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APR. 29-MAY 6, 2021 VOL. 35 ■ NO. 798

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APRIL 29, 2021

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PAID FOR BY COLD SPRING COMMUNIT Y MEMBERS Dear Concerned Community, Recent stories have been shared by the press which portray our beloved Cold Spring Community as a war-torn battlefield, the casualty of infighting between the parents, teachers, School Board and administrative staff. Although that narrative is interesting, entertaining and presumably sells papers and gets clicks, it is also hurtful and grossly inaccurate. The far less exciting reality is that the majority of families get along and are regularly seen enjoying all that Cold Spring School has to offer. The teachers and staff are wonderfully supportive, effective, and do an amazing job of raising the next generation of thoughtful and courageous little humans. The board regularly conducts meetings, full of ordinary and sometimes mundane tasks, to a typically vacant auditorium. However, their stories aren’t told because they are filled with gratitude rather than drama. They are respectful of people’s privacy and are shared internally rather than blasted on social media or other outlets that shamefully fuel falsities and encourage those armed with rumors and gossip to make a name for themselves by making noise. And sadly, they are silenced by the fear of retaliation and the retribution of one neighbor. Recently, a letter written anonymously and attached below, was circulated by text message and email from one parent to another. There was no mass publication, agenda or fanfare. Its intention and result was simply to show support for those working for, and at, Cold Spring School. Over 90 signatures were submitted anonymously within days. This current letter was similarly circulated and received over 150 signatures within days, by individuals wish to now show their public support and many additional community members privately support this message. Clearly, we, the majority of families, love and support the community, the teachers, and the school. We are tired of the noise and need to take action to change the narrative and ensure the teachers who go above and beyond, are not ostracized by the antics of one. Truthfully, most of us work at least one job, take care of our children, our parents, volunteer where we can, and have responsibilities that prevent us from effectively countering the baseless attacks on our community. They may be the loudest, but they do not represent us. And so, although the fight isn’t fair, and we are not at fault, we the community, find ourselves saddled with this problem of skewed narratives and personal vendettas. When the dust eventually settles and the teachers have finally reached a breaking point, it is the children who will be left paying the price. If you support and appreciate the teachers, staff, board, administration, and even parent volunteers, it is time to show them that support. Place supportive signs in your yard or on your fence. Wear your school spirit around town. Appreciate them for the difficult and often thankless work they all do. Write and send your opinions to outlets like the Montecito Journal, Independent, and Noozhawk, but be mindful that some publications choose which opinions to publish, and often, our voices are silenced. Come to board meetings so that you are informed of the facts and can base your opinions on the truth, rather than what you have been spoon-fed by those that take comments out of context or refuse to take responsibility for their own actions. Board meetings are published on the school’s website and listed on the marquee in the parking lot. Please get involved by volunteering and participating where you can. Stand up for the teachers, and children of Alex Arconian Paul Arria Bill Asher Jane Asher Jette Asher Julia Asher Jim Bain Lynn Barker Jeremiah Barlow Kymberly L. Barlow F. Bejar Tricia Bergakker Rosey Bishop Kimberly Bloom Cody Bramson Miles Bramson Bonnie Brighton Robert Brighton David Bruemmer Jude Callahan Mari Callahan

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Patrick and Janita Cavanaugh Cara Christensen Stephen Coetzer Taran Collis Zoe Copus Jason Copus Paul Darin Tessa Darin Renee Dektor Erin Duarte Erika Easter Brian Finster Laurel Finster Jennifer Fitch Jonathan Micah Fitzgerald Barbara Fuller Gary Fuller James Fuller Coral Godlis Linda Godlis

APRIL 29, 2021

Sunny Godlis Jean Gradias Mathew Gradias Adam Graham Bonnie Green, Grandparent Gabrielle Haas Van Haas Josiah Hamilton Justine Hamilton Cynthia Hawkes Angela Hueber Pierre-Alain Hueber Claudia Jaco Crystal Jensen Greg Jensen Antoine Joulie-Mares Elke Kane Holly Kane Josh Kane Justin Kane Jessica Kasztelan

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those teachers, who are being targeted. Most of all, be mindful of the fact that most of us don’t have all of the information, and never will. I leave you with the previous letter anonymously supported by many families: Dear Fellow Parents and Community Members of Cold Spring School, I hope this letter finds you well. I am writing to you today in hopes of gathering your names as a show of support for our incredible school, its teachers and staff. Most of you are aware of the well-deserved and fantastic reputation of Cold Spring School. Our little haven of education manages to outperform larger and better funded schools year upon year. It offers a profound educational foundation for our children, while instilling in them the basics of good citizenship. Yet, the school itself is just a building made up of bricks and mortar. The real success of Cold Spring is due to the teachers and staff who work there. The men and women who often spend more time with our children, than their own. These people love our children and shed blood, sweat, and tears for them. They are giants among us. These giants are under attack. By now, many of you have seen the article in the Santa Barbara Independent on March 29, 2021. How did it make you feel? Were you surprised and angry that our teachers are feeling so stressed from the bullying caused by one parent/community member that they required medical attention? Are you upset that our school has had to pay a whole teacher’s salary to defend against the constant and frivolous litigation produced by this same person? This additional senseless expense could mean that there may be one less classroom that can be split next year. What about the fact that our administration has to waste countless hours of their time dealing with this nightmare and the constant and excessive requests for public and private information that is either confidential or has been disclosed? The school should be able to focus on our children during a public crisis, not on one person who has decided to target the school for their own vendetta! Personally, I am livid that my children are not getting the best education possible because one parent is having a tantrum. I am angry, saddened, and concerned for our giants. The teachers and staff that we all love and appreciate need our support now more than ever. I would like to show them my support and am asking you to do the same. By signing this form, you are telling Cold Spring School teachers and staff that you believe in them. That you support them and appreciate them, especially during these difficult times. That you agree no one should have to withstand the bullying that has occurred and want it to stop. That you thank them for their hard work during this year and for doing their best in educating our dearest possessions. We are Cold Spring Strong. In order to ensure this majority opinion would be published, we’ve purchased ad space. We love and support the teachers and want the baseless rumors, vexatious litigation, and attempt to rip apart the community to end.

With concern and love, Cold Spring Families

Sonia Kermen Michelle Kerwood Lynda Kest Alan Keyser Alisa Keyser Angelina Keyser Kanlaya Keyser Andrea Krautmann Damien Krautmann Jane Krautmann Jay Krautmann Kate Krautmann Sam Krautmann Jack Larson Nan Larson Sascha Liebowitz Ikon Joulie Mares Jette Mavris Michael Mavris JR McGinnis Kasen McNerney Patrick McNerney

Ryder McNerney Eileen McQuade Jim McQuade Jeff Metcalfe Jen Miller Tony Miller Jon Montanaro Shannon Montanaro Kirsten Moore Tamra Murphy Elsha Narachi Amber Neely Jon Ohlgren Chris Orwig Kelly Orwig Katie Osumi Dan Otero Monique Otero Kristopher Parker Michellene Parker Ann Pattison Trevor Pattison

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volume 35, # 798, Apr. 29-May 6, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Lily Hopwood, Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

2021 Summer Camp Guide

Find the Perfect In-Person or Virtual Experience for Your Kids

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

FEATURE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 49

US AND OUR ARROW For years, even before the death of their very old king snake, Ferocious Kai, Mason Kettmann, who is 11 years old, and his 8-year-old sister, Madeline, were pining for a puppy. Last month, their dream came true when Joanna and Matt Kettmann — our longtime senior editor, who’s worked at the paper since 1999 — brought home a Goldendoodle, whose longer hair leans more toward the golden retriever side of things. It’s Matt’s first dog since Lollypop, the dachshund/terrier he adopted on his 5th birthday and lived with until he left home for UCSB. The Kettmanns named their dog Arrow, and the 10-week-old pup is “very sweet and smart,” according to Matt, who explained, “He’s already sleeping through the night, though still peeing a bit inside.” Arrow’s current hobbies involve exploring the backyard, following Joanna around, chilling under the avocado tree, and chewing on iris, kangaroo paw, and other plants that he shouldn’t be. Madeline loves playing fetch and chase with Arrow and is excited to take him on walks and go to the beach when he’s fully vaccinated, but she doesn’t like “watching him when I don’t want to”— lesson in responsibility, check! As for Mason, “He licks and bites me in a gentle way — no, a majestic way! We’re learning about strong words in class.”

JOANNA KETTMANN

TABLE of CONTENTS

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

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CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

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APR. 22-29, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

COMMUNITY

Residents Turn Out to Save Ortega Park Murals Bilingual Saturday Event Organized by One Community Bridge Project, Bienestar Latinx, and City Officials IGN AC IO ‘N ASH’ MOR EN O/B I EN ESTAR L ATI N X PHOTOS

by Camille Garcia

T

his Saturday, a throng of Santa Barbara residents turned out to Ortega Park to voice their ideas for the future of the park’s murals. The murals — colorful depictions of Aztec, Chumash, and Chicano imagery—were originally slated for removal as part of a city-funded redevelopment plan meant to bring new amenities to the space, such as sports fields, a heated swimming pool, treelined promenades, and more. MURAL AMBASSADORS: Members of the Neighborhood Outreach Team for the Ortega Park Mural Rescue Project (above) were But, upon learning about the among the 150 or so people in attendance at Saturday’s event. plans that included no mention of preserving the murals, local residents and activists last year called upon side residents who have been going to Ortega Santa Barbara youth continue to maintain the City Council to find a way to save the Park their entire lives. Some learned to swim a sense of stewardship over the murals and works of art. They continued to speak out in the park’s public pool, played basketball have undeniably helped propel the preservaon Saturday, this time in person at a bilin- on the courts, and picnicked with family tion efforts forward. Before Saturday’s event, gual event organized by the One Community on the weekends. The murals, they said, are middle and high schoolers, along with colBridge Project, Bienestar Latinx, and the City influential fixtures in the backdrop of their lege students, canvassed around the Eastside of Santa Barbara. memories. under the leadership of Bienestar Latinx. With about 150 people in attendance, “These murals give people a sense of iden- They informed neighbors about the park many citizens demanded that the city leave tification, direction, motivation, and with redevelopment plan and the movement to the park and the murals as they are, or at that comes a sense of community steward- save the murals. least preserve the murals while updating and ship,” said John Huerta, a seventh-generation Santa Barbara High School Ethnic Studadding amenities. This viewpoint was voiced Santa Barbara resident and One Community ies Club President Lilyanna Jaimes and Vice despite the fact that the city has already deter- Bridge Project member. “For me, they repre- President Blanca Juan González spoke canmined that some of the murals have weath- sent a window into the past that allows me to didly to the city’s elected officials in attendance, which included Mayor Cathy Murillo, ered enough damage that they can’t be safely exist as I am today in the present.” relocated and will have to be repainted or As children, others literally lent a hand in District 1 Councilmember Alejandra Gutiermemorialized in another way. the murals’ creation. They washed brushes, rez, and others. Other suggestions included adding art- mixed colors, and even helped paint the “If you’re truly doing this for the comwork representative of the Eastside’s Black, pieces under the guidance of the artists, who munity, then listen to us,” Jaimes said, “and Asian, and Italian communities, and dedicat- included Manuel Unzueta and Armando please do all you can for the people who live ing city funds to expand youth art programs, Vallejo, both Santa Barbara residents who and grew up here, and not for the people who especially so youth of color can continue were in attendance Saturday. vacation here for a weekend.” Santa Barbara’s muralist traditions. For world-renowned artist Unzueta, the At the start of the event, CouncilmemThe 18 pieces, first painted by local and involvement of local children— including ber Gutierrez—who grew up on the Eastinternational artists in the late 1970s with his own niece and nephews—in creating the side—apologized on behalf of the city for additions over the years, are important cul- pieces should be celebrated and respected. neglecting to first consult the community tural artifacts representing Santa Barbara’s “I think within the project of the city, about the mural removal plans. She said Indigenous and Chicano heritage, the major- there is room to make sure that the historical the city will review Saturday’s feedback and ity of citizen speakers said. expression of art that has been done here by determine how to incorporate it into the Many of those speakers were lifelong East- a thousand children” is preserved, he said. redevelopment project. “We have to hold each other accountable,” she said, “and that’s how we can [begin] this changing process, and also [begin] to heal.” At the helm of the mural preservation effort is Mark Alvarado, director of One Community Bridge Project and a former city staffer. He said if the city allows the project to move forward in a “truly communitycentered effort, then I think it’ll be a win-win. “If this doesn’t demonstrate to the city that [effective community outreach] is important, then they’re not listening,” Alvarado said.

Our gratitude to Ignacio “Nash”Moreno for use of photo stills from his upcoming documentary on Ortega Park.

NEWS BRIEFS CORONAVIRUS CORONAVIRUS Along with the rest of the nation, the county gave the all-clear for the Johnson & Johnson vaccine on 4/26. Six cases of women developing blood clots, one fatally, had caused federal health authorities to “pause” the coronavirus medication, also called the Janssen vaccine, on 4/13. Centers for Disease Control and Food & Drug Administration officials lifted the advisory, saying a review of the cases and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System led to the determination that the benefits outweighed the risk. (Read the full story at independent.com/j&j-resumes.) Both the UC and CSU systems announced a proposed policy to require COVID-19 vaccinations for all students, staff, and faculty who will be working or studying on campus this fall. Under the proposal, students planning to be on campus would have to update their immunization documentation or provide an approved exception or medical exemption. The vaccination requirement would also allow for the further reopening of campuses, along with continued safety requirements of physical distancing and mask wearing. Public Health Director Dr. Van Do-Reynoso attended President Joe Biden’s first joint address to Congress on 4/28 as the virtual guest of Rep. Salud Carbajal. The honor, which was also extended to S.L.O. Public Health’s Dr. Penny Borenstein, recognizes their key leadership during the pandemic. Normally, the 535 congressmembers can invite one in-person guest each, Carbajal’s office said. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, in whose chamber the speech is held, limited attendance to about 200 lawmakers with no in-person guests, following COVID protocols and amid high post-1/6 security.

COMMUNITY Montecito resident Oprah Winfrey will be the keynote speaker for UCSB’s commencement ceremony, Chancellor Henry T. Yang announced last week. An in-person graduation processional will take place the week of 6/7, allowing graduating students and also Class of 2020 grads to cross a stage and pose for photographs in front of the campus lagoon; the online commencement ceremony featuring Winfrey will take place on 6/12. Both events will be livestreamed so friends and family can share in the celebration. The electric shuttles serving Santa Barbara’s downtown and waterfront — which were suspended last April — might not make a post-pandemic comeback. The shuttles provided frequent service for just 50 cents a ride, made possible through a contract between city Public Works and its bus company. Without Public Works’ $1 million subsidy or the city’s financial help, Metropolitan Transit District (MTD) doesn’t have the resources to continue the shuttle. The shuttle termination is one element of MTD’s proposed annual service change for August. MTD is currently taking comments via a public survey at sbmtd.gov/servicechanges and at its next virtual community meeting on 5/11.

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news.

CONT’D ON PAGE 8 

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APRIL 29, 2021

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APR. 22-29, 2021

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High fire season begins 5/3, meaning no more burn permits will be issued and individual departments will be increasing resources. The 2020-21 rainy season yielded just 47 percent of our normal rainfall, explained County Fire’s Daniel Bertucelli, resulting in significantly drier fuels. County Fire is in the process of applying for some of the $165 million the state is giving out for fire-prevention projects. For now, residents are urged to maintain vegetation clearance around structures, review their Ready! Set! Go! wildfire action plans, and be cautious in wildland areas. See sbcfire.com.

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ENVIRONMENT & CARROTS More than 3,500 individuals, businesses, and foun-

dations gave more than $7.6 million toward the purchase of the West Mesa at the San Marcos Foothills. The total goal of $20 million got a mid-April Springfield 8 oz. burst of momentum from a $3.6 million zero-interest loan from the Allemall Foundation of Maryland. “The moment that we learned of the community efforts to save this important grassland open space, we knew we wanted to help,” said Ed Scott, executive director for Allemall. To secure the legacy Minute Maid of 59theoz. 100 acres of land facing the development of eight luxury homes, $12.4 million is needed before 6/1, said Peter Schuyler, cochair of the fundraising effort. See foothillsforever.org.

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EDUCATION PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

COVID Uptick in S.B. Schools

students 16 and older who obtained parental consent to Goleta Cottage Hospital next week to vaccinate them. The district is focusing on students who have barriers to transportation or can’t bring a parent or guardian with them to get vaccinated. “We need to treat vaccinations like college, that level of excitement,” said Boardmember Wendy Sims-Moten about the vaccination buses. The district will be taking students from the three traditional high schools first and the alternative high schools in the coming weeks. Wageneck also said that the district has seen an overall net decline of 217 students since August 2020. The district also moved one step closer to building a summer learning program that will help students make up for any learning loss stemming from a tumultuous past academic year in the pandemic. Read more on that at independent.com/summer-learning. —Delaney Smith

officers’ request to drop the knife and made an advance toward them. The officers were eventually able to talk Ortiz down and get him to surrender the knife. Ortiz was charged with being under the influence of a controlled substance and possession of methamphetamine and a fixed blade over three inches. He is booked in County Jail on $10,000. The County Jail won accreditation by the National Commission on Correctional Health Care, putting it on par with incarceration facilities nationwide for higher standards of safety, training, health care, and special needs and services. The road to accreditation started in 2017 when county supervisors contracted with Wellpath to take over the jail’s medical services from a provider highly criticized by inmates, their families, and mental-health organizations. Ironically, in the same week the accreditation was announced, the new provider was sued in the death of a mentally ill inmate in Ventura County’s jail. (Read the full story at independent.com/jailaccred2021.)

SCIENCE & TECH The Delta IV Heavy rocket’s triple set of boosters thundered a classified payload for the National Reconnaissance Office from Vandenberg Air Force Base on 4/26. For “Team Vandenberg,” the mission was the culmination of a successful collaboration between numerous agencies, said Colonel Anthony Mastalier, commander of the 30th Space Wing based at Vandenberg. The launch represented the ninth of a Delta Heavy for Vandenberg and is the largest rocket to rise from the West Coast. Only SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy is said to be larger. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

City Council Gives Itself a Raise

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he Santa Barbara City Council voted to give itself a 2.6 percent pay increase when City Hall’s projected budget for the new year is $7.5 million in the hole, mostly due to the impacts of the COVID pandemic on local tourism. The uncomfortable optics of the decision notwithstanding, the amount involved is less than $2,500. The mayor will see a $62 a week pay bump and the councilmembers an increase just shy of $50. In Santa Barbara, the council pay is dictated by city charter, not by the council itself. It goes up or down automatically based on fluctuations of the Area Median Income. The council vote ratifies those fluctuations. Last year’s increase of 10 percent, however, elicited significant discomfort among councilmembers, many of whom pledged to donate all or some of their raises back to the general fund or to nonprofits such as the Santa Barbara Library Foundation. Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez inquired whether that option was still available to

CITY

councilmembers, and he was told it was. Even though the City of Santa Barbara is slated to receive $22 million from the American Rescue Plan—$11 million this year and $11 million the next—City Hall has incurred $25 million in revenue losses because of COVID-19. City Administrator Paul Casey said Santa Barbara has been hit harder than any other local government in the tri-counties, citing the intensity with which the Santa Barbara economy relies on the tourist dollar. This week, the council’s Finance Committee voted unanimously to recommend the rescue revenues be used to replenish badly depleted reserves, now $14 million less than what council policy dictates. Even so, Councilmember Meagan Harmon questioned the wisdom of putting all the federal windfall into reserves. “Is there something important that our neighbors need to help them get through this moment that these funds can provide?” When the matter gets to the council as a whole, that debate will begin in earnest. —Nick Welsh

TRANSPORTATION

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he State Assembly just voted to finally legalize the “California stop” — at least for bicyclists as they approach a stop sign. Currently, cyclists who do not completely stop at intersections controlled by stop signs are subject to tickets and significant fines. If the new law wins approval, cyclists will be required instead to slow down and yield to oncoming traffic, but not necessarily to stop. More than 75 organizations advocating on behalf of greater road LET ’EM ROLL: The S.B. Bicycle Coalition was one of more than 75 groups access for cyclists wrote that wrote letters on behalf of the bill. letters on behalf of this through stop signs cited safety reasons for bill, including the Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition. Steve Bennett, doing so. The study noted that motorists vioS.B.’s representative in the Assembly and late the law with greater frequency. Dave Snyder, a pro-bike lobbyist and an ardent bicycle advocate, voted in favor advocate with CalBike in Sacramento, of the bill. Driving the argument on behalf of the noted that the new bill enshrines into law change were concerns about road safety the existing behavior of many cyclists for cyclists. States that relaxed road rules already. “To me, it confers dignity on peoregarding stop signs saw a significant ple who ride bikes,” he said. “You don’t have decrease in collisions involving cyclists to break the law to behave in a normal and at intersections. Delaware reported a convenient fashion.” 23 percent reduction three years after its Snyder also evoked aspects of the George state legislature passed a similar measure Floyd moment, noting, “It gives police less in 2017. Washington — the most recent of an opportunity to harass cyclists,” adding state to adopt such a measure—reported that in Black and brown communities, that a 14.5 percent drop in the year following nerve is especially raw. Snyder was struck the change. by the desultory nature of the opposition to Based on a study on the behavior of 18,000 the bill led by the California Police Chiefs cyclists dubbed “Scofflaw Cycling, Illegal but Association. The bill won by a 53-11 margin Rational,” 70 percent of cyclists who rode with support from both parties. —NW

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APR. 22-29, 2021

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ENVIRONMENT

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APRIL 29, 2021

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veryone alive today will be 24 years older when California stops pulling oil from below the ground in 2045. This ambitious goal was a coda to Governor Gavin Newsom’s announcement last Friday that the state would stop giving permits for fracking in 2024. Environmental groups such as the Sierra Club and Food and Water Watch immediately found Newsom’s bans insufficient. Sierra Club’s Brandon Dawson called for a shorter timeline on both “to confront the climate crisis.” Alexandra Nagy, head of Food & Water Watch, called the action a dodge by Newsom to put the burden on the state’s permitting agencies.

task was more to perform an analysis that would give the state facts on which to base decisions, rather than to provide solutions. A third study specifically on a changing workforce is due in the fall. (More at independent.com/frackban2021.) “We want to be part of the solution,” said Kevin Slagle of the Western States Petroleum Association of his members’ efforts to make their carbon footprint smaller, invest in biofuel production, and transition to solar. The ban order was the wrong approach, he said: “When they say we want to eliminate your industry, they’re saying we don’t need you as part of the solution.” California has led the world in curbing emissions, which the Biden administration recognized this week in reversing Trump’s attempt to stop enforcement of the state’s rigorous regulations. But Newsom’s fracking ban announcement has its skeptics: “It’s curious that a year ago he couldn’t do it,” said Slagle. The governor had kicked the respon—Senators Scott Wiener and Monique Limón sibility for ending fracking to the Legislature last October but had been criticized for not putting Though Newsom is currently fac- any political muscle behind the ask. Senaing a Republican-led recall effort (it tors Scott Wiener and Monique Limón crossed the petition threshold Monday), sponsored a bill to do just that, but it failed his bans may go beyond political ploys. to pass out of its first committee. Two days before his April 23 announceIn a joint statement, Wiener and Limón ment, two studies—looking at supply and agreed that 2045 was too far away, but “at demand—commissioned by the state EPA least having a set end date will trigger the were published. The UC Institute of Trans- long-overdue conversation about what a portation Studies examined vehicles large transition away from oil looks like.” They and small and the infrastructure needed to blamed the lack of progress on politisupport a switch to zero carbon. The sec- cal paralysis and again demanded that a ond—from UCSB—looked at options in 2,500-foot buffer protect communities reducing supply and effects on health and from oil field activity: “Our frontline comequity. Kyle Meng, an economist and head munities are paying the price every day for of Climate and Energy at UCSB, said their our addiction to oil.” —Jean Yamamura

‘Our frontline communities are paying the price every day for our addiction to oil.’

ENVIRONMENT

DDT Dumping Worse Than Once Thought

M

arine scientists with Scripps Institute have discovered that a much larger swath of the Pacific Ocean between Los Angeles and the Catalina Island was used as an industrial dumping ground for tens of thousands of barrels laden with the pesticide DDT or sludge from the DDT manufacturing process. “It’s much, much bigger than anything we had thought,” said UCSB Professor David Valentine, a marine scientist who’s been studying the DDT dumping for more than 10 years. According to Valentine, new mapping of the ocean floor reveals that dumping took place in an area of more than 50 square miles. Before that, he said, the understanding was that dumping occurred within a three-mile circle. According to best estimates, at least 27,000 confirmed barrels were dumped overboard in the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. In addition,

Valentine said there are more than 100,000 other human-made objects on the ocean floor that may or may not be barrels. Some of the barrels, he noted, were still intact; others had decomposed. “There is so much we do not know,” he added. To date, he said, not one of the barrels has been retrieved from the ocean floor. Valentine said much research is needed to determine the biological consequences of DDT in the marine environment; its adverse consequences to dolphins and sea lions have been documented, he said. Valentine is too young to have run and played in DDT clouds sprayed throughout neighborhoods across the United States as a mosquito control measure—as countless children did in those decades. But he cited a research paper released last week demonstrating how the granddaughters of pregnant women exposed to DDT showed —Nick Welsh traces of it.


PHOTOS COU RTESY WH ITE BU F FALO L AN D TRU ST

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

Jalama Canyon Ranch Sells for $6M White Buffalo Land Trust to Turn Property into Regenerative Farming Center by Matt Kettmann n a bold move for both land conservation and the future of earth-friendly farming, the Summerland-based White Buffalo Land Trust just purchased the 1,000-acre Jalama Canyon Ranch for $6 million, with plans to turn the property into a center for regenerative agriculture. Located on Jalama Road close to Highway 1, about eight miles north of Point Conception and a 10-minute drive south of Lompoc, the ranch was best known for years as an event venue and home to JCR Vineyard, which was the name of a wine brand until recently. “It was an Earth Day gift for sure,” said Ana Smith, the director of programs and engagement for White Buffalo. “We’re really excited about this opportunity to begin the development of this center for regenerative agriculture that will be an important hub for this region and beyond. It’s really a beacon for the power of regenerative agriculture and how we can grow out food, fiber, and medicine in a way that restores the ecosystem.” Quickly gaining steam in farming communities across the world—including in the region’s vast wine industry—regenerative agriculture, according to Regeneration International.org, “describes farming and grazing practices that, among other benefits, reverse climate change by rebuilding soil organic matter and restoring degraded soil biodiversity, resulting in both carbon drawdown and improving the water cycle.” The $6 million was raised as part of a “blended capital effort,” with funding coming from the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County as well as foundations, individual donors, and conservation lenders. The next step will be raising another $4 million by May 2022 to pay for infrastructure development and bring the programs to life. White Buffalo plans to kick that campaign off in June. The grand dream is laid out in detail at tinyurl.com/campaign-for-jalama. “What we’re looking to create is a center that’s focused on demonstrating the prin-

I

REGENERATION: Best known for years as an event venue and home to JCR Vineyard, Jalama Canyon Ranch is where the White Buffalo Land Trust plans to build a center for regenerative agriculture.

ciples and practices of regenerative agriculture, that focuses on the links between those practices and the positive ecological outcomes on the land, that focuses on training the next generation of land stewards as well as current land stewards,” said Smith of their ambitions, which will emphasize educational opportunities for all ages. Among other goals, the plan calls for a biodiverse persimmon orchard, to feed the trust’s Figure Ate brand of persimmon vinegar; a reinvigorated olive grove; continued management of the vineyard; holistic managed grazing of cattle, sheep, and goats; and

Spring Challenge to Spend Time in Nature Being in nature is good for body and mind. It lowers stress and improves our sense of well-being. Visit HealthyPeopleHealthyTrails.org to join the Spring Challenge to spend time in nature and to be active outdoors. Send in weekly logs to be entered into drawings for art cards, goody stuffed backpacks and more. The Challenge begins May 1, free of charge and open to all! For more inspiration, visit Art from the Trail: Exploring the Natural Beauty of Santa Barbara County at WildlingMuseum.org or in person when the museum is open.

