__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

FREE

Santa Barbara

APR. 22-29, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 797

FRESH FACES E N V I R O N M E N TA L A C T I O N of

EIGHT PEOPLE WORKING ON THE

FRONT LINES OF SUSTAINABILITY

also inside

SANTA BARBARA ENTERS ORANGE TIER • JOSEF WOODARD’S DEBUT NOVEL • LYNDA WEINMAN AND PATRICK HALL CERAMIC ART INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

1


Comprehensive Cancer Care. Close to Home.

for more than 70 years

At Ridley-Tree Cancer Center, you have access to the latest technology and treatments, clinical research, evidence-based wellness programs and support services, all under one roof. • A team of 21 board-certified physicians, 5 advanced practice providers and 160 highly-trained and compassionate staff members delivering the best cancer care for our patients

• Radiation Oncology Department Achieved Accreditation by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Accreditation Program for Excellence (APEx ®)

• The latest Medical Oncology and Hematology treatments including chemotherapy, immunotherapy and targeted therapy

• Clinical Research Program providing patients with access to a broad network of clinic trials in medical oncology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology and medical research

• 27 bay Infusion Suite with floor-toceiling windows available with views of the Mesa and the Santa Ynez mountains

• A Palliative Care & Advance Care Planning Program to help seriously ill patients achieve the best possible quality of life

• Multidisciplinary Tumor Boards where experts from the community review individual cases and determine a patient’s multidisciplinary treatment plan together

• Integrated Patient Navigation, Genetic Counseling, Nutrition and Social Work programs to meet the multi-layered needs of our patients

• State-of-the-art Radiation Oncology technology, including (2) Elekta Versa HD™ linear accelerators, CT Simulator, Vision RT and Sentient Technology

• Authorization Team and Patient Financial Counselors coordinate insurance coverage and payment options before treatment begins to prevent financial challenges

ridleytreecc.org • Santa Barbara • Solvang

2

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

• A wide range of Supportive Care Services including counseling, support groups, mind-body classes, music therapy, exercise programs, library resources and education to provide healing and support for patients and caregivers • Leadership role in the Santa Barbara Breast Care Alliance accreditation as a Center of Excellence “without walls”, by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) • On-site oncology pharmacy team and full-service clinical laboratory • A Solvang branch providing medical oncology, infusion, nutrition, genetic counseling and support services to patients in North Santa Barbara County

Exclusive Fundraising Partner cfsb.org


We’ve Brought the Best Physicians to You Our doctors come from some of the best medical schools and centers around the country. Harvard University University of Massachusetts Wayne State Massachusetts University Tufts University General Hospital University Dana-Farber Cornell of Michigan Cancer Institute University Mayo Clinic Brigham and Women’s Hospital Mount Sinai Hospital University Columbia University of Chicago Drexel University University National Institutes of Health of Cincinnati National Cancer Institute Washington University

University of Washington

UC Davis UCSF Stanford University

City of Hope John Wayne Cancer Institute UC Irvine UCLA UC San Diego USC

Dr. Abate

Dr. Anwar

Dr. Bank

Dr. Gupta

Dr. Kass

Dr. Kendle

Dr. Kennedy Dr. Newman

Dr. Penn

Dr. Woliver

Dr. Meyers

Stefanie L. Rashti, NP

Kristin DeHahn, Marissa P. Jobe, NP-C PA-C

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY AND HEMATOLOGY

Dr. Cheng

Erica S. Koeppen, Andrea DNP, NP Kremsreiter, PA-C

MEDICAL ONCOLOGY

Dr. Cotter

Dr. Suh

Dr. Voog

Dr. Carlson

Dr. Pace

NUCLEAR MEDICINE

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

PALLIATIVE CARE

Dr. Choi

Dr. Mitchell

BREAST SURGERY

Receive the highest-quality cancer care Dr. Conway

Dr. Harnsberger

Dr. Howard

Dr. Zerey

SURGICAL ONCOLOGY

COLORECTAL SURGERY

ENDOCRINE SURGERY

GENERAL SURGERY

rivaling major medical centers

throughout the country, close to home.

COMMUNITY PHYSICIAN PARTNERS

Ridley-Tree Cancer Center would like to recognize these physicians for their invaluable partnership

Dr. Grafton BREAST SURGERY

Dr. Yurcho

COLORECTAL SURGERY

Dr. Rodriguez GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY

Dr. Hogan

GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY

Dr. Delio

NEUROLOGY

Dr. Zauner

NEUROSURGERY

Dr. Chung

NEUROSURGERY

Dr. Jones

NEUROSURGERY

Dr. Oni-Orisan NEUROSURGERY

Dr. Soares PLASTIC SURGERY

INDEPENDENT.COM

Dr. Schooler PLASTIC SURGERY

Dr. Yegiyants

APRIL 22, 2021

PLASTIC SURGERY

Dr. Baay

THORACIC SURGERY

THE INDEPENDENT

3


GRAB A PENCIL, LET’S HAVE SOME FUN!

:

Kids Activity How much does it cost?

Circle the coins or bills that you will need to be able to buy the items below.

$0.55

$6.32

$1.51

$0.99

$21.07

$16.86

Bonus Challenge: Add up all the remaining change from each purchase Final Total $

present

Financial Literacy Month

Weekly activities to sharpen your financial savvy!

:

Week Four Value of money/Credit Understanding your credit Score What Makes up a Credit Score?

What a Good-Excellent Credit Score can do for you: • Lower interest rates on credit cards & loans • Better chance for credit card & loan approval

Payment History 35%

Length of Credit History 15%

Total Amount Owed 30%

New Credit 10% Types of Credit 10%

Want to check your Credit Score?

If you’re a MB&T client, check out MB&T Credit Pulse™ on our mobile banking app!

4

Want more exercises? Use the QR code or visit montecito.bank/FinLit

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

• Approval for higher credit limits • Easier approval for home loans or apartment rentals • Better insurance rates

Very Poor 499 & under

Poor 500–599

Fair 600–659

Good 660–779

Excellent 780+

5 Ways to Improve Your Credit Score:

Pay your bills on time.

Use 30% or less of your credit limit

Have different types of credit

Don’t close your older accounts

Avoid opening many credit accounts within a short period


Virtual Events

- VIRTUAL EVENTS -

Leading activists, creatives and thinkers confront racism in America, guiding us towards racial equality

Intimate, interactive online events you won’t find anywhere else Classical Music Treasures

Yo-Yo Ma & Kathryn Stott Songs of Comfort and Hope Wed, May 5 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

Thu, Apr 29 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! An artist, musician and cultural planner, Theaster Gates draws on his training in urban planning to redeem spaces that have been left behind, upturning art values, land values and human values.

Founder of the Equal Justice Initiative

Former President of the American Enterprise Institute

Bryan Stevenson

Arthur C. Brooks

American Injustice: Mercy, Humanity and Making a Difference

National Renewal

Tue, May 11 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required) Drawing on social science and a decade of experience leading the American Enterprise Institute, Arthur C. Brooks shows that what the country needs is not agreement, but better disagreement. Corporate Sponsor:

Acclaimed Producer and Filmmaker

Fri, Apr 30 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

MacArthur Fellow Bryan Stevenson is an attorney, human rights activist, author of Just Mercy and founder of the Equal Justice Initiative.

Bryan Stevenson Event Sponsors: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli

Mira Nair

Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Patty & John MacFarlane, Sara Miller McCune, Santa Barbara Foundation, Lynda Weinman & Bruce Heavin, Dick Wolf, and Zegar Family Foundation

Speaking with Pico Wed, May 26 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

UC Santa Barbara Campus Partners:

One of the freshest and most fearless directors working today, Mira Nair’s groundbreaking films include Salaam Bombay!, Mississippi Masala, Monsoon Wedding and Queen of Katwe.

Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Dori Pierson Carter & Chris Carter, Martha Gabbert, and Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor

Theaster Gates (UCSB student registration required)

Beloved cellist Yo-Yo Ma and acclaimed pianist Kathryn Stott perform selections from their recent album, featuring traditional and new takes on familiar works from Europe, Asia and the Americas.

Presented in association with the Carsey-Wolf Center at UC Santa Barbara

Artist and Social Innovator

Department of Black Studies Center for Black Studies Research Division of Social Sciences Division of Humanities and Fine Arts Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences Division of Student Affairs Gevirtz Graduate School of Education Graduate Division Bren School for Environmental Science & Management

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

College of Creative Studies College of Engineering MultiCultural Center Carsey-Wolf Center The Program in Latin American and Iberian Studies UCSB Library | UCSB Reads Office of the Chancellor Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor

Community Partners: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli Special Thanks: INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

5


CEC’s

2021 Virtual Earth Day Festival THURSDAY, APRIL 22 - YOUTH CLIMATE LEADERSHIP DAY

SBEarthDay.org

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS FRIDAY, APRIL 23 - BUSINESS CLIMATE LEADERSHIP DAY

12 noon - 1:00pm hour

12 noon - 1:00pm hour

Sigrid Wright, CEC CEO - opening address

Eric Cárdenas and David Fortson of LOACOM - Emcees

Florencia Ramirez, author, chef, clean water activist - Emcee

Nadra Ehrman, Towbes Group Residential Community Manager and CEC Board Member - Keynote Address

Laura Capps, former CEC Board President and current SB School Board Member - Keynote address and spotlight on Monroe School County Of Santa Barbara Water Agencies - fun and entertaining water conservation assembly from “Shows that Teach" Santa Barbara Audubon Society - film

Oniracom - green business and marketing innovators

1:00 - 2:00pm hour LOACOM “Better World” interviews with: Karen Lickteig, Strategic Advisor, B Corp Climate Collective; Community Coordinator B Lab U.S. & Canada

1:00 - 2:00pm hour Jackson Gillies, Santa Barbara Teen Star and American Idol 2019 Top 70 finalist - musical performance Explore Ecology - “Flows to the Ocean” Watershed Education Workshop KJEE - Earth Day greetings from your favorite radio personalities

2:00 - 3:00pm hour UCSB Environmental Affairs Board - eco activism on campus

3:00 - 4:00pm hour State Senator Monique Limón - Earth Day greetings from our state senator Pesticide Free Soil Project, an environmental justice initiative led by young people in Oxnard to build soil, increase access to good food, and uplift the links between human and ecological health - film Kenny Loggins, award-winning singer-songwriter - musical performance Sojourner Kincaid Rolle, former Santa Barbara Poet Laureate - “Why Earth Day Matters” Poetry contest winners share their work

Kate Williams, Chief Executive Officer, 1% For The Planet Gregory Landua, Chief Executive Officer, Regen Network

2:00 - 3:00pm hour Zach Gill, multi-instrumentalist, singer/songwriter most known for his work with ALO and Jack Johnson - musical performance Santa Barbara County Food Action Network - two short films on our local food system, with an introduction from Executive Director Shakira Miracle Annual Green Car Show - virtual visits with electric vehicles from bikes to buses

3:00 - 4:00pm hour Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI) - green jobs discussion with LACI Senior VP Estelle Reyes Tina Schlieske, rock artist, best known for fronting the band Tina and the B-Sides - musical performance

Assemblymember Steve Bennett - environmental message from our state assembly member

Central Coast MIT Enterprise Forum - carbon sequestration technology discussion

4:00 - 5:30pm hour

4:00 - 5:30pm hour

Santa Barbara County Food Action Network - three short films on our local food system, with an introduction from Executive Director Shakira Miracle Santa Barbara Channelkeeper - student art show awards ceremony World Dance for Humanity - Earth Day Dance Party

SATURDAY, APRIL 24 - COMMUNITY CLIMATE LEADERSHIP DAY 12 noon - 1:00pm hour April Price, CEC Renewable Energy Program Senior Manager - Emcee, with friends from the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

Lamara Heartwell - guided mindfulness embodiment, earth-centered practice Tri County Regional Energy Network (3C-REN) - Reduce Your Carbon Footprint: The All-Electric Home webinar EQOGO - preview of new app that tracks sustainable purchasing

2:00 - 3:00pm hour League Of Women Voters Climate Forum - “Our Climate Emergency: Nature Based Carbon Drawdown Solutions” Moderated by Allegra Roth, CEC Food & Climate Program Manager.

3:00 - 4:00pm hour

Citizens Climate Lobby, Santa Barbara Chapter - The Year of Climate Action! A Climate Policy Workshop

Santa Barbara County Food Action Network - two short films on our local food system, with an introduction from Executive Director Shakira Miracle

Glen Phillips, songwriter and guitarist, best known as the singer/ songwriter of alternative rock group Toad the Wet Sprocket musical performance

U.S. Congressman Salud Carbajal - Earth Day greeting

1:00 - 2:00pm hour

4:00 - 5:30pm hour

CEC CEO Sigrid Wright interviews Terry Tamminen, author, lecturer and strategist on energy and the environment, former cabinet member in the Schwarzenegger Administration Lamara Heartwell - guided mindfulness embodiment, earth-centered practice Santa Barbara Zoo - an inspiring film about the California Condor Recovery Program 6

April 22–24 | 12 noon - 5:30pm

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

ENVIRONMENTAL HERO AWARD to Annie Leonard, Executive Director, Greenpeace US. With Dr. David N. Pellow and CEC CEO Sigrid Wright

Earth Day Mural - finished art work revealed Climate Leadership Summit


23

volume 35, # 797, Apr. 22-29, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Lily Hopwood, Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

Fresh Faces of Environmental Action Eight People Working on the Front Lines of Sustainability

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18, 21 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

OUR REAL ESTATE WRITER Though Marsha Gray just recently started a helpful Q&A column on our Real Estate section, her Santa Barbara history goes back to the 1970s, when she came to town to attend UCSB. Soon after, she married her husband, Gary, a third-generation Santa Barbara resident, and they traveled to state fairs in a black van, selling wood cabinets and towel racks, then ran their own coffee shop in Piccadilly Square during the 1980s. In 1995, Gray started her real estate career with Silvio DiLoreto and Sunset Company and never looked back.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

Why real estate? My two children were young, and I was able to work around their schedule. The saying in real estate is, “You can set your own hours, as long as it’s all your hours.”I’ve loved real estate ever since. What sets our real estate community apart? Santa Barbara has a relatively small number of agents, and we all know each other. There is a great deal of cooperation. I’ve realized how spoiled I am when I do transactions outside of Santa Barbara. It’s night and day as far as the cooperation, trust, and honesty we have here. How have things changed? Things have evolved over the years; prices go up and down. For me, there is nothing more boring than to hear, “I bought my house for $50,000 and it’s now worth $5,000,000.” Real estate is always changing, and it’s constantly in the now. What I like is how cutting edge and exciting it is.

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT

ON THE COVER: Clockwise from top left: Laurel Serieys, Teresa Romero, Christopher Ragland, Liz Carlisle, Summer Gray, Meredith Hendricks, Kristen Hislop, and Jay Reti. Courtesy photos.

FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

Design by Caitlin Fitch.

TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS

NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

THREE PERSPECTIVES ON CONTEMPORARY PAINTING

W p it

A CONVERSATION WITH SUZANNE HUDSON, MATH BASS, AND CHRISTINA QUARLES FRIDAY | APRIL 30 | 5 PM | VIA ZOOM In her forthcoming book Contemporary Painting, Los Angeles-based art historian and critic Suzanne Hudson considers painting as a vibrant and sometimes contentious medium. Two esteemed painters, Math Bass and Christina Quarles, who are discussed in Hudson’s book, join the author in a conversation about painting. This virtual event is moderated by curators from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara.

FREE | RESERVE TICKETS ONLINE AT TICKETS.SBMA.NET SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART | WWW.SBMA.NET

Images left to right: Suzanne Hudson, Math Bass (photo cropped: Steven Taylor, 2021); and Christina Quarles (photo cropped: Erik Carter, Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles, 2021)

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

7


APR. 15-22, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

COURTS & CRIME

I

ER IC K M ADR I D

by Nick Welsh t’s sad that people are so excited and so relieved that the verdict came back the way it did” said Lawanda LyonsPruitt, head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in Santa Maria and Lompoc. “It should never have happened.” LyonsPruitt was commenting on the three guilty verdicts rendered by the Minneapolis jury in the murder trial of former police officer Derek Chauvin for killing George Floyd last May. “It’s not going to ease that family’s pain, I can tell you that. But they will sleep better at night knowing that the person committed these heinous crimes was convicted. We saw justice served today.” Lyons-Pruitt, the former chief investigator for the Santa Barbara Public Defender’s office, said the verdict surprised her not at all. “While I’m not an attorney, I’ve sat at the defense counsel’s table when we didn’t have a case and you’re grasping at straws,” she commented. “But we never had to throw up crap the way he [Chauvin’s defense attorney] did. I will give him that.” The case against Chauvin just got worse and worse, she noted. It would come out that Chauvin had his knee on George Floyd’s neck and back even longer than previously understood. “It was nine minutes and 29 seconds, not eight minutes and 46 seconds,” Lyons Pruitt noted,

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Relief over Guilty Verdicts but ‘It Never Should Have Happened’

JUSTICE FOR GEORGE FLOYD: Local NAACP leader Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt and S.B. Police Chief Barney Melekian responded to Tuesday’s conviction, each saying justice had been served.

separating each syllable from the one before it for dramatic effect. In the immediate aftermath of the killing, Lyons-Pruitt stated, “Enough is enough; we’re done dying.” A reporter at the time, she said, suggested that the Santa Maria Police Department was immune from that kind of violence. “We don’t have those kind of problems anymore,” she replied. “But there was a time when they were involved in some things that were pretty questionable. And now there was just a police shooting in Lompoc, a young man named Krys Ruiz. A transgender man. A client of Behavioral Wellness. People are saying he didn’t have a

gun.” (See article by Tyler Hayden on page 9.) In Santa Barbara, Interim Police Chief Barney Melekian issued a statement, declaring, “The verdict in Minneapolis was an affirmation that the legal system can deliver justice. Today represents a significant step forward in advancing the ideals this nation was founded on.” He also stated, “The humanity and great work of the officers who protect the Santa Barbara community is something you don’t see everywhere. I think it is unfortunate the actions of thousands and thousands of American police officers n are being judged by a few.”

CORONAVIRUS

County Enters Orange Tier Over Half of County Residents Have Received at Least One Vaccine Dose by Delaney Smith fter two weeks of meeting the criteria, Santa Barbara County is now moving into the orange tier. The county has seen a 21 percent decrease in active cases from April 5-19. Hospitalizations and intensive-care-unit rates are the lowest they’ve been since last October— hospitalizations have decreased by 63 percent and ICU cases by 71 percent. Santa Maria, most notably, saw a 53 percent decrease in cases from April 1-15. The county’s adjusted case rate is 4.5 and its positivity rate is 1.8 percent. To be in the orange tier, the adjusted case rate must be below 5.9 and the positivity rate must be below 4.9 percent. Jasmine McGinty, CEO principal analyst with the county, gave an update Tuesday about the orange tier’s impact on businesses. She said

A

that to date there are 4,706 businesses that have submitted their attestation and have reopened. The main difference between moving from the red tier to the orange tier, McGinty said, is that the allowed capacities change. For example, a maximum of 25 people were allowed to gather in the red tier, but in the orange tier, that bumps up to 50. County Public Health’s full list of guidance for the orange tier can be found at publichealthsbc.org/orange-tier-2021.

VACCINE UPDATE

Fifty-two percent of Santa Barbara County residents have received at least one dose of the vaccine, and 29 percent are fully vaccinated. This week, the county received 7,280 first doses and 16,870 second doses. These totals do not include federal allocations to pharmacies and other providers. Each week, allocations are ramping up more.

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

The coveted positions of Senior and Junior Spirit of Fiesta were announced on 4/17 by Old Spanish Days. Junior Spirit for 2021 is 9-year-old Savannah Hoover, who won with a charming rendition of “Bahia de Cadiz.” Senior Spirit is 16-year-old Ysabella Yturralde (above), who competed with nine other finalists to win with her vivid dance set to “Huele a Sal.” Both winners received $600 scholarships, and Yturralde also earned a trip to Sevilla, a journey that includes private lessons and participation in a flamenco show. Last year’s dancers were featured in videos due to the pandemic, but the organization did not respond to inquiries of how Fiesta 2021 would be held. A broad coalition of groups is going door-to-door in the Ortega Park neighborhood to spread the word about a workshop to discuss the park’s future and its murals. Originally painted in the 1970s and ‘80s, the artwork developed out of the Chicano Movement in Santa Barbara and were slated to be demolished in recent plans for the park. The meetup — which takes place 4/24, at 1 p.m. at Ortega Park — will discuss the murals and a new redesign of the park with a $8.5 million grant from the state.

