draw from more traditional forms, such as the landscape painting “American Pastoral Past Times” by Thomas Stoeckinger. This picture heavily exaggerates certain features, such as the vividly red sky, breaking the mold of typically unobtrusive landscape paintings and underscoring how shifting emphasis and focus can reflect the artist’s values. On a shelf next to the painting, Stoeckinger exhibits a series of statuettes titled “Duck-Rabbit-Person” that represent a diversity of human perspectives drawn from personal experiences; each statuette can be viewed either innocuously, as an animal in profile, or more confrontationally, as a human in a submissive posture. To the right of the gallery entrance, “Such Strange Weather” by Marshall Sharpe shows the artist’s parents in a sitting room. On the surface level, the painting reflects a sense of familial longing, but Sharpe imbues the work with other meanings as well. For all the homeliness of the scene, it is set in a rarely used formal room with the furniture arranged artificially, demonstrating the often-superfluous nature of some living areas. In another acrylic painting titled “Broken,” Sharpe depicts himself after injuring his collarbone. “Broken” uses reddish hues to evoke his physical trauma and casts a penetrating light that seems to expose the outlines of his injured rib cage. The injury, Sharpe explained, gave him another sense of longing, this time for good health.

L I F E PAGE 33

Thomas Stoeckinger, “American Pastoral Past Times”

Megan Koth’s art focuses on personal grooming and the anxieties born from imperfect skin. Like Sharpe, Koth draws on personal experience — in her case, an internal abscess. She uses the theme of imperfect skin as the basis for various artistic applications. Her painting “Ablution” mirrors the pose typical of models in skin-care advertisements — splashing water on one’s face in profile — but the inclusion of bright, prominent pustules on the face underscores how advertising varnishes over the reality of human skin conditions. In another series of paintings called “Dermascapes,” skin conditions are incorporated into landscape paintings, and their distinguishing features read as rugged terrain or natural landmarks. After passing through a charred door, visitors to David Wesley White’s portion of Unending see “White Inferno, The Burning of Washington,” a model of the White House’s damaged shell in the aftermath of the British attack in 1814. White confirms that this subject intentionally parallels the damage wrought by pro-Trump insurrectionists on January 6, 2021. Though most of his fire is trained on the former president, White also scorns current neoliberal discourse, representing its inanity by highlighting similarities between such discourse and

Megan Koth, “Cleansing”

Republican anti-New Deal propaganda in the form of two posters shaped like dollar bills and titled “Altered Anti-Populist Propaganda.” A chastity belt made of paper cell phones stands on a pedestal in “Rose Gold I-phone Chastity Belt Pareidolia” by Serene Blumenthal. The work represents the tendency of popular media to parrot “bad history” for dramatic effect — such as the falsehood that chastity belts were commonly used in medieval times. In another three-dimensional work, Blumenthal shapes a series of clay masks into different expressions. In her video “Trust Clinic,” these masks influence her choreography much in the way one’s personality can be consumed by a projected facade. Kio Griffith’s “Silence Moves Faster” installation takes up a whole room. Various materials and objects in this elaborate construction can be played with a violin bow or by hand to produce all manner of sounds. A text score is provided for those who can sight-read. For Griffith, even silent moments in this period have been ringing with tinnitus, and thus his installation explores the COVID time-space distortion, acoustics, and the distance between the object and the visitor. —Nicholas Liu

INDY BOOK CLUB SEPTEMBER SELECTION:

DOMINICANA BY ANGIE CRUZ Loosely based on her mother’s life story, Dominicana by Angie Cruz is an engrossing novel about immigration, motherhood, and finding independence. Our protagonist, Ana, is 15 years old when her mother makes a business deal that lands Ana married to Juan Ruiz, who is almost 20 years her senior. She leaves her home in the Dominican Republic to start a new life in New York City with papers that identify her as 19 years old. Once there, Ana knows no one and does not speak English, and Juan turns out to be a possessive, abusive, and disloyal husband. Although her marriage is a symbol of the hope that her family will soon be able to join her in N.Y.C. and escape the political turmoil at home, the life that Ana is now living is not what she had imagined it would be. But when Juan leaves New York for a trip back to the D.R., Ana begins finding herself again. Set against the backdrop of 1960s New York, an era which is depicted in great detail in the novel, Cruz writes a visceral story that is at once heartbreaking and full of hope. Dominicana is both universal and laser-focused on the Dominican immigrant experience. Join the Indy Book Club on Wednesday, October 6, 6 p.m., at Municipal Winemakers (22 Anacapa St.) as we discuss the themes and story behind Angie Cruz’s beautiful work of fiction as well as other books written by Latinx authors. Learn more at independent.com/indybookclub. —Caitlin Fitch

JACKSON BROWNE’S

WILD DREAMS

When Jackson Browne takes the stage at the Santa Barbara Bowl on Sunday, September 5, he’ll do so on the strength of his majestic back catalog, which contains some of the biggest hits in all of classic rock, and with a great batch of new songs as well. The 10 tracks on his 2021 release, Downhill From Everywhere, are as fresh and exciting as anything he’s recorded since the 1980s. This concert is special, not only for Browne, but also for the Santa Barbara Bowl, since it will be the first live music performance there since 2019. For Browne, the show represents a break from his demanding (and unusual-for-him) role as a supporting act; he’s been opening for James Taylor on one of the season’s biggest tours. Whether you’re going to the show or not, you should spend some time with Browne’s new album. Downhill from Everywhere reveals the ironical perspective of a man entering his eighth decade who still reveres the progressive political principles that have animated him since the 1960s, and who somehow remains committed to living his dreams, even when they take wild directions. Browne’s self-awareness comes with a touch of wry whimsy in the current single, “My Cleveland Heart.” In it, the singer hymns the advantages of mechanical tickers over the vulnerable fleshy organs ordinary humans are born with. In the song’s darkly hilarious video, Browne undergoes a heart transplant performed by his band, with good pal and sometime collaborator Phoebe Bridgers doing the honors of receiving his old-fashioned human heart when it’s removed. Most of us would shy away from dreaming of such a lurid scenario, never mind producing it as a music video, but this selfdeprecating brand of courage is a quality Jackson Browne has always had, and it will be on glorious display when he returns to the Santa Barbara Bowl stage on Sunday. See sbbowl.com. —Charles Donelan

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

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CHARLES DONELAN PHOTOS

REVIEW

PARTNERS EN POINTE: Members of Ballet22 perform Heartbeat, choreographed by Myles Thatcher.

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ot knowing what to expect from this performance was probably an understatement. While I was aware of the world-famous Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, an all-male company that’s been performing classical ballet in drag and en pointe since 1974, I had never seen them, and there was no way to know how much or how little Ballet22, which was founded in 2020, would share with a group from an entirely different generation. The good news is that no context, either from ballet or from the drag performance world, was necessary to enjoy these wonderfully charismatic and athletic dancers and their program. Keeping it light, AT CENTER STAGE and relatively short, meant that their THEATER, FRI., AUG. 27. Best of Ballet22 program was an ideal introduction to their approach. The first half featured three pieces from the classical ballet repertoire. Carlos Caballero Hopuy and Lucas Ataide came out first with the pas de deux from Giselle, Act II. It turns out that Hopuy is a veteran of the Trocks, and he established both the seriousness and the fun of the way this group dances en pointe immediately. He returned with Evan Ambrose and Roberto Vega Ortiz for an excerpt from Carmen in the next number. Part one of the program wrapped with Ataide joined by Brian Gephart and Daniel R. Durrett for a spirited adaptation of the Three Odalisques from Le Corsaire. After the intermission, things really got going when Ballet22 Carlos Hopuy lifted by Evan Ambrose switched over to contemporary material. The first two pieces, scored to Vivaldi and Bach respectively, showed how vivid and distinctive the group’s movement could be, and how powerful Brian Gephart is as a solo performer. The final work, Heartbeats, was set to original contemporary music and brought the whole ensemble onstage for sizzling choreography from Myles Thatcher. Thanks to Center Stage for booking this unusual company, and to Nikolay, the Moscow-based manufacturer of pointe shoes, for sponsoring the tour. —Charles Donelan


CONT’D CRAIG SCHWARTZ; COURTESY OF EBONY REPERTORY THEATRE

ARTS LIFE REVIEW

GOD BLESS THE CHILD: Karole Foreman sings Billie Holiday’s music with conviction and finesse.