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dryland agave production for both booze and fiber. A nonprofit founded by Steve Finkel to honor the work of his late wife, Lyndsey McMorrow, White Buffalo Land Trust already owns a 12-acre farm behind Summerland, where the staff of about eight people are already practicing regenerative farming. The flagship farm is “our living laboratory,” said Smith. “Jalama Canyon Ranch is our opportunity to show regenerative agriculture at scale and to work with others who have those types of land holdings to show how a transition to regenerative agriculture is possible.” “Throughout history we have struggled to live in balance and harmony with the earth and with each other; yet our shared future rests on our expanding awareness and ability to do so,” said Finkel in a press release. “The community coming together to do this work at Jalama Canyon Ranch is a resounding step forward on this journey.” n

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APR. 22-29, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

Prying the Lid off 45-Year-Old Cold Case Sheriff’s Office Reexamining 1975 Murder of Paul Ornelas by Nick Welsh have their worst fears realized. “That’s when he last words Paul Ornelas would I fell in love with the instrument,” said Sersay to his brother John were, “I’ll geant Jarrett Morris of the coroner’s office. be back.” Based on that experience, the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Office bought one of their As it happened, he never was. The body of Paul Anthony Ornelas own ANDE machines at a cost of $125,000. was found early the next morning along When a Sikorsky helicopter crashed into the railroad tracks near San Marcos a Calabasas hillside on January 26, 2020, High School. The back of his skull had leaving nine badly mangled bodies among the wreckage, Santa Barbara sent its ANDE been bashed in. Blunt force trauma with down to Los Angeles County Medical a blunt object. The wound was so deep, Examiner’s office. That was how the world it took three inches of cotton to fill it. learned that Laker great Kobe Bryant, his Paul Ornelas was 15 years old at the time of his murder. His brother John was daughter, and seven others were on board. just 14. All this happened a long time The new technology allows investigators ago — June 21, 1975, to be exact. The to make DNA matches using much smaller night before was a Friday. John and Paul DNA strands. No longer are DNA mother had been at party on Wentworth Avenue lodes like blood, semen, or saliva required. on the city’s lower Westside. John OrneWorkable strands can now be obtained from a simple touch on a steering wheel. las remembers begging his brother not And it’s much faster. Matches that used to to go. “I had a bad feeling,” he recalled. take weeks now can be obtained in a matter “That was the last I saw of him.” of a few hours. John Ornelas is third-generation Santa Like a lot of murders, this one never got solved. Early this April — 45 years Barbara; he grew up in the Ladera Apartlater — the Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Office ments on the city’s Westside, the youngest issued a press release announcing that of eight kids. His brother Paul was exactly it had officially reopened the Ornelas 12 months older. They did everything murder case. Press releases like that together. The family’s path was not easy. Ornelas’s father left early on. His mother, don’t happen every day. In fact, they never happen at all. Pauline Ornelas-Jaramillo, worked as a In the intervening 45 years, John certified nursing assistant first at Santa Ornelas graduated from Santa Barbara Barbara’s old General Hospital and then later at an acute care nursing home. She had High School, got a job with the City of her hands full. John’s older brother Vincent Santa Barbara’s water department, marwas drafted into the military and spent two ried, had two sons, divorced, served on the Michael Jackson Grand Jury, fell years in Vietnam. That was rough on the family, but he made it home okay. Vince in love again, retired, and then took another job working as a pipe inspector BACK ON THE CASE: When Paul Ornelas left a party on the Westside 45 years ago, his brother John had a bad would later become a martial arts specialat the Glen Annie Reservoir in Goleta. feeling. Paul would be found early the next morning with his head bashed in. Detectives with the Major Crimes ist, teaching cops and Sheriff ’s deputies the Life has been good. But throughout Unit of the Sheriff’s Office just reopened what until now was a very cold case. fine points of controlled mayhem, and then all the years, Ornelas said, he’s carried worked in juvenile hall for the Probation around “a big hole in his heart.” Department. typically involves “lots of interviews, a lot of re-interviews, The family moved to Oxnard for a while. John and He still does. “We always wanted answers, but we never could get and a lot of looking over the forensic evidence.” Looking Paul — Johnny and Paulie — played Little League baseball any,” he said, speaking for his entire family. “We could over the past reports, he could see that the original detec- together for the Hueneme Pirates. Paul, a lefty, played first never get over the fact someone killed our brother and tives worked the case hard. For three years. “It was a big base. As a batter, John remembered his brother as a real there were no answers.” The questions don’t go away. “How deal back then,” he said. “A very big deal.” “ripper.” After the games, the two boys would walk home, could someone do something so cold and cowardly and Maybe new avenues of inquiry will emerge. Definitely sauntering down J Street, still wearing their gray woolen still live with themselves?” he asked. “Why would they there has been new technology, particularly a new rapid baseball uniforms, the kind with the stirrups. In one hand take the life of such a young man — were they vindictive? DNA testing machine. The ANDE, made by a company they’d hold a deep-fried burrito, in the other a large Coke. Or jealous?” out of Colorado, is a big metal box that hums like a loud Paul was tall, strong, outgoing, and handsome. His looks Over the years, Ornelas became persistence personi- air compressor when in use. Designed for wartime use, were decidedly not lost on the girls. “He was really charmfied, contacting each of the successive detectives assigned it can be dropped out of airplanes and survive intact. Its ing,” Ornelas said of his brother. “Really charming.” to solve his brother’s murder. “They always told me there purpose is to identify bodies that have been blown up or The two got into their fair share of young dude trouble. In 1975, both would find themselves sent to Los Prietos were things they couldn’t tell me,” he recalled. “They said burned beyond recognition. it might jeopardize the case.” Ornelas got that. But like It was first tested in civilian use during the hellacious Boys Camp for about half a year. “We weren’t bad, but we many murder victims’ family members, he got tired of all Camp Fire of 2018, during which 85 Northern California weren’t perfect either,” Ornelas confided. “We didn’t go the waiting. “I was getting frustrated,” he said. residents were wiped out by the flames. Sheriff ’s Lieuten- to school all the time, we partied, we were a little out of Several months ago, Ornelas got a call from Detective ant Eric Raney saw a presentation on ANDE’s usefulness control sometimes, things like that.” At the camp, the two Matt Maxwell of the department’s Major Crimes unit. He in that fire, so when the Conception dive boat went up in Ornelas brothers looked after each other. Always close, announced that he’d be taking over the case. “He said, flames off Santa Barbara a year and a half ago, killing 34 they got closer still in the six months they spent at the ‘John, you’ve been patient for all these years,’ ” Ornelas crew and passengers, Raney asked his counterparts in camp. Paul also studied restaurant management while recalled. “‘I don’t know how I would have acted.’” Sacramento to loan their machine. For a coroner’s office there, attending classes at La Colina Junior High School. Detective Maxwell — with five years at the Sheriff ’s scrambling to identify a mass of charred bodies, ANDE He was very good at that, too. “He’d have been a great busiDepartment and 15 years total in law enforcement — soon proved to be a game changer. In that case, families received nessman if he lived,” Ornelas said. “He had the personality found himself working under the tutelage of Lieutenant the cold comfort of getting the bad news sooner rather and the temperament. He could connect with anybody.” Jeffrey McDonald. Working a cold case, Maxwell said, than having to wait weeks — perhaps months even — to Everything seemed so promising.

T

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APRIL 29, 2021

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CONT’D

G RA N D

O P E N I N G

COU RTESY PHOTOS

NEWS of the WEEK

45 YEARS LATER: “I can’t believe this is happening,” said John Ornelas. “Now I’m getting caught back in the moment. Man, this is crazy.”

Then June 21 happened. John Ornelas remembers the Westside party. At the time, he’d been out of the camp just one week. His brother Paul—out on leave—was to be released one week later. They were celebrating freedom. He remembers going out to use the restroom. When he came back, Paul was just taking off. “I’ll be back,” Paul Ornelas declared. John would spend the night at his sister’s house in Santa Barbara. Their mother would show up the next morning from Oxnard. Another sister was there, too. John remembers the knock on the door and the Sheriff ’s deputies showing up to deliver the bad news. “I was devastated,” he said, but for his mom, it was even worse. “It took everything she had and just broke her,” he recalled. “I’ll never forget the look on her face. They may as well have grabbed her heart right out of her rib cage. They never put it back.” Pauline Ornelas was 40 years old the night her son was killed. John credits his older brother Vincent for keeping the family together. At the time, John Ornelas—fresh out of boys’ camp—figured he’d be living with friends in Goleta. His big brother Vincent brought Ornelas back to earth, making him part of his own family. —John Ornelas, on how his brother’s murder “‘This is your home,’ ” he told John. affected his mother, Pauline Ornelas Jaramillo Four years later, John graduated from Santa Barbara High School. He was on the football team. He was focused. “I was the only one in my immediate family to graduate,” he noted. Ornelas’s brother Vincent died suddenly in 2015. Today, only two of the eight Ornelas kids are still alive. The other surviving sibling, a brother, suffers from dementia. John Ornelas is the last Ornelas standing. “I made a promise I was going to find out what happened,” he said. “I made a promise we would find answers, that we would see justice done.” Closure, like grief, comes in many forms. “Their grieving has affected the family for years,” said Detective Maxwell. But even when crimes gets solved, “sometimes, it’s a big weight lifted,” he said, “but sometimes it’s never quite enough.” For John Ornelas, it all remains very much an open question. He’s still not sure what got the case reopened, but he is hoping it’s because the detectives have something. If they do, they still can’t tell him. But he’s confident they mean business. Forty-five years ago, he noted, there was no social media. Now the echoes are coming back on him with a vengeance. “I can’t believe this is happening. Now I’m getting caught up in the moment all over again,” he said. “Man, it was crazy.” To keep himself grounded, John Ornelas prays. “I just ask God to give me the strength and courage to keep going so we can see justice for this family.” n

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‘It took everything and just broke her. They may as well have grabbed her heart out of her rib cage. They never put it back.’

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Santa Barbara

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Dog Chasing the Czar

WHAT’S IN A NAME: Who in their right mind wouldn’t want to be “czar?” It’s a title

so powerful that it doesn’t need—nor would it tolerate—an “a” in front of it. One simply is czar, which decidedly is not to be confused with its syphilitic kissing cousin “tsar,” a title that reeks of aristocratic inbreeding and mothballs. The issue came to a head this Tuesday when City Councilmember Eric Friedman asked Kimberlee Albers whether what is really needed is a “homeless czar?” At the time, they were discussing an impenetrably dense report — 104 pages long — that Albers was presenting on the county’s latest plan to address homelessness. Albers, being the county’s de facto

homeless czar—though without the furs and scepter — all too predictably answered no. Santa Barbara, she said, already has a stakeholder group that has 27 members guiding

the 180 groups dealing with homelessness

one way or the other. Also, another such commission is made up of elected officials from each of the eight cities and the County of Santa Barbara. This Tuesday, for example, the council voted to appoint Mayor Cathy Murillo and Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez to serve on it.  In other words, yes, we absolutely need a Homeless Czar.  Albers is endowed with a rare sense of mission, a bulletproof optimism that is contagious, and an uncanny ability to juggle 19 plates while doing somersaults and some-

how still keep smiling. She is, in other words, utterly invaluable. But she is totally incapable of uttering simple declarative sentences, such as “Let there be light.” We need a Homeless Czar. Hope is good. Fear might be helpful, too. The subliminal reality to which Albers alluded throughout her remarks—though she will swear she didn’t—is the crushing

need for a new bed tax, sales tax, or property tax to create a sustainable year-in-year-

out revenue stream upon which we can rely when all the millions in one-time state and federal dollars starts drying up this coming June. The political cognoscenti tell us now is not the time. Wait a few years, they say. Only Councilmember Michael Jordan, onetime mouthpiece and representative for hospitality industry and downtown merchants, has been so foolhardy as to stick his neck out on favor of this. Jordan, an enthusiastic but impatient mansplainer, has the urgent energy possessed only by Johnny-come-latelies to the cause. Even before there was ink on the documents, Jordan came out loudly and preemptively in favor of a plan to transform the abandoned youth hostel at the bottom of Chapala Street into transitional homeless housing. And he represents the district where this will happen. Prior efforts to build much-needed homeless housing — one on Alisos Street and another at the Castillo-Carrillo street

parking lot —died on the vine, the victims

of bureaucratic self-immolation, stupidity, and NIMBY outrage. To get any tax passed, voters will need to perceive progress is being made. Despite what appears to be overwhelming evidence to the contrary on the streets, it is. As Albers noted, in the past two years, 585 people have gotten housed, and 20,000 bed nights of shelter have been provided; 270 households have gotten rental assistance; 173 homeless people—those at highest risk—have gotten emergency housing in hotels. Of those, 80 have found permanent housing. Two weeks ago, the council approved half a million bucks on a similar “hoteling” plan. Within one day, all 15 beds were fully occupied. Even so, the fastest rising homeless subpopulation are people living in cars and vans. New Beginnings’ Safe Parking Program —started in 2004—is by far the cheapest, safest, most practical, and most necessary program that addresses this need. Yet the program’s sparse inventory of 150 parking spaces is holding stubbornly steady. Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez asked Albers a great question Tuesday: What are

the churches and corporations doing?

When it comes to parking spaces, not nearly enough. In fact, many of the churches that were once mainstays of the program have pulled out. No doubt they have their reasons. But what about Sears and Costco, with their

vast oceanic parking lots? How many car campers could they accommodate? Short answer? A whole lot more than they do.  Ask city functionaries, and they suck in their breaths and note ruefully how the Sears lot has many owners. Maybe a call from a Homeless Czar—making them an offer they can’t refuse—would simplify things. Maybe City Hall has some tit to exchange for Sears’ tat, some quid for the churches’ quo. Maybe if we had a Homeless Czar, City Hall would not embarrass itself passing “neutral” ordinances regulating feral shopping carts or banning oversized vans from parking on city streets. The good news is not that Nomadland —a movie about older people forced by death and economic displacement into vans and RVs—just won the Oscar for Best Film. The good news is that Congressmember Salud Carbajal saw fit to introduce a bill—named after his former boss, mentor, and ultimate political mamma bear supervisor Naomi Schwartz — to create new federal funding opportunities for programs like Safe Parking. Under Carbajal’s proposal, local governments could apply for up to $5 million to fund such programs. Such funding would go a very long way to help defray the costs of running these programs. It would not, however, make parking spaces magically appear. Maybe some private property owners now threatening to create an armed militia of private security cops on State Street could help out.  Did you know “czar” is a Slavic bastardization of the word “Caesar?”  We need a Homeless Czar. —Nick Welsh

FOOTHILLS FOREVER Together, we are making this happen…but we have a lot more to do! With your help we reached an agreement to purchase the 101 acre West Mesa of the San Marcos Foothills! This will permanently preserve and protect the land for future generations. Our intent is to add it to the 200 acre San Marcos Foothills Preserve.

We need your help now!

We’re forging ahead full steam to our goal of raising the purchase price of $18 million by June 1st.

How to help: Make a tax-deductible contribution to the Foothills Forever Fund, a fiscal sponsorship fund at the Santa Barbara Foundation. Please make checks payable to: Santa Barbara Foundation, with Foothills Forever Fund in the memo line. Mail to: 1111 Chapala St. #200, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Donate on-line: FoothillsForever.org To donate gifts of stock or other assets, please contact info@foothillsforever.org Visit the San Marcos Foothills West Mesa at the end of Via Gaitero Road. Docent Led Tours of the property are offered every Saturday & Sunday at 10 a.m. or by special arrangement. Email Julia Laraway at a1fyr516@gmail.com

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Rita Perez Rojas

Brett Gourley

Rita Perez Rojas passed away peacefully on the morning of April 13th with her husband Roberto Rojas by her side as she took her last breath. Rita leaves behind her loving husband Roberto Rojas, Son Richard Rojas (Luci Rojas), daughter Rita Rojas Sanchez (Gilbert Sanchez), Grandson Rick Rojas, Granddaughters Ramona Rojas, Nicolle Sanchez, Great Grandchildren Robby Rojas and Holly Rojas. Rita has been reunited in the afterlife with her son Robin Rojas, Mother Ruth Perez, Father Rito Perez, and sister Angie Contreras. She was born in Phoenix Arizona on March 10th, 1926. Rita spent her childhood in Arizona with her family. In 1953 she met the love of her life Roberto Rojas who was stationed at Luke Field Air Force Base, shortly after they married, they had their first son Robin Rojas. After her husband was discharged from service they moved to El Paso, Texas where she had her 2nd son Rich Rojas and years later her daughter, Rita Sanchez. The family enjoyed their time in El Paso, Texas but when a job opportunity presented itself Rita and her husband uprooted their family to California. They made Santa Barbara their forever home. With the beautiful weather in Santa Barbara, Rita loved to spend time in her garden, and enjoy all the beauty that Santa Barbara had to offer. She enjoyed taking her grandchildren to the beach to hunt for shells. Becoming a Great Nana was an exciting time for Rita, she really enjoyed every moment spent playing with her great grandchildren and making memories. Rita was an amazing Wife, Mother, Daughter, and Nana. She was the family Matriarch, an advice giver, and the glue that kept The Rojas family together, she will be greatly missed. Burial services will be held at Santa Barbara Cemetery on Friday April 30th 2021 at 3pm

Brett Gourley was born at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, California on September 17,1938 to Jean Ballantyne Gourley and Phillip Nordli. On April 12, 2021, he passed away after a two year battle with cancer. His life was not defined by how he died but by how he lived. His passion for the ocean and beach was apparent from early in his life, including fishing with the local Italian fisherman, surfing at Hendry’s and playing volleyball at East Beach. However, after graduating from SBHS in 1956, Brett served in the army instead of heading to surf Hawaii with his buddies. He left the army and went on to complete his AA degree in landscape horticulture from SBCC and then attended Cal Poly Pomona. Returning to Santa Barbara, Brett started his own landscaping business. In 1961, he married his first wife, Judy Ann Johnson. They had two girls, Gwynn Ellen and Lesley Jean. They moved to Pacific Grove, where he started work for CalTrans as a tree surgeon, arborist and lead foreman covering all of Monterey County. Part of his responsibilities were to trim and care for giant redwoods in Big Sur. Prior to his retirement from CalTrans, he set the standard of tree work protocol which is still used today. Ultimately, he was drawn back to the ocean and spent the rest of his working life as a commercial fisherman. He fished many areas off the Central Coast from San Simeon to Half Moon Bay. Although his marriage of 22 years with Judy ended, they continued a lifetime of friendship and a shared love of their daughters. In 1984, Brett married Lesley Keil and adopted Asia Keil as his first son. Soon after, they had twins, Steven and Keil Gourley. He shared his love

3/10/1926 - 4/13/2021

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9/17/1938 - 4/12/2021

APRIL 29, 2021

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of fishing and hunting with his sons who have avidly continued his passion. Although Brett and Lesley’s marriage eventually ended in 1993, their friendship endured. After some time had passed, Brett reconnected with a longtime friend, Christie Ford who became his third wife and the love of his life, in February of 2003. Her three children from a previous marriage quickly became members of Brett’s large and extended family. During their marriage, they shared a passion for the written word, history, politics, a prolific garden and their dog Nellie. They also enjoyed traveling, fishing, hunting and the meals they shared with so many friends and family. Brett was a man of countless talents and attributes, as a builder, wood carver and master craftsman. By the end of his life, he had constructed seven boats from a 12- foot Pirogue to a 20-foot Alaskan Skiff. Although he lived a simple life, he was anything but simple. Distinguished, kind hearted and gentle to some; rough edged, untamed and rugged to others. His love was shown through deeds, not words. As a deep thinker and man of few words, when he spoke, everyone listened and when you spoke, he always listened. Brett was preceded in death by his parents and maternal aunt Marjorie. He is survived by his wife Christie, his beloved sister Jill Ryan, two daughters, Gwynn (Martin) and Lesley (Andrea); three sons, Asia (Heather), Steven and Keil (Melissa); eleven grandchildren; nine nieces and nephews; two previous wives; Christie’s children, Peddrick (Johanna), Max (Maria) and Beth (Bruce) and his two cousins. Cindy Reed (Jim) and Brian Clare. Due to COVID restrictions, at this time there will be no public memorial.

Chong A. Song

4/28/1950 - 3/21/2021

The Lord Jehovah’s angels peacefully lifted Chong A. Song to heaven on March 21, 2020. She was known as Song, Songie or Songie-Doll to her many loved ones, friends and work colleagues. The country was in the first stages of its lock-down from COVID19, when her heart gave way to her lengthy and valiantly fought battle with metastatic cancer through which she maintained her dignity to the end. She was born in Pusan, South Korea, April 28, 1950 to LiHwan Song and Kim Song and grew up with three brothers. Eventually, she married Won Ho Yun and had a son, Won Dong Uk. Being very poor, she decided to emigrate to the United States in 1985, to follow a desire to work in Health Care. Her husband and son chose not to follow her. One of Song’s most proud moments was when she became a citizen of her beloved, adopted country, the United States of America in October of 1994. She became one of our community’s most beloved and respected care workers working without ever calling in sick, for twenty-five years at Valle Verde and twelve years at Samarkand. Her career as a CNA and Med Tech, working with the elderly and terminally ill, with a kind and loving heart and caring compassion was often held up as an example to others. Among her many awards were: The Circle of Excellence Award in Recognition of Outstanding Performance from Valle Verde for 2001, the Certificate of Appreciation for 20 years of service to the Valle Verde Retirement Neighborhood on December 16, 2005, and the Certificates of Appreciation for her 5 years and 10 years of service at Samarkand. Every person she met became her best friend. “A heart is not judged by how

much you love, but by how much you are loved by others.” The Wizard of Oz She leaves a large family in South Korea and a half-sister, Eun Ju Song in New York. A Year is a Day. A Day is Forever. In my quiet and solitude, she often comes to my mind. Song had a strong faith, was truly dignified, and kind-hearted while also being reserved. She had a joyous and gracious nature. She was a complex soul and I; Edwin Perales, was fortunate enough to be her friend, her roommate and her Life Partner for twenty-four years. It was my honor to know her. I want to acknowledge a few of many of her beloved friends: Mr. David Back, Mr. Roy Handleman, Mr. Lad Handleman, Mr. NuNo A. deSena, Mr. Frank Hernandes, Ms. Rhoda Magllasang, Mr. Clore Magllasang, Rev. Jaiko Lee, Roxanne Zamarron, her longtime beloved neighbor Jeanie Schneider, and posthumously, Mr. Michael Stackpole. Song’s belief in her journey with the Jehovah’s Witnesses was shared by the loving and comforting visits from Paul and Martha Ledesma, and Karlene Hays. Song said, “Jehovah’s Witness is the true path to God.” I wish to thank many caring people starting with the compassionate doctors and staff at The Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, and Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital for their care of her during her long fight with cancer and the merciful, warmhearted doctors and staff at Channel Islands Post-Acute/ Alto Lucero Transitional Care where she stayed until her death under the excellent care of VNAHealth hospice, and finally, the Neptune Society. Because of COVID 19, distribution of her cremated remains in Pusan, South Korea is still being planned as is her memorial for her loved ones and friends in Santa Barbara, CA.


obituaries Ronald Radbill Koegler 5/15/1927 - 4/12/2021

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Ronald is survived by his wife Carolyn and by his children, Dana, Jan, and William; grandchildren, Milo Dubinsky, Daniel Meller, and Leah (Jake) Olins; and great-grandchildren, Oscar and Abe.

Barbara Dominguez Holguin 2/3/1929 - 4/15/2021 Born in Atlantic City, Ronald grew up in his mother’s hotel near the famous Boardwalk and worked as a lifeguard on the city beaches every summer until completing medical school at Temple University in 1953 – experiences that would inspire him to write three novels after retiring from his career as a psychiatrist at the age of 84. In 1953, Ron moved to Los Angeles to begin his medical residency. He met Carolyn Vick at St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica, where she worked as a pediatric nurse. With a first date at a car show, and another for a road rally through the streets of Venice, they then married in 1955 and embarked on an adventurous honeymoon, driving his Triumph TR2 as far as Acapulco. Ron then spent over 30 years working in Los Angeles, including psychiatric residency, research psychiatrist, and associate clinical professor at UCLA, director of the Frederick Douglass Child Development Center, and director of the Center for Urban Education at Mount St. Mary’s College, chairman of the American Montessori Teacher Training Program in Los Angeles, chief of Children’s Services at Central City Community Mental Health Services, and director of the psychiatric resident training program at Olive View Hospital. In 1987, Ron and Carolyn moved to Santa Barbara, where Ron worked at Santa Barbara County Department of Mental Health, and considered himself fortunate to enjoy the camaraderie and support of his co-workers both before and after he retired at age 84. A lifelong aficionado of the pun and prodigious writer of scientific, educational, literary, and historical articles, he devoted his remaining years to writing historical novels set in Atlantic City.

