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INSIDE COUNTY'S BIGGEST DRUG BUST EVER by Tyler Hayden FREE

Santa Barbara

MAY 6-13, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 799

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also inside EARTH DAY MURAL • STEAKS & SIPS IN SOLVANG • PATRISSE CULLORS OF BLACK LIVES MATTER INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 6, 2021

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JOIN OUR LADIES & GENTLEMEN HIRING FAIR

Tuesday, May 11th from 1:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Wednesday, May 12th from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. The Ritz-Carlton Bacara, Santa Barbara will be interviewing for positions in Food & Beverage, Guest Services, Culinary, Spa, Housekeeping and more! For a complete list of open positions and to expedite your experience, complete an online application at RITZCARLTON.COM/CAREERS. The Ritz-Carlton Bacara, Santa Barbara offers excellent salaries, exceptional benefits, employee discounts at over 7,000 hotels worldwide, and more. The Ritz-Carlton is an equal opportunity employer. We conduct background checks, drug screenings and verification of right to work as part of the hiring process. Please come prepared as you may receive an offer the same day! Masks and social distancing required. Parking is free.

LOCATION Angel Oak at The Ritz-Carlton Bacara, Santa Barbara 8301 Hollister Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93117 805.571.3221 Marriott International is an equal opportunity employer that does not discriminate on the basis of disability, veteran status or any other basis protected under federal, state or local laws. 2

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MAY 6, 2021

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- VIRTUAL EVENTS Former President of the American Enterprise Institute

Arthur C. Brooks National Renewal

Tue, May 11 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

Drawing on social science and a decade of experience leading the American Enterprise Institute, Arthur C. Brooks shows that what the country needs is not agreement, but better disagreement.

Corporate Sponsor:

Patrisse Cullors

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Dialogue Wed, May 12 / 5 PM Pacific FREE! (Registration required) Artist, organizer and educator Patrisse Cullors is co-founder and executive director of the Black Lives Matter Global Network and founder of Dignity and Power Now. Presented as part of UCSB Reads, sponsored by the UCSB Library and the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor with additional support from UCSB Arts & Lectures and a variety of campus and community partners

Acclaimed Producer and Filmmaker

Keynote Event

Creating Hope with His Holiness the XIV Dalai Lama In Conversation with Pico Iyer

Mira Nair

Speaking with Pico

Tue, May 18 / 8:30 PM Pacific* FREE Virtual Event

Wed, May 26 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

One of the freshest and most fearless directors working today, Mira Nair’s groundbreaking films include Salaam Bombay!, Mississippi Masala, Monsoon Wedding and Queen of Katwe. Presented in association with the Carsey-Wolf Center at UC Santa Barbara Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Dori Pierson Carter & Chris Carter, Martha Gabbert, and Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

*Live events with His Holiness usually begin 15-20 minutes before the official start time. Arrive 20 minutes early. In this keynote event of A&L’s 2021-2022 CREATING HOPE programming initiative, His Holiness is joined in conversation by Pico Iyer, a friend, observer and student of the Dalai Lama for more than 40 years.

Community Partners: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli Special Thanks: INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 6, 2021

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Back, Together

“We would not have survived the crisis without American Riviera Bank. They got me federal assistance and made it easy. Now all my restaurants are open and all my staff are back. That feels really good” — Carlos Luna, Owner of Flor de Maíz, Santo Mezcal, and Los Agaves

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TABLE of CONTENTS volume 35, # 799, May 6-13, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Lily Hopwood, Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY 18

OUR COVER ILLUSTRATIONS WIN AWARDS! NEWS: BELLOSGUARDO WATCH, 2020 EDITION ★ SPORTS: BASKETBALL BUZZER BEATERS FREE

Santa Barbara

JAN. 15-22, 2020 VOL. 34 ★ NO. 731

FREE

Keeping the Promise

SBCC Welcomes New S.B. Grads and Those Pushed Out by Pandemic by Delaney Smith

FEATURE 22

DEC. 24-31, 2020 VOL. 35  NO. 780

Peace on Earth W E E K O N E

★★ ★ ★★ ★ ★

FILM FESTIVAL SANTA BARBARA INTERNATIONAL

Inside

KATE FARMS SHAKES UP MEDICAL NUTRITION VOICE: A Win for Tenants

 ARTS: Art From Scrap Turns 30  FOOD: Dalan Moreno's Vegan Meats G O O D T I D I N G S : Thousands Get COVID Vaccine

and more!

★ ★ ★ INTERVIEWS, MOVIES, AND MORE

FREE

Inside County’s Biggest Drug Bust Ever by Tyler Hayden

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . .

Santa Barbara

14 24 26 29

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

ON THE COVER: Design by Caitlin Fitch. Photo: 2019 SBCC Promise graduates. Courtesy.

We nearly stopped our presses to get in this late-breaking news: The Santa Barbara Independent picked up awards for both — yes, both! — first and second place in the California Newspaper Publisher Association’s 2020 California Journalism Awards for Print Illustration. Coming in first was our former art director/longtime contributor Ben Ciccati for his cover drawing of Brad Pitt for last year’s SBIFF, while our web content manager Saehee Jong snagged second for her Peace on Earth cover at the end of 2020. Ciccati actually won fourth place for his Queen Bee illustration during our Best of Santa Barbara® issue, and Jong shared a fifth-place nod with our creative director, Caitlin Fitch, too for their election night image. Check out their drawings here!

FIND OUT WHO TAKES

THE STING

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OCT. 15-22, 2020 VOL. 34  NO. 770

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FREE

Santa Barbara

NOV. 5-12, 2020 VOL. 34 • NO. 773

L O A D I N G . . .

LTS RESU KNOW The

WE

PENDING R EG I O N A L RAC E S CA L L E D ; N AT I O N A L N U M B E R S also inside

WATCHING THE DODGERS WIN • G ROSLIE TEXTILE ART JUDGE WILLIAM GORDON CONNECTING THROUGH CHILAQUILES • IN MEMORIAM:

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Happy Nurses Week Saluting the inspirational, the compassionate, the fearless, and those who step forward every day to care. Thank you to the nurses in our community.

cottagehealth.org

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Friday, May 7 11:00 AM

Sunday, May 9 3:00 PM

vna.health/luncheon

Join Andrew Firestone and Catherine Remak to celebrate 40 remarkable women and one amazing couple who helped to shape the legacy of our community’s character, health, and ability to live well.

KEYT Channel 3

THANK YOU 2021 Luncheon SPONSORS, Donors, And Partners LEGACY SPONSORS Peter Douglas

Alixe and Mark Mattingly Nora Lynn Mattingly

Christine and Reece Duca

Trusted SPONSORs Lady Leslie Ridley-Tree and Suzette Chafey

HEART SPONSORS Roberta and Stan Fishman

Nora McNeely Hurley and Michael Hurley

Ginny and Tim Bliss

Anna and David Grotenhuis

Val and Bob Montgomery

Louise and David Borgatello

Kimberly Schizas and Mark Linehan

Sharol and Wayne Siemens

COMPASSION SPONSORS

CAREGIVER SPONSORS

MEDIA PARTNERS

Bartlett, Pringle & Wolf LLP

American Riviera Bank

Casa Dorinda

Bob Andrews and Margaret Wilkinson

Special Thanks

HEALING SPONSORS

Thank you to all the gentlemen of Peter Murphy Men’s Night who have donated through the years.

The goal of the Give Well, Live Well 2021 Campaign is to bring awareness, education, information and financial resources to help VNA Health better care for our community.

Cottage Health Pamela Dillman Haskell and Chris Haskell Chris and Bob Emmons

CenCal Health Jelinda and Barry DeVorzon

The Habit Burger Grill

Jodi Fishman-Osti and Darren Osti

HUB International Barbara Kummer Mission Wealth

May 6, 2022 21st Annual VNA Health Mother’s Day Luncheon ROSEWOOD MIRAMAR BEACH HOTEL

Brown & Brown Insurance

Jane and Norm Habermann

LEGACY

SAVE THE DATE for next year

Sharon Bradford

Gregg Hackethal and Penny Jenkins Karen Kistler

Alan Porter

Kenneth Kraus and Perry Gibson

Paul and Shelley Schulte Rudi Schulte Family Foundation

Nasif, Hicks, Harris & Co LLP

Warren Family: Robert, Kathy, Scott, Joy, Robert, and Jason

Thomas Rollerson and Michael Erickson Maryan S. Schall Anne Smith Towbes Village Properties (Renee Grubb) SPONSORS AS OF 5/4/21

6

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MAY 6, 2021

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APR. 29-MAY 6, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CORONAVIRUS

CITY

by Jean Yamamura

W

DAN I EL DR EI FUSSS F I LE PHOTO

Public Health Rolls Out Mobile Walk-Up Vaccination Clinics

e have to get into the persuasion business,” Supervisor Gregg Hart observed Tuesday, noting how the rate of vaccinations was slowing while the supply was growing. Hart has reason to be concerned. Van Do-Reynoso, head of County Public Health, announced that the county’s case rate sat at 4.6 as of May 4, which is an increase from last week’s 3.6. That rate of infection per 100,000 county residents is what keeps Santa Barbara in the orange tier and businesses open, and it’s getting close to the 5.0 red-tier threshold and its increase in restrictions. New walk-in clinics and more mobile clinics are rolling out to reach more people more conveniently, said Do-Reynoso, and more than 3,000 people have walked in for a vaccine since the vans and buses moved out on April 15. A no-appoint- HEADED FOR RED: Public Health czar Van Do-Reynoso announced the county’s case rate to be 4.6 as of Tuesday, which is a ment-needed clinic is set for Lompoc tick above last week’s 3.6. To remain in the orange tier, Santa Barbara has to stay below 5.0 cases per 100,000 residents. on Saturday, May 8, to give the “one and — people beyond the two-week antibody- contrasts with Uruguay’s 84, the world’s highest, done” Johnson & Johnson vaccine, said Do-Reynoso, and another on Sunday, May 9, buildup period after the last shot—benefits and 49 in Sweden, for instance, as a New York at the Goleta Community Center—15 walk-up exist, such as visiting without a mask with oth- Times map summarized this weekend. clinics in all will be held this coming week. (See ers who’ve completed the vaccine series, and Different studies offer different interpretapublichealthsbc.org/vaccine for all locations and even with a single low-risk household, indoors tions of the Indian variant, the B.1.617, and the times.) or outdoors. Centers for Disease Control has so far given it One of the mobile clinic stops will be at Altogether the county stands at 41 percent a lesser classification as a “variant of interest” UC Santa Barbara on Thursday, May 6; Isla of people over the age of 16 who are vaccinated, rather than one of concern—the U.K. variant is Vista residents without cars had a 90-minute Do-Reynoso told the supervisors. People of thought to be driving the surge in some Indian bus ride to the Santa Barbara Hilton for the Latin descent remained disproportionately states. California had yet to find the B.1.617 last set of Public Health vaccination appoint- high among positive cases, hospitalizations, among the variants counted in the state as of ments. This is an especially important group and death, she said, with Santa Maria having April 28, but the slightly vaccine- and antibodyto reach because the local and national cases the highest number of cases in January through resistant Brazil and South Africa variants are were showing a sharp increase among people March. Most of the county’s cases developed both here and both considered “variants of conin their twenties and younger than 17. “That symptoms, and 36 percent were traced to cern” by the CDC. youngest age group had been 3 percent,” said infection through close contact. Mask wearThe state has sequenced over 41,000 samples Jackie Ruiz, spokesperson for Public Health, ing, hand washing, distancing, and getting as of late April, and statewide, the West Coast “and 20 percent is more common now.” vaccinated continued to be the state of art for variant outstrips the U.K. variant—15,000 cases to 3,400—which is contrary to the small Santa Ruiz said the walk-up clinics were success- avoiding the illness, Ruiz iterated. ful at making the vaccine easier to find and get: Among the potential causes for the jump in Barbara sample of 18 for the month of April. “At Santa Maria last week, about 30 percent of case rate this past week could be the emerging One instance of the somewhat vaccine-resistant the people were walkups.” And the age for vac- predominance of the variant first spotted in the South African variant was noted in early April cines is soon expected to be lowered to 12 years United Kingdom, dubbed the B.1.1.7 variant. In in Ventura, however, and five of the Brazilold, once Pfizer gets approval from the FDA for UCSB’s genetic sequencing for variants, April’s ian. Neither has yet been discerned in Santa an emergency-use authorization, Do-Reynoso results reveal the more contagious U.K. variant Barbara, which has a limited ability to test 50 said. Pfizer is expected to file for full approval of rising to 66 percent of samples compared to 37 samples at most per week. its vaccine shortly, she added, answering Super- percent in March. That may soon change. Among the Board visor Bob Nelson’s question about employers Hart, who led the COVID press conferences of Supervisors approvals this morning was an requiring the vaccine. It could be some time during the pandemic’s first year, said, “You don’t extra $19 million to fund the epidemiology before it receives a license, she agreed. have to look far around the world to see this laboratory and staff at County Public Health Among the tri-counties, vaccine hesitancy virus is not contained,” referring to India, which and its partners through July 2023. The “unanwas highest in Santa Barbara, at 12 percent has a vast surge that is breaking the medical sys- ticipated revenue” from the California Public compared to Ventura’s 10 percent and San Luis tem in a country that manufactures vaccines. Health Department includes just about all of Obispo’s 11 percent. Ruiz said Public Health “It’s not unimaginable here,” Hart said, “seeing Public Health’s COVID activities, from testing had heard concerns about future fertility, long- the large number of people who are not vacci- and contact tracing to vaccinations and surveilterm side effects, and a general “wait and see” nated.” But though India has been much in the lance — as well as the sequencing needed to test posture countywide. For the fully vaccinated news, its 26 cases per 100,000 people case rate for variants. n

The Department of Justice concluded the city’s historic downtown train depot fails to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. The DOJ launched its investigation of the train depot two years ago as part of a nationwide effort. Its findings, released two months ago, alluded to steep sloping grades at the depot and cracks in the concrete. City Hall transportation planners were told they need to hire a qualified architect to conduct a more detailed survey and then make any necessary alterations and repairs.

ENVIRONMENT S.B. City Councilmember Meagan Harmon has been appointed to the California Coastal Commission, beating out S.B. County Supervisor Das Williams and Oxnard City Councilmember Vianey Lopez, who had also been seeking the politically prestigious appointment. Harmon and Williams are both liberal, environmentally minded Democrats; Lopez also serves as district manager to Democratic State Sen. Monique Limón. What informed Governor G avin Newsom’s decision in favor of Harmon is open for speculation, but Williams drew the vocal and organized wrath of anti-cannabis activists in the Carpinteria Valley.

CORONAVIRUS Visitations will resume on 5/10 at the County Jail on special pandemic terms of 25 percent the previous capacity. The county’s orange coronavirus tier enables the jail to allow 30-minute visits for people on an inmate’s visitation list. “We are moving ahead with caution,” Sheriff ’s Office spokesperson Raquel Zick said. “We understand that staying connected to friends and family is an important factor in successful reentry to the community.” For more info, see “How Do I” and “Visit an Inmate” at sbsheriff.org.

PUBLIC SAFETY S.B. COU NT Y P U B L IC WOR KS

County’s Case Rate Ticks Upward

Roughly 100 people gathered 5/4 to mark the commencement of the Randall Road Debris Basin, including Montecito resident Curtis Skene, who was credited for making the project happen. All observed a minute of silence to remember the people who died in Montecito during 2018’s 1/9 Debris Flow. The new debris basin lies just above State Route 192, at a point where boulders and tree trunks “floating” on a massive mudflow tore through seven homes after a devastating downpour broke over the Thomas Fire–scarred foothills. Read the full story at independent.com/randall-road.

n For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 6, 2021

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APR. 29-MAY 6, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

Jail Diversion Program Big Success

Locally Owned and Operated

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ver the past year, 574 criminal defendants in Santa Barbara County entered a diversion program known as pre-trial supervision: Of those, 426 completed it; of those, 339 completed GOLETA YOU FOR VOTING US it successfully without reoffending. This Ave 5757 Hollister information elicited enthusiastic responses from all five county supervisors this Mahatma 2# Tuesday. On the table was a report on the 10th year of a statewide program — known Seedless obliquely as “realignment” — designed to WATERMELONS get prisoners out of the state’s overcrowded lb. prison system and shifted to county jails. This, in turn, put pressure on county jails to lb. 7# divest themselves of less serious offenders or to keep them out in the first place. WHITE CORN Playing a leading role in this effort has been County Probation Chief Tanja Heitman, who basked in the glow of unanimous supervisorial praise Tuesday for ea. El Pato 7 oz.being responsive to the supervisors’ impatience for greater reform of the criminal Green/Red/Yellow justice system. When the supervisors expressed strong interest three weeks ago BELL PEPPERS in the creation of a data dashboard detail-

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ing how many charges are filed, whether they are felony or misdemeanor, and the extent to which there’s a race-based discrepancy in the disposition and outcomes, Heitman took the lead in initiating a collaborative process with the Sheriff ’s and the District Attorney’s offices to make this happen. At that meeting, both the sheriff and the DA expressed reservations about the accuracy of the data that might go into such a dashboard. Gregg Hart, who is leading the charge to keep the county jail population down at the historic lows it’s been hovering at since the COVID pandemic struck, was adamant about the need for such data. “What are the numbers? What do they mean? What are the implications?” he asked. “We can’t make proper decisions if we don’t know what the numbers are.” Andy Caldwell, spokesperson for COLAB (Coalition of Labor, Agriculture & Business), expressed the only cautionary word, warning that what he called “the decriminalization movement” was “too much, too fast.” —Nick Welsh

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— much rumored about — could be officially announced. The arrests also involved the seizure of several weapons—three assault-style rifles, one revolver, and three semi-automatic handguns—as well as 16 assault rifle magazines, one high-capacity handgun drum magazine, eight bulletproof vests, 2,400 rounds of ammunition, and gang-related indicia. Killed in the shootings were Angel Castillo and Omar Montiel-Hernandez, 17 and 18, respectively. At least one of the victims, Castillo, had been shot in the back while fleeing. Police indicated three others had been victims of attempted murder. Previously, it had been reported that two others had been wounded in the shooting. With the inclusion of a third nonfatal victim, it’s not clear whether the third victim was wounded or simply shot at. Police arrested three other suspects in connection with the shooting in raids executed in both Carpinteria and Summerland on April 8. All three are Carpinteria residents and were charged with multiple counts: murder, committing more than one murder, and committing murder to further a criminal street gang. —NW


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

*Terms and Conditions Apply

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

HOUSING

THE OPPOSITION: From left, Hannah-Beth Jackson, Kristen Sneddon, and Sharon Byrne

New Bills Could Reshape S.B. Housing Senate Bills 9 and 10 Eliminate Single-Family Homes by Delaney Smith s the state puts increasing pressure on Santa Barbara to build housing, two new state bills are currently in committee that have the potential to dismantle single-family homes and replace them with multi-unit housing. Introduced by State Senator Scott Wiener, Senate Bill 9 allows homeowners to put a duplex on single-family lots or split them. Where a single-family home stood, eight units of housing can be built. Wiener’s other bill, SB 10, would allow cities to adopt an ordinance to zone any parcel of land, including single-family homes, for up to 10 units of housing if it is in a “transit-rich or jobsrich area.” Neither bill would require environmental analysis or a hearing or approval from the local government. “The biggest challenge with both of them is that they take away local control,” said former state senator Hannah-Beth Jackson, who was hired by the Montecito Association to guide its members as they lobby against the bills and educate the community. Sharon Byrne, executive director of the Montecito Association, agrees with Jackson and is also concerned that neither bill would require developers to upgrade water, sewage, or other infrastructure. “It will allow rampant gentrification where the locals cannot do anything about it — and that’s the intent of these two bills — and it doesn’t provide any parking or any infrastructure upgrades,” Byrne said. “We need better solutions.” And what are the better solutions? For one, Byrne and Jackson agreed that both bills are geared toward a 2019 world, though the pandemic has changed housing needs. Byrne said she hoped to see a bill that would address this new reality — where physical proximity to transit and jobs is less of a factor for many now working remotely — or one more geared toward housing millennials and Generation Z, who have different living habits and needs. She also said she sees housing atop State Street buildings as an option and was disappointed none of the bills allow that. Councilmember Kristen Sneddon, who takes issue with many of the same points Byrne and Jackson do, is focused on potential gentrification that could result from

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either of the bills passing. “As we’ve seen, there’s no limit to what people will pay for rent here,” Sneddon said. “This would be a dream for developers to be able to knock one thing down and put up 10 units instead and rent each of those out for exorbitantly high rent.… I think it would be terrible for neighborhoods like the Westside and Eastside.” The city has made several changes to build more housing to meet state requirements. Known as granny flats, accessory dwelling units (ADUs) allow up to two apartments on a single-family lot. In 2016, the state decided that as long as a lot meets the requirements, developers can build ADUs without a hearing or approval from the local government. Sneddon said she felt these have been largely successful in creating new housing. But local developer Frank Thompson disagrees. Under current rules, he said, “you can’t divide the ownership of the property and sell off the ADU separately. So there always has to be a landlord. SB 9 is trying to change that…. “And frankly, I don’t think in Santa Barbara that the ADUs have proven to be affordable,” he said. “We expanded the housing supply, and we kind of hoped that the rents would come in lower, but golly, gee whiz, the rents came in high.” Thompson said because SB 9 would be market-driven, he doesn’t think anyone will attempt to split their smaller lot when it would be too cramped. He also doesn’t believe SB 10 will have much of an impact on Santa Barbara if it passes. Even though it allows up to 10 units on a single lot, he said most lots wouldn’t allow for that and developers wouldn’t try. As for the city itself, planner Renee Brooke said that they stand with Byrne, Jackson, and Sneddon for many of the same reasons. She said that while the city generally supports streamlining housing production, it must be the housing it truly needs, and SB 9 does not have any affordability requirements. The city would also prefer to retain some local control and be able to identify areas where that type of housing is best suited, like outside of hazard zones. She isn’t worried about SB 10 because it is an “opt-in” bill, meaning that cities do not have to implement it. n

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APR. 29-MAY 6, 2021

From Four Wheels to Four Walls Carbajal Pushes Bipartisan Bill to Help People Living in Their Vehicles by Nick Welsh or Julie Bowles, living on the streets had never been in the cards. Born to a well-to-do family, Bowles worked for many years as a real estate broker. But then her mother got sick, and Bowles had to drop everything. Then Bowles encountered serious health issues of her own. No drugs or alcohol, she stated, were involved. Soon, Bowles found herself living out of a 2002 Nissan Pathfinder. “You can no longer do all the things you take for granted,” she said at a press conference late Monday afternoon. Simple things — such as where to go the bathroom in the middle of the night or charge her cell phone — became significant challenges. For a while, she parked at night by Vista Point near Refugio to stay out of the way. But she worried that the big rigs rumbling by might crash into her. Later, she moved out near UC Santa Barbara but soon found herself chased off by someone else who had the same idea. “It was a territorial thing,” she explained. “It was scary.”