E

LADY DAY AT EMERSON’S BAR AND GRILL

arthy, direct, and disdainful of conventional feminine roles from an early age, Billie Holiday’s reputation as an artist and an enduring icon of oppositional identity has only grown in the decades since her untimely passing in 1959 at the age of 44. In the outstanding production of Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill running now through September 5 as part of PCPA’s Solvang Festival Theater season, Karole Foreman commands the stage as Holiday, giving a sharply drawn, deeply felt performance that’s unforgettable in its immediacy. Lady Day at Emerson’s isn’t a musical; it’s a play with music, and it includes more than a dozen songs and an equal number of revealing Holiday monologues. It has been widely produced since PRESENTED BY PCPA. AT THE SOLVANG FESTIVAL it premiered in the midTHEATER, FRI., AUG. 20. ’80s, when playwright SHOWS THROUGH SEPT. 5. Lanie Robertson got the idea to present the singer’s life through the lens of one shambolic late-career performance. The location, Emerson’s Bar and Grill, is a small, run-down joint in Philadelphia, a city for which Holiday had a strong and understandable dislike. The time is 1959, just a few months before the singer’s death, and she’s in rough shape, both physically and emotionally. In between songs, Holiday banters with her pianist, Jimmy Powers (here played by the excellent Stephan Terry, who is also the show’s music director), and spills her guts to the audience. Apparently unable or unwilling to let go of a long list of grievances, Holiday rages and reminisces, expressing a wide range of mostly negative emotions, from anger at the undercover cops who hounded her out of being able to perform in New York City to disappointment with her mother, the “Duchess,” who struggled with her own demons and let Holiday down more than once. It’s well known that Holiday suffered mightily at the hands of law enforcement, and that her

own outsized appetites compounded the problem. Foreman’s thoughtful performance lifts the painful details of Holiday’s ongoing struggles out of the swamp of misery and voyeurism and distills them until they register as an index of the hurt felt by an entire generation of Black artists. Her singing captures Holiday’s virtuosity and hints at her idiosyncrasies without ever stooping to the level of impersonation or mimicry. Over the course of the show’s 90 uninterrupted minutes, Foreman adds layer after layer of behavioral nuance, resulting in an achingly powerful cumulative impact. No doubt this production owes its surefooted pacing and nimble transitions in part to the experienced direction of Wren T. Brown, who developed the project in Long Beach and at the Ebony Theatre in Los Angeles. What’s most memorable about this production, thanks to the beauty and honesty with which Foreman and Terry deliver the material, is the degree to which their reverence for the subject’s art resonates with the audience. In the context of Holiday’s chronic mental instability, her artistic achievement stands out all the more dramatically. When Foreman delivers the monologues that connect songs like “Strange Fruit” and “God Bless the Child” to their roots in Holiday’s personal experience, even those audience members who are hearing the music for the first time listen carefully and enter into communion with them. For example, knowing that Holiday wrote her finest and bleakest original song, “God Bless the Child,” about her difficult mother puts a keener edge on its already haunting ambivalence. It’s as though Holiday could, through the act of singing, inhabit a place apart from the pain of her self-destruction and the spectacle of her bad reputation. “I just want to sing,” she says more than once, and by the end of the show, one knows what that’s about. God bless the child that’s got his own. —Charles Donelan

Santa Barbara Festival Ballet’s 46th Annual

Saturday, Sept 11th and Oct 2nd

EMAIL: info@santabarbarafestivalballet.com for more information and an audition appointment.

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welcome

BIRTH BUDDIES!

SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

BORN ON THE SAME DAY - AUGUST 6, 2021

Marta and Cassius will always have a special birthday bond!

Baby Girls

Marta (Amur Leopard) BIRTHPLACE: Santa Barbara Zoo NAME:

SEX:

X

MALE

WEIGHT:

1 lbs, 1 oz

FEMALE

HEIGHT:

13”inches

NOTES:

- Has own unique spot pattern. - Eyes don’t fully open until approximately 7 days old. -Will keep warm by wrapping sel f in tail.

mes Westover NAME: Cassius Ja ttage Hospital BIRTHPLACE: Santa Barbara Co SEX: WEIGHT:

X

MALE

9 lbs, 8 oz

FEMALE HEIGHT:

21 inches

ints. - Has own unique fingerpr ero. - Eyes can fully open in ut ing - Will keep warm bykewetsar clothes and blan .

NOTES:

health e baby

Goleta Shalini Kannan, 6/20/2021 Dahlia Rose Moggia, 7/22/2021 Lea Victoria Kolbitsch, 8/2/2021 Lompoc Mayley Grace Carreno, 7/28/2021 Santa Barbara Isobel Charlotte Hope McNamara, 6/7/2021 Allison Mae Cogan, 7/5/2021 Isabel Grace Monroy, 7/11/2021 Lia Elizabeth Jazo, 7/12/2021 Lucy Marie Jazo, 7/12/2021 Romy Fernandez, 7/13/2021 Lillian Bell Godinez, 7/13/2021 Olive Annick Pabon, 7/13/2021 Everly Gama, 7/15/2021 Georgia Faye Dalbey, 7/20/2021 Andrea Yozuri Garrido, 7/29/2021 Alana Rose Ortiz Rios, 7/30/2021 Gianna Rosemary Montano, 8/2/2021

Baby Boys Buellton Peyton Scott Kerr, 7/24/2021 Angus Robert Cain, 8/2/2021 Goleta Connor Jayden Keeley, 7/28/2021 Lennox Carter Ruiz, 7/29/2021 Lompoc Noah Perez, 7/4/2021 Santa Barbara Milan De Los Rios, 6/23/2021 Dresden Michael Derrick, 7/4/2021 Leonardo Rey Martinez, 7/10/2021 Gael Perez, 7/10/2021 Patrick Joseph Costello, 7/11/2021 Arthur Lee Charles III, 7/16/2021 Sterling Alexander Gonzales, 7/16/2021 Remy Hermes Buenviaje, 7/25/2021 Bentley Ivan Daniel Raedel, 7/25/2021 Axel Santiago Mantilla, 7/28/2021 Amias Jayce Velasquez, 7/29/2021 Bowen Maxwell Lynn, 7/30/2021 Santa Ynez Fenley Kai Ford Lawrence, 7/21/2021

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 2

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19) Aries poet Anna Kamienska wrote, “I’ve learned to value failed conversations, missed connections, confusions. What remains is what’s unsaid, what’s underneath. Understanding on another level of being.” In the coming weeks, I suggest you adopt her perspective as you evaluate both past and present experiences. You’re likely to find small treasures in what you’d assumed were wastelands. You may uncover inspiring clues in plot twists that initially frustrated you. Upon further examination, interludes you dismissed as unimportant or uninteresting could reveal valuable wrinkles.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20) After studying your astrological omens, I’ve decided to offer you inspiration from the ancient Roman poet Catullus. I hope the extravagant spirit of his words will free you to be greedy for the delights of love and affection. Catullus wrote, “Give me a thousand kisses, then a hundred; then another thousand, then a second hundred; then yet another thousand.” I’ll add the following to Catullus’s appeal: Seek an abundance of endearing words, sweet favors and gifts, caresses and massages, help with your work, and fabulous orgasms. If there’s no one in your life to provide you with such blessings, give them to yourself.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20) Gemini author Elif Batuman writes that the Old Uzbek language was rich in expressions about crying. There were “words for wanting to cry and not being able to, for loudly crying like thunder in the clouds, for crying in gasps, for weeping inwardly or secretly, for crying ceaselessly in a high voice, for crying in hiccups, and for crying while uttering the sound ‘hay hay.’ ” I recommend all of these to you in the coming days, as well as others you might dream up. Why? It’s prime time to seek the invigorating release and renewal that come from shedding tears generated by deep and mysterious feelings.