Barbara Dominguez Holguin, 92 of Santa Barbara, passed away on April 15, 2021 in Santa Barbara. Born on February 3, 1929 at St. Francis Hospital in Santa Barbara to Paul and Mary Dominguez of Santa Barbara. Barbara was raised in Santa Barbara where she attended Elementary School thru High School. When Barbara was 18 she met Frank Holguin and they were married a short time later. She was a stay at home mom until her youngest child was able to attend school. She then worked for the Santa Barbara School District as a Teacher’s Aide at Lincoln Elementary School and Roosevelt Elementary School. Barbara then began working at Santa Barbara City College as the Women’s Athletic Equipment Manager for several years until retiring. After her retirement she and Frank moved to Weed, CA where they lived for 16 years, eventually moving back into the area and settling in Solvang. Barbara was an Elder Tribal Member of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians. She loved to work in her garden, along with working on crafts and puzzles. She enjoyed fishing, going for long drives, watching the cowboy channel and watching wrestling. One of her favorite places to be was at the Chumash Casino. Most importantly Barbara loved to be with her family, whether it was watching her grandchildren play sports, going to barbeques, or just simply visiting with family. Being with family is what made her happiest. She was a strong, kind, generous

woman. She had a big heart and always put everyone else first. Even at the age of 92 she would give up her seat for someone else. Barbara is preceded in death by her parents Paul and Mary Dominguez, husband Frank Holguin, son John Holguin, brothers Manuel and Robert Dominguez. She is survived by her children George (Esther) Holguin, Richard Holguin, Mary (Mark) Mazzoni, Polly (John) Sanchez; grandchildren George Jr, Denise, Tommy (Rose), Joe (Nicole), Melanie (Gardy), Jeanette (Ali), Anthony (Brett), Daniel “Mo”, Monique, Eric (Crystal), Keela (Scott), Brian (Britt), Barbara; 11 great grandchildren; siblings David (Sherry)Dominguez, Alex (Rose) Valencia, Richard (Barbara) Valencia, Carmelita Cordero also including many nieces and nephews. The family would like to thank Dr. Sim, Dr. Thorsell for all the great care they gave to Barbara. We also would like to thank Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital MICU for the loving care they gave Barbara in her final days. As a family we would like to thank our brother Richard Holguin for his dedication in caring for our mom for over 20 years. He always put her first and cared for her to ensure she had a long and happy life. The family will respect Barbara’s wishes and hold a private service.

Robert Manuel Carrillo 1/19/1936 - 12/12/2020

It is with great sadness that the family of Robert Manuel Carrillo announces his passing on December 12, 2020. He was born in 1936 to Lupe Echevarria and Manuel Carrillo in Ventura, CA. His father passed away when he was 7 years old. His mother lovingly raised him along with her brothers. Robert (Bob as most of us know him) started out working in the fields throughout Santa Barbara County. Bob attended Santa Maria

and Santa Barbara schools. He was married at the tender age of 19 and fathered 3 boys: Jack, John and Robert Carrillo Jr. The three boys grew up in the Santa Ynez Valley, as their father worked for the Alisal Golf Resort. Many fond memories grew from living and growing up there. Bob had many goals and many jobs throughout his years. His boys tagged along and remember helping him clean the wine bottles and vacuuming the old Solvang Windmill Restaurant as well as sweeping and dusting the Farmer Boy Restaurant in Santa Barbara. When the boys were growing up, one of his favorite things to do was give them the “Bowl Hair Cut” or the BUZZ cut. They still remember when the cutters hit the bowl near their ears. In 1967 Robert packed the family up and moved to San Bernardino to attend Barber College and become a certified barber. Bob had a few jobs in San Bernardino cutting hair to make ends meet. In 1970 Bob packed up his family again and moved back to the Santa Barbara area where he eventually landed his dream job working for Danny Ramirez’ Barber Shop “Dannys” in Loreto Plaza. Bob eventually, with great pride, bought his own shop in Goleta, CA. He later moved to a larger space a few doors away and then to the Costco shopping center in Goleta. Many great barbers and hair stylists worked with him throughout the years. Eventually he moved back to Ventura and opened a shop there. Numerous customers followed him to Ventura and he was always thankful for their loyalty. Bob loved his barbering until the day he passed. There was a special warmth about him that endeared him to relatives and friends alike. Bob is survived by his wife of 41 years, Diane, his brother Alex Southgate (Debbie), his sons, Jack Carrillo, John Carrillo (Susie), Robert Carrillo Jr. (Donna), his step-son, William Toliver III, 13 grandchildren and 6 greatgrandchilldren. His mother preceded him in death. Robert, you are missed. INDEPENDENT.COM

Danny Scott (Robert Daniel Scott) 4/6/2021

Danny Scott (Robert Daniel Scott), “Danny Boy” to most, passed suddenly on April 6, 2021 at the age of 59. Born in Detroit, Michigan, a diehard Lions fan “next year will be our year”. Since 1985 he lived mostly in Las Vegas and also resided in Santa Barbara throughout the years. Danny was a kick-ass bartender and welcomed you as a friend whether meeting for the first time or one of his many “regulars”, and always kept an immaculate bar and made sure you received a tasty drink in a spotless glass. He was one one of the funniest guys you ever met, his laughter was contagious and his repertoire of jokes was endless, if you could tell him a joke he didn’t know, he would buy you a drink! He was a “force” when he entered a room and would cause a raucous working the crowd, walking right up to anyone with “have you heard the one about…” When not working he spent his time with the love of his life “Tiny” as he called Elizabeth Grinder, often referring to her as his wife & adored their little dog Mona “Baby Girl”. Danny was loved by many, and will be truly missed everyday by Elizabeth, his parents William & Connie Scott, sister & brother-in-law Kim and Jeff Harris, nephew Zack Harris, niece Jessie Harris and so many friends and family that loved him. “Danny Boy you touched so many hearts and quite a few livers, you were our laughter, we will miss you so much & love you always”.

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obituaries Shelby L. Adams

Karen Margaret (Kleveland) May

1946 - 2021

1941 - 2021

Shelby L. Adams passed away April 19, 2021 at home peacefully in his sleep with his wife Irene by his side after a four-year struggle with lung cancer. Shelby was born in Marked Tree, Arkansas in 1946 to James Shelby Adams and Susie Bernice Beck. He is preceded in death by his parents, his son David Adams, and 10 siblings (Clarence, Verdia, Virginia, Evelyn, Betty, Floyd, Jerry, Bruce, Tommy, and Marvin). Shelby joined the Air Force in 1961, he served 2 years on the Salinas PD before achieving his boyhood dream of joining the California Highway Patrol (CHP). During his time with the CHP, he and Irene moved throughout California (Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Sacramento, and San Diego) before settling in Ventura. He achieved the rank of Lieutenant before retiring. He was very proud of his time and service with the CHP. Shelby adopted Irene’s family and loved them as his own. He will be missed by his sister-inlaw Rachel Barajas (Roger), his brothers-in-law Luis Medrano (Barbara) and Mario Medrano (Cindy) along with the many extended cousins who got to know him as a true part of the family. He loved Irene, reading, spending time with his cats and he loved Hawaii. He and Irene traveled several times to the islands and if Heaven looks anything like Hawaii – he is in his “happy place.” Shelby and Irene would like to acknowledge and thank Dr. Ronald Natalie of Cedars-Sinai for his persistence in pursuing treatments and giving us four years we did not think we would have together. A special thank you to his nephew Jay Adams who lifted Shelby’s spirits over these difficult years. In celebration and remembrance, donations may be made in Shelby’s name to Cedar Sinai Medical Center, Beverly Hills CA. Aloha Shelby – we miss you already. 18

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Karen Margaret (Kleveland) May passed away on 4/8/2021 in the comfort of her home from the cancer she so bravely lived with for over 27 years. Karen was born in 1941 in Hemet, California to Thomas Laverne Kleveland and Margaret Louise (Vettel) Kleveland. They soon moved to Santa Barbara, California where Karen spent the entirety of her childhood and most of her adult life. During her childhood Karen spent as much time as she could at the Museum of Natural History down the street from her home, and at the Santa Barbara Botanic Gardens where she developed her deep, everlasting love of nature and made some life-long friendships. During her adult life she spent 18 years working as a legal secretary and built some more long-term friendships. She enjoyed spending her free time birding, gardening, taking walks near her mountain top home on West Camino Cielo, exploring her artistic and crafty talents, and creating the “Tom and Margaret Kleveland Family History Album”. Later in life she studied watercolor painting through adult education for several years and became quite an accomplished artist. She had some wonderful adventures traveling with her painting group friends to Italy (twice), Greece, and Maine. She also traveled to Japan (three times), Costa Rica and the Yucatán. Her journals and artwork from these trips will be cherished by those who survive her. Karen is survived by her husband Dean May; Brother: Christopher Kleveland, his wife Patty Aoyama and her daughter Lauren. Children: Jan Birdsell and Lisa Grimm. Stepchildren: Deborah (Grimm) Werner and husband Tom Werner, and their children Katherine, Nicolas, and MadelineMarina May; Colin May, his wife Mandy,

APRIL 29, 2021

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and their son Winston.Grandchildren: Jesse Crotty; Hannah (Crotty) Kidd and husband Ian Kidd and their son Sawyer. Stepgrandchildren: Katherine Werner; Nicolas Werner; Madeline Werner Nieces: Margaret Kleveland; Katherine Kleveland and her husband Colin Nash Grand nieces and nephews: Wilder, Shepard and Prairie Nash; Julian Ramey and Georgina Demitrevic A Potluck Picnic “Celebration of Life” for Karen will be held on Sunday, June 27th, 2021 at Skofield Park Area “C” from 12PM – 4PM. Please bring a dish of your choice to share. Also, we are creating a book of memories to honor Karen. If you have a special memory to contribute please bring it in paper form (8”x 11” or smaller) to be added to the loose leaf/ page protector binder style book. Funny stories, poems, letters, artwork, photos, or anything else that reminds you of Karen for the Memory book will be deeply appreciated by her family.

Joanne Martin

Virginia. Throughout Joanne’s time on earth, she learned early on how to be independent and responsible as she managed to rent her own apartment and be employed while still in high school. Needless to say, she made many friends who popped over to share her pad and party like there was no tomorrow. Whether she worked as an efficient waitress (locally Garretts and The Solvang Restaurant) , persevering hardware cashier, or diligent English tutor/college instructor (SBCC, CSUN, Ventura CC), Joanne maintained her purposeful demeanor with an upbeat personality that made others feel comfortable. Even though she had to overcome several of life’s heaviest obstacles, Joanne maintained her zany sense of humor and generous soul. In keeping with Joanne’s philosophy, let’s gather to share our fond, inspirational and musing stories for a unique woman who modeled a courageous and fighting life spirit to the end.

5/5/1955 - 3/9/2021

Joanne Martin, our beloved friend, partner, daughter, sister, Mom, Grandma, aunt, teacher, and colleague was taken to a better place during the early morning hours of March 9. A timely celebration of her life will take place tentatively on her birthday, Wednesday, May 5 with time/place to be determined. Call/text Christina Hale for updated details at (434) 531-1952. Joanne was born May 5, 1955 in Paso Robles, CA. She was the fourth child of six children born to Alice Bolinger of Paso Robles, CA, who survives her, along with her siblings Sharon, Kathy, Mary (Lee), and Michael (Megan). A brother Gary predeceased her in 1954. Joanne is also survived by her boyfriend, Jim Anderson. Joanne’s newest joy was the birth of her grand-daughter Dylan born July 2020 to Joanne’s daughter, Christina and husband Doug Hale of

Roger H. Davidson 1936 - 2021

Roger H. Davidson, of Santa Barbara, died suddenly on April 14. He had a long and illustrious career as a professor and author on American government, especially Congress and the presidency. Professor Davidson was born in 1936 in Washington, DC, to Ross and Mildred Davidson. He spent his early years in Arlington, VA. As he was entering ninth grade, the family moved to Fort Collins, CO, where he graduated from high school. He was a brilliant student at the University of Colorado, graduating with high honors and being voted outstanding senior

man. Fifty years later, at his class reunion, he led the class in its procession into the stadium. He received his doctorate from Columbia University and began his teaching career at Dartmouth College. He moved to the University of California at Santa Barbara in 1968, where he served as chairman of the Department of Political Science and associate dean of Letters and Science. In 1980 he moved to Washington, DC, where he was a senior specialist at the Congressional Research Service. He was also a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, American, and George Washington University, and later joined the political science department at the University of Maryland. In 1999, he retired, and with his wife, who was acquisitions editor at the Brookings Institution, moved back to Santa Barbara. He was active in local cultural affairs in Santa Barbara, serving on the board of the Architectural Foundation and Opera Santa Barbara, and on a committee of the Music Academy of the West. He was also a docent at the Santa Barbara Historical Museum. In 2002 he was John Marshall Professor at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, awarded by the Hungarian Fulbright Commission. Professor Davidson was the author or coauthor of numerous books, including Congress and Its Members, of which the 18th edition is about to be published. He established the first opportunity for UCSB students to spend an academic quarter in Washington, DC, working as interns in Congress and other government agencies and interest groups. This was the precursor to UCSB’s popular UCDC program. Roger was a loving and supportive husband to his wife, Nancy, of almost 60 years, and a proud father and grandfather of his sons Douglas (Victoria) and Christopher (Theodora), and his six grandchildren (Elizabeth, Thomas, James, Alexander, Emily, and Olivia). Roger and Nancy shared a love of music and theater, but in particular they loved to travel. They visited over 50 countries, on every continent except Antarctica. A memorial service will be held when large gatherings are allowed. Gifts in his honor may be made to the Music Academy of the West, Opera Santa Barbara, or the UCDC Public Service Scholarship program at the University of California, Santa Barbara.


OPINIONS CONT’D

The Perils of Parking

W

hen my wife and I arrived at the Hot Springs trailhead on a Friday at 9:30 a.m., there was not a single legal space anywhere in the area. Every space on Mountain Drive either had boulders placed in it or No Parking signs. There was even a stretch of hundreds of feet with yellow tape. I am quite sure these boulders and signs are illegally placed by local residents. Even the tiny number of “legal” spaces right at the trailhead are not legal. Our hike took three hours. Those signs restrict parking to two hours. The situation at the Tunnel trailhead faced similar battles over the years. But eventually there was a compromise that has worked relatively well, which was to restrict almost all parking to one side of the road. And to have a total ban on parking on red flag days of fire danger. The difference with the two trails? Tunnel is a dead-end street with no other access. The Hot Springs area has far more access and no dead ends. I would propose these changes:

1) Make Riven Rock Road one way downhill. Allow parking only on the right (downhill) side. 2) Residents on Mountain Drive have been placing boulders in the public right of way to keep people from parking in front of their houses. These obstructions need to be removed. 3) The tiny parking lot in front of the trailhead has absurd signs limiting parking to two hours. Most hikes take more than two hours. Those signs should be removed. 4) Additional parking areas should be created and designated. Just as there is at the Cold Spring trailhead and at the Tunnel trailhead. 5) Ban all parking on red-flag high fire-risk days. No one should be hiking on those days, anyway. I will add one more point: Literally thousands of vehicles from outside our area enter our residential Goleta neighborhood every hour of every day. Is there some reason we are treated differently than people in Montecito? —Robert Bernstein, Goleta

A Remedy to the Situation

F

or decades, Hot Springs Trail hikers parked on upper Riven Rock Road, but that parking is being eliminated. Residents on Riven Rock complain of a seemingly endless number of hikers since the pandemic.

CHRISTOPHER WEYANT / THE BOSTON GLOBE

Letters

Hikers’ cars now go way down the road, including where it narrows to 18 feet. This creates a potential problem in the event of an emergency if cars are parked there: A fire truck is eight feet wide. The residents voted to paint white lines on both sides of the road; under the Vehicle Code, cars parked over the line can be ticketed. The justification is fire safety and allowing room for emergency vehicles, which is very important. After the white lines were painted in early April, hikers parked over the line, not realizing the problem. Cars with tickets on them still pose a problem Curator of Photographs, for emergency vehicles. A more effective solution Smithsonian, National Portrait Gallery would be signs prohibiting parking or painting the curb red. So where are hikers to park? The trailhead can Revisiting “One Life: Marian Anderson” hold nine cars. Residents of nearby roads have Thursday, May 6 blocked the shoulder where hikers traditionally parked with rocks and private property signs. 3 pm Assessor maps indicate the public right of way for Mountain Drive is 60 feet. Are residents illegally using public property? Could the county hire a surveyor to determine the right of way and restore it? Or create a new shoulder on Riven Rock to get cars away from the road? Why not encourage hikers to carpool or bicyFree via Zoom, register at tickets.sbma.net cle? It’s easy to get to the trailhead with an electric bicycle. Donations welcome. Enough parking is needed for a reasonable William H. Johnson, Marian Anderson (detail), ca. 1945, oil on paperboard, amount of cars, one equivalent to the pre-pandemic Smithsonian American Art Museum, Gift of the Harmon Foundation. level. It’s not fair for the neighborhood to be overrun with too much traffic and parked vehicles. But it’s sad that neighbors are being so un-neighborly toward hikers. One sign on Hot Springs, which happens to be a public road, says “No Hot Art Matters ad_APR22.indd 1 4/22/21 Springs Trail Access or Parking.” I wish the sign were replaced with one saying, “Welcome to our neighborhood. This is a public road, but hikers, please use the trail.” —Bryan Rosen, Montecito

ART MATTERS LECTURE Leslie Ureña

8:49 AM

Alamar Dental Implant Center

For the Record

¶ Last week’s news story on 100 percent rental assistance should have stated preference goes to tenants on the lowest economic rungs; it is not a first-come, first-served process. Regarding the “Raza Educators Unite” story on April 15, the Santa Barbara Teachers Association’s Equity Ad Hoc Committee is alive and well, not defunct.

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LEGO MASTERS • ARTS @ LAGUNA • BATTLEFIELD NERF • STEM • SPORTS PERFORMING ARTS • ACADEMICS • SUPER HERO ACADEMY • DANCE • AND SO MUCH MORE! PRIORITIZING HEALTH & SAFETY | MORNING & AFTERNOON CARE AVAILABLE | SNACKS & LUNCH PROVIDED 20

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2021

SUMMER CAMP

e d i Gu

Find the Perfect Summer Experience for Your Kids Using Santa Barbara’s Complete Guide to Fun — In Person or Virtually Word on the street is that summer camp in S.B. is a great antidote for living through a pandemic. For this year’s annual guide, we have compiled a diverse list of over 75 camps for kids to choose from. Students from tots to older teens can once again participate in this great summer tradition after a long school year of virtual learning. It’s time to hang with friends, meet new ones, learn a new activity, or improve on a particular talent. The guide includes camps that hone a young person’s skills in the visual and performing arts, deepen a love of nature, offer STEM classes, and keep kids active in every type of sport. The old favorites are back, such as Zoo Camp, S.B. Parks & Rec, S.B. Girls and Boys Clubs, and the YMCA with new additions such as Enriched Nature Camp, On the Same Page — All Ages Library Program (free), Rowing Camp at Lake Cachuma, West Coast Kite Life Flight Camp, and more. Don’t forget to ask about early-bird and sibling discounts as well as scholarships when signing up. Let the S.B. Independent Summer Camp Guide assist you in finding the perfect experience for your hard-working kids. Choose camps that are in person, virtual, or a combination of both. School’s out, and freedom and fun are in!

Happy summer!

tega

—Terry Or

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SUMMER SURF CAMPS JUNE 7- AUGUST 27 SANTA CLAUS LANE DAY CAMPS BEGINNER-INTERMEDIATE JUNIOR ELITE RIDER DOMINIC ARCE

SUMMER PROGRAM JUNE 15 – JULY 30 AGES 6-12 8:15 AM – 2:30 PM Our thematic summer camp offers opportunities for creativity, discovery, social interaction and fun!

(805) 683-9383 WWW.MCSSB.ORG License #42-6205239

BEST SANTA BARBARA 20 20

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WWW.SURFHAPPENS.COM 805.966.3613 22

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SUMMER CAMP

SUMMER CAMP!

Arts APPLES TO ZUCCHINI COOKING SCHOOL Each day, children will prepare a meal with Apples to Apples to Zucchini Cooking School Zucchini culinary educators and skilled volunteers, and then sit down and enjoy it together. Afternoons will be spent on field trips focused on local culinary fun! In person. Grades K-7. July 19-Aug. 6. $295. Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. Call (805) 452-3497 or email nancy@atozcookingschool.org. atozcookingschool.org

ART CAMP S.B. Campers’ imaginations will soar with an extravaganza of colorful arts and crafts projects created out of doors, in the woods! In person. Ages 6-15. June 7-Aug. 13. $275/week. 4597 Camino Molinero. Call (646) 369-7277 or email thewoodsartstudio@gmail.com. thewoodsartstudio.com

ART EXPLORERS VISUAL & DIGITAL ARTS & SEWING CAMPS Weekly camps: Extreme Art, Stop Motion, Special Effects, 2D & 3D Art, Spectacular Superheroes, Couturier, Famous Faces/Places & Art Expedition. In person.

ncourage e s, d in m e t la u im t S racter, a h c d il u b , k r o w team steem! and develop self-e

RSON at the beautiful Join us LIVE AND IN PE TRE for a 3-week EA TH E K LU E RI O RJ MA es method including journey into the Boxtal elling, acro-yoga, mime, yt or st g, tin ac : in ng ni trai h and collaboration. Yout music, characterization iginal stage production or an te ea cr ill w rs pe cam Campers will create an of Tatterhood and Teen of The Popul Vuh. n tio uc od pr e ag st al in orig

Grades K-8. June 14-July 31. $245-$390/week. Two locations. Email ozwicke@artexplorerssantabarbara.com. artexplorerssantabarbara.com

ART STUDIO 4 KIDS The Art Studio 4 Kids Summer Art program offers weekly sessions. In person. Grades 1-8. June 14-Aug. 20. $288-$360/week. 815 Puente Dr. Call (805) 689-8993 or email geraldineotte@gmail.com. artstudio4kids.com

B. mp S. Art Ca

BOXTALES SUMMER THEATRE CAMPS

Take a three-week journey into the Boxtales method that will include training in acting, storytelling, Acro-Yoga, mime, music, and mask in separate camps for youth or teens. In person.

Youth: ages 9-13; June 21-July 9. Teens: ages 14-19; July 12-30. $800/three weeks. The Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. Call (805) 962-1142 or email info@boxtales.org. boxtales.org/education/summer-camp

TH CAMP:

YOU

9 June 21-July ost: $800 Ages: 8-13 C

TEEN CAMP

:

July 12-July 3 0 Ages: 14-19 Cost: $800

COMPOSING MUSIC FOR FILM AND VIDEO GAME Learn how to compose and conduct music for video games and film from award-winning game composers and conductors. Ages 13-18. $345/session. June 14-July 16. Trinity Lutheran Church, 909 N. La Cumbre Rd. Call (818) 601-0875 or email laurie@socalpianoacademy.com. socalpianoacademy.com

DANCE JAMS SUMMER CAMPS Join for a summer full of fun with two different styles of dance camp to choose from: Dance Jams and Dance Jams Connect! Virtual and in-person classes. Ages 5+. July 5-Aug. 13. Confirm by June 1: $110-$220/week; after June 1: $130-$240/week. Magnolia Ctr., 5130 Hollister Ave. Call (805) 225-6078 or email info@thedancenetworksb.com. thedancenetworksb.com/summer-2021 CONTINUED

Sign up early, limited space! More info: 805.962.1142 | info@boxtales.org Download Registration Form at boxtales.org INDEPENDENT.COM

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CAMP IGNITE

SUMMER ENRICHMENT PROGRAM FUEL HER FIRE AND SHE WILL CHANGE THE WORLD. of Greater Santa Barbara

TK-6TH GRADE

Mon. - Fri. 8:00AM-4:00PM

LEARN MORE & REGISTER TODAY! girlsincsb.org/summer $900 per 4-week session

Financial Assistance is Available Our summer program operates in accordance with CDC and Santa Barbara County COVID-19 safety protocols.

SESSION 1: JUNE 21 - JULY 16

Goleta Valley Center 4973 Hollister Avenue 805.963.4757

SESSION 2: JULY 19 - AUG 13

   @girlsincsb

IGNITE A PASSION FOR LEARNING! SPARK IMAGINATION, CONCEIVE POSSIBILITIES, AND INSPIRE MINDS!

S A N TA B A R B A R A STEAM CAMPS 2021 Kindergarten-8th Grade • 7 Individual Weeks June 14th – July 30, 2021

Our 40 ++STEAM Camps feature hands-on and minds-on projects and activities! Our curriculum is designed for K-8th Grade, and is “kid-tested” to ensure that camps are fun and full of learning concepts. Locally owned and serving Santa Barbara families for over 20 years, our programs lay the foundation for problem solvers and design thinkers of the future.

WE HAVE CAMPS IN ALL THESE AREAS…

ART * SCIENCE * ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY YOUTH CAMPS:

TEEN CAMPS:

Kindergarten-6th Grade K-1st: Mon-Fri 9am-2pm 1st-6th: Mon-Fri 9am-3:30pm

6th-8th Grade Mon-Fri 9am-3:30pm

COST:

LOCATION:

$275-$390 p/week

Providence School, Santa Barbara

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO SEE 40+ DIFFERENT CAMP DESCRIPTIONS!

REGISTER FOR CAMP ONLINE NOW: TerrificScientific.org

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SUMMER CAMP DESTINATION DANCE Small Classes. BIG Fun! Indoor and outdoor dance classes and camps for all levels! In person. Ages 12 mo.-teen. June 14-Aug. 11. $55-$400. S.B. Dance Arts Performing Arts Ctr., 531 E. Cota St. Call (805) 966-5299 or email alana@sbdancearts.com. sbdancearts.com

HALF-DAY SURF CAMP in SANTA BARBARA

GOLETA SCHOOL OF BALLET Dance Camp offers classes in ballet, stretch, musical theater, dance history, sewing, and performance. Summer Intensive offers intermediate/advanced students a focus on classical ballet technique ending with a performance. In person. Ages 9-17. June 21-Aug. 13. $840/three weeks-$1,500/five weeks. Goleta School of Ballet, 303 Magnolia Ave., Goleta. Call (805) 328-3823 or email info@goletaschoolofballet.com. goletaschoolofballet.com

SUMMER SURF DAYS!

Gustafson Dance Camps

GUSTAFSON DANCE CAMPS Gustafson Dance offers a variety of one- and two-week themed camps throughout the summer, including ballet techniques, musical theater, sewing projects, choreography class, and more. All programs culminate in a performance. In person.

ENROLL TODAY @

LovewaterSurf.com or call 805-636-1552

Try a new sport!