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‘There are lots of people out there — hundreds if not thousands — who are invisible living in their vehicles.’ — 1st District Supervisor Das Williams

She did not sleep well. Bowles’s life as a car camper lasted about 14 months. Somewhere along the way, she made contact with New Beginnings, the counseling service that runs the much-heralded Safe Parking program for vehicular homeless people. The ultimate point of that program is to get its clients — about 150 of them now — inside. While Bowles is not back at work yet, she is housed, thanks to vouchers secured on her behalf by workers with the Safe Parking program. All this came to light Monday afternoon during a press conference convened by Congressmember Salud Carbajal as he unveiled new legislation to fund programs like Safe Parking that target people living in vans, cars, and RVs. If passed, the bill — named after Carbajal’s political mentor and former boss, onetime 1st District supervisor Naomi Schwartz — would set aside $125 million in federal funds over a fiveyear span for programs helping people who are living in their vehicles. The money could be secured by local government agencies across the country on behalf of such programs with the maximum award of $5 million for the duration of the five years. As Carbajal noted, the bill is the first of its kind to focus federal assistance to such programs. “It’s kind of a no-brainer,” he declared, citing the much-touted record of the Safe Parking program, which now operates throughout much of the South Coast in 26 parking lots. The program’s virtues, he said, were not always quite so self-evident. Back in 2004, when then-county supervisor Susan Rose first hatched the idea, there was intense resistance to the program. Homeless people parking in public parking lots in downtown Santa Barbara? 10

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MAY 6, 2021

N IC K WELSH PHOTOS

HOMELESSNESS

“I know,” Carbajal recalled. “I fielded the calls.” At the time, Carbajal worked for Supervisor Schwartz, who represented the district in which the program was first launched — in the parking lot right behind the county’s own Administration Building. But it was then-supervisor Rose who stumbled onto the idea. Rose had been scouring the South Coast for a suitable site where people living in their vehicles could park at night without fear of “the knock” — the dreaded 3 a.m. intrusion by law enforcement. But neighborhood resistance was, predictably, intense, and Rose encountered staunch resistance. Looking out from her fourthstory window one night, she noticed that the County Administration Building’s own parking lot was all but empty. “I realized then the answer had been there all along, right in front of me,” she exclaimed. The rest, as they say, is history. Initially, the project was overseen by Catholic Social Services. Then New Beginnings took it over. Applicants are carefully screened. Monitors show up on a nightly basis to ensure codes of conduct are complied with. Restrooms are provided. Only a small handful of residents are allowed per lot. (The county admin lot has the most: 10.) Food is THE LITTLE THINGS: “You can no longer do all the things you take for granted,” said Julie Bowles of the 14 months she spent living in her car. provided on occasion, as is technical automotive assistance or help for residents trying to navigate tricky bureaucracies. The goal, always, is to get people advancing in age; 80 percent are older than 55. The fastest out of their cars and into housing. That requires inten- growth is taking place with people over 65. People in their sive case management. eighties and nineties are not uncommon. All of this takes money that’s painstakingly cobbled By most reckonings, the Santa Barbara program has been a together with a patchwork of public and private grants. great success. The number of complaints has been negligible, If Carbajal’s bill — co-sponsored by Doug LaMalfa, a and a host of other communities have looked to Safe Parking conservative Republican from Northern California as a model for programs of their own. Schwarz said she’s been — were to pass, that funding could help underwrite contacted by 65 other communities from a dozen states and such expenses. two countries. More than 135 copies of Safe Parking’s how-to The demand for safe parking spaces, everyone manual have been mailed out, 30 to other municipal entities. agrees, has escalated sharply in response to COVID. Of the “We’re a success,” declared Carbajal. “I don’t know how 1,900 documented homeless people living throughout Santa much more perfect a look it can get.” Barbara County, fully one-third are believed to be residing in For all the accolades — including a glowing write-up in vehicles. The real number is no doubt considerably higher. Rolling Stone magazine — Schwarz has found her way blocked. “You know there are a lot more people out there than peo- Getting new parking lots into the program, she said, is very ple can even imagine,” said 1st District Supervisor Das Wil- difficult. Neighborhood opposition is fierce. Big, obvious lots, liams, who succeeded Carbajal as county supervisor. “There like the one by Sears, are tangled up by complex ownership are lots of people out there — hundreds if not thousands — structures. The Earl Warren Fairgrounds are more logistically who are invisible living complicated than they in their vehicles. They’re might seem at first blush. invisible; they’re trying And she’s gotten nowhere to be invisible.” Many, trying to negotiate deals he added, had jobs and with any of the many Cal“looked for all purposes ifornia state government agencies that own lots like normal members of throughout the county. the housed community.” The answer, he said, is The good news, she said, is that Safe Parking obvious. “We need to become YIMBYs, Yes in has negotiated deals with My Backyards.” the cities of Lompoc and At last week’s Santa Carpinteria to open new lots there. But even those, Barbara City Council she said, have proved meeting, it was stated logistically complex. that four 91-year-olds ‘NO-BRAINER’: On Monday, Congressmember Salud Carbajal unveiled new were living in their cars. legislation to fund programs that help people living in vans, cars, and RVs. “It’s kind of Schwarz said she’s been lobbying Congress Since 2004, New Begin- a no-brainer,” he declared. for years to introduce nings executive director Kristine Schwarz estimated Safe Parking served 300 people such a bill. Carbajal waited until the timing was right. There and housed 70. The program shields participants from the would have been no point, she said, with Donald Trump still fear of violence and police intrusion. Residents, Schwarz in the White House. With Joe Biden now president, she said, said, can “get a good night’s sleep.” Most of the residents are Carbajal’s bill stands a good chance of passage. n

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CANNABIS

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by Melinda Burns

MELI N DA BU R N S

‘The Bar Has Been Raised’ Supervisors Require Strict Controls on Odor at Central Coast Agriculture zoning permit for Central Coast Agriculture, a 30-acre cannabis “hoophouse” operation in the wine region west of Buellton, was approved by the County Board of Supervisors this week, just hours after the grower signed off on a comprehensive odor-control plan that his critics had been requesting for months. SNIFF TEST: Central Coast Agriculture, a 30-acre cannabis Voting 4-0 on Tuesday, with one operation at 8701 Santa Rosa Road, will be required to test for the abstention, the supervisors praised smelly gases that the crop gives off during harvest time. both John De Friel, the owner and CEO of Central Coast Agriculture De Friel made these concessions during at 8701 Santa Rosa Road, and Marc Chytilo, an attorney for the Santa Barbara Coalition the course of three county Planning Comfor Responsible Cannabis, a countywide mission hearings on the project, beginning group of farmers, vintners, and residents last October. During this week’s last-minwho advocate for tougher regulation of the ute negotiations, he also agreed to hire an odor expert to test and monitor the gases burgeoning industry. “The bar has been raised,” said Supervisor released by the cannabis crop during the Steve Lavagnino, who represents the Santa first seven days of each seasonal harvest, for Maria Valley. “We ended up with a better two of the next three years. project at the end of the day.” Also, if De Friel receives more than one Matt Allen, De Friel’s attorney, declined substantial complaint, he must conduct a to comment on Tuesday’s vote. But Chyt- study of the best available control technolilo, who has filed lawsuits challenging the ogy, including, for example, an analysis of county’s approval of three other outdoor can- the location and type of his plantings. nabis operations west of Buellton, said that Finally, in addition to sending reports negotiations with De Friel’s team, hosted by every six months to residents living within the county, began on Zoom on Friday and 1,000 feet of his operation, De Friel must wound up at noon on Tuesday, just two hours send reports to any person or organization before the hearing began. As part of the deal, located within the Buellton zip code that he said, the coalition has agreed not to sue requests to be included on the community De Friel. outreach list. “We’d been trying to have a discussion The odor-control plan for Central Coast with this operator back to last fall,” Chytilo Agriculture is similar to what members of said. “Now, I’m confident that if there are the coalition and Concerned Carpinterians, odor issues, they will be dealt with. Our a smaller citizens’ group, hammered out approach demonstrates that the coalition is late last year with Cindy and David Van not anti-cannabis. The coalition can and does Wingerden, the owners of CVW Organic work with growers to help them get it right.” Farms, a future greenhouse cannabis operaCentral Coast Agriculture is located near tion on Cravens Lane in the Carpinteria the eastern gateway to the Sta. Rita Hills, a Valley. federally designated American Viticultural Central Coast Agriculture has been Area where many vintners contend that the approved for 22 acres of cannabis under sight of white plastic hoop houses and the 12-foot-high white plastic hoops that were stench of pot will drive wine-tasting tour- erected without permits on a 68-acre propists away. In Buellton, residents complain of erty. In addition, the project includes more having to endure weeks of “skunky” smells than 44,000 square feet of developed strucduring the spring and fall harvests, along tures, such as 25,000 square feet of cannabis with sore throats, respiratory problems, and greenhouses and buildings for processing, headaches. distribution, and storage. The odor control plan for Central Coast Eighty percent of the cannabis for proAgriculture — one of only two cannabis cessing will be grown off-site. The harvested operations currently up and running near product will be stored in 57 refrigerated Buellton — will require De Friel to install car- containers, each of them 320 square feet in bon air filters in his processing building and size. The containers were erected without place an odor-neutralizing piping system, permits; 42 of them must be removed after called a “vapor-control” system, along his three years. northern and eastern property boundaries; Supervisor Joan Hartmann, who reprethe idea is to prevent odors from traveling sents much of the Sta. Rita Hills, abstained toward Buellton in the prevailing winds. In from Tuesday’s vote on the project. Nearly addition, De Friel must monitor wind and 800 acres of cannabis cultivation has been weather conditions, fresh-freeze his plants proposed for the scenic wine region, a within two hours of harvest, and address potential concentration that Hartmann odor complaints. called “untenable.” n

Peabody is now considering transfer requests for the 2021-2022 school year. We will be returning to a rich and engaging full-day program beginning in the fall. Peabody Charter School strives to be innovative in developing academic excellence and the full potential and well-being of each student. If interested in joining our exceptional educational program, please contact the office at 805-563-1172 or email PCS.info@peabodycharter.net for more information.

peabodycharter.org

Peabody Charter School

Established 1927. Chartered 1993.

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APR. 29-MAY 6, 2021

BUSINESS

HOUSING

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PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

he City of Santa Barbara lost big in a Court of Appeals ruling that severely limits the city’s ability to regulate vacation rentals in its own coastal zone. The case pitted City Hall’s desire to preserve its housing stock against the state Coastal Commission’s interest in preserving affordable access to vacations along the coast. The Coastal Commission won, and City Hall came up empty. The appeals court concluded that City Hall’s 2015 decision to restrict and Theo Kracke regulate vacation rentals in its coastal zone qualified as a “development,” the City Council voted to appeal, arguing and as such needed to apply for a Coastal that it need not apply for a Coastal ComDevelopment Permit with the Coastal mission permit to enforce its own rules and Commission. regulations. Kracke noted that City Hall had long In 2015, City Hall — in an effort to protect its limited housing stock — decreed allowed and taxed vacation rental operathat any vacation rental not permitted as a tors — 349 citywide in 2010 — and could hotel was illegal and began cracking down not abruptly change the rules without conon “illegal” operators. The number of vaca- sequence. The Court of Appeals agreed. tion rentals in the city’s coastal zone plum- The city’s decision to change those rules, meted from 114 in 2015 to just six in 2018. the judges concluded, qualified as a develFighting City Hall every step of the way opment for which a coastal permit was was Theo Kracke, who owned and man- required. In the showdown between the aged a number of vacation rental proper- state and city over their competing interties. Kracke won at the trial court level, and ests, the state won. —Nick Welsh

DAN I EL DR EI FU SS F I LE PHOTO

City Loses Big in Vacation Rental Lawsuit

Hero Pay for Grocery Workers Passes

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iting the undue risk grocery workers have been exposed to during the pandemic and the undue profits some grocery chains have made, the Santa Barbara City Council voted 5 to 1 to require any grocery chain within city limits to pay its workers an additional $5 an hour for 60 days. For fulltime workers that translates to $2,400. The council’s vote also applies to retail workers employed by big pharmaceutical chains such as Rite Aid and CVS. Councilmembers were eager to exempt smaller operations such as Tri-County Produce and Santa Cruz Markets while sticking it to larger chains, which reported a 90 percent increase in profits during the first two quarters of the pandemic profit. Councilmembers heard plenty before the

meeting from representatives of the United Food and Commercial Workers Union Local 770, from representatives of the California Grocers Association, and the California Retailers Association. The latter two argued the pay bump would erode into the industry’s “razor thin” profit margin, causing loss of jobs, an increase in prices —$400 a year for a family of four — or the outright closure of stores. Union representatives pointed out that prices have not gone up even though 30 cities have enacted similar measures and that to date only two stores in California have been closed. “These workers were not expecting to be on the front lines of the pandemic,” argued Daniel Mora, of the Tri-Counties Central Labor Council. The vote outcome was much more in doubt than the final vote suggested. Councilmembers Michael Jordan and Kristen Sneddon expressed real reservations about bestowing “hero” status upon certain retail workers and not others. What about nurses, Jordan asked? His daughter showers off outside with a hose before coming into the house when she gets off work. Jordan was the sole “no” vote. Councilmember Meagan Harmon, who spearheaded the effort, pushed back, arguing it made no sense to do nothing for anyone just because the council couldn’t do something for everyone. Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez, who co-sponsored the measure, added, “We have to be brave and help those who can’t really speak for themselves.” —NW

Save the West Mesa of San Marcos Foothills Forever Together, we are making this happen… but we have a lot more to do!

FOOTHILLS FOREVER

With your help we reached an agreement to purchase the 101 acre West Mesa of the San Marcos Foothills! This will permanently preserve and protect the land for future generations. Our intent is to add it to the 200 acre San Marcos Foothills Preserve.

We need your help now!

We’re forging ahead full steam to our goal of raising the purchase price of $18 million by June 1st.

How to help:

Make a tax-deductible contribution to the Foothills Forever Fund, a fiscal sponsorship fund at the Santa Barbara Foundation. Please make checks payable to: Santa Barbara Foundation, with Foothills Forever Fund in the memo line. Mail to: 1111 Chapala St. #200, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Donate on-line: FoothillsForever.org To donate gifts of stock or other assets, please contact info@foothillsforever.org

Information: FoothillsForever.org 12

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MAY 6, 2021

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Visit the San Marcos Foothills West Mesa at the end of Via Gaitero Road. Docent Led Tours of the property are offered every Saturday & Sunday at 10 a.m. or by special arrangement. Email Julia Laraway at a1fyr516@gmail.com


OPINIONS CONT’D

Go Humans!

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ibraltar Dam recently had its centenary to no fanfare at all. A monument to the lack of foresight in all things Santa Barbara, it was built and started filling up with sediment. It was raised but still filled up with sediment at an alarming rate. Go humans; you are enlightened and beautiful. All the millions of tons of sand stuck back there over the last 100 years would have fed the South Coast Littoral Cell, that now-depleted river of sand flowing along our South Coast beaches from the mouth of the Santa Ynez River to the mouth of the Mugu/Hueneme Submarine Canyon. Ooooopsie-daisy. We are such a clever species! Did anyone else notice how nice and fat Leadbetter Beach became after the debris from Montecito’s flows was trucked to Goleta Beach? It took two years for the bumps of sand to wash down to Lead. Fat Leadbetter! Think of all that sand we gotta dredge to keep the harbor open! Maybe that can be trucked back to Go-Let-A!

—Thomas Joseph Harper, S.B.

JOHN COLE / THE TIMES TRIBUNE

Letters

To City and County of S.B.

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he community of Santa Rosa resisted the location of a tent city for homeless people in a central parking lot, according to the Los Angeles Times article on April 22. The city council listened to the neighbors’ strong objections and remained strong, saying that this has to be done, and we need to do this, period. The community then threatened to end their political careers. The mayor said, “Go ahead, vote me out. It’s important for government to listen, but these are our neighbors and we have to help them.” The Santa Rosa experiment, which is a huge success, is one way for cities to move forward. Clearly, it takes leadership to push against NIMBYism. With good planning and collaboration between the city, county, and social service agencies, residents near Santa Rosa’s “green tent” city are now engaged and supportive, and people who had been homeless are getting their lives back together. We don’t have to reinvent the wheel. Let’s take a lesson —Lois Phillips, S.B. from Santa Rosa.

ART MATTERS LECTURE Leslie Ureña

Curator of Photographs, Smithsonian, National Portrait Gallery

Revisiting “One Life: Marian Anderson” Thursday, May 6 3 pm

@sbmomsdemandaction #MillionsMissing

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n April 25, survivors, victims, and fellow mourners gathered at the courthouse to honor the victims of police violence in our community and around the nation. A community altar honored the dead with food, flowers, and burning candles. The crowd gathered to say the names of all we’ve lost to police violence. Three people are killed by the police every day in our country. Tragically, Krys Brandon Ruiz of Lompoc was fatally shot by Lompoc police in March. The death of Mr. Ruiz is not unprecedented. Transgender people are seven times more likely to experience physical violence when interacting with the police when compared with cisgender victims and survivors. Santa Barbara’s Moms Demand Action demands that our officials address gun violence for what it is: a public health crisis. Our Everytown Survivor Network is available to all victims and survivors of gun violence, and LGBTQ support is offered each month. We have a plan to end gun violence. We hope you will join us. Learn more at everytown.org and momsdemandaction.org.

—Kendall Pata and Emily Engel, S.B.

For the Record

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illions are missing from their once-normal lives due to a debilitating illness often triggered by a virus. Post-COVID patients are expeFree via Zoom, register at tickets.sbma.net riencing the same life-altering symptoms at an Donations welcome. alarming rate and being dismissed or misdiagnosed. William H. Johnson, Marian Anderson (detail), ca. 1945, oil on paperboard, Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) causes profound Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation. metabolic dysfunction and is accompanied by physical and cognitive limitations. Imagine having mono, the flu, and a concussion all at once, every day — and no amount of rest makes it better. Exertion can worsen it and cause perma- Art Matters ad_APR22.indd 1 4/22/21 nent cell damage. Of those with the disease, 75 percent are unable to work; 25 percent are homebound or bedridden. Researchers at UC Davis expect that 1 in 4 “recovered” COVID-19 patients will go on to develop ME/CFS, or long-COVID. ~~ Transformational Life Counseling Counseling ~~ This is my “new normal.” I closed my business in Transformational Life ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ August. And if you’re unvaccinated — this could be Relationships• •Occupation Occupation and Relationships andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation your fate or the fate of someone you love. It can be a Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions living death that often ends in suicide. Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Please educate yourself and recognize May 12 Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual as the day of #MillionsMissing. Visit #MEAction, Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone meaction.net, or solvecfs.org . —Perry Norton, S.B.

¶ In our Fresh Faces of Environmental Action for Earth Day, we note that Kristen Hislop graduated from UCSB’s Bren School in 2010, not 2008.

8:49 AM

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obituaries Richard Long

8/6/1926 - 5/8/2020

I first met Richard in May of 2002. I was shopping at B & L, a 99 cent store for teaching supplies. Richard struggled to reach for an item on the shelf. I asked if he needed any help. He asked if I was a social worker, I replied I am a school teacher. We went next door to Rudy’s Mexican Restaurant and talked for three hours. Thus, began a remarkable and life changing 18 year friendship. Richard was born August 6, 1926 in the Bronx, New York to a lifelong Navy sailor and his bride. While his father was out at sea on duty, his mother spent her time enjoying the single life. Richard was raised by the Foster Care system and his brother Philip was raised by his stern grandmother. Richard lived in many different households throughout his youth. He often mentioned how thankful he was for the diversity of his upbringing. Richard volunteered for the Navy at age 17. He trained at the Great Lakes Naval Station. He was assigned to the newly built and commissioned light cruiser USS HOUSTON. After an initial cruise, it sailed through the Panama Canal and on to Hawaii. Eventually his ship joined the Pacific Task force under Admiral William F. Halsey. Richard participated in numerous campaigns throughout, Marianas, Bonin Island, Guam, Rota islands, Palau islands and Mindanao. He continued on and fought in Formosa, Philippines, Leyte, Cebu, Manila Bay and Southern Luzon. One of the highlights was the bombarding of Leyte, which prepared the landing of Army troops which eventually liberated the capital of the Philippines, Manila. The USS Houston was hit by a torpedo on October 14,1944. Richard survived and the entire ordeal was recounted in the book titled “The Battle to Save the Houston” published by author John Miller in 1985. After being honorably discharged from the Navy in 1946. Richard re-enlisted in the Air Force. He was assigned to Japan, 14

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com handling mainly classified materials. During this time, Richard married Chiyoko, a Japanese citizen. It was very difficult for an American serviceman to obtain permission to marry a Japanese citizen during this time, shortly after the war. But true love prevailed and Richard married his beloved bride. Richard and Chiyoko were married for over 62 years. She worked over 30 years for The May Company, which became Macy’s at the La Cumbre plaza. Following his discharge from the Air Force, Richard remained in Japan working as a translator for an American Company. Upon returning to the United States, he worked for the motion pictures studio as a driver and finally attended barber school in Pasadena, CA. He first owned a barber shop in Lompoc and then in 1960, he purchased a barber shop on East Valley road in the upper village of Montecito. Eventually, Richard was forced to sell his shop to make space for the Post Office. Later he was part owner of the La Arcada barber shop and finished his career with his dear friend Willy at Willy’s barber shop on Figueroa street. Richard loved his clients and cherished the enduring friendships he was blessed by over the many years of barbering. Richard was proud of his time spent in the military. He was a true patriot and loved being recognized as a World War II veteran. He constantly supported Veterans and proudly displayed his flag and patriotism. He enjoyed riding in the Veterans Day Parade. He spent his last years of life living at Cliffview Terrace and truly loved all the staff like family. Richard passed away on May 8, 2020. The day is recognized as Victory in Europe or VE DAY, which commemorates the unconditional surrender of Nazi Germany to the allied forces, thus ending World War II. A fitting ending to a remarkable patriotic life. Please make contributions in honor of Richard L Long to the local Veterans Foundation or Pierre Claeyssens Veterans Foundation 1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 1-334 Santa Barbara, CA 93108 or call 805 259 4394 or at info@pcvf.org. or kindly donate to the Visiting Nurses & Hospice Care 512 East Gutierrez Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103 or call

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805 965 5555. Please remember to value and tip your barber No services are being held as requested by Richard. Just remember a friend is a present you give to yourself.

Keith Leonard Wright 4/6/1955 - 4/29/2021

Keith Leonard Wright was born at Cottage Hospital April 6, 1955. He passed away April 29, 2021 after a courageous 8 year battle fighting cancer. Keith grew up on the Eastside attending local schools.  He proudly identified himself as one of “Van’s kids.” He graduated from Santa Barbara High School where he met his wife, Marsha, of 43 years.  He attended SBCC transferring to San Francisco State.  After the birth of their first daughter, they relocated back to Santa Barbara where he enjoyed a 30 year career in architectural design. Keith is survived by his wife, Marsha Wright, daughters, Andrea (Jamall) Broussard of Panama, and Erica (Edward) Nolasco of Santa Barbara.  He loved being called “Papa” by his grandchildren, Aryah, Leilani, Logan and Luca.  In addition to his biological children, Keith openly accepted countless local youth into the family, and enjoyed being a father to many. Keith is also survived by his mother, Jewel Timmons, of San Jose, his brother, Kevin (Rhonda) Wright of Castro Valley, his sister, Karla (Thomas) Giles of Colorado Springs, sister-in law, Debbie (Jack) Rivas of Santa Barbara, along with an amazing extended family of nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews, aunts, cousins and lifelong friends. Keith lived life to the full-

est. He was happiest when his home was filled with family and friends standing at the grill or watching sports. His Super Bowl parties were legendary and everyone was welcome. He took great pride in being a SBHS Don.  He enjoyed bicycling, both back packing and car camping, and traveling all over the world.  His happiest times were when the family was together.  He had the biggest smile and so much love in his heart.  He will be missed greatly. A celebration of life will take place later this summer.  In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara/ Ridley Tree Cancer Center 601 W. Junipero Street, SB, CA 93105, website: cfsb.org, or the SBHS Alumni Association, Class of 1972 Scholarship, P.O. Box 6121, SB, CA 93160, website:sbdonsalumni.com.

Craig Callen Baise

6/24/1945 - 4/14/2021

Craig Callen Baise, age 75, passed away on April 14, 2021, after a long battle with multiple myeloma. He was surrounded by his wife and children at his home in Glenbrook, Nevada. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, on June 24, 1945, Craig moved with his family in 1948 to Santa Barbara, California, where he spent his childhood. It was there that he developed his love for fishing with his father, Bill Baise, and the game of tennis. In 1959, he entered the Thacher School, in Ojai, California, where he earned varsity letters in tennis, soccer and basketball and built friendships that lasted throughout his life. His name with his many tennis records is still hanging in the Thacher Dining Hall. After graduating from Thacher, Craig went on to Stanford where he was a 3-year varsity letterman on the Stanford Tennis team. In his Senior year, he played first doubles with his now long-time friend Brian Leck, winning the Northern California Intercollegiate doubles

and earning the Sportsman of the Year Award. He majored in history and lived in the Delt House, where he made many of his closest friends, graduating in 1967. It was at Stanford that he met his future wife of 53 years, Cynthia (“CeCe”) Hart Baise. Craig and CeCe lived and raised their three children in Pacific Palisades, California. Craig was happiest on the golf course at the Los Angeles Country Club, on the paddle tennis court at the Beach Club, hunting with his buddies and, most importantly, being with his family. Professionally, Craig began his career at Dean Witter but soon moved into the financial printing business. He would go on to serve as Vice President of Sales at Bowne and President of Pandick Los Angeles, before finishing his career as the owner of Sutter Printing in Sacramento. After retiring, Craig and CeCe moved to Glenbrook, Nevada, on the shores of Lake Tahoe, to a home they had owned for over 30 years and had become the family gathering place for their three children and seven grandchildren. Throughout his life, Craig pursued a wide array of interests and passions, including tennis, golf, hunting and fishing, cooking, using his smoker and, in recent years, making sourdough bread which he shared with much of Glenbrook. In the last few years, he perhaps felt most at peace while fishing for trout on Lake Tahoe, often having his best luck late in the fall, when most other boats and fishermen had long left for the season. Although these pursuits brought Craig a lifetime of joy, his greatest love was always reserved for his friends and family. His friends, many of them going back over sixty years, remember him for his warmth, loyalty, integrity, and quick wit. His family remembers him for his incredible love, generosity and thoughtfulness, for his selflessness and compassion and, again, for his sense of humor, which he maintained to the very end. Craig is survived by his wife Cynthia Baise; his children, Brian Baise (Laurie), Christopher Baise (DeEtte), and Susan Warburg (Sam); his grandchildren, William, Nathan, and Iris Baise; Callie and Charley Baise; and Wynnie and Scottie Warburg. He is also survived by his sister, Cindy Hughes


obituaries (Don), his brother David Baise, and was preceded in death by his parents Helen and William Baise and his brother Daily Baise.As a tribute to Craig’s life, the family would be grateful for donations to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (themmrf.org) or to Keep Tahoe Blue (keeptahoeblue.org).A private family service at St. John in the Wilderness Episcopal Church followed by a gathering at The Glenbrook Club to celebrate Craig’s life will be held in Glenbrook on June 21st, 2021.