BUSINESS

Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso also gave an update on the county’s mobile clinics. The goal of the clinics is to bring the vaccine to those who can’t access it, and it was built off of Public Health’s success with bringing the vaccine to seniors, homebound individuals, and homeless people. There are five bilingual teams composed of eight or nine Public Health staff with the Santa Maria Health Care Center hosting three teams, Lompoc Health Care Center hosting one team, and Santa Barbara Health Care Center hosting one team. The target groups are H2-A housing, community-based mental health care and treatment centers, churches, and others. Do-Reynoso also encouraged community groups to partner with Public Health and request a mobile clinic for their employees or clients by emailing mobileclinics@sbcphd .org. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. 8

F R ITZ OLEN B ERG ER, COU RTESY OF OLD SPAN ISH DAYS

NAACP Leader and S.B. Police Chief on Chauvin Jury Decision

COMMUNITY

Since California’s COVID shutdown stopped tourism in its tracks, hospitality employees have suffered, including at the Four Seasons Biltmore, a hotel property owned by Beanie Babies tycoon Ty Warner but managed by the eponymous resort company, majority owned, said attorney Bruce Anticouni, by two billionaires: Bill Gates and Saudi Arabia’s Prince Al Waleed bin Talal. Anticouni represents more than 250 of the Biltmore’s employees whose furlough, by law, has turned into a termination of employment; if a mediation of 4/30 results in a class-action agreement, all 450 employees could be eligible for up to $6 million in separation pay.

COUNTY A Sunday-afternoon flight over the coastal mountains above Carpinteria ended with a call to CarpinteriaSummerland Fire when a paraglider went down below Divide Peak. Dispatch was able to locate him using his cell phone’s GPS, but when the department’s paramedics tried to climb up from below and Search & Rescue teams tried from above, the steep terrain defeated both attempts. Ultimately, a rescuer descended from Fire Copter 3 and brought the man out. He was in his sixties and had only minor injuries. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

COU RTESY

HOMELESSNESS

Family Demands Answers, Accountability by Tyler Hayden he family of Krys Brandon Ruiz — a 26-year-old transgender man fatally shot by Lompoc police late last month — is calling on the state Attorney General’s office to investigate the incident, arguing Santa Barbara County’s law enforcement system can not be relied upon to fairly and objectively investigate its own officers. Sheriff Bill Brown, whose department is currently leading the investigation, formerly served as Lompoc’s chief of police and maintains deep ties there, said the family’s attorney William L. Schmidt. That constitutes a clear conflict of interest, he declared. Moreover, Schmidt said, District Attorney Joyce Dudley has never in her tenure “criticized, let alone prosecuted” any law enforcement officer who has hurt or killed a civilian despite multiple instances of misconduct later uncovered in lawsuits. At approximately 8 p.m. on March 28, Lompoc dispatchers received a 9-1-1 call of a person with a gun walking northbound on H Street. Ruiz was in the area and was approached by two officers. Some kind of altercation took place in an alley between H and G streets that ended with Ruiz being shot in the head and upper torso. After three weeks of silence and intimations that Ruiz was armed with a gun when he was killed, Lompoc Police Chief Joseph Mariani announced for the first time this Tuesday that Ruiz was in fact carrying a knife and had “charged” at the officers. “The knife was recovered as evidence at the scene,” Mariani said. But Schmidt and Ruiz’s family have a hard time believing that account. Ruiz had no criminal record and no history of violence, Schmidt said. “It was not his nature to be confrontational. He was small—51.” Earlier that evening, Schmidt went on, Ruiz had dinner with his family and hadn’t exhibited any signs of being agitated or depressed. “He was in a fine mood.” His mother had dropped him off at his apartment an hour before he was killed. “We really don’t know what happened yet,” said Schmidt. “We don’t know who called 9-1-1. We don’t know why the officers opened fire.” Lompoc police are not equipped with body cameras, explained Schmidt, fearing the investigation will rely solely on the officers’ statements without any recorded evidence. “Whether the shooting was intentional or a mistake due to poor training by the department is yet to be seen,” he said. A Change.org petition was recently created to compel the Lompoc Police Department to start wearing body cameras. It has so far received 1,100 signatures. Supporters cited the controver-

COU RTESY

Why Was Krys Brandon Ruiz Killed by Lompoc Police?

T

GETTING BACK ON TRACK: The onetime youth hostel could provide 25 rooms of temporary housing to people transitioning off the streets.

From Youth Hostel to Transitional Housing?

West Beach Building Would House Those ‘Ready to Make a Change’ Krys Brandon Ruiz

sial shooting of 27-year-old Lompoc resident Michael Giles in 2016. His family ultimately received a $300,000 payout from the City of Lompoc after filing a wrongful-death lawsuit in federal court. “My experience tells me that the details we get from law enforcement don’t tell the whole story,” Schmidt continued. He previously represented the family of 26-year-old Bryan Carreño, who was killed by Sheriff’s deputies in Santa Barbara in 2017. The family had filed their own lawsuit and last summer accepted an $850,000 settlement from the county. Both Brown and Dudley had cleared the deputies involved of any wrongdoing, but Schmidt uncovered proof that the deputies had actually broken their own safety protocols during the incident, putting Carreño and themselves at greater risk. Schmidt said he plans to file a wrongfuldeath complaint in the Ruiz case as well. But it could be months to years before local authorities release the information he and the family are seeking. “The reality is that the police control all of the evidence and all of the information,” Schmidt said. In the meantime, he hopes the Attorney General’s office will consider his request to step in. “We just want an impartial investigation,” he said. In his obituary, Ruiz was remembered for being “compassionate and kind.” A fourthgeneration Lompoc native who loved music and dogs, he graduated from Delta High School and worked as an in-home care provider while attending Allan Hancock College. A public “Celebration of Life” service was held April 16, where attendees wore Dodger blue. Ruiz was buried during a private ceremony on April 20. n

by Nick Welsh anta Barbara’s onetime youth hostel at 134 Chapala Street abutting Mission Creek just across the train tracks from the city’s downtown railroad depot could soon be the site of transitional bridge housing for people living on the streets if a deal approved last week in closed session by the County Board of Supervisors bears fruit. If all goes according to plan, the youth hostel could be opened in about half a year to provide 25 rooms of transitional housing — some would be doubles and others singles — to those making their way off the streets. Although details of the transaction remain murky, the supervisors approved plans to purchase the property last week. The hostel — estimated to cost $4.7 million to purchase and rehabilitate — was just one of three properties the supervisors approved as part of a broader plan to expand the inventory of beds serving people without housing throughout the South Coast. As the issue of homelessness has achieved new critical mass under the pressures of the COVID pandemic, county administrators have scrambled to acquire new property sites — using state and federal funds earmarked for just this purpose — from which to provide a range of housing alternatives that cumulatively meet the rainbow of needs for people living in cars, in shelters, and on the streets. The stated goal is to provide transitional housing — temporary but longer term — so that those on the streets can be surrounded with the range of services necessary to make them housing ready. Neither of these sites, as adherents of the plan have stressed, are to function as homeless shelters or as detox facilities. If the deal goes through, the City of Santa Barbara Housing Authority would assume

S

ownership of the property, and day-today management would be farmed out to an organization like Santa Maria’s Good Samaritan shelter operation. To date, it’s important to note a purchase offer has not yet been made to the property owner. If it’s accepted, it remains unclear the extent to which the County of Santa Barbara — now flush with reserves — would expect and demand financial assistance from the City of Santa Barbara, which is still struggling with the financial ravages wrought by COVID. “We are confident this model would be a success at this location,” said Rob Fredericks, chief executive for the Housing Authority. “The location is one where an individual might feel comfortable with the general conditions yet will be able to adjust to a more structured living environment.” County Supervisor Gregg Hart confirmed the deal, explaining that for the past year, the county has been looking for suitable hotel-motel properties to buy to create long-term transitional housing to get people off the streets. Hart said he’s confident the involvement of the Housing Authority should address neighborhood concerns. Santa Barbara City Councilmember Michael Jordan — whose district includes the property in question — expressed emphatic support for the deal. The need for such housing, he said, could not be more pressing, and the availability of a transitional housing project could go a very long way to easing the impacts of homeless people on the West Beach neighborhood. Jordan said the project is at least six months from opening and repeatedly stressed that it will not be a homeless shelter. “It’s exactly what everyone always says we need, only somewhere else,” Jordan stated. Like Hart, Jordan expressed confidence in CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

9


APR. 15-22, 2021

HEALTH

Spike in OD Deaths

Locally Owned and Operated

N

ationwide, the number of overdose deaths accelerated markedly during the COVID pandemic, and in Santa Barbara County, the overdose numbers are in keeping with this trend. Last week, Sheriff Bill Brown told the GOLETA that 114 people killed YOU FOR VOTING US Board of Supervisors Ave last year— 5757 themselvesHollister with drug overdoses either accidentally or on purpose. The year Mahatma 2# before that, the number was 80. Of those, 40 were determined to be accidental. Brown added that his deputies helped save PASILLA CHILES 26 overdose victims this past year by administering emergency injections of Narcan, a lb. drug that reverses an opiate’s ability to shut the body down. In the same hearing, the supervilb. 7# sors heard Alice Gleghorn, director of County Department of Behavioral Wellness, that in the CANTALOUPES past year, 416 potential overdose deaths had been reversed countywide with the Narcan applications. Gleghorn stressed that number did not include the doses administered by all lb. ea. El Pato 7 oz.the various first responders, so this past year’s numbers are even higher. Parenthetically, Gleghorn noted, 1,136 lives have been saved ROMA TOMATOES

www.santacruzmarkets.com

RA o St

THANK

SANTA BARBARA

®

WINNER

TIP

BEST CORNER STORE!

BANANAS

Beef

T-BONE STEAKS

$

69¢

$5.98 lb.

PINEAPPLES ERS LEG QUARTERS Chicken

LARGE SHRIMP

$5.98 lb.

$

1

59 ¢

PORK CHORIZO

89 5 T

$

SQUASH

report on youth violence Tuesday after two shootings earlier this year left behind several young victims. Springfield 15 oz.“This year has been a tragic one in terms of the impact of violence on young people,” Police Chief Bernard Melekian said. “For a long time, law enforcement saw its role solely as to solve the crime and arrest the perpetrators. It is very clear that this is no longer enough.”

89 ¢

PEAS & CARROTS

HEAD LETTUCE lb.

PORK CHOPS

89 ¢

69¢ ea. $2.29 lb. MEDIUM YAMS

ORIZOFresh Daily

59

¢ GREEN CABBAGE

GROUND BEEF

LARGE EGGS

lb.

49¢ lb.

HEAD LETTUCE Mazola (40 oz.)

79 $3.99

antacruzmarkets.com

Springfield 8 oz.

WHIP TOPPING $

ORANGE JUICE

3

$EASTSIDE89 MEMORIAL: Friends light a candle

ea.

in memory of the two victims killed in January’s Liberty Street shooting.

www.santacruzmarkets.com

featuring bread daily Parrot (16fresh oz.) Mesquite from (7 lb.) CHARCOAL ANANAS LaCOCONUT WATER Bella Rosa BANANAS BEEF TRIBakery TIP 49 1 49 GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

¢

LONG GRAIN RICE 99

$

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

Mahatma 2#

By the bag

99¢

¢

$2.99

LONG GRAIN RICE

259 D TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS lb.

$

lb.

lb.

7#

MESQUITE CHARCOAL NEAPPLES OCTOBER PINEAPPLES FROM NOVEMBER 2ND $ 27TH LEG QUARTERS 289 THROUGH

$

1 99 ea.

MA TOMATOES

89 ¢ lb.

UJI APPLES

89

EDIUM YAMS

59

lb.

¢ lb.

EAD LETTUCE

79 ¢

ea.

bread daily from sa Bakery

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

1

INSTANT COFFEE

of

Thin sliced

CARNE RANCHERA $

Springfield 15 oz.

PEAS & CARROTS

89 ¢

598

ROMA TOMATOES

89 ¢

®

winner

589

lb. ®

FUJI APPLES � �WINNER

89

lb.

Santa Cruz

PORK CHORIZO SANTA BARBARA SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 $ 49 2 St St 324 W. Montecito 1 324 W. Montecito Springfield 8 oz.

PORK CHOPS

ORANGE JUICE By the bag $ $ 89

¢

lb.

MEDIUM YAMS

$

199

7#

MESQUITE CHARCOAL $

289

El Pato 7 oz.

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

59 ¢

Folgers 8 oz.

INSTANT COFFEE $

589

Springfield 15 oz.

PEAS & CARROTS

89 ¢

¢ GOLETA WHIP TOPPING GOLETA lb. $ 49 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister 1

59

lb.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

1 99 ea.

$ 59 lb. Santa Barbara

Folgers 8 oz.

HEAD LETTUCE

Springfield 8 oz.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

ORANGE JUICE

79 $ 89 3 Support1local people at BANANAS 3 BANANAS LONG GRAINworking RICE 98

BEEF TRI ¢TIP

249

lb.

Mahatma 2#

¢

ea.

49 ¢

Now featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa businesses! 99 $ $ locally 59 lb.NOowned 1Bakery SALES TO DEALERS LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

lb. LIMITED STOCK ON HAND 7# • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM APRIL 22 THROUGH APRIL 28 Chicken

MESQUITE CHARCOAL PINEAPPLES

PINEAPPLES APRIL 22, 2021 LEG QUARTERS

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

$

¢lb.

2018 PORK BUTT Best

59 ¢

ES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS UGH NOVEMBER 2ND

10

69

El Pato 7 oz.

$

¢

Chicken

SANTA BARBARA THE INDEPENDENT 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

$BANANAS ¢99

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

2 LONG GRAIN RICE

89 $INDEPENDENT.COM

Mahatma 2#

149

Minute Maid 59 oz.

CORN OIL ¢

$1.39 Mahatma 2#

—Nick Welsh

Folgers 8 oz.

lb.

NCHERA 69¢ lb. $2.98 lb. FUJI APPLES

(doz.)

from death by overdose since 2016. Epidemiologists studying overdose trends have suggested social distancing requirements triggered by the pandemic have led to an increase in the number of individuals taking dangerous drugs alone, thus increasing the risk of overdose. On top of that, drug dealers are mixing in cheaper, more dangerous compounds, such as fentanyl, considerably stronger than heroin. Additionally, many drug rehab programs have either shut down totally or partially as a result of the pandemic.

City Council Talks Youth Violence INSTANT COFFEE MEXICAN & ITALIAN he Santa Barbara City Council received a an arts alliance program that has served over

Santa Cruz

OPS

BACK FROM THE BRINK: Narcan (aka naloxone hydrochloride) prevented more than 400 OD deaths countywide in 2020.

PUBLIC SAFETY

69¢ lb. ¢

89

289

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

ROMA TOMATOES

$1.98 lb.

1

99

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

$ 99 69¢

75¢ lb.

T

49

LONG GRAIN RICE

¢

DA N I EL D R E I FUSS FI L E PHOTO

BEST 20 20

$

Mahatma 2#

lb.

Melekian pointed to the Liberty Street shooting in January that left a 17-year-old and an 18-year-old dead, and the March shooting on Eucalyptus Hill Road, in which a 24-yearold was killed. He said a combination of prevention, intervention, and enforcement is needed to stop incidents like these. He was joined by community partners who are doing the intervention and prevention pieces, while police do the enforcement work. Melekian first introduced Ricardo Venegas GOLETA from5757 City Parks toAve talk about his department’s Hollister efforts to prevent youth violence. They have Mahatma 2# a job apprentice program to keep youth busy LONG GRAIN and out ofRICE $ 99trouble, he said, and that more than 240 apprentices have been hired by the city through the program. He also said they have

1

7#

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

99

$

289

800 young people. Santa Barbara Unified Superintendent Hilda Maldonado presented to the council the “ABCs” she is focused on: academics, belonging, and connection. She cited the presence of too many Latino children in special education as a major example of problems in the district’s academics. She talked about how crucial it has been to get kids back in school so they can experience belonging and connection, her other focuses. During the pandemic, social isolation affects not just student well-being but also youth violence. Saul Serrano with South Coast Youth Safety Partnership said that after the Liberty Street shooting, the community engagement team met weekly and did a call to action to community partners to reach out to their students and alumni to gauge grief levels and coordinate and connect them to services. Finally, Isis Castañeda from the Santa Barbara County Teen Network gave the council a glimpse into its work around youth violence prevention. Castañeda said her organization is in preliminary discussions with the Bucket Brigade about collaborating and providing gardening boxes for the youth at St. George Youth Center. She also said they are creating a six-week summer program for Eastside students in grades 6-9 who have been either directly or indirectly affected by the violence in their neighborhoods. It will be called the Legacy Program and will be housed through the Police Activities League. Several public commenters urged the council to shrink the Police Department budget and increase the budget for youth programs. Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez agreed, saying, “Their lives are at stake, and the youth and the children are the —Delaney Smith future of the city.”


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOUSING

County Ups Rental Assistance

F

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

lush with an infusion of COVID relief dollars, the Santa Barbara Supervisors voted Tuesday to increase the amount of rental assistance being provided to 100 percent. That assistance spans a 15-month period.

Laura Bode

“This is huge,” exclaimed Laura Bode, head of Santa Barbara Rental Property Association. “We are the only place in California to do this; we are the only place in the whole country to do this.” Prior to Tuesday’s vote, the maximum amount of rental assistance available to applicants had been $6,000 and 80 percent of the amount owed, with the tenant to pay the remainder.

Bode said most of the owners who belong to her organization have already worked out deals with their tenants; many have worked to help connect their tenants with rental assistance. Some tenants, she said, have not pursued such assistance based on the mistaken notion that all they had to pay was 25 percent. After the state moratorium on evictions expires June 30, Bode said, tenants will be on the hook for whatever unpaid rent they still owe. The 25 percent payment merely protected them from evictions prior to the June 30 deadline. “The renters who owe most are typically the most economically vulnerable,” Bode said. She said the new rental support — administered through United Way — will prevent what otherwise could become a tidal wave of evictions. To qualify, renters can make no more than 80 percent of the Area Median Income. Special preference will be given to tenants making 50 percent or less. Translated, a single person making $66,750 or less could qualify under the 80 percent rule, and a single person making $41,650 would qualify under the 50 percent guideline. Funds will be dispensed, Bode said, on a first-come, first-served basis. If tenants lack the computer setup needed to apply, Bode said, they should call the Santa Barbara Rental Property Owners Association. Otherwise, applications can be made via United Way at —Nick Welsh unitedwaysb.org/rent.

YOUTH HOSTEL CONT’D FROM P. 9 the Housing Authority as a conscientious and competent partner. “They have five projects just like this, but nobody ever hears anything about them because they do such a good job managing them,” he stated. The city is currently spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on aggressive, accelerated outreach efforts to get people on the streets into long-term transitional housing, he said, but there’s no place to put them. “When people say they’re ready to make a change, we have to be ready to get them inside some place,” Jordan added. “Not in a month or two, but right now. Or maybe a few days. We don’t have that. This will help greatly.” Jordan, who started his political career as a representative of the hospitality industry on a creeks advisory committee that oversaw the expenditure of bed tax funds earmarked for creek restoration, said he fully expects there to be concern from waterfront hotel and motel owners around West Beach. He expressed concerns of his own that the project will be subject to a lot of “misinformation” put out by fearmongers. “Let me say it again: It’s not a shelter,” Jordan said. “It’s going to be managed housing where we will smother people with the sort of services and counseling they need to get their lives back together.” In addition, he vowed to bird-dog the project relentlessly to make sure every precaution is taken to address neighborhood concerns.

Jordan, who has emerged as one of the more brashly outspoken councilmembers when it comes to expanding homeless housing options, said this acquisition — coupled with the $480,000 the council committed to last Tuesday, April 13, to secure 15 motel rooms over the next six months — should help make a real dent in a problem that has achieved renewed public awareness and concern. No matter how needed such projects may be, getting them past neighborhood opposition is another matter. Two recent such efforts — one proposed for Alisos Street on the city’s Eastside and another at the parking lot by Castillo and Carrillo streets — both blew up in City Hall’s face because of community pushback exacerbated by extraordinarily poor outreach and rollout by the principals involved. Fredericks noted the Housing Authority currently manages several projects that provide various levels of bridge housing for people transitioning off the streets, but most are considerably smaller. The Housing Authority currently has about 60 residents in such housing and estimated that another 40 have transitioned “out of homelessness into permanent housing.” Not everyone, he acknowledged, makes it, adding, “In general we have a very high rate of individuals that succeed in both transitional n and permanent housing.”