Ages 3-16. June 7-Aug. 20. $225-$650. Gustafson Dance, 2285 Las Positas Rd. Call (805) 563-3262 x1 or email info@gustafsondance.com. gustafsondance.com

INTERACT THEATRE CAMP — ACT IT! MOVE IT! MAKE IT! Full program from the musical theater world including acting, dance/ movement, and singing. Great fun creating characters/stories plus a performance. In person. Ages 4-16. June 7-July 2. $295-$535. Unity of S.B., 227 E. Arrellaga St. Call (805) 869-2348 or email info@interacttheatreschool.com. interacttheatreschool.com/summer-camps-2021

LIGHTS UP! THEATRE COMPANY This teen theatre conservatory will provide professional training, personal growth, and a like-minded tribe for teen actors. In person. Ages 12-18. July 12-30. $155-$355. The S.B. Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. Email info@LightsUpSB.com. lightsupsb.com

MOMENTUM DANCE COMPANY SUMMER DANCE CAMPS Fun and fanciful dance camps with exciting themes, such as Shark-tacular Shenanigans, Pastel Popstars, and Rainbow Rockers, as well as crafts! Camps combine hip-hop, jazz, acro, and more! In person. Ages 3-11. June 7-Aug. 13. $225-$250/week. Momentum Dance Company, 316 State St., Ste. A. Call (805) 364-1638 or email momentumdancesb@gmail.com. momentumdancesb.com

CONTINUED

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY’S COMMUNITY ROWING PROGRAM AT CACHUMA LAKE

SUMMER CAMPS LEARN TO ROW YOUTH (GRADES 5-12) ONGOING PROGRAMS

MISSIONROWING.ORG / CAROL@MISSIONROWING.ORG INDEPENDENT.COM

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AH a

DIGITAL CLEANSE

Summer 2021

INTRODUCING AHA!’s first-ever Digital Cleanse! Five device-free days exploring nature and diving into creative expression and outdoor activities at breathtaking El Capitan Canyon. From Monday, June 21 - Friday, June 25, for teens aged 14-19. E-mail ahadigitalcleanse2021@gmail.com to request an application. “I love the way AHA has help me in the four years that I have been in the program and grow to love it more and more every year. I love how much AHA creates a safe and welcoming space to be who you are without judgment.”

A H a!

21 0 2 R E UMM TM

S

Get Inspired Art Program: Teens aged 13-18. Art exploration with community artists in collaboration with historic Casa del Herrero. July 5 - 26. Contact molly@ahasb.org.

Monday

Tue/Wed/Th

Friday

Saturday

“I loved the experience of being able to participate in the project of constructing a new farm from scratch. While working on the Littlest Little Farm, I learned how to start building my own farm and how to sustain and manage animals and insects that help the ecosystem flourish. ” * “In AHA!, I have made many friends, and I come back every year to help and support new teens like older teens did for me.”

AHA! Summer Groups: Teens aged 14-18 AHA! Summer: Three days a week of outdoor fun and connection, building emotional intelligence, leadership, and creativity. July 6 – 29. Morning & afternoon groups. Contact perla.ahasb@gmail.com. EQ Vibes! Music Group: Teens aged 14-18 learn to express themselves through music composition and collaboration - no music experience required. In collaboration with The Turner Foundation. July 9 – 30. Contact brandonbattle.ahasb@gmail.com. AHA!’s Littlest Little Farm: Teens aged 13-19 lovingly maintain a small-scale biodynamic farm under the supervision of AHA! facilitators and farm educator. Participants take home fresh organic produce. Contact perla.ahasb@gmail.com. PHOTOS: Carly Otness Photography

AHA! | 1209 De La Vina Street, Suite A | Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 770-7200 Ext. 3 | ahasb.org | @aha_sb | enrollment@ahasb.org 26

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SUMMER CAMP THE NICK RAIL SUMMER BAND CAMP This well-established four-week music program will provide students the opportunity to continue their musical learning in the summer and includes concert band and sectional instruction. In person. Ages 9-14. June 14-July 9. $125/per student. La Cumbre Junior High School, 2255 Modoc Rd. Call (805) 284-9125 or email katie@santabarbaraeducation.org. tinyurl.com/NickRailBandCamp

OUTDOOR CLAY CAMP Campers will explore the fundamentals of clay in a peaceful outdoor setting. In person. Ages 7-12. June 21-July 30. $300-$380/session. The Clay Studio, 1351 Holiday Hill Rd., Goleta. Call (805) 565-2529 or email info@claystudiosb.org. claystudiosb.org/claycamp

PIANO, UKULELE, AND MUSIC CAMPS Campers will play, sing along, explore a large variety of instruments, and participate in active games and creative movement. In person. Ages 4-8+. July 5-Aug. 12. $250/week. Elings Park, 1298 Las Positas Rd.; Carpinteria Community Church, 1111 Vallecito Rd., Carpinteria. Call (805) 729-0698 or email kindermusikathy@gmail .com. kindermusikwithkathy.com/camp

SBEF SUMMER STRING CAMP This two-week camp welcomes participants with at least one year of experience on violin, viola, cello, or bass. In person. Ages 9-14. June 14-25. $250. La Cumbre Junior High School, 2255 Modoc Rd. Call (805) 284-9125 or email katie@santabarbaraeduction.org. sbefoundation.org

SBEF SUMMER DRUMLINE CAMP All levels are welcome to this two-week camp that will expand understanding of music performance, rhythm reading, and playing technique. In person.

S U M M E R

C A M P S

OUTDOOR BEACH ADVENTURES

Entering grades 6-8. June 7-18. $250. La Cumbre Junior High School, 2255 Modoc Rd. Call (805) 284-9125 or email katie@santabarbaraeduction.org. sbefoundation.org

SWIMMING • BOOGIE BOARDING • SURFING

SEW MUCH FUN Kids will sew super-fun stuffed animals, beach bags, pj pants, and more. Small classes arranged by appointment. In person. K+. Eight hrs.: $200-$220; 12 hrs.: $275-$330. Overpass Rd. Call (805) 450-7129 or email heyprissy@gmail.com.

STAGE LEFT JUNIOR Exploration and self-expression through performing and cooking. Small group classes include singing, dancing, acting, and cooking. Culminates with a final performance. In person. Ages 6-12. June 28-July 26. $295. Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. Call (805) 570-1661 or email stageleftjr@gmail.com. stageleftsb.com

K AYA K I N G • S TA N D - U P PA D D L E • S A I L I N G M A R I N E B I O L O G Y •   E N V I R O N M E N TA L E D U C AT I O N

TEAM BUILDING • SPORTS

J U N E 7 T H - J U LY 3 0 T H

8 SESSIONS •

9:00am - 3:00pm

(MULTI-SESSION & SIBLING DISCOUNTS AVAILABLE)

CAMPERS (AGES 5-12 )

C . I . T. ( A G E S 1 4 - 1 8 )

STAGE LEFT PRODUCTIONS PERFORMING ARTS CAMP Training in auditioning, physical/vocal techniques, acting/dancing/singing, and set/costume/tech design. Culmination: a full-scale musical performance! In person. Ages 10-17. June 28-July 26. $795. Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. Call (805) 965-0880 or email stageleft@cox.net. stageleftsb.com

TEEN FILM CLUB A video production workshop for high school students to learn video and editing skills. In person and virtual. Ages 13-18. Please inquire for session dates/times, cost, and location. Call (805) 452-7069 or email teenfilmclub805@gmail.com.

CONTINUED

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2021 YAC SUMMER PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP: CAMP BROADWAY Ensemble Theatre Company’s Young Actors Conservatory (YAC) will provide young performers the chance to expand their skills in the fundamentals of acting, singing, and dancing. In person. Ages 8-12 (no audition necessary). July 5-17. $550/two weeks. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. Call (805) 965-5400 x541. tinyurl.com/YAC-ETC

2021 YAC SUMMER PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP: MUSICAL THEATER PERFORMANCE Under the direction of award-winning actor/director Brian McDonald, participants will study vocal technique, dance, and acting, culminating in a live musical production of ’50s pop musical Zombie Prom: Atomic Edition. In person. Ages 13-19 (acceptance by audition). July 19-Aug. 12. $950/four weeks. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. Call (805) 965-5400 x541. tinyurl.com/YAC-ETC

General AHA! SUMMER PROGRAM 2021 AHA! will host four-week morning and afternoon summer groups. In person. Ages 13-18. July 6-29. Donation based. Location: TBD. Call (805) 770-7200 x3 or email enrollment@ahasb.org. ahasb.org

CAMP HAVERIM This nondenominational camp is accredited by the American Camp Association and offers art, music, newspaper, drama, talent shows, swimming, and a full array of sports. In person. Grades K-8. July 5-30. $325-$1,100. Visit the website for CIT prices. Cate School, 1960 Cate Mesa Rd., Carpinteria. Call (805) 895-6593 or email camphaverim@gmail.com. camphaverim.com

CATE SUMMER MINI In partnership with the Cate Early Learning Center, minicamp is designed for preschool children. In person. Ages 3-5. July 12-23, $300/week. Cate School, 1960 Cate Mesa Rd., Carpinteria. Call (805) 684-4127 or email catesummerprograms@cate.org. cate.org/summer/mini

COSTA DE ORO GIRL SCOUT SUMMER DAY CAMP

Go behind the scenes

of this week’s Santa Barbara Independent and hear straight from our journalists about the cover story and more.

independent.com/theindy

At Girl Scout Summer Day Camp, you will spend your summer trying new things, exploring the great outdoors, and making memories with new friends. In person. Grades K-12. July 19-23. Email costadeorocamp@gmail.com for more information. girlscoutsccc.org

GIRLS INC. OF GREATER SANTA BARBARA: CAMP IGNITE! Hands-on enrichment fun in a pro-girl

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Girls Inc.


SUMMER CAMP

2 week T h e a t e r C a m ps Ag e s 4 -1 6

environment! Girls practice team building and leadership, sports and movement, STEAM, and more! In person. Grades transitional K-6. June 21-Aug. 13. Goleta Valley Ctr., 4973 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $900/four weeks. Call (805) 963-4757 or email info@girlsincsb.org. girlsincsb.org/programs/summer

GIRLS INC. OF GREATER SANTA BARBARA: CAMP IGNITE FOR TEENS! A safe, supportive, pro-girl environment for teens featuring STEAM enrichment, leadership development, advocacy, movement, college prep, and more! In person. Grades 7-12. June 21-Aug. 13. $500/four weeks. Goleta Valley Teen Ctr., 4973 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Call (805) 963-4757 or email info@girlsincsb.org. girlsincsb.org/programs/teens

Ac t I t! Move It ! M a k e It ! Camp 1: June 7th - June 18th Camp 2: June 21st - July 2nd 10am - 2pm Monday - Friday

INNERU MINDFULNESS OCEAN ADVENTURES

*One week options available

Through exploration, fun, and games, children will learn mindfulness skills and deepen their relationship with ocean wildlife. Grades K-6. June 14-25. $370/week. Goleta and S.B. beaches and parks. Call (805) 708-6363 or email inneru4u@gmail.com. mindfulnessnaturecamp.com

MARYMOUNT SUMMER EXPERIENCE There is something for everyone! Outdoor sports, theater arts, arts and crafts, and pool time! In person.

Location

Unity of Santa Barbara 227 E Arrellaga St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 $535 (2 weeks) Enroll now at https://www.InterActTheatreSchool.com/

Entering grades K-6. June 14-July 16. $215/week. Marymount School, 2130 Mission Ridge Rd. Call (805) 569-1811 x114 or email ddowdy@marymountsb.org. tinyurl.com/Marymount2021

MONTESSORI CENTER SCHOOL ELEMENTARY SUMMER PROGRAM These summer sessions will enrich your child’s education with diverse and fun programs. In person.

You can call us on: (805) 869 2348 or email us at info@InterActTheatreSchool.com

Ages 6-12. June 15-July 30. $300-$375/week. Montessori Center School, 401 N. Fairview Ave., Ste. 1, Goleta. Call (805) 683-9383 or email l.tosta@mcssb.org. mcssb.org/summer-camp InterAct_Indy_QuarterPage_2.indd 1

SANTA BARBARA CREATIVE EDUCATION

4/12/21 11:42 AM

Children can rotate through a variety of activities such as sports, games, art, music, theater, video/photography, science/nature, or academic tutoring. In person. Ages 6-14. June 7-Aug. 13. $250/week. Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. Call (805) 455-1124 or email darezzocenter@gmail.com. darezzocenter.com/summer-camps

CAMP BROADWAY for Ages 8-12 July 5 - 17, 2021 Tuition: $550 Culminates in Student Showcase

S.B. Zoo Camp

S.B. ZOO CAMP This award-winning Zoo Camp will offer age-appropriate themed programs featuring animal encounters and hands-on science. Ages 3-12. June 7-Aug. 13. $195-$345/week. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Call (805) 962-5339 or email cabbott@sbzoo.org. sbzoo.org/learn/zoo-camp

THE MUSICAL THEATER PERFORMANCE WORKSHOP for Ages 13-19 July 19 -August 15, 2021 Tuition: $950 Production: Zombie Prom

COCONTNTININUEUEDD

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ROCK, TUMBLE & ROLL

GYMNASTICS SUMMER CAMP AGES 5-12

Mon. - Fri. 8:30AM-12:30PM

LEARN MORE & REGISTER TODAY! girlsincsb.org/gymnastics $480 per 2-week session

Our summer program operates in accordance with CDC and Santa Barbara County COVID-19 safety protocols.

of Greater Santa Barbara

531 E. Ortega Street 805.963.4757

   @girlsincsb

SESSION 1: JUNE 21 - JULY 2 SESSION 3: JULY 19 - JULY 30

SESSION 2: JULY 6 - JULY 16 SESSION 4: AUG 2 - AUG 13

SANTA BARBARA COUNT Y JUNIOR LIFEGUARDS

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SantaBar Santa Barbara County Junior Lifeguards at Hendry’s and Goleta Beach This fun and educational junior lifeguard program is instructed and supervised by the Santa Barbara County Lifeguards. Through a variety of ocean and beach activities, this program improves your child’s confidence and knowledge in and around the marine environment. Ages 8 to 17. Session 1: June 28 to July 9 (no July 5th) Session Full Session 2: July 12 to 23 Session 3: July 26 to Aug 6 Sessions Run M-F 9:15AM to 12:45PM $315 per two week session ($275 each additional sibling) Registration for tryouts will begin May 1st. Visit our website to pre-register. Hurry, enrollment is limited! For more information go to: www.sbparks.org/jg Email: sbcojg@sbparks.org 30

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SUMMER CAMPS

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SUMMER CAMP SUMMER @ LAGUNA Choose from Laguna’s favorite summer camps such as Arts @ Laguna or from more than 30 new camp offerings, which come in different shapes and sizes to satisfy a wide range of ages and interests. In person. Ages 4-18. June 21-Aug. 13. $360/week. Laguna Blanca School, 4125 Paloma Dr. Call (805) 687-2461 or email zmoore@lagunablanca.org. lagunablanca.org/summer

JUNE 7–JULY 9 Want to make learning fun again, but not ready to mingle in person yet?

Education/STEM AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CAMP Daily themed American Sign Language lessons that include vocabulary, grammar, and Deaf Culture through fun, interactive lessons, games, and music. In person. Ages 8-12. June 21-July 30. $225/week. Stow Grove Park, 580 N. La Patera Ln., Goleta. Call (818) 515-6593 or email aslinsb@gmail.com. aslinsb.com

Our camps for ages 4–12 cover kids’ favorite topics, from butterflies to bioluminescence, from sea otters to space, from the chemistry of wizarding to the science of grossology! Nature Adventures™ camps and classes are fun, interactive, and informative explorations of nature and science topics, customized to meet the needs and curiosity levels of specific age groups. Zoom with our experienced instructors as you investigate the natural world together. One-week camps range in price: Members $150–$225, non-members $175–$250 Partial scholarships available.

CALIFORNIA LEARNING CENTER Elementary students can brush up on math or English, and rising seniors can take a college application or college essay workshop. In person. Ages 8-18. July 26-Aug. 29. $100-$675/camp or workshop. California Learning Ctr., 3324 State St., Ste. L. Call (805) 563-1579 or email info @clcsb.com. clcsb.com/summer

ENRICHED NATURE CAMP Nature activities enriched with social and emotional learning. Engage the senses with short hikes, games, art, observation, and discussion! In person. Ages 6-10. June 28-Aug. 20. $275/week. Tucker’s Grove Park, Stevens Park, and S.B. Botanic Garden. Call (805) 8952110 or email hello@ enrichedathome.com. enrichedathome.com/ enriched-nature-camp

Register today at sbnature.org/natureadventures

Camp Enriched Nature

MATH CAMP AT S.B. FAMILY SCHOOL Fun, hands-on exploration of creative mathematics for kids who enjoy math. Weekly themes include: magic, art, codes, sports, games, money, and infinity. In-person and virtual classes. Grades 4-9. June 8-Aug. 14. $300-$550/week. Goleta (near Goleta Library). Email camps@sbfamilyschool.com. sbfamilyschool.com/camps

The human mind was built outdoors. When we spend all of our time staring at screens, we miss so much of what the world has to offer us. We miss the tiny creatures under our feet and above our heads.

MOXI CAMP Choose from these Moxi Camps: Summer Games, Craft + Create, Top Secret, and Super Messy Science. In person. Grades 1-6. June 7-Aug. 5. $230-$395. MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, 125 State St. Call (805) 770-5020 or email sales@moxi.org. tinyurl.com/MoxiCamp2021

Reconnect with nature at Camp Natoma, where camp is completely screen-free and all outdoors!

Activities

Sleeping under the stars

ON THE SAME PAGE — ALL AGES LIBRARY PROGRAM

Geocaching

Free programs, a paper-chain reading log, a community-wide scavenger hunt, and a new mobile library! In person and virtual. All ages. June 1-Aug. 15. Free. Carpinteria, Central, Eastside, and Montecito Libraries and the Library on the Go outreach van. Call (805) 962-7653 or email youthservices@santabarbaraca .gov. tinyurl.com/SamePage-MismaPagina

CONTINUED

Swimming Exploring Archery Arts & crafts Hatchet throwing

Sessions:

Each summer there are 7 week long sessions for boys and girls 1st through 11th grade. The sessions run Monday through Sunday (6 nights).

CampNatoma.org - (805) 316-0163 Instagram/Facebook: @CampNatoma INDEPENDENT.COM

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CITY OF SANTA BARBARA

A Fun, Safe Summer with SB Parks and Rec

LOBSTER JO’S BEACH CAMP AGES 6–17

This all-new beach camp is full of fun! Aquatic sports and education about ocean stewardship and environmental issues before lunch. After lunch, it’s an afternoon filled with campers and counselors having freerange fun with toys, games, and art supplies. A 1:7 counselor-to-camper ratio means kids will have supervision from a counselor right at their side as they learn new sports and skills.

YOUTH EVOLUTION SOCCER CAMP

AGES 5–12 Campers learn to love soccer in a supportive, fun environment with Youth Evolution Soccer Camp. Another of our focused-on-fun sports camps, Youth Evolution Soccer Camp brings expert, age-appropriate instruction in a non-intimidating way that is perfect for beginners and kids who thrive in a non-competitive atmosphere. The motto? Play, learn, and grow.

BEACH VOLLEYBALL CAMP

AGES 9–17 Spend active, fun mornings on Santa Barbara’s East Beach with Beach Volleyball Camp. All level players are welcome to join us at East Beach for a morning immersion in volleyball. Players are introduced to doubles and six-person team play and are coached on correct ball handling, passing, setting, and hitting.

...AND LOTS MORE! REGISTER TODAY AT SBPARKSANDREC.ORG WE’RE HIRING!

Join the Parks and Rec team for an awesome summer (or longer!) doing a fun, meaningful job CAMP COUNSELORS AND LIFEGUARDS We have lifeguard and camp counselor positions available, so you can spend your days at the pool, at the beach, or working with kids!

Apply today at bit.ly/SBCityHourly CITY OF SANTA BARBARA PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT SBPARKSANDREC.ORG

(805) 564-5418 32

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/SBPARKSANDREC

@SBPARKSANDREC


SUMMER CAMP SBHS COMPUTER SCIENCE ACADEMY CREATIVE COMPUTING CAMPS Learn to create digital art and animations through code. Fun and engaging activities taught by SBHS CS Academy students with school staff supervision. In person and virtual. Grades 6-8. June 7-18. Free. S.B. High School, Rm. 26, 700 E. Anapamu St. Call (805) 966-9101 x5027 or email dmoschitto@sbunified.org. sbhscs.org/summer-camp

TERRIFIC SCIENTIFIC STEAM CAMPS STEAM Camps: Minecraft & Roblox, engineering and programming, LEGO WeDo and EV3 robotics, drawing and sculpting, and fun, hands-on science! Grades K-8. June 14-July 31. $245-$390. Providence School, 3224 Calle Pinon; and Art Explorers Studio, 5330 Debbie Rd., Ste. 100. Email ozwicke@terrificscientific.org. terrificscientific.org

Sleepaway CALIFORNIA BACKPACKING CAMP Stewardship through experience is this camp’s motto. Campers will be circumnavigating California, backpacking, rock climbing, sea kayaking, and mountaineering in the most epic parks along the way. Ages 14-17. July 19-Aug. 13. $2,400. Call (415) 747-1451 or email yehudahrc@gmail.com. caba.camp

CAMP NATOMA Sleep under the stars, connect with nature, and be creative! Get outside this summer and experience true summer fun! Ages 7-17. June 28-Aug. 15. $850/session. Adelaida mountains west of Paso Robles. Call (805) 316-0163 or email info@campnatoma.org. campnatoma.org

FREE Day Camp for Children with Asthma Join us for camp fun! Enjoy games, crafts, cooking and more, all while learning about asthma. Now, more than ever before, taking care of your asthma will help you live your healthiest life. Free of charge and open to the community. Who:

Children with asthma who will be 6 through 10 years old on September 1, 2021

When:

Monday through Thursday, August 2 through 5, 2021, 8:30 to 11:30 AM

Where:

Veronica Springs Church, 949 Veronica Springs Road, Santa Barbara

How

Apply today! Space is limited to a small number of children. For more information and to apply visit www.SansumClinic.org/camp-wheez or call (805) 681-7672

Camp Wheez is designed to meet the special needs of children with asthma and to meet the highest safety standards. It is staffed by medical professionals and community volunteers. Volunteer applications are welcomed!

Sansum Clinic is the largest independent nonprofit healthcare organization on the Central Coast, providing the full spectrum of services from primary care to more than 30 specialties.

Learn more at www.SansumClinic.org

Cate School Summer Camp

CATE SUMMER INSTITUTE Campers at this residential academic camp will experience boarding school, a different kind of academic experience, leadership, and the outdoors. Grades 6-8. June 27-Aug. 7. $1,875/week. Cate School, 1960 Cate Mesa Rd, Carpinteria. Call (805) 684-4127 or email catesummerprograms@cate.org. tinyurl.com/CateInstitute2021

CATE SUMMER OUTDOORS In this Residential Outdoors program, campers will enjoy the natural beauty Santa Barbara County has to offer while challenging themselves. Grades 6-10. July 12-23. $995/week. Cate School, 1960 Cate Mesa Rd., Carpinteria. Call (805) 684-4127 or email catesummerprograms@cate.org. tinyurl.com/CateOutdoors2021

DUNN SCHOOL This fun-filled four-week overnight camp is for students needing academic support or who have learning differences. Ages 13-17. July 10-Aug. 6. $8,000. Dunn School, 2555 W. Hwy. 154, Los Olivos. Call (805) 686-0615 or email summer@dunnschool.org. dunnschool.org/summer/learning-strategies CONTINUED

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2021 CAMPS

GIRLS ROCK S.B. AMPLIFY SLEEPAWAY CAMP Amplify Sleepaway Camp empowers girls and women through music, creative arts education, community, and positive mentorship.

DAY & RESIDENTIAL

Grades 5-12. June 27-July 31. $1,950-$3,650/session. Catalina Island. Call (805) 6995247 or email girlsrocksb@gmail.com. girlsrocksb.org

INNERU GET WILD BACKPACKING ADVENTURE Middle and high school girls will experience five days of fun and adventures backpacking in the S.B. backcountry. Get wild! Ages 13-16. June 7-11. $650/week. Los Padres National Forest. Call (805) 708-6363 or email inneru4u@gmail.com. mindfulnessnaturecamp.com

Outdoor/General SUMMER SAILING WITH THE S.B. YOUTH SAILING FOUNDATION There are five, two-week sessions in the morning to learn to sail and afternoon race-level classes. In person.

DAY CAMPS

We offer camps for all ages, positions, and skill level. In many day camps we include focused sessions for competitive club players within our day camp setting. See website for details. Camps offered: Full Day Premier, 1/2 Day Premier, Goalkeeper, and Juniors. @ Viola Park, Carpinteria, CA JULY 26 - 30 @ Girsh Turf, Goleta, CA JUNE 14 - 18 & AUGUST 2 - 6

WILDERNESS YOUTH PROJECT SUMMER CAMP At these one- to two-week camps in S.B. outdoor natural spaces, the focus is on child-centered nature exploration and play. Scholarships are available. In person. Ages 4-17. June 7-Aug. 13. $250-$685/session. Various locations throughout S.B. and Goleta. Call (805) 964-8096 or email info@wyp.org. wyp.org/kids-summer-camp/

Sports/ Wellness

RESIDENTIAL CAMPS

805 BEACH VOLLEYBALL CLUB

These programs allow players to experience demands identical to collegiate and professional players, and train for the highest levels of youth (MLS Next, GA and ECNL), college (Division 1) and professional soccer (MLS or overseas).

Ages 12-18. June 14-Aug. 13. Email for pricing and registration. East Beach. Call (805) 259-9573 or email sb805beach@hotmail.com. 805beach.com

@ Cate School, Carpinteria, CA June 27 - July 1

BISHOP DIEGO SUMMER VOLLEYBALL CAMPS

Ages 9-17. June 24-July 23. $150/session. Bishop Diego High School, 4000 La Colina Rd. Call (805) 967-1266 or email dbennett@bishopdiego.org. tinyurl.com/BishopSummerVolleyball

July 11 - 15 July 16 - 20 ELITE 10 - DAY ACADEMY

CAMP WHEEZ Join for camp fun! Enjoy games, crafts, cooking, and more, all while learning about asthma. Taking care of your asthma will help you live your healthiest life. In person.

July 11 - 20

REGISTER NOW AT www.oneSoccerSchools.com 805.845.6801 info@oneSoccerSchools.com THE INDEPENDENT

This competitive beach volleyball club is for girls. In person.

These camps offer high-level instruction and competition for players of all abilities! Four weeks, two sessions per day. In person.