HERMAN, Jeffery Del 9/4/1954 - 4/3/2021

HERMAN, Jeffery Del, 66, of Ballard passed away on Saturday, April 3, 2021. Born in Salem, Oregon on September 4 1954, Jeff was the son of the late Delmar Paul Herman and Jeane Herman. He is survived by his wife of 35 years, Lori, their four children, Julie, Jenifer (Raymond), Adrienne (Chasen) and Joseph, and two grandchildren Finn and Bexley. He is also survived by his mother Jeane, brother, John (Tanya) and two nephews, Kyle (Annie) and Michael. Jeff was an alumnus of the University of Oregon (Class of 1977) and the Willamette University School of Law (Class of 1980). Jeff practiced law in Eugene, Oregon and Santa Barbara CA. In 2000 he left law and purchased Vandenberg Senior Residence in Santa Maria CA, where he found his calling working with seniors. He also purchased Hummel Village in Orcutt CA. Jeff had a passion for his grandchildren, travel, photography, golf, geology and many facets of the outdoors. He was an intelligent man with a curious nature and could often be found with a book his hand, but he was happiest when surrounded by his family. In lieu of flowers please make a donation to his favorite charities (of which there were too many to list) The Nature Conservancy or SPLC (Southern Poverty Law Center), or to your personal favorite charity.

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Adam H. Miller 1961 - 2021

Adam “Millhouse”,“Fuzzy”, “Mop Top”“Addybro” Miller passed away unexpectedly on February 15, 2021 in Santa Barbara CA, the oldest child of Babette and Eugene Miller. Adam was born in New York City in 1961. The Miller family eventually landed in Santa Barbara when Adam was 5 years old and lived there until the family relocated to Ojai, CA when he was 11 yrs old; there he finished grade school and attended both Junior High and High School. After high school graduation, Adam began an on and off again career in hospitality, mostly in the Food & Beverage industry as he had an extraordinary ability to connect with people. Adam could converse with all walks of life and everyone that met Adam wanted to be around him. He had a charming and magnetic personality that was filled with humor, kindness, a little cockiness and a smile that would light up room. Adam could banter with the best of them and he had an unbelievable quick wit that kept everyone around him on their toes! Putting off academia to pursue adventure, Adam traveled extensively throughout his 20’s and early 30’s. He loved scuba diving and visited many of the world’s diving attractions, including the Great Barrier Reef in Australia and the Blue Hole in Belize. He also spent a great deal of time in Southeast Asia, Central America and in New Zealand–he bought a car in NZ, camped, traveled around for several weeks and then sold it again.  Having gotten some of the wanderlust out of his system, Adam returned to Santa Barbara, attended UCSB and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Communications in 1995. Later, he enrolled in Law School at Southern California Institute of Law and graduated with honors in 2004. All the while, Adam continued to work in some of Santa Barbara’s most famed restaurants and bars and soon became a fixture on the Santa Barbara Food & Beverage scene. After getting his law degree,

Adam worked in the DA’s Office as well as in two different law offices in Santa Barbara. He continued to work in the restaurant and bar industry, and with his combined legal knowledge and restaurant/bar experience, he helped to launch a few Santa Barbara bars. In addition, he assisted friends over the years with various business legal-ease documents, drafting business plans and filing for liquor licenses. Adam was a gifted athlete. A prolific runner, he ran in some of Santa Barbara’s most grueling races, he also played in a men’s soccer league and raced road bikes for many years. When Adam turned 50, he started riding motocross and loved riding the Santa Barbara backcountry and other locations across CA, UT, WY and ID. Adam felt most connected when he was in the ocean or the mountains. He was also an avid Skier and worked in some of the top Ski Resorts in New England during the mid 90’s. As all of us have our challenges in life; Adam’s struggle with alcohol would lead him to become very involved in the Santa Barbara AA community. He both leaned on others and was someone that you could count on for support  and great advice.  Many who knew him said that he always had time to listen and was genuinely concerned with how others were doing. He had an enormous amount of life experience and was someone that helped guide many friends and acquaintances through their darkest times. He would engage with everyone and had an approachable way about him that drew people to him. He touched many people during his time on the planet and his absence will be deeply felt. Adam is survived by his two sisters Abigail (Ventura), Jessie (San Francisco), brother Simon (Alabama) niece Chelsea (Los Angeles) and nieces Kayla and Jessica (Alabama), nephews Nathan, Taylor and Garrett, (Alabama). He was preceded in death by his loving and beautiful mother, Babette, whom he revered, his father Eugene and his nephew Nicholas. Adam will be sorely missed by his family and many, many friends who adored him, especially his crew from Ojai (many of whose friendships go back almost 50 years), his old com-

rades from the Charthouse, and his Brophy’s and Cliff Room family. “Millhouse”, rest in peace, goodbyes are not forever, are not the end; it simply means I’ll miss you until we meet again. A celebration of Adam’s life will be held in August at East beach with a paddle out to celebrate Adam’s life. We will make the date and time announcement within the next month.

Edward J. Boyle

5/17/1941 - 4/11/2021

Edward J. Boyle, of Goleta, California, passed away on April 11th. Born May 17, 1941 in Charlestown, Mass. to Edward Boyle and Ann Boyle (Devlin), he grew up and spent the first half of his life in Charlestown. He joined the Army in 1958 where he served in an Airborne Unit at Fort Bragg, N.C. until his honorable discharge in 1962, After leaving the Army, Ed got a job as a machine operator in Watertown MA., where he worked until they went out of business. He married his wife Evelyn Webber in 1970. They moved to Quincy, MA. in 1974 where he attended Quincy City College and was elected president of his graduating class. He then went on to the U. of Mass. After college he moved to Santa Barbara, CA. with his wife Evelyn (Evey) and their two sons Gregory and Sean. He worked at Aero Spacelines as a machinist until 1980 when he hired on at Raytheon as a Precision Mechanical Inspector. He worked there until 1998 and retired. Ed loved to be involved in the community. He coached baseball at Dos Pueblos Little League and youth soccer at the Goleta Boys Club. He and his son Sean owned Grandslam Sports Card on Hollister in downtown Goleta in the early 90’s. Ed enjoyed working part time as the Assistant Manager at the Hope Ranch Inn until it’s closure in 2012. He spent most afternoons at Goleta Beach. If you ever walked to the Goleta Pier you would see Ed sitting next to the picnic table with a smile, a cold Bud Light and a Boston sports shirt. He was very proud of his Boston teams and Heritage. He always had a hello for passing tourists and locals. Surviving are his wife Evelyn of Santa Barbara, his son Edward IV, and wife Kathy of New Boston, NH, His daughter Linda INDEPENDENT.COM

and her husband Steve Plante of Albuquerque, NM. Son Sean, and Wife Heidi of Shingletown, CA. Sisters Ann and husband William Nolan of Melrose, MA., Cathy and husband Paul Shea of Stoneham, MA. Carol (Stinky) and her husband Denis Devlin of Charlestown, MA. He also had 13 grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. And many nephews and nieces. He was preceded in death by his son David of Lowell, MA and his son Gregory Boyle of Arcata, CA. Ed wished to be cremated and his ashes tossed into the ocean at Goleta Beach. This way the tide comes in twice a day and Ed can say HI to all his friends at the Goleta Yacht Club.

Gary Lewis Baldwin 9/24/1936 - 4/5/2021

On April 5th, 2021, Gary Lewis Baldwin, loving father of two children, passed away at the age of 65. Gary Lewis Baldwin was born on September 24th, 1955 in Evanston, Illinois to Clifford and Dorris Baldwin. Gary had a passion for surfing, the ocean, music, boating, tropical places, and loved a great party. His was a common name in Beach Haven, New Jersey, and Santa Barbara, California where he owned and operated the Beach Shack, The Ketch and Banana Reef restaurants. He eventually settled in West Palm Beach, Florida. Gary made a big impact on people, establishing himself as a leader and providing opportunities for them to establish a footing in their early years. He loved old school rock music and had a great ear for upcoming new bands. He would usually strum his guitar at home at the end of his day. Gary was known for his quick wit, big smile, kind and compassionate spirit. Gary was preceded in death by his father, Clifford, and his mother, Dorris. He is survived by his two children, Brooke and Cody Baldwin. A Celebration of Life service will be held for Gary on Saturday, May 8th, 2021 at Miramar Beach in Montecito at 2PM PST. Please join us with memories of good times with Gary in Santa Barbara. Continued on p.16

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obituaries Darryl Gregg Perlin 11/27/1947 - 4/29/2021

“I never expected to be anybody important” – Elvis Presley Reflections on the life of Darryl “Elvis” Perlin, dedicated fan of “The King” by Elise Cunanan (middle daughter) and Linda Perlin (wife) Darryl Gregg Perlin was born on Thanksgiving, November 27, 1947, in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Herbert and Gertrude Perlin, the second of three sons. He grew up in Pomona, enjoying the California sunshine and music of the 50’s and 60’s. Darryl met his future wife, “Lovely Linda,” while in junior high. Their first date was prom in their senior year of high school and they married on December 14, 1968. Darryl and Linda attended UCLA and he graduated in 1969 and then attended law school. In 1973, Darryl and Linda bought a van and drove across the U.S. to find their forever home. Toward the end of their trip, they passed through Santa Barbara as the sun was setting over Shoreline Park and knew this was where they wanted to establish roots, a place they made their home for most of the next four-plus decades. Darryl joined the Santa Barbara District Attorney’s office in 1975 as a Senior Deputy District Attorney. He loved the law, was highly opinionated, and prosecuted many high-profile cases during his career. Darryl’s priority was to advocate for the rights of people who had been victimized by crime. He retired from the District Attorney’s Office at the end of 2009 where integrity was the watchword of his career. Darryl had many pas16

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

sions outside of his work. He enjoyed playing softball for decades with the District Attorney’s team. He was a congregant of Congregation B’nai B’rith since 1973 which led to his involvement with his supportive close friends within Havurrah Atid since 1981. For many years he volunteered for The Dream Foundation. He also co-chaired the UCLA Alumni Scholarship Committee for more than a decade. Running was a passion of his, having lettered in crosscountry during his junior year of high school. When he was in trial, he would run during court recess to clear his head and develop strategy. He participated in many community running events and 5-K races. He was the supreme organizer of Dodger baseball trips for his synagogue and the District Attorney’s Office, where he also masterminded NCAA basketball tournament rankings during March Madness. He delighted in the fact he had daughters (Hilary, Elise and Alana) who participated as Flower Girls during Old Spanish Days. This gave him the caveat to dress up and walk with them at the head of the Fiesta parade. He also loved going on bike rides with his girls and helped them to memorize all the U.S. Presidents (in order!) as well as the U.S. states and capitals. He wanted them to be curious, embrace education and work hard. Anyone who knew Darryl soon came to realize his great passion for “The King,” Elvis Presley. His office and home were filled with Elvis memorabilia. He acquired many Elvis outfits, even a hand-made gold lame’ suit that served him well over the years when he acted as the emcee for several retirement parties and other events. He enjoyed many trips to Graceland and once took his family on a 6-week cross-country train trip that included, of course, another visit to the home of Elvis. Darryl was strong-willed and full of humor. He loved having fun and playing pranks, yet was devoted to justice and held a strong belief that life was a gift. He took many vacations to his beloved Kauai with Linda and his daughters, and truly

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embraced the Aloha spirit. He fought a courageous battle with Parkinson’s Disease and Type 1 Diabetes and passed away in the caring environment of Serenity House on April 29, 2021. A celebration of his life will be held later this summer when Covid restrictions are more fully lifted. Survivors include his wife of 52 years, Linda; daughters Hilary (Chris); Elise (Jay); Alana (Peter); grandchildren Byron, Dylan and Brooke; and brothers Joel (Ruth); and Barry Michael. Our heartfelt thanks to Dr. Michael Bordofsky and Dr. Daniel Berger for their many years of excellent medical service to our beloved Darryl. Those wishing to make donations can do so to the Parkinson’s Association of Santa Barbara; Congregation B’Nai B’Rith (Rabbi’s/Cantor’s Discretionary Funds); or Santa Barbara Visiting Nurse Association Hospice.

Betsy Green Thies

12/25/1928 - 4/18/2021

On April 18, peacefully and gracefully, Betsy Thies took leave of this life with her family by her side. She was born on Christmas Day 1928 in Mt. Clemens, Michigan, the second child and first daughter of Stuart and Marjorie Green. She and her brother and sister grew up in Mt. Clemens, a small town on the shores of Lake St. Clair. Her stories of growing up included how she, at age four, was so persistent in following her big brother to school every day that the school finally relented and let

her sit in class; memories of skating on the Clinton River during the winters; and tales of working in the family jewelry store. After high school she attended Michigan State College (now Michigan State University) in East Lansing, where she majored in Social Services. It was at MSC that she met Bill Thies, a handsome sailor going to school on the GI Bill, who became her loving life partner. The couple married in 1950 and began their life together in Geneva, Illinois. World events and Uncle Sam soon intervened, and Bill was called back to active duty in the Navy because of the Korean Conflict. This began several nomadic years, with the young family — which now included two daughters —making brief homes in Virginia, Florida, Michigan, California, and Massachusetts. When Bill left active duty, the family settled in suburban Boston, and continued to expand, adding two more daughters. Betsy devoted herself to raising her daughters; she also was an engaged member of Hancock Congregational Church, taught at Community Nursery School, led Brownie troops, and attended classes at Northeastern University. In 1968 the family moved to Santa Barbara. It didn’t take Betsy long to become involved with her new community, becoming active at the First Congregational Church, working at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden for nearly half a century, serving on the Santa Barbara Environmental Review Board, becoming a cherished member of the women’s service organization PEO, acting as a poll worker election after election — the list goes on. Somehow she also found time to take classes at Santa Barbara City College, to plant and maintain magnificent vegetable and flower gardens, and to continue being the absolute mainstay of the family, the one everybody depended on. Betsy was a people person in the best sense of the term.

Everyone responded to her innate kindness and decency, and admired her competence. What Betsy set out to do, she did, and she did it well. She had a strong creative streak, expressed in calligraphy, sewing, and in the gorgeous wreaths and other items she crafted for the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden Guild. If you would like to honor Betsy’s memory, reach out and help another person, tend a garden, create something beautiful. All her long life, she did those things, and more. Betsy was predeceased by Bill Thies, her husband of 53 years, her brother Don, and her sister Marjorie. She is survived by her four daughters, Nancy, Janet, Avis, and Marjorie; ten grandchildren, Tania, Stuart, Chelsea, Tom, Clay, Lena, Emily, Will, Sara, and Maggie; and five great-grandchildren, Myuna, Vos, Enoah, Weylyn, and Cielo; as well as many loving nieces and nephews. A celebration of Betsy’s life will take place when Covid19 restrictions have been removed and friends and family can assemble in person. Memorial donations can be directed to the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, or the charity of your choice.

Richard L (Rick) Smalley 4/15/2021

Survived by his father Richard Smalley, mother Shirley Edwards, beloved sister & brother-in-law Judy & Brian Darbyshire & nieces Lindsay & Lauren and numerous friends. He grew up in the Goleta Valley, loved the outdoors, hiking, water and snow skiing, camping. Forever in our thoughts A private service will be held at a later date.


obituaries David Messick

9/3/1937 - 4/26/2021

It is with great sadness that we announce that David Messick passed on April 26, 2021, in the home he shared with his wife Judy for more than 50 years in Santa Barbara, California. He died peacefully, after a long illness. He was born on September 3, 1937 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to Maurice Henry Messick and Ruth Anne Thurwanger Messick. The family moved to Seaford, Delaware when he was a small child. David was a rowdy and rambunctious youth. He captained his high school football team and made AllState Honorable Mention as a 155-pound lineman. He was pugnacious and once spent a night in jail after mistakenly punching a policeman. The child of a security guard and a housewife, he was the first in his family to go to college – up the road at the University of Delaware. Judy Hassan helped him find his way. Raised a few blocks down North Bradford Street in Seaford and two years behind him at Seaford High, David and Judy became reacquainted and fell in love while in college. They were inseparable for the next 60 years. Their marriage gave David the stability and focus to channel his considerable intelligence and drive. After earning a doctorate at the University of North Carolina, they moved the family to California in 1964. David received tenure at UC Santa Barbara while still in his 20’s, and during his 27 years on the faculty, served as the Chairman of the Psychology Department and the head of the Academic Senate. When his work began to receive notice in managerial circles, the JL Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University recruited Dave to be the Morris and Alice Kaplan Professor

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com of Ethics and Decision Science. As a result, Dave retired from UCSB, and joined one of the world’s leading institutions for graduate business education. David made meaningful contributions in the field of social psychology – his work has been cited thousands of times in peer-reviewed journals. He put great effort and time into the development of his graduate students who now populate think tanks, businesses, and university faculties worldwide. He won numerous awards for his teaching. His academic career gave the Messicks the opportunity to travel and, besides their time in Evanston, David and Judy lived and worked in Bergen, Norway; and Leiden & Groningen in the Netherlands. He guest lectured extensively, including at Hong Kong University of Science & Technology and Stanford University. David was open, curious, gregarious, welcoming, and generous. Visitors came often: current and former students, colleagues, family members and friends. David loved wine and food, especially Judy’s, and had a discerning palate. He loved opera, in particular multi-day performances of Wagner’s Ring Cycle. He was a passionate Tar Heels supporter, an accomplished birder, and loved walking the trails in Santa Barbara. After his retirement he became a docent at Lotusland and a regular at recitals at the Music Academy of the West. He will be remembered by his family and friends as a force who lived fully. While time and success softened him, he never lost his pride that he came from the working class and that he attended only public schools. He is preceded in death by his parents, older brother Peter Messick, and sister-inlaw Constance Mullen. He is survived by his wife Judy, sons Chris and Andrew, Chris’s partner Jenni, Andrew’s wife Beth, grandsons William and Peter, and numerous nieces and nephews. A time and place to commemorate David’s life will be announced later, ideally after the COVID situation is brought under control.  Until then, the family asks you to

direct any communications to Chris Messick at chrisdmessick@gmail.com or at 703-7123116 where he will be happy to take texts or direct calls on Judy’s and the family’s behalf.  Please also forward any jpegs of photos of Dave and friends/ fam worthy of sharing. And finally, a request.  Can you write us back with a personal testimonial about Dave Messick? How you met and got to know him, who he was to you, and how he impacted your life.  Don’t forget to include any classically Davidian moments.  We’d like to assemble a guestbook that Mom can peruse at her leisure, and that we can eventually share with others.  Anyone who would assist in this effort please let us know. Arrangements entrusted to McDermott-Crockett Mortuary

Garrett Michael Van Wyk 8/4/1935 - 4/24/2021

Garrett Michael Van Wyk, 85, passed away of natural causes on April 24th, 2021, at his home in Santa Barbara, California. Magnanimity, or greatness of soul, reflects well the 85 larger-than-life years Garrett Michael Van Wyk graced this earth. Born August 4th, 1935 in Bismarck, North Dakota, Garry would soon be hurling fastballs at Roger Maris in Fargo with the American Legion, pushing the aerobatic limits of the T-28 Trojan in Naval flight training over the Florida coast, and assembling the Pacific fleet at sea from inside the USS Hancock. His eyes would sometimes glisten as he’d describe the reward for his all-night navigational work: witnessing the convergence of the planet’s greatest nuclear task force, the US Pacific fleet, silhouetted against the morning dawn. “The call-sign was ‘Rampage’.” he would recall, “I loved our call-sign.”

After his Norman Rockwell upbringing in Bismarck, North Dakota, Garry moved to California and attended UCLA on an NROTC scholarship. During Naval service he married his college sweetheart, JoAnn Rusconi, settled in Santa Barbara and took over his father’s Volkswagen/ Porsche dealership with his sister Greta and brother Loren. He later expanded the franchises to include Santa Barbara Mazda, Peugeot, Renault, Van Wyk’s Body Shop, and a used car dealership. Meanwhile, with JoAnn he expanded the Van Wyk family, first with Julie, followed by Chris, Paul, Lisa, Steve, Greg, and Mary. Garry was magnanimous in sharing his passions of sailing, flying and travel with family and friends alike. With great effort he taught his children the basics of sailing with the “Sea Shells” using Mahogany boats in the Santa Barbara channel. Other times he’d awaken a lucky son, daughter, or friend for an early morning aerobatic adventure. As an EAA member, he sponsored or helped build numerous home-built airplanes and was an avid model airplane builder as well. Garry’s WESTPAC tour sparked his love for world travel, and introduced him to his beloved island of Maui, where he often brought his family for special memories and cherished sunbathing time. When at home, Garry would regularly reconnoiter with the “Old Vultures”, a small group of singularly impressive pilots; cut from the cloth of the greatest generation, to tour car/airplane museums or just share stories and a meal in downtown Santa Barbara. More importantly, Garry was a larger-than-life citizen and father. He had medical superpowers, capable of maintaining a steady diet of Baskin Robbin’s Mocha Blasts, chocolate chip cookie dough, and a complete absence of vegetables, yet still enjoyed near-perfect health. He would order hamburgers over the car dealership PA system at 630 Chapala to the adjacent “Ernie’s” across the street. Garry was named Santa Barbara Father of the INDEPENDENT.COM

Year, Businessman of the Year, and received the FAA’s “Master Pilot” award. He was once ‘caught’ on KEYT hidden camera, where he, in keeping with his character, made a heroic effort to return a cash filled wallet to its rightful owner when he thought no one was watching. Garry’s bigheartedness was consistent and often anonymous. Not only did he donate cars at his cost to worthy causes, at times he just footed the entire bill. He doted on his thirteen grandchildren, and seemed to enjoy the toys he gave them as much as the grandchildren themselves. In the evenings he opened up his car-dealership to Christian youth group meetings, and in his 50+ years as a Father he never missed a Sunday Mass. Businessman, benefactor, aviator, sailor, friend, brother, father and husband, Garry would want to be remembered above all as a child of God. In his last days he was surrounded by his wife, children, and grandchildren, who miss him and pray for him. With heavy hearts, we bid a great man a fond farewell. Garry is survived by his wife JoAnn of 61 years, his sister Greta Meaney, children Julie Sanregret, Chris (Iris) Van Wyk, Paul Van Wyk, Lisa Van Wyk, Steve (Gabrielle) Van Wyk, Greg (Shelley) Van Wyk, and Mary (Brandon) Willer, and grandchildren June, Henry, Sofia, Chloe, Daniela, Christopher, Owen, Micah, Solenne, Beatrice, Guitner, Hal and Boden. He was preceded in death by his brother Loren. Visitation hours will be held from 3 to 5PM on Tuesday, May 11th at McDermott Crockett Funeral Home. Private family funeral services will follow. Friends of Garry are invited to Calvary Cemetery Wednesday, May 12th at 11:30 for the interment. In lieu of flowers, contributions in his memory can be made to VNA Health, Saint Raphael’s Church, or San Roque Church. Arrangements entrusted to McDermott-Crockett Mortuary.