CANCER

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Several states in the U.S. have statutes prohibiting blasphemy. Saying “God damn it” could theoretically get you fined in Massachusetts, South Carolina, and Wyoming. In the coming days, it’s best to proceed carefully in places like those, since you’ve been authorized by cosmic forces to curse more often and more forcefully than usual. Why? Because you need to summon vivid and intense protests in the face of influences that may be inhibiting and infringing on your soul’s style. You have a poetic license to rebel against conventions that oppress you. SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Everyone dreams at least three dreams per night. In a year, your subconscious mind generates over 1,100 dreams. About this remarkable fact, novelist Mila Kundera writes, “Dreaming is not merely an act of coded communication. It is also an aesthetic activity, a game that is a value in itself. To dream about things that have not happened is among humanity’s deepest needs.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because September is Honor Your Dreams Month. To celebrate, I suggest the following experiments. (1) Every night before sleep, write down a question you’d like your dreams to respond to. (2) Keep a notebook by your bed and transcribe at least one dream each time you sleep. (3) In the morning, have fun imagining what the previous night’s dreams might be trying to communicate to you. (4) Say prayers of gratitude to your dreams, thanking them for their provocative, entertaining stories.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21) In her autobiography Changing, Sagittarian actor Liv Ullmann expresses grief about how she and a loved one failed to communicate essential truths to each other. I propose we regard her as your anti-role model for the rest of 2021. Use her error as your inspiration. Make emotionally intelligent efforts to talk about unsaid things that linger like ghostly puzzles between you and those you care about.

(June 21-July 22) A blogger named MythWoven imagines an “alternate universe where I literally go to school forever (for free) so I can learn about art and literature and history and languages for 100 years. No job skills. No credit requirements. No student loans. Just learning.” I have longings like hers. There’s an eternal student within me that wants to be endlessly surprised with exciting information about interesting subjects. I would love to be continually adding fresh skills and aptitudes to my repertoire. In the coming weeks, I will give free rein to that part of me. I recommend you do the same, my fellow Cancerian.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) “I could do with a bit more excess,” writes author Joanne Harris. “From now on I’m going to be immoderate — and volatile,” she vows. “I shall enjoy loud music and lurid poetry. I shall be rampant.” Let me be clear, Capricorn: I’m not urging you to be immoderate, volatile, excessive, and rampant every day for the rest of your long life. But I think you will generate health benefits and good fortune if you experiment with that approach in the coming weeks. Can you think of relatively sane, sensible ways to give yourself this salubrious luxury?

LEO

AQUARIUS

(July 23-Aug. 22) In 2016, the International Garden Photograph of the Year depicted lush lupine flowers in New Zealand. The sea of tall purple, pink, and blue blooms was praised as “an elegant symphony” and “a joy to behold.” What the judges didn’t mention is that lupine is an invasive species in New Zealand. It forces native plant species out of their habitat, which in turn drives away native animal species, including birds like the wrybill, black stilt, and banded dotterel. Is there a metaphorically comparable phenomenon in your life, Leo? Problematic beauty? Some influence that’s both attractive and prickly? A wonderful thing that can also be troublesome? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to try to heal the predicament.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “I often wonder who I am and where is my country and where do I belong and why was I ever born at all,” wrote Virgo author Jean Rhys (1890-1979). I don’t think you will be agitated by those questions during the next eight weeks, Virgo. In fact, I suspect you will feel as secure in your identity as you have in a long time. You will enjoy prolonged clarity about your role in the world, the nature of your desires, and how you should plan your life for the next two years. If for some inexplicable reason you’re not already enjoying these developments, stop what you’re doing and meditate on the probability that I am telling you the bold truth.

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18) While wading through the internet’s wilder terrain, I found a provocative quote alleged to have been uttered by the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates. He supposedly said, “My ultimate goal is to look totally hot, but not be unapproachable.” I confess that in the past I have sometimes been fooled by fake quotes, and I suspect this is one. Still, it’s amusing to entertain the possibility that such an august personage as Socrates, a major influencer of Western culture, might say something so cute and colloquial. Even if he didn’t actually say it, I like the idea of blending ancient wisdom with modern insights, seriousness with silliness, thoughtful analysis with good fun. In accordance with astrological omens, I recommend you experiment with comparable hybrids in the coming weeks. (PS: One of your goals should be to look totally hot, but not be unapproachable.)

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PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20) “If you don’t know what you want,” writes Piscean novelist Chuck Palahniuk, “you end up with a lot you don’t.” Very true! And right now, it’s extra important to keep that in mind. During the coming weeks, you’ll be at the peak of your ability to attract what you want and need. Wouldn’t you prefer to gather influences you really desire — as opposed to those for which you have mild or zero interest? Define your wants and needs very precisely.

1st THURSDAY TONIGHT! SEPT 2, 5-8PM Join us for an evening of art and culture in Downtown SB. Music by Do No Harm and entertainment by Simon Kiefer (aka The Typewriter Guy). FREE! * Masks required * w w w.D owntownSB.org

HOMEWORK: What’s your greatest blessing? Newsletter@freewillastrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. INDEPENDENT.COM

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clerical support experience. Preferred candidates will have medical office experience as well as knowledge of medical terminology. Benefits include medical, dental, vision, life and disability insurance, as well as 403b retirement plan. Interested candidates can apply online at https://www.sansumclinic. org/employment to position #2995.

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Grant Support Specialist Part‑Time Temporary. Telecommute negotiable.(Approximately 400‑500 hours through 6.30.2022) For more information, go to https://www.sbccfoundation.org/ grant‑support‑specialist‑position/

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Patient Services Representative Sansum Clinic is the leader in healthcare in Santa Barbara, with 100 years of excellence. As one of the first points of contact for our patients you be expected to provide high quality customer service in terms of appearance, demeanor and interactions with patients and their families. This candidate will work directly with patients, members of our healthcare team and physicians. Duties will also include data entry, scheduling, providing instructions/directions and completing necessary paperwork. Qualified candidates will have a 1 year of customer service and

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL AND OPERATIONS COORDINATOR

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for all academic personnel matters including departmental administration of all faculty recruitments and merit and promotion cases. Serves as a department resource for and advises the Department Chair, Business Officer, and all

faculty on academic personnel policies including procedures covering academic recruitment, appointment, and advancement; compensation and salary administration; labor contracts; faculty welfare programs; visa procurement; benefits; payroll; training and development; faculty misconduct; and faculty equity. Coordinates the academic search process, including placement of ads, drafting of search plans, and conducting the initial screening of materials submitted. Tracks and analyzes senate and non‑senate faculty teaching assignments, sabbatical leave, and other leave requests. Responsible for processing employment transactions for ladder faculty and temporary instructors using UCPath. Reqs: Experience and/ or the ability to quickly become proficient in the following areas; academic personnel merit & promotion, recruitment, budgetary responsibility and management. Demonstrated proficiency with Word, Excel, UCPath, AP Folio and UCRecruit. Good judgment, tact, and diplomacy. Able to effectively work with a diverse community of faculty and staff. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $61,200‑$70,380/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/7/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22979

ASSISTANT TO THE DEANS

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Coordinates Deans’ appointments and workflow. Maintains and prioritizes multiple, complex calendars and makes arrangements that require coordination of multiple schedules and facilities. Arranges travel and entertainment schedules. Oversees timely receipt and distribution of correspondence, reports, and responses to inquiries for the Deans. Compiles information, analyzes and organizes data, updates databases, prepares reports, and drafts correspondence. Assists with visitors regarding Bren School space, computing, internal communications and other resources. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and work experience in a higher education setting. Experience as an assistant to high level executives or academics. Excellent computer skills, including experience with databases, spreadsheets, word processing. Demonstrated ability to independently prioritize, edit and proofread materials, organize and multi‑task with frequent interruptions and meet critical deadlines with a high degree of professionalism. Possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills, assertiveness and diplomacy, and critical attention to detail with a high degree of accuracy. Excellent verbal and outstanding written communications skills with the ability to write and edit memos and letters. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $24.61‑$25.77/hr. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/8/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job# 22982

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, ACADEMIC PERSONNEL

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL Provides leadership and management over comprehensive academic personnel services, including academic recruitment and compensation, training, and academic personnel policies. Assists the Director with the strategic planning, development, assessment, implementation, and management of an innovative, comprehensive, and successful campus academic personnel program that provides a broad range of services, education, and expertise to a diverse community of administrators, staff, faculty, and other academic employees.