ELITE 5 - DAY ACADEMY

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Ages 5-18. June 7-Aug. 13. $375/two-week session; $1,250/five weeks. SBYSF, 130 Harbor Wy. Call (805) 965-4603 or email sbysf.director@gmail.com. sbysf.org/summer

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Ages 6-10 on Sept. 1. Aug. 2-5. Free. Veronica Springs Church, 949 Veronica Springs Rd. Call (805) 681-7672 or email campwheez@sansumclinic.org. sansumclinic.org/camp-wheez

mp l Summer Ca Cate Schoo


SUMMER CAMP CAMP SUMMER CATE SPORTS ACADEMY Half-day, day, and overnight camp options place an emphasis on both athletic advancement and personal development. Sports offered vary by week and include baseball, basketball, boys’ lacrosse, girls’ lacrosse, softball, tennis, and volleyball. In person. Grades 3-11. July 12-Aug. 7. $195-$895/week. Cate School, 1960 Cate Mesa Rd., Carpinteria. Call (805) 684-4127 or email catesummerprograms@ cate.org. tinyurl.com/CateSports

GIRLS INC. OF GREATER SANTA BARBARA: GYMNASTICS CAMP Tumble into Girls Inc.! Certified gymnastics instructors teach skill instruction, games, and perforp m a mances to beginner-intermediC r e ol Summ ate girls and boys. In person. Cate Scho Ages 5-12. June 21-Aug. 13. $480/two-week session. Girls Inc. Gymnastics, 531 E. Ortega St. Call (805) 963-4757 or email info@girlsincsb.org. girlsincsb.org/programs/gymnastics

LEARN TO ROW CAMP Mission Rowing brings the first opportunity for local youth to explore and try the amateur Olympic sport of rowing. Learn the basics and develop your skill set. In person. Entering grades 5-12. June 7-Aug. 13. $325/session. Mission Rowing, Lake Cachuma Recreation Area, 2225 Hwy. 154. Call (206) 660-3567 or email carol@missionrowing.org. missionrowing.org/camps

LOVEWATER HALF-DAY KIDS SURF CAMP This camp focuses on working with a select group of kids who are truly excited about surfing. Whether a total beginner or a little shredder, take your skills to the next level in a fun and encouraging atmosphere. In person. Ages 5-13. June 7-Aug. 27. $70-$95/day; $275-$425/week. Campus Point Surf Break, Goleta. Call (805) 636-1552 or email info@lovewatersurf.com. lovewatersurf.com/summer-surf-camps

MOUNTAIN BIKING & BIKE MECHANICS CAMP Come learn proper bicycle riding techniques on trails and basic bike mechanics, taught by the experienced staff of S.B. Middle School! In person.

Let us pay for your

presents

Ages 9-14. July 26-Aug. 5. $295/week. S.B. Middle School, 1321 Alameda Padre Serra. Email summercamp@sbms.org. sbms.org/sbms-summer-camps

ONE.SOCCER SCHOOLS SUMMER CAMPS For those playing at the highest club or new to soccer, one. Soccer Schools offers day and residential soccer camps. In person. Ages 5-16. June 14-Aug 6. $299-$1,799. Various locations. Call (805) 845-6801 or email info@onescoccerschools.com. onesoccerschools.com

CONT INUED

SUMMER CAMP Etherton Real Estate’s

6th Annual

Summer Camp Giveaway We’re giving away up to 10 local summer camps in the community. It’s easy to enter and 100% Free! our 12th annual celebration of chocolate & wine

LIVE STREAM! Featuring…

TARANA BURKE Founder of the ‘me too’ Movement

Email, “Send Me to Summer Camp” with your name, phone # and how many children you have to JustinEtherton@ethertonrealestate.com

Deadline is May 31st • Raffle is June 1st

Friday, May 14, 2021 5:30–6:30PM INDEPENDENT.COM

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CAMP IGNITE

SUMMER ENRICHMENT TEEN PROGRAM

FUEL HER FIRE AND SHE WILL CHANGE THE WORLD. 7TH-12TH GRADE

Mon. - Fri. 8:00AM-4:00PM

of Greater Santa Barbara

LEARN MORE & REGISTER TODAY! girlsincsb.org/teens

$500 per 4-week session Financial Assistance is Available Our summer program operates in accordance with CDC and Santa Barbara County COVID-19 safety protocols. Goleta Valley Teen Center 4973 Hollister Avenue 805.963.4757

SESSION 2: JULY 19 - AUG 13

   @girlsincsb

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SUMMER CAMP

Junior & High School Girls

Let’s Get WILD June 7-11, 2021

Backpacking Nature Adventure

Mission Rowing

Get Wild Adventure Camp

PEAK2PACIFIC OUTDOOR ADVENTURES SUMMER CAMPS Campers will have fun with swimming, boogie boarding, surfing, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, sailing, marine biology, ecology, and sports. In person. Ages 5-12; CITs: ages 14-18. June 7-July 30. $100/day, $400/week. West Beach.Call (805) 6898326 or email peak2pacific@gmail.com. peak2pacific.com

PEAK2PACIFIC SAILING ADVENTURES CAMP Campers will gain skilled experience in the techniques and strategies of sail racing and also enjoy kayaking, boogie boarding, stand-up paddle boarding, and team-building games! In person. Ages 7-12; CITs: ages 14-18. July 5-30. $100/day, $400/week. West Beach. Call 689-8326 or email peak2pacific@gmail.com. tinyurl.com/Peak2Pacific2021

PEAK2PACIFIC OUTDOOR ADVENTURE COUNSELOR IN TRAINING (CIT) SUMMER CAMP PROGRAMS Youth outdoor adventure and leadership training in swimming, boogie boarding, surfing, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, sailing, team building, marine biology, and environmental education. In person. Ages 14-18. June 7-July 30. $100/day, $400/week. West Beach. Call (805) 689-8326 or email peak2pacific@gmail.com. peak2pacific.com

Get Wild is an amazing opportunity for adventurous and nature-loving girls to explore the hidden gems of Santa Barbara’s back country. Come hike ancient trails, swim in hidden pools, and discover the magic of the outdoors. This backpacking trip will leave you feeling empowered and alive by building new wilderness skills and knowledge. Enjoy fun games, new friendships, and excitement for adventure. Discover your inner wild. COST: $650/week, $620 for siblings or bring a friend

MINDFULNESS OCEAN ADVENTURES CAMP June 14-18: Seastars (Grades K-2) June 21-25: Dolphins (Grades 3-6)

ROWING CAMP EXPERIENCED Refine your rowing skills and develop fitness levels and racing execution. In person. Ages 13-21. June 7-Aug. 13. $115/week. Lake Cachuma Recreation Area, 2225 Hwy. 154. Call (206) 660-3567 or email carol@missionrowing.org. missionrowing.org/camps

Dive In Join the Fun

Visit our website for COVID Policies

Inspire interconnectedness with nature! Kids will discover their inner world through mindfulness lessons integrated with exploring local coastal areas and marine animals. Daily activities will include playful beach games, wildlife exploration and interpretation, hiking, tidepooling, and crafts. Make new friends and enjoy your summer in nature. Ignore the Zoom. Come outside! COST: $370/week, $340 for siblings Surf Happens

CONTINUED

For more info about our camps: www.mindfulnessnaturecamp.com innerU4u@gmail.com INDEPENDENT.COM

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Summer Programs SUMMER INSTITUTE

SPORTS ACADEMY

June 27 - July 3 August 1-7

July 12 - August 6 (Monday - Friday)

Current 6th, 7th, and 8th graders

Current 3rd - 11th graders

SUMMER OUTDOORS

SUMMER MINI

July 12-16 July 19-23

July 12-16 July 19-23

Current 3rd - 11th graders

Preschoolers age 3-5

The best days of Summer happen at Cate!

For information and to register online, visit:

www.catesummerprograms.org

Surf Happens

SBBIKE CYCLING CAMP Taught by certified bike instructors, participants will learn bike handling skills, traffic laws, and bike maintenance and ride to fun destinations. In person. Ages 10-14. Goleta: June 7-11; S.B.: June 14-18; Carpinteria: June 21-25. $150/session. Call (805) 875-3562 or email admin@sbbike.org. www.sbbike.org/summer_camp

S.B. COUNTY JUNIOR LIFEGUARDS The S.B. County Junior Lifeguards is a fun and educational program at Hendry’s and Goleta Beach. In person. Ages 8-17. June 28-Aug. 6. $315/two-week session. Goleta Beach, 5986 Sandspit Rd., Goleta; Hendry’s Beach, 2981 Cliff Dr. Email sbcojg@sbparks.org. sbparks.org/jg

S.B. MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY: NATURE ADVENTURES FROM HOME Camps will cover kids’ favorite topics, from butterflies to bioluminescence, sea otters to space, and the chemistry of wizarding to grossology! Virtual. Ages 4-12. June 7-July 9. $150-$250. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Call (805) 682-4711 x171 or email tchin@sbnature2.org. sbnature.org/natureadventures

S.B. SOCCER CLUB SUMMER DAY CAMPS Camps offer a FUN introduction to the forging ground that encompasses the technical, tactical, physical, and mental aspects of the game. In person. Ages 5-16. June 14-18. $165/half-day. Girsh Park Turf, 7050 Phelps Rd., Goleta. Call (805) 4520083 or email info@santabarbarasc.org. tinyurl.com/SBSoccerClub2021

S.B. SOCCER KIDS CAMP Camps are designed for K-8 school year boys and girls field players and goalkeepers. In person. Ages 5-16. June 7-Aug. 6. $40/day; $160/week. Girsh Park, 7050 Phelps Rd., Goleta. Call (714) 222-1903 or email sbsoccercamps@gmail.com. tinyurl.com/SBSoccerKids

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SUMMERCAMP CAMP SUMMER West Coast Kite Life Flight Cam p

SURF HAPPENS SURF CAMPS Get stoked! For the last 22 years, Surf Happens has introduced students to the joy of surfing. In person. Ages 4-17. June 7-Aug. 27. $110-$160/daily; $450-$650/week. East side of Santa Claus Ln. Beach, Carpinteria. Call (805) 966-3613 or email info@surfhappens .com. tinyurl.com/SurfHappens2021

TWIN LAKES JUNIOR GOLF SUMMER CAMP This camp is designed for kids of all skill levels to fall in love with the game of golf. In person. Ages 4-14. June 7-Aug. 13. $300-$600/week. Twin Lakes Golf Course, 6034 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Call (805) 223-7508 or email katy@donparsonsgolf.com. twinlakesgolf.com/summer-camp

UCSB CAMPUS POINT JR. LIFEGUARDS Participants gain a wide variety of skills, knowledge, and valuable experience, which builds self-confidence and skills for life. In person.

Register now at sbzoo.org/zoo-camp

Ages 8-17. June 21-Aug. 13. $480/four-weeks. Campus Point, Goleta Beach, and UCSB Recreation Ctr. Call (805) 893-3913 or email camps@recreation.ucsb.edu. tinyurl.com/JrLifeguardUCSB

UCSB SWIM LESSONS

(805) 962-5339 • Just off Cabrillo Blvd. at East Beach • sbzoo.org

Learn to swim at the beautiful UCSB Recreation Center pools taught by experienced instructors. In person. Ages 4-15. Dates and cost TBA. UCSB Recreation Ctr. pools. Call (805) 893-2501 or email swimlessons@recreation.ucsb.edu. tinyurl.com/SwimLessonsUCSB

ART IN THE GARDEN Where An outdoor classroom. 815 Puenta Drive, Santa Barbara

UCSB SURF & KAYAK CAMP

When 6 weekly sessions Beginning June 14th and ending August 20th

Enjoy surfing and other beach activities at the best beach camp at the best location in town. Staff are certified lifeguards. Ages 9-15. June 21-Aug. 13. $30 one-time rash guard fee; $175/week. Campus Point, UCSB. Call (805) 893-3913 or email camps@recreation.ucsb.edu. tinyurl.com/Surf-KayakUCSB

Ages: Grades 1-6 Small groups up to 8 students

For Kids Who Love Art

The Summer 2021 Art Studio4 kids Workshop is a fun and enriching program that will educate, inspire and entertain creative young minds. The weekly workshops offer children the opportunity to explore a variety of art projects such as drawing, painting, sculpting, paper Mache, sewing, Tie-Dye, batik and printmaking.

WEST COAST KITE LIFE FLIGHT CAMP Learn to fly stunt and power kites on the beach through teamwork and focus with fellow flight enthusiasts. Ages 10-17. June 7-Aug. 13. $197-$237. East Beach (across from the Hilton S.B., 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Call (805) 837-9666 or email westcoastkitelife@gmail.com. westcoastkitelife.com

DD UEUE ININ NTNT COCO

For more information, visit: www.artstudio4kids.com or call 805-689-8993

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GRAB A PENCIL, LET’S HAVE SOME FUN!

:

Kids Activity Word Scramble

Unscramble these words to reveal the different banking phrases. KBAN

NYNPE

AOLG

GINNEPU

MYEON

TREESIN

ITCO

FASE

SENED

ETRE

TCOPEK

LINEKC

NATSW

MEID

TALWLE

SIBLL

TRICED

LADROL

RANE

OPIDTSE

GEHCNA

GIVNASS

NTMOY

RUESTCIY

YIPGG NKAB

TARQREU

TEBID

Want more exercises or tips? Use the QR code or visit montecito.bank/FinLit

present

Financial Literacy Month

Weekly activities to sharpen your financial savvy!

:

Week five Safety & cyber security Cut me out or take a photo to remember these tips

:

Cyber Fraud Protect what’s yours! Consumers reported $3.3 billion in losses to fraud in 2020. Here are a few tips to help protect your information and keep your finances safe.

Beware of phishing - think before you click any links or open documents in emails.

Create strong passwords - use long passwords with a combination of letters, numbers and symbols.

Don’t trust incoming calls or provide information to callers. Caller ID can be spoofed.

Use mobile banking tools such as CardControl to protect your debit card.

Keep your software up to date.

Avoid using the same password across multiple accounts.

Use two-factor authentication to protect your accounts.

Be careful about using public Wi-Fi and use a VPN.

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APRIL 29, 2021

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SUMMER CAMP

Go For Gold At Girl Scout Summer Day Camp! Leadership, Team Building, Adventure & Fun!

July 19 – 23, 2021 9:00 am - 3:00 pm daily Camp Fee of $180 includes t- shirt, patch, daily snacks and friday lunch

For Girl Scouts & Non-Girl Scouts Entering Kindergarten Through 6th grade

PLEASE EMAIL COSTADEOROCAMP@GMAIL.COM FOR MORE INFO

Art Camp S.B.

A SAFE, FUN SUMMER WITH S.B. PARKS AND REC This summer, S.B. Parks and Recreation is offering many different camps at some of S.B.’s most iconic locations with full- and part-day camps, summer drop-in, and Junior Counselors. We’ve compiled a list of Parks and Rec camp titles with ages and cost for you to choose from. All summer camp information is available at: tinyurl.com/Park-RecSummer2021 tinyurl.com/FullDayCamps tinyurl.com/PartDayCamps tinyurl.com/DropInSummer tinyurl.com/JrCounselors

Adventure and Ocean Explorers Camp: ages 5-14, $325-357/week. Beach Volleyball Camp: ages 9-17, $150-$165 Beginning Water Polo: ages 9-14, $95-$105

Now in its 37th year, locally owned by a teacher/counselor in-person or zoom Signature Math madness camp

Summer refresh: English, Math & SAT College application workshop

Private tutoring and college advising

Go to clcsb.com or email info@clcsb.com for more info.

Bizzy Girls Entrepreneurship Camp: ages 6-12, $345-$395 Boogie and Surf Camp: ages 5-17, $400-$440 Camp Millionaire: ages 10-14, $370/week Ceramics Camp: ages 7-14, $207-$227 CSI Camp (Online): ages 12-17, $107 Hearts Horseback Riding Camp: ages 6-10, $425 Junior Lifeguards: Full Summer or Individual Sessions. Ages 9-17, $300-$330/session, $800$880/full summer LEGO-Inspired Engineering Camp: ages 5-12, $350-$385 Nature Camp: ages 6-12, $395-$435 Skate Camp: ages 6-12, $185-$205 Spotlight Kids Theater Camp: ages 6-12, $324-$356 Tennis and Swim Camp: ages 7-15, $275-$300

Winter Gardening & Cooking Classes

Register for Summer Camp! Breakfast & Brunch Plant-Powered Kids Tasty Transformations atozcookingschool.org

Follow us @atozcookingschool

805 Beach is a competitive beach volleyball club for Girls ages 10-18 years old. Summer club season will be from June 14th to August 5th. www.805beach.com

Travel Skate Camp: ages 8-12, $200-$220 Volleyball - Beach Camps: Ages 9-17, $150-$165/week Youth Evolution Basketball: ages 5-10, $199-$219 Youth Evolution Soccer: ages 5-12, $169-$188

MAKE YOUR SUMMER SHINE AT THE YMCA The YMCA is ready to go for Summer Day Camp by offering a safe and fun environment for your child. Strict safety protocols have been established by the American Camping Association, including new COVID-19 operational guidelines.

Support the Zoo Donate today at sbzoo.org

We’ve got a lot of mouths to feed!

Ages 2½-18. June 7-Aug. 13. Preschool Camp, Counselor in Training, Traditional Summer Day Camps: art, STEM activities, sports and outdoor recreation, field trips; Summer Specialty Camps: All Sorts of Sports, Explorer Camp, Kinder Camp, Pioneer Camp, Jr. High Camp. Visit the website for camp descriptions, locations, and cost. Call Montecito at (805) 969-3288 or S.B. at (805) 687-7727. ciymca.org/summer-camp n

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Released

OH, TO BE

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here’s a certain lightness in the air, and it feels like hope. As the vaccine has rolled out more and more widely, those who’ve gotten the shot in the arm can venture to speak and laugh more easily with friends and strangers. We’ve come a long way in the past year. “What will you do when released from COVID captivity?” we asked our readers, and they replied with stories of joy delayed, future plans aplenty, and images of their last get-togethers. What a relief to be able to look forward again. It’s a new world — likely to still be a masked and careful one — but we’ve never been so happy to celebrate “normal”!

CELINA GARCIA

Just a few short months before the pandemic lockdown, my brother moved to Louisville. There are many places I’d rather travel once it’s safe to do so, but I haven’t seen him in over a year and a half! I’m so relieved my family and I have been able to get vaccinated. I’m one step closer to being able to actually embrace them. I’m Latinx — we’re very affectionate. Before the pandemic changed everything, my college bestie had recently moved back to S.B. We went out on the town and ate bomb food and drank fancy cocktails at Cubaneo and then went and played games at The Cruisery. Somebody had a very adorable puppy I couldn’t stop petting despite everyone telling me to leave the poor dog owner alone, although he didn’t seem to mind.

ANA PAPAKHIAN It felt weird to start crying in the CVS makeup aisle, but the relief and joy after getting the vaccine couldn’t be held back! As the pandemic wore on, our family was so tired of cooking and cleaning that we invented “Fend for Yourself Night,” where you only have to figure out something to eat for dinner and not have to cook for the whole gang. I work at Music Academy of the West, and on March 10, 2020, the Solo Piano Competition Winner Elliot Wuu (pictured) gave a recital. About half the audience we anticipated showed up, as we were near lockdown. I had no idea that would be my last live concert for over a year. Once this is over, it will be so great to go to a live concert, opera, ballet, play, lecture, or anything cultural again in person!

WARNER ANDERSON

Our friend Misty’s wedding at the Rosewood Miramar has stuck with me throughout the pandemic, as it was one of the last times we were able to get together with a large group of our close friends. A three-person New Year’s Eve party was definitely a break from the norm, but we made it work! I got the vaccine more for my family, friends, and community than myself, because I want to be a part of the solution of getting us back to whatever was considered normal. But once that happens, I want to travel somewhere far away and then throw in a music festival on top of that.

DOMINIQUE SMITH The first thing my husband and I are doing now that we are vaccinated is the last one we did before the shutdown. We were on a trip to Costa Rica in March 2020, blissfully unaware of what was ahead. We’d had a wonderful trip in a spectacular country, with beautiful national parks and beaches, fun activities, good food, and very nice people — and came back home a couple of days before flights were canceled and airports closed. What better way to close this difficult time, now that we have gotten our vaccines, than to go back to Costa Rica to visit our grandchildren 42

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APRIL 29, 2021

(and great-grands). Planning our trip did wonders for my gypsy soul. The hope of exploring the world again is what kept me sane during the dark months of 2020. My introvert husband supported Chaucer’s all by himself! Getting the shot reopened so many possibilities; most important was feeling the anxiety of the past year start to diminish. Sometimes I think I want to forget 2020 ever happened, for it’s been frustrating, often painful, and hard on everyone. But it’s taught me a lot: about myself, my family and friends, our country, and the world. So maybe it served at least some purpose? INDEPENDENT.COM


KAREN S. LYTLE By taking the vaccine, I’m helping the community stop the variants and protecting myself from COVID (cancer treatment reduces immunity). I’m going to my uncle’s 100th in Virginia and seeing my family once I can! Hugging will be sooo nice to do again! I’m so looking forward to playing with my band for an audience and being with live music, but I’ve been jamming with friends outdoors rather than in my studio. Our last singer showcase was on February 8, 2020. I love producing at SOhO, which is now closed — but I have a live, no-audience recorded showcase I hope to air soon to raise $ for SOhO. The photo here (Lytle, left, and Brandi Redman) was an event to support my favorite venue, the Lobero Theatre. Miss that!

FACEBOOK ‘Hockey Greg’: Honestly, just sit around a fire with friends. Been working this whole time anyway, so taking the mask off will be nice.

INSTAGRAM darlabea: DJ Weddings! bodhibee: Sing with my band. ojaijelly: #spreadmywings I mean JAM… susanblanchard: Bowling at Zodo’s with my dad! liv__inthedream: I was never in captivity! I did my homework instead bellaterra.realestate: Spend time with family and friends and TRAVEL!

AMANDA MAFFETT Thanks to the wonderful folks at Cottage and my employment at UCSB, I am now fully vaccinated — huzzah! I feel safer in my daily life and protected from serious illness or death due to COVID. I also wanted to protect the people near me, whether it’s strangers at my local Dune Coffee shop or elderly folks out walking their dog. I want to protect my community as well as my loved ones. Last year was my first time not visiting my family for Christmas, so my husband and I celebrated at home together. I cooked a whole Christmas feast as a distraction, and I realized what a pain the holiday cooking has been for my mom over the years. I look forward to eating her cooking this Christmas. In February 2020, I celebrated my niece’s 8th birthday with a fun hotel sleepover.

PAYGE BELLINI

To be “normal” is to go to a concert! Obviously, that will have to wait ’til more people are vaccinated, but that is what I miss the most. And my Grammy’s hugs! I can’t wait to get the vaccine so that I can be a part of the solution to keeping people healthy and ending this chaos. I’m the cautious one in my family, and we’ve just been doing the immediate-family-only, outdoors kind of holiday and making sure people were safe. My fiancé and I canceled our wedding and decided to elope in October. We realized that big fancy gatherings aren’t our style, and we will likely keep a small, close-knit circle even after COVID. But the last thing I did before the shutdown was go wedding-dress shopping in San Luis Obispo with my mom, Grammy, and girlfriends, followed by a hotel stay and girls’ night sleepover party. We didn’t yet know the severity of the virus back in March.

powerofyourom: Host a prom dance party

TONI WELLEN We are “older folks” and have serious health issues. We were anxious to get the vaccine and hope everyone will eventually be vaccinated. Normal means being able to have family and friends exchange visits, share meals, and celebrate events. We were able to celebrate birthdays and Thanksgiving virtually with lots of planning. The second normal thing will be to have the house cleaner return and have all the windows washed!

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE

COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit. “Somewhere in Nevada “ by Michael Drury

4/29:

CWC Virtual Discussion: The Babushkas

of Chernobyl Register to receive a link to screen the 2015 documentary The Babushkas of Chernobyl, about a group of women who evacuated after the 1986 disaster and returned to live there semi-officially; then join director Holly Morris for this discussion. 4-5pm. Free. Call (805) 893-4637 or email info@carseywolf.ucsb.edu. tinyurl.com/BabushkasOfChernobyl

THURSDAY 4/29 4/29: Comedy for a Cause — Live Comedy in S.B.! Join this night of comedy with Pete George, Dr. Mike, Anne Wilde, and emcee Scott Topper in a safe environment on the new outdoor back patio. Proceeds will go to the Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation. Doors: 7pm; show: 8pm. The Red Piano Backstage, 516 State St. $45$55. Ages 21+. tinyurl.com/RedPianoComedy

4/29: Race to Justice Virtual Event: Theaster Gates Artist, social innovator, musi-

FRIDAY 4/30

5/1-5/4:

4/30: SBWCN Virtual Open House & Groundbreaking Celebration Get the first look

tradition of preserving open spaces, is proud to present this show that will benefit the S.B. Wildlife Care Network. The exhibition can be viewed online and will be available through May 28. S.B. Fine Art Gallery, 1321 State St. Sat.: 11am-8pm; Sun.: noon-4pm; Mon.-Tue.: noon-5pm. Free. Call (805) 845-4270. sbwcn.org/oakgroup2021

at videos from the S.B. Wildlife Care Network during spring baby season and hear from the staff about animal intakes, rehabilitations, and releases, and see the construction of the new Wildlife Hospital. Noon12:45pm. Free. sbwcn.org/openhouse

4/30: Virtual Event: Borders — Forensic Oceanography and the Aesthetics of Borders

Studies, UCSB) and Bhaskar Sarkar (Film and Media Studies, UCSB) for a discussion about Forensic Oceanography’s investigations into the shifting modalities of border violence operating at the E.U.’s maritime frontiers. Noon-1:15pm. Free.

Charles Heller and Lorenzo Pezzani will be joined by moderators Bishnupriya Ghosh (English and Global

4/30:

Race to Justice Virtual Event: Bryan

tinyurl.com/ForensicOceanography

Stevenson Founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, visionary legal thinker, social justice advocate, and author of Just Mercy Bryan Stevenson will speak on American Injustice: Mercy, Humanity, and Making a Difference followed by a Q&A. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535.