MAY 6, 2021

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KEEPING COURTESY PHOTOS

THE PROMISE J

uwan Vega was inspired by his father’s business — an

upholstery shop on North Nopal Street — and knew he wanted to build a business of his own. He enrolled in the entrepreneurship academy at San Marcos High School and had his sights set on pursuing a business degree. But there was just one problem. Though he was accepted into several Cal State colleges, he was still unable to secure enough financial aid to actually enroll. Vega was unsure of how to pursue his degree until a representative from Santa Barbara City College visited his high school and gave a presentation on the Promise, a groundbreaking initiative that fully covers all student tuition, books, and fees for two years for local high school graduates. He was one of the first students to take part in the Promise at its inception in 2016. He has since completed his credits at Santa Barbara City College and has transferred to Cal State Los Angeles, where he is pursuing his bachelor’s degree in business. Because of the Promise, he didn’t have to pay for any classes or books at City College, so he was able to save up enough money to cover his tuition at Cal State L.A. During his time at City College, Vega said he was able to sharpen his business dream even further, forming a more specific vision. He wants to open his own clothing and apparel store and combine it with his passion for social justice. “I want to bring out this brand of clothing that supports and promotes diversity and equity in a society where diversity and equity is always challenged and has always been a struggle for us people of different backgrounds and different colors,” Vega said. Without the Promise, Vega said, his clothing store dream might not have had a chance. At a time when President Joe Biden just proposed free community college tuition across the nation, here on the American Rivera, Santa Barbara City College, philanthropic activists, and educational leaders are way ahead of the curve. Biden’s initiative coincides with the nation’s community colleges facby Delaney Smith ing serious enrollment decline. The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center recently reported a 9.5 percent decline at community colleges nationwide, and SBCC dropped dramatically from 20,232 in the fall of 2009 to 14,179 in the fall of 2020. There are many factors behind the national decline. For one, GRADUATES: Over 5,000 students have benefited from the Promise initiative so far, which provides two free years many students are sick of online classes and may have decided to of college — including all tuition, books, and fees — to any student that completes high school in the Santa Barbara wait out the pandemic until classes can resume in person again. For Community College District. another, community colleges tend to attract the type of students who

Santa Barbara City College

Still Offers Every High School Grad Free Tuition and Fees and Encourages Students Who Left Because of the Pandemic to Return. No Questions Asked.

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MAY 6, 2021

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COVER STORY

are most financially impacted by the pandemic, forcing many to drop classes and focus on work instead. The challenge now will be for colleges to find ways to encourage students to return to their studies.

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FIVE YEARS IN — WHAT’S CHANGED?

Vega is just one of about 5,000 Santa Barbara students who have benefited from the Promise since it began five years ago. When at its highest in the fall semesters of 2018 and 2019, Promise enrollment plateaued around 1,700 students. Nearly a third of the enrollment number was lost over the pandemic last year, with 1,100 currently enrolled. “What happened is a lot of students stayed enrolled, but they didn’t stay full-time,” said Geoff Green, the chief executive officer for the Santa Barbara City College Foundation, which launched the Promise. “And, of course, a greater number of Promise students are the most marginalized, are the ones suffering in poverty and all kinds of other challenging situations. Those are exactly the students that are most impacted by it. We actually saw a greater impact than the general population of the school.” The SBCC Foundation is a separate entity from SBCC and has been providing the college with philanthropic support since 1976. Green, who took over as executive officer of the foundation in 2015, launched the SBCC Promise in the very next year. Green said the founBUSINESS GRADUATE: Juwan Vega, a Promise dation is working on student, successfully graduated from SBCC and transferred to Cal State Los Angeles to pursue his bringing back students. bachelor’s in business. This fall, the Foundation will alter its original requirement that students stay in the program continuously and instead, for this next year, allow anyone who left the Promise during the pandemic to reenter, no questions asked. But generally, the other requirements that were set five years ago will remain the same. To qualify for the Promise, you must complete your high school education within the Santa Barbara Community College District — from Carpinteria to Gaviota. Students must enroll at City College in the fall or spring semester immediately after completing high school, whether it be graduation, GED completion, or an equivalent. Any high school in the area, whether it is public, private, or home school, is eligible. There is no high school GED requirement or income restrictions. Any local graduated student has access to the program. One of the requirements for staying in the Promise is that students must remain in good academic standing or keep a GPA of 2.0 or higher. More than half of all Promise students far surpass that with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. In addition to remaining in good academic standing, Promise students must enroll in full-time classes, see an academic counselor at least once per semester, and apply for financial aid every academic year. In return, students receive two full years of tuition, books, and materials, and other mandatory fees. Green said that although some of the requirements can seem like a barrier for students, it has been proved that students are more likely to succeed if they have firm guidelines and are required to stick to them. “I was connected with wonderful counselors that just kind of laid out all my different options based on my interests and my passions

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DEGREES: In 2019, 4,591 degrees were awarded across all undergraduate and graduate programs at SBCC. about serving those in need,” said past Promise 2019. “And I really hated that students didn’t see us student Leslie Marin about the academic coun- as an opportunity, but a barrier.” selor requirement. “They mentioned sociology Lagunas, a product of community colleges would maybe be up my alley, and as soon as they himself, aims to develop more of a connection started telling me more about the major it COMMUNITY COLLEGE REALLY IS THE really sparked my interest, and I declared myself a sociology major, and I’ve stuck SETTING BECAUSE STUDENTS CAN BE with it ever since.” RECENTLY INCARCERATED, SYSTEM Marin said there initially weren’t many opportunities for her as an undocumented IMPACTED, POST-TRADITIONAL, THEY student, and the Promise opened doors JUST TOOK A LITTLE LONGER TO SEE for her. She is now about to graduate from THE OPPORTUNITY IN EDUCATION, OR UCSB on a full-ride scholarship for sociology. The academic counseling requirement STUDENTS ARE STRAIGHT OUT OF HIGH really pushed her to explore herself and pick SCHOOL THAT HAVE NO IDEA WHAT’S her major.

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“Before I got here, hearing from the manager means ‘I did something bad,’ ” said Sergio Lagunas, who has been manager for the Promise since fall of

—SERGIO LAGUNAS

with Promise students and to change the culture around it. “I’m a first-generation immigrant in this country,” Lagunas said. “Just that experience alone really has driven me to move forward as much as I can and to help as many people, whichever level they’re at in life. And community college really is the setting for this because students can be recently incarcerated, system impacted, post-traditional, they just took a little longer to see the opportunity in higher education, or students that are straight out of high school that have no idea what’s going on. It’s there for everyone.” Lagunas wants his office — now on Zoom — to be a space where he can connect with Promise students and help them to thrive. He focuses on always saying something optimistic and rewarding to students for what they’ve accomplished, rather than punishing them for what they don’t yet know. He is also trying out new ways to communicate with students. For example, he recently started an internal newsletter for Promise students called Persist that gives updates about the STUDENT CONNECTION: Sergio Lagunas has been the initiative and keeps more regular communicaPromise manager since fall 2019. Lagunas has aimed to tion between the Promise office and students. build stronger connections with Promise students.


COVER STORY

Experience the joys of biking with online events and in-person rides & activities. Thu 5/13 • Bike Adventures Close to Home • Inspiring stories & how-to advice featuring Cycling Without Age, backcountry Taco Tuesday E-Bike Demos • The EZ Bike Project invites you to bikepacking riders & BCycle • Online Panel • 5:30-6:30PM test ride various e-bikes on a group ride destined for tacos Sun 5/16 • EZ Bike Pop-Up: Carpinteria • Join the EZ Bike Project • 1219 Anacapa St. • May 4, 11, 18 & 25 • 11:30AM-1:30PM (r) to demo a variety of electric bikes at one convenient location Wheelie Wednesdays for Beginners & Beyond • Learn & practice • Carpinteria Amtrak Parking Lot, 475 Linden Ave. • 1-4PM (r) the art of wheelies. A Wheelie Contest will be held on May 26 Wed 5/19 • Biking with Littles • Choose the bike setup & gear • SBCC Parking Lot 3 • May 5, 12, 19 & 26 • 3:30PM-sunset that’s right for your family. Parents share their experiences to help Bike to Nature Rides • Accessing nature with children is an easy ride! you decide & ride • Online Panel • 5:30-6:45PM Join COAST & WYP on a neighborhood ride to a special outdoor spot Sat 5/22 • Bike-In Movie Night • Ride over to an outdoor screening with guided nature activities • Carpinteria, Santa Barbara & Goleta of The Ride (2018) • SBBike/Bici Centro, 434 Olive St., SB • 8PM (r) • Weekends in May • 1-4PM (r) Tue 5/25 • The Greatest Car-Free Zoom Show on Earth! • Hear personal tales & practical tips on car-free & car-lite living One-Time Rides & Activities to inspire you on your own path • Online Panel • 5:30-6:30PM Wed 5/5 • National Bike to School Day • Celebrated locally at Thu 5/27 • Bicycle Friendly Community • National & local several elementary & junior high schools…check with yours! experts share the latest in bike-friendly urban design & practices. Featuring People for Bikes, League of American Cyclists & the Thu 5/6 • E-Bikes! Technology, Trends & How to Choose City of Santa Barbara • Online Panel • 5:30-7PM • Local experts with the EZ Bike Project discuss everything you want to know about e-bikes • Online Panel • 5:30-6:45PM Sat 5/29 • Bike DeLights • Social ride, decked out in lights Sat 5/8 • EZ Bike Pop-Up: Goleta • Join the EZ Bike Project & City • SB Amtrak Station Moreton Bay Fig Tree • Meet 7PM/Depart 7:30PM of Goleta to demo a variety of electric bikes at one easy location Sun 5/30 • Community E-Bike Ride • Fast-paced bike ride with • City Hall Parking Lot, 130 Cremona Dr. • 1-4PM (r) like-minded e-bikers. Ride your own or register early to demo Sun 5/9 • Mother’s Day Ride • Cruise along the waterfront, from one • SB Amtrak Station by the Moreton Bay Fig Tree • 1-4pm (r) Santa Barbara to Butterfly Beach • Meet at SBCC Lot 3 across from Visit the website for the full calendar Leadbetter Beach • 1-4PM (r) and to register for in-person rides Wed 5/12 • City Cycling Basics & Bonus E-Bike Tips and activities. • Improve skills, confidence & safety when biking in urban settings. New safety tips for e-bike riders • Online Class • 6-7PM (r) = Registration required

Recurring Rides & Activities

PRESIDENTIAL RECOGNITION: The Santa Barbara City College Promise was recognized after its launch in 2016 by the now-First Lady Dr. Jill Biden. Above, SBCC Foundation CEO Geoff Green poses with the Bidens.

ACROSS THE NATION

The Santa Barbara City College Promise was recognized after its launch in 2016 by the now-First Lady Dr. Jill Biden because of its unique model that is unparalleled elsewhere. There were two national networks of Promise efforts at the time Green set out to create the SBCC Promise in 2016. He interviewed more than 100 people involved in the networks and did extensive research before launching SBCC’s one-of-a-kind initiative. He learned that in order to create an equitable program, it needed to be completely comprehensive and a first-dollar initiative, meaning that even if a student is eligible for other scholarships, the Promise still pays first and in full, rather than filling in funding gaps left behind from scholarships or other financial aid. The Promise is also offered to anyone, regardless of income. These alone are rare in other Promise programs.

POWERED BY DONORS

The fact that the Promise is entirely privately funded also makes it the only one of its kind in more than 300 college Promise initiatives. The SBCC Foundation is the single largest community college foundation in the state and one of the largest in the country, giving it the ability to build such a model. At peak enrollment, the foundation was giving about $1.2 million per semester to the Promise. “The first year, there was a luncheon for the donors, and we got to sit at a table with some of the students who had benefited,” said Lois Phillips and her husband, Dennis Thompson, the first donors to the SBCC Promise in 2016. “They were very specific in explaining to us why they would not have been at college if it weren’t for the Promise. “I know without that, a lot of kids SUCCESS STORY: Leslie Marin was in the first 2016 would be struggling Promise cohort and is now weeks away from graduating from UCSB on a full-ride scholarship. to, you know, work a couple of jobs and maybe take them three or four or five years to get through city college. So it was inspiring to see them accomplishing their goals.” Phillips and Thompson were just two of close to 2,000 donors who have contributed to the SBCC Foundation. The philanthropic culture of Santa Barbara has paved the way for the foundation to be successful in launching the privately funded Promise. “I really liked that it was a straightforward way to take financial concerns out of the picture,” said Jon Clark, president of the James S. Bower Foundation, one of the first foundations to donate to the Promise. “Even though it’s open for everybody, there are just so many students who have such financial strains that even small amounts of money are keeping them from advancing their education. And those are the students who n we want to help and why we chose to support the Promise.”

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F E AT U R E

The Complicated Reality of

a Cartel Drug Bust

Five Fishermen from Sinaloa Smuggled 1.5 Tons of Meth into Santa Barbara.

Was It by Choice or by Force? BY TYLER HAYDEN

I

n the early-morning hours of August 19, 2020, as the rest of Santa Barbara slept, a platoon of law enforcement officers lay wide awake in the thick chaparral above Arroyo Quemada Beach. The team, led by Detective Christopher MacAuley with the Sheriff ’s Office, included more than two dozen deputies accompanied by FBI and Homeland Security agents. They had received intelligence that a panga boat loaded with drugs was powering its way up California toward the remote stretch of coastline between El Capitán and Refugio state beaches. At the same time, a small fleet of SUVs and a minivan — carrying 29 people, known as a “load crew” — was driving from Riverside County to meet it. At around 3 a.m., the load crew parked along an Arroyo Quemada frontage road and, under the darkness of the new moon that night, quietly crept under nearby trees and brush to wait for the panga. They came so close to some of the officers that they almost stepped on them. Soon after, the boat pulled up, and five fishermen from the small town of Altata, Mexico, jumped out. They had traveled across 1,300 miles of open ocean, carrying 58 large white bales that belonged to the Sinaloa Cartel. They would later tell authorities that armed mafiosos had threatened their wives and children and forced them to make the trip north. One of them had already lost a family member to the cartel. The journey lasted 10 days, during which the men took turns sleeping, steering, and keeping the three outboard motors fueled. They ate canned food and defecated in plastic bags that were thrown overboard. Once the boat landed, the combined crews formed a daisy chain from the panga along a footpath to the cars and started to unload the cargo. That’s when MacAuley and his team sprung the trap. They broke from their hid-

‘Fishermen are sitting ducks for the cartels.’

— Attorney Melissa Fernandez

ing places and fanned across the beach as the suspects scattered. Many were apprehended almost immediately, though a handful made a run for it and were brought down by K-9 units. The next morning, the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Office announced the 34 arrests and the seizure of 3,164 pounds of methamphetamine — the biggest drug bust in the county’s history, and one of the largest ever in the nation. The $10 million worth of meth was enough to provide a dose for every man, woman, and child in the United States and Mexico combined, and then some. Photos in a departmental press release showed the bindles proudly stacked in front of an American flag. 22

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MAY 6, 2021

“Today’s seizure of a panga boat illicitly smuggling more than a ton and a half of methamphetamine into our county and the arrest of the 34 suspects responsible for transporting and unloading its ruinous cargo was a major milestone in counter-drug operations in Santa Barbara County,” said Sheriff Bill Brown at the time, who thanked U.S. Customs and Border Protection and the Coast Guard for providing backup. “We will never know how many lives were saved from overdose or addictive misery as a result of this exceptional law enforcement action.” For reasons unclear, the U.S. Attorney’s Office declined to prosecute the case. It was especially perplexing because Donald Trump was running for reelection at the time and the successful raid would have galvanized his cause for stricter border policies. Those with knowledge of the operation believe federal officials may have been protecting the identity of an informant embedded within the Sinaloa Cartel. Regardless, the task of holding the suspects to account fell to our District Attorney’s Office. While the incident briefly made local headlines, the public’s attention was focused on the COVID-19 pandemic at the time, and the case quickly faded from memory. Incidentally, it was the virus that likely directed the heavy freight into the ocean and toward our shores, as many of the cartel’s regular land and air crossings were blocked by transportation shutdowns. Nearly everyone in the load crew, except for its main driver and leader, 25-year-old Enrique Ortega out of Riverside, has since pleaded guilty to a single misdemeanor count of acting as an “accessory after the fact to the transportation of methamphetamine for sale” and received time served. Ortega was sentenced to six years behind bars. The five Mexican nationals who made up the boat crew — Santiago Carrillo-Galvan, 53; Oswaldo Lopez-Felix, 37; Felix Mojardin, 25; Gabriel Moreno-Sepulveda, 31; and Mario Saenz-Avila, 35 — were charged with more serious felonies. With added enhancements for the volume of meth involved, they faced the possibility of spending nearly 30 years in prison if they went to trial and lost. The defense attorneys argued in court that the felony trafficking charges against their clients should be dismissed. But without any hard evidence of a criminal kidnapping conspiracy, it was only the men’s words against those of the Sheriff ’s and District Attorney’s offices. Rather than take that chance, four out of the five agreed to plea deals this April and were also sentenced to six years. Carrillo-Galvan, the only one among them with any criminal history, will receive a 6-14 year sentence when he returns to court next month. Under California law for nonviolent drug cases, all of the defendants will serve their time in Santa Barbara County Jail, which was originally designed for only short stays but because of state prison overcrowding is now home to many long-term inmates. Defense attorneys, by practice, are accustomed to watching the state take custody of their clients. But this case has left a particularly sour taste in the mouths of all five lawyers, who argue the men are hardly the seasoned drug runners law enforcement officials made them out to be. Instead, they insist, the group are victims of Mexico’s prolonged drug wars that often ensnare impoverished

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people, especially those who live on the coast and know how to work a boat. “Fishermen are sitting ducks for the cartels,” said Carrillo-Galvan’s attorney, Melissa Fernandez, explaining the power and prevalence of the Sinaloan syndicate throughout the region cannot be overstated. “They’ll either BOAT BUST: The county’s biggest drug bust seized 3,164 kidnap these guys, or tell pounds of methamphetamine them, ‘You’re going to from the pictured panga boat, work for us, or we’ll rape which came ashore at Arroyo your wife and chop her Quemada Beach on August 19, head off.’ And they do.” 2020. After his arrest, Carrillo-Galvan told authorities he had been drinking beers on Altata’s boardwalk with friends Saenz-Avila and Moreno-Sepulveda when three masked men forced them at gunpoint into a van. They were held overnight at a house an hour away, Carrillo-Galvan said, and then brought the next morning to a panga boat packed with bales, given supplies and a satellite phone, and told to sail north until they received a call with further instructions. During their own interrogations, Saenz-Avila and Moreno-Sepulveda provided similar stories. Mojardin and Lopez-Felix told officials they were approached by cartel members on separate occasions and strong-armed into participating, though they were allowed to leave the harbor and come back the following day. Both had spouses and toddlers at home who were threatened by name. “The coercion and threat of death is very real,” said Lopez-Felix’s attorney, Sanford Horowitz. The Altata community is small, only about 2,000 people, and it’s easy for mafiosos, or “gangsters,” to identify potential marks. “They’re called disposable mules,” Horowitz said of the fishermen. “The cartel doesn’t care about them—they use them and throw them out.” It’s common for the cartel to keep their forced laborers in the dark, he said. That way, if they’re caught, they can’t give authorities any useful information. Dr. Everard Meade, a scholar of Latin American studies at UC San Diego and an expert on the Sinaloa Cartel, said the case reflects a complicated and often overlooked aspect of the drug wars. “It would really be false or misleading to say that most of the cartel’s workforce are voluntary actors,” he said. “When you look at the activity, most of the perpetrators are also victims. I don’t say that to excuse anyone, but that’s what you find.” Over the last decade, Meade explained, the cartel’s business operations have become “much less patrimonial” and “more narrowly transactional.” Meaning its leaders are now looking beyond their sworn ranks to manufacture and move drugs. The effect has been “particularly brutal” on Mexico’s citizenry, he said. “U.S. law enforcement tends to make a hard-and-fast division of who are criminals and who are not,” he said. “The reality is that there are lots more shades of gray.” Like anyone, Meade can’t fault the logic of preventing more than 3,100 pounds of meth from reaching American


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Friday, May 14, 2021 5:30–6:30PM Includes…

A Fireside Chat with

TARANA BURKE While MacAuley had recently attended a training on cartel coercion tactics, where a kidnapping victim outlined his experience in graphic detail, MacAuley said the Santa Barbara smugglers couldn’t be trusted. “They all developed a cover story,” he said. “They stuck to the script.” Meghan Behrens, Moreno-Sepulveda’s attorney, remains very bothered by the outcome of the case. “These guys are not cartel heavies,” she said. “They are poor, uneducated men, and that’s who we’re punishing.” “Am I grateful all that meth isn’t on the street?” Behrens continued. “Yes, absolutely. But are we punishing the right people? No. This sentence will in no way curtail cartel activity.” Behrens worries for the future of her client, who has a young son back home he “misses dearly.” Once his sixyear sentence is up and he’s deported back to Mexico, what then? Won’t the cartel come after him for failing the mission and losing the meth? “I hope he leaves the area,” she said. Moreover, Behrens wondered why the load crew, who willingly drove from RiverCARGO: A photo from the Sheriff’s Office press release shows the bindles of meth side to collect the bales, got off proudly stacked in front of an American flag. with misdemeanors while the boat crew, “who was forced to smugglers. Funneling foreign aid to economic devel- do something,” now sits in County Jail. opment programs could also help, Meade suggested, “This was simply unjust,” she declared. “I nornoting, “Piracy went away in the 1800s because there mally don’t say that, but I really feel that way.” were better economic opportunities for people.” Carrillo-Galvan’s attorney, Melissa Fernandez, In court, Sheriff ’s Detective Christopher MacAu- said her client will return to court June 7, where his 6ley, who was a narcotics investigator for the U.S. Air to 14-year sentence will be decided. His adult son was Force prior to joining the department, said he didn’t previously murdered by the cartel, she said, and now buy the fishermen’s claims of kidnapping. He sug- he’s terrified for the safety of his 9-year-old daughter. “He’s just another disposable piece in the cartel’s gested they were attempting to “play off the violence of the cartels” and pointed to inconsistencies in some drug-dealing machine,” she said. “This is really a of their statements.  human rights issue.” n cities. The Arroyo Quemada delivery was on its way to a Southern California hub, and from there it would have bled across the map. But he wonders what impact the individual sentences will have on the bigger issues at play, or the people pulling the strings. “These seizures don’t really tell you much about whether there is any progress being made against individuals or organizations,” he said.  U.S. resources would be better spent on treating and curbing America’s drug appetite, he said, rather than playing Whac-A-Mole with modern maritime

Founder of the ‘me too’ Movement

In 2017, #metoo went viral, and has been used more than 19 million times on Twitter alone. Since then, Tarana Burke has been widely recognized for her work with survivors of sexual assault. She was named Person of the Year by TIME Magazine in 2017, one of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People in 2018, and in 2020, one of USA Today’s Women of the Decade.

plus… OPPORTUNITY DRAWING!

Chocolate de Vine TICKETS “M&Ms” level: $25 (access to event link) “White Chocolate” level: $100 (access to event link + premium chocolate)

PURCHASE HERE: www.chocolatedevine.org

OR contact Elsa Granados STESA Executive Director at elsa@sbstesa.org INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 6, 2021

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23


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

5/6-5/8:

From left: Maddie Thomas, Rachel Henderson, and Roz Borah

San Marcos High Pres-

ents Mamma Mia! Take in live theater

outdoors at this jukebox musical based on the songs from ABBA about young Sophie, who lives on a Greek island and dreams of the perfect wedding and finding her father. The show runs through May 15. 7:30pm. Greek Theater, San Marcos High School, 4750 Hollister Ave. $8-$20.

tinyurl.com/SMHS-Tickets

5/6: Art Matters Virtual Lecture: Revisiting One Life: Marian Anderson Leslie Ureña, curator of photographs at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, will discuss Philadelphia-born contralto Marian Anderson (1897-1993) and her struggle for AfricanAmerican equality and civil rights. 3pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/MarianAndersonSBMA

SATURDAY 5/8 5/8: All-Levels Flow This class will encourage

THURSDAY 5/6

you to move and breathe intentionally. Alignment and variations will be offered that will make the class available to all levels. 10-11am. Shoreline Park West, 1237

5/6-5/9: A Crimson Holiday Presents A Very Special Mother’s Day Weekend Pop-Up Find

5/7:

the perfect gift from your favorite area artists. 11am6pm. La Cumbre Plaza, 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call (805) 453-4897 or email mardanne@silcom.com.