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Maintains a broad and functional understanding of academic personnel policies and procedures to provide oversight and training for the campus. The position requires a high level of initiative, problem‑solving ability, independence, and judgment, a strong professional orientation, effective verbal and written skills, and the capacity to organize and handle a wide range of responsibilities accurately and consistently. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Thorough knowledge of complex personnel, compensation, and related policies and procedures, and employment law related to academic client groups. Strong understanding of the organizational structure and responsibilities of the academic personnel function. Ability to develop creative solutions which may have no precedent. In‑depth knowledge of organizational and university policies and operational procedures. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $71,600‑$100,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/12/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23130

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS GARDEN COORDINATOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Provide agricultural expertise to students within Associated Students (AS) in the maintenance of the garden projects. Addresses areas of food safety procedures including providing support in creating outreach programs regarding social, economic, and environmental aspects of food systems. May work with staff colleagues in Business Enterprises (Services) areas including AS FoodBank, AS Bike Shop, AS Publications. Will develop and/or deepen partnerships with staff and faculty in related areas. Primarily supports the Edible Campus Program Student Farm and greenhouse, and serves as an additional resource to campus‑wide sustainability efforts/ programs. Reqs: Experience managing or working on a farm, including crop planning and production, pest management, harvesting, garden beds and compost stalls. Experience in facilitating experiential learning in sustainable agriculture and food systems, teaching and mentoring students, and supporting student agency, initiative, and empowerment. Knowledge and experience developing and maintaining a safe farm working environment, including an understanding of food safety rules.Experience facilitating a team approach with student leadership, decision‑making, and management, particularly with individuals from diverse backgrounds. Knowledge of the principles of soil biology, crop production, soil testing, seed saving, compost and vermicompost, and/or other ecological/organic growing methods. Demonstrated

strong communication skills. Strong organizational and time management skills to establish goals and priorities and meet critical deadlines. Strong computer skills. Ability to work outside in all weather conditions. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act and Satisfactory criminal history background check. Monday‑Friday 8‑5, with some evenings and weekends as needed. $23.66‑ $26.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 22361

BIKE SHOP LEAD MECHANIC

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Responsible for organizing the day‑to‑day technical and repair aspects with the student mechanics of the A.S. Bike Shop. The Lead Mechanic implements the training for student employees, outlined in the AS Bike Shop training manual, to student employees for the repair and maintenance of a wide range of bicycle types and other rolling stock. Responsible for ensuring staff’s adherence to safety standards in all repair procedures. Will endeavor to maintain the A.S. Bike Shop in accordance with its mission statement to provide high‑quality bicycle repair and safety education to the students, faculty, and staff of UCSB. Reqs: broad knowledge and technical aptitude related to bicycle maintenance and mechanic functionality. Must be able to communicate about processes clearly and effectively to customers and staff in a fast‑paced work environment. Ability to complete mechanical tasks left uncompleted by Student Mechanics. Knowledge of inventory control, systems and storage related to merchandise stocked within the Bicycle Shop. Understanding or experience with community based bicycle spaces. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act and Satisfactory criminal history background check. $20.66‑$22.50/ hr. Full Benefits. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job#17781

CALFRESH PROGRAM & BASIC NEEDS COMMUNICATION COORDINATOR

GEOGRAPHY This role will act as the main point of contact for internal and

external partners and advise faculty and campus administration on a variety of student issues related to CalFresh and basic needs services. Collaborates with partners to identify ways to continue to improve and grow the program and provides recommendations to the UCSB Food Security and Basic Needs Taskforce on changes to policies, practices, and procedures related to CalFresh and basic needs and maintains a strong active working relationship with the Santa Barbara County Department of Social Services and stays abreast of all state and local policies and protocols related to CalFresh. Reqs: 2 years professional experience in social work, crisis support, and/ or food security. Knowledgeable about CalFresh. The coordinator must recognize and be proficient in understanding and accommodating the intersectional and layered needs of a diverse client base. Must have good self‑care practices in place to work through the emotional burden of handling crisis cases regularly. Be comfortable speaking with students experiencing crises, be empathetic, and be a good listener. Proficient in Microsoft office suite and google drive. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $59,000‑$66,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/12/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22762

COMMUNITY SERVICE OFFICER COORDINATOR

POLICE Manages, supervises, and implements the Police Department Community Service Organization. Is a senior member of the police department’s supervisory staff and participates on campus‑wide and inter‑agency public safety committees representing campus and community safety, security, and risk management issues and planning. Serves on campus‑wide committees as Chief of Police designee. Develops and maintains specialized programs and works with specialized campus committees to increase awareness of and promote safety for students, faculty, staff, and visitors in the campus and Isla Vista communities. Recognized by campus safety committees and departments as having specialized experience, advanced training, and leadership expertise in managing campus special events, incidents, and overall daily campus operational security. Plans, proposes and co‑manages campus event security, campus residential housing security, bike programs, campus fire watch, fiscal management, program development and community liaison. Consults on student, faculty and staff safety and security issues

Continued on p. 40


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Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Sunrise 6:35 Sunset 7:17

High

Thu 2

2:06 am 0.5

9:09 am 3.7

1:15 pm 3.0

7:21 pm 5.4

Fri 3

2:38 am 0.2

9:28 am 3.9

1:53 pm 2.7

8:02 pm 5.7

Sat 4

3:08 am -0.0

9:48 am 4.1

2:29 pm 2.4

8:40 pm 5.9

Sun 5

3:37 am -0.2

10:10 am 4.2

3:06 pm 2.1

9:17 pm 6.0

Mon 6

4:06 am -0.2

10:34 am 4.5

3:45 pm 1.8

9:56 pm 6.0

Tue 7

4:36 am -0.1

10:59 am 4.7

4:28 pm 1.5

10:37 pm 5.8

Wed 8

5:07 am 0.2

11:27 am 5.0

5:15 pm 1.2

11:22 pm 5.4

Thu 9

5:38 am 0.6

11:58 am 5.2

6:06 pm 1.0

6D

13 H

20 D

28 source: tides.net

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INDY TODAY! Independent.com/newsletters 61 It gets spilled, so to speak 62 Singer Rita 63 Colorful final track in most 1 “25” singer Mario Kart games 6 “No thanks” 68 Make a dent in 11 “Awesome!” (and the letters seen on the outside 69 Kemper who plays Kimmy Schmidt of each theme answer) 14 Cartoon cat with a “bag of 70 Avoid skillfully 71 Button on some flip phones tricks” 72 “Black Velvet” singer 15 “Same here” Alannah ___ 16 Fight of the Century 73 Suffix with poly participant 17 They’re coming to save the day 1 2nd-largest continent, for 19 Downside short 20 Announcer Hall 2 River in Scotland that 21 Hardly sympathetic sounds like a letter 23 Noble partner? 3 See 57-Down 26 “A ... crawly thing!” 4 Franchise operator 27 Fivesome on a clock face 5 Gives off 28 Gathered 6 Proofs of age 30 “Semper Paratus” org. 7 Raise, as curiosity 32 Cereal box activity, maybe 8 Carry ___ 33 Easy two-pointers 9 Compare 36 Tire filler 10 Vending machine drink 39 “Carmen” composer 11 Leaving competitors in the 41 “La ___” (Debussy opus) dust 42 “Gandhi” character 12 Privately 44 “Angry Anymore” singer 13 Fender flaws DiFranco 18 Automotive disaster of the 45 “The Wizard of Oz” setting 1950s 48 Illuminating gas 22 Sinbad’s giant egg-layer 49 Financial subj. 23 “La ___” (Ritchie Valens hit) 51 ___ souchong tea 24 At full speed, on the sea 53 Get hold of 25 What “Dolittle” won in the 55 Come up short category of Worst Prequel, 58 “Sir, this is a ___” (fast Remake, Rip-off or Sequel, food-based meme in 2021 response) 29 2017 Kendrick Lamar album 59 Rookie