WANTED OLD COINS & PAPER MONEY

WE BUY: · Coin Collections (US and Foreign) · US Proof Sets & Mint Sets · All Gold & Silver Coins · Gold & Silver Bars

By Appointment Only Call Ron Gillio · Cell #(805) 637-5081 or email rjgillio@gmail.com GILLIO COINS · 1103 State Street Serving Santa Barbara Since 1971 For Jewelry, contact: Bella Rosa Galleries phone #(805) 966-1707 INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

11


CALI FOR N IA DEPARTMENT OF WATER R ESOU RC ES

APR. 15-22, 2021

INFRASTRUCTURE

r rtunity fo rs an oppo io unseling n o se C d h n lt ies a l He a ta n e M g Give famil n supporti ervices Future by Support S a Brighter a & F mily

With a $125 donation You’ll be entered in a May 14, 2021 drawin

50 winners receive a gift cer

EXPANDED AUTHORITY: The Central Coast Water Authority, which owns and operates the pipeline from the California Aqueduct in Kern County (above) to Lake Cachuma, can now buy and sell water on the open market.

g

tificate valued at $50, $100 or

Your contribution supports ma

$150

ny of the establishments that have supported us in the past!

and

You’ll also receive a recipe boo klet featuring scrumptious dishes from local chefs

Visit CookingUpDreams.org for more information

Our event was a great success!

Thanks to our community we are able to support families with children battling pediatric cancer!

Special thanks to our Advocate Sponsors: J. Paul Gignac

Nathan Rogers Rogers, Sheffield & Campbell, LLP

If you missed the event

use the QR code to watch the video 3892 State Street, Suite 220 Santa Barbara, CA 93105 (805) 962-7466 12

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

TeddyBearCancerFoundation.org INDEPENDENT.COM

County Strikes State Water Compromise

With Drought Looming, Supes Let Water Agency Compete on Open Market by Nick Welsh ith the specter of another of intense drought looming, the county supervisors unanimously voted in favor of a compromise deal that now enables the Central Coast Water Agency (CCWA) — which is responsible for bringing state water into the county — to buy supplemental water supplies on the open market throughout the state. Had this compromise — over new rules easing restrictions on the purchase of out-of-county water — not been approved, the water authority would have been severely hamstrung in its ability to compete for water on the open market. During the last drought, for example, CCWA bought 33,000 acre-feet from private and public water companies, without which Santa Barbara County water customers would have been eating proverbial “dirt sandwiches.” Had the supervisors not approved an amended version of what’s known as Amendment 21 to the new State Water Contract, CCWA would have been able to negotiate only water transfer deals. Under the language approved by the county supervisors, CCWA will now be able to negotiate outright water sale deals. The difference is stark. Under the old water transfer rules, the county could offer no more than the actual cost of water, which has been defined as about $450 an acre-foot. In addition, all water transfers — under the prior rules — had to be paid back. Under the new water sale rules, the price of water is defined as whatever the market will bear and there’s no water payback requirement. Had the supervisors not adopted the changed language, CCWA officials are convinced they could not have competed on the open market with water agen-

W

cies willing and able to pay more. Santa Barbara was the last county south of the Sacramento Delta to adopt the new rules. Making matters suspenseful, the deadline for the supervisors to act expired at the month’s end. At a March meeting, the supervisors, led by Supervisor Das Williams, had vehemently opposed provisions of Amendment 21 because it also allowed CCWA to sell water out of county as well. At a time of drought, Williams argued, it made no sense to allow water to be sold outside the county. CCWA members objected to Williams’s objections with objections of their own. By selling water not being used, they argued, they could defray the costs of more reliable water supplies, such as desalination. Given the shifting geological realities of the state, some regions have water when others are in drought. Santa Barbara’s water managers, they argued, should be allowed the flexibility to manage their water portfolios as conditions on the ground dictated. Instead, under the deal struck by the supervisors, such sales must first be ratified by the supervisors, a laborious and time-consuming process. With the deadline looming large, CCWA’s Ray Stokes ultimately and reluctantly capitulated to the terms of the compromise. Supervisor Gregg Hart extolled the virtues of compromise, to which Supervisor Steve Lavagnino gushingly concurred. “I get it; water is for fighting,” he said. “But do we have to fight every time we talk about it?” Williams took a more combative stance, saying, “CCWA didn’t want to present anything but ‘We want 100 percent of what we want.’” To the extent compromise was achieved, he said, it came about only by “reading their minds.” n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CORONAVIRUS

FEMA Offers COVID Funeral Assistance

C

ongressmember Salud Carbajal announced this week that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is offering funeral assistance to individuals who lost loved ones to COVID-19. Central Coast residents who have paid for funeral expenses after January 20, 2020, for an individual whose death may have been caused by or was likely the result of COVID-19, can apply for up to $9,000 of assistance per funeral through FEMA’s dedicated call center at (844) 684-6333 on weekdays. “No amount of money can make up for the loss of a loved one, but I’m hopeful this assistance will help ease the financial bur-

den on those experiencing the compounded pain of grief and a global pandemic,” Carbajal said. The program applies retroactively and is not means tested, meaning anyone who qualifies can apply regardless of income. In the relief package passed in December, there was $2 billion set aside for funeral assistance. The American Rescue Plan ensures that when FEMA spends the initial $2 billion for the funeral assistance program, there is no further cap on additional funeral assistance coming out of the Disaster Relief Fund. To learn more about applying for funeral assistance, see tinyurl.com/fema-funeralassistance. —Delaney Smith

COUNTY

A

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Mental Health Czar Stepping Down lice Gleghorn notified the county supervisors last week in closed session that she was stepping down as executive director of the Department of Behavioral Wellness after six and a half years at the helm of one of the county’s most challenging departments. When Gleghorn Department of Behavioral Wellness Executive Director Alice Gleghorn was hired in December 2014, the department was a hotbed of despair and dysfunction ioral Wellness over those discharged from for patients, staff, and county supervisors the emergency room has emerged as a sigalike. With a no-nonsense style, Gleghorn is nificant problem. Gleghorn assured the credited — even by her critics — for creating supervisors last week that her department order where chaos once reigned. But even was creating a new liaison position so that her admirers also concede that Gleghorn’s ER doctors will know exactly who to refer “soft skills” could at times use some polishing. patients to. Last Wednesday, Gleghorn was all optiAs a department head, Gleghorn was mism and accomplishments as she unveiled regarded as tough, smart, competent, and her last budget presentation to the supervi- stubborn. Supervisors in support of Laura’s sors, detailing, for example, how the county Law—a mental-health approach in which had secured 32 new long-term beds for those judges are enlisted to order service-resistant experiencing acute mental health challenges clients into treatment — had to resort to at the Champion facility that opened just legislative trickery to overcome Gleghorn’s months ago in Lompoc. In addition, Gleg- opposition. horn cited the 350 new slots opened up for Supervisor Das Williams praised Glegthose dealing with drug addiction under her horn for stabilizing a department that he watch, the 1,136 lives saved from drug over- described as the bureaucratic equivalent doses in the past five years, and the creation of Afghanistan. Her tenure, Gleghorn said, illustrated that “Everything is possible, even of 118 new residential mental-health beds. In the past year, Gleghorn said, COVID the impossible.” has posed significant challenges to finding Gleghorn is leaving to become president room in the county’s 16-bed Psychiatric and CEO of Phoenix Houses of California, Health Facility and other facilities for those Inc., a SoCal-based private nonprofit subin such acute distress they required invol- stance abuse treatment program, and will untary holds. While there are still fewer step down from her Behavioral Wellness involuntary holds now than in 2017, Cottage post in mid-June. In her stead, Pam Fisher, Hospital’s emergency room has experienced the department’s second in command, will a significant spike in such cases in the past fill in pending the selection of a permanent replacement. Fisher had announced her year. Coordination between Cottage ER own retirement just last month and will stay workers and their counterparts at Behav- on to facilitate the transition. —Nick Welsh

Advancing Career and Life Skills

Summer Sessions Start:

May 17 and June 28

ENROLL TODAY! sbcc.edu/ExtendedLearning INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

13


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Car Chasing the Dog

these companies saw their wages increase by 1.11 percent. Many companies initiated some form of hazard pay but soon dropped it. Proponents larded their arguments with words like “despicable” and “unconscionable. “A political, moral, and legal failure.” Or, more pointedly, a “shameful abdication of responsibility.” Maybe I’d come down with a bad case of righteous indignation fatigue. More alarming yet, I found myself nodding along in agreement with Anna Marie Gott, the ultimate troll under the bridge at any council meeting. Gott is off-the-wall smart, relentless, and indefatigable. If she wasn’t such a nattering nabob of negativity — to steal a line from Nixon’s Vice President Spiro T. Agnew —she’d truly be an awesome civic watch dog. Unfortunately, her usual agenda seems to be “I’m right; you’re stupid.” But Tuesday night, she was right. And the whole thing did look a little stupid. “Thirteen months into a worldwide pandemic and you’re just now concerned about hazard pay?” she demanded, her voice quavering with theatrical incredulity. “This is an election year; let’s be blunt.” Why not help out all workers? she demanded. Why not pass a real

AMG vs. AOC: Even by my own standards, I was getting a little reactive. Churlishly perverse, you might say. I was watching Santa Barbara’s City Council at the time. They

were deliberating over a proposal to require that big grocery chains and big pharmacy chains give their frontline and essential workers what’s alternately been described as “hazard” pay, “hero” pay, or pandemic pay. Maybe I’d come down with a bad case of hero fatigue. I’m hardly dispassionate. My son works for Trader Joe’s and has throughout the deadly lifespan of our current pandemic. He lives at home. Given the necessity of the job and the intense exposure that comes with it, I’ve long held that grocery workers deserve to move to the front of all lines — testing, vaccines, and yes, even pay. This is where my nepotism —naked and unapologetic—dovetails nicely with my role as un-appointed public health czar. Yet there I was, getting seriously bugged with the people espousing these very arguments. On the table was a proposal to require Big Grocery and Big Pharma to pay their workers $5 more an hour for four months. On a ton of points, they made a lot of sense. A Brookings Institution study released last December shows these companies had a 40 percent profit surge in the first half of 2020. Kroger—which owns Ralphs—enjoyed a 90 percent increase. By contrast, the workers for

living wage?

My nepotistic sympathies aside, I’d harbored similar doubts. This week, we just shifted from Red to Orange. Schools are opening up. Bars no longer have to pretend to serve food. (And who among you believes

Cottage quality. Urgent care.

those oversized microwave pretzels they serve qualify as actual food?) Case counts are way down. Homeless people now hold signs in front of Jim Knell’s properties reading, “Will intubate for food.” Yes, there are some scary variants out there ready to bite us all on the ass if we aren’t stampeded by our rush to complacency first. That being acknowledged, the timing of this measure calls to mind what they used to say in France about 700 years ago: “Figs after Easter?” (Look it up.) It should be understood that councilmembers Meagan Harmon —quickly emerging as Santa Barbara’s equivalent of AOC —and Oscar Gutierrez, stolid stalwart of the Westside, are pushing this as an urgency ordinance, meaning it gets processed 10 times faster than other proposed ordinances. To make that stick, however, the council needs to make the finding that action is necessary for “the imminent preservation of public peace, health, and safety.” A few months ago, that would have been a no-brainer. Now, however, as City Attorney Ariel Calonne put it, “That’s not a trivial hurdle.” A few councilmembers had questions. Kristen Sneddon wondered why City Hall should single out some “heroes” for remuneration and not others. Mike Jordan wanted to know what happened in the other 30 cities where such measures have been passed. (The answer is that Big Grocery is suing. Kroger shut down five supermarkets. And

the Grocers Association is threatening to increase prices, cut back on employee hours, and shut down more stores, all the while patting themselves on the back for providing hand sanitizers, not to mention the protective shields and screens that they initially resisted.) In response, Harmon quickly watered down key provisions to get the required fivevote supermajority; mathematically, that’s challenging because Councilmember Eric Friedman can’t vote since he actually works at Trader Joe’s. Harmon reduced the number of days the ordinance would be in effect from 120 days to 60 days. And to the extent any of the chains had initiated some form of hazard pay —as Trader Joe’s has—that would be included in whatever hourly bump in pay the council eventually mandated. All these obvious flaws acknowledged, does that mean it’s a bad idea? No, not at all. The grocery industry made out like bandits during the pandemic. Forty percent profits! My son —not a hero, but a conscientious and hard worker —showed up, danced with the virus, surfed all the attendant panic, and weathered the inevitable fallout induced by various outbreaks at a time when test results were typically not available until eight days later. Maybe I’m just another nepotist. Or maybe I came down with a bad case of greed fatigue. —Nick Welsh

13 th Presented by

Now Open in Goleta

H o n o re e s , Lu z R eye s - M a r t i n a n d B a r b a ra B e n - H o r i n NOW OPEN

Cottage clinical providers

Two convenient Goleta locations:

“Vision, Voice, and Advocacy

Goal of complete care in 45 minutes

for a New Generation”

Walk-ins and online appointments

Hollister Village 7070 Hollister Ave #103 Calle Real Shopping Center 5652 Calle Real

X-ray and lab services Open 8 a.m.–8 p.m., 365 days a year

Friday April 30 12pm on Zoom register for this FREE event at awcsb.org

cottagehealth.org/urgentcare

Emcee, Starshine Roshell 14

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


OPINIONS CONT’D DAVE WHAMOND, C ANADA

Letters

Save 25% Sale begins April 23

Say It Ain’t So

T

his is not so much a question as an expression of incredulity — they’re going to close El Capitan for a year and not fix the hike/bike trail to Refugio? Did I read that correctly? All the improvements they’re going to make are at the entrance, and it’s going to take a year? Did State Parks talk to any people who actually use the parks about this? I guess that is a bunch of questions after all. Thanks much for the article.

. .—Norm . Nelson, Goleta

Pamela Libera This is my favorite place to camp, and I go numerous times during the year. I understand that the permit process in Santa Barbara County is difficult, etc., but it sure would’ve been nice if this could have been at least started when things were shut down. • Lorraine Gonzales Why did they wait ’til now? Why not in the height of the pandemic when no one was going out? • Jay Schlemer Closed for a year. Now needs to close for a year. Central planning at its finest. Margo Zapata Wish they would leave it. It’s perfect and a treasure as it is! • Jessica Bambach Glad we just went camping! • Sabrina Bean Nooooo. Guess we will have to postpone our camping trip there.

To Prevent Further Tragedies

I

n May 2014, Elliot Rodger gunned down several unsuspecting residents in Isla Vista before turning his gun on himself. It was a well-known fact among his psychiatrist and parents that he had evidenced mental imbalance of a serious nature for a significant period of time. The knowledge of this atypical behavior on the part of those who knew him well was not enough, however, to curtail its escalation with its devastating irreversible result. My own experience as a psychotherapist over the years points to a flawed diagnostic system often lacking in appropriate and timely interventions. Our humanity as mental-health professionals often compels us to conveniently overlook seriously aberrant behavior on the part of our clients. Laura’s Law has sought to identify these behaviors in a timely manner and then implement them with concrete and effective strategies, which will prevent societal tragedies such as the one that

Rodger perpetrated against the inhabitants of Isla Vista. As I have interfaced with our city’s officials since 2014, during the aftermath of this incident in Isla Vista and in reference to the acceptance and application of this model, it has been a source of profound dismay to me that this effective paradigm for remediation of mental imbalance has been approached with an attitude of seeming lethargy and less than adequate fiscal resources toward its appropriation. Now, more than ever, let’s support the National Alliance on Mental Illness’s investment of endorsement over the years for increased funding for this valuable program. To do so is truly in the best interest of us all. —Elizabeth Araluce Mason, Goleta

J&J Vaccine Debate

Brenda Milton Six people affected out of 6.8 mil-

lion. I am one of the latter. For such an extremely low possibility, it seems like overkill to stop using the J&J vaccine. Driving and walking are more risky — and only one person died. • Jessica Daniela Until it’s someone you know or yourself. • Mary Anderson Harrison The fact that they’re pausing makes me think that there’s more to the story. Better to be cautious. • Tara Smith They say 66 percent prevention of getting sick and 100 prevention of hospitalized or dying. • Jeanette Arnoldi I’m not getting a vaccine. I have so many allergic reactions to meds I once went code blue. I just double mask out in public and wipe hands, phone, wallet, purse, and keys.

For the Record

¶ Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt, featured in the “Truth to Rumor” story about vaccine liaisons, was born in the small town of Bogue Chitto in Lincoln County, which is down the Bogue Chitto River from another town called Bogue Chitto in Neshoba County, where three Freedom Riders were killed, which we incorrectly referenced in the story. Lincoln County had its share of racist incidents, she said, including the murder of Lamar Smith while he helped Black voters at the county seat and plenty of KKK activity. Also, Lyons-Pruitt’s work in the Probation Department was in Long Beach, and her first post in Santa Barbara was with the Department of Social Services.

3317A State St., Loreto Plaza • 805.568.5402 Mon-Sun 11am- 5pm

DO YOUR FEET HURT? •Do you have thick or painful ingrown toenails?

The good news: Most painful thick or ingrown toenails can be treated in 15-30 minutes. •Do you have heel pain? The good news: Plantar fasciitis can be treated and painfree in 3-6 weeks. Hint: STOP STRETCHING

•Do you have painful bunions or hammertoes that you are afraid to fix? The good news: Most bunions require only one week of "no weight bearing" Most patients return to shoes in 3-4 weeks

•Do you have painful corns and calluses? The good news: These painful lesions can be treated in an office visit •Do you have Diabetes? The good news: With regular foot care, you can avoid calluses, ulcers and infection

EXPERIENCE MATTERS • 30+ Years treating these and all conditions of the foot and ankle • Serving Santa Barbara and Goleta

DR. LORIE ROBINSON Board Certified ABFAS

5370 Hollister Ave., Suite 7 Goleta, CA 93117

805-683-5674 University Professional Bldg.

We accept Medicare, Anthem Blue Cross, Blue Shield and Cottage INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

15


obituaries Sanford (Sandy) Brier 12/15/1931 - 4/9/2021

Sanford (Sandy) Brier, 89, passed away of natural causes on April 9, 2021, at his home in Santa Barbara, California. Born in Detroit, MI on December 15, 1931, Sandy was the only child of Morris and Anna Rae (Broner) Brier. On the Brier side of the family, he was the only grandchild and much loved by his Uncles Max and Isadore, and his Aunt Anne. On the Broner side of the family, he grew up close to his cousins Sheldon and Melvin, remaining close to them throughout his life. When Sandy was 12, the family moved to Santa Monica, where his parents ran Brier’s Silk Shop on Third Street in Santa Monica, a typical schmatta store at which people bought material to make their own drapes and clothes. Sandy graduated from Santa Monica High and Santa Monica College, earning his real estate broker’s license. After several years working for his parents (and occasional visits to the horserace track), Sandy formed Brier’s Draperies, working long hours measuring and installing draperies in many houses and apartments in the Santa Monica area. Around this time, he also started purchasing and improving duplexes and fourplexes in Santa Monica. In 1957, Sandy met a cute 18 year-old named Beverley Lewis. They were engaged within six weeks after their first date and married eight months later. Their honeymoon included Sandy’s two favorite pastimes – fishing and gambling – so they went to Las Vegas and June Lake. Bev won at the tables and caught all the fish. Ten months later they welcomed their daughter Lauri, followed by Arnold and Mark two and ten years later. In 1970 Sandy saw an article in Popular Mechanics on prefab housing and thought he could try to make 16

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com a living without working so hard installing draperies. He bought two lots in Malibu and installed prefab houses, selling them quickly, and making $8,000 and $12,000. He decided he was a real estate developer. In 1972, the family moved to Santa Barbara where they joined Congregation B’nai B’rith and became active in the community. He built many homes in Santa Barbara and industrial parks in Lompoc. He convinced several national companies to locate in Lompoc, bringing 500 jobs to the area. Bev always said that Sandy had an amazing ability to pick up things about which he knew nothing about. Sandy and Bev enjoyed tennis at Cathedral Oaks Country Club, annual trips with the family to Hawaii and Tahoe, regular trips to Vegas, and then later extended winter stays at their condo in Palm Desert. Sandy particularly enjoyed his weekly poker games with the same group of friends for over 40 years. Sandy and Bev hosted many parties for their many friends, which usually had a Polynesian theme. Sandy loved dogs and new cars, rarely keeping a car for more than three years. Sandy loved his time with his children and then his grandchildren. Beginning in 1995, his children began moving back to Santa Barbara, bringing several of his grandchildren near and allowing him to work closely with his son-in-law Michael on real estate projects. He included his kids in fishing, pool time, trips to Palm Desert, and vacations. He attended every little league and basketball game, water polo meet, track event, and theater play. He only cared if one of his kids was involved. He was the dad who always picked his kids up from school. He claimed to know a little about everything and his friends named him The Maven. Everyone has a Sandy story, and but for Covid, Congregation B’nai B’rith would have been filled with friends remembering him. He is survived by his wife of 62 years Beverley, his daughter Lauri Baker (Michael), his sons Arnold Brier (Jill Feldman) and Mark Brier (Jill), and grandchildren Dylan Baker, Tracy Baker, Zoe Brier,

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Ethan Brier, and Zachary Brier, and by his many cousins and friends. He was preceded in death by his grandchild Brandon Brier. His family is thankful for the care and friendship of Brian Quintana.