Springtime in France: Music of Les Six The

UCSB Department of Music will present this virtual chamber music recital on its YouTube channel. The program will include performances by faculty and special guests with solo and chamber works by the members of Les Six. 6-7pm. Free.

acrimsonholiday.com 5/6: Indy Virtual Book Club: Poetry Join S.B. Public Library and the Santa Barbara Independent for a book discussion about Nature Poem by Tommy Pico. Register to receive a Zoom link. 6-7pm. Free. Call (805) 564-5642 or email mwetta@santabarbaraca.gov.

tinyurl.com/SpringtimeInFrance

COURTESY

COURTESY

5/9 Y A D SUN

Shoreline Dr. $23. Call (805) 965-8811 or email support@ yogasoup.com. tinyurl.com/AllLevelsFlow

TUESDAY 5/11 5/11: Press Conference: Save Summerland Farm Sweet Wheel Farms and the S.B. Agriculture and Farm Education Foundation are the leaseholders of the 6.83 acres of dry farming owned by the Carpinteria Unified School District and will sell the property this November. Listen to experts discuss public and farmworker housing, food security, and steps to save the farm. 11amnoon. Whitney Ave. and Temple St., Summerland. Free. Call (805) 453-1465 or email sbafefoundation@gmail.com.

tinyurl.com/SaveSummerlandFarm 5/11: House Calls Virtual Event: Arthur C. Brooks Harvard professor and former president of the American Enterprise Institute, one of the nation’s preeminent think tanks, Arthur C. Brooks will discuss National Renewal followed by a moderated Q&A. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535.

tinyurl.com/ArthurCBrooks

5/9:

Zaca Creek Mother’s Day Brunch Make your

reservations for this three-course prix fixe brunch with multiple menu options with a Mimosa bar and Lindsay Branquinho’s “Favour” Pop-up Boutique. 10:30am-2pm. The Tavern at Zaca Creek, 1297 Jonata Park Rd., Buellton. $55/per person. Call (805) 6882412 or email reservations@zaca-creek.com.

zaca-creek.com/the-tavern-2

WEDNESDAY 5/12 5/12: AWC-SB Virtual Chapter Meeting: Clear is Kind. Unclear is Unkind The Association for Women in Communication presents S.B. workplace effectiveness coach and consultant Sara Caputo, who will share how clear communication boosts productivity and well-being in every area of your life. Paula Lopez will open the meeting with How to Produce a Successful News Conference. Register to receive a link. 5:30pm. Free-$10.

tinyurl.com/ClearIsKind Dr. Natasha Kislenko

tinyurl.com/SBIndyBookClub 5/6: 2021 Rupe Virtual Conference: Communicating about COVID-19 Attend one or more of UCSB Department of Communication’s five sessions on how public institutions, individuals, media, and organizations communicate (or don’t) about COVID-19. 11am-6:15pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/2021RupeCon

5/11:

5/6: Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion: Local Novelist Victoria Shorr Area author Victoria Shorr will discuss her latest novel, The Plum Trees, a story about one woman’s quest to recover her family’s history and story of loss and survival during the Holocaust. 7pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbook.com.

Winkler will join Pollock Theater Director Matt Ryan for a discussion of his role in the dark comedy Barry and his distinguished career in entertainment. Barry may be streamed in advance on Amazon Prime and HBO MAX. 4-5pm. Free. Call (805) 893-4637.

COURTESY

tinyurl.com/VictoriaShorr

tinyurl.com/Script-ScreenBarry

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 24

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 6, 2021

Virtual Event: Script to Screen – Barry Actor Henry

INDEPENDENT.COM


MAY

6-12

Cottage quality. Urgent care.

by

TERRY ORTEGA and SOPHIE LYND

Now Open in Goleta COURTESY

10 AY 5/ D N MO

NOW OPEN

Cottage clinical providers

Two convenient Goleta locations:

Goal of complete care in 45 minutes Walk-ins and online appointments

Hollister Village 7070 Hollister Ave #103

5/10:

Science Pub from Home: Humans and Mountain Lions Join UC Santa

Cruz Prof. Chris Wilmers, PhD, as he presents some of the long-term findings of the Santa Cruz Puma Project that studies the mysteries of mountain lion natural history. Don’t forget to order dinner from Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant. Register in advance. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Email scoleman@sbnature2.org. tinyurl.com/MountainLionSciencePub

5/11:

X-ray and lab services

Calle Real Shopping Center 5652 Calle Real

Open 8 a.m.–8 p.m., 365 days a year

cottagehealth.org/urgentcare

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Storywalk in the Park/Cuentos en el Parque Join outside to

Downtown Business

enjoy the picture book Finders Keepers, participate in activities with your children, and then take home a free activity kit. Social distancing guidelines will be in place. Acompáñanos en el parque paradisfrutar el libro ilustrado Finders Keepers participe en actividades con sus hijos y despues llévesea casa un kit de actividades gratis. Se implementarán pautas de distanciamiento social. 2-3:30pm. Parque de los Niños, 520 Wentworth Ave. Free/gratis. Call (805) 962-7653 or email youthservices@ santabarbaraca.gov.

Spotlight a virtual interview series Join Nick Welsh in conversation with Jesse Rosenberg (Santa Barbara BCycle), Scott Lamoine (Electric Bikes of Santa Barbara), Kent Epperson y Todam (SBCAG Traffic Solutions) in this week’s episode on “Biking Downtown.” ! 3p

at

tinyurl.com/Cuentos-Storywalk

COURTESY

Join Robin Elander in conversation with t Nexek! We

SKIP ABED

Santa Barbara Sailing Center

GREG GORGA Santa Barbara Maritime Museum

MADDY FOSSATTI Land and Sea Tours

Ocean Adventures Thursday, May 13 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 6, 2021

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25


‘EL VOZ’ HAS LEFT THE BUILDING A Downtown Window Washer and Elvis Tribute Performer Says Goodbye

ERICK MADRID PHOTOS

Sports

People

by Nick Welsh

I

NICK WELSH

t was one of those magical early-morning moments casinos of Palm Springs and Indio. He worked real that make you glad to be up before anyone else. A estate finance in Tustin. He returned to Santa Barbara man wearing blue shorts, white sneakers, and a red- about 10 years ago to help raise a son about to enter and-black plaid Pendleton-style shirt is singing on film school. A few years ago, Frink decided it was time State Street at the top of his lungs. He’s holding a win- to go public with his inner Elvis. As he tells it, it was an dow washer squeegee pole with a Bluetooth speaker accident of fate. Calling down a long hallway to a dog named Blue box attached to the end. Blasting out of the speaker is what passes for his backup band. It’s way too early in — yes, Blue, as in “Blue Moon of Kentucky,” the Bill Monroe classic that Elvis injected with amphetamines the day for street musicians to be setting up shop. and made his own — he got sonically boomeranged Is he a nut? No, it’s Elvis. Or more precisely, it’s El Voz del Rey, by the reverb. He could do this thing. His first gig, a k a The Voice of the King. And El Voz is totally for he recalled, was a wine festival. “I was really nervous real, crooning, purring, growling, belting, hiccupping, with all those people staring at me,” he recounted. “I didn’t know what to do. and singing to the dawn of a Then it came to me — screw brand-new day. The dawn, it this: I’d been singing Elvis turns out, is enjoying the attenmy entire life. I just rememtion and reciprocates with a bered jumping up and down splash of radiance both warm on my bed in my pajamas, and cool. singing into my hairbrush. Am I the only one who gets That took care of it.” to see this? Before COVID, Frink State Street, it turns out, still was averaging one or two has a few tricks up its sleeve. gigs a month, private parSo, it turns out, does Chris ties, things like that. He Frink, the alter ego who credid all the old standards ated the sideburned and pom— “Hound Dog,” “Don’t Be padoured El Voz. In real life Cruel,” “Love Me Tender,” — as opposed to magical realand “Jailhouse Rock.” But ism of the moment — Frink is he’s got about 118 songs proa window washer. grammed into his Bluetooth. Over the years, Frink says, Of those, he can perform 90 he’s washed a lot of windows. without words or music. “There is no window on State That’s five hours of music, Street that I haven’t washed,” he said, without repeating he said. He remembers the Chris Frink, a k a El Voz del Rey a song. names of businesses that have Over the years, Frink has come and gone. He himself washed into Santa Barbara in 1986, having just gotten learned a few tricks of the trade. “Don’t play more out of the U.S. Navy. He tried his hands working in a than two or three fast songs in the beginning of a set,” lemon orchard. That lasted just three days. “My hands he cautioned. “The adrenaline will floor you.” Perhaps were totally shredded,” he said. So he and his traveling the ultimate compliment Frink has received came after buddy at the time took to washing windows instead. his adult son finally listened to Elvis on his own. “You The capital requirements are low, and the money’s know,” his son said, “that guy sounds like you.” Frink is now packing up and leaving town. His good enough. Frink was born in Plainfield, Connecticut. His mother, now in her eighties, is physically frail and father was a truck driver who seized upon the Johnny living alone in Florida. She needs help. Chances are, Paycheck classic “Take This Job and Shove It,” sing- Frink said, he’s never coming back. The apartments ing it around the house upon his retirement with that now rent for $3,000 a month, he said, will go for the fervor of a religious convert. Country music was $4,000 in a couple of years. “Landlords say, ‘Oh, that’s big in the Frink household. Elvis was, well, god. As a what the market will bear,’ ” he commented. “That 10-year-old kid, Frink remembers singing Elvis, using means, ‘Oh, I can gouge you this much.’ ” Frink takes a cigarette break next to his Honda van his hairbrush as a mic. From 3rd grade on, he played every kind of horn and was in all kinds of bands along in the CVS parking lot. He looks around at the mounthe way. In the Navy, he played in the Drum and Bugle tains and the sky; he looks around at the people comCorps while stationed in San Diego. “It was the best ing out of their early-morning exercise class. “Man,” he exclaimed, “this is a beautiful town.” detail I ever had,” he said. Before he goes, Frink — El Voz del Rey — wanted to Frink never considered himself a singer; singing was just one of the things he did. Elvis is who and what say goodbye. “Thanks to all my clients over the years,” he sang. Exclusively. Yes, Frink sports all the requisite he said, “for letting me into your homes and shops.” jumpsuits and high-collared black shirts to be the He gave one last shoutout to the Fiesta and Solstice King. He can curl a convincing lip. But don’t make the parades, as well. “Who else has a weeklong party mistake of calling him an Elvis impersonator. He most right in the middle of town?” he asked. To everyone else — friends, fellow musicians, and members of his decidedly is not. He is, instead, a tribute performer. Frink has come and gone since first moving to church — he expressed gratitude for “the greatest of n Santa Barbara. He dealt cards for a while in the desert memories.” 26

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MAY 6, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

UCSB BASEBALL Eyes Postseason E

xpectations were high coming into the 2021 season for the UCSB baseball team, and with the majority of the regular season completed, a special season is still on the table as the Gauchos begin a decisive stretch of Big West conference play. UCSB (29-13 overall, 20-8 Big West conference) is currently looking up in the standings at first-place UC Irvine (26-14, 18-6), whose Anteaters will be in town for a four-game series beginning Friday for what figures to be a season-defining showdown. “It’s a big weekend. They’re ahead of us; we all know it; everybody can look and see that. It’s the elephant in the room,” said UCSB head coach Andrew Checketts. “ They’re good, and we’re going to have to come out by Victor Bryant and play well.” After going 13-2 in the abbreviated 2020 season, including a victory over No. 1–ranked UCLA, the Gauchos returned nearly every player on their roster and came into the season ranked in the top 10 in some of the preseason polls. In 2021, the Gauchos have performed well but lack the signature victories out of conference that would give them margin for error in terms of an NCAA tournament berth. With an RPI of 66 and zero Quadrant 1 wins heading into the UC Irvine series, the Gauchos will likely need the automatic berth into the NCAA tournament that is awarded to the Big West Champion. Injuries to key players, including middle infielders Marcos Castanon and McClain O’Connor, have played a major role in UCSB’s season. Add in the loss of Friday

Gauchos Face Critical Weekend Series Against UC Irvine


Travel

starter Zach Torra, and it’s undeniable that the Gauchos have faced major adversity. “We had some key injuries,” said Checketts of O’Connor, his leadoff hitter, and Castanon, the team’s strongest batter. “The guys that have filled in for them have done a really nice job.” A major bright spot this season has been the play of newcomers Broc Mortensen and Zach Rodriguez, who are now fixtures in the middle of the UCSB lineup and consistently produced. Mortensen is a Ventura High product who played football at Cal Poly his freshman year before switching to baseball and transferring to UCSB after a stint at Cuesta College. He leads the Gauchos with 10 home runs this season. “I feel like it’s about taking care of our stuff on and off the field. Even though we’re new faces around here, we’ve been able take care of opportunities,” Mortensen said. “We’re not trying to press or do anything else; we’re just trying to play some baseball.” Rodriguez is a freshman who leads the entire Big West conference with 39 RBI. He is also second on the team with a .372 batting average. In addition, Jordan Sprinkle has done an admirable job as a middle infielder in the absence of O’Connor and Castanon, while hitting .364 and notching a Big West–leading 18 stolen bases. This “next man up” mentality has served the Gauchos well. “I think the guys have handled some of the adversity that they’ve had to deal with. The guys that have gotten their opportunities have made the most of it,” Checketts said. “We’re not a finished product by any stretch of the imagination.” In the series with UC Irvine, the Gauchos will have a worthy opponent. The Anteaters are coming off a split of a fourgame series with Long Beach State but boast a talented group and an impressive resume with victories over Pac 12 programs Oregon State, Stanford, UCLA, and Washington this season. “We’ve had some weekends or some games this year where we’ve just been able to out-talent people because we have a talented team, but that’s not going to be the case with Irvine,” said Checketts of the pivotal series. The first game of the series with UC Irvine begins on Friday at 5 p.m. The two teams will play a doubleheader on Saturday in which the second game will be nationally televised on ESPNU beginning at 7 p.m. n

living

K ARYN R. MILLET

WINNING WEEKEND: Left, UCSB freshman pitcher James Callahan got the win at Sunday’s home game against Cal Poly. Below, UCSB short stop Jordan Sprinkle fields a ball, and third baseman Cole Cummings congratulates Jason Willow on his run.

p. 27

Style Meets Serenity at the

HOTEL YNEZ

H

otelier Kimberly Walker planned to open the Hotel Ynez last fall, but the pandemic had a schedule of its own. After months of COVIDcaused shortages, delays, and innumerable complexities, the property is finally open for business. “We never really thought there was going to be a worldwide pandemic and a shutdown,” said Walker. “It makes being able to be open even more special.”

New Wine Country Inn Offers Santa Barbarans a Staycation Solution by Alex Ward Walker is the cofounder and managing partner of the Nomada Hotel Group, a hospitality company specializing in the renovation of historic hotels, including San Luis Obispo’s Granada and the Skyview in Los Alamos. For those of us who remember the “Bates Motel meets haunted truck stop” aesthetic of the Skyview in the ’90s, Walker’s transformation of the property from scary to chic is a true testament to her abilities. Walker’s latest endeavor is an idyllic 22-room midcentury sanctuary set on a hilltop outside of Solvang. Once an aging motor lodge, the Hotel Ynez has been reimagined as a tranquil winecountry getaway featuring well-appointed rooms, upscale amenities, and an emphasis on outdoor spaces. The inn’s beautifully landscaped central courtyard makes for a convivial atmosphere in which discreetly placed speakers and a carefully curated playlist of slow jams set a decidedly chilled-out tone. Ample Adirondack chairs, stylish picnic tables, and a bocce-ball court sit beneath a canopy of old-growth oak trees, beckoning visitors to spend a day in the Santa Ynez sun. “We wanted to create a sacred space in the center where guests can feel like they can relax outside of their room in common areas,” Walker says, “but also still feel like they’re in an intimate environment.” At night, the outdoor pavilion is especially stunning, with citrus and conifers awash in lantern light and expansive fire pits providing warmth and an undeniably romantic ambience. It’s the perfect set-

ting for sharing a blanket and a bottle of wine with someone near and dear. “It’s almost like this elevated camping experience,” says Walker. “There’s an outdoor element, and yet you still get to go back into your room and sleep in a really nice bed.” Indeed, Hotel Ynez’s rooms are exceptionally comfortable, with luxurious Montauk bedding and bespoke club chairs ensuring a restful stay. Though the aesthetic is vintage, the creature comforts are appropriately modern, including speedy Wi-Fi and oversized televisions. Some rooms are outfitted with gas fireplaces and Jacuzzi tubs. But arguably the most compelling feature of the guestrooms is what lies just outside their doors. One of Walker’s essential changes to the property was to transform each unit’s motel-style parking space into a private patio lined with dry stacked limestone and furnished with remarkably cozy Bolivian hammocks. Although the hotel lacks a dine-in restaurant, takeaway boxed breakfasts are included in the room rate. Guests may also opt to purchase a BBQ kit, packed with Santa Maria–style meat and seasonal vegetables delivered to their patio alongside a portable propane grill. While I can’t personally relate, those looking for something more active than a meat-induced hammock nap can take a dip in the property’s understated swimming pool or choose to borrow one of several available Linus bicycles. For a Santa Barbaran, the Hotel Ynez represents a fantastic option for a quiet staycation somewhere sufficiently different yet eminently accessible. There is something particularly enjoyable about spending a peaceful evening in the Solvang area, long after the hordes of æbleskiver-stuffed tourists have returned from whence they came. Moreover, the Hotel Ynez offers a throwback glimpse of a simpler era, when California’s roadside lodges encouraged their visitors to step outside, breathe in the Pacific air, and take some time to unwind. Standing on my room’s patio in the warm valley breeze, waving at the neighbors and flipping ribs on the Weber grill, I felt a sudden kinship with all the 1960s vacation dads who came before me, and I wondered how I might look in plaid shorts and tall black socks. n

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MAY 6, 2021

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27


AH a

DIGITAL CLEANSE

Summer 2021

INTRODUCING AHA!’s first-ever Digital Cleanse! Five device-free days exploring nature and diving into creative expression and outdoor activities at breathtaking El Capitan Canyon. From Monday, June 21 - Friday, June 25, for teens aged 14-19. E-mail ahadigitalcleanse2021@gmail.com to request an application. “I love the way AHA has help me in the four years that I have been in the program and grow to love it more and more every year. I love how much AHA creates a safe and welcoming space to be who you are without judgment.”

A H a!

21 0 2 R E UMM TM

S

Get Inspired Art Program: Teens aged 13-18. Art exploration with community artists in collaboration with historic Casa del Herrero. July 5 - 26. Contact molly@ahasb.org.

Monday

Tue/Wed/Th

Friday

Saturday

“I loved the experience of being able to participate in the project of constructing a new farm from scratch. While working on the Littlest Little Farm, I learned how to start building my own farm and how to sustain and manage animals and insects that help the ecosystem flourish. ” * “In AHA!, I have made many friends, and I come back every year to help and support new teens like older teens did for me.”

AHA! Summer Groups: Teens aged 14-18 AHA! Summer: Three days a week of outdoor fun and connection, building emotional intelligence, leadership, and creativity. July 6 – 29. Morning & afternoon groups. Contact perla.ahasb@gmail.com. EQ Vibes! Music Group: Teens aged 14-18 learn to express themselves through music composition and collaboration - no music experience required. In collaboration with The Turner Foundation. July 9 – 30. Contact brandonbattle.ahasb@gmail.com. AHA!’s Littlest Little Farm: Teens aged 13-19 lovingly maintain a small-scale biodynamic farm under the supervision of AHA! facilitators and farm educator. Participants take home fresh organic produce. Contact perla.ahasb@gmail.com. PHOTOS: Carly Otness Photography

AHA! | 1209 De La Vina Street, Suite A | Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 770-7200 Ext. 3 | ahasb.org | @aha_sb | enrollment@ahasb.org 28

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MAY 6, 2021

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HEATHER DAENITZ PHOTOS

openings

FOOD &DRINK

STEAKS & SIPS: Sear Steakhouse expands on the traditional steakhouse format to serve meats, veggies, and more, much of which is grown on the owners’ nearby farm.

Sear Steakhouse

S

urfing Cows, Santa Barbara syrah, and a juicy

tomahawk steak — that’s what my “return to normalcy” tasted like. Of course, we aren’t quite there yet, and no one knows what “the new normal” will be. But that cocktail, wine, and hunk of meat are at least what I’ll remember about eating indoors at a restaurant — with other people nearby! — for the first time in a very long time. The setting was Solvang’s Sear Steakhouse, one of the many Santa Ynez Valley restaurants that have opened, or are about to open, amid the pandemic. It’s a partnership between two of the region’s more formidable hospitality forces: Alberto Battaglini, the Verona, Italy–raised bartender who exponentially elevated the valley’s craft cocktail game when he helped open S.Y. Kitchen in 2012; and Demetri “Jimmy” Loizides, a restaurateur and chef who modeled his three-acre farm in the style of his parents’ village in Cyprus and used those harvests to power K’Syrah Catering & Events for years. (He and his wife, Karen Loizides, also now own the legendary Maverick Saloon in Santa Ynez, as well as three Greek restaurants in Southern California.)

Alberto Battaglini Runs Classic Format in Former Event Space BY MATT KETTTMANN

When the pandemic decimated the catering industry, Loizides approached Battaglini with the idea of turning K’Syrah’s event space on Fourth Place near Copenhagen Drive into a classic steakhouse. “The idea is super valid — this meets all the needs of the valley, with the feeling of a steakhouse but still a little ranch-y,” said Battaglini. “We sat down, laid a plan down, and started working on it.” It wasn’t Battaglini’s first time developing a new concept. Almost three years ago, he opened Pony Espresso, which serves a range of coffee drinks as well as simple breakfast, lunch, smoothies, and

gelato in Santa Ynez. That was his breakout move after helping to run S.Y. Kitchen for more than six years. “I just wanted to do something on my own wings,” explained Battaglini, who was actually first schooled as a chef. “I never liked it,” he said of those early kitchen days in Italy. “So I jumped in front of the bar.” Part of the early wave of bartenders who brought a culinary mindset to cocktails, Battaglini spent nine years in London and then time in Mexico and Spain before coming to Toscana in Los Angeles, which is owned by the family behind S.Y. Kitchen. Sear’s core concepts are de rigueur in today’s restaurant world: sustainable ingredients, as regional as possible, full-throttle farm-to-table — although their produce comes primarily from just two properties: the Loizides’ acreage and Roblar Farm, both very nearby. Seafood is also a prominent option, and Battaglini expects that the daily specials options will one day rival the size of the regular menu. “We have the classic part of the menu because it’s a steakhouse format,” said Battaglini. “Then you have these modern twists, which are vegetable-forward. We’re just tweaking it a little bit with modern ingredients and modern tools.” That ethos extends to the drinks, which depend on farm-raised ingredients, such as the bell peppers that were in both the Surfing Cow — a gin- and Aperol-based ode to the cattle ranching tradition of Santa Rosa Island — and the Barbacoa, a mezcal cocktail whose smoke is further balanced by jalapeño and cilantro. “I wanted to push the bar a little above the situation in Solvang,” said Battaglini of the drinks he developed, which include a line of martinis that are shaken tableside, such as the Irish Gunpowder gin version my friend Señor M. ordered. Battaglini hopes the bar will be a regular haunt for neighbors, explaining, “We want to be a focal point for locals to come by after COVID and enjoy their life.”

Working the grill is Erik Dandee, a Pacific Northwest native whose nearly 20 years of experience extends from family-owned steakhouses like Sear to gigs in Palm Springs at the Wolfgang Puck Kitchen & Bar and Birba inside the Alcazar Hotel. Trying to survive the pandemic, he’d been applying to an endless run of restaurants when Sear called. “I’ve always worked at steakhouses, and I always ended up on a grill,” said Dandee, who’s excited to once again serve prime rib on Sundays. He told us as much as we finished what we could of our expertly charred, 32-ounce tomahawk, which came out alongside our crispy Brussels sprouts and fried cauliflower, enhanced with a roasted tomato choka sauce. We’d started off with the beet and goat cheese salad, recommended for its crunchy-saltytangy blend by our server Kara Teel, another wine country hospitality veteran. We followed drinks with the Barieau syrah from the surrounding Los Olivos District, made by Bingo Wathen. The son of Foxen cofounder Billy Wathen, Bingo happened to be working at the bar that night, so he came over to personally thank us for the order. The only minor gripe was that our two-top was too little table for the feast we ordered, but by the time Battaglini was explaining the ins and outs of amaro, we didn’t care. I opted for the Nonino, a bitter liqueur made with saffron, while Señor M. reconnected with his Argentinian days by ordering the Branca Menta, a minty cousin of Fernet Branca, which is beloved down there. Both helped soak up the butter cake we ordered, a globby treat that’s not too impressive to look at but provided a warm, rich, and comforting bite. “It’s like a warm shortbread cookie,” said Señor M.