Across

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SEPTEMBER2, 2,2021 2021 THE THEINDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER

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in building and construction, with a particular emphasis on women’s, student, and event safety issues. Responsible for accounts receivable, billing and recharges, payroll reconciliation and is the Kronos timekeeper for all CSO students. Handles daily personnel issues, including hiring, separation and oversight/supervision. Provides a variety of professional and administrative duties to support the CSO operations. Reqs: Demonstrated ability to identify research, analyze, interpret, and conduct complete analyses of complex laws, statutes, policies, and data. Ability to plan, organize, and deliver workshops/training courses and training materials appropriate to the program. Demonstrated ability to develop, design, and implement operational and administrative policies and practices. Ability to work with sensitive information and preserve confidentiality, meet deadlines, maintain objectivity, and prioritize workload in an organized manner. Demonstrated critical, innovative, and strategic thinking skills and judgment to make sound decisions in uncertain or ambiguous situations; ability to approach challenges with a clear perception of organizational and political impacts. Experience managing or supervising UC students or Bachelor’s Degree in related fields and at least three to five years relevant experience OR Master’s Degree/J.D. and at least one to two years relevant experience is preferable. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting req of Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Form 700 Statement of Economic Interests Filer. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $55,600‑$111,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 22543

(CONT.)

to due process procedures. Outstanding interpersonal skills in working with college students; paraprofessional counseling skills required. Strong analytical and computer skills for the collecting, coding, and recording of disciplinary files. Outstanding administrative and organizational skills. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Mandated reporting req of Dependent Adult Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $60,125 ‑ $69,750/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/5/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 22885

CUSTODIAN SR

UNIVERSITY CENTER Responsible for all aspects of custodial work such as cleaning floors, walls, windows, furniture, restrooms, stairs, ceilings, garbage cans, entryways, and walkways; emptying garbage cans, changing lights, moving equipment, and supplies and arranging furniture. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. May work flexible hours/schedule as necessary, including nights and weekends. $20.14‑$21.38/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22633

an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/12/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23170

INTAKE ADVISOR/ ADMIN ASSISTANT FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATOR

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for processing all types of reimbursements including supplies, entertainment, memberships, and travel. In addition, the Financial Administrator serves as department buyer for Gateway purchases and is responsible for the purchasing of supplies and equipment on departmental and extramural funding. Receives all merchandise. Contacts the end‑user to pick up items, and prepares invoices for payment. Reqs: Ability to organize, coordinate and prioritize workload and work independently under the pressure of deadlines. Ability to interpret and comply with complex policies and procedures. Must be detail‑oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Must possess strong problem‑solving skills. Ability to work collaboratively with a diverse pool of faculty, students, and staff and provide excellent customer service. Demonstrated experience multi‑tasking with frequent interruptions. Excellent time management skills. Demonstrated experience with accounting, purchasing, and office management procedures. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $24.61‑$25.16/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 22778

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RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING Charged with the responsibility of articulating and educating the Housing and Residential Communities on resident policies, procedures and community standards. Develops and implements programs for Lead staff, resident assistants and student‑residents on Residence Hall/Apartment Living community standards. Assists in the investigation, adjudication and general resolution of cases referred to Resident Student Conduct (Housing) and the Office of Judicial Affairs. Maintains and updates the curriculum for HDAE Personal Responsibility and Fire Safety courses. Leads/co‑leads the facilitation of these courses throughout the academic year. Serves as an institutional contact and referral point for students, parents and clients who have questions and concerns regarding the judicial process. Co‑advises and trains the Peer Review Board. Responsible for maintaining the conduct case management database/system (Advocate). Responsible for the coordination of conduct hearings and restorative justice circles. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Experience working in a confidential environment. Experience adjudicating a student’s caseload with strict adherence

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UCSB PROFESSIONAL AND CONTINUING EDUCATION PaCE The Customer Service Specialist provides strong customer support services to PaCE students, PaCE instructors and members of the public. Follows established procedures for student enrollment and maintenance of students’ academic records. Processes fee payments and refunds, issues transcripts and certificates. In addition, the person in this position works with international students and assists with publicity and the promotion of PaCE programs and special events. Working with the other team members, maintains an audit compliant office, trains new staff and up‑to‑date files of students, student services policies, and office practices. Assist with the implementation of CRM platform and customer outreach campaigns in coordination with program marketing efforts. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or an equivalent combination of education and experience. One or more years of experience in customer support and outreach. Experience with MS Office Suite, Google Suite or equivalent. Demonstrated excellent interpersonal and writing skills for collegial and professional exchanges with diverse audiences including. Students, parents of students, faculty, and staff. Service orientation, active listening, and critical thinking. $24.61‑$29.58/ hr. The University of California is

to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/8/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 23074

HVAC MECHANIC

DFSS FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Working on a zone maintenance team composed of all trades, the incumbent performs HVAC maintenance work. Installs, repairs, maintains and inspects heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and pneumatic systems and equipment. Installs, repairs and maintains pumps, air compressors, steam, and hot water boilers, heating and boiler tubes, heat exchangers, fans, dampers, hydraulic units, control, and monitoring systems. Makes working drawings and control diagrams for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment. Work with others as part of a team. Provide direct customer service to the campus community. Reqs: four years journeyman experience as a trades craftsman in the area of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. EPA Technicians certification required. Experience with large commercial boilers, chillers, cooling towers and fans. Experience with diesel engines and compressors preferred. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $37.56/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard

OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS Generates initial I‑20’s in the International Student & Scholar Management system, providing general immigration advice, explaining UCSB policies, answering phones, scheduling appointments and responding to inquiries. Processes basic updates to international student records and providing updated I‑20 documents to students. Manages a large system of confidential immigration files. Prepares a variety of official letters and documents. Triages documents are submitted to the front desk and processes documents relating to travel or updates to certificate of eligibility. Determines urgency of student inquires and directs the student to appropriate advisor. Supports the Employment Based Visa team with file maintenance, posting notices and distribution of immigration paperwork to departments and scholars. Reqs: Experience working in a fast‑paced office environment, possess strong communication, organizational and record‑keeping skills and have the ability to learn a large volume of information quickly and communicate information to our clientele. Time‑management and multitasking skills. Experience with PC or Mac computer and database programs. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check. Must be a citizen or permanent resident of the U.S. in order to be authorized to use the Department of Homeland Security SEVIS database. May be called upon to work occasional nights and weekends. $24.61/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 22806

KCSB RADIO ENGINEER

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Bears the legal responsibility of Chief Operator to ensure that KCSB broadcasts within the technical limits imposed by the FCC. Maintains, repairs, installs, documents and inventories the entire system of complex hardware/ software and electronic equipment necessary for the proper operation of a radio station including the tower at the Broadcast Peak transmitter site. Responsible for developing, maintaining, repairing, installing, and documenting radio station office computer networks. Reqs: Advanced knowledge of Radio communications and network systems in operation, maintenance and repair of radio equipment. The ability to install, operate, and repair various standard test equipment and a wide range of audio control equipment is required. Must be familiar with FCC rules and broadcast standards and monitoring and measuring station audio signals for both FCC technical requirements and the highest possible audio