Jay David McCafferty 2/21/1948 - 3/21/2021

Irma Velazquez Borrayo 1957 - 2021

Irma Velazquez Borrayo passed away unexpectedly on Sunday, February 21, 2021, in Santa Barbara, California at the age of 63. Irma is survived by her husband Rafael Velazquez of 46 years and her children: Lupe, Anjelica, Ofelia, Adriana and Antonio Velazquez, as well as eight beloved grandchildren. Irma was born in 1957 in San Nicolas de Ilbara, a small pueblo in Jalisco, Mexico. She was the youngest of six children raised by Antonino and Jovita Borrayo. After losing her father, Irma’s family relocated to Santa Barbara when she was five years old. Irma attended local schools, including Santa Barbara High. After marrying at a young age of 18, she and Rafael started their family. Irma cleaned houses to supplement the family’s income while Rafael started his own landscaping company. Irma’s first love was family above all. She enjoyed spoiling her grandchildren and cooking fabulous meals for her expanding family. Every holiday or important event was at Mom’s house, where she would make everyone feel welcome. We all confided in her and felt her unique warmth. She was also known for selflessly helping neighbors and friends. The family, and everyone who knew her, are shocked that she was taken from us so soon. Irma will be remembered as a loving mother, wife, grandmother and dear friend. Due to Covid, a small private funeral service will be held at: Our Lady of Sorrows 21 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 on Friday, April 23, 2021 at 10:00 a.m.

Jay McCafferty, one of Los Angeles’s most important and convention-defying artists, died March 21 at his home north of Santa Barbara. He was 73. Although commonly known as a Minimalist, he was also grouped with the Post-Minimalist tendencies of Conceptual and Process art. His working method remained constant-focusing rays of sunlight through a magnifying glass to achieve perforated surfaces of great variety; from early works resembling transgressive, cigarette -sized burns on various grounds and later to delicate, complex compositions on pigmented papers. McCafferty was born and raised in San Pedro, California where he lived and worked for his entire life-with sojourns to his ranch north of Santa Barbara. As a young artist, McCafferty won the LACMA New Talent Award and received a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship grant. His art has been exhibited locally, nationally, and internationally, in well over one hundred exhibitions between 1971 and 2019. McCafferty’s work is held in numerous public collections including The Getty Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art.After graduating San Pedro High School, McCafferty studied for a brief time at Los Angeles Harbor College, in Wilmington. Subsequently, he attended Chapman College where he also studied on the World Campus Afloat before attending California State University, Los Angeles. There he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art. In 1973 he received an MFA degree from the University of California, Irvine(UCI). At UCI, McCafferty studied with such artists as Craig Kauffman, Ed Moses and Tony Delap. His classmates included Charles Christopher Hill, John Knight,

Richard Newton, Chris Burden and Alexis Smith. McCafferty presented his first video exhibition, solo, in 1974 at the Long Beach Museum of Art. It was described by the Getty’s Glenn Phillips as a “suite of truly humorous and poetic single-channel videos”. At Harbor College from 1976 to 2019, McCafferty was an associate professor of art and head of the art department. For 30 years starting in 1966, he also worked as a lifeguard on beaches from San Pedro all the way north to Ventura County.During a teaching career spanning more than four decades, McCafferty taught and inspired multiple generations of artists, teaching everything from ceramics to painting to art appreciation. He will be deeply missed by his friends and especially by Ellen Montgomery McCafferty, his wife of 41 years. Ellen wishes to thank Dr. Marston, Laura Guerrero , Susan Clark and Alex Velazquez from VNA in Santa Barbara for their extraordinary care of Jay. A memorial will be held at a later date. Please make any donations to VNA of Santa Barbara in Jay’s name. To Plant Memorial Trees in memory, please visit our Sympathy Store.

Godefrey

“To my man Godefrey: A dear brother and friend You had a profound love of nature You were truly one of a kind Unique, colorful, intelligent And always a gentleman We always made each other laugh You have always been a strong fighter Now you are free flying in the stars And at the waterfalls in Snow Creek Your spirit will live on Forever grateful, Teri Keep the Eucalyptus oil flowing”


obituaries Richard Orsua

8/24/1948 - 3/27/2021

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Richard Orsua, Sr. on March 27th 2021 in Camarillo, CA. Richard suffered bravely through a battle with Alzheimer’s Disease, but now “all the restless tossing” is passed. You are now safe in Heaven, and inside our hearts. Richard was born on August 24th, 1948 in Santa Barbara, CA where he attended Santa Barbara High School. He enlisted and served in the U.S. Marine Corps during the Vietnam war. Upon returning to Santa Barbara, he embarked on a career with the United States Postal Service. He spent 40 years there in various management roles spanning the distance of Santa Barbara, Ventura, and Los Angeles Counties. Richard was a beautiful and complex person. He led his life with courage, strength, perseverance, and with the idea to find-a-way despite the challenges he faced. He often quoted the phrase “I think I can, I think I can…” (from the childrens’ book The Little Engine That Could) to his daughter, Megan. This encouraged her to overcome her own oppositions. With his strong appearance and personality also came a gentle touch and demeanor. One may not have noticed that he was a cat-lover, or that he didn’t like hunting game because he could never bring himself to harm an animal. Chapter 1: Childhood Fun, Santa Barbara, CA. Richard was the grandson of Perciliano and Lucia Orsua. Having a large network of cousins, aunts, and uncles, Richard enjoyed fun in the sun while growing up in Santa Barbara. There was nothing better than swimming at East Beach, scamping around town, or indulging in a loaf of freshly baked bread from the Wonder Bread factory. He attended

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Franklin Elementary School as a boy. Chapter 2: Richie Richard married Mary Alice Pulido in 1971. They bore a son, Richard “Richie” Orsua Jr., in 1972. Being a proud father, Richard enjoyed little league with Richie, playing tennis, and trading baseball cards. Chapter 3: Megan By 1981, Richard remarried to Patricia Marie Fagan. Together they bore a daughter, Megan Orsua, in 1984. With his little girl, Richard enjoyed swimming, bike-riding, and taking family vacations. He also spent countless holidays and family celebrations with the entire Fagan family, who he loved and respected very much. Chapter 4: Boris By 1999, Richard remarried to Alma Orozco. Through this marriage, Richard would find another special component of his life: stepchildren. This especially showed in his connection to his stepson, Boris Palencia. Richard enjoyed being a vital part of Boris’ life, sharing love, kindness, and friendship. Richard would influence Boris’ decision to become a marine, and also showed him with grace an example of what a loving father could be. Chapter 5: Tino, Magsy, and Coey One of the greatest joys to Richard’s life arrived when he became a grandfather to Valentino, Magdalena, and Francisco. What warmth and cheer his heart would emit when the kids exclaimed, “Hi Grandpa!” and embraced him in hugs. Never would my dad, Richard, miss a chance to visit, go out for a bite, take a trip to the mall, or park. His schedule revolved around the kids’ activities – soccer, taekwondo, basketball, tennis, and gymnastics, just to name a few. Dad always tried to live life to the fullest without regrets. Of all the many chapters in his life, he valued each person God put before him. Richard was a truly devoted family man, avid golfer, good Samaritan, kind and generous friend – always willing to help someone in need. Richard is survived by his daughter, Megan Lucia OrsuaGuerra (and her husband Joseph Guerra); their children, Valentino, Magdalena, and Francisco Guerra; his sister

Martha Angeles; his stepson Boris Palencia, and many nieces, nephews, and cousins. He is preceded in death by his son, Richard “Richie” Orsua, Jr.; his mother, Pauline Flavia Orsua; and his grandparents, Perciliano and Lucia Orsua. He will be greatly missed by all his family and by all who knew him. A Rosary will be prayed for Richard at Perez Family Funeral Home in Camarillo on Thursday, April 22nd, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. A funeral mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of the Assumption Church on Friday, April 23rd, 2021 at 10:00 a.m., followed by a burial at Calvary Cemetery in Santa Barbara. Family will gather at a later date to celebrate his life. Donations to the Alzheimer’s Association in his memory would be greatly appreciated.

Richard Anthony Baum 8/18/1952 - 2/22/2021

Richard Anthony Baum passed away in his sleep of cardiac arrest on March 22, 2021 at age 68. He lived a full and vibrant life while fighting a challenging 40-year battle with bipolar disorder. Richard was born on August 18, 1952 at St. Francis Hospital in Santa Barbara, grew up in Montecito, resided in Santa Barbara, and was a parishioner of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. Intellectual pursuits, specifically economics and mathematics, were his lifelong passions. Richard was awarded a B.A. by UCSB in Economics and Philosophy as well as elected to the Lambda Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in June of 1974 following Honors-At-

Entrance at UCSB in 1970. Richard attended graduate school at UCLA from September of 1974 until December of 1980. He was awarded a M.A. by UCLA in Economics in 1976 and was an ABD “all but dissertation” economist from UCLA. His unfinished PhD dissertation was Essays in the Theory of Insurance. Richard loved UCLA and lived by its motto Fiat Lux—Let There Be Light. Continuing education in mathematics fueled his research on complex topics in mathematical economics. Richard was a patient and encouraging instructor teaching students at California State University Northridge, Loyola Marymount University, Whittier College, Ventura College, Santa Barbara City College, and Allan Hancock College. Richard was quick to spot the potential in any student of any ability in any subject. Aside from academia, Richard enjoyed biking the foothills of Montecito, playing tennis at Westmont, designing stationery with a custom-made printing press, and was a prolific and talented creative writer. Late in life Richard met his future wife at Santa Barbara City College where they both were instructors in the Mathematics department. His marriage to Melanie Lansing in 2017 was a dream come true for Richard. Together with Melanie, he enjoyed the symphony, outdoor concerts, dining and conversing with friends, and life with their escape artist cat, Fluffy. Richard is survived by his wife Melanie Lansing; sisterin-law Sandra Baum, older brothers Peter Baum, Francis (Eileen) Baum, and younger sister Mary Baum (Eric Cantlay); aunt Isabelle Baum; cousins John Baum, Theresa Shelley, and Margaret (John) Doyle; nieces Katrina Baum (Paul Stone), Maryann Baum, Stephanie (Saul) Gonzalez, and nephew Kevin Baum; great-nieces Leanne Gonzalez and Sophia Stone; and special friend Ann McEvan. Richard joined his parents, Custer and Persis Baum, eldest brother Eugene Baum and sister-in-law Elaine who preceded his death. Richard’s death occurred on what would have been his father’s 107th birthday and eleven years to the day after his INDEPENDENT.COM

mother’s death. The family of Richard wishes to thank the numerous clinicians and priests who cared for him. In lieu of flowers, Richard may be remembered by donations to Pacific Pride Foundation, Ridley-Tree Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, or the National Alliance on Mental Illness. A commemorative mass will be held on April 14th at 10 am at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, 1300 E. Valley Road, Montecito, followed by interment at Calvary Cemetery.

Jary Lee Cater

4/8/1947 - 4/8/2021

Jary Lee Cater died April 8, 2021 choosing End of Life to die from ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) on his birthdate April 8, 1947. He was born and raised by his parents Kenneth and Lucille Cater in Salem, Oregon. He came to the Goleta/Santa Barbara area in 1972 and stayed forever. He is survived by his son Dylan Nash (Janell), grandsons Darian and Riley; granddaughter, Taylor & her fiancé, Enrique; great grandson E.J.; and niece and nephew, Jonny and Leslie Cater. Grandson, Jaren Nash, is deceased. Important people in Jary’s life were his ex-wives Jennifer & Estella; Diane R., RED, Lisa, Den, Sudsy, Greg, and Gary Drager. He says farewell to the Gang at Monte Vista Schoolteachers, kids, parents & all. He kept that school sharp and organized for 25 years. He thanks his Sansum doctors and Cancer Center Dr. Deborah Meyer; his VNA Care helpers-Gloria, Dayna, Chris, and Denise; Food from the Heart; and Friend helpersMarlo, Karen, and Bob and Nanna Televi. He is very grateful that Dylan could be with him so much in recent days. After life, Jary wishes to REST and SMILE. GO DUCKS!

APRIL 22, 2021

Continued on p.19 THE INDEPENDENT

17


on everything the

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

is doing beyond our pages.

Sign up for our weekly

EXTRA!

NEWSLETTER. Independent.com/newsletters

18

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

CONT’D

The Wild, Wild West of

Telecom Acquisition

Does Santa Barbara Want 5,000 Antennas Blanketing the City?

A

BY KATIE MICKEY

new frontier called the public right of way has sprung up in the residential neighborhoods of Santa Barbara. Telecom carriers are lassoing real estate in the public right of way like the cowboys of yesteryear, taming our local governments with their hypnotic mantra, “Your hands are tied. The FCC has got you strapped and tied to do our bidding!” The telecoms’ goal is to lay their claim to pole space in the public right of way before their competitors. As stated in Santa Barbara City’s Draft Telecom Ordinance, they have their sights on installing 30-60 towers per square mile per carrier. If you do the math on this equation, that makes roughly 5,000 antennas blanketing our city. Perhaps you concur? We need more wireless connectivity. More towers, please. Let’s do our part in making sure everyone gets connected. That sounds great, unless it’s your bedroom window that is now 16 feet from the next public right-of-way acquisition. Well, they’re not exactly pretty, but with so many power lines and utility poles, it all blends together. They can’t be that bad, surely? Well, yes, they actually can. Nobody’s monitoring the intensity of their pulsed modulations that blast through your walls like a smack on the face every few hours. There are now thousands of peerreviewed studies that say the levels of microwave radiation being transmitted cause harm, while the FCC sticks to their outdated data from 1996 measuring the effect of only thermal radiation with 2G technology, ignoring the non-thermal effects of 4G and emerging 5G technology. What possible harms might there be? Well, they include fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, depression, brain fog, cardiovascular issues, and cancer, to name a few. Meanwhile, homebuyers say, “No thank you.” Property values decline an average of 20 percent adjacent to so-called small cell antennas. Furthermore, they are combustible, and their electrical fires cannot be put out with water and standard fire equipment. Cell antenna applicants claim significant gaps in coverage that must be filled with another tower. While their marketing literature claims the opposite, they actually have excellent coverage! Their cannonsize equipment housing 4G antennas hung on utility poles, dedicated poles, light poles, and wires radiate broadband data through microwave radiation for miles within feet of our residences. When, instead, a few macro towers on our hillside away from our residences will suffice for personal wireless services. Or we can install peashooter-size antennas with a cap on power of .1-2 watts or -85 dBm, which gives us five bars on a cell phone for personal wireless coverage. Fiber Optics to the Premises gives us ample capacity and is faster, safer, and more private for our broadband data.

COURTESY

Stay up to date

Opinions

Who is the sheriff, you may ask, to halt the robbery of our public right of way? So far, both the city and the county have rolled over to assist the acquisition. The County Board of Supervisors rescinded restrictions such as proof of significant gap in coverage and prohibition of cell towers in residential neighborhoods. Likewise, the City Council voted down placing a moratorium on new cell towers, until their outdated ordinance is revised. In recent weeks, Andrew Campanelli, a leading national telecom attorney, gave instruction to our county attorney, county public officials, and local residents on the legal arguments that refute the billion-dollar telecom industry mantra “your hands are tied.” He educated participants that our local zoning laws offer us the local authority to protect our residents, if our local government officials so choose. That is a big “if.” The power is in their hands to ensure that our telecom ordinances and codes enact specific provisions such as proof of a significant gap in coverage, setback limitations, height limitations, fall zones, prohibition in residential zones, and cap on radiative power. So the question remains, do you want cannons or peashooters on your street? Do you want “so-called” small cells pulsing microwave radiation within feet of your bedroom? Or do you want affordable Fiber Optics to the Premises or coaxial cable for your broadband, with macro towers in the hills, at a good distance, for your personal wireless services? Will your street be next? Your City Council and your Board of Supervisors need to hear from you! For more information, visit SafeTechSBC.org. n


In Memoriam COURTESY

obituaries

Peter Richards 1957-2021

P

Lived Life to the Fullest

BY L A U R I E R I C H A R D S eter Dewey Richards passed away on

March 25, 2021. He lived every day with joy, sang and laughed with abandon, never met a stranger, and never forgot a friend. Peter’s motto, in his own words, was “Life is short. You have to enjoy it.” You would be hardpressed to find anybody who enjoyed life more than he did. He was so proud of children Rio and Tanner, and he adored his soul mate and wife, Laurie. His passing has left a profound void in all our lives. Peter was the youngest of Joe and Betty Richards’s five boys. Born in Oakland, he spent his childhood years running around the fields and hills of Lafayette, California, with his four brothers: Mike, Chris, Joe, and Gyani. They lost their dad young, which probably played a part in why Peter always treasured his life. But Betty stepped up and raised the boys, encouraging their exuberance and adventures and imbuing them with her own zest for life. Peter was extremely close to his brothers — they could not contain themselves when they were in the same room, vying to provoke laughter from old and possibly inflated stories, with the volume in the room rising until they were all yelling and laughing simultaneously. The brothers took every opportunity to vacation together in their “golden triangle” — Santa Barbara, Maui, and Lake Tahoe. Pete moved south for college, attending Santa Barbara City College and UCSB. While he did love history, he loved surfing and a bit of rabble-rousing more. He waited tables by night and played hard by day, enjoying the surf, sun, and tennis courts, and cruising on his motorcycle with a huge smile on his face. He also spent a few seasons in St. Thomas after college and was a natural for the island life. His St. Thomas rotation was interrupted when he met and immediately fell in love with Laurie. They were opposites in many respects, but they both shared a sense of fun, a love of travel, a devotion to family, and a passionate connection that swept all others aside. They married just a little more than a year after their first meeting at Andrea’s Fish House in Santa Barbara, where Pete bribed another waiter to have Laurie’s table and a chance to meet her. They were married almost 34 years. Those early family years were some of Peter’s favorite times. Trips to the beach and Carpinteria

bluffs, scary movies, eating out, dancing and deejaying — Pete was in his element as a father and best friend to Rio and Tanner. In a home video of Pete and the kids in the surf at Cancún, Dad is body surfing, Rio is holding onto his back, and Tanner is holding onto Rio’s. We called it a Richards surfing sandwich. As the three rushed up the shore, Peter’s face was completely buried in the sand, but as the water receded, they all jumped up laughing, leapt into the water, and did the whole thing over and over again. Peter was truly the best: a loving and affectionate father, the kids’ champion and best friend. They shared a bond that was deeper than words can explain, though; if you saw them together, you knew it was there. When Peter and his young family returned to the Central Coast after a few years in Cathedral City, he started a business — First Serve Tennis Courts — building and resurfacing tennis, pickleball, and game courts. He loved every aspect of the business, especially meeting new clients. Peter was always ready to chat about the latest tournament and debate the merits of the current champions, but it must be said that Roger Federer was his alltime favorite. The business was a great source of pride for Pete over its 30 years of operation. Peter’s most recent joy was the birth of his first grandchild, Opal. She and he immediately connected, and although their time together was short, we will make sure she remembers her “Papushka” forever. As anyone who knew him knows, Peter loved music. Big voices like Tom Jones, Elvis, and Bocelli; soaring harmonies like the Bee Gees and the Doobie Brothers; and reggae voices like Third World, Steel Pulse, and Jimmy Cliff. Music was ever-present in the car, home, and front yard — usually very loud — with Peter singing and tapping and dancing along. And animals — there was not a creature on earth he didn’t immediately love and want to take home to feed it treats: dogs, cats, birds, lizards, goats, baby ducks, squirrels, skunks — they all loved him right back. He also loved a great party, a Frisbee, a “bitchin’ ” sunset, a deep conversation. The world is a dimmer place without Peter, our gentle, joyous, and beloved husband, father, brother, and friend. He kept things fun, full of life, interesting, and upbeat. He kept us laughing, and he made sure we felt his love each and every day. He was irrepressible. He is irreplaceable. A memorial website can be seen at peter drichards.com. n

Lisa Fox

3/29/2021

Lisa Fox had an infectious love of life, her kind, loving, and adventurous spirit will live on in all who knew her. Lisa had a passionate heart, and a desire to live life to its fullest potential. She never met an adventure she didn’t want to take, a horse she didn’t want to ride, or a country song, to which, she didn’t want to dance. She was the kind of person who would be there in the middle of the night, if she was called, show up with food if you were hungry, and sit with you for hours if you were sad. She was truly magical. Things always seemed to work out in her favor, and she was very generous with all of her blessings. In our hearts we know that her wings were ready, but we were not. Though a piece of our hearts has gone with her, she will live on in our memories and we know she will be with us as we find our own adventures. Lisa lost her battle with COVID-19 in the early morning hours of March 29, 2021. Her desire to live never wavered. She did not give up hope at any point of her hospital stay, often taking phone calls from her family members and making plans for what she wanted to do after leaving the hospital. Born in Santa Barbara as the youngest child of 6, Lisa had a life long love of horses and was extremely proud of her Native American heritage. She held many different jobs over her life and was always willing to assist her family members whenever it was possible. Lisa is survived by Tyler Fox, her beloved son, her brothers Larry and Paul, and her sisters Silvia, Carmen, and Maria, as well as her INDEPENDENT.COM

many cousins, nieces and nephews. Services will be held on Monday, April 26, 2021. The rosary will be held at Welch Ryce-Haider Funeral home, at 9 am, a church service at Our Lady of Sorrows will be held at 10 am, with a cemetery service to follow. All are welcome, masks are requested, and social distance is required. She would want us all to stay safe.