FOOD & DRINK

Drops Tomahawks and Martinis on Solvang

p.29

COCKTAIL LEGEND: After years behind the bar at S.Y. Kitchen, Verona-raised Alberto Battaglini is now a partner and manager of Sear Steakhouse in Solvang and also owns Pony Espresso in Santa Ynez.

When I called Battaglini on the phone later, I was curious whether this steakhouse format is indeed a unique American idea, as we seem to think. From his experience in Italy, London, and elsewhere, Battaglini confirmed that, while plenty of meat is served at restaurants around the world, this steakas-star, martini-as-mandatory appears to be our invention. “This is really an American concept,” he said. We also talked briefly about staffing, which is a real struggle for restaurants emerging out of the pandemic. So far, Battaglini seems pleased with the team he’s assembled. “We have a crew of pirates, and we are pushing it through every day,” he explained. “That’s it!”

478 4th Pl., Solvang; (805) 245-9564; searsteakhouse.com

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FOOD & DRINK

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W

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L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

hat I felt that was missing in the Santa Ynez Valley was the equivalent of an English pub,” says Anna Arrowsmith, a London-raised former adult film director and gender studies expert who took over the former home of Wandering Dog last summer and reopened the Solvang location as Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar in the fall. “That British pub vibe PUB & VINO VIBES: Tim and Anna Arrowsmith hope to cultivate English pub vibes without the theme,” concurs at their eponymous wine bar in Solvang, where they serve 47 wines by the glass, 23 her husband, Tim Arrowbeers, and veggie food. smith, who was born outside of Manchester and runs his family’s labeling and As it is for many Europeans, the Arrowsmiths packaging business. “We wanted to have a little bit grew up with wine as an everyday part of life, so of what we missed.” they know the Old World well. While there’s plenty That vibe, they explained, is welcoming to all of Central Coast wine to be had, they’ve expanded sorts of people — especially single women who the bar’s international selections to reflect their own want a glass of wine on their way home from work global interests, and the retro advertising posters on —and so friendly in nature that folks of disparate the walls amplify such globetrotting. “They’re little backgrounds and viewpoints can find common nods to places we’ve been, or places of significance ground over good drink. “I love when I see that,” for us,” said Tim. said Anna of when she notices complete strangNo matter where the wine comes from, though, ers striking up a conversation in her bar. “You’ve both Tim and Anna must approve of each bottle for it to make their menu. They serve 47 wines by the glass made them comfortable enough.” She’s uniquely qualified at making human —from falanghina made in Campania and Greek beings comfortable, and in much more stressful rosé to Santa Maria Valley pinot noir and Paso Robles settings. As Britain’s first female porn director in malvasia bianca—and offer $15 tastings of three to the late 1990s — when the genre was still techni- five wines. “We like variety,” said Tim, whose list cally illegal there—Anna Span, as she was known changes weekly. “We like offering interesting, somethen, made such films from a female perspective, times quirky wines.” Like Wandering Dog, winning multiple awards and critical acclaim Arrowsmith’s features a wine club, and for challenging that industry’s maleits four levels are named after their five focused standards. She parlayed canine companions, ranging in price her work into academia, earning from $120 to $480 per shipment. degrees in the study of feminism There are 23 beers as well, includand masculinity, writing a book, ing three on tap, almost all of which and eventually teaching gender are European, and Intelligentsia studies courses at UCSB. coffee for a hot drink. The small That’s what brought the Arrowfood menu is vegetarian and N smiths to the Santa Ynez Valley in 2017, meant to share. “We want to be TMAN T E K TT the place where people come for a when they bought a home and a small BY M A fresh veggie bite in between the big brunch at vineyard. Those grapes have become the their hotel and a steak dinner at night,” said Anna, a soul of an eponymous wine project with winemaker Ariki Hill — for sale at the bar, of vegetarian herself. course. But they’d moved to Pasadena a few years Opening amid the pandemic is allowing the earlier, having become enamored of the state dur- Arrowsmiths to dial in their offerings, and they ing a visit to celebrate Anna’s 40th birthday in look forward to offering live music and other public 2014. events, like speakers on philosophy or other subjects, When a “For Sale” sign popped up in front which is common in pub culture. But they’re already of Wandering Dog in 2020, Anna snapped into pleased to see familiar faces of locals as well as return action. “We thought someone else was going to traffic from tourists who escape Los Angeles on the screw it up,” she explained. That popular wine weekends. “We’ve been getting a lot of that,” said bar on Highway 246 in the heart of the Danish- Anna, “and it’s lovely.” themed town had been run since 2007 by CT and Jody Williams, who are now focused on Broken 1539-C Mission Dr., Solvang; (805) 686-9126; arrowsmithwine.com Clock Vinegar Works.

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Dine Out

NoTown Tavern ast March, readers Steve H. and Brian

told me that Monty’s Sports Bar, the dive bar at 5114 Hollister Avenue, in the Magnolia Center just east of Goleta (a region affectionately known as Noleta), had permanently closed and that a replacement was coming: NoTown Tavern. Steve H. wants to let you know that NoTown Tavern is now open for business. Their original plan was to partner with Woody’s BBQ to offer food, but I don’t know if that is still happening. I have also heard that NoTown Tavern will be making superb cocktails with Goleta Red Distilling Company’s Goodland Gin.

SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY AT HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS READER STEVE H.

OPENS L

TAKE OUT

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm | Sunday Prix-Fixe 5 - 7:30 pm 1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

GELSON’S REOPENING CELEBRATION: Evolving

RESTAURANT STAFFING WOES: John Bennett, whose family owns Brophy Bros., On the Alley, Benchmark Eatery, and Farmer Boy, offers some thoughts on the restaurant workforce and how it has been affected by the pandemic: To Those We Wish to Serve,

Santa Barbara’s restaurant industry, having suffered an almost fatal blow from the pandemic quarantine, is now dealing with lingering side effects. Even as restaurant sales are rebounding from the pandemic-hammered levels of a year ago, Santa Barbara full-service restaurants are struggling to ramp back up because they can’t recruit enough employees. Even with 1.8 million restaurant workers displaced by the crisis since February 2020, the local full-service restaurant industry’s labor crunch is in full force. I assure you that full-service restaurant operators understand that service will be more important than ever as guests unleash their pent-up demand for enhanced restaurant experiences. They’re going to want to be waited on, pampered, and served an experience they could never re-create at home. And it will be up to restaurants to deliver, because even as that pent-up demand fuels dine-in traffic, customers will remain aware of the convenience we delivered during the pandemic. They’ll know how to dial up delivery, order ahead, pick up, shop curbside, and all those channels that kept them afloat during COVID. They will not be happy when they return to dine-in if the experience is not as satisfying. The loss of an experienced workforce is, therefore, a side effect of the pandemic. Many in the community may be wondering, “What happened to all the wonderful servers we came to know and look forward to seeing again? Where did they go?” 1. While restaurants were furloughing their whole workforces, employers in other

industries kept hiring. Businesses like supermarkets, e-retailers, and fulfillment warehouses scarfed up the former busboys, servers, and kitchen workers, who welcomed the relative safety those fields afforded. 2. Rival industries tried to lock in their employees by raising pay. Target, for instance, temporarily raised its standard pay to $15 an hour, and Amazon increased its starting wage to the same amount. 3. Because restaurant workers are more exposed to the COVID-19 virus, hospitality occupations became less and less attractive. 4. Women, the very backbone of the restaurant business, fell out of the workforce due to child-care issues and school not being in full swing. 5. The extension of the enhanced unemployment benefits of $300 until September 6 enabled restaurant employees to wait a little longer before jumping back in. 6. College being held remote and not on campus removed most of the UCSB students from our labor force. Restaurant work has been the mainstay employment for Americans in transition since the end of World War II. They have been attracted to the flexible hours, high hourly tipped income, the entertainment atmosphere, and the magic that comes with being of service. They will return, but, unfortunately, it’s not likely until after the summer. We hope the guests are aware of this struggle and show some empathy for the workforce carrying the load.

FOOD & DRINK

with the communities it serves, Gelson’s announced that it will be celebrating the grand reopening of its Santa Barbara loca- NEW BAR IN TOWN: The NoTown Tavern just opened in the Magnolia tion at 3305 State Street in Loreto Plaza Shopping Center in Noleta. through May 23. The store, whose expanded format offers larger more, offering a savings of 40 percent or more. In wine, floral, and food preparation areas augment- business for 70 years, Gelson’s currently operates ing the already existing gourmet grocery store, 27 full-service specialty grocery stores in Southern will feature specials on meats, seafood, wine, and California.

Andersen’s Danish Restaurant & Bakery. Menu available for curbside or walk-up pickup. For dining in, order inside and we’ll bring you everything you need at an outside table. Open Daily 10am-6pm, closed Tuesday. Breakfast served until 2pm, Lunch & Dinner 12- Close. We also deliver through restaurant connection. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

Go behind the scenes

of this week’s Santa Barbara Independent and hear straight from our journalists about the cover story and more.

independent.com/theindy

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COURTESY

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TWELVE WAYS OF LOOKING AT MOTHER EARTH L I F E PAGE 32

TIERRA MADRE: Adriana Arriaga and Claudia Borfiga collaborated on “Nurture Our Mother,” now on view at Paseo Nuevo.

T

he Community Environmental Council’s annual Earth Day celebration took a double hit from the coronavirus pandemic, with the 2020 and 2021 events both moving from the festive Sunken Gardens of the Santa Barbara County Courthouse to the virtual world of livestreaming. Looking for a way to pre-

grid containing 12 images of nature that people would recognize and appreciate as indigenous to Santa Barbara. From monarch butterflies to a mushroom, a hummingbird, and an ear of corn, these icons of the 805 biota indicate not just the vitality of our region, but also the interconnectedness and unity of its ecosystem. In the mural’s largest panel, keeping watch over everything, there’s one of Arriaga’s instantly recognizable madres, the pop art versions of traditional votive images that this Xicana artist has made her signature trope. Coming from different backgrounds has not stopped these artists from finding common ground in their passion for public art. Since moving to Santa Barbara from Great Britain several years ago, Claudia Borfiga has proved to be one of the city’s most thoughtful and productive creators in the emerging field of social practice art. In this medium, which is sometimes referred to as relational aesthetics, the emphasis is on the interaction between the audience, the artwork, and the social systems within which the event takes place. Whether she’s working with the Print Power group she founded in 2018 to create grants-funded screenprinting workshops as a means to explore trauma or holding a popup show in the Funk Zone to remind us all that some-

NEW MURAL IN PASEO NUEVO EXPRESSES ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS serve some of the missing pageantry associated with the festival, this year the CEC teamed up with the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara, the Arts Fund, Paseo Nuevo, and Santa Barbara BCycle to sponsor a 60-foot mural on the Paseo Nuevo Arts Terrace Parking Deck. A panel of judges, one from each organization plus two additional community members, Maria Rendón and Arturo Heredia Soto, came together and selected “Nurture Our Mother,” by Adriana Arriaga and Claudia Borfiga as the winning proposal from 27 entries. Responding to a call for entries that reflected this year’s Earth Day theme of climate leadership, Arriaga and Borfiga proposed a brightly colored horizontal

times people just get sad, Borfiga radiates a rare combination of intelligence, ingenuity, and empathy. Coming out of the MFA program at UC Davis, Adriana Arriaga knew what she wanted to do with her graduate degree in design. Since returning to Santa Barbara, where she grew up and attended SBCC, she has turned her eye toward the possibilities available for art that proceeds from a solid foundation in activism. With this new, high-profile project, she can expect to gain further attention in the art world while her 21st-century Xicana feminist imagery enters into the public art history of her hometown. What makes this collaboration special, in addition to the evident skill and creativity that went into the work, is the degree to which these artists share a common goal of bringing all people into a deeper understanding of the obligation we have to serve the planet we have been given to protect. As Borfiga told me one afternoon while taking a break from riding the lift to complete the painting, “Whatever we do to the earth at this time we’re going to pass on to the next generation. If we make a mess of it, we are going to have nothing left to give them.” Fortunately, now we have been given this beautiful and inspiring work to remind us of that every time we see it.

WHEN THEY CALL YOU A TERRORIST

Sometimes, all it takes to change the world is a phrase. In July of 2013, Patrisse Cullors became one of the most influential authors of the 21st century with just three words. In an exchange on Facebook with her close friend and fellow activist Alicia Garza, she responded to the injustice she felt at the acquittal of Trayvon Martin’s killer with a simple hashtag: #BlackLivesMatter. Cullors now has a book, When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir, co-written with Asha Bandele and filled with fascinating stories and insights from the life of a queer woman of color who grew up in Southern California’s San Fernando Valley. Don’t miss the chance to hear Cullors speak at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 12, as part of the UCSB Arts & Lectures Race to Justice series. For more information and to register for the talk, visit artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. —CD

—Charles Donelan

THE POETS WILL SEE YOU NOW For Laure-Anne Bosselaar, the former poet laureate of Santa Barbara, writing poetry and editing poetry anthologies comes about as naturally as breathing. She’s been at it for decades now, and her latest anthology may well be the one that’s read the most often. While You Wait: A Collection by Santa Barbara County Poets is published by Santa Barbara–based Gunpowder Press, and although there are physical copies of the book available both for purchase and at the public library, the work’s primary manifestation is a website, whileyouwait.org, that’s accessible through QR codes that will be popping up on posters in doctor’s waiting rooms and on buses all over town in coming weeks. Originally conceived as an alternative to those well-thumbed stacks of National Geographic, Ladies’ Home Journal, Sunset, and Highlights for Children that have been the mainstays of waiting rooms since time immemorial, While You Wait took a turn for the digital when the pandemic imposed severe restrictions on what surfaces could circulate in public spaces. That’s when Chryss Yost, co-editor of Gunpowder Press with David Starkey, began thinking about QR codes and what they could do to connect individuals with literature while on the go. In partnership with Sansum Clinic, which is celebrating a century of health care in Santa Barbara, and with the help of the County Office of Arts & Culture and the MTA, Yost hatched a plan to provide QR-assisted access to the work of 80 poets throughout not only the various waiting rooms, but also on the public transportation that many people take to reach them. For Bosselaar, this freedom to include multiple examples of work by each author, and to have the poems cross-indexed for easier access, meant that her dream of a flexible anthology could be realized. As she observed of the various emotional experiences one might have in a doctor’s waiting room, or even on the bus, “they’re all different, right? There’s a whole range, and no matter where they are in that process, they might find a poem that connects for them.” —CD

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 32

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CONT’D CRISTIAN ARAMBULA / @SUNDAYGALLOP

ARTS LIFE

ALL HAIL THE

QUEENTIDE! BAND OF POLYMATHS, ARTISTS, AND SURFERS SINGS THE PRAISES OF GOLETA

T

by Alex Ward

here are songs about Goleta, and almost all of them are disparaging. Take the track “Goleta” by ska band Mad Caddies, which repeatedly describes the town as “not the place I wanna be.” Or Camper van Beethoven’s “(Don’t You Go To) Goleta,” an upbeat little number depicting the seaside community as a playground for “fascist rich kids.” And let’s not forget Lagwagon’s creatively titled ditty “Lag Wagon,” a blistering condemnation of Goleta’s “smalltown minds” and culture of “beer bongs and bong hits.” But here to redeem Goleta’s musical reputation at long last comes the band Queentide and their bassdriven earworm “West Goleta,” a loving tribute to the incomparable charms of gentlemen who exit the freeway at Storke Road. “Out on the street / there’s lots of boys I get to meet,” croons lead singer Madeline Dahm, “but there’s nobody that’s as sweet / as those boys out in west Goleta.” It’s a bouncy, celebratory tune that romanticizes sandy hands and sticky tar, name checks Devereux Slough, and compels the listener to “keep Goleta country!” As a boy from north-central Goleta, I humbly nominate it as the city’s official anthem. Formed in 2019, Queentide is a collective of creative polymaths, artists, and surfers who first cut their teeth performing at venues like M.Special and SOhO. The band identifies its music as “porch rock,” a description meant literally—early rehearsals occurred on the front stoop of their Westside rental —and one that belies the complexity and seriousness of their work; twee hipsterism it is not. Lyrically, Queentide’s songs explore a broad range of human experience, from the paralyzing infatuation of “Sliver of Moon” (“It’s time to get out of my dreams / I’m scratching you out of the scenes / rewind / I’d like to reclaim my mind”) to the Pixies-esque “Sticky Salty,” an ode to post-coital contentment: “We wake up warm / we wake up slow / fingers sticky, salty, low.” Others speak to a kind of agitated restlessness, including gothic surf rocker “Seasick” (“Home’s feeling pretty far / guess I’ll move into my car / staying still’s a little hard”) and the recently released folk-pop single “Filled with Water,” on which guitarist Cameron Crabtree’s beautifully lilting melody contrasts with a sentiment of discomfort: “Sometimes I feel like heading straight for the hills / because something ain’t right when I’m sleeping at night / it ain’t home.”

“I wrote ‘Filled with Water’ on the other side of the world,” explains Dahm, “thinking about missing Santa Barbara, missing the ocean, and coming back and being like, ‘Oh wait, it’s not all perfect here’ because you have new situations that arise.” Indeed, unexpected complications have challenged the group from the outset. Not long after Queentide’s formation, when the band was beginning to hit its stride and had booked a full slate of shows, Dahm was diagnosed with breast cancer. “It was hard, and I was really bald and doing chemotherapy,” Dahm recalled. “The day after my chemo, I’d be lying sideways on the couch with the mic stand propped up, practicing. And then we’d go play our show, and all the chemo nausea would go away.” The experience would inspire “The Situation,” a shouty stomper featuring what is surely one of the American songbook’s finest raps about a malignant growth, penned and delivered by singer Bela Lafferty: “She’s got herself a situation / from the inception of a mutation / No amount of meditation could affect this cancerous creation.” Now cancer-free, Dahm is eager to return to the stage with her bandmates. But the pandemic has impeded matters, putting a strain on rehearsals and resulting in the cancelation of a scheduled tour throughout the Bay Area. “Everything just stopped, and it was sad for a while,” explained Dahm. “But there was a certain tipping point we reached when it was like, there’s not going to be live music for a long time. Maybe we can use this time productively and learn how to record ourselves.” The band is currently self-producing a new album and, in keeping with their lo-fi DIY ethos (drummer Diego Melgoza and bassist Emma Vogan provide Queentide’s cover art), recording it in their makeshift home studio. The hope is that the record will drop in late spring of this year, followed by the opportunity to regale hometown crowds once again with songs about the ineffable appeal of Ellwood boys. As for the tunes that portray Goleta in a less-thanflattering light, Dahm has a theory that those denigrations are merely a ruse: “All these people know that Goleta is the hot spot, and they’re just trying to deter others from coming here!”

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny CANCER

ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Created by Leonardo da Vinci in the

16th century, the “Mona Lisa” is one of the world’s most famous paintings. It’s hanging in the Louvre museum in Paris. In that same museum is a less renowned version of the “Mona Lisa”. It depicts the same woman, but she’s unclothed. Made by da Vinci’s student, it was probably inspired by a now-lost nude “Mona Lisa” painted by the master himself. Renaissance artists commonly created “heavenly” and “vulgar” versions of the same subject. I suggest that in the coming weeks, you opt for the “vulgar” “Mona Lisa”, not the “heavenly” one, as your metaphor of power. Favor what’s earthy, raw, and unadorned over what’s spectacular, idealized, and polished.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Taurus poet Vera Pavlova writes,

“Why is the word yes so brief? It should be the longest, the hardest, so that you could not decide in an instant to say it, so that upon reflection you could stop in the middle of saying it.” I suppose it makes sense for her to express such an attitude, given the fact that she never had a happy experience until she was 20 years old, and that furthermore, this happiness was “unbearable.” (She confessed these sad truths in an interview.) But I hope you won’t adopt her hard-edged skepticism toward YES anytime soon, Taurus. In my view, it’s time for you to become a connoisseur of YES, a brave explorer of the bright mysteries of YES, an exuberant perpetrator of YES.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In indigenous cultures from West

Africa to Finland to China, folklore describes foxes as crafty tricksters with magical powers. Sometimes they’re thought of as perpetrators of pranks, but more often they are considered helpful messengers or intelligent allies. I propose that you regard the fox as your spirit creature for the foreseeable future. I think you will benefit from the influence of your inner fox — the wild part of you that is ingenious, cunning, and resourceful.

(June 21-July 22): “The universe conspires in your favor,”

writes author Neale Donald Walsch. “It consistently places before you the right and perfect people, circumstances, and situations with which to answer life’s only question: ‘Who are you?’” In my book Pronoia Is the Antidote for Paranoia: How the Whole World Is Conspiring to Shower You with Blessings, I say much the same thing, although I mention two further questions that life regularly asks, which are: (1) What can you do next to liberate yourself from some of your suffering? (2) What can you do next to reduce the suffering of others, even by a little? As you enter a phase when you’ll get ample cosmic help in diminishing suffering and defining who you are, I hope you meditate on these questions every day.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The poet Anne Sexton wrote a letter to

a Benedictine monk whose real identity she kept secret from the rest of us. She told him, “There are a few great souls in my life. They are not many. They are few. You are one.” In this spirit, Leo, and in accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to take an inventory of the great souls in your life: the people you admire and respect and learn from and feel grateful for; people with high integrity and noble intentions; people who are generous with their precious gifts. When you’ve compiled your list, I encourage you to do as Sexton did: Express your appreciation; perhaps even send nostrings-attached gifts. Doing these things will have a profoundly healing effect on you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “It’s a temptation for any intelligent

person to try to murder the primitive, emotive, appetitive self,” writes author Donna Tartt. “But that is a mistake. Because it is dangerous to ignore the existence of the irrational.” I’m sending this message out to you, Virgo, because in the coming weeks it will be crucial for you to honor the parts of your life that can’t be managed through rational thought alone. I suggest you have

WEEK OF MAY 6

sacred fun as you exult in the mysterious, welcome the numinous, explore the wildness within you, un-repress big feelings you’ve buried, and marvel adoringly about your deepest yearnings.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Science writer Sharman Apt Rus-

sell provides counsel that I think you should consider adopting in the coming days. The psychospiritual healing you require probably won’t be available through the normal means, so some version of her proposal may be useful: “We may need to be cured by flowers. We may need to strip naked and let the petals fall on our shoulders, down our bellies, against our thighs. We may need to lie naked in fields of wildflowers. We may need to walk naked through beauty. We may need to walk naked through color. We may need to walk naked through scent.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): As Scorpio author Margaret Atwood

reminds us, “Water is not a solid wall; it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, being like water will be an excellent strategy for you to embrace during the coming weeks. “Water is patient,” Atwood continues. “Dripping water wears away a stone. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”

her career as a poet in earnest, reading extensively and finishing an average of one poem every day for many years.)

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now is a favorable time to celebrate both life’s changeableness and your own. The way we are all constantly called on to adjust to unceasing transformations can sometimes be a wearying chore, but I suspect it could be at least interesting and possibly even exhilarating for you in the coming weeks. For inspiration, study this message from the Welcome to Night Vale podcast: “You are never the same twice, and much of your unhappiness comes from trying to pretend that you are. Accept that you are different each day, and do so joyfully, recognizing it for the gift it is. Work within the desires and goals of the person you are currently, until you aren’t that person anymore.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian author Toni Morrison

SAGITTARIUS

described two varieties of loneliness. The first “is a loneliness that can be rocked. Arms crossed, knees drawn up; holding, holding on, this motion smooths and contains the rocker.” The second “is a loneliness that roams. No rocking can hold it down. It is alive, on its own.” Neither kind is better or worse, of course, and both are sometimes necessary as a strategy for selfrenewal — as a means for deepening and fine-tuning one’s relationship with oneself. I recommend either or both for you in the coming weeks.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In a letter to a friend in 1856, Sagittar-

PISCES

ian poet Emily Dickinson confessed she was feeling discombobulated because of a recent move to a new home. She hoped she would soon regain her bearings. “I am out with lanterns, looking for myself,” she quipped, adding that she couldn’t help laughing at her disorientation. She signed the letter “From your mad Emilie,” intentionally misspelling her own name. I’d love it if you approached your current doubt and uncertainty with a similar lightheartedness and poise. (P.S.: Soon after writing this letter, Dickinson began

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): England’s Prince Charles requires his

valet to iron his shoelaces and put toothpaste on his toothbrush and wash all of his clothes by hand. I could conceivably interpret the current astrological omens to mean that you should pursue similar behavior in the coming weeks. I could, but I won’t. Instead, I will suggest that you solicit help about truly important matters, not meaningless trivia like shoelace ironing. For example, I urge you to ask for the support you need as you build bridges, seek harmony, and make interesting connections.