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EMPLOYMENT quality. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $67,500‑ $84,275/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb. edu Job # 22363

LEAD PARKING MAINTENANCE WORKER

TRANSPORTATION & PARKING SERVICES Leads the daily operations of the HDAE‑Grounds Parking Maintenance Team. Establishes and maintains maintenance schedules for all campus parking lots, parking structures, bike paths, bike parking areas and campus roads. Coordinates maintenance needs with supervisor and staff, and is responsible for being aware of all daily campus activities that affect parking maintenance. Trains new staff in all aspects of maintenance procedures. Implements a variety of maintenance projects and organizes responses to daily maintenance requests. Assigns work tasks to Building Maintenance Worker, Groundskeepers and an Equipment Operator, as required to keep all assigned areas clean and safe. Oversees daily maintenance of department‑owned street sweeper, and schedules and assists operators with periodic brush changes and routine maintenance. Oversees the maintenance of all hand and power tools used by team members. Ensures safe work practices by all team members and enforces compliance with campus and HDAE‑Grounds safety rules. Ensures that scheduled work does not impede safe flow of traffic on campus, and that all work areas are signed and delineated in compliance with the Work Area Traffic Control Handbook (W.A.T.C.H. manual). Reqs: At least 3 years experience in parking lot traffic control, demarcation, and painting using airless paint equipment, laying out & installing painted two‑color stenciled signage on asphalt and concrete, installing & repairing aluminum signage, laying out & installing parking space demarcation and emergency access demarcation. At least 2 years experience in landscape maintenance and installation, and building maintenance including painting, & minor mechanical repairs. Ability to read, write, and perform basic arithmetic calculations. Demonstrated experience in handling and distributing work orders. Notes: Satisfactory criminal history background check Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. $23.95‑$26.96/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22817

NURSE PRACTITIONER

STUDENT HEALTH Responsible for gathering data, making hypotheses, identifying problems, implementing management plans, and evaluating results of interventions both independently and collaboratively. The APP integrates health maintenance, disease prevention, physical diagnosis and treatment of common episodic and chronic problems in primary care

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with equal emphasis on health teaching and disease management. Reqs: BRN and current RN and Nurse Practitioner license, CA Furnishing license (DEA registration schedules 2‑5). Notes: Credentials verification for clinical practitioners. Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent Adult Abuse. Satisfactory criminal history background check. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. This is an 11 month, per‑year position with 4 weeks of furlough that must be taken during quarter breaks or during the summer. Salary commensurate with experience and licensure. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 8/17/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job # 21938

OFFICE MANAGER

UCSB CAMPUS STORE Provides direct staff assistance to the Director, Associate Director and Assistant Director as well as administrative support to a $10M retail Auxiliary department. The Campus Store has a staff of 18 FTE and 70‑80 part time student employees. The position also acts as the gatekeeper of the Campus Store Administration office with direct responsibility for Employment and Personnel, Payroll, Office Management and Staffing and Training, and Administrative Support to the Campus Store Director. Reqs: Ability to use sound judgment in responding to issues and concerns. Solid communication and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively with all levels of staff verbally and in writing. Solid organizational skills and ability to multi‑task in a high‑volume environment with demanding timeframes. Ability to function effectively as a member of a team. Ability to adapt to changing priorities. Ability to use discretion and maintain confidentiality. Notes: must be able to work some evenings and weekends and be a keyholder for opening and closing shifts. Satisfactory criminal history background check. $24.61‑ $28.90/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22611

ONDAS STUDENT CENTER PROGRAM ASSISTANT

LETTERS AND SCIENCE ACADEMIC ADVISING Assists in the administration of the ONDAS Student Center. The Program Assistant supports the daily operations and administrative tasks of the ONDAS Student Center. This position provides daily support to students, center staff, and physical space along with assisting with essential programming and overseeing Center marketing. Assists in the hiring and training of student staff positions. Reqs: Strong

verbal and written communication skills. Attention to detail. Ability to manage workload, prioritize tasks and work on multiple projects under the pressure of tight timelines. Knowledge of Google Suite: Email, Drive and Calendar. Able to work independently and as a member of a team. Strong interpersonal skills. Ability to respond and have frequent communication, in person and virtually, with Center stakeholders: students, parents, administrators, prospective students, and family, etc. $24.61‑$25.16/hr. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/7/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22995

PAYROLL/PERSON­ NEL/TRAVEL COORDINATOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Supports the department with administration, personnel/payroll support, and financial and travel processing in compliance with UC policies and procedures. Provides expertise and guidance in the full range of staff and academic personnel policies and procedures. Provides authoritative advice on graduate division policies and bargaining unit agreements. Manages sensitive and confidential information and interacts with a broad range of personnel and visitors. Posts monthly payroll expenses, creates tracking reports, and produces bi‑weekly and monthly payroll reports. Serves as a Timekeeper for the Kronos timekeeping system. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and work experience in a higher education setting. Proficient in personnel payroll and timekeeping systems. Excellent computer skills, including experience with databases, spreadsheets, word processing. Demonstrated ability to independently prioritize, edit and proofread materials, organize and multi‑task with frequent interruptions and meet critical deadlines with a high degree of professionalism. Possess excellent communication and interpersonal skills, assertiveness and diplomacy, and critical attention to detail with a high degree of accuracy. Excellent verbal and outstanding written communications skills with the ability to write and edit memos and letters. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. $24.61‑$26.32/hr. Salary commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/8/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job# 22981

PLUMBER

MAIN ‑ RESH LODGING MAINTENANCE Performs a variety of skilled tasks in connection with the installation, maintenance, and repair of plumbing systems and related equipment for the University owned Residence Halls, apartments, dining commons and related buildings to accomplish the

operational needs of the department. In compliance with Housing, Dining, & Auxiliary Enterprises goals and objectives, affirms, and implements the department Educational Equity Plan comprised of short and long‑term objectives that reflect a systematic approach to preparing both students and staff for success in a multicultural society. Works in an environment, which is ethnically diverse and culturally pluralistic. Works effectively in a team environment. Reqs: Journey‑level plumber as evidenced by completion of an accredited apprenticeship program, or equivalent documented training and work experience, with a minimum of 5 years performing journey‑level plumbing tasks.Work experience demonstrating the ability to design, troubleshoot, install, repair, and maintain plumbing fixtures of all types including plumbing associated with commercial food cooking equipment, steam boilers, and HVAC systems. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $37.56/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/8/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 23137

SR CUSTODIAN

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS ‑ HOUSEKEEPING Responsible for completing job duties that demonstrate support for the Operations Team. Initiates communication directly with co‑workers and or supervisor to improve and clarify the working relationship, identifying problems and concerns, and seeking a resolution to work‑related conflicts. Completes custodial tasks within an assigned area such as, but is not limited to: cleans and sanitizes restrooms, hallways, stairways, lounges, public areas, office spaces, and building entrances. Replenish restroom supplies. Disposes of trash may be required to drive a motorized vehicle with a trailer to move trash. Utilizes cleaning equipment to perform cleaning duties such as squirt bottles, dusters, mops, vacuums, broom, power floor buffers, mop buck/ringer, hot water carpet extractor, steam cleaner, wet/ dry vacuum, doodlebugs, powered wall cleaning machine. Reqs: working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors, and related custodial equipment desirable. Will train on all equipment and chemicals used. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multicultural work environment. Notes: satisfactory criminal history background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. May be required to work schedules other than the assigned schedule to meet the operational needs of the unit.$21.38/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/7/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #22863