Lauretta L. May 2/27/2021

We are saddened to announce the passing of our dear Mother, Lauretta L. May (Laurie to her friends). She passed on February 27th, in Santa Barbara, after suffering from a lengthy illness. She was a resident of Santa Barbara for 53 years, and widowed to Kenneth L. May, who passed in 1979. She is survived by her five children Larry May, Phillip May, Linda Bush, Alice Blatt, Lois Miller, 44 grandchildren/ great grandchildren, and 3 great-great grandchildren. She made many friends, especially at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church in Santa Barbara, where she worked for many years. We especially want to thank Father Steve her friend and mentor, and the Knights of Columbus who continued to comfort and care for her after Dad passed away. We have so much respect for all of you. We thank her very good neighbors and friends for their love and kindness over the years. We also want to thank the VNA Hospice nurses who helped care for her, as well as the Serenity House. Everyone will remember her as a special person who was very gracious, kind and always put the consideration of others before herself. We will truly miss her.

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

19


RESET YOUR MIND, BODY, AND SOUL THIS SPRING! ENTER OUR

g R n i r eset p S

w a y a e ! v i G

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series

y Todam ! at 3p

Join Robin Elander in conversation with Sigrid Wright (CEC), Hillary Hauser (Heal the Ocean), and Deborah Schwartz (Santa Barbara Beautiful) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

Join Robin Elander in conversation with t Nexek! We

Win prizes from local businesses to get you on track this season.

April 15 - 28 independent.com/springreset

E R F E C T G I F T S F O R T H E H O L I D AY S E A S O N

ROBIN GOSE MOXI

ANNABEL PADILLA Girls Inc.

ADAM PORTE Parks & Rec

Summer Camps Thursday, April 29 | 3pm Live on Zoom Register at independent.com/spotlight

Choose from our wide variety of premium olive oils, balsamic vinegars, gourmet foods as well as our selection of beautiful homeware items including handmade olive wood products and Italian ceramics. We have a little something for everybody!

Introducing the

WE SHIP TO ANYWHERE IN CONTINENTAL USA • ORDER IN STORE OR ONLINE 927 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 | (805) 886 4342 | www.VivaOliva.com

MICKEY FLACKS JOURNALISM FUND FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE A fund that directly supports the Santa Barbara Independent’s coverage of social justice and environmental issues. In 2020, the Mickey Flacks Fund supported the in-depth coverage of the Lompoc Prison COVID Outbreak, the Force Files, a look into police use-of-force incidents, and many other issues. To make a contribution visit sbcan.org/journalism_fund To read articles supported by the Flacks Fund go to indpenedent.com/mickeyflacks

20

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Opinions

CONT’D

Every Day Can Be Earth Day

voices

21 Ways to Do Your Part and Make a Difference

D

BY D E B O R A H W I L L I A M S

espite the pandemic, carbon dioxide

COURTESY

concentrations in our atmosphere have just climbed to the highest concentration in recorded history — over 421 parts per million. As Central Coast Californians, we see the consequences of this all around us: including much hotter temperatures, severe fires, rising sea level, and significant droughts. Since 1895, the average temperature in Santa Barbara County has increased by more than 4 degrees Fahrenheit. There has never been a more important time for Earth Day. Earth Day celebrates our life-giving and remarkable environment, while also providing crucial information about threats to the air we

Deborah Williams holds a dishwasher tablet, which has replaced large plastic bottles of soap in her home.

breathe, the water we drink, the public lands we enjoy, and the climate we all rely on. One of the most positive aspects of Earth Day is discovering strategies to help address the challenges our planet and our well-being face, in order to do our part to help heal the environment for current and future generations. One day or one weekend, however, is not enough to tackle what needs to be accomplished to protect our planet and ourselves. The lessons from Earth Day can and must be incorporated into our lives every day as new, sustainable, and winning habits. Recognizing this, the Community Environmental Council (CEC) and I worked together to create “Earth Day – Every Day,” which can be accessed on the Santa Barbara Earth Day website: sbearthday.org /eded. In honor of the year 2021, “Earth Day – Every Day” contains 21 informative, successful, researchbased commitments, including Slaying Energy Vampires, Earth Conscious Transportation, Lower the Paper Flow, Reuse, and Buh-Bye Food Waste. Five years ago, as the Sherpa Fire was raging,

my husband and I decided to significantly reduce our carbon footprint. The heartbreaking signs of climate change were everywhere — not only in Santa Barbara County, but also throughout our state, our nation, and the world. In addition to climate change, we also had so many other environmental reasons to take personal action, including reducing our negative impacts on threatened and endangered species, air and water pollution, plastic pollution, and water scarcity. Because we could not do everything at once, we made a list, which turned into the 21 positive actions in “Earth Day – Every Day.” Over the ensuing years, we have implemented at least one recommended action in each of the “Earth Day – Every Day” Commitments described on the CEC’s website. In every instance, we have been exceedingly happy with the results. In addition to reducing our carbon and pollution footprints, we have often saved money and also meaningfully increased our quality of life on numerous levels, including doing a much better job “walking the talk.” There is so much at stake. What’s more, it has been fun. Really fun. Perfection has never been the goal, just thoughtful reductions implemented over time, with lots of interesting and beneficial discoveries — and a few laughs (we are still not sure we are using beeswax wraps correctly). There have been abundant highlights associated with our “Earth Day – Every Day” journey. Some of them include: (1) planting oaks and sycamores and watching them grow; (2) buying an electric vehicle and fueling it with power generated by our 16 beautiful solar panels; (3) discovering and using toilet paper made from recycled products (not old-growth trees); (4) installing and using low-flow showerheads and shower buckets to conserve water and help water the garden; (5) buying and using silicon cookie sheet liners instead of aluminum foil (they are so much better); (6) canceling unwanted mail (and reducing waste and frustration); (7) finding and using laundry detergent and dishwashing detergent that does not come in a plastic container; (8) finding nontoxic ways to remove pests from the garden (especially using soapy water); (9) figuring out systems to always bring reusable shopping bags to the store; (10) testifying as a public member at numerous hearings to advance renewable energy in our community (and having the decision makers act!). There are so many more. What will be your Top 10 list? Together, we can help address some of the greatest threats humans have ever faced — climate change, fresh water depletion, plastic pollution, and pervasive toxic pollution — one person and one community at a time. Let’s do it. Let’s make every day our Earth Day. Deborah Williams is a lecturer at the UC Santa Barbara Environmental Studies Department and holds a juris doctor from Harvard Law School.

EARN A TOP-RANKED MPA

Classes offered in Santa Barbara.

Learn policy, development and leadership with a Master of Public Administration. go.csun.edu/MPA-SantaBarbara

presents

Dashiell Hammett’s

A Live Radio Play DIRECTED BY KATIE LARIS

AN ONLINE STREAMED PRODUCTION APRIL 21-MAY 8, 2021 Thank you to our season sponsor:

TICKETS: 805.965.5935 www.theatregroupsbcc.com

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

21


HAPPY EARTH DAY! IS NOW PART OF *1% for the Planet is a global organization that exists to ensure our planet and future generations thrive.

1%

of sales from select Lazy Acres brand items will be donated to local earth-minded nonprofits

Grades of Green empowers the next generation of environmental changemakers. Your support helps local student Eco-Leaders build a greener and cleaner community for us all.

Visit LAZYACRES.COM/COMMUNITY to learn more about the local nonprofits that Lazy Acres is supporting! 22

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

ON THE MESA 302 MEIGS ROAD SANTA BARBARA, CA 93109 805.564.4410


BRUCE REITHERMAN

SAVING LANDSCAPES: The Rincon Bluffs Preserve is one of the many places saved from development by the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County.

C

O

V

E

R

S

T

O

R

Y

Fresh Faces of

ENVIRONMENTAL ACTION Introducing Eight Engaged Eco-Warriors

T In this week’s episode of The Indy podcast, host Molly McAnany talks with the editor of this week’s cover story, Matt Kettmann. Listen at independent.com/the-indy.

he founding of Earth Day in 1970 is inextricably tied to Santa Barbara, where a disastrous oil spill the year before

fired up the nation’s environmental hackles and led to the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency. Our region remains a hotbed for Mother Earth–minded preservation, planning, and restoration, carried forth by generations of eco-warriors, who’ve taken the form of every archetype—from activist to academic, lawmaker to litigator, farmer to philanthropist. Today, many of the same battles persist over conserving landscapes, fighting development, cleaning up waterways, saving species, and bringing sustainability to everything. But thanks to the zeitgeist of Black Lives Matter and associated equity-aimed endeavors, the Earth Day movement also encapsulates environmental justice in 2021, an era where racial reckoning extends to all corners of society. We’d like to introduce you to eight fresh faces of environmental action in Santa Barbara. Some of the following folks are new to town, some are multi-generation residents, and one is working on a more regional goal—but all are actively engaged in projects, policies, and programs that matter. We hope their stories inspire the next generation to follow in their footsteps. Happy Earth Day. —Matt Kettmann

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

23


O

V

E

R

S

T

O

R

Y

COURTESY PHOTOS

C

NATIVE PLANTS AND PEOPLE: Teresa Romero, a member of the Coastal Band of Chumash, helps the tribe grow native plants and divert trash from their Santa Ynez Valley reservation.

TERESA ROMERO: PROTECTING TRADITIONAL RESOURCES

For more recycling information please visit:

LessIsMore.Org 24

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Teresa Romero’s career has taken her from nonprofit administration with the San Francisco Symphony to preserving treaty rights to hunt, fish, and gather for Michigan’s Little River Band of Ottawa Indians. “It was complex,” she said of enforcing an agreement from 1836. But now, she’s come home. Romero runs the Environmental Office for the Santa Ynez Chumash, keeping a dozen grants and myriad programs on track, from monitoring the valley haze to nurturing native plants. “If you take care of the resources, they take care of you,” she said. “We have gathering permits out in the forest, and we’ve propagated 3,000 plants of 60 different native species.” Trial and error is teaching them which need a freeze or a burn to sprout. “It’s about stewardship,” she explained. “When we care for our environment and our resources, our land and our waters, it protects our communities, protects our foods, our medicinal plants.” This extends to trash. At the annual powwow, unlike most festivals, trash bins don’t overflow. Romero and her team start with the vendors, explaining the need to avoid single-use items — they’ve achieved a 90 percent landfill diversion rate. “There has been a huge focus on recyclables, but take plastic water bottles, for instance: Why put them in recycling when you can reuse them?” said Romero, who provides hydration stations for refills. “My hope is that when people observe what we’re doing, they think about what they’re doing at home.” Romero is a member of the Coastal Band of Chumash and grew up in Monte-

cito on the hill, canyon, and creek named for her family. She laughed as she said, “We all have a Jacques story,” referring to the infamous lifeguard who once patrolled the Miramar, running off the neighborhood kids who ventured too close to the resort. She left to study anthropology at Oregon State University. “When you study anthropology and archaeology, you dig things up and study what’s been left behind. It really opens your eyes,” she said. “It becomes quite apparent that we’re leaving an awful lot of stuff behind. Where are those things going?” See syceo.org. —Jean Yamamura


BRUCE REITHERMAN

Come Work for MarBorg Companies! Improving the environment and your career...

MarBorg Industries is currently recruiting for: · Co-Driver (Commercial License A or B) · Customer Service Representative · Fleet Mechanic III · Service Technician Driver / P. Restroom · Shop / Wash Rack Tech

ENTRUSTED TO PROTECT: Meredith Hendricks runs the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County, which helped protect the Carpinteria Salt Marsh, among other natural landscapes.

MEREDITH HENDRICKS: THE DEAL MAKER

Email HRdept@MarBorg.com for additional job opening information

MarBorg Recovery is currently recruiting for: · Equipment Operators · Maintenance Equipment Cleaning Techs · Mechanic I Email HR@MarBorgRecovery.com for additional job opening information

Equal Opportunity Employer

COURTESY

Meredith Hendricks’s mother grew up on a Santa Barbara ranch. When she was young, she’d invite her pig Abigail into the house, they were such good friends. When she was a little older, she’d ride her horse through groves of walnuts, apricots, and berries down to the beach. Within a generation, the century-old family ranch was gone, paved over by the Five Points Shopping Center. Hendricks, who grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, traces a clear line between that loss and her ultimate career path of preserving natural landscapes and agricultural land. “It tugged at my heart,” she said. After studying at UC Davis and protecting open space in Northern California, including as director of land programs for the Save Mount Diablo land trust, Hendricks is now leading the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County. She started last fall, smack in the middle of the pandemic, but she hit the ground running—the Land Trust is pushing ahead on a handful of major projects, including the finalization of one that will be announced in the coming weeks. Hendricks, like the organization she now heads, is pragmatic about the complicated pursuit of land conservation. “There’s absolutely a place for development in the world,” she said. “People need a place to live and work and shop.” It’s mindless urban sprawl that she and trusts around the country push against, instead working with landowners willing to explore long-term options for preservation, including for habitat, recreation, or agriculture.

At the County’s new ReSource Center

That effort often means “bringing odd bedfellows together,” as Hendricks puts it, from environmentalists to estate planners to ranchers to builders. But she enjoys it. “I like working with disparate entities to get on the same page and do remarkable things together,” she explained. And she’s well-suited to it, with a master’s degree in environmental business relations and true pride in her work. After more than three decades of success in the southern parts of Santa Barbara County—notching wins for Arroyo Hondo Preserve, the Carpinteria Bluffs, several Gaviota Coast ranches, and several other properties—the Land Trust and Hendricks are now casting an eye farther north. Trails and parks in and around Santa Maria and Lompoc “are getting loved to death,” she said, as sky-high housing prices push workers out of Santa Barbara. “As communities grow and get more complicated, it’s really important we match that with conservation and open space,” she explained. “We want to provide meaningful resources to everyone.” See sblandtrust.org. —Tyler Hayden

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

25


Congratulations Certified Join the City of Santa Barbara in thanking the for taking important steps to protect our

Automotive Businesses Ayers Automotive (805) 962-7316 Bowman’s Auto Repair (805) 965-5051 Cory Motors (805) 965-4581 The Engine Company Auto Repair (805) 965-6789

Santa Barbara Autowerks (805) 966-3200 Schneider Autohaus (805) 962-8015 Smog-It (805) 564-4948

A & A Window Cleaning (805) 699-5656

Superior Brake & Alignment (805) 962-1417

All Natural Carpet Cleaning (805) 245-6030

Swedemasters (805) 962-6633

The Auto Detailing Teacher (805) 448-5132

Westside Auto Repair (805) 963-5053

Fast Lane Oil Change (805) 962-8735

Contractors

Haik’s German Autohaus (805) 965-0975

Armstrong Associates (805) 569-6170

Higgins Muffler & Brake (805) 564-1033

Finley Construction Inc. (805) 722-2181

International Autohaus (805) 965-8012

Matthew G Sicheri Construction (805) 451-0857

Lang Motors (805) 965-5671

Santa Barbara Koi (805) 882-2256

Lara Auto Repairs (805) 963-1096

Santa Barbara Painting, Inc. (805) 685-3548

Meineke Auto Care (805) 687-0281 Muller & Goss Automotive Repair (805) 962-1613 Munoz’s Auto Repair (805) 963-1121 Powell Garage (805) 962-6163

26

THE INDEPENDENT

Mobile Washers

SB Progressive Painting, Inc. (805) 570-8520 Stone & Masonry (805) 692-6810

B&R Carpet Cleaning (805) 966-3208 Big Green Cleaning Company (805) 692-1000

Treat the Leak (805) 896-1864

Jan-Eco Cleaning Company (805) 453-1708

Unique Maintenance Inc. (805) 962-4053

JC’s Auto Detailing (805) 452-8361

Vico’s Auto Detailing (805) 252-5703

Munoz Auto Detailing (818) 300-9989 Nova Mobile Detail (805) 708-3517 Pacific Coast Powerwash (805) 455-1537

Restaurants & Caterers Ah Juice 432 E. Haley Street Arigato Sushi 1225 State Street

Perfection Detail (805) 617-5608

Arnoldi’s Café 600 Olive Street

The Carpet Guy (805) 962-2020

Quality Wash and Detail (805) 570-1076

Backyard Bowls 331 Motor Way 3849 State Street

Royal Carpet Cleaning (805) 284-3929

Blenders in the Grass 1046 Coast Village Rd 315-J Meigs Road 3973 State Street 720 State Street

Casa Beautiful (805) 886-5554 Coastal Bin Cleaning (833) BIN-GUYS Coleman Carpet Cleaners, Inc. (805) 683-2305 Cris’ Mobile Car Wash (805) 680-9463 Evershade (805) 962-9700 Felix’s Carwash (805) 680-1823

Vernon Construction (805) 963-1244

Francisco’s Mobile Detailing (805) 729-6367

INDEPENDENT.COM

J Luna’s Mobile Carwash (805) 284-8868

Southern Coast Janitorial Services (805) 964-4993

Car Wash Coming Mobile Detail (805) 746-4167

Value Added Building, Inc. (805) 722-5771

APRIL 22, 2021

Holguin’s Detail (805) 453-5728

S. B. Pacific Carpet and Window Cleaning (805) 895-9576 Santa Barbara Steam Cleaning (805) 962-2723 Santos Carpet Cleaning & Auto Detail (805) 617-5608 SB Pressure Washing (805) 896-5433 SB WaterWorks (805) 884-0215

Brasil Arts Café 1230 State Street The Brewhouse 229 W. Montecito St Ca’Dario Pizzeria Veloce 38 W. Victoria Street Ca’Dario Restaurant 37 E. Victoria Street California Pizza Kitchen 719 Paseo Nuevo

Visit www.sbcreeks.com, or call (805) 897-2658


Clean Creeks Businesses! following Certified Clean Creeks Businesses, local creek and ocean water quality! _ Casa Blanca 330 State Street

The Green Table 113 W. De La Guerra St

Chad’s 216 W. Cabrillo Blvd

Hana Kitchen 503 State Street

Los Agaves 2911 De La Vina St 600 N. Milpas Street

Nook 116 Santa Barbara St

Norton’s Deli Los Arroyos 18 W. Figueroa Street Handlebar Coffee 1280 Coast Village Rd Roasters 14 W. Figueroa St Oat Bakery 128 E. Canon Perdido St 5 W. Haley Street Creamistry Louie’s at the 2720 De La Vina St 935 State Street Upham Hotel Pacific Pickle Works The Harbor 1404 De La Vina St pacificpickleworks.com The Cruisery Restaurant 501 State Street The Lovin’ Spoonful 210 Stearns Wharf The Palace Grill 2028 Cliff Drive 8 E. Cota Street Dawn Patrol Helena Avenue 324 State Street Lucky Penny Bakery Panino 131 Anacapa St Suite C 127 Anacapa Street 1014 Coast Village Rd Derf’s Café 834 Santa Barbara St 2000 De La Vina St Marty’s Pizza Here’s the Scoop 2733 De La Vina St 1187 Coast Village Rd The Patio Café Dune Coffee 3007 De La Vina St Roasters McConnell’s Fine Institution Ale 1101 State Street Ice Creams 516 State Street Peet’s Coffee & Tea 528 Anacapa Street 728 State Street 3905 State Street Jack’s Bistro Duo Catering & McDonald’s & Famous Bagels Pickles & Swiss Events 1906 Cliff Drive 53 S. Milpas Street 811 State Street 614 E. Haley Street 29 N. Milpas Street Jill’s Place 3940 State Street Pressed Juicery El Paseo Restaurant Shalhoob’s 1024 Coast Village Rd 813 Anacapa Street Meun Fan Thai Café Restaurant 1819 Cliff Drive 632 Santa Barbara St Pure Joy Catering Eureka! purejoycatering.com 601 Paseo Nuevo Milk & Honey Joe’s Café 30 W. Anapamu St 536 State Street Recipes Bakery Feast & Fest 604 Santa Barbara St Catering Mission Street Juice Ranch 1917 De La Vina St Ice Cream & Yogurt 33 Parker Way Rockin’ Yogurt 201 W. Mission Street 620 State Street Finney’s Crafthouse Kanaloa Seafood & Kitchen Mony’s Mexican Kitchen & Market Roy 35 State St Suite A Food 715 Chapala Street 7 W. Carillo Street 217 Anacapa Street Fresco Café Kyle’s Kitchen Rusty’s Pizza 3987 State Street Mother Stearns 791 Chapala Street 111 State Street Candy Co. 232 W. Carrillo Street Giovanni’s Pizza The Lark 219 Stearns Wharf 3731 State Street 3020 State Street 131 Anacapa Street 414 N. Milpas Street Mulligan’s Café The Good Cup Lilac Patisserie and Bar Santa Barbara 918 State Street 1017 State Street 3500 McCaw Avenue Wine Collective 131 Anacapa St Suite C The Good Lion Little Alex’s Natural Café 1212 State Street 1024 Coast Village Rd 361 Hitchcock Way The Shop Café 508 State Street 730 N. Milpas Street Chuck’s of Hawaii 3888 State Street

to learn more about our Business Programs!