HOMEWORK: The Dream of the Month Club wants to hear about your best nightly dreams. Truthrooster@gmail.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

s d a garre ! d ra

r

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$22.50/hr. The orientation, University gender of California primary floors consideration applycleaning. by 05/12/21, and carpet Ability to sex, sexual identity, Publishers Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative thereafter openwritten until filled. online is annational follow and Apply oral instructions origin, disability status, Association (CNPA), a 132‑year‑old, Action Employer, and status, all qualified at https://jobs.ucsb.edu 17682 with all in English. MustJobbe# familiar protected veteran or any 500‑member tradeInsurance. organization, is LOWEST PRICES on Health applicants receive consideration custodial power equipment including other will characteristic protected by for law. its next Executive The We have seeking the best rates from Director. top employment without regard toapply race,by truck mount carpet machine and high For primary consideration candidate must be an excellent companies!ideal Call Now! 1‑888‑989‑4807. color,3/22/20, religion,thereafter sex, sexual pressure washers. 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Apply online record of success as well as at PROGRAMMER least Pull‑Notice Program. 3 Days and hours at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #17781 five years of senior management ENTERPRISE & may vary toPLANNING meet the operational experience in a media environment or ARCHITECTURE needs of the dept. May be required DIVISION HELP DESK trade association. The compensation Explore to working andUCSB‑provided building a career wear an uniform. package for this position includes with theMultiple Application andavailable. Technology positions $18.62‑ TECHNICIAN a competitive base pay,Services a (ATS) team as an Applications $21.79/hr. The University of California STUDENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS & performance‑based bonus plan Programmer. and TECHNOLOGY (SIS&T) We Opportunity/ are committed to is an Equal Affirmative attractive benefits package. (Seeproviding the Serves as a Student Affairs (SA) Division Actionexceptional Employer, andcustomer all qualified DEVELOPMENT Job Bank at cnpa.com for detailedservice job to our will faculty, applicants receive students, consideration Tier 2 Help Desk Technician under the posting.) Qualified candidates should supervision of the Help Desk manager Now Hiring! ASSISTANT, and staff. See https://www.it.ucsb. for employment without regard forward re‑opens, a cover letter along edu/enterprise‑technology‑services. with As our community we want to race, color, religion, sex, sexual and guidance of other SIS&T Systems their to cnpajobs@gmail.com REGIONAL GIVING to be ready to resume serve. We have both Responsible for supporting applications orientation, gender identity, national staff. Supports all division users at (Cal‑SCAN) DEVELOPMENT FULL‑TIME & PART‑TIME positions for all and systems by UCSBstatus, employees, origin,used disability protected their locations; installs and configures Provide essential administrative and shifts & positions. Apply online www. with emphasis on the orIT Service veteran status, any other computer hardware and software. financial support that is critical to the COMPUTER/TECHor in Management PizzaManDans.com/Job‑Application systemprotected ServiceNow. characteristic by law. The Tier 2 Help Desk responds to successful of a complex requestsoperation that are escalated by Tier 1 person at 699 Linden Ave. Ask for Maria. IncludesForconducting business process primary consideration apply by COMPUTER & IT TRAINING fundraising Assists thefor Help Deskprogram. Field Reps. Responsible engineering tasks, systems 3/17/20, thereafter openanalysis, until filled. PROGRAM! Train at home to Directors with all aspects of analysis, the analysis of functional requirements, Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu requirements analysis, design, MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE become a Computer & Help Desk and implementation and diagnoses, research andstrategies resolution Job #20200102 implementation, and testing, as well planning Professional now! Call CTI for details! Regional Team, support the of problems. Reqs: toExperience with PORTABLE OXYGEN Concentrator as responding to End User Computing for the 888‑449‑1713 (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET) overall missionrepair, by securing computer hardware Windows May Be Covered by Medicare! Reclaim (EUC) tickets and & creating technical University’s HEALTH FITNESS from private donors Operating Systems, MS(individuals, Office in a independence and mobility with the documentation. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree support foundations corporations). Excellent Duties Networkandenvironment. LOWEST on Health compact design and long‑lasting battery in related area andPRICES / or equivalent CONSTRUCTION include scheduling appointments, Insurance. We have1+the years’ best rates customer service and communication of Inogen One. Free information kit! Call experience / training. making arrangements, skillstravel are essential. Notes:directing Criminal fromworking top companies! Call Now! 844‑327‑2824. (Cal‑SCAN) experience with ServiceNow calls, background updating databases and History check required. 1‑888‑989‑4807. from a development and(Cal‑SCAN) administrative critical paperwork Maintain a completing valid CA driver’s license, a perspective. 1+ years of experience spreadsheets, PROFESSIONAL withandUniversity clean DMV record enrollmentand in the workingLEGAL with Javascript, XML and HTML. in compliance Construction Project Engineer policies and procedures, and DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. $68,000 ‑ $71,000/yr. DOE. Note: Department needed for lg. apartment project, DID YOU KNOW that the average confidential, andof $25.19‑ $29.75/hr.high Theprofile, University Satisfactory criminal history background handling F/T, benefits, 401k. Exp. req’d. Start business spends the equivalent of sensitive matters. School is an Reqs: Equal High Opportunity/ check. The University of California is time California date: mid‑March. Email resumes to: nearly 1½ days per week on digital Diploma or equivalent combination of Affirmative Action Employer, and an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative awallace@wallacesmith.com, Attn: Ali marketing activities? CNPA can help education and experience. Ability to all qualified applicants will receive Action Employer, and all qualified WWW.WALLACESMITH.COM act professionally, and consideration forindependently, employment without savewillyoureceive time and money. For applicants consideration formore regard to race, sex, exercise discretion andcolor, soundreligion, judgment. ADMINISTRATIVE info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call employment without regard to race, sexual computer orientation,skills gender identity, EDUCATION including (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN) color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, Excellent ASSISTANT nationalin Word, origin,Excel, disability status, proficiency PowerPoint, INTERDISCIPLINARY HUMANITIES AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here –gender Get identity, national origin, disability Internet protected veteran or any and e‑mail and status, demonstrated PROFESSIONAL veteran status, or any CENTER trained as FAA certified Aviation status, protected other characteristic protected by law. ability to quickly learn various software other characteristic protected by law. For ResponsibleTechnician. for theFinancial transactional aid for qualified For primary consideration apply by primary consideration apply by 5/12/21, programs. Strong technical, written and financial efforts of the Interdisciplinary students. Job placement assistance. 3/19/20, thereafter open until filled. thereafter open until filled. Apply online oral communication and social skills, HumanitiesCall Center (IHC).Institute Responsibilities Aviation of Maintenance Applyattention online attohttps://jobs.ucsb.edu unfailing detail accuracy, include accounting, fund (Cal‑SCAN) tracking and at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 17938 877‑205‑4138. Job and #20200111 policies procedures, and effective management, processing all payment problem‑solving and reasoning skills are AUDIT related activities, and close interaction EMPLOYMENT essential. Ability to establish and maintain with faculty and staff in both the SERVICES PROFESSIONAL 2 cooperative working relationships within IHC and other campus departments. AUDIT AND ADVISORY SERVICES the division of Institutional Advancement, The Administrative Assistant AIRLINES ARE HIRINGworks ‑ Get FAA Performs and documents audits the Development Office and with the MARKETING & Notes: independently withhands onlyon Aviation minimal training. and advisory services in accordance approved broader campus community BIKE SHOP LEAD supervisionFinancial and Aid regularly makes for qualified students with the International Standards for Satisfactory criminalMEDIA history background SOCIAL decisions that require application and CALL the Professional Practice of Internal ‑ Career placement assistance. check. Ability to work some weekends MECHANIC interpretation of University financial Aviation Institute of Maintenance Auditing and Practice Advisories and COORDINATOR evenings. $23.89/hr. ‑ $24.43/ ASSOCIATED STUDENTS policies and888‑686‑1704 procedures. Reqs: Excellent MULTICULTURAL established by theof the Institute hr. The University ofCENTER California is an Under the general supervision Bike of business writing, problem solving and Develops the program’s Internal Auditors, the UC Internal Affirmativemarketing Action Shop Coordinator, the Lead Mechanic Equal Opportunity/ research skills. Excellent verbal and goals and oversees productions FINANCE Audit Manual, and UCSB Audit Employer, and all qualified applicants will will be responsible for organizing the day written communication skills. Accurate and distribution of all marketing. and Advisory Services procedures. receive consideration for employment to day technical and repair aspects with ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE and effective liaison between students, marketing Reports to andofisthe supervised a Manages regardsocial to race, color, campaigns religion, the student mechanics A.S. Bikeon without ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage faculty, Accounting department, and & bank day‑to‑day basis by the Associate all gender marketing is in sexual ensuring orientation, identity, Shop. The Lead Mechanic implements sex, while levies,units. liens Knowledge & audits, unfiled tax Audit Director. Works closely with other campus of compliance with the departmental the training for student employees, national origin, disability status, payroll & resolve tax accounting returns, principles. Highissues, degree of mission. Responsible researching, Audit Services staff protected veteran status, for or any other outlinedother in the ASand BikeAdvisory Shop training debtattention FAST. Call to 888‑626‑3581 accuracy and detail and writing, editing, collaborative team approach characteristic protectedandbyproofreading law. For manual,intoa student employees for the to all materials developed for the the ability to multitask. to follow complete projects and help ensure OVER $10K Ability in Debt? Be debt repair free and maintenance of a wide primary consideration apply by 5/11/21, MultiCultural Center’s events. guidelines, meet and maintain the types Audit and and other Advisory Services in 24deadlines, to 48 months. No upfront thereafter open until filled. Apply online range ofthat bicycle rolling Reqs: Demonstrated experience a schedule.feesAbility to organize organizationformeets its goals to enroll. A+ BBB and rated. stock. Call Responsible at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #17775 ensuring staff’s and process work with frequent interruptions. objectives. Bachelor’s degree in in programming and marketing National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. adherence to safetyReqs: standards in all repair events for diverse populations and Must have (Cal‑SCAN) attention to detail with the accounting, businessto administration, procedures. Will endeavor maintain in a university setting. Experience ability to pick up complexities quickly and or a with related the A.S.computer Bike Shop science, in accordance its field follow through tasks/projects completely. or equivalent combination of years with social media, experience and GENERAL FULL-TIME mission statement to provide high quality Solid experience with Microsoft Office of experience. + of relevant knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, bicycle repair and safety 3‑5yes education to the Suite (MS Excel, Word, and Outlook). Exceptionally strong Photoshop, and Word. Knowledge student,experience. faculty, and staff of UCSB. Min Able to interact effectively with faculty, organizational and time management of marketing principles, concepts, Reqs: Broad knowledge and technical EMPLOYMENT staff, students, and visitors on a variety skills; proven ability to set priorities strategies, and best practices. Keen aptitude related to bicycle maintenance of advising issues and communicate that accurately reflect the relative sense of political acumen with 2 regard and mechanic functionality. Must be REPRESENTATIVE importance of job responsibilities and to communicating policy and procedures effectively. RESOURCES online via social able to communicate about processes HUMAN LABORER politicized such as take into consideration deadlines, media a onwide Notes: This is a 50% time per year range topics of complex clearly and effectively to customers and Performs FACILITIES MANAGEMENT race,related gender, oppression. competing requirements and career position working Mon.‑Thurs services to and staffsystemic talent acquisition Performs a variety of custodial staff tasks in a fast‑paced work environment. Criminal history background complexity. Notes: Criminal history Notes: 9am‑3pm. Satisfactory criminal recruitment, placement and Ability to complete mechanical and check and other related duties. Laborer(s) required. background check required. Maintain background check. $23.89 ‑ $24.43/ activities, Occasional diversity evening and tasks left uncompleted by Student retention will handle all heavy lifting and moving and weekend hours may be required. a valid CA driver’s license, a clean hr. The University of California is an and employment contracts Mechanics. Knowledge of inventory outreach tasks, the moving of all furniture $25.14‑ $26.82/hr. The University DMV record and enrollment in the Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Manage recruitmentsof out of classrooms, offices, labs control, and systems and storage related to administration. is an Equal staff Opportunity/ DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Employer, and all qualified applicants will and California assist University and the replacement of all furniture. merchandise stocked within the Bicycle Affirmative ActionServe Employer, and $24.52‑ $35.58/hr. The University of receive consideration for employment external applicants. as lead Required to perform custodial Shop. California Understanding or experience all qualified applicants will receive is an Equal Opportunity/ without regard to race, color, religion, adviser for laid‑off and disabled duties in zone and campus wide as community‑based bicycle spaces. with consideration for employment without Affirmative Action Employer, and sex, sexual necessary. orientation,Reqs: gender employees regarding re‑employment Twoidentity, years similar Notes: UCSB Campus applicants Security Authority color, religion,the sex, all qualified will receive regard to race,Represent national industry origin, experience. disability Must status, have under 6mo Clery Act and Satisfactory criminal opportunities. sexual orientation, gender identity, consideration for employment protected veteran status, or any other University at diversity and outreach + experience stripping and waxing history background check. $20.66/hr. ‑ national origin, disability status, without regard to race, color, religion, characteristic protected by law. For events. Manage the administration of NEWS HEALTHCALIFORNIA & FITNESS

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employment contracts. Design, protected veteran status, or plan, any coordinate, and deliver a variety other characteristic protected by law.of talent acquisition workshops.apply Servebyas For primary consideration a 3/18/20, TAM (Talent Acquisition Manager) thereafter open until filled. system Reqs: Bachelor’s degree Apply liaison. online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu inJobrelated area and / or equivalent #20200105 experience / training. Working knowledge of recruitment, screening, interviewing and referral processes. Ability to exercise judgment within defined employment procedures and practices to determine appropriate PAYROLL ANALYST DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAbility to action/ recommendations. Serves asa large Payrollvolume Coordinator, UC Path manage of recruitments Coordinator, Kronos inPayroll Manager and other work a fast‑paced and Timekeeper for 1,500+ofemployees environment. Knowledge common requiringused accurate detail‑oriented software within employment and attention timelines other areastoofpayroll HR, and how and they deadlines, attention to detail, work together. Basic knowledge of accuracy, andlaw.extensive employment Note: knowledge Satisfactory of University policies and procedures. criminal history background check. Payroll includes instructors, careerof $24.52‑$26.65/hr. The University staff, contract casual California is an employees, Equal Opportunity/ BYA staff, student work study Affirmative Action staff, Employer, and appointments, and summer program all qualified applicants will receive staff. Coordinates the onboarding consideration for employment without procedures for allcolor, employees. Tracks regard to race, religion, sex, employee employment compliance sexual orientation, gender identity, in regardsorigin, to background national disability checks, status, required certifications, and required protected veteran status, or any trainings. Works with the marketing other characteristic protected by law. staff to ensure vacant positions For primary consideration applyareby advertised. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree 5/17/21, thereafter open until filled. in related / or equivalent Apply onlinearea at and https://jobs.ucsb.edu experience Job # 17702 / training. Working knowledge of payroll processes, policies, and procedures; knowledge of organization‑specific computer application programs. Note: Criminal history background check required. $24.09‑ $26.50/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ EQUIPMENT Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive ENGINEER consideration forAND employment without ELECTRICAL COMPUTER regard to race, color, religion, sex, ENGINEERING‑NANOFABRICATION sexual orientation, gender identity, FACILITY nationaltheorigin, disability status, Ensures continuing development status,resources or anyof ofprotected equipmentveteran and process other characteristic protected by law. the 400‑user nanofabrication research For primaryforconsideration apply byof cleanroom the Department 3/16/20, thereafter open until filled. Electrical and Computer Engineering. Apply onlinesupervises at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Additionally, the day‑to‑day Job #20200103 laboratory operation of the cleanroom. Reqs: related PROF. Bachelor’s EDITING anddegree Writing in Services. area /or equivalent experience Quickand turn‑around. Business, orAcademic, training.Memoir. Strong 805‑220‑8127 oral and written communication skills with proficiency in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Strong knowledge of electronics, mechanics, and computers. Works well both within a team and independently. Note: Satisfactory criminal historyCHEF background SR EXECUTIVE check. SalaryDINING commensurate RESIDENTIAL SERVICES with experience. 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Must specifications, and torecipe Affirmative Employer, ANNOUNCEMENTS changeand at institutions by providing all a qualified have a thorough knowledge of a valid applicants CA driver’swilllicense, testing menu development. receivea clean comprehensive, systematic approach DMV record and enrollment Designs new recipes, determines consideration for employment without in the reconciliation and how to proceed AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ to organizational transformation appropriate ingredients and specifies regardDMV Employee to race, color, Pull‑Notice religion, sex,Program. and resolve problems, determine month w/12‑mo agmt. Includes 1 individual portionsself‑assessment for each sexualMandated orientation, genderreqidentity, using aserving structured reporting of Dependent solutions with independence. The TB of data per month. 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UC Manager also: Coordinate For primary consideration apply by ServeSafe certification. Note: engagement Criminal Santa Barbara’s broader 5/12/21, thereafter open until filled. PERSONNEL history background required. with the IChange check Network, including Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu $91,400‑$108,500/yr. through an established Microsoft MANAGER Job # 17926 The University of California is an MOLECULAR, CELLULAR & Teams Collaboration or similar Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (MCDB) software platform; Organize and Action Employer, andBarbara’s all qualified Oversees all aspects of staff and FAMILY SERVICES support UC Santa IChange applicants will receive consideration team efforts, various project fortasks: student employment and payroll in employment without to race, the FOR MCDB department. 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MONEY TO LOAN

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Sunrise 6:00 Sunset 7:49

Low

High

Thu 6

1:33 am 1.8

7:06 am 4.2

1:29 pm 0.3

8:10 pm 4.8

Fri 7

2:16 am 1.3

8:01 am 4.2

2:01 pm 0.6

8:34 pm 4.9

Sat 8

2:52 am 0.8

8:49 am 4.0

2:29 pm 0.9

8:55 pm 5.1

Sun 9

3:26 am 0.5

9:33 am 3.9

2:53 pm 1.3

9:15 pm 5.2

WANTED: REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

Mon 10

3:58 am 0.2

10:16 am 3.7

3:16 pm 1.7

9:35 pm 5.4

Tue 11

4:30 am -0.0

10:58 am 3.6

3:39 pm 1.9

9:57 pm 5.4

ROUGH & Tumble Fixer Local Pvt. Pty. seeks 2 bed or more Lease with option or Seller Finan. Can do lots of improvements !! 805‑538‑1119 JBG PO Box 3963 SB Cal 93130

Wed 12

5:04 am -0.1

11:41 am 3.4

4:01 pm 2.2

10:22 pm 5.4

Thu 13

5:40 am -0.2

12:27 pm 3.3

4:22 pm 2.5

10:49 pm 5.4

11 D

19 H

26 D

2 source: tides.net

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crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

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“All Over the Place” -- it’s another themeless mess of words!

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Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 6, 6, 2021 2021 MAY

28 Canine suffix for Bern or Peking 34 Get ready to ride again 35 Carrier to Leonardo da Vinci Airport 36 Pantheon figure 37 High card 39 Site of intense magnetic activity 40 “___ Goes to the Mayor” 41 Briggs who hosts “The Last Drive-in” 42 Watching just one more episode, maybe 43 Some potluck desserts 44 ___ bind 50 Buckwheat bowlful 52 Jamie Lee’s “Freaky Friday” character 53 Direction from Madrid to Barcelona 55 Non-profit that started NPR in 1970 56 GRF’s vice president 57 2021 U.K. award for “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” actor Toby Jones ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1030

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

37 37


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 965-5205

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO A D M I N I S T E R E S TAT E O F : ­ H A R O L D PA G A L I N G C A S E NO.: 21PR00088 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent c re d i t o r s , and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of HAROLD PAGALING A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: LAURA

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A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Jonathan D. Wideman 485 Alisal Rd. Suite 232 Solvang, CA 93463; (805) 766‑1766 Published May 6, 13, 20 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELIZABETH P. HOUSTON aka ELIZABETH HOUSTON CASE NO.: 21PR00171 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELIZABETH P. HOUSTON aka ELIZABETH HOUSTON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: STEVEN C. VON DOLLEN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: STEVEN C. VON DOLLEN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/03/2021 AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, ANACAPA DIVISION, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey L. Boyle, Esq. Delwiche, Von Dollen & Boyle, Attorneys at Law 1114 State Street, Suite 256, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 962‑8131 Published May 6, 13, 20 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THOUGHTBOX PHOTO BOOTH at 4545 Atascadero Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Jacob Pighetti (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Jacob Pighetti County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOLEIL RESIDENTIAL at 5387 Paseo Cameo Santa Barbara. CA 93111; Tracey Messner (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Tracey Messner, Owner County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0000851. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STEPPING STONES CONSULTANTS at 758 Via Miguel Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Michiel A De Bruin (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Michiel A De Bruin County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0000978. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ADOBE PET HOSPITAL at 3230 State Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Mission City Veterinary Hospital, Inc (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed:Evelyn Brand County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0000880. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PA C I F I C BAMBOO DISTRIBUTION at 101 S. Quarantina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Lucidity Festival LLC (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: Luke Holden County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0001168. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SERVICE NOW, JOHNNY’S SHEET METAL & HEATING at 879 S Kellogg Ave Goleta, CA 93117; Bradley L Reginato 158 Kinman Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Bradley Reginato County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0001252. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AMPLIFY WINES at 2320 Thompson Way, Ste F Santa Maria, CA 93455; Cameron Michael Porter (Same Address) and Marlen Sosa Porter (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Married Couple Signed: Marlen Porter, Co­Owner County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0000847. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CROSSFIT SANTA BARBARA at 264 Orange Ave Goleta, CA 93117; Foster Functional Fitness, LLC 7127 Hollister Ave Suite 25A‑154 Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: Erin Foster County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0001230. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LITTLE LADY BUTTERFLY at 1436 Santa Fe Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Valerie A Selvaggio (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Valerie Selvaggio County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001010. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BABYSITPRO LLC at 1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 1‑440 Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Babysitpro LLC (same address) (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed:Austin Jessie Davidson County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001098. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARCADIAN WINERY at 300 Central Avenue #6 Lompoc, CA 93427; Joseph Davis (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed:Joseph Davis County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WILD SPELLCRAFT at 115 W Gutierrez St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Payge A Bellini (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Payge Bellini County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0001076. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021.