ADMINISTER OF ESTATE

TRANSFER STUDENT CENTER PROGRAMS ASSISTANT

LETTERS AND SCIENCE ACADEMIC ADVISING Assists in the coordination of Transfer Student Center programs, workshops, and activities, including the development of new projects and programs. Corresponds with campus partners (ie: EOP, EP, CLAS, Summer Sessions) and students who utilize Center services; assists in managing student questions and concerns; and contributes to the welcoming and supportive culture of the Center. Reqs: Strong verbal and written communication skills. Attention to detail. Ability to manage workload, prioritize tasks and work on multiple projects under the pressure of tight timelines. Able to work independently and as a member of a team. Knowledge of google suite: email, calendar, forms and sheets. Ability to work with frequent interruptions. Ability to respond and have frequent communication, in person and virtually, with Center stakeholders: Students, parents, administrators, prospective students etc. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Pay Rate/Range: $24.61‑ $25.16/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 9/7/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 22973

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: GUILLERMO FELIX GIACHETTI NO: 21PR00349 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of GUILLERMO FELIX GIACHETTI A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: CLAUDIA R. BENVENUTO in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): CLAUDIA R. BENVENUTO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 9/16/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance

may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Brian L. Fox, 290 Maple Court, Suite 126 Ventura, CA 93003; (805) 964‑1170. Published Aug 19, 26. Sep 2 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CLOUDTRADERS at 1563 Sycamore Canyon Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; William P Cottingham (same address) This business is conducted by A Individual Signed: William P Cottingham County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002155. Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, September 14, 2021 at 3:00 P.M. ATTENTION: The Governor’s Executive Orders N-29-20 and N-08-21 suspend certain requirements of the Brown Act and authorizes local legislative bodies to hold public meetings via teleconferencing. The regular meeting of the Design Review Board for September 14, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. Design Review Board Members will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review Google Site Improvements 301 Mentor Drive (APN 071-140-079) Case No. 21-0017-DRB Building 5 & 12 and Site Improvements 5385 Hollister Avenue (APN 071-140-075) Case No. 21-0018-DRB IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice are new items. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, September 2, 2021

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(s) is/are doing business as: DUTCH GARDEN RESTAURANT at 4203 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Dutch Garden LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Matthew English, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 24, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002450. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: REED, ANDERSON, & OLIVER at 980 Village Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Charles J Rao Jr (same address), Susannah J Rao (same address) This business is conducted by A Married Couple Signed: Charles J Rao Jr County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland,

County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002257. Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAMMERHEAD CONSTRUCTION at 6070 Ashley Place Goleta, CA 93117; Brandon A Montano (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Brandon Montano County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002241. Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LUCKY PUPPY OPTICAL at 1114 State St, Ste 25 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; David Zucker, O.D., A Professional Optometric Corporation 1114 State St Ste 7 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by A Corporation Signed:

David Zucker, President County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002264. Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: WRIGHT DENTAL CO. DENTAL OFFICE OF DR. HOUSTON WRIGHT at 33 West Mission Street, Suite 102 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Wright Dental Corporation 5632 Cielo Ave Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by A Corporation Signed: Houston Wright County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002218. Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. FICTITIOUS

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STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: MISSION LAUNDRY at 1911 De La Vina Street Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Hudson Lane Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by A Corporation Signed: Houston Wright County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on July 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E29. FBN Number: 2021‑0002039. Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NOSTALGIC METAL at 835 W Valerio St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Karin Beal (same address) This business is conducted by A Individual Signed: Karin Beal County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002245.

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING (Electronically and Telephonically) September 13, 2021 at 6:00 P.M. General Plan and Zoning Amendments to Allow Entertainment and Recreation Services in the General Commercial Land Use Designation and Zoning District Case Nos. 21-0001-GPA, 21-0003-ORD ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 and Executive Order N-08-21 dated June 11, 2021 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings electronically and telephonically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the Planning Commission on September 13, 2021 will be conducted electronically and telephonically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. The Planning Commission will be participating electronically and telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing to consider a resolution recommending to the City Council adoption of General Plan and Title 17 (Zoning) of the Goleta Municipal Code (GMC) Amendments (Case Nos. 21-0001-GPA, 21-0003-ORD). Any recommendations from the Planning Commission will be provided to City Council. City Council will consider the recommendation at a later hearing to adopt any amendments to the General Plan and Title 17 of the GMC. The date, time, and location of the Planning Commission public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE/TIME:

Monday, September 13, 2021 at 6:00 P.M.

PLACE: Teleconference Meeting; Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) PROJECT LOCATION: The amended regulations would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The proposed amendment to the General Plan would allow Entertainment and Recreation Services in the General Commercial (C-G) land use designation within Table 2-2 of the Land Use Element. The associated proposed Title 17 amendment would allow Indoor Sports and Recreation in the C-G zoning district, in Table 17.08.020 of the GMC. Environmental Review: An Addendum to the General Plan Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) was chosen for the amendments in accordance with California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and CEQA Guidelines. According to CEQA Guidelines Section 15164(a), an addendum to a previously certified FEIR is the appropriate environmental document in instances when “some changes or additions are necessary but none of the conditions described in [CEQA Guidelines] Section 15162 calling for the preparation of a subsequent EIR have occurred.” Because the impacts associated with the proposed amendments do not exceed those impacts identified in the General Plan FEIR, a subsequent EIR pursuant to Section 15162 is not required. Therefore, this Addendum is the appropriate environmental document under CEQA. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/comments should be addressed to City Clerk cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by City Clerk on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted via email to Deborah Lopez, City Clerk e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendasand-videos. FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Andy Newkirk, Senior Planner, at 805-961-7544 or anewkirk@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Sandra Rodriguez, Management Assistant, at 805-961-7576 or srodriguez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org.

Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BIOMED LIFE LLC at 211 E Anapamu St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Biomed Life LLC (same address) This business is conducted by A Limited Liability Company Signed: Leslie Valle‑Montoya, Medical Doctor County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002320. Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE HR MENTOR at 605 W Canon Perdido St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ashley R Jones (same address) This business is conducted by A Individual Signed: Ashley Jones County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002289. Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND FISHING at 5527 Pembroke Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Robert G Cathcart (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Robert Cathcart, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002265. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOUISE K. MIZOTA & ASSOCIATES at 136 East Carrillo Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Louise K Mizota (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Louise K. Mizota, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002122. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ARBORGRAPH, ARBORGRAPH VINEYARD at 1051 Croft Lane Solvang, CA 93463; J & K Vineyard, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Kristen Carlson, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002336. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: J+K VINEYARD at 1051 Croft Lane Solvang, CA 93463; J & K Vineyard, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Kristen Carlson, CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002335. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021.

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOU ANN SMITH ART at 468 Camino Laguna Vista Goleta, CA 93117; Lourdes A Smith (same address) This business is conducted by A Individual Signed: Lourdes Ann Smith County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002317. Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021.

Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent, September 2, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s)

SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing. Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 69009[b][2]).