4/30: Virtual Panel Discussion: S.B. County African American Life, Culture, and Contributions, 1890-1990 Join the panel discussion about the new exhibit created by the S.B. County Genealogical Society (SBCGS). Hear from some of the featured African-American participants and learn about the process and challenges of creating such an exhibit while learning about S.B.’s Black history. The exhibit shows through June 30. 4:30-6pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/Bryan-Stevenson-RTJ

cian, and cultural planner Theaster Gates will talk about land and human values followed by a Q&A. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 8933535 or email info@artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

tinyurl.com/SBCGSpanel

4/30: AWC-S.B. Women of Achievement Virtual Awards The Association for Women in

tinyurl.com/TheasterGatesUCSB

Communications (AWC) invites the community to celebrate Barbara Ben-Horin and Luz Reyes-Martín for their contributions to Vision, Voice, and Advocacy for a New Generation, with Starshine Roshell serving as emcee. Noon-1pm. Free. Call (805) 845-9774. tinyurl.com/AWCSBAwards

4/29-5/2: MOXI Reopens You are invited to explore, discover, and play in the Build It. Test It. Race It., Light Patterns, Whitewater, and CurioCity exhibits in a safe and fun environment. 10am-5pm. MOXI, The Wolf Museum of Exploration + Innovation, 125 State St. Free-$16. Call (805) 770-5000. moxi.org

4/30: Three Perspectives on Contemporary Painting: A Virtual Conversation with Suzanne Hudson, Math Bass, and Christina Quarles The S.B. Museum of Art and

4/29: Zoom Event: UCSB Dance Company in Flight and on Film Artistic Director Delila Moseley, videographer Samsun Keithley, and choreographers Caili Quan, Gianna Burright, and Josh Manculich have created three dance films that showcase the UCSB Dance Company. 6pm. Free. COURTESY

tinyurl.com/DanceUCSB

Museum of Contemporary Art S.B. present L.A.based art historian and critic Suzanne Hudson and esteemed painters Math Bass and Christina Quarles in a discussion. 5-6pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/ContemporaryPainting

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 44

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The Oak Group 35th Anniversary Exhibition Opening: Circle of Compassion The Oak Group, continuing its

INDEPENDENT.COM

SATURDAY 5/1 5/1: Art Meets Science — Block Printing Botanicals Maximus Gallery Curator Linda Miller discusses the 400-year-old history of illustrated gardening catalogs and “Tulipmania” in 17th-century Holland. After, follow along with artist Hilary George to learn how to block print your own botanical print. Visit the website about picking up your supplies. 11am-12:15pm. Members: $40; nonmembers: $50. Call (805) 682-4711 or email info@sbnature2.org

tinyurl.com/WorkshopBlockPrinting

5/1: Buellton Brew Fest @ Home Guests will walk through tastings of beer, tequila, micheladas, margaritas, and more as they hear music from area bands and DJ Hecktik. The 13-pack is enough to enjoy with one or two people. 12:303:30pm. $70. Ages 21+. buelltonbrewfest.com

SUNDAY 5/2 5/2: Mujeres Makers Market Visit this community market in the heart of S.B.’s Eastside that empowers and supports makers, creators, and artists. Follow @mujeresmakersmarket on Instagram for more information. 11am-4pm. 523 N. Milpas St. (Big Brand Tire & Service parking lot). Free. Call (805) 428-9368 or email latinxmakersmarket@gmail.com. Read more on p. 47.

tinyurl.com/MujeresMakersMarket 5/2: Opening Reception: Scenes of Santa Ynez Valley, Drawings & Paintings by Susan Belloni Enjoy refreshments, see intriguing charcoal drawings of the Valley’s towns and


APR. MAY

ihc.ucsb.edu

29 5 by

TERRY ORTEGA and SOPHIE LYND

5/3:

Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion: Steven Gilbar S.B. writer Steven

Gilbar will talk about his latest book, Published & Perished: Some Forgotten Santa Barbara Writers Remembered. 7pm. Free.

What We Can Do for Each Other

tinyurl.com/SteveGilbar

countryside, and see Susan Belloni paint plein air in the garden. The exhibit shows through August 1. 1-4pm. Global Eye Shop & Studio, 2935 Grand Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 259-6390.

MAY 6 | 4:00 PM

Cristina Rivera Garza

tinyurl.com/SusanBelloni

5/2: Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion: Mike Bender Mike Bender will discuss his latest children’s book, The End Is Just the Beginning: A Book of Endless Possibilities, about helping kids understand life’s challenges and optimism and hope. 3:30pm. Free. tinyurl.com/MikeBender

MONDAY 5/3 5/3: Online Class — Supplementing the Modern Diet Nutritionist Justine Perrizo will discuss what vitamins and minerals are missing from the standard American diet and how to best supplement what is needed for better care of the immune, endocrine, digestive, and cardiovascular systems. 5-6pm. Free. Call (805) 769-4926 or email info@ artemisiaacademy.com. tinyurl.com/ModernDiet

University of Houston TUESDAY 5/4 5/4: Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion: Valerie Rice Local author Valerie Rice will discuss her book Lush Life: Food and Drinks from the Garden, a California dream of a cookbook, with Gina Tolleson, editor of S.B. Magazine. 7pm. Free.

ASL and Spanish interpretation provided Habrá interpretación en ASL y español

Free Online Talk One of the greatest threats to democracy and justice is indolence caused by indifference to the suffering of others. Award-winning author Cristina Rivera Garza will explore the importance of transnational emotional communities in Mexico and the U.S. that share the experiences of social suffering and grieving.

REGISTER NOW bit.ly/Rivera-Garza-IHC

tinyurl.com/ValerieRice

5/4: Race to Justice Virtual Event: Heather McGhee Author, advocate, and public policy expert Heather McGhee will talk about The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together followed by a Q&A. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535. tinyurl.com/

COURTESY

HeatherMcGhee

WEDNESDAY 5/5 5/5: Chaucer’s Virtual Discussion: Jewel Nunez Author Jewel Nunez will launch her new book, What it Means to be a Mom: A Celebration of the Humor, Heart (and Chaos) of Motherhood. 7pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/JewelNunez

5/5:

House Calls Virtual Event: Yo-Yo Ma & Kathryn Stott — Songs of Comfort and Hope Beloved cellist Yo-Yo Ma vand acclaimed pianist Kathryn Stott, musical friends for 35 years and collaborators on the recent album Songs of Comfort and Hope, will perform songs from the album selected specifically for this event followed by a Q&A with Yo-Yo Ma. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535.

tinyurl.com/YoYoMaKatherineStott

Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 29, 2021

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Sports

anta Barbara has two very successful but very hungry college teams. “It’s our turn,” said Ken Preston, speaking on behalf of UCSB men’s volleyball, a program that knocked on the door of the NCAA championship five times in the past 50 years but never broke through. “We don’t want a stinking runner-up trophy,” said Ruth McGolpin, who took Westmont women’s volleyball to the brink of the NAIA title in her first year as the Warriors’ head coach but had to settle for second place. Now, each team gets a crack at makTHE WARRIOR’S WAY: Westmont’s Lexi Malone, an all-conference ing history. Westmont goes first. The honoree who led the team in kills Warriors, who went 14-1 in a shortened room with Lauren Tsuneishi, the basketball team’s Golden State Athletic Conference season, are ranked No. 3 among 24 teams battling in lone senior starter, who won the Hustle Award at the NAIA women’s nationals this week at Sioux the championships. “Lauren played with a fierce mentality,” Moore City, Iowa. The champion will be crowned on said. “When it’s your last shot, you go out and go Saturday, May 1. UCSB won a pressure-packed Big West tourna- for it.” UCSB men’s volleyball coach Rick McLaughlin ment last Saturday to earn a bid to the exclusive NCAA men’s championships at Ohio State. The sees the same intensity in his four seniors—setter third-ranked Gauchos will face Pepperdine on Casey McGarry, outside hitter Roy McFarland, Tuesday, May 4, the winner going to a semifinal middle blocker Keenan Sanders, and opposite hitter Randy DeWeese—who stuck around after matchup against top-ranked Hawai‘i on May 6. Preston’s fingerprints are on both teams. He their 2020 season ended prematurely. They breathed life into the Gauchos at crucial coached the Gaucho men for 30 years, including the 1988 season that ended with a five-set loss to USC in moments in last week’s Big West tournament at the NCAA final. He was Patti Cook’s assistant coach Hawai‘i. In the semifinals, they came back from with the Westmont women for an additional eight years, helping them go as far as the NAIA quarterfinals. Slowed down by Parkinson’s disease, he retired for good in 2018, his dream of bringing a national title to his hometown unfulfilled. by John Zant McGolpin, who shared assistant duties with Preston, was promoted to Westmont’s head coach in 2019. It’s a dream job for the Goleta native, a three-sport star at Dos Pueblos High and a Hall of a first-set loss to Long Beach State, the two-time Fame volleyballer at Northern Arizona. She had defending national champion, taking the match by coaching gigs at NAU, South Carolina, and Colo- scores of 16-25, 25-17, 25-18 and 25-15. That win seemingly assured the Gauchos would rado Mesa before landing back where she came receive at least an at-large NCAA bid, as they from. “I feel lucky being here,” she said. Buoyed by their stunning run to the 2019 NAIA anticipated playing Hawai‘i in the final. But UC final, McGolpin’s Warriors had to wait through the San Diego upset the Rainbow Warriors, who were postponement of the fall 2020 season because of still an NCAA shoo-in—meaning UCSB had to the COVID pandemic. They got off to a 7-0 start beat the red-hot Tritons or its season would be in January but then had to go into quarantine for over. San Diego continued its Cinderella run by winsix weeks when half the roster tested positive for ning the first set of the final, 25-22, and leading the the virus. “We learned to be present with each other in every second, 23-20. The Gauchos teetered on the edge moment, live every day, and appreciate every oppor- of a crevasse. But they tied the score when a replay tunity,” said senior Maddy Morrison, described by reversed an out-of-bounds call, and points by McFarland, freshman blocker Donovan Todorov McGolpin as the team’s “spiritual advisor.” After resuming play in late March, the Warriors and DeWeese put them over the top, 27-25. Sophomore hitter Ryan Wilcox, a Honolulu finished with a 14-1 record, 10-0 in the GSAC, and three all-conference honorees: Lexi Malone, native, also stepped up as the Gauchos finished a powerful sophomore who led the team in kills; off the tiring Tritons, 25-21 and 25-20. UCSB will freshman attacker Jessie Terlizzi; and Morrison, take a 15-4 record and a 10-match winning streak who mastered the defensive skills of the libero to Ohio. McLaughlin said the Gauchos’ return to the position. A good omen for the Warriors is the site of NCAAs for the first time since 2011—when they the nationals—Sioux City’s Tyson Events Cen- lost 3-2 to Ohio State in the final—hinged on their ter—the same floor where Westmont claimed the comeback in the second set. “There’s something about our guys,” he said. “They don’t get rattled. NAIA women’s basketball crown a month ago. “Our teams support each other,” hoops coach They got back, with the seniors leading the way.” n Kirsten Moore said. Morrison shares her dorm

UCSB Men’s, Westmont Women’s Teams Chasing National Titles

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COURTESY WESTMONT COLLEGE

Voracious Volleyballers S

living p. 46

Gardening

A Rose by Any Other Name I

love growing roses because they are a challenge. Often there is no rhyme or reason to what they do. They can be high maintenance and finicky, and their success or failure is dependent upon a “perfect storm” of weather, watering, fertilizing, disease and pest resistance, luck, and a little bit of skill and knowledge. It’s a thrill when all of your gardening efforts pay off like lemons lining up on a slot machine. The rewards are grand, astonishingly beautiful, and often fragrant. Maybe if roses were easier to grow, the successes wouldn’t seem so significant and sweet. Even though I care for many roses, I feel like I know and recognize each one as a friend. Not only does every variety differ in vigor, resilience, and performance, but individuals within a given variety can also vary. I can rely on a ‘Julia Child’ grown in Montecito to have a sunny disposition and an abundance of butter-yellow blooms. Her twin sister over in chilly Hope Ranch may surprise me and have so much rust and black spot that she throws a tantrum and drops all her leaves. I know that I may need to stand on a bucket to deadhead a ‘Princess Charlene de Monaco’ or a ‘Francis Meilland,’ because both are extremely enthusiastic and by Randy Arnowitz very vertical. All of my newly planted ‘State of Grace,’ ‘Burst of Joy,’ and ‘Big Momma’ roses have exceeded my highest expectations, and I enjoy watching their progress when I check in with them each week. And did I tell you about my ‘Coretta Scott King,’ ‘In Your Eyes,’ ‘Honey Dijon,’ ‘Koko Loco,’ ‘Passionate Kisses,’ and ‘Marilyn Monroe,’ and how every time I go into my garden, I have to take yet another picture of my ‘Flutterbye’ as it changes from yellow to tangerine to orange to everything in between? I mean, how many pictures of the same rose does a person need? Seemingly, a lot. To do well, roses need lots of sunshine, warm weather, adequate irrigation, and plenty of food. If you don’t keep them happy, they will disappoint. But even if you supply them with all of their basic needs, they sometimes fail to perform. Not only is this discouraging, but their optimistic, whimsical, and often romantic names can be misleading and seem to promise gifts that they’re sometimes unable to deliver. For example, when I welcomed the popular yet temperamental ‘Double Delight’ into my garden, I soon began to address it as ‘Mildew Magic.’ I couldn’t resist the ivory pink hues of ‘First Prize,’ but after one gloomy spring, she turned into ‘Last Place.’ And finally, after being seduced by the strong citrus scent of ‘Chrysler Imperial,’ I realized that this Chrysler was just not so imperial. All of this got me thinking, and so allow me to suggest some new, more appropriate names for a few popular roses for when you’ve done all you can do and your gardening efforts go unappreciated.

The Successes Are Glorious, but the Failures Can Be Major Bummers

Old Name

New Name

‘Living Easy’  ‘Hard Times’ ‘Dream Come True’  ‘Nightmare on Elm Street’ ‘Drop Dead Red’  ‘Just Drop Dead’ ‘Easy to Please’  ‘Hard to Get’ ‘First Prize’  ‘Sore Loser’ ‘Forever Yours’  ‘You Should Move Out’ ‘Jump for Joy’  ‘I Think I Pulled Something’ ‘Lasting Love’  ‘It’s Not You, It’s Me’ ‘Moonlight in Paris’  ‘After Hours in Goleta’ ‘Passionate Kisses’  ‘I Just Want to Be Friends’ ‘Paris d’Yves St. Laurent ‘  ‘Sorry, I Don’t Speak French’ ‘Iceberg’  ‘Frostbite’ ‘Julia Child’  ‘Burned the Pan’ ‘In The Mood’  ‘I Have a Headache’

Randy Arnowitz, a k a Mr. Greenjeans, is a Santa Barbara–based fine gardener and writer. Visit greenjeansmr.com.


JEAN ZIESENHENNE

Business

Makers Market Centers Mujeres of Color

Visit our Rose Field

Elysia Guillen, Maritza Flores, Leah Ortega, and Daniela Aguirre standing in front of the “Campesinos” mural at Ortega Park

May 2 Milpas Street Event Will Feature 28 Local Vendors by Camille Garcia ence but also encouraged cross-cultural exchange and empathy, especially among women. What they got was the Mujeres Makers Market, a pop-up market that showcases the work of local women of color, who range in cultural and racial backgrounds. Once the team posted the call for participants in March, they received hundreds of applications, along with an “overwhelming sentiment of gratitude,” said Aguirre, event co-creator and owner of AURA, a handmade candle business. “The other main sentiment was how Santa Barbara lacks representation of people of color,” she said, “and this is an event that is really working toward highlighting these vendors and giving them a safe space to share what they make, share what they do, and share their passions with the community.” The market is slated for Sunday, May 2, from 11 a.m.4 p.m. in the parking lot of Big Brand Tire & Service on Milpas Street. It will feature 28 vendors from the Santa Barbara area selling a variety of items, including handmade jewelry, vintage wares, baked goods, bath products, ceramics, and more. There also will be music, snacks for sale, a photo booth, and a raffle. “In today’s context, representation is so important,” said Jan Hunter, one of the vendors and owner of handmade jewelry brand UA Atelier. “As a Filipinaowned business, UA Atelier was born in memory of both my grandmothers.… I think they both would have wanted this business to thrive while also having the maker behind it all being recognized as a woman of color, the daughter of immigrants, and a proud Filipina-American.” There are about twice the amount of white, maleowned businesses than non-white, women-owned

businesses in Santa Barbara, according to 2019 census data. The Mujeres Makers Market organizers want to help address this disparity, said Muñoz, event cocreator and owner of Latin-American artisan shop Colibri. Having personally experienced barriers, such as expensive entry fees or long waitlists, to participate in pop-ups and similar events, Muñoz and her colleagues intentionally set a low vendor fee and encouraged first-time vendors to apply. “It’s hard going into markets sometimes if you’ve never participated in one,” she said. “We want to give the underdogs the opportunity to participate.” Their mission to foster and celebrate community has guided their process from the start. All five organizers—born and raised here—have witnessed their city change. Amid shifting demographics and growing costs of living, they’ve watched neighbors leave for more affordable areas and local businesses and cultural institutions struggle to keep their doors open. Some of the women are from the city’s Eastside, an ethnically diverse neighborhood that includes people of Black, Indigenous, and Asian backgrounds. Hosting the market there is no coincidence, Muñoz said. Milpas Street is iconic for facilitating business and culture, especially among communities of color. Even Big Brand Tire & Service, where the event will be, serves as a gathering space for everything from vintage car shows to the beloved Tacos Pipeye food truck. Flores and Guillen, fellow event co-creators and owners of Sol Vintage y Mas and La Segunda Goods, respectively, want to pay homage to the area. “It feels like going back to your roots,” Flores said. “Milpas has changed so much,” Guillen said, “but I think the location we have is a perfect spot.” Community markets have been around for centuries, but many have disappeared as cities, neighborhoods, and economies evolve. The Mujeres Makers Market team hopes their endeavor can stand the test of time and expand to include more vendors and offerings not limited by the size restrictions they’re facing in their first iteration. “With how many people that applied, it shows that people really wanted this, and needed it,” said Ortega, event co-creator and owner of Ortega Vintage Goods. For Chelsie Hood, a Black business owner from Santa Barbara, this opportunity to share her bakery business, Baked by the Hoods, is much appreciated—and long overdue. “Centering events around safe places for women of color is a beautiful thing,” Hood said. “We need places to heal, speak, and learn from each other, with nothing but support surrounding us.”

See @mujeresmakersmarket on Instagram.

Spring bedding color and veggies arriving daily. We have beneficial insects,worm bins, and composters.

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ehind Santa Barbara’s newest artisan pop-up are five Latina creatives driven to build community. With this shared desire, Santa Barbara locals Lili Muñoz, Leah Ortega, Maritza Flores, Daniela Aguirre, and Elysia Guillen collectively dreamed of creating a marketplace reminiscent of the ones they knew growing up: vendors selling their goods in English and Spanish. A live grupo performing over radio chatter in the stalls. Lines for raspados, fruit cups, and esquites that snake through the aisles. These gatherings are at the convergence of culture and commerce, intertwined with vibrant colors, smells, and sounds. As Latinas, the women took this inspiration and reimagined it to create their ideal event: something that evoked a similar sensory experi-

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Experience the joys of biking with online events and in-person rides & activities. Thu 5/13 • Bike Adventures Close to Home • Inspiring stories & how-to advice featuring Cycling Without Age, backcountry Taco Tuesday E-Bike Demos • The EZ Bike Project invites you to bikepacking riders & BCycle • Online Panel • 5:30-6:30PM test ride various e-bikes on a group ride destined for tacos Sun 5/16 • EZ Bike Pop-Up: Carpinteria • Join the EZ Bike Project • 1219 Anacapa St. • May 4, 11, 18 & 25 • 11:30AM-1:30PM (r) to demo a variety of electric bikes at one convenient location Wheelie Wednesdays for Beginners & Beyond • Learn & practice • Carpinteria Amtrak Parking Lot, 475 Linden Ave. • 1-4PM (r) the art of wheelies. A Wheelie Contest will be held on May 26 Wed 5/19 • Biking with Littles • Choose the bike setup & gear • SBCC Parking Lot 3 • May 5, 12, 19 & 26 • 3:30PM-sunset that’s right for your family. Parents share their experiences to help Bike to Nature Rides • Accessing nature with children is an easy ride! you decide & ride • Online Panel • 5:30-6:45PM Join COAST & WYP on a neighborhood ride to a special outdoor spot Sat 5/22 • Bike-In Movie Night • Ride over to an outdoor screening with guided nature activities • Carpinteria, Santa Barbara & Goleta of The Ride (2018) • SBBike/Bici Centro, 434 Olive St., SB • 8PM (r) • Weekends in May • 1-4PM (r) Tue 5/25 • The Greatest Car-Free Zoom Show on Earth! • Hear personal tales & practical tips on car-free & car-lite living One-Time Rides & Activities to inspire you on your own path • Online Panel • 5:30-6:30PM Wed 5/5 • National Bike to School Day • Celebrated locally at Thu 5/27 • Bicycle Friendly Community • National & local several elementary & junior high schools…check with yours! experts share the latest in bike-friendly urban design & practices. Featuring People for Bikes, League of American Cyclists & the Thu 5/6 • E-Bikes! Technology, Trends & How to Choose City of Santa Barbara • Online Panel • 5:30-7PM • Local experts with the EZ Bike Project discuss everything you want to know about e-bikes • Online Panel • 5:30-6:45PM Sat 5/29 • Bike DeLights • Social ride, decked out in lights Sat 5/8 • EZ Bike Pop-Up: Goleta • Join the EZ Bike Project & City • SB Amtrak Station Moreton Bay Fig Tree • Meet 7PM/Depart 7:30PM of Goleta to demo a variety of electric bikes at one easy location Sun 5/30 • Community E-Bike Ride • Fast-paced bike ride with • City Hall Parking Lot, 130 Cremona Dr. • 1-4PM (r) like-minded e-bikers. Ride your own or register early to demo Sun 5/9 • Mother’s Day Ride • Cruise along the waterfront, from one • SB Amtrak Station by the Moreton Bay Fig Tree • 1-4pm (r) Santa Barbara to Butterfly Beach • Meet at SBCC Lot 3 across from Visit the website for the full calendar Leadbetter Beach • 1-4PM (r) and to register for in-person rides Wed 5/12 • City Cycling Basics & Bonus E-Bike Tips and activities. • Improve skills, confidence & safety when biking in urban settings. New safety tips for e-bike riders • Online Class • 6-7PM (r) = Registration required

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MAMA LIDIA’S LEGACY: “Our purpose is for our family to keep traditions,” said Silvia Franco-Comer, whose mother’s recipes live on in reimagined form in Casa de Comer’s Smokin’ Good Salsas.

CASA DE COMER’S

FOOD & DRINK

Smoking Salsas Sean and Silvia Comer Craft Fresh Salsas in Goleta BY MATT KETTMANN

T

he California story is syncretized in the origins

of Casa de Comer salsa, in which an immigrant woman from Tepatitlán, Jalisco, named Mama Lidia teaches traditional Mexican recipes to her new son-in-law, a white man of Irish descent raised in the San Fernando Valley. He can barely handle the heat, but enjoys the process of charring tomatillos and chili peppers on the comal and combining all of the ingredients into a condiment that’s used on everything from eggs at breakfast to chips ’n’ salsa at lunch to marinade for chicken dinner. But given his knowledge of grilling tri-tip Santa Maria–style over red oak in that classic Central Coast way, the son-in-law brings his own flavor to the party. He figures out how to naturally impart those smoky essences into the salsas, and Casa de Comer’s Smokin’ Good Salsas are born. The name plays on the word “comer,” which means “to eat” in Spanish, but it’s really just the last name of founders Sean Comer and Silvia Franco-Comer, the daughter of Mama Lidia, who passed away a decade ago before seeing her reimagined recipes in official action. “Our purpose is for our family to keep traditions,” said Silvia, who is the mother of four kids, ages 3 to 12, all of whom she’s homeschooling during the pandemic. “Quality time with our family usually revolves around food,” she explained, to which Sean quickly added, “We’re always at the dinner table.” “The salsa is part of that,” continued Silvia, who believes the smoke element fires up memories of campfires and family barbecues. “When people try it, they have reminiscences of their childhoods.” The couple met in Santa Barbara, where Silvia had come to study at UCSB in the late 1990s and

Sean had moved to take care of his grandfather while working in the restaurant business. His jobs at Starbucks, Anchor Woodfire Kitchen, and various catering gigs led to the creation of a food truck called Street Level Café in 2012. It didn’t last long — the food-truck craze was short-lived in Santa Barbara due to lack of volume and unfriendly regulations — but the truck is where Comer perfected his tri-tip and tested out other ideas. “That’s where we validated the salsa,” said Silvia. Fast-forward to 2018, and Casa de Comer’s fresh salsas are being sold at about 10 markets around Santa Barbara, including Tri-County Produce, Gladden & Sons, and I.V. Food Co-op. Then, in August 2019, as part of Silvia’s enrollment in SBCC’s Scheinfeld Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation, they participated in a pitch competition — and won. Gelson’s agreed to stock Casa de Comer in all 27 of its Southern California grocery stores, tripling demand overnight. “We weren’t ready for it, but we were able to hustle and scale from 10 stores to 40 stores,” said Silvia. They bought new equipment for their commercial kitchen on Aero Camino near the airport in Goleta and signed a distribution deal, and their product landed on those new shelves within two months. Most proudly, they didn’t change the ingredients or small-batch process despite the growth. Though other ideas are in the works, Casa de Comer currently produces three flavors, which usually cost $6.99 for a 12-ounce tub. There’s the original, Signature Red, which they describe as bold and rich. “The vegetables are filling, so people feel like that can have a meal of chips and salsa,” said Silvia. “It’s fulfilling.” The tomatillo-based Golden Green zips with a citrus character, and the Salsa Taquera Ahumada

packs the most kick. “It’s hot, but you can’t stop eating it once you start,” said Silvia. “You start to feel your nose running.” All three show the smoke influence in varying degrees, but that doesn’t come from the use of liquid smoke, a curious ingredient often used in barbecue sauces. “It’s 100 percent natural,” said Silvia, who gets the liquid-smoke question a lot. Though the pandemic presented the usual trials and tribulations for the young company, it seemed to trigger even more growth, as new customers found the salsas when other products were missing from the shelves. They’re facing some growing pains right now, needing more space and equipment to meet increased demands. “The stores are asking us,” said Sean. “They want new products.” As the name implies, Casa de Comer is a full-family affair, with their four kids pitching in to husk tomatillos at the crack of dawn, wash hundreds of pounds of vegetables, package salsas, and serve as the faces of the brand on social media. “Instead of a lemonade stand, they had a salsa stand,” laughed Silvia, whose son Jude also started his own company, Hammer Head Hand Planes. “It’s taught them this amazing work ethic,” said Sean. “And we get to spend time with them, too, which is really awesome.” There’s plenty more to do before Casa de Comer becomes a household item across California, but the Comers already feel like a success. “I honestly can say we’re proud of this,” said Sean. “Time is meaningful, and this gives us purpose,” said Silvia. “It’s okay to work hard because you feel satisfied at the end.” n See casadecomerfoods.com.

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Diving into S.L.O. County WINE HISTORY

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FOOD & DRINK

TARANA BURKE

M

ost people don’t know how

special we are,” explains Libbie Agran, co-author with Heather Muran of the new book San Luis Obispo County Wine: A World-Class History. “I wanted people to realize there had been a long history of very talented people here, because Prohibition didn’t destroy our wine industry,” she said, pointing to the many pioneer families who still have ties to the region today. “We have a consistency that most counties don’t have.” The 190-page paperback — which is broken into numerous short but detailed chapters that go from the 1700s to today and are full of archival photographs — is the culmination of years of research that began when Agran founded the Wine History Project of San Luis Obispo County in 2015. She met weekly with vintners and other experts in the region’s agricultural history for a year; compiled a list of 202 significant people, places, milestones, and events; and worked for two years on a timeline. “There was an interesting story to tell, and I was surprised that no one had written it, except in fragments,” said Agran. “We had to figure out who had shaped the history and what their footprints were.” Muran, the former director of the S.L.O. Coast Wine Collective, came onboard in 2018 to help with the histories of South County hotspots such as Edna Valley and Arroyo Grande. “It’s like detective work,” said Muran, a San Diego State journalism grad whose dad was a detective for the LAPD. “As you start to unravel one story, you just keep going down rabbit holes. BY MATT It’s hard to stay focused, KETTMA NN because there are so many ways you can go.” Agran sees the book as the first in a series — she’s working on one about the county’s more than four dozen wine-grape varieties right now — and it’s really just a sliver of what the Wine History Project is up to. The nonprofit is producing and/or promoting a number of documentaries both short and long, showcasing the impacts of the Dusi family, Tom Myers of Castoro Cellars, and Tobin James, among others, now available to see for free on their website.