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LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA TOURS & EXPERIENCES, SANTA BARBARA PARANORMAL EXPERIENCES at 1501 Santa Barbara St ., Apt C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Joseph S Soltis, III (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Joseph S. Soltis, III County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001049. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAS ALLA WINES at 84 Industrial Way, Unit C Buellton, CA 93427; Bravo West Wines LLC 400 Adena St Pasadena, CA 91104 This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed:Cleo De La Torre County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001035. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACROAMATICS TELEMETRY SYSTEMS at 7230 Hollister Ave #100 Goleta, CA 93117; Acroamatics, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed:Terri L Didion County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001107. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NIKKI’S SALON at 130 S Hope Ave, Suite 108 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Two Moons, Inc., A California Corporation 810 Puente Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Nicole Reden County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0001016. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ATP EXPRESS at 241 San Nicolas Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Alexis F Tavera Pons (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Alexix F. Tavera Pons County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001094. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRUSH BAR & TAP, CRUSHCAKES BAR at 1315 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Crshfoods Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by An Copartners Signed: Shannon M Gaston County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0001176. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: STRATOS USA, STRATOS at 381 Wyola Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael T. Mete (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Michael Mete County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001110. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: MAD & VIN at 1576 Mission Drive Solvang, CA 93463; 1576 Mission Drive, L L C ( s a m e a d d re s s ) T h i s business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: James P. Knell County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0001186. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: YOYITA at 7624 Hollister Ave #328 Goleta, CA 93117; Gloria Y Almanza (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Gloria Y Almanza County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0001093. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: TECHWISELITTLES at 653 Verde Mar Drive., Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jennifer L.S. Bochsler 746 Toro Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108 This business is conducted by An General Partnership Signed: Kay De Veer Ulanch County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0001077. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: THE MEDICINE OF YUM at 315 Meigs Road, Suite A‑194 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Empowering Health, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: Erin Presant County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001107. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: LANSPEED at 597 Avenue of The Flags, Suite 103 Buellton, CA 93427; Red Tail Networks, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Christopher Chirgwin County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001031. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA HUMANE at 5399 Overpass Rd. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Santa Barbara Humane Society For The Prevention of Cruelty To Animals (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Kerri Burns County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001106. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JGF CONSTRUCTON at 322 West Victoria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Joel G Flores (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Joel G Flores County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001173. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: S A N TA BARBARA EQUESTRIAN ACADEMY at 4377 Via Esperanza Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Santa Barbara Equesreian Academy (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: Michelle Freels County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001114. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HA SERVICE at 37 Dearborn Pl Apt 75 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Andrea Maria Machado (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Andrea Machado County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0001051. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: S E RV I C E EMPLOYEES I N T E R N AT I O N A L UNION LOCAL620 at 114 Vine St Santa Maria, CA 93454; Santa Barbara County Employees Association (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Daniel Vegezzi County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0001167. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALICLAY, CALIFORNIA CLAY COURTS, CALICLAY BASALT SURFACES at 336 Sheffield Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Novacourt USA LLC (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: Stephen Brillhart County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E31. FBN Number: 2021‑0001207. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: FARMER’S FRIEND MANAGEMENT SERVICES at 1036 E Cota St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Hosanna E M i c k ( s a m e a d d re s s ) T h i s business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Hosanna Mick County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 26, 2021. This statement expires f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e o f the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001197. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ATLANTIS G O O D S a t 1 2 3 3 We s t b ro o k Drive Lompoc, CA 93436; Monica A Orsua (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Monica A Orsua County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 27, 2021. This statement expires f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e o f the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0001204. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g p e r s o n ( s ) i s / a re d o i n g b u s i n e s s as: DINGDONGDISASTER at 6759 Sueno Rd, Unit B Goleta, CA 93117; Kelli Martinez ( s a m e a d d re s s ) T h i s b u s i n e s s is conducted by An Individual Signed: Isaac Anguiano County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 03, 2021. This s t a t e m e n t e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e o f t h e C o u n t y Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 0 . FBN Number: 2021‑0001275. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business a s : J B P O T T E RY a t 1 1 2 7 E Cota Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Harold J Bailey (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Harold Bailey County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e o f the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0001115. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: NATIVE SAGE at 124 1/2 N o r t h N o p a l S t re e t S a n t a Barbara, CA 93103; Jennifer L L e e r ( s a m e a d d re s s ) T h i s business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Jennifer Leer County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 13, 2021. This statement expires f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e o f the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) b y. E 9 5 6 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001047. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: CHELLA TEXTILES at 6464 Hollister Avenue, Ste. 5 Goleta, CA 93117; Hospitality Trading Corp (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Lee P. M e n i c h e l l a C o u n t y C l e r k of Santa Barbara County on Apr 28, 2021. This statement e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0001221. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business a s : I S A A C O R N A M E N TA L METAL at 709 E. Mason St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Isaac Anguiano (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Isaac Anguiano County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 28, 2021. This statement e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E30. FBN Number: 2021‑0001229. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g p e r s o n ( s ) i s / a re d o i n g b u s i n e s s as: KEA PLUMBING INC. at 4856 Ashton St Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Kea Plumbing Inc. ( s a m e a d d re s s ) T h i s b u s i n e s s i s conducted by An Corporation Signed: Chris Reed County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 29, 2021. This s t a t e m e n t e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e o f t h e C o u n t y Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 0 . FBN Number: 2021‑0001230. May 06, 13, 20, 27 2021

INVITATION FOR BIDS

01‑NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS 1.OWNER: Montecito Union School District 2 . P R O J E C T I D E N T I F I C AT I O N NAME: 2021‑1 Electrical Panel Relocation 3 . P R O J E C T L O C AT I O N : 3 8 5 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: â¢Provide infrastructure for Southern California Edison service upgrade â¢Provide new main service and concrete pad â¢Coordinate installation with photovoltaic project equipment (separate contract, concurrent) â¢Decommission old main service and pad â¢Provide electrical connection to south property â¢This project is anticipated to start on approximately June 8, 2021 and is anticipated to be completed by July 27, 2021 5.BID DEADLINE: Bids are due on May 19, 2021 not later than 2:00 p.m. 6.PLACE AND METHOD OF B I D R E C E I P T: A l l B i d s m u s t b e s e a l e d . P e r s o n a l d e l i v e r y, c o u r i e r, o r m a i l e d v i a U n i t e d States Postal Service and addressed to Montecito Union School District, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa B a r b a r a , C A 9 3 1 0 8 . AT T N : Virginia Alvarez 7.PLACE PLANS ARE ON FILE: Montecito Union School District, Business D e p a r t m e n t , S e c o n d F l o o r, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa B a r b a r a , C A 9 3 1 0 8 , w w w. tricoblue.com 8 . A LT E R N AT E S : I f a l t e r n a t e b i d s a r e c a l l e d f o r, t h e contract will be awarded to the lowest bid e on the base contract without consideration of the prices on the additive or deductive items. 9 . M A N D AT O RY JOB WA L K : M e e t a t M o n t e c i t o Union School Front Office by the stairs, on May 10, 2021 at 10 a.m.. Attendance at the entire job walk is mandatory and failure to

attend the entire job walk may result in your bid being rejected as non‑responsive. Contact OWNER for details on required job walks and related documentation. 10.This is a prevailing wage project. OWNER has ascertained the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which this work is to be performed for each craft or type of worker needed to execute this contract. These rates are on file at OWNERâs office, and a copy may be obtained upon request, or at w w w. d i r. c a . g o v. C o n t r a c t o r shall post a copy of these rates at the job site. ALL PROJECTS OVER $1,000 ARE S U B J E C T T O P R E VA I L I N G WA G E M O N I T O R I N G A N D ENFORCEMENT BY THE LABOR COMMISSIONER. It shall be mandatory upon the contractor to whom the contract is awarded (CONTRACTOR), and upon any SUBCONTRACTOR, to pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the contract. 11.A Payment Bond for contracts over $25,000 and a Performance Bond for all contracts will be required prior to commencement of work. These bonds shall be in the amounts and form called for in the Contract Documents. 12.Pursuant to the provisions of Public Contract Code Section 22300, CONTRACTOR may substitute certain securities for any funds withheld by OWNER to ensure CONTRACTORâs performance under the contract. At the request and expense of CONTRACTOR, securities equivalent to any amount withheld shall be deposited, at the discretion of OWNER, with either OWNER or a state or federally chartered bank as the escrow agent, who shall then pay any funds otherwise subject to retention to CONTRACTOR. Upon satisfactory completion of the contract, the securities shall be returned to CONTRACTOR. Securities eligible for investment shall include those listed in Government Code Section 16430, bank and savings and loan certificates of deposit, interest bearing demand deposit accounts, standby letters of credit, or any other security mutually agreed to by CONTRACTOR and OWNER. CONTRACTOR shall be the beneficial owner of any securities substituted for funds withheld and shall receive any interest on them. The escrow agreement shall be in the form indicated in the Contract Documents. 1 3 . To b i d o n o r p e r f o r m the work stated in this Notice, CONTRACTOR must possess a valid and active c o n t r a c t o r ’s l i c e n s e o f t h e following classification(s) B No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor shall be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of § 4104 of the Public Contract Code, for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless currently registered with the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5. No CONTRACTOR

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or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project (awarded after April 1, 2015) unless registered with the DIR. DIRâs web registration portal is: w w w . d i r . c a . g o v / Public‑Works/Contractors. html 14.CONTRACTOR and all subcontractors must furnish electronic certified payroll records (eCPR) to the Labor Commissioner monthly in PDF format. Registration at w w w. d i r. c a . g o v / P u b l i c ‑ W o r k s / Certified‑Payroll‑Reporting. html is required to use the eCPR system. The following notice is given as required by Labor Code Section 1771.5(b) (1): CONTRACTOR and any subcontractors are required to review and comply with the provisions of the California Labor Code, Part 7, Chapter 1, beginning with Section 1720, as more fully discussed in the Contract Documents. These sections contain specific requirements concerning, for example, determination and payment of prevailing wages, retention, inspection, and auditing payroll records, use of apprentices, payment of overtime compensation, securing workersâ compensation insurance, and various criminal penalties or fines which may be imposed for violations of the requirements of the c h a p t e r. S u b m i s s i o n o f a b i d constitutes CONTRACTORâs representation that CONTRACTOR has thoroughly reviewed these requirements. 15. OWNER will retain 5% of the amount of any progress payments. 16. This Project does not require prequalification pursuant to AB 1565 of all general contractors and all mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontractors 17. B I D PA C K E T w i l l a v a i l a b l e a t w w w. t r i c o b l u e . com and provided at the job walk Advertisement Dates: April 23 â May 8, 2021 Virginia Alvarez 805‑969‑3249 x 420

LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE/ DISPOSITION OF C O L L AT E R A L To : G A I L A N N E GALLESSICH 30 WINCHESTER C A N Y O N R O A D # 1 1 5 G O L E TA CA 93117 PR File Number: MHCB.177‑017 Account Number: 253090 From: Prober and Raphael 20750 Ve n t u r a B o u l e v a r d , S u i t e 1 0 0 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Attorney for: Community West Bank 445 Pine Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 This communication is made in an attempt to collect upon a debt or judgment and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Community West Bank, hereinafter referred to as (“Community”) will sell your mobile home, truck camper or floating home which registered with the Department of Housing and Community Development under the registration numbers PH0230419A/B and Label/Insignia numbers ARZ329763/4 and Decal No. LBJ5949 located at 30 WINCHESTER CANYON ROAD # 1 1 5 , G O L E TA C A 9 3 1 1 7

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LEGALS to t h e h i g h e s t q u a l i f i e d bidder in public as follows: Date of Sale: 5/19/2021 Time: 1:00 PM Place: At the main entrance to the county courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Please be advised that if you notify my office within 30 days that all or a part of your obligation to Community West Bank is disputed, then I will mail to you written verification of the obligation and the amounts owed to Community West Bank. In addition, upon your request within 30 days o f r e c e i p t o f t h i s l e t t e r, I will provide you with the name and address o f t h e o r i g i n a l c r e d i t o r, if different from the current c r e d i t o r. Yo u may request an

accounting by calling Prober and Raphael at (818) 227‑0100, Ext 355. If I do not hear from you within 30 days, I will assume that your debt to Community West Bank is valid. The state Rosenthal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act require that, except under unusual circumstances, collectors may not contact you before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m. They may not harass you by using threats of violence or arrest or by using obscene language. Collectors may not use false or misleading statements or call you at work if they know or have reason to know that you may not receive personal calls

at work. For the most part, collectors may not tell another person, other than your attorney or spouse, about your debt. Collectors may contact another person to confirm your location or enforce a judgment. For more information about debt collection activities, you may contact the Federal trade Commission at 1‑877‑FTC‑HELP or www. f t c . g o v. A t a n y t i m e before the sale, you may redeem the collateral in accordance with Section 9623 of the California Uniform Commercial Code anytime before we sell it by paying the full amount you owe (not just the past due payments), including our expenses and fees incurred. The account is due and owing the sum of $183,107.50

plus interest a t the contract rate from 4/13/2021, plus any amounts necessary to reimburse Prober and Raphael for reasonable foreclosure fees and costs as well as any other sums to which Community West Bank, may be entitled to under the terms of your agreement. To learn the exact amount y o u m u s t p a y, c a l l u s at Prober and Raphael at (818) 227‑0100, Ext 355. If you want us to explain to you in writing how we have figured the amount that you owe us, you may call us at (818) 227‑0100, Ext 355.. Prober and Raphael, A Law Corporation E l i z a b e t h Ye r a n o s i a n , Tr u s t e e S a l e O ff i c e r cc: Community

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING (Electronically and Telephonically) May 18, 2021 at 5:30 P.M.

West Bank 445 Pine Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 A‑4731035 0 4 / 2 9 / 2 0 2 1 , 05/06/2021

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF VICTOR HUGO ANDRADE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01356 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VICTOR HUGO ANDRADE TO: VICTOR JAKE ANDRADE THE COURT ORDERS

that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 24,

NOTICE OF CITY COUNCIL PUBLIC HEARING (Electronically and Telephonically) May 18, 2021 at 5:30 P.M. Land Use Element Table 2-2 General Plan Amendment Initiation Case No. 21-0001-GPA

Housing Element, Safety Element, and Other Elements as Needed to Satisfy State Housing Law Requirements General Plan Amendment Initiation Case No. 21-0002-GPA ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings electronically and telephonically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council on May 18, 2021 will be conducted electronically and telephonically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. The City Council will be participating electronically and telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers.

ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings electronically and telephonically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council on May 18, 2021 will be conducted electronically and telephonically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. The City Council will be participating electronically and telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to City Council Resolution 12-13 and the Goleta Municipal Code (Section 17.67.030), the City Council will consider, at a public hearing, a City-initiated request for an amendment to the General Plan to update the Housing Element, Safety Element, and other Elements as needed, including the Land Use Element, of the General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan (General Plan). to comply with the requirements of the California Government Code regarding Housing Element updates. The initiation will be considered on:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to City Council Resolution 12-13 and the Goleta Municipal Code (Section 17.67.030), the City Council will consider, at a public hearing, a City-initiated request for an amendment to the General Plan to allow Entertainment and Recreation Services in the General Commercial Land Use Designation in Land Use Element Table 2-2 of the General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan (General Plan). The initiation will be considered on:

HEARING DATE/TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday, May 18, 2021 at 5:30 P.M.

Teleconference Meeting; Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda)

The initiation would provide staff instruction to begin processing any necessary amendments. Any future amendments would apply Citywide, including all areas within the Coastal Zone. The City Council decision on the General Plan Amendment Initiation has no effect on how the City Council may ultimately act on future amendments.

HEARING DATE/TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday, May 18, 2021 at 5:30 P.M.

Teleconference Meeting; Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda)

The initiation would provide staff instruction to begin processing the proposed amendment. Any future amendment would apply Citywide, including all areas within the Coastal Zone. The City Council decision on the General Plan Amendment Initiation has no effect on how the City Council may ultimately act on the General Plan Amendment in the future.

IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted via email to Deborah Lopez, City Clerk e-mail: cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https:// www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meetingagendas-and-videos.

IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted via email to Deborah Lopez, City Clerk e-mail: cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https:// www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meetingagendas-and-videos.

FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Anne Wells, Advance Planning Manager, at 805-961-7557 or awells@cityofgoleta. org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Sandra Rodriguez, Management Assistant, at 805-961-7576 or srodriguez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org.

FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Andy Newkirk, Senior Planner, at 805-961-7544 or anewkirk@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Sandra Rodriguez, Management Assistant, at 805-961-7576 or srodriguez@cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org.

SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION: If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing.

SIMULTANEOUS INTERPRETATION. If you require interpretation services for the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s office at (805) 961-7505 or via email to: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. Please specify the language for which you require interpretation. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting helps to ensure that reasonable arrangements can be made to provide accessibility to the hearing.

Note: The action of the City Council is not appealable. If you challenge the nature of the action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Council at, or prior to, the public hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]).

Note: The action of the City Council is not appealable. If you challenge the nature of the action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Council at, or prior to, the public hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]).

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent, May 6, 2021

Publish Date: Santa Barbara Independent, May 6, 2021

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2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 13, 2021. by Colleen K . S t e r n e . S u p e r i o r. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021. IN THE MATTER OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F JOANIE SHONETTE VOGEL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV01422 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JOANIE SHONETTE VOGEL TO: JOANIE SHONETTE SAFFELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing June 1, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 16, 2021. by Thomas P. A n d e r l e . S u p e r i o r . of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021. IN THE MATTER OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F LESLIE BAXTER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:­ 21CV01361 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s):


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NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF REVISED DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT for Recirculation & NOTICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEARING OFFICER HEARING Wednesday, May 26, 2021 at 5:00 P.M.

LEGALS FROM: LESLIE ANN BAXTER TO: LESLIE JADE BAXTER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 28, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 10, 2021. by Donna D . G e c k . S u p e r i o r. o f the Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES E X T R A S PA C E STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. May 27, 2021 at 3:30 PM Donna Blockhus Camp supplies Cynthia Bollinger Furniture, art, piano, household goods Senel Acosta To o l , power tools, garage stuff Sierra Snodgrass Clothing, personal items Earl Reif To o l s Thomas Carroll Bed, boxes, clothing Chisum Moon Snowboard, boxes, bag Jahseh Ahlem Business equipment andrew young To o l b o x e s , c l o t h i n g bags The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the p e r s o n a l p ro p e r t y.

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HERITAGE RIDGE 332 RESIDENTIAL RENTAL UNIT PROJECT CASE NO. 14-049-GPA-VTM-DP Located on the North Side of Camino Vista Between S. Los Carneros and Aero Camino Roads (North of Willow Springs II); APNs 073-060-031 through -043 ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Environmental Hearing Officer (EHO) hearing will be conducted telephonically and electronically and broadcast live on the City’s website. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. The EHO will be participating electronically and telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (City), as Lead Agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et seq.; “CEQA”), completed a Revised Draft Environmental Impact Report (Draft EIR) for the Heritage Ridge Residential Project (Project). A detailed description of the Project is provided below. The City invites comments on the adequacy and completeness of the environmental analysis and mitigation measures described in the Revised Draft EIR from April 29, 2021 through June 14, 2021. A meeting to take comments on the Revised and Recirculated Draft EIR will be held by the City Environmental Hearing Officer on: DATE AND TIME:

Wednesday, May 26, 2021 at 5:00 P.M.

LOCATION:

Teleconference Meeting Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION SUMMARY: The Project components include the following: 1. A General Plan Amendment (14-049-GPA) to remove a designation of Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Area (ESHA) on the Open Space Map (Figure 3-5 in the Open Space Element of the General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan) and on the Special Status Species and Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Areas Map (Figure 4-1 in the Conservation Element of the General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan). 2. A Vesting Tentative Map (14-049-VTM) to allow the subdivision of the existing 17.36 gross acre (16.2 net acres) project site from 13 lots to 4 lots (2 lots for the Affordable housing complex, 1 lot for the market housing, and 1 lot for the public park). The subdivision map would also abandon two unused roads (Via Maya and Via Luisa). 3. Development Plan (14-049-DP) pursuant to GMC § 35-317 to allow construction of 332 rental units with associated recreational facilities. The rental units would be broken into two “neighborhoods” as follows: 104 up to a 100% supportive-units comprised of both senior affordable housing and family affordable housing units with separate recreational facilities; and 228 market-rate rental units with separate recreational facilities including a swimming pool. 4. Streamside Protection Area (SPA) buffer reduction in the northeast corner of the project site, varying from 0’ to 33’. 5. Vacation of portions of right of way and landscape easements adjacent to Los Carneros Road per Streets & Highway Code Section 8324 (b). Also proposed is a two-acre neighborhood public park to be dedicated to the City in the center of the site and three above ground bio-retention basins including a 15,000 square foot bio-retention basin in the southeast portion of the site. The site would be served by three access points onto Camino Vista. Preliminary raw earthwork volumes are estimated at 178,000 cubic yards of cut and 15,500 cubic yards of fill and 115,000 cubic yards of export. The project was filed by FLT Heritage Ridge TG, LLC in partnership with the Towbes Group of Towbes, LLC. In addition, the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara would be the developer for the supportive/affordable housing unit component. Location: The project site is located in the Inland area of the City and is situated on unaddressed parcels located on the north side of Camino Vista between Aero Camino and Calle Koral Roads in the City of Goleta, Santa Barbara County (APNs 073-060-031 through -043). Access to the Heritage Ridge site is from Camino Vista Road. The 17.36 gross acre (16.2 net acres) Heritage Ridge site is bounded on its north by Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) tracks, on the east by industrial buildings on Aero Camino Road, on its south by Camino Vista Road and Willow Springs II apartments, and on its west by S. Los Carneros Road/Overpass. The Project site had a General Plan land use designation of Medium-Density Residential (R-MD) with an Affordable Housing Overlay and had a Zoning designation of Design Residential (DR-20) prior to April 3, 2020. Since April 3, 2020, the property’s zoning designation is Medium Density Residential (R-MD). As the project was deemed complete prior to September 1, 2019, the development is being consider using Article III, Inland Zoning Ordinance. CHANGES REQUIRING RECIRCULATION AND ORGANIZATION OF THE REVISED DRAFT EIR A Draft EIR was circulated for public review in 2016 and the administrative draft Final EIR was completed in 2018. Since that time, the project has been revised to include the conversion of the senior component to an affordable housing component (targeting low/very low senior and family residents), reduction in the total number of housing units from 360 to 332 units, changed the mix of units from market rate and senior units to market rate (228 units) and affordable units (104 units) for senior and families, and to provide increased right-of-way along Los Carneros Road, resulting in a building setback shift along this roadway. The affordable unit component maybe up to 100% supportive housing if necessary funding is secured. Finally, the application was revised to remove the request for a parking modification because, as an affordable housing development, the project would qualify for reduced affordable housing parking requirements in accordance with Gov. Code Section 65915. These changes required revision to the EIR Project Description as well as updated analysis in the following issue areas: air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, land use, noise, public services, transportation, and utilities and service systems. The proposed revisions to the project do not substantially change the overall development footprint or the project footprint relative to identified tribal cultural resources on the project site. Moreover, since completion of the prior Draft EIR for the prior design iteration of the project, new regulatory requirements and updated CEQA guidelines and thresholds (updated in late-2018), as well as changes to the project-level environmental and cumulative setting in the vicinity of the Project have occurred. As a result of these changes, additional analysis of topics, including air quality, greenhouse gas emissions transportation impact (thresholds have changed from Level of Service to Vehicles Miles Traveled), energy demand, tribal cultural resources, and wildfire risk, were added to the EIR. Therefore, revisions to the prior Draft EIR are reflected in Section 2.0, Project Description, Sections 4.2 (air quality), 4.4 (cultural and tribal cultural), 4.6 (Greenhouse Gas), 4.9 (Land Use), 4.10 (Noise), 4.11 (Public Services), 4.13 (Transportation), and 4.14 (Utilities) of the Draft EIR. The cumulative setting/baseline has also been updated in Section 3.0, Related Projects. Further, new sections 4.16 and 4.17 have been added to the Revised Draft EIR in the areas of energy and wildfire, respectively, that were not included in the original Draft EIR. This recirculation also includes the relevant portions of appendices as originally contained in the Draft EIR and supplemented, as necessary, as a result of updates to the Project. PUBLIC REVIEW OF THE REVISED DRAFT EIR The Recirculated Draft EIR is available for a 45-day public review period from April 29, 2021 to June 14, 2021. The Limited Recirculated Draft EIR is available on the City’s website at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/city-hall/planning-and-environmental-review/ceqa-review. Reviewers of this recirculated document should limit their comments to those that relate to the following chapters and sections of the Draft EIR that have been revised or added and recirculated: • 2.0 Project Description • 3.0 Related Projects • 4.2 Air Quality • 4.4 (Cultural and Tribal Cultural) • 4.6 Greenhouse Gas Emissions • 4.9 Land Use • 4.10 Noise • 4.11 Public Services • 4.13 Transportation/Circulation • 4.14 Utilities and Service Systems • 4.16 Energy • 4.17 Wildfire Significant and unavoidable project specific and cumulative impacts (Class I) are identified in the areas of; cultural resources (cumulative); noise (short construction noise impacts); and utilities and service systems (solid waste project and cumulative). Potentially significant, but mitigable, impacts on the environment (Class II) are anticipated in the areas of: aesthetics and visual resources (building heights/massing compatibility & lighting); air quality (exposure of sensitive receptors); biological resources (nesting/foraging birds, indirect habitat impacts/ wildlife linkage); cultural resources (impacts on Native American Site #CA-SBA-56); geology and soils (liquefaction potential, expansive and erodible soils); and hydrology and water quality (alteration of drainage patterns/increased impermeability). CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on any hazardous waste facilities or disposal sites identified by Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY AND FURTHER INFORMATION: The Revised Draft EIR will be posted on April 29, 2021 on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. For more information about this project, contact project planner Mary Chang at 805-961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org. PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD: The public review period begins on April 29, 2021 and ends on June 14, 2021 at 5:00 P.M. All letters should be emailed to Mary Chang, Supervising Senior Planner at mchang@cityofgoleta.org. All comments must be received no later than 5:00 P.M. on June 14, 2021. Please limit comments to environmental issues only. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted as instructed in link below or via email to Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Environmental Hearing Officer Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meetingagendas-and-videos. NOTE: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to the City of Goleta Planning and Environmental Review Department on or before the date that the public comment period ends (Gov’t. Code § 65009 (b) (2)). Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, April 29, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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Santa Barbara Independent 5/6/21  

May 6, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 799

Santa Barbara Independent 5/6/21  

May 6, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 799

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