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THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 2, 2, 2021 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

is/are doing business as: PALISADES PRODUCTIONS LLC at 220 Palisades Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Palisades Productions LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Emily Caitlin Rosen Hay, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002353. Published: Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHAPALA UNIT F CO‑OWNERS at 1933 Cliff Drive Ste 26 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Carlo Sarmiento (same address) This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Carlo Sarmiento, General Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002319. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACHIEVING AWESOME at 5403 Tree Farm Lane, Unit 103 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hannah M Kafer Jenner (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Hannah Kafer Jenner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002403. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SALAMANDER FABRICATION at 7500 San Julian Rd Lompoc, CA 93436; Isaac W Baer (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Isaac Baer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002227. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SYV SANDBLASTING at 1684 Laurel Ave Solvang, CA 93463; Kevin S Serritslev (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kevin Serritslev, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002392. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE LIFE YOU WRITE at 79 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103;Taylor L Ross (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Taylor Ross, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E28. FBN Number: 2021‑0002401. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISA BIRD, ISA BIRD DESIGN, ISA EATON DESIGN, ISA HENDRY EATON DESIGN, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE DESIGN, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE, ISA BIRD LANDSCAPE DESIGN AND STYLING at 960 Andante Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Isa Bird, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Isa Eaton, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002356. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: VIDA CONSULTING SERVICES at 506 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Maria (Mari) G Hernandez (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Maria (Mari) Hernandez, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0002389. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 805 UNIVERSITY, 805 U, 805U, 805U BRANDS, 805U CLOTHING COMPANY, 805U CLOTHING CO., 805U SCREEN PRINTING & EMBROIDERY, 805U LOGISTICS CO., 805U DISTRIBUTION & MANUFACTURING, 805U LICENSING, 805U SOCIAL MEDIA CO., 805U SALES & MARKETING, 805U MANAGEMENT at 920 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 805 University Enterprises LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Steven Fuentes, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002376. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SUREGE ELECTRIC & UDERGROUND UTILITY LOCATING, SUREGE ELECTRIC at 2890 Foxen Canyon Rd. Los Olivos, CA 93441; Sergio Medina (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Sergio Medina, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0002311. Published: Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LOUISES KITCHEN TABLE, LLC, MOMMY MEALS, CULINARY CREATIONS at 1210 Mission Drive, Suite 110 Solvang, CA 93463; Louise’s Kitchen Table 1678 B Eucalyptus Drive Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Victoria Louise Smith, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002337. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIANESMITHCOUNSELING at 428 Los Verdes Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Diane C Smith (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Diane C. Smith, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002355. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAWKHOUSE FALCONRY at 5511 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hannah J Atkinson (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Hannah Atkinson Filed with the County


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

(CONT.)

Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002230. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MUJERES MAKERS MARKET, LLC at 1217 Laguna St Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mujeres Makers Market, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Leah Ortega, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002472. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THINGSTODOINSANTABARBARA. COM at 4067 State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Andrea M Plackett 141 Valdivia Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Justin S. Plackett (same address) This business is conducted by an Married Couple Signed: Andrea M. Plackett, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 11, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002330. Published: Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PYRAMID MTM at 208 N. Nopal Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Pyramid Tile Company (same address) This business is conducted by A Corporation Signed: Cary Hitsman, Sec/Treas County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 03, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0002247. Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF BIANEY PACHECO TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02113 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: EVELYN LORRAINE GARCIA TO: EVELYN LORRAINE PACHECO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 05, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 6, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 12, 19, 26.

Sep 2 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ANDUIN ROSE BRIDGES and DANIEL CHARLES BRIDGES TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV03173 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CALEB ASH BRIDGES TO: EVAN OCEAN BRIDGES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 05, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 13, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF CONSUELLA AGUIRRE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04337 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CONSUELLA AGUIRRE TO: CONNIE SPEAR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 05, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 13, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 19, 26. Sep 2, 9 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF BRENDAN PIERCE LETT TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02936 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: BRENDAN PIERCE LETT TO: IBRAHIM ABDUSHAKUUR SIRI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for

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change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Oct 08, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Civil, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Aug 19, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Aug 26. Sep 2, 9, 16 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG AKA RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV02828 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RENA HARRIETTE ROSENBERG aka RENA HARRIETTE SCHOOLER TO: NINA R. SCHOOLER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Sep 20, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, ANACAPA DIVISION SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated July 30, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Sep 2, 9, 16, 23 2021.

SUMMONS SUMMONS ‑ (Family Law) NOTICE TO REPONDENT: KARINA MARIE VEJBY AVISO AL DEMANDADO: Petitioner’s name is: NICHOLAS CHRISTIAN BERGGREEN Nombre del demandante: CASE NUMBER: (Numero de caso) 21FL01073 You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association.

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NOTICE‑RESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON PAGE 2: These restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. They are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerto. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion, y honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encountrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO‑LAS ORDENES DE RESTRICCION SE ENCUENTRAN EN LA PAGINA 2: Las ordenes de restriccion estan en vigencia en cuanto a ambos conyuges o miembros de la pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la peticion, se emita un fallo o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier autoridad del orden publico que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas ordenes puede hacerlas acerlas acater en cualquier lugar de California. EXENCION DE CUOTAS: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. 1.The name and address of the court are (El nombre y direccion de la corte son): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: (El nombre, direccion y numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Nicholas Christian Berggreen 830 Flora Vista Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93109 805‑450‑1178 Dated June 23, 2021. Darrel E. Parker, Execcutive Officer; Clerk, by (Secretario, por) Johnny Aviles, Deputy (Asistente) Published Aug 12, 19, 26, Sept 2, 2021. SUMMONS ‑ (Family Law) NOTICE TO REPONDENT: HELEN BIRD AVISO AL DEMANDADO: Petitioner’s name is: EDGAR RICHARDSON Nombre del demandante: CASE NUMBER: (Numero de caso) 20FL01943 You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courts. ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California

E M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Legal Services website (www. lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE‑RESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON PAGE 2: These restraining orders are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. They are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerto.

Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion, y honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encountrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO‑LAS ORDENES DE RESTRICCION SE ENCUENTRAN EN LA PAGINA 2: Las ordenes de restriccion estan en vigencia en cuanto a ambos conyuges o miembros de la pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la peticion, se emita un fallo o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier autoridad del orden publico que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas ordenes puede hacerlas acerlas acater en cualquier

lugar de California. EXENCION DE CUOTAS: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. 1.The name and address of the court are (El nombre y direccion de la corte son): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: (El nombre, direccion y numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Edgar Richardson 761 Camino Pescadero Goleta, CA 93117; 805‑335‑7508 Dated Nov 30, 2020. Darrel E. Parker, Execcutive Officer; Clerk, by (Secretario, por) Nicolette Barnard, Deputy (Asistente) Published Aug 19, 26, Sept 2, 9 2021.

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING (Held Electronically and Telephonically) Adoption of Affordable Housing Fees and associated Goleta Municipal Code Title 17 (Zoning) Ordinance Amendments ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20, dated March 17, 2020, and Executive Order N-08-21, dated June 11, 2021, authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the Planning Commission for September 13, 2021, will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. Planning Commissioners will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing to consider a resolution recommending to the City Council adopt two new affordable housing fees and adopt associated Title 17 Amendments (Case No: 21-0004-ORD). Any recommendations from the Planning Commission will be provided to City Council. City Council will consider the recommendation at a later hearing to adopt the fees and amendments to Title 17. The date, time, and location of the Planning Commission public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE AND TIME:

Monday, September 13, 2021, at 6:00 P.M.

PLACE: City Hall (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117 PROJECT LOCATION: The affordable housing fees and the amended Title 17 regulations would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The City’s General Plan Housing Element includes policies and programs intended to support the creation, maintenance, and preservation of affordable housing in the City. One of the critical barriers to the development of affordable housing identified in the Housing Element is funding. By adopting and implementing a new affordable housing fee program for all new development, including redevelopment, the City would have the ability to uniformly calculate and collect both residential in-lieu fees and non-residential impact fees to be used to subsidize or fully-fund creating more affordable housing throughout the City. Environmental Review: Adoption of the housing fees is not subject to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Section 15267 (Financial Assistance to Lowor Moderate-Income Housing), Section 15060(c)(3) (Preliminary Review - “Not a Project”), Section15061(b)(3) (Review for Exemption - Common Sense Exemption), and Section 15183 (Projects Consistent with a Community Plan, General Plan, or Zoning). PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters / comments should be addressed to City Clerk cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by City Clerk on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above via email to cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org or by other electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit a comment or to call in during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendasand-videos NOTE: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 69009[b][2]). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the City Clerk’s office, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or can be obtained by calling Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk (805) 961-7505. NOTE: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, September 2, 2021

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Santa Barbara Independent 9/2/21  

September 2, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 816

Santa Barbara Independent 9/2/21  

September 2, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 816

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