BOT & BATRLES RELS

Their office in downtown San Luis Obispo is home to a library of 500-plus books, plenty of tools, old labels, and wine bottles, as well as a growing digital archive that will one day be open to the public. (It’s actually open by appointment already.) In addition to roving displays at tasting rooms around the county, the project is also curating a rotating exhibit about wine history inside the prominent brick building of the Paso Robles Historical Society, located in that city’s central park. “She’s really done a dynamic job of promoting the region’s history,” said Muran. “It’s coming full circle, being able to tie that knot between the past and the present.” Agran believes her work can also have impact for the county’s modern wine industry, which is really split between those north of the Cuesta Grade in Paso Robles and those to the south in the Edna and Arroyo Grande valleys. “There was more communication between these two extremes of distance than there is today,” she said. “I hope I can help rebuild those connections.” She’s not planning to stop anytime soon. “There are a lot of stories to tell,” she said. “We would love to tell many more.” n See winehistoryproject.org.


Dine Out

THE WINGMAN Takes Flight

Andersen’s Danish Restaurant & Bakery. Menu available for curbside or walk-up pickup. For dining in, order inside and we’ll bring you everything you need at an outside table. Open Daily 10am-6pm, closed Tuesday. Breakfast served until 2pm, Lunch & Dinner 12- Close. We also deliver through restaurant connection. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm | Sunday Prix-Fixe 5 - 7:30 pm

FOOD & DRINK

he Restaurant Gal and I just enjoyed Thai Peanut and Lemon Pepper Rub wings at the new Wingman Rodeo in Old Town Goleta, which recently opened at 5892 Hollister Avenue in the former location of Gimeal Café and The Natural Café. The original Wingman opened in March 2020 at 730 North Milpas Street, sharing space with The Shop Kitchen. Owner Dudley Michael tells me that locations in Ven- OLD TOWN CHICKEN JOINT: Wingman Rodeo just opened in Old Town Goleta, serving chicken tura and Santa Maria are wings and much more. planned. The $1.50 wings feature Pineapple Bourbon, LA SIRENA LAWSUIT: Reader SB4Ever emailed me Cali BBQ, Thai Peanut, Rodeo Parmesan, Korean wondering if the extended delay of the openBBQ, Buffalo, Strawberry Árbol, Atomic Buf- ing of the La Sirena restaurant at the Cabrillo falo, Lemon Pepper Rub, Chipotle Lime Rub, and Pavilion, in the space formerly occupied by the Sichuan Tingly Run flavors, with $1 dips of blue East Beach Grill, is in any way related to a lawcheese, ranch, honey mustard, and Rodeo Parme- suit filed last month against the eatery’s owner san available. A variety of sandwiches, burritos, Doug Cavanaugh. The city’s Parks & Recreation Department says the building is ready; it’s just salads, and sides are also available. This is the third wing-themed eatery to open waiting for the pandemic to be over. on the South Coast in the last year. Wingstop In January 2019, the Santa Barbara City opened at 3849 State Street last February, while Council approved a 10-year contract with CavaWing Drop opened behind 436 State Street last naugh’s company, The Beachcomber at Crystal Cove in Orange County, which will pay Santa June. Barbara over $216,000 in annual rent. CAFÉ STELLA REOPENING: Le Café Stella at 3302 The complaint, which seeks $35 million in McCaw Avenue resumed dinner service on April damages, alleges that Cavanaugh and Ralph 28, with limited seating to start due to social dis- Kosmides, owners and former officers of Ruby’s tancing. Reservations are available via OpenTable Diner, Inc., drove the chain into bankruptcy and their website (lecafestella.com). “We can’t wait in August 2018 while developing The Beachto welcome you back with an upgraded concept comber and The Shake Shack restaurants in focusing on traditional French cuisine,” said Crystal Cove. owner Philippe Rousseau. A reader posted that Budi Kazali’s name was attached to the lease as well, and I have heard STARBUCKS FOR DLV: Reader Oxmyx inquired that he will be the chef, whenever it opens. about new fencing around the building at 3052 De la Vina Street, the former home of Coffee Bean & RECENT CLOSURES: Here is a list of area eateries that Tea Leaf that closed last July. Fortunately reader have permanently closed in the last six months. Leon quickly followed up with an answer: a new February 2021: Hibachi Steak House & Sushi Bar, Starbucks is on the way, quoting a recent Archi- 500 State St.; Malibu Farm at Miramar, 1759 S. Jameson Ln., Montecito (now The Revere tectural Board of Review agenda. Room); South Coast Deli, 6521 Pardall Rd., Isla BYE TO I.V. SOUTH COAST: After Reader Josh inquired Vista about the status of the South Coast Deli at 6521 January 2021: Beachside Bar-Café, 5905 Sandspit Pardall Road in Isla Vista that opened in October Rd., Goleta; Noemi Pizza Romana, 3534 State St. 2011, I was told that the eatery closed permanently (now South Coast Deli); Panera Bread, 3851 State a couple of months ago. The small chain still has St.; Yanni’s at Mackenzie Market, 3102 State St. four other locations, including the brand-new December 2020: Chocolats du CaliBressan, 1114 San Roque spot restaurant at 3534 State Street. State St.; Dunkin’ Donuts, 3771 State St.; Jeannine’s Bakery, 15 E. Figueroa St. CAJUN KITCHEN NOW BIKE SHOP: After Reader Aug November 2020: Neighbor Tim’s BBQ, Food Truck asked what was up with the balloons in front October 2020: Olio Crudo Bar, 11 W. Victoria St. of the old Cajun Kitchen on De la Vina street, (now Olio Bottega) Reader Erin announced that she and her hus- September 2020: Lucky Dragon, 6831 Hollister band, a longtime bike mechanic, opened a bike Ave., Goleta; Paradise Café, 702 Anacapa St. shop/repair/retail space called Boom Boom Bike (now La Paloma Café); Silvergreens, 900 EmbarRoom. They also own the barbershop next door. cadero del Mar, Isla Vista (now Kyle’s Kitchen)

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THE MANY FACES OF BRAIN INJURY IN THE SANTA BARBARA COMMUNITY

th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020

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Jodi House is the only nonprofit organization in Santa Barbara County that is solely to supporting brain injury survivors in their continued Join dedicated us for a gala evening recovery and rehabilitation. honoring Saraongoing Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

AMERICAN MASTERS

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Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

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A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

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RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

Santa Barbara Beautiful Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit

SLEEPING BEAUTY KEEPING Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

DAVID BAZEMORE

group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces Change a Child’s Story SBCASA.ORG a custom four-page insert specific to the Good Work Lives On individual agency's needs. The insert is published We are and distributed in the Santa Barbara Change a Child’s Story SBCASA.ORG SHINING A Independent, with the cost underwritten by LIGHT IN OUR Hutton Parker Foundation. COMMUNITY

FOR 55 YEARS

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th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary l a sterling year of performances & events Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

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“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.”

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

“My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Rachel, Age 17

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

The GranadaTheatre

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

statestreetballet.com

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

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RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES YMCA 105 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805.569.1103 • ciymca.org/youthandfamilyservices

Find out more about this opportunity e! boost erto is H n o as your organization's marketing y Se efforts, promote Bab your good works, and tell your story to a wider INSPIRING ALL GIRLS TO BE STRONG, SMART, AND BOLD ere! audience. is H

Youth and Family Services YMCA operates four core programs that provide a continuum of care to underserved at-risk youth. Youth, young adults, and families that participate in our programs experience greater safety and well-being while they develop skills and lasting relationships to improve their resilience and build a successful, independent future.

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

St. George Youth Center provides critical family, community and afterschool programming to keep youth away from high-risk behaviors.

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

My Home continues the care for youth as they become young adults but still need critical support services as they pursue educational or employment opportunities.

SLEEPING BEAUTY Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre DAVID BAZEMORE

A CONTINUUM OF CARE

Street Outreach Services provide on the street assistance to youth and young adults who find themselves living on the streets or being at-risk of homelessness.

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THANK YOU SPONSORS

Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

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AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

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Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Casa del Herrero Media Grant application. educated independent.

The GranadaTheatre Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

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For reservations, call 805 845 1432

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Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up healthy,

Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on notion that we are, for better or for worse, different peop different places  places — and — and on the conviction that it is architect task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Bo

Noah’s Anchorage is a safe haven for at-risk and homeless youth and provides programs to end the cycle of homelessness.

th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary l a sterling year of performances & events

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

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Stay up to date on everything the SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT is doing beyond our pages.

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.” Rachel, Age 17

Change a Child’s Story

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Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on the notion that we are, for better or for worse, different people in different places — and on the conviction that it is architecture’s task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Botton

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

THE I IS AN OTHER SHANA MOULTON’S ART OF THE ALTER EGO

A

rtists have long known the usefulness of having an alter ego, someone who, while they may occupy the same body as you, can manifest impulses that you prefer not to own in propria persona. Musicians love them — think of Ziggy Stardust, Sasha Fierce, Slim Shady, and Hannah Montana — and so HER SELVES: “Tower 1” by Shana Moulton do some visual artists. For example, there’s Shana Moulton, a pink tower. Over the course of the installawho just opened a show called The Invisible tion’s six-and-half-minute loop, we see video Seventh Is the Mystic Column at the Museum of Cynthia negotiating a stone labyrinth on of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara. Her the UCSB campus, pricking her finger on a character Cynthia (just Cynthia) has been pink spinning wheel, and ascending via the around since 2002, when Moulton began expanding legs of an adjustable desk through producing videos, installations, and per- the levels of the screens as though they were formances starring this solitary, wellness- one continuous space. This multi-monitor obsessed, mystical version of herself. In a magic trick proves something about Cynseries of videos named Whispering Pines thia that’s important to the whole enterprise: after the senior living mobile home park She’s real, or at least fictional in a way that in Northern California where she grew up, transcends the boundaries of any individual and in ancillary projects and installations, frame that tries to hold her. Through extenMoulton has elaborated an increasingly sive deployment of green-screen technolcomplex, fantastic, and evolving universe ogy, Cynthia flies through space and time, an where Cynthia performs a wide range of Alice in Wonderland figure whose gestures activities in pursuit of some elusive goal of echo those of Charlie Chaplin and Buster transcendence. It’s a brightly colored world Keaton. full of surprises that’s at once parallel to our In the large central piece, 2021’s “The own and distinctively out of kilter. Invisible Seventh Is the Mystic Column,” The show at MCASB contains just four video of Cynthia is projected on multiple surworks, but within these multimedia pieces, faces while some of the objects in the videos visitors will find material for hours of rapt are arranged on either side of a freestanding contemplation. To the left as one enters the wall. As Cynthia works out with an isometspace, there’s “The Pink Tower V2,” a stack of ric band device or does breathing exercises, traditional flat screens housed in (what else?) background projections of mountains and

lakes alternate with geometric and matrix-like shapes. Cynthia’s eccentric activities in “The Invisible Seventh” follow a general pattern: They start out purposeful and relatively familiar, then get progressively more resistant and weird. The isometrics give way to twirling the rubber band device, and the breathing exercises cause her to absorb the knickknacks that occupy her home shelves into her body, eventually requiring an operation that’s playfully made to resemble the old battery-powered children’s game of that name. “Whispering Pines 10,” the longer video installation in a side room, is the show’s most ambitious work. At a little over 35 minutes, it’s a mini-opera with original music by Moulton’s collaborator Nick Hallett. Based in an oblique way on the famed redwood-tree sitter Julia “Butterfly” Hill, it’s a sprawling investigation of consciousness, spirituality, and the mystical effects of smearing your entire body with peanut butter. Like everything in Cynthia’s fascinating universe, “Whispering Pines 10” overflows with portents of some apocalyptic transformation, yet when she’s eventually devoured by birds (they’re attracted to the peanut butter), you get the feeling that she won’t be gone for long. This show is an outstanding example of the kind of thing that MCA Santa Barbara does best, and it’s a matter for rejoicing that the gallery is open again for in-person visits. —Charles Donelan

L I F E PAGE 53 POETRY MATTERS

(America Never Was America to Me), by Rick Benjamin

a riff-off of Langston Hughes but it was to you? & him, too? Who am I to say what was, wasn’t, or, for that matter what is or isn’t true? I will say nothing’s new, that freedom’s just for a chosen few, also that it won’t do, this promise long past due, & so many singing the blues, bop, Bach & Bessie too. You, me, then America will be.

UNTOLD: WESTMONT GRADUATE EXHIBITION Walking into the actual, ever-inviting art haven of the Westmont RidleyTree Museum of Art recently to behold Untold: Westmont Graduate Exhibition — my first step into a museum in a year and a month — was akin to visiting a friend after a lengthy illness: a warm sense of homecoming uneasily mixed with innate wariness. Reminders of pandemic nervousness entered the picture quickly through fine realist portraits by Madeline Lush that chronicle ostensibly “normal” student life on campus — but with masks attached, natch. Deeper into the museum, amid a healthy diversity of voices and media, Daniel Staples’s graphic comic-style narrative deals with the historical mythology of the “Plague Doctor,” renewed and retooled for current COVID-19 realities. Last year’s student show had to go virtual, whereas this year’s event, though limited, enjoys living in the material world. That “real space” factor makes a difference, especially with sculpture. Corban Bañez’s canny, money-themed blend of ceramics, plaster, and found objects and Caroline

Wyckoff’s installation of sculpted hands, from open to clenched, embedded in plants and nails both benefited from being seen in person. Emily Bark’s “Daily Rites” screen prints celebrate surfing, as culture and as meditative practice, while Evelyn Thoen’s screen prints crossstitch memories and impressions of her time spent in Cairo. Sophia Gutierrez’s mixed-media collages nod to the influence of graffiti, but with subtle washes and poetic vapor intact. Imagery varies greatly in the show, from Rachel Elliott’s mystical, hermetic oil portraits of endangered species to Charlotte Westburg’s Prismacolor odes to everyday tools. Valerie Angulo’s “And Then It Was Good” offers a

COURAGE OF ART: Panel five from the series “And Then It Was Good” by Valerie Angulo INDEPENDENT.COM

metaphorical tableau in seven panels dealing with her trauma following a rape in Bali. Other works capitalize on the museum space. Elisabeth Lee’s digitally printed banners allude to “spiritual warfare imagery” in the Hebrew Bible, and Sharon Ko’s “The Undoing” fills a wall with video, photography, objects, and personae. Jared Clarke’s gentle tune “Footsteps” wafts through the museum as the soundtrack to Ceci Amboy’s simple tale of self-searching, rendered in painstaking stopmotion animation. Great to be back, in an actual, art-packed “somewhere.” —Josef Woodard

APRIL 29, 2021

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny CANCER

ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Poet Allen Ginsberg despairingly

noted that many people want MORE MORE MORE LIFE, but they go awry because they allow their desire for MORE MORE MORE LIFE to fixate on material things— machines, possessions, gizmos, and status symbols. Ginsberg revered different kinds of longings: for good feelings, meaningful experiences, soulful breakthroughs, deep awareness, and all kinds of love. In accordance with astrological potentials, Aries, I’m giving you the go-ahead in the coming weeks to be extra greedy for the stuff in the second category.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): In her poem “Mirror,” Taurus poet

Halina Poświatowska wrote, “I am dazed by the beauty of my body.” I applaud her brazen admiration and love for her most valuable possession. I wish more of us could genuinely feel that same adoration for our own bodies. And in accordance with current astrological omens, I recommend that you do indeed find a way to do just that right now. It’s time to upgrade your excitement about being in such a magnificent vessel. Even if it’s not in perfect health, it performs amazing marvels every minute of every day. I hope you will boost your appreciation for its miraculous capacities, and increase your commitment to treating it as the treasure that it is.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini poet Buddy Wakefield writes

that after the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami of 2004, “the only structure still standing in the wipedout village of Malacca [in Malaysia] was a statue of Mahatma Gandhi. I wanna be able to stand like that.” I expect you will indeed enjoy that kind of stability and stamina in the coming weeks, my dear. You won’t have to endure a metaphorical tsunami, thank Goddess, but you may have to stand strong through a blustery brouhaha or swirling turbulence. Here’s a tip: The best approach is not to be stiff and unmoving like a statue, but rather flexible and willing to sway.

(June 21-July 22): No educator had ever offered a class

in psychology until trailblazing philosopher William James did so in 1875. He knew a lot about human behavior. “Most people live in a very restricted circle of their potential being,” he wrote. “They make use of a very small portion of their possible consciousness, and of their soul’s resources in general, much like a person who, out of his whole bodily organism, should get into a habit of using only his little finger.” I’m going to make an extravagant prediction here: I expect that in the coming months, you will be better primed than ever before to expand your access to your consciousness, your resources, and your potentials. How might you begin such an adventure? The first thing to do is to set a vivid intention to do just that.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Someone in me is suffering and struggling toward freedom,” wrote Greek author Nikos Kazantzakis. To that melodramatic announcement, I reply, good for him! I’m glad he was willing to put himself through misery and despair in order to escape misery and despair. But I also think it’s important to note that there are other viable approaches to the quest for liberation. For example, having lavish fun and enjoying oneself profoundly can be tremendously effective in that holy work. I suspect that in the coming weeks, Leo, the latter approach will accomplish far more for you than the former.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo novelist Agatha Christie

sold hundreds of millions of books and is history’s most-translated author. While growing up, she had few other kids to associate with, so she created a host of imaginary friends to fill the void. They eventually became key players in her work as an author, helping her dream up stories. More than that: She simply loved having those invisible characters around to keep her company. Even in her old age, she still consorted with them. I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because

now is a great time to acquire new imaginary friends or resurrect old ones. Guardian angels and ancestral spirits would be good to call on, as well. How might they be of assistance and inspiration to you?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “To hurry pain is to leave a classroom

still in session,” notes Libran aphorist Yahia Lababidi. On the other hand, he observes, “To prolong pain is to miss the next lesson.” If he’s correct, the goal is to dwell with your pain for just the right amount of time—until you’ve learned its lessons and figured out how not to experience it again in the future—but no longer than that. I suspect that such a turning point will soon be arriving for you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In her poem “Every Day,” Scorpio

poet Denise Levertov wrote, “Every day, every day I hear enough to fill a year of nights with wondering.” I think that captures the expansive truth of your life in the coming weeks. You’ve entered a phase when the sheer abundance of interesting input may at times be overwhelming, though enriching. You’ll hear—and hopefully be receptive to—lots of provocative stories, dynamic revelations, and unexpected truths. Be grateful for this bounty! Use it to transform whatever might be stuck, whatever needs a catalytic nudge.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I hope you’re not too stressed these

days. There has been pressure on you to adjust more than maybe you’d like to adjust, and I hope you’ve managed to find some relaxing slack amid the heaviness. But even if the inconvenience levels are deeper than you like, I have good news: It’s all in a good cause. Read the wise words of author Dan Millman, who describes the process you’re midway through: “Every positive change, every jump to a higher level of energy and awareness, involves a rite of passage. Each time we ascend to a higher rung on the ladder of personal evolution, we must go through a period of discomfort, of initiation. I have never found an exception.”

WEEK OF APRIL 29 CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): We can safely say that Anaïs Nin

was a connoisseur of eros and sensuality. The evidence includes her three collections of erotic writing, Delta of Venus, Little Birds, and Auletris. Here’s one of her definitive statements on the subject: “Sex must be mixed with tears, laughter, words, promises, jealousy, envy, all the spices of fear, foreign travel, new faces, stories, dreams, fantasies, music.” In response to Nin’s litany, I’m inclined to say, “Damn, that’s a lot of ambiance and scaffolding to have in place. Must it always be so complicated?” According to my reading of upcoming cosmic rhythms, you won’t need such a big array of stuff in your quest for soulful orgasms—at least not in the coming weeks. Your instinct for rapture will be finely tuned.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “One is always at home in one’s past,” wrote author Vladimir Nabokov. I agree. Sometimes that’s not a good thing, though. It may lead us to flee from the challenges of the present moment and go hide and cower and wallow in nostalgia. But on other occasions, the fact that we are always at home in the past might generate brilliant healing strategies. It might rouse in us a wise determination to refresh our spirit by basking in the deep solace of feeling utterly at home. I think the latter case is likely to be true for you in the coming weeks, Aquarius.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): “Not everything is supposed to

become something beautiful and long-lasting,” writes author Emery Allen. “Not everyone is going to stay forever.” Her message is a good one for you to keep in mind right now. You’re in a phase when transitory boosts and temporary help may be exactly what you need most. I suspect your main task in the coming weeks is to get maximum benefit from influences that are just passing through your life. The catalysts that work best could be those that work only once and then disappear.

HOMEWORK: Write an essay on “What I Swear I’ll Never Do Again as Long as I Live — Unless I Can Get Away with It Next Time.” FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

s d a garre ! d ra

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DOMESTIC CARS CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! 2002 and Newer! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! Free To w i n g ! W e ’ r e N a t i o n w i d e ! Call Now: 1‑888‑416‑2330. D O N AT E YOUR CAR, B O AT O R R V t o r e c e i v e a major tax deduction. Help homeless pets. Local, IRS Recognized. To p Va l u e Guaranteed. Free Estimate and Pickup. LAPETSALIVE. ORG 1‑833‑772‑2632 (Cal‑SCAN)

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THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 29, 2021

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: NOTOWN TAV E R N at 5114 Hollister Avenue Santa Barbara. CA 93111; Liquid Essentials LLC 2785 Painted Cave Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: J i l l Tu c k e r, M a n a g i n g Member County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000748. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are d o i n g b u s i n e s s a s : C R E AT E ORDER TILE at 228 North Street Lompoc, CA 93436; Karis E. Clinton (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000860. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHUCK WAGON WINES, CIRCA 5 5 C E L L A R S , H E R I TA G E RANCH CELLARS, M I M I C RY W I N E S , PA R A EL ALMA WINES, SADDLE RANCH CELLARS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Te r r a v a n t W i n e C o m p a n y, L L C ( s a m e address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000718. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SLO CURIO at 1117 1/2 Olive St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jeeyon Roslie (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000888. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: LUQUE TRANSPORT at 4413 Hacienda Dr Guadalupe, C A 9 3 4 3 4 ; M a r t i n J r. Luque (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000827. April 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JERROCA at 588 Mills Way Goleta, CA 93117; Charuwan M Pichardo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000903. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: M R . D E W D A B a t 9 4 8 W. Chestnut Ave Apt D Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Meesha Rose (same address) Lafa Jones (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000951. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: OA C O N S U LT I N G at 4551 Brighton Place Santa Maria, CA 93455; Susan E Gibbons (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000867. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ARCADIAN WINERY at 300 Central Avenue #6 Lompoc, CA 93427; Joseph Davis (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed:Joseph Davis County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 5 . F B N Number: 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CALIFORNIA VINS at 4390 Calle Real #A Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Lorraine Cole 843 Portesuello Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by Lori Cole a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000700. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ORG‑GARDEN LANDSCAPE at 5832 Mandarin Dr Apt C Goleta, CA 93117; Benedicto Cuevas (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000681. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: M E T R O P O L I TA N GANSTER at 27 West Anapamu St, #265 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jonathan P Holmes (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000893. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SOLEIL RESIDENTIAL at 5387 Paseo Cameo Santa B a r b a r a . C A 9 3 1 1 1 ; Tr a c e y Messner (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Tr a c e y M e s s n e r , O w n e r County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 9 5 3 . F B N Number: 2021‑0000851. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: STEPPING STONES C O N S U LTA N T S a t 7 5 8 V i a Miguel Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Michiel A De Bruin (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Michiel A De Bruin County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 5 . F B N Number: 2021‑0000978. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: AMPLIFY WINES at 2320 T h o m p s o n W a y, S t e F S a n t a Maria, CA 93455; Cameron Michael Porter (Same Address) and Marlen Sosa Porter (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Married Couple Signed: M a r l e n P o r t e r, C o ‑ O w n e r County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 2 4 . F B N Number: 2021‑0000847. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LITTLE LADY B U T T E R F LY at 1436 Santa Fe Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Valerie A Selvaggio (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Valerie Selvaggio County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) b y. E 3 5 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001010. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THOUGHTBOX PHOTO BOOTH at 4545 Atascadero Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Jacob Pighetti (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual S i g n e d : J a c o b Pighetti County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) b y. E 9 5 3 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ADOBE PET HOSPITAL at 3230 State Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Mission City Veterinary Hospital, Inc (Same Address) T h i s b u s i n e s s is conducted by An Corporation Signed:Evelyn Brand County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) b y. E 3 5 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0000880. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACROAMATICS TELEMETRY SYSTEMS at 7230 Hollister Ave #100 Goleta, CA 93117; Acroamatics, Inc (same address) T h i s b u s i n e s s is conducted by An Corporation S i g n e d : Te r r i L D i d i o n County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001107. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MAS ALLA WINES at 84 I n d u s t r i a l W a y, U n i t C Buellton, CA 93427; Bravo West Wines LLC 400 Adena St Pasadena, CA 91104 This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company S i g n e d : C l e o D e L a To r r e County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 5 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001035. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: S A N TA B A R B A R A T O U R S & E X P E R I E N C E S , S A N TA BARBARA PA R A N O R M A L EXPERIENCES at 1501 Santa Barbara St ., Apt C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Joseph S Soltis, III (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Joseph S. Soltis, III County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 9 5 6 . F B N Number: 2021‑0001049. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WILD SPELLCRAFT at 115 W Gutierrez St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Payge A Bellini (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Payge Bellini County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 2 4 . FBN Number: 2021‑0001076. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BABYSITPRO LLC at 1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 1‑440 Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Babysitpro LLC (same address) (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed:Austin Jessie Davidson County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 5 . F B N Number: 2021‑0001098. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/ a r e d o i n g b u s i n e s s a s : AT P EXPRESS at 241 San Nicolas Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 9 3 1 0 9 ; A l e x i s F Ta v e r a P o n s (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual S i g n e d : A l e x i x F. Ta v e r a Pons County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 5 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001094. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

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PHONE 965-5205

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONTINUED)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: S T R AT O S U S A , S T R AT O S at 381 Wyola Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; M i c h a e l T. M e t e ( s a m e address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Michael Mete County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) b y. E 3 5 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001110. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAD & VIN at 1576 Mission Drive Solvang, CA 93463; 1576 Mission Drive, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: James P. K n e l l C o u n t y C l e r k o f S a nta Barbara County on Apr 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 0 . F B N Number: 2021‑0001186. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/are d o i n g b u s i n e s s a s : Y O Y I TA at 7624 Hollister Ave #328 Goleta, CA 93117; Gloria Y Almanza (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Gloria Y Almanza County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 9 5 3 . F B N Number: 2021‑0001093. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g p e r s o n ( s ) i s / a re d o i n g b u s i n e s s as: TECHWISELITTLES at 653 Ve rd e M a r D r i v e . , U n i t B S a n t a Barbara, CA 93103; Jennifer L . S . B o c h s l e r 7 4 6 To r o Canyon Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108 This business is conducted by An General Partnership Signed: Kay De Ve e r U l a n c h C o u n t y C l e r k of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2021. This statement e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. E 2 4 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001077. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: NIKKI’S SALON a t 1 3 0 S H o p e Av e , S u i t e 1 0 8 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tw o M o o n s , I n c . , A C a l i f o r n i a Corporation 810 Puente Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Nicole Reden County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2021. This statement e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e d a t e i t w a s f i l e d i n t h e O ff i c e of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. E 2 4 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001016. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRUSH B A R & TA P, C R U S H C A K E S BAR at 1315 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Crshfoods Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by An Copartners Signed: Shannon M Gaston County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 0 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001176. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE MEDICINE OF YUM at 315 Meigs Road, Suite A‑194 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Empowering Health, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed: Erin Presant County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. E 9 5 6 . F B N Number: 2021‑0001107. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LANSPEED at 597 Avenue of The Flags, Suite 103 B u e l l t o n , C A 9 3 4 2 7 ; R e d Ta i l Networks, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed: Christopher Chirgwin County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. E 3 5 . F B N N u m b e r : 2021‑0001031. Apr 29, May 06, 13, 20 2021.