INDEPENDENT.COM

Shoreline Beach Café 801 Shoreline Drive South Coast Deli 10 E. Carrillo Street Stanton’s Gourmet Catering stantonsgourmet.com Starbucks Coffee 1046 Coast Village Rd 1235 State Street 1990 Cliff Drive 208 W. Carrillo St 3815 State Street 3957 State Street 539 State Street Super Cucas 626 W. Micheltorena St Taffy’s Pizza 2026 De La Vina St Test Pilot 211 Helena Avenue Three Pickles 126 E. Canon Perdido Toma Restaurant & Bar 324 W. Cabrillo Blvd Tyger Tyger 121 E. Yanonali Street Via Maestra 42 3343 State Street Whole Foods Market 3761 State Street Yellow Belly 2611 De La Vina St

APRIL 22, 2021

Yogurtland 621 State Street

THE INDEPENDENT

27


C

O

V

E

R

S

T

O

R

Y

KRISTEN HISLOP: WATCHING WIND ENERGY

Kristen Hislop grew up enjoying California to its fullest — the Stockton native and her family would often venture to the Sierra Nevada to camp amid its towering trees and imposing granite peaks and to the stunning beaches on the state’s coast. These experiences ignited Hislop’s love for environmental science, and she now manages an extensive portfolio of issues in her role as director of the Environmental Defense Center’s Marine Conservation Program. Hislop, who holds a BA in geography from UCSB, was initially interested in pursuing a career in physical therapy, but she changed her path after becoming fascinated by undergraduate human geography and oceanography classes. She graduated from UCSB’s Bren School in 2008 with a Master of Environmental Science and Management degree. Driven by a passion for protecting and preserving Santa Barbara’s abundant natural environment, Hislop works mainly on issues related to climate change, like fossil-fuel usage and the safe introduction of renewable energy sources. While renewable energy may sound like a straightforward way to mitigate climate change, inadequate planning could harm environments and communities. “We want to make sure there are no lasting negative environmental impacts of renewable energy,” explained Hislop. “We take on that role not only as advocates of renewable energy but also in the venue of offshore wind, which is an exciting issue but should be coupled with protection.” Hislop believes offshore wind is a viable energy source that must be thoughtfully implemented, and she is currently working with multiple state agencies to ensure proposed projects — including two near Point Conception — will be located in areas that reduce the risk to the environment and other user groups, such as fishermen and recreationalists. “We have concerns about nearshore projects because many species are found in higher abundance close to shore,” said Hislop, who’d like to see them located farther offshore and would like to “avoid unnecessary environmental and community impacts.” “This is part of a bigger picture that we get to contribute to on a local scale,” she said of her work at the Environmental Defense Center. “Working in this field and this place is such a gift. It takes a long time to influence policy, but I’ve been in the field for enough time that I’ve seen some wins.” See environmentaldefensecenter.org. —Lily Hopwood

28

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

COURTESY COURTESY

Christopher Ragland credited his mother teaching him how to swim young and his early comfort with the beach as allowing him to become interested in pursuing environmental studies at UCSB. Originally from San Pedro, Ragland said that he was fortunate to have this opportunity because many people of color don’t. “I have Black family and friends now that don’t like going to the beach; they don’t like sand on their feet,” Ragland said. “They don’t like being in the water, and they’re not safe in the water. They don’t think that it is for them — it’s just not a Black thing to do.” So after graduating UCSB and searching for his place in environmental work, Ragland eventually found the perfect fit when he combined his love for the ocean and water sports with his passion for environmentalism and social justice. He’s formed The Sea League — a year-round ocean sports league that is accessible to low-income youth of color and creates pathways to environmental stewardship. He wants to take it from a “fun first” approach rather than overloading the kids with facts. The project began in January and is still small. Ragland has a team of five kids he takes surfing at Leadbetter Beach twice a week for two hours. He hopes to expand once he is able to get more adults involved to help take the kids into the ocean.

Rebuilding relationships between the natural world and communities of color is a central goal of The Sea League. All of the men older than Ragland in his family either are incarcerated or were previously incarcerated, and Ragland believes that he broke that cycle for himself because of his relationship with the ocean and the environment. “It’s not like Black people never had a culture with the environment or the ocean,” he said. “It’s just that it’s sort of been erased and rewritten in a way where many folks don’t think they’re welcome.” —Delaney Smith

LAUREL SERIEYS: URBAN WILDLIFE EXPERT Laurel Serieys knew from a young age that she would need to get all the education she could in order to study and help animals, especially wild cats. As a high school student, Serieys read a scientific paper about “how most research, money, and effort is put into large cats, even though there’s 33 species of small cats that most people don’t invest in. So I was like, okay, maybe I should be a small cat person.” Serieys received her PhD in ecology and evolutionary biology from UCLA, where she studied how anticoagulant rat pesticides affected the genetics and disease susceptibility of bobcats in Los Angeles. From there, she went to Cape Town, South Africa, as the project coordinator and founder of the Urban Caracal Project. After six years in South Africa, her career studying smaller cats brought her back to the West Coast. On the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state, where Serieys is now, logging companies are collaborating with nonprofits like Panthera and with Native American communities to promote a more balanced ecosystem in which predators such as bobcats help control the mountain beaver population, which threatens young saplings. Closer to Santa Barbara, Serieys is hopeful about the impact of the Liberty Canyon Wildlife Crossing, which is scheduled to break ground in 2021. “I think it’s a really amazing, excellent thing. And I know that a lot of thought has gone into it for many years,” said Serieys, who worked in that area between 2006 and

COURTESY

COURTESY

CHRISTOPHER RAGLAND: OPEN OCEANS FOR ALL

2014. “I was there when P-12 became the first cat documented as crossing the 101, and when that happened, I was also doing the genetic analysis for the mountain lion project. And we could immediately see his genetic contribution and how that really helped the population.” Serieys believes that if the crossing can facilitate movement of more mountain lions in and out of the landscape, it will relieve multiple pressures on the cats, adding that another leading cause of mortality there is “mountain lions killing other mountain lions, presumably over fights for territory.” For eco-biologists and lovers of wild cats all over the world, Dr. Laurel Serieys is a source of information and inspiration. See urbancaracal.org. —Paloma McKean


Changing your own motor oil is low-cost, easy, and can be done right at home.

RECYCLE YOUR USED OIL and FILTERS! Remember, it’s illegal to dump motor oil in the trash or down the drain. Make sure to recycle oil and filters at a center near you.

LIZ CARLISLE : SUSTAINABLE SOILS COURTESY

Liz Carlisle grew up in Missoula, Montana, listening to her grandmother’s memories about life in the Dust Bowl. “I was so compelled by her stories of an agrarian childhood, and I wanted that connection to the land,” explains Carlisle, an agroecologist and author who started teaching in UCSB’s Environmental Studies program in the fall of 2019. But those stories were ultimately tragic, as mismanagement of the land led to the destruction of countless communities. After graduating from Harvard, Carlisle hit the road as a country ENTRUSTED TO PROTECT: Meredith Hendricks singer and ran into similar reports. runs the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County, which “There were a lot of farming fami- helped protect the Carpinteria Salt Marsh, among lies all over rural America who other natural landscapes. had incredible traditions of land At UCSB, Carlisle is inspired by a focus stewardship, but were all constrained by essentially the same forces,” she on environmental justice and equity. “It’s explained, pointing to federal farming just not acceptable to continue with the policies of the early 1970s that directed food system we have if you care about farmers toward chemical-dependent equity and climate change,” explained monocultures of commodity crops. “It Carlisle. “The students I work with at not only encouraged but really forced UCSB understand that 100 percent.” farmers, as the Secretary of Agriculture She’s about to publish her third book, said, to get big or get out.” Healing Grounds, whose working subtitle Motivations were multiple. The over- explains it all: How Farmers and Scientists supply of food became a weapon of the of Color Are Reviving Ancestral Traditions Cold War, while corporations like Ford or Regenerative Agriculture to Combat and Sears, which needed low-wage work- Racism and Climate Change. “There’s ers for their urban factories, influenced beautiful symmetry to it,” she said of economic policies that encouraged rural social and eco causes converging. “The land is the place where we need to find flight. Carlisle found a savior of sorts in Sena- healing.” tor Jon Tester, a flat-topped, missing-finThe country may finally be prepared gered Montanan who promoted organic for such. “The experience of this global farming and renewable energy over fos- pandemic, as well as the racial reckoning sil fuels and extractive agriculture. After of the BLM movement, has pulled back working in his D.C. office for a year, Car- the veil for some folks on the structure of lisle went to grad school at UC Berkeley the food system that supports their everyand then worked for four years at Stan- day consumption of food,” said Carlisle. “I ford, along the way co-writing two books: have seen people raise their voices.” Lentil Underground and Grain by Grain. See lizcarlisle.com. —MK

FREE Collection Centers in Goleta Auto Zone at 5799 Hollister Ave., (805) 770-4019 Fast Lane Oil Change at 180 N. Fairview Ave., (805) 683-9640 Jiffy Lube at 6015 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-4100 MarBorg Industries at 20 David Love Place, (805) 964-1498 O’Reilly Auto Parts at 5754 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-1318 Toyota of Santa Barbara at 5611 Hollister Ave., (805) 967-5611 UCSB Campus at Mesa Road, Building 565, (805) 882-3602

Please call ahead, wear a mask, and practice social distancing when turning in your used motor oil and filters. Provided by:

In partnership with:

FOR MORE RECYCLING INFORMATION

(805) 882-3603 www.LessIsMore.org

PLEASE CALL: OR VISIT:

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

29


Happy Earth Day from Heal the Ocean!

30

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


O

V

E

R

S

T

O

R

Y

COURTESY PHOTOS

MATT KETTMANN FILE PHOTO

C

ISLAND ORGANIZER: Jay Reti directs the Santa Cruz Island Reserve, whose pristine landscape makes a perfect outdoor laboratory. Santa Cruz Island

SUMMER GRAY: MARINE JUSTICE ACTIVIST Summer Gray stumbled into the world of environmental activism almost by accident, thanks to a friendly push from Mr. Nagler, a high school art teacher. Gray, the first in her family to attend college, grew up a blue-collar kid in the asphalt concrete wilds of Montclair, where San Bernardino County bleeds into Los Angeles. She was into art — the environment, not so much. Even so, Mr. Nagler recommended Gray for a collaborative arts and science fellowship in the Bahamas to study coral reefs. Witnessing the impacts of human development on the sea was a lightbulb moment for Gray, turning her on to the miraculous complexities of marine ecology and later to the more complex ecology of power, equity, and access as applied to the aquatic universe. For the past four years, Gray’s been teaching environmental studies at UCSB. Along the way, Gray managed to be almost everywhere: monitoring climate-change negotiations in Poland, studying the impacts of sea-level rise in the Maldives, and co-authoring a scholarly treatise proclaiming the emergence of marine justice, a new variant in the realm of environmental justice. Along the way, she also signed on with UCSB Professor Ed Keller to study what made some people more vulnerable than others to Montecito’s catastrophic debris flow in 2018 — essentially, why some got out and others didn’t. Her role was to

interview 25 people who lived, worked, or did business in the upended area. “I’m a qualitative researcher,” she said. “Data is effective, but what I’ve learned over time is that people resonate with stories.” As an assistant professor, Gray has found storytelling a critical tool in teaching “community resilience.” Many environmental studies students, she said, find themselves overwhelmed by the imminent threat of the “slow incremental violence” posed by climate change. “I show little things that people are doing, like the Santa Barbara Soup Kitchen, for example,” she explained, “that give students a sense that they have a role to play, that show people can be involved in making change.” See summermgray.com. —Nick Welsh

JAY RETI: SANTA CRUZ ISLAND’S SCIENCE SUPERVISOR

Jay Reti first visited Santa Cruz Island as a Paso Robles High student, taking a summer course in field biology and immediately falling in love. Today, he’s the director of the Santa Cruz Island Reserve, part of the University of California’s Natural Reserve System, whose 41 properties totaling more than 750,000 acres of land make it the largest research reserve system in the world. “The goal I have for the research is to use the island to test conservation and land stewardship methodology, and export that to mainland California and globally,” said Reti. “We’re really well poised to do that.” While pursuing anthropology degrees at UCLA and Rutgers, Reti worked 15 field seasons in the deepest corners of East Africa, but he would visit the Channel Islands every time he came home. He lectured at UC Santa Cruz until seeing the Santa Cruz Island job posted in 2018, when longtime director Lyndal Laughrin, who’s been on the island for 55 years, decided to retire. (Laughrin still lives out there and helps out.) “I’m stepping into some tremendously big shoes, and I’m really humbled by it,” said Reti. “By our standards, the Santa Cruz Island Reserve is a remote field station. But compared to where I’ve worked, it’s not that bad. Plus, you don’t have to worry about spitting cobras and puff adders.” The “jack of all trades” job involves overseeing a small staff, processing research applications from scientists around the world, scheduling stays at the field station (where 40 people can sleep in normal times), and fundraising. “We get everything

INDEPENDENT.COM

COURTESY

STORY IMPORT: Summer Gray embraces the power of storytelling when by speaking to classes and the public.

from people studying subtidal zones to geologists to entomologists to people studying lichens and different kinds of fungi on the island,” said Reti, who noted that even art students use the island occasionally. “It’s extremely varied, and there is a lot of room for collaboration between all these disparate research groups, which makes it very exciting.” During COVID, Reti spearheaded a climate-monitoring project by installing weather stations around the island in what will be an open-access data system. “I would love in the future to see scientific publications that are citing these weather stations by people that don’t even have to visit the islands,” said Reti. He hopes more people go see the islands for themselves. “I would encourage everyone to visit the islands,” he said. “It’s very common to meet local people who have never been out here. You have this absolutely world-class, spectacular, stunning place an hour away.” See santacruz.nrs.ucsb.edu. —MK

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

31


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE PAUL WELLMAN

COURTESY UCSB A&L

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

4/25:

Mesa Bookstore 4th Anniversary Book Sale and Author Joe Woodard Celebrate four years and counting with D.J. and Diane at this socially distanced and safe book sale. There will be a book hunt, cookies, and coffee; Joe Woodard will be signing his first novel, Ladies Who Lunch; and D.J. Palladino will be signing the second edition of his book, Nothing That Is Ours. 11am6pm. Mesa Bookstore, 1838 A Cliff Dr. Free. Call (805) 966-3725 or email djpalladino@gmail.com.

tinyurl.com/MesaBookstore

4/22:

Virtual Movement Workshop: Shake-a-Leg with Archie & Ephrat All ages are welcome to try out New York City club moves with legendary Archie Burnett and choreographer and b-girl Ephrat Asherie. 5-6pm. Free. Call (805) 893-3535.

3:30pm. Free. Call (805) 963-3636 or email hello@ pacificpridefoundation.org.

tinyurl.com/PrideProm2021

tinyurl.com/Shake-a-legWorkshop

FRIDAY 4/23

4/22: The Theatre Group at SBCC Presents The Thin Man, A Live Radio Play This

4/23: Zoom Presentation: UCSB Bren School 2021 Master’s Project Presentations Join the

production of Dashiell Hammett’s mystery based on his 1934 novel features amateur sleuths and society couple Nick and Nora Charles and their dog, Asta. Access the “watch video” button through your confirmation email. Stream through May 8. $5-$15. Call (805) 965-5935 (10am-3pm, weekdays).

UCSB Bren School of Environmental Science & Management for their annual Master’s Project Presentation Day. Student groups will present both group capstone projects and eco-entrepreneurship projects. Register to receive a Zoom link. 8am-6pm. Free.

theatregroupsbcc.com/shows

4/22: Virtual Author Discussion with Craig Carey Hiking and Backpacking S.B. and Ventura Join Craig R. Carey, who will talk about his latest book, Hiking & Backpacking Santa Barbara & Ventura: A complete guide to trails of Los Padres National Forest. 6pm. Free. Call (805) 6826787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com.

tinyurl.com/CraigCarey

4/22-4/25: Online Art Sale and Gallery Exhibition: Sanctuary — From the Garden, for the Garden This exhibition represents area artists creating work in collaboration with Lotusland to promote and support its sustainable horticulture programs. A generous portion of each sale will benefit the garden. The show goes through May 3. Walk-in hours: Thu.Sat.: 4-8pm; Sun.: noon-4pm. Free.

lotusland.org/sanctuary

4/24: Virtual Event: Calming and Gentle Yoga for Caregivers The Lompoc Hospital District Foundation and Yoga Vie Yoga Studio are joining forces for a webinar designed to provide calming techniques and guided meditation ideas for caregivers. 11am. Free. Call (805) 875-8868 or email ortizk@lompocvmc.com to RSVP.

tinyurl.com/Yoga4Caregivers

4/24: Script to Screen Virtual Discussion: Thirteen Watch 2003’s Thirteen, about the

tinyurl.com/BrenPresentations

SATURDAY 4/24 4/24: 8th Annual Virtual PROUD PROM All 12to 18-year-old LGBTQ+ and ally youth are invited to prom with guest appearances from Lil Nas X and Hari Nef, drag performances, and musical dance breaks. Register online.

tinyurl.com/Script2Screen13

MONDAY 4/26

4/24:

Opening Reception: Walk into Wildfire: An Immersive Multimedia Exhibit The Burn

4/26: Flow + Yin Outdoor Yoga with Sierra Noland All levels are invited to begin

Cycle Project and artist Ethan Turpin present this family-friendly immersive multimedia exhibit designed to give participants an experiential view inside the belly of a wildland fire. Saturday’s reception will feature fire awareness resources, speakers, live music, and a ribbon cutting. Open daily 2-6pm through May 1. 1-4pm. Buellton Recreation Center, 301 2nd St., Buellton. Call (805) 688-1086 or email ethan@burncycleproject.com.

with a warmup that builds into a heat-building active flow followed by Yin poses (deep stretches). Registration is required. 5:30-6:30pm. La Mesa Park, 295 Meigs Rd. $17.

divinitreesantabarbara.com/outdoor

TUESDAY 4/27 4/27: Conscious Conversations Virtual Series: Abolition and the UC: A Virtual Discussion with Organizers In the U.S., uni-

burncycleproject.com

tinyurl.com/AbolitionAndUS

COURTESY

4/28: Día de los Niños/Children’s Day Virtual Event Join this celebration of children, families, and reading. This event will emphasize the importance of literacy for children of all linguistic and cultural backgrounds and present a special

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

WEDNESDAY 4/28

relationship between a mother (Holly Hunter) and her 13-year-old (Evan Rachel Wood) navigating junior high, on Amazon Prime or YouTube, and then join this discussion with writer/director Catherine Hardwicke. 2-3pm. Free. Call (805) 893-4637 or email mattryan@ucsb.edu.

versity police forces are the norm while universities in other countries do not have their own police forces. This panel will feature student and faculty organizers from the California Cops off Campus coalition to discuss how university campaigns are connected to broader struggles for abolition and learn about the Cops off Campus campaign and how to get involved. 6pm. Free.

32

tinyurl.com/DiaDeLosNinos DAVE PEREKSTA

THURSDAY 4/22

performance by musical artists Nathalia. Únase a esta celebración de los niños, las familias y la lectura. ¡Este evento hará hincapié en la importancia de la alfabetización para los niños de todos los orígenes lingüísticos y culturales y contará con la actuación especial de los artistas musicales Nathalia! 4-4:45pm. Free/gratis. Call/llame al (805) 684-4314.

4/28:

S.B. Audubon Society Presents Zoom Event: The Russian Far East – Birding in the Sea of Sorrow David Pereksta, avian biologist with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), had a rare opportunity to explore the Sea of Okhotsk (pronounced aa-kowts-uhk) in the Russian Far East, a few years ago and will share some of his experiences with the wildlife, culture, and history in a talk illustrated with the highlights of the photos he took while there. 7:30-9pm. Free. Call (805) 964-1468 or email programs@santabarbaraaudubon.org.

tinyurl.com/BirdingSeaOfSorrow

4/28: History Happy Hour at Home: Our One-of-a-Kind Courthouse: A Santa Barbara Treasure Pour your beverage of choice and listen to urban design architect and historic preservation advocate David DeSelm as he shares insight of key events and people who shaped the Spanish image of S.B. 5pm. Free. tinyurl.com/HappyHourAtHome

4/28: YMCA Healthy Family Virtual Series: Recognizing Mental Health Warning Signs & Taking Action Learn from Amy Buckner, MS, APCC, Early Childhood Mental Health Specialist, how to identify potential youth mental-health concerns and how to take action. 5-6pm. Free. Call (805) 569-1103 or email info@ciymca.org. tinyurl.com/

HealthyFamiliesYMvCA


APR.

Whale Watching

22-28

Departs Daily from the Santa Barbara Harbor

888-77WHALE

by

www.condorexpress.com

TERRY ORTEGA and SOPHIE LYND

We're back on the water. The Condor Express is fully upgraded with new state-of-the-art propeller-free engines. Modern technology makes them smaller, lighter, and quieter. They are better for air quality with low emissions and better fuel economy. It's gray whale migration season, come join us.

4/22-4/24:

CEC’s 2021 Virtual Earth Day Festival This year’s theme,

Climate Leadership, will be highlighted throughout the festival with a variety of programming, from conversations with climate leaders to musical performances, art contests, and inspirational speakers. Visit the website for the full schedule. Noon-5:30pm. Free. sbearthday.org

4/22: Virtual Show and Reception: S.B. Channelkeeper 18th Annual Juried Art Contest: What the Channel Means to Me S.B. Channelkeeper presents this art show as part of the Youth Day at the S.B. Earth Day Festival. The theme What the Channel Means to Me inspired high school students from Carpinteria to Goleta to reflect on their connection to the S.B. Channel and to create art that celebrates the area’s natural beauty and diversity, while inspiring others in our community. 3:55pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/EarthDayArtContest

4/22-4/25: Earth Day Dance Party Be part of a free, fun, virtual Earth Day Dance Party and move to World Dance for Humanity on Zoom. Come as you are and dance as you desire your own style! 10am. Free.

tinyurl.com/DancePartyVirtual

4/22-4/23: Explore Ecology’s Earth Day Virtual Workshop and Beach Cleanup Explore Ecology Educators will teach a Flows to the Ocean virtual workshop on Thursday and host an in-person, socially distanced East Beach cleanup on Friday. Come early to get your free kit, which includes a bucket, reusable gloves, hand sanitizer, and instructions. Thu.: 1:302:15pm; Fri.: 4-5:30pm. East Beach, 1118 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Free.

exploreecology.org/calendar/list

4/23: Zoom Presentation: UCSB Bren School 2021 Master’s Project Presentations The Master of Environmental Science and Management (MESM) Class of 2021 will present 19 Master’s Group Projects and EcoEntrepreneurship Projects, the culmination of a year working in collaboration with a client partner or on a business plan which addresses an environmental problem. Visit the website for a presentation schedule. Register to receive a link. 8am-6pm. Free. tinyurl.com/MESMPresentations

4/24-4/25: Watershed Brigade Trails & Turnouts Cleanup Event Join S.B. Channelkeeper’s Watershed Brigade this weekend for a dispersed cleanup event targeting front-country trails and trailhead areas from S.B. to Ventura. Visit the website to register, complete a waiver, and find out about a cleanup kit and safety guidelines. Various times and locations. Free. tinyurl.com/WatershedBrigade

Volunteer Opportunity

Fundraiser INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

33


34

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

35


Santa Barbara Independent’s Annual

SUMMER CAMP & FAMILY FUN GUIDE Publishes

next week! Thursday, April 29

Advertising Deadline

Monday, April 26 at noon

36

Contact your advertising representative today advertising@independent.com

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Outdoors

living

COURTESY

p. 37

Santa Barbara Birding

The Changing of the Guard

The Great Push of Migration from the South Is in Full Swing COURTESY

by Hugh Ranson,

MEMBER OF THE SANTA BARBARA AUDUBON SOCIETY

I

El Capitán State Beach

CLOSING FOR ONE YEAR

Closure for Construction of New Road, Bridge, Kiosk, and Trail to Begin on September 1 by Matt Kettmann

C

oastal campers, here’s the bad news: El Capitán State Beach is going to completely close for about one year starting on September 1, 2021. That’s according to a notice on the state-run campground’s website, which is somewhat buried beneath the long list of COVID-related rules and announcements.  The good news, for those with patience, is that the closure will allow State Parks to build a new entry road to accommodate more cars; a new bridge over the creek near the entrance to the park, with ample room for steelhead trout passage beneath; a larger kiosk for rangers to process day-use and camping visitors; and an ADA-accessible trail along the entrance road to allow safer access for pedestrians, who currently must walk along the road to reach the beach and campground.  “We didn’t come out with a big shebang about it because COVID has slowed down a lot of things, and getting agencies to issues permits has been a real challenge,” said Dena Bellman, who took over as the State Parks Channel Coast District Planning Chief and PIO in January 2019. “So we are still trying to get those permits, but our plan, and the funding, and the way we need to approach it really needs to start on September 1.” In fact, it was slated to start a year earlier, before COVID threw a wrench in those plans.   The ever-popular campground, which overlooks the beach along the Gaviota Coast just a few miles from Goleta, features more than 130 camp sites, many of which can accommodate RVs, bicycle trekkers, and larger groups. That’s why it’s often sold out, even in the off-season, and is popular with tourists and locals alike.  “It’s a really exciting project, and probably years overdue,” said Bellman. The project focuses entirely on the entrance to the park, currently a two-lane road with no sidewalks that travels over an old bridge to be serviced by an aging kiosk. “What we’re really trying to

do is find a much more efficient way for people to enter the park and not cause congestion in other areas,” she said, noting that, on extremely busy days, traffic can back up to the 101 on- and offramps.     The road will be widened to more lanes, and the larger kiosk will be able to deal with two visitor vehicles at a time. The rebuilt bridge will be better for stormwater runoff and steelhead trout passage, removing the current barriers that exist to the endangered fish swimming upstream to reproduce.  The ADA-accessible path is also a critical addition, since so many visitors — whether surfers who parked outside of the park or overnight guests at El Capitan Canyon and Ocean Mesa properties across the freeway — now must walk along the road. “There are a lot more people coming to El Cap State Beach than was ever envisioned when the infrastructure was built here,” said Bellman. “Trying to accommodate that all of these years has put a stress on our system.” She anticipates that the park will be closed for a year, but said that the timeline is technically nine months. “That’s what we would prefer, but a year is a much more reasonable timeline,” said Bellman, explaining that the weather could affect work, among other variables.  When closed, there will be no way to legally access the El Cap shoreline, as the entrance road will be offlimits to the public. To offset this loss of coastal access, the usual seasonal capacity reductions at Refugio State Beach and Gaviota State Beach will not occur, and both parks will be fully open, weather permitting, of course. Surfers seeking those rare but magical El Cap tubes will have to paddle or boat in from elsewhere.  The extensive work is also triggering a number of mitigation projects around the park, so expect to see more native plantings and restored riparian habitat when it’s reopened. “We’re really proud of the fact that this is a fully beneficial project,” said Bellman. “We’re looking forward to having a much better facility to welcome the public.” n

t’s a magical time in the bird world. Though many of our familiar wintering birds have left us, a few remain and have been joined by recent arrivals from Mexico and Central America. In this short window, we have an opportunity to view a great diversity of birds — those arriving, those preparing to leave, and of course, the resident birds. Most are in their summer finery and are singing their hearts out. Though we understand more about bird migration than we did a decade or two ago, it still The northern harrier winters in seems to me a miraculous phe- grassland habitat. nomenon. One day the birds are with us, and the next, gone. The white-crowned sparrows that spent the winter finding seeds in our yards will disappear any day now. One night, the urge to move will become overwhelming, and the birds will launch into an all-night flight that will take them far to the north. We can only imagine what this must be like for diurnal birds for whom night leaves them at their most vulnerable. To move at night is to attract the attention of predators, but the urge to migrate must overcome all fears. Some of our wintering sparrows will fly tremendous distances and will have to make several layovers before their destination is reached. Some of our winterers nest as far away as the Puget Sound and beyond. One bird that was particularly conspicuous this winter was the northern harrier, a ghost of a bird that looks and acts as though it’s half hawk and half owl. They were particularly abundant at More Mesa, one of the last remaining areas of undeveloped grassland along the South Coast. Dusk would see up to five of these birds floating low over the golden grasses, looking and listening for the movement of rodents and birds. A particularly thrilling sight is to see a harrier tussle with a short-eared owl, another special bird of More Mesa, and a direct competitor for the harrier’s food. Harriers, as with most other birds of prey, migrate during the day, hunting as they travel. They are known as “leapfrog migrants,” with the most northerly breeders in Alaska wintering the farthest to the south. Our birds will depart any day now, leaving More Mesa and its rodents to the resident red-tailed hawks and white-tailed kites. The great push of migration from the south is in full swing. When conditions are favorable, streams of birds make landfall along the coast at dawn and funnel up the canyons, feeding and singing as they flit from tree to tree. Refugio Canyon is a particularly good place to view this phenomenon. On a good morning, you can see tanagers, orioles, vireos, flycatchers, kingbirds, and warblers all on the move. A few of these migrants will stick around to nest. One such bird, also one of the more spectacular birds you’ll see, is the hooded oriole. They first arrive in mid-March, announcing their presence with an ascending whistled “wink” call. They nest almost exclusively in palms, weaving their basket nests on the underside of fronds. If you see a brilliant orange-yellow apparition with black-and-white wings and a black throat, that’s your bird. Most migration will be complete by mid-May, and nesting will be in full swing. The first fall migrants, the shorebirds, will head south from the Arctic as soon as late July. There’s always movement in the world of birds. n INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

37


living

Close Escapes

Unplug at a

DUDE RANCH

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

We a re

Coura

ge, C onfid

ence

& Ch

arac te

r

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

We are

Rachel, Age 17

Change a Child’s Story

Media Grants

SBCASA.ORG

And this is

what we do!

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

for Santa Barbara County Nonprofit Organizations April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

by Shannon Brooks

O

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique INSPIRINGopportunity ALL GIRLS TO BE nonprofits the ability to spread provides STRONG, SMART, AND BOLD their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. ere! H n is o s a Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is y Se b a healthy, is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent B educated & independent. design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation.

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

Casa del Herrero

SB Wildlife Insert.indd 1

2/22/19 3:20 PM

Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience.

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

Good Work Lives On ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION OF SANTA BARBARA

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with the goal of enhancing our community’s awareness and appreciation of architecture and the built environment. A public nonprofit charitable organization

Since 1989, changing the world for one cat at a time.

Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on the notion that we are, for better or for worse, different people in different places — and on the conviction that it is architecture’s task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Botton

38

Architectural Foundation Insert FINAL.indd 1

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021 1/11/19 1:56 PM

ASAP Cats Insert.indd 1

INDEPENDENT.COM

Two Nights at Solvang’s Alisal Guest Ranch & Resort

Toesy

r 6/18/19 10:39 AM

ne of the perks of vacationing closer to home is seeing familiar places with fresh eyes. So, when I had the opportunity to spend two nights at Solvang’s Alisal Guest Ranch & Resort this fall, I was all in. I’d visited the ranch many times over the years, but it would be my first time as an overnight guest. Since 1946, the 10,500-acre working cattle ranch has served as a haven for visitors seeking the quiet, simple pleasures of country life. Many families have been loyal repeat guests for generations and have standing weeklong annual reservations on the Alisal’s books. While the resort has been modernized over the years, it’s maintained a distinctly oldfashioned air. To this day, there are no televisions, telephones, or worldly distractions in the simple yet luxurious studios, suites, and cottages. (Don’t worry, there is Wi-Fi in the main the resort area!) It felt like summer camp for grown-ups in the best of ways. To start, there was structure. In advance of my stay, guest services provided me with a schedule of activities to choose from — many included in the room rate and others with prices listed. Classic staples of the ranch’s to-do lineup include golf, tennis, fishing, and horseback riding. They’ve also got a spa and tons of wellness and hands-on arts-and-crafts activities. The preplanning meant I could enjoy the luxury of not having to make “big” decisions during my stay because my itinerary was already crafted. Upon check-in, I was given my personalized agenda, which made it easy to keep track of where I needed to be when between meals and activities. Once I got settled in my Western-chic accommodations, I hit the tennis courts for a 45-minute session with the ball machine. The pros looking after me gave me helpful pointers to improve my rusty form and filled me in on their club program for locals, as I admired the finesse of the young kids practicing on the adjacent courts. After working up a sweat under the late-afternoon Santa Ynez Valley sun and having flashbacks to my high school tennis practices, I had a couple of hours to relax before dinner.

Sit-down breakfast and dinner are included in the room rates—any upgrades are simply added to your bill settled at final checkout, another welcome simplification that added to the overall feeling of effortlessness. Dinner is a four-course affair featuring generous portions, local wines, and attentive service. The Alisal encourages guests to dress up for dinner, and after months of being in pandemic casual mode, it was lovely to have an excuse to put on a pretty frock and bring some ceremony to the occasion. I also appreciated the elegance of the grand dining room bathed in the golden light of a huge chandelier and robust crackling fire—a live pianist added to the ambiance. Walking back to my room, I stopped to admire the clear night sky awash in stars. The fireplace in my room was calling to me as I warmed up and wound down for one of the quietest nights of sleep I’ve ever had in a hotel. That solid rest and my breakfast of chilaquiles the next morning readied me for the day ahead. I walked over to the stables to get checked in for my horseback ride and got situated atop Roco, the agreeable horse I was paired with for the 90-minute equestrian expedition. Since no one else had booked the beginner group ride on that particular morning, I was spoiled with a private tour led by one of the Alisal’s knowledgeable wranglers. Courtney guided me along the scenic trails, pointing out the wildlife and sharing interesting background on the ranch — including the fact that the cattle brand dates back to when it was a Spanish land grant given to Jose Raimundo Carrillo in the 1700s. The rest of my leisurely afternoon was dedicated to lunch and sunbathing by the pool, followed by a calming double-header of a guided meditation and gentle yoga class held outside under the shade of towering oak trees. I was greeted by name when I arrived for dinner and savored another feast of seasonal fare paired with local vintages. On my last morning, I explored the main hiking trail loop on property that brought me up some serious hills to catch sweeping valley vistas. As I walked back down to the resort along the dirt path, I couldn’t help but wish I were staying another day. n


SPORTS INVEST IN SILVER

AS PANDEMIC WANES,

SELLING SILVER

PLAYOFFS RETURN

· American Silver Eagles · Silver Rounds 1oz .999 fine · Silver 10oz bars .999 fine · Silver 100oz bars .999 fine

by VICTOR BRYANT

T

he gradual return of Santa Barbara high school sports has served as a light at the end of the pandemic tunnel, and the athletes who participate in many of the winter and spring contests took another step toward normalcy when the California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) announced the return of section playoffs this week. Athletes in baseball, softball, boys’/ girls’ basketball, boys’/girls’ lacrosse, boys’/girls’ tennis, boys’ volleyball, and boys’/girls’ dual-meet wrestling will have the chance to compete for Southern Section championships, an opportunity that was ripped away from spring sports last year at the onset of the pandemic. Unfortunately, fall sports such as boys’/girls’ cross country, boys’/girls’ water polo, and football have completed SHOOTING HIGH: Senior guard Elliot Redkey hopes to lead Bishop Diego their abbreviated spring season and will girls’ basketball back to the playoffs. not have the opportunity to compete in the playoffs. “We moved up three divisions, but it’s better to have The Cardinals defeated four Ventura County [playoffs] than not to have them,” said Bishop Diego teams, including St. Bonaventure, Camarillo, Simi High girls’ basketball coach Jeff Burich, whose team Valley, and Newbury Park in addition to a win over reached the CIF-SS Division 5A finals last season. “It the defending CIF State Division 3A state champions kind of gives you that extra motivation for the season, Bakersfield Christian. so I’m happy about it.” A blend of talented young players and a deterBishop Diego competed in CIF championship mined senior class came together to make the most games on February 29, 2020, and just 12 days later, all of the unusual season. nonessential travel and events were canceled for Santa “I think the undefeated season is a testament to the Barbara county schools. perseverance of our kids and the level of desire that With league competition now underway in many they had,” said Bishop Diego coach Tom Crawford. sports, the incentive to climb the standings and earn “In the end, this was about rewarding the kids for their a playoff berth is a special opportunity for young ath- commitment over the past 13 months, and they rose letes who have endured waves of disappointment this to the standards of performance of the solid Bishop teams we’ve had in the past.” past year. A dominant offensive line that consisted of Parker “I’m excited. I think we have a chance to make the playoffs, but nothing is guaranteed,” said Santa Bar- Maho, Logan Maho, Jayden Martinez-Stiles, Semisi bara High boys’ basketball coach Corey Adam after Falemaka, Jordon Tagaloa, and tight end Ben Ortiz a recent loss to St. Joseph. “We’re going to get better, paved the way for talented ball carriers such as Marcus Chan and Qu’ran Gosset in what became a dominant and I think the playoffs are an attainable goal for us.” rushing attack as the season progressed. On defense, Buddy Melgoza was the ultimate ball Spring Football Wraps Up hawk in the secondary and finished with five interThere will be no playoffs for high school football this ceptions in the five games. Seniors Ben Boeddeker season, but the overwhelming sentiment coming and Luke Knightley were also strong contributors from players and coaches is that they are grateful that on defense. they were able to play at all. The Dos Pueblos High football team ended its sea“I couldn’t ask for a better game to leave on,” said son with a 34-24 victory over rival San Marcos in Santa Barbara High quarterback Deacon Hill follow- the annual “Battle for the Goodland.” Senior captain ing the Dons’ 19-9 loss to Lompoc. “I’ve been riding Daniel Santacruz earned the Jeff Hesselmeyer MVP with these boys since I was in 5th grade. I think we’re Award for his contributions at linebacker and running finally starting to change the program around here, back, which included a touchdown run. Sophomore running back Nathan Bojorquez was and I’ve left my mark.” The future is indeed bright for Santa Barbara as also able to assert himself offensively and scored two the Dons return all five offensive linemen and two of touchdowns. “It was really nice for him to be able to establish its top backs from the spring season in freshman Koa Herrera and sophomore Nathan Barrios. The receiv- himself and basically have a junior season as a sophoing core, which took its lumps this year while gaining more,” said Dos Pueblos coach Doug Caines. “The experience, is loaded with returners, including Miguel reality is we have 6-9 sophomores playing and startUnzueta, Trent Williams, and Clifford Matthews. ing, so all of those kids getting that experience will pay The clear standout among the local football teams dividends, not just next year, but in their senior years this season was Bishop Diego, who went 5-0 to claim when they will have had three years of varsity experin ence going into league.” the Camino League Championship.

VICTOR BRYANT

S.B. Athletes Can Again Compete for Southern Section Championships

All Available For Immediate Delivery By Appointment Only Call Ron Gillio · Cell #(805) 637-5081 or email rjgillio@gmail.com

GILLIO COINS · 1103 State Street Serving Santa Barbara Since 1971

ESCAPE COUPON PACKAGE Rooms from

$169

Suites from

$199

PLAN YOUR SPRING GETAWAY! Includes two dinner entrées & a bottle of house wine plus breakfast!

Visit cambriapineslodge.com to learn about everything we’re doing to keep our guests safe.