INVITATION FOR BIDS

01‑NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS CALLING FOR BIDS 1.OWNER: Montecito Union School District 2 . P R O J E C T I D E N T I F I C AT I O N NAME: 2021‑1 Electrical Panel Relocation 3 . P R O J E C T L O C AT I O N : 3 8 5 San Ysidro Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108 PROJECT DESCRIPTION: â¢Provide infrastructure for

Southern California Edison service upgrade â¢Provide new main service and concrete pad â¢Coordinate installation with photovoltaic project equipment (separate contract, concurrent) â¢Decommission old main service and pad â¢Provide electrical connection to south property â¢This project is anticipated to start on approximately June 8, 2021 and is anticipated to be completed by July 27, 2021 5.BID DEADLINE: Bids are due on May 19, 2021 not later than 2:00 p.m. 6.PLACE AND METHOD OF B I D R E C E I P T: A l l B i d s m u s t b e s e a l e d . P e r s o n a l d e l i v e r y, c o u r i e r, o r m a i l e d v i a U n i t e d States Postal Service and addressed to Montecito Union School District, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa B a r b a r a , C A 9 3 1 0 8 . AT T N : Virginia Alvarez

Tide Guide Day

High

Sunrise 6:06 Sunset 7:45

Low

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Thu 29

6:20 am -1.1

1:01 pm 3.6

5:27 pm 2.1

11:52 pm 6.0

Fri 30

7:20 am -0.9

2:20 pm 3.4

6:13 pm 2.6 7:18 pm 2.9

Sat 1

12:43 am 5.7

8:27 am -0.7

3:56 pm 3.4

Sun 2

1:46 am 5.2

9:41 am -0.5

5:29 pm 3.6

9:12 pm 3.1

Mon 3

3:08 am 4.7

10:55 am -0.2

6:30 pm 3.9

11:19 pm 2.9

Tue 4

4:40 am 4.4

11:58 am -0.1

7:11 pm 4.2

Wed 5

12:39 am 2.4

6:01 am 4.3

12:49 pm 0.1

7:43 pm 4.5

Thu 6

1:33 am 1.8

7:06 am 4.2

1:29 pm 0.3

8:10 pm 4.8

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11 D

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26 D source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Re:Re:Re:” -- better than a long email thread.

7.PLACE PLANS ARE ON FILE: Montecito Union School District, Business D e p a r t m e n t , S e c o n d F l o o r, 385 San Ysidro Road, Santa B a r b a r a , C A 9 3 1 0 8 , w w w. tricoblue.com 8 . A LT E R N AT E S : I f a l t e r n a t e b i d s a r e c a l l e d f o r, t h e contract will be awarded to the lowest bid price on the base contract without consideration of the prices on the additive or deductive items. 9 . M A N D AT O RY JOB WA L K : M e e t a t M o n t e c i t o Union School Front Office by the stairs, on May 10, 2021 at 10 a.m.. Attendance at the entire job walk is mandatory and failure to attend the entire job walk may result in your bid being rejected as non‑responsive. Contact OWNER for details on required job walks and related documentation.

61 Cooking acronym 62 Barbera’s animation 1 Harry’s partner in crime in partner “Home Alone” 63 “The Joy of Cooking” 5 Draw forth author Rombauer 10 Fledgling’s home 64 “Oh, drat” 14 “Scratch a lover and find 65 Prodded, with “on” ___”: Dorothy Parker 66 Barbecue leftovers? 15 Ephron and Dunn, for two 67 Dark gemstone 16 Italian city known for 68 “___ lift?” sparkling wines 69 Prince hit of 1986 17 “The Avengers” star Diana 18 Bed covering 1 Soft Cell lead singer 19 Sandcastle shaper Almond 20 Late-night monster movie, 2 Glowing maybe 3 Seth of “Future Man” 23 Existential boredom 4 Aquafaba users, e.g. 24 Institute in “Contact” and 5 Controversial “National” “The X-Files” tabloid that had a TV show 25 Throw out in 1999 28 Deadly snakes 6 Gloomy 32 Dollar divs. 7 Michael of “Ugly Betty” or 35 Paparazzi subject Brendon of Panic! at the 37 Lake source of the Disco Niagara River 8 ___ liver (butcher shop option) 38 Reason for a dashboard 9 Appreciation warning light 10 Afternoon breaks of a sort 42 Idaho’s neighbor 11 Genesis twin 43 “Okay, so I was wrong” 12 Recipe directive 44 Cartoonist Rall 13 Do some floor work 45 Nursery rhyme loser of 21 “Stanley ___: Searching sheep for Italy” 48 Poopdeck ___ (Popeye’s 22 ___ standstill dad) 50 Tournament exemptions 26 Hoppy drinks 27 Energize 52 Fish wrap spread 29 Aftershave brand 55 Places designated for 30 Ending for million or billion biking, camping, etc. 31 Bit of bird food

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APRIL 29, 29, 2021 2021 APRIL

32 Multi-level sandwich 33 Group that got the geography of Africa wrong 34 Trade 36 California’s La ___ Tar Pits 39 Where hip-hop originated 40 Savory turnover 41 Antique photo tone 46 Pupil’s place 47 Female fowl that doesn’t have that ornate tail 49 His skull is held in “Hamlet” 51 Play place? 53 Poet Jones (aka Amiri Baraka) 54 Feet for poets 55 Overhaul 56 Longtime Indiana senator Bayh 57 Booker in the Senate 58 “Natural Affection” playwright William 59 Linear, for short 60 Insolence ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1029

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

57 57


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

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It shall be mandatory upon the contractor to whom the contract is awarded (CONTRACTOR), and upon any SUBCONTRACTOR, to pay not less than the specified rates to all workers employed by them in the execution of the contract. 11.A Payment Bond for contracts over $25,000 and a Performance Bond for all contracts will be required prior to commencement of work. These bonds shall be in the amounts and form called for in the Contract Documents. 12.Pursuant to the provisions of Public Contract Code Section 22300, CONTRACTOR may substitute certain securities for any

funds withheld by OWNER to ensure CONTRACTORâs performance under the contract. At the request and expense of CONTRACTOR, securities equivalent to any amount withheld shall be deposited, at the discretion of OWNER, with either OWNER or a state or federally chartered bank as the escrow agent, who shall then pay any funds otherwise subject to retention to CONTRACTOR. Upon satisfactory completion of the contract, the securities shall be returned to CONTRACTOR. Securities eligible for investment shall include those listed in Government Code Section 16430, bank and savings and loan certificates of deposit, interest bearing demand deposit accounts, standby letters of credit, or any other security mutually agreed to by CONTRACTOR and OWNER. CONTRACTOR shall be the beneficial owner of any securities substituted for funds withheld and shall receive any interest on them. The escrow agreement shall be in the form indicated in the Contract Documents. 1 3 . To b i d o n o r p e r f o r m the work stated in this Notice, CONTRACTOR must possess a valid and active c o n t r a c t o r ’s l i c e n s e o f t h e following classification(s)

B No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor shall be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of § 4104 of the Public Contract Code, for a public works project (submitted on or after March 1, 2015) unless currently registered with the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Labor Code § 1725.5. No CONTRACTOR or subcontractor may be awarded a contract for public work on a public works project (awarded after April 1, 2015) unless registered with the DIR. DIRâs web registration portal is: w w w . d i r . c a . g o v / Public‑Works/Contractors. html 14.CONTRACTOR and all subcontractors must furnish electronic certified payroll records (eCPR) to the Labor Commissioner monthly in PDF format. Registration at w w w. d i r. c a . g o v / P u b l i c ‑ W o r k s / Certified‑Payroll‑Reporting. html is required to use the eCPR system. The following notice is given as required by Labor Code Section 1771.5(b) (1): CONTRACTOR and any subcontractors are required to review and comply with the provisions of the California Labor Code, Part

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, May 11, 2021 at 3:00 P.M. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Final Review The Grange Façade and Site Improvements 250-270 Storke Road (APN 073-100-032) Case No. 19-0203-DPAM Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review Koeper 2nd Story Addition 6536 Camino Caseta (APN 077-412-019) Case No. 21-0004-DRB ATTENTION: Pursuant to of the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the Design Review Board for May 11, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. Design Review Board Members will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. You may also request your written comments to be read into the record during the hearing. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice are new items. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org.

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10.This is a prevailing wage project. OWNER has ascertained the general prevailing rate of per diem wages in the locality in which this work is to be performed for each craft or type of worker needed to execute this contract. These rates are on file at OWNERâs office, and a copy may be obtained upon request, or at w w w. d i r. c a . g o v. C o n t r a c t o r shall post a copy of these rates at the job site. ALL PROJECTS OVER $1,000 ARE S U B J E C T T O P R E VA I L I N G WA G E M O N I T O R I N G A N D ENFORCEMENT BY THE LABOR COMMISSIONER.

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Santa Barbara Independent, April 29, 2021

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APRIL 29, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

7, Chapter 1, beginning with Section 1720, as more fully discussed in the Contract Documents. These sections contain specific requirements concerning, for example, determination and payment of prevailing wages, retention, inspection, and auditing payroll records, use of apprentices, payment of overtime compensation, securing workersâ compensation insurance, and various criminal penalties or fines which may be imposed for violations of the requirements of the c h a p t e r. S u b m i s s i o n o f a b i d constitutes CONTRACTORâs representation that CONTRACTOR has thoroughly reviewed these requirements. 15. OWNER will retain 5% of the amount of any progress payments. 16. This Project does not require prequalification pursuant to AB 1565 of all general contractors and all mechanical, electrical and plumbing subcontractors 17. B I D PA C K E T w i l l a v a i l a b l e a t w w w. t r i c o b l u e . com and provided at the job walk Advertisement Dates: April 23 â May 8, 2021 Virginia Alvarez 805‑969‑3249 x 420

LIEN SALE NOTICE OF SALE/ DISPOSITION OF C O L L AT E R A L To : GAIL ANNE GALLESSICH 30 WINCHESTER CANYON R O A D # 1 1 5 G O L E TA C A 93117 PR File Number: MHCB.177‑017 Account Number: 253090 From: Prober and Raphael 20750 Ve n t u r a B o u l e v a rd , S u i t e 100 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Attorney for: Community West Bank 445 Pine Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 This communication is made in an attempt to collect upon a debt or judgment and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Community West Bank, hereinafter referred to as (“Community”) will sell your mobile home, truck camper or floating home which registered with the Department of Housing and Community Development under the registration numbers PH0230419A/B and Label/Insignia numbers ARZ329763/4 and Decal No. LBJ5949 located at 30 WINCHESTER CANYON R O A D # 1 1 5 , G O L E TA C A 93117 to the highest qualified bidder in public as follows: Date of Sale: 5/19/2021 Time: 1:00 PM Place: At the main entrance to the county courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Please be advised that if you notify my office within 30 days that all or a part of your obligation to Community West Bank is disputed, then I will mail to you written verification of the obligation and the amounts owed to Community West Bank. In addition, upon your request within 30 days of r e c e i p t o f t h i s l e t t e r, I w i l l provide you with the name and address of the original c r e d i t o r, i f d i f f e r e n t f r o m t h e c u r r e n t c r e d i t o r. Yo u may request an accounting by calling Prober and Raphael at (818) 227‑0100,

Ext 355. If I do not hear from you within 30 days, I will assume that your debt to Community West Bank is valid. The state Rosenthal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act and the Federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act require that, except under unusual circumstances, collectors may not contact you before 8 a.m. or after 9 p.m. They may not harass you by using threats of violence or arrest or by using obscene language. Collectors may not use false or misleading statements or call you at work if they know or have reason to know that you may not receive personal calls at work. For the most part, collectors may not tell another person, other than your attorney or spouse, about your debt. Collectors may contact another person to confirm your location or enforce a judgment. For more information about debt collection activities, you may contact the Federal trade Commission at 1‑877‑FTC‑HELP or w w w . f t c . g o v. A t a n y t i m e before the sale, you may redeem the collateral in accordance with Section 9623 of the California Uniform Commercial Code anytime before we sell it by paying the full amount you owe (not just the past due payments), including our expenses and fees incurred. The account is due and owing the sum of $183,107.50 plus interest at the contract rate from 4/13/2021, plus any amounts necessary to reimburse Prober and Raphael for reasonable foreclosure fees and costs as well as any other sums to which Community West Bank, may be entitled to under the terms of your a g r e e m e n t . To l e a r n t h e exact amount you must p a y, c a l l u s a t P r o b e r a n d Raphael at (818) 227‑0100, Ext 355. If you want us to explain to you in writing how we have figured the amount that you owe us, you may call us at (818) 227‑0100, Ext 355.. Prober and Raphael, A Law Corporation Elizabeth Ye r a n o s i a n , Tr u s t e e S a l e Officer cc: Community West Bank 445 Pine Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 A‑4731035 04/29/2021, 05/06/2021

NAME CHANGE I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F PAT R I C I A ELLEN COTTRELL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00809 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): F R O M : PAT R I C I A E L L E N COTTRELL TO: PAT R I C I A ELLEN COTTRELL‑MARKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, w h y t h e petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection

at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 21, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, p r i n t e d i n t h i s c o u n t y, a t least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 25, 2021. by Colleen K. S t e r n e . S u p e r i o r. o f t h e Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F T E R R Y A N N TA B A C C H I T O S H O W CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01034 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TERRY ANN TA B A C C H I TO: TERRY ANN THOMPSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, w h y t h e petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 11, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, p r i n t e d i n t h i s c o u n t y, a t least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 22, 2021. by Thomas p. A n d e r l e . S u p e r i o r. o f t h e Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F M I L E S WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00830 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear

before this court at the hearing indicated below to s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, w h y t h e petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, p r i n t e d i n t h i s c o u n t y, a t least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. S t e r n e . S u p e r i o r. o f t h e Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF THE A P P L I C AT I O N OF VICTOR HUGO ANDRADE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01356 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VICTOR HUGO ANDRADE TO: VICTOR JAKE ANDRADE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, w h y t h e petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 24, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, p r i n t e d i n t h i s c o u n t y, a t least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 13, 2021. by Colleen K. S t e r n e . S u p e r i o r. o f t h e Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F J O A N I E SHONETTE VOGEL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV01422 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in


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Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JOANIE SHONETTE VOGEL TO: JOANIE SHONETTE SAFFELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, w h y t h e petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing June 1, 2021 10:00 am, D e p t 3 , C o u r t h o u s e , S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, p r i n t e d i n t h i s c o u n t y, a t least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 16, 2021. by T h o m a s P. A n d e r l e . S u p e r i o r. o f t h e Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F L E S L I E BAXTER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01361 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: LESLIE ANN BAXTER TO: LESLIE JADE BAXTER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, w h y t h e petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 28, 2021 10:00 am, D e p t 4 , C o u r t h o u s e , S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, p r i n t e d i n t h i s c o u n t y, a t least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 10, 2021. by Donna D . G e c k . S u p e r i o r. o f t h e Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF THE S TAT E OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF S A N TA BARBARA In the matter of: MCDONALD F A M I LY T R U S T d a t e d M a r c h 30, 2001, as amended Case No. 21PR00149 NOTICE T O C R E D I T O R S O F PA U L A D. McDONALD, Deceased [PROB C §§19003, 19040(b), 19052] Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Paula D. McDonald (Decedent) that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, and deliver pursuant to Section 1215 of the California Probate Code a copy to Catherine M . B r u n n e r, a s Tr u s t e e o f t h e M c D o n a l d F a m i l y Tr u s t dated March 30, 2001, as amended, wherein the decedent was the surviving S e t t l o r, a t 1 0 0 0 W i l s h i r e Boulevard, Suite 1500, Los Angeles, California 90017‑1730, within the latter of four months after April 08, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) o r, i f n o t i c e i s m a i l e d o r personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. D AT E D : M a r c h 3 1 , 2 0 2 1 . Parisa F. Weiss, Esq., A t t o r n e y f o r Tr u s t e e Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. SUPERIOR COURT OF THE S TAT E O F C A L I F O R N I A I N AND FOR THE COUNTY OF S A N TA B A R B A R A A N A C A PA DIVISION In re Shirley J. Otto R e v o c a b l e Tr u s t Case No. 21PR00146 NOTICE TO CREDITORS [PROB C §§19040(b), 19052] Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Shirley J. Otto (Decedent) that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver a copy to Joe Bourdeau, as trustee of the Shirley J . O t t o R e v o c a b l e Tr u s t dated June 12, 2015, of which Decendent was the s e t t l o r, c / o t h e L a w O f f i c e s o f J a m e s F. C o t e , P. O . B o x 20146, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146, as provided to Section 1215 within the latter of four months after April 15, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) o r, i f n o t i c e i s m a i l e d o r personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. D AT E D : M a r c h 3 0 , 2 0 2 1 . L a w O f f i c e s o f J a m e s F. C o t e Published Apr 15, 22, 29 2021.

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF REVISED DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT for Recirculation & NOTICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEARING OFFICER HEARING Wednesday, May 26, 2021 at 5:00 P.M. HERITAGE RIDGE 332 RESIDENTIAL RENTAL UNIT PROJECT CASE NO. 14-049-GPA-VTM-DP Located on the North Side of Camino Vista Between S. Los Carneros and Aero Camino Roads (North of Willow Springs II); APNs 073-060-031 through -043 ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Environmental Hearing Officer (EHO) hearing will be conducted telephonically and electronically and broadcast live on the City’s website. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. The EHO will be participating electronically and telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (City), as Lead Agency under the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et seq.; “CEQA”), completed a Revised Draft Environmental Impact Report (Draft EIR) for the Heritage Ridge Residential Project (Project). A detailed description of the Project is provided below. The City invites comments on the adequacy and completeness of the environmental analysis and mitigation measures described in the Revised Draft EIR from April 29, 2021 through June 14, 2021. A meeting to take comments on the Revised and Recirculated Draft EIR will be held by the City Environmental Hearing Officer on: DATE AND TIME:

Wednesday, May 26, 2021 at 5:00 P.M.

LOCATION:

Teleconference Meeting Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda)

PROJECT DESCRIPTION SUMMARY: The Project components include the following: 1. A General Plan Amendment (14-049-GPA) to remove a designation of Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Area (ESHA) on the Open Space Map (Figure 3-5 in the Open Space Element of the General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan) and on the Special Status Species and Environmentally Sensitive Habitat Areas Map (Figure 4-1 in the Conservation Element of the General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan). 2. A Vesting Tentative Map (14-049-VTM) to allow the subdivision of the existing 17.36 gross acre (16.2 net acres) project site from 13 lots to 4 lots (2 lots for the Affordable housing complex, 1 lot for the market housing, and 1 lot for the public park). The subdivision map would also abandon two unused roads (Via Maya and Via Luisa). 3. Development Plan (14-049-DP) pursuant to GMC § 35-317 to allow construction of 332 rental units with associated recreational facilities. The rental units would be broken into two “neighborhoods” as follows: 104 up to a 100% supportive-units comprised of both senior affordable housing and family affordable housing units with separate recreational facilities; and 228 market-rate rental units with separate recreational facilities including a swimming pool. 4. Streamside Protection Area (SPA) buffer reduction in the northeast corner of the project site, varying from 0’ to 33’. 5. Vacation of portions of right of way and landscape easements adjacent to Los Carneros Road per Streets & Highway Code Section 8324 (b). Also proposed is a two-acre neighborhood public park to be dedicated to the City in the center of the site and three above ground bio-retention basins including a 15,000 square foot bio-retention basin in the southeast portion of the site. The site would be served by three access points onto Camino Vista. Preliminary raw earthwork volumes are estimated at 178,000 cubic yards of cut and 15,500 cubic yards of fill and 115,000 cubic yards of export. The project was filed by FLT Heritage Ridge TG, LLC in partnership with the Towbes Group of Towbes, LLC. In addition, the Housing Authority of Santa Barbara would be the developer for the supportive/affordable housing unit component. Location: The project site is located in the Inland area of the City and is situated on unaddressed parcels located on the north side of Camino Vista between Aero Camino and Calle Koral Roads in the City of Goleta, Santa Barbara County (APNs 073-060-031 through -043). Access to the Heritage Ridge site is from Camino Vista Road. The 17.36 gross acre (16.2 net acres) Heritage Ridge site is bounded on its north by Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR) tracks, on the east by industrial buildings on Aero Camino Road, on its south by Camino Vista Road and Willow Springs II apartments, and on its west by S. Los Carneros Road/Overpass. The Project site had a General Plan land use designation of Medium-Density Residential (R-MD) with an Affordable Housing Overlay and had a Zoning designation of Design Residential (DR-20) prior to April 3, 2020. Since April 3, 2020, the property’s zoning designation is Medium Density Residential (R-MD). As the project was deemed complete prior to September 1, 2019, the development is being consider using Article III, Inland Zoning Ordinance. CHANGES REQUIRING RECIRCULATION AND ORGANIZATION OF THE REVISED DRAFT EIR A Draft EIR was circulated for public review in 2016 and the administrative draft Final EIR was completed in 2018. Since that time, the project has been revised to include the conversion of the senior component to an affordable housing component (targeting low/very low senior and family residents), reduction in the total number of housing units from 360 to 332 units, changed the mix of units from market rate and senior units to market rate (228 units) and affordable units (104 units) for senior and families, and to provide increased right-of-way along Los Carneros Road, resulting in a building setback shift along this roadway. The affordable unit component maybe up to 100% supportive housing if necessary funding is secured. Finally, the application was revised to remove the request for a parking modification because, as an affordable housing development, the project would qualify for reduced affordable housing parking requirements in accordance with Gov. Code Section 65915. These changes required revision to the EIR Project Description as well as updated analysis in the following issue areas: air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, land use, noise, public services, transportation, and utilities and service systems. The proposed revisions to the project do not substantially change the overall development footprint or the project footprint relative to identified tribal cultural resources on the project site. Moreover, since completion of the prior Draft EIR for the prior design iteration of the project, new regulatory requirements and updated CEQA guidelines and thresholds (updated in late-2018), as well as changes to the project-level environmental and cumulative setting in the vicinity of the Project have occurred. As a result of these changes, additional analysis of topics, including air quality, greenhouse gas emissions transportation impact (thresholds have changed from Level of Service to Vehicles Miles Traveled), energy demand, tribal cultural resources, and wildfire risk, were added to the EIR. Therefore, revisions to the prior Draft EIR are reflected in Section 2.0, Project Description, Sections 4.2 (air quality), 4.4 (cultural and tribal cultural), 4.6 (Greenhouse Gas), 4.9 (Land Use), 4.10 (Noise), 4.11 (Public Services), 4.13 (Transportation), and 4.14 (Utilities) of the Draft EIR. The cumulative setting/baseline has also been updated in Section 3.0, Related Projects. Further, new sections 4.16 and 4.17 have been added to the Revised Draft EIR in the areas of energy and wildfire, respectively, that were not included in the original Draft EIR. This recirculation also includes the relevant portions of appendices as originally contained in the Draft EIR and supplemented, as necessary, as a result of updates to the Project. PUBLIC REVIEW OF THE REVISED DRAFT EIR The Recirculated Draft EIR is available for a 45-day public review period from April 29, 2021 to June 14, 2021. The Limited Recirculated Draft EIR is available on the City’s website at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/city-hall/planning-and-environmental-review/ceqa-review. Reviewers of this recirculated document should limit their comments to those that relate to the following chapters and sections of the Draft EIR that have been revised or added and recirculated: • 2.0 Project Description • 3.0 Related Projects • 4.2 Air Quality • 4.4 (Cultural and Tribal Cultural) • 4.6 Greenhouse Gas Emissions • 4.9 Land Use • 4.10 Noise • 4.11 Public Services • 4.13 Transportation/Circulation • 4.14 Utilities and Service Systems • 4.16 Energy • 4.17 Wildfire Significant and unavoidable project specific and cumulative impacts (Class I) are identified in the areas of; cultural resources (cumulative); noise (short construction noise impacts); and utilities and service systems (solid waste project and cumulative). Potentially significant, but mitigable, impacts on the environment (Class II) are anticipated in the areas of: aesthetics and visual resources (building heights/massing compatibility & lighting); air quality (exposure of sensitive receptors); biological resources (nesting/foraging birds, indirect habitat impacts/ wildlife linkage); cultural resources (impacts on Native American Site #CA-SBA-56); geology and soils (liquefaction potential, expansive and erodible soils); and hydrology and water quality (alteration of drainage patterns/increased impermeability). CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on any hazardous waste facilities or disposal sites identified by Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY AND FURTHER INFORMATION: The Revised Draft EIR will be posted on April 29, 2021 on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. For more information about this project, contact project planner Mary Chang at 805-961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org. PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD: The public review period begins on April 29, 2021 and ends on June 14, 2021 at 5:00 P.M. All letters should be emailed to Mary Chang, Supervising Senior Planner at mchang@cityofgoleta.org. All comments must be received no later than 5:00 P.M. on June 14, 2021. Please limit comments to environmental issues only. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted as instructed in link below or via email to Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Environmental Hearing Officer Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/government-meetingagendas-and-videos. NOTE: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to the City of Goleta Planning and Environmental Review Department on or before the date that the public comment period ends (Gov’t. Code § 65009 (b) (2)). Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, April 29, 2021

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Santa Barbara Independent 4/29/21  

April 29, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 798

Santa Barbara Independent 4/29/21  

April 29, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 798

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