Special Code SBMJ

Package only bookable by phone at 800-966-6490

Not valid with other promotions, subject to availability, not available on holidays. Does not apply to groups. Must mention this coupon when making reservations and present at check-in. Does not include tax. Valid 4/3/2021-6/17/2021. Sunday-Thursday nights. No Friday & Saturday availability. Blackout date: 5/30/2021 800-966-6490 • 805-927-4200 • 2905 Burton Dr., Cambria, CA 93428

STAY CONNECTED

WINDOW CLEANING PRESSURE WASHING

FOLLOW US ON

FACEBOOK @sbindependent

805-259-5255

5

on Google and Yelp

$5 per

Window

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

39


COURTESY

FOOD&DRINK PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

Milpas 216 South Milpas Street

Lompoc 1413 N H Street

Downtown 628 State Street

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Buellton 209 E Hwy 246

Santa Maria 985 E Betteravia Road

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Featuring

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

Brenna Quigley Presents

BOT & BTALRERS ELS

BY MATT K

ETTMANN

Roadside Terroir

Geologist Showcases Wine Country in Four-Episode Podcast

ently An indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! hop since ently ASn indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! Shop since Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS! Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

805.569.2323

Gift Certificates Available Support SOhO SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 40

ROCKS, GRAPES, AND MICROPHONES: Brenna Quigley (seen here with winemakers Sashi Moorman, left, and Rajat Parr) is combining her geology studies, wine passion, and interviewing skills into the Roadside Terroir podcast.

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

B

renna Quigley was in the midst of a “little quar-

ter-life panic moment” while finishing her master’s thesis in geology at UCSB in 2015. The Minnesota-raised grad student was unsure of how to follow in the footsteps of her father and older brothers, who were already big names in the realm of rocks and natural resources. So she started working in the tasting room at Kunin Wines just for some extra cash, unknowingly stumbling into a world that craved her earth expertise. “I met people who thought geology was cool,” said Quigley. “All of the sudden, there was this industry that was really hungry for knowledge. I couldn’t believe how passionate they were and how badly they wanted to understand details about all of these things.” Hanging out with wine industry innovators, folks such as winemaker/sommelier Rajat Parr and importer Ted Vance, Quigley began traveling regularly to Europe and soon was consulting for vineyard owners in both France and California. But she wanted a broader audience, and she considered publishing a booklet in the vein of those Roadside Geology books that seemingly every American geologist collects. “I always wanted there to be some resource for the wine community, because driving through wine regions is how we spend so much of our time,” she said. When a friend suggested doing a podcast instead, Quigley dove into learning something brand new yet again. “I really fell in love with the format, the amount of details and color and texture and the depth you can do with audio,” explained Quigley, whose Roadside Terroir podcast launched last year and just released its fourth episode, the final installment for the inaugural series all about Santa Barbara County wine. “People are more willing to listen. They can put it on while they’re doing something else. It doesn’t take up all of your time.” Though Quigley lived here until last August, when she moved up to Napa to be closer to consulting gigs, Santa Barbara wasn’t the original plan for the first series. She had lined up serious funding from Austria

and was set to fly out there in March 2020. That, of course, did not happen due to the pandemic, so she settled into focusing on Santa Barbara instead. Starring a number of winemakers (as well as me), the series explores all of the county’s winegrowing appellations. (Even the just-approved Alisos Canyon appellation gets a quick mention.) It’s narrative in style, traveling along remote canyons and steep mountainsides while interspersing candid conservations about the region’s quirks and qualities with Quigley’s musings on geology. Though I’m certainly biased due to my own involvement and deep interest in the topic, Roadside Terroir should be a treat for anyone remotely interested in wine, geology, Santa Barbara, history, or just well-made podcasts. Quigley is already plotting the second series, which will be in Europe, though she’s not ready to say where yet. That will bring her closer to the origins of terroir, the French concept that broadly means “sense of place” and is what winemakers use to describe how a specific vineyard or region is reflected in the finished wines. “The idea of terroir is everything, and I think geology is the basis of that,” said Quigley. “Well, there’s granite there,” she explained by way of example, “so that means that it weathers and erodes in a certain way, which affects the minerals that are there, which affect how soil develops and also influences microclimate and mesoclimate. It literally shapes the landscape.” Podcast producer isn’t quite what Quigley imagined she’d be doing as part of her career, but she’s happy to have found a way to disseminate what she’s learned about rocks and grapes in an enjoyable way. “It’s turned into a total dream job,” she said. “I love telling stories about geology, and I love learning from other people, especially winemakers, and visiting sites. There are so many wine regions all over the world that can use the love.” n See roadsideterroir.com.


COURTESY

pivots

Dine Out

TAKE OUT

SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY AT HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS

PERMIT PRESERVATION: The Point Drive-Thru Coffee is now serving Storke Road in order to keep the coveted drive-through permit alive.

$500,000

1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

for 71 Restaurants

T

he Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation Restaurant

Fund, in partnership with the Santa Barbara Foundation, announced $500,000 in grants to 71 restaurants located in the City of Santa Barbara and the Santa Ynez Valley, including Los Alamos. This new grant program was launched in early February as a response to the economic impacts of COVID-19, with eligible restaurants able to receive grants of up to $10,000. “The grant we received … has been invaluable in allowing us to reopen after a prolonged shutdown,” said Kelly Kastanos-Rogers, co-owner of Louie’s California Bistro in downtown Santa Barbara. “We were able to stock our shelves with the seafood and produce to prepare for opening, and we were able to provide our employees with the first paycheck many of them have had in months. We will be forever grateful.” The funding was managed by the Santa Barbara Foundation, which is working to provide additional relief to the community at large, said the foundation’s director of donor relations Jessica Sanchez. “This committee-advised fund is creating immediate impact, and we are grateful to support our community-at-large in this way,” she explained. DRIVE-THROUGH COFFEE: A drive-through coffee pop-

up named The Point has opened at 370 Storke Road in Goleta, formerly Zizzo’s Coffeehouse & Brew Pub and the Storke Road Drive Inn. “State-of-the-art ondemand machines create the freshest cup possible and allow customers to select from five different roasts and three different sizes,” is how the business is described at pointmarkets.com. “Beans are instantly pressed during each brew process to deliver our customers with the freshest and most flavorful cup of coffee.” The coffee shop was added so that the owner John Price does not lose the drive-through permit, which would happen if the building is unoccupied for more than a year. The permit is not needed for the gas station, but I am told it is valuable to have for future use since drive-throughs are no longer permitted out in Goleta. The building is scheduled to be torn down, and the property will become a Fuel Depot gas station. The Point Market, which also has six other locations in the area, will open at the Storke Road property once the new Fuel Depot is built.

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm | Sunday Prix-Fixe 5 - 7:30 pm

REVERE ROOM OPENS: Last week, the Rosewood Mira Miramar Beach proudly unveiled The Revere Room, an all-day eatery helmed by the resort’s executive chef, Massimo Falsini. Named in a subtle nod to one of Southern California’s most prolific architects, Paul Revere Williams, whose work influenced several of Rosewood Miramar Beach’s most distinguished design details, the restaurant is a celebration of the best of the American Riviera. “The launch of The Revere Room is a testament to our dedication to facilitating even more magical moments for both guests and neighbors, all while honoring our beautiful home here in Montecito and the vibrant character of Southern California at large,” said Rick Fidel, resort manager at Rosewood Miramar Beach. “We’re thrilled to welcome the community to enjoy it with us at long last.”

Andersen’s Danish Restaurant & Bakery. Menu available for curbside or walk-up pickup. For dining in, order inside and we’ll bring you everything you need at an outside table. Open Daily 10am-6pm, closed Tuesday. Breakfast served until 2pm, Lunch & Dinner 12- Close. We also deliver through restaurant connection. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

ALL THE OPENINGS: Here is a list of area eateries that

have opened in the last eight months:

April 2021: The Point Coffee, 370 Storke Rd., Goleta;

South Coast Deli, 3534 State St. March 2021: 4 Eggs & Pizza, 1221 State St., Ste. 10; Palihouse Café and Bar, 915 Garden St.; Sear Steakhouse, 478 4th Place, Solvang; Secret Bao, 1201 Anacapa St.; Tondi Gelato, 723 State St. February 2021: Wingstop, 3849 State St. January 2021: Barb’s Pies, 18 E. Cota St. November 2020: Café Lido at Mar Monte Hotel, 1111 E. Cabrillo Blvd.; Cajé Coffee Roasters, 1316 State St.; Costa Kitchen & Bar at Mar Monte Hotel, 1111 E. Cabrillo Blvd.; Hustle & Grind Coffee Company, 11 W. De la Guerra St.; La Paloma Café, 702 Anacapa St.; Yona Redz Queso Tacos, 532 State St. October 2020: Cheese Shop Santa Barbara, 827 Santa Barbara St.; Chomp on the Rocks, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 180; Kyle’s Kitchen, 900 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista; Olio Bottega, 11 W. Victoria St. September 2020: Salty at the Beach, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 180; Sprouts Farmers Market, 29 S. Milpas St. August 2020: Aperitivo, 7 W. Haley St.; Bristol Farms, 3855 State St.; Crazy Jim’s Tacos y Mas, 505 State St.; Dean Coffee Shop, 6100-1 Hollister Ave., Goleta; Insomnia Cookies, 430 State St.; Revolver Pizza, 1429 San Andres; Thai Kitchen, 4317 State St., Ste. D

STAY CONNECTED

FOLLOW US ON

INSTAGRAM @sbindependent

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

41


DIGITAL MEETS CERAMIC

LYNDA WEINMAN AND PATRICK HALL ARE KINDRED SPIRITS

tktk FAMILY TIES: From left, Katrina Lef-

fler, Josef Woodard, Alex Van Halen, Kelly Van Halen, Eddie Van Halen, and Valerie Bertinelli at the wedding of Katrina and Ed Leffler in 1993

K

42

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

L I F E PAGE 42

COURTESY

indred Spirits, on view at Sulli- den of sculptures, the newly fortified Clay van Goss, An American Gallery, Studio “is going to create its own gravity through May 24, is a sculptural very quickly.” garden of earthly delights celebrating the Although modern ceramics have not collaborative ceramics made by Patrick always been appropriately valued or extenHall and Lynda Weinman. Each piece mar- sively displayed by galleries and museries one of Hall’s elegant and symmetrical ums, there have always been exceptions, bases to a top section created by Wein- especially on the West Coast. Those who man using computer-aided 3D modeling. have embraced the ceramic medium and While Hall’s vessels infused it with wit, follow the venerable wisdom, and themes ceramic art tradition beyond well-crafted of vases and bowls, surfaces and objects Weinman’s quirky include Ojai’s late, contributions put a great centenarian Beatrice Wood and different spin on the idea, reimagining other such art world vessels that resemble denizens as Peter the anatomical tubes Voulkos, Viola Frey, that carry blood, or and Robert Arneson. perhaps cephalopod In Kindred Spirits, tentacles, or even we see an enlightenthe stems of exotic ing and witty example of the actual and plants. Weinman, a local theoretical merging DIGITAL VESSEL: “Collaborative work #26” (2021) from Kindred Spirits luminary and highly of arts, craft, invensuccessful internet tion, and technoleducation entrepreneur, will be familiar ogy. The latter, of course, has long been to many of you as a generous sponsor Weinman’s world of choice, now paired of — among many other things — the with a newfound love of clay and what Santa Barbara International Film Festival might be done with it. Among the pieces and UCSB Arts & Lectures. Since selling here, bearing numbers rather than titles, Lynda.com in 2015, her instinct for teach- “#29” includes knobby whorls on the suring, learning, and creation has led her to face of Weinman’s work, as if taking the become increasingly involved in ceramics. challenge to keep an organic air in her art, Beginning just over a year ago, in the last despite the digital toolkit she relies on. months of the pre-pandemic, her artistic Diversity and continuity are to be found in plot thickened when she started avidly this introductory sampling of the Hall-Weinpursuing — and really pioneering — the man partnership. Works “#18” and “#23” nascent technology of 3D printing ceramic suggest variations on the more conventional art. ceramic model of jug-like vessels, while “#20” Enter veteran ceramicist Patrick Hall, a explodes that underlying form, its “handles” designer, architect, and passionate ceramic evoking fanciful cake icing touches. artist going back four decades, who has Things tubular and twisty that perhaps kept his Clay Studio in Goleta open for allude to petrified life forms and that resist many years. A still-new partnership with neat geometry or ceramic clichés congifted—and generous—neophyte Wein- sistently inform Weinman’s input. They man resulted not only in the unique col- respond to Hall’s refined shapes most dralaborative body of work on exhibit at matically in pieces like the tall “#28,” in Sullivan Goss, but also in the evolution of which a fluted gesture tops Hall’s clean and Hall’s original Clay Studio into a vast new rounded black base with its sumptuous sur28,000-square-foot structure at the rural- face glaze. Her large olive-colored, clenched ish end of Fairview Avenue. tree-trunk-like form consumes the middle Great potential will be unlocked once of the work’s vertical spread, reminding us the Clay Studio opens to the public and that something fresh and whimsical and yet gains traction with its grand plan of offer- graceful is going on. Digitally driven art has ing educational services, two dozen artist rarely looked so tactile and generally delistudios, exhibition spaces, and more, all cious. The technological reinvention of clay in a ceramics center that seems destined rules in this gallery show, in a tendency that’s to become world-renowned. As Sullivan set to expand soon at Clay Studio in Goleta. Goss owner Nathan Vonk effused last —Josef Woodard week, surrounded by this octopus’s gar-

JOSEF WOODARD’S

LADIES WHO LUNCH

A

fter writing about music and art for more than 40 years in this newspaper, the Los Angeles Times, Rolling Stone, and other publications, authoring two books on jazz musicians, and playing guitar in a panoply of uniquely named and sounding bands, Josef Woodard finally nicked the novelist notch on his belt this week with the publica-tion of Ladies Who Lunch. Across 267 quickturning, punchy pages, we walk in the high heels of recent divorcée Danielle Wiffard as she explores the celebrity and highnet-worth dating scene in Los Angeles during the glitzy and gilded 1990s, reflecting on progress and problems regularly with a snarky, boozy coterie of couture-wearing cacklers. The book’s sardonic, tongue-in-cheek tone makes for plenty of darkly comedic turns, but Woodard frequently drops deeper nuggets of cultural analysis about L.A. and California at large. “It’s an indictment of Los Angeles in a way, but I love L.A. too,” said Woodard, who’s lived in Santa Barbara since he was one year old. “I love partaking of its cultural treasures that we don’t have here. But then I also love getting the hell out of there and

coming home to little Santa Barbara.” The book is a time capsule, having been written 25 years ago when Woodard was visiting L.A. multiple times a week for work, often staying with his sister, Katrina Leffler, who was married to Van Halen’s manager, Eddie Leffler, until his 1993 death. “With her support and urg urging, the book started out being a straighter story of her life,” said Woodard. “But I quickly steered it off into this more bizarre, exaggerated, satirical direction. I wanted to keep this comic gonzo air, which also gave me license to veer off into some weird little twists and adven adventures.” He estimates that the tales and characters are about 15 percent true. With a pandemic producing free time, the siblings dusted off the manuscript — which had some “near misses” in traditional publishing circles over the past quarter century—and decided to take the self-publishing route last fall. Leffler, meanwhile, started recording the audiobook version. “It’s weird to think that the person narrating is the person who the protagonist is modeled after,” said Woodard. Though he could have updated the novel — and parts do feel more relevant than ever, like watching Malibu burn over a


COURTESY

EMAIL : ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

AN ILIAD

John Tufts

W

LADIES WHO LUNCH blackened catfish lunch — Woodard left everything as it was. “What I came to realize was that what I wrote during that period is now an official period piece,” he explained. More daring is for a first-time male novelist to write in a woman’s voice. “It was kind of bizarre, but that was also liberating,” said Woodard. “It’s like an actor who sinks into a role that’s detached Josef Woodard from themselves, so they are able to do things or say things or invent things from outside of their comfort zone. I just became Danielle Wiffard for a year. I don’t know if I want to be her anymore.” As to what he thinks of L.A. today, Woodard hasn’t visited so much in recent years, but he does believe there are many more socially and ecologically conscious pockets of the metropolis than existed in the 1990s, from Echo Park to Santa Monica. “I do sense more cultural awareness,” he said. “But I still get a creepy vibe driving through Beverly Hills.” — Matt Kettmann

COURTESY

hile the premise of An Iliad is relatively simple—have one actor tell the story of Homer’s epic in as theatrical a manner as possible — the result is anything but. In Ensemble Theatre Company’s excellent new Presented by Ensemble version, John Tufts proved to be a Theatre Company. Fri., Apr. 16. fearless performer capable of wringing every nuance out of a rich and brilliantly conceived script. Thanks to Jonathan Fox’s meticulous direction and some spectacular yet unobtrusive camera work, this live online production managed to transcend that problematic category and set a high standard for the future of the medium. The anonymous narrator begins his tale modestly, making frequent references to the great narrative he will deliver as something he only remembers in fits and starts. As the show gathers momentum, he gradually comes to admit that he does retain “a lot of it.” What follows is a verbal whirlwind of extraordinary range and depth. Not for nothing does the Iliad enjoy its reputation as the greatest of all works of literature. In a remarkably successful strategy of revision, the authors of An Iliad displace Homer’s epic similes with historical comparisons and lists of subsequent conflicts. This places the work in a context that makes the violence and power of the story all the more effective. —Charles Donelan

4·1·1

Josef Woodard will be signing books at the Mesa Bookstore (1838 Cliff Dr.) on Sunday, April 25, when fellow scribe D.J. Palladino and Diane Arnold celebrate their four years of owning the bookshop. Palladino will also be singing copies of his first novel, Nothing That Is Ours, and reading from his soon-to-be-published second novel, Werewolf, Texas. See LadiesWhoLunch.me for more information.

THANK YOU SPONSORS

Is Your Boss Violating Your Rights? Adams Law focuses on Advocating employee rights in claims involving: • Wrongful Termination • Pregnancy Discrimination • Disability Discrimination • Hostile Work Environment • Sexual Harassment • Racial and Age Discrimination

• Misclassified “Salaried” Employees and Independent Contractors

• Working “Off the Clock” • Unpaid Overtime Compensation/Bonuses • Reimbursement for Work-Related Expenses

CALL US TODAY 805-845-9630 Visit our website at www.adamsemploymentlaw.com

Adams Law Serving the Employment Law Needs of California’s Central Coast

(805) 845-9630

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

43


CONT’D ALEX ASGARI

ARTS LIFE

ReSource CENTER

Santa Barbara County Public Works

REDEFINING WAS TE RECOVERY KEEPS OUR RECYCLING LOCAL, WHICH MEANS GREATER LOCAL CONTROL AND FLEXIBILITY

ART AS EULOGY: Gary Bradley’s mural on the back of Eos Lounge is an ode to the late rapper MF DOOM.

GARY ’S Y E L D BR A

KEEPS OUR RESOURCES LOCAL. ORGANICS PULLED OUT OF OUR WASTE ARE MADE INTO COMPOST THAT WILL BE USED BY OUR COMMUNITY ORGANICS CONVERTED TO COMPOST WILL GENERATE GREEN ENERGY THAT WILL BE USED BY OUR LOCAL COMMUNITY

Artist’s Vision of DOOM May Be a Good Sign

S TO LEARN MORE, VISIT

LessIsMore.org

We are here for you!

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael H Kreitsek, MA Michael H Kreitsek, MA Michael H Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286 44

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

LIC ART B U P R O HOPE F

INDEPENDENT.COM

Need support? 805.964.5245 info@dvsolutions.org dvsolutions.org

anta Barbara can thank artist Gary Bradley for the incredible new mural on the back wall of Eos Lounge, which faces toward the east on Haley Street, less than two blocks from State. Atop a pink-and-blue sunburst pattern is a massive figure clad in a green cloak. He is made of metal, and his riveted face is fitted with a stygian snarl. He looks down upon you as you walk (or drive) past with an imposing glare in his eyes, pointing, and seemingly both demanding and commanding your attention. While some might quickly recognize this character as Doctor Doom, arch-nemesis of Marvel’s Fantastic Four. But the painted words “You’ve been trippin’ around uptown with some fancy clown!” —from the song “Fancy Clown” by Madvillain—and the onomatopoeic “RIP DOOM’’ identify this figure as the iconic, masked hiphop artist MF DOOM, who died on October 31, 2020, even though the world didn’t learn of his passing until December 31. MF DOOM’s sampling style, which repurposed short musical clips from various genres into new songs, inspired Bradley’s own explorations in music. Today, Bradley describes his taste in music as “soul to punk to funk,” and he thanks DOOM for introducing him to that varied menu.  Bradley’s new mural shares a corner with another piece of very important art: the George Floyd memorial that rose in the wake of the protests during the summer of 2020. This corner of Eos is now a testament to the impact of the lives and legacies of two Black men. Both Bradley’s mural and the George Floyd mural received pushback from the city, but he hopes that this will contribute to a building conversation about the role of public art in Santa Barbara. He suggests that this could start with something as small as trash cans or utility boxes, similar to those in Isla Vista, but dreams of a day where “business owners would be able to do what they want.”  “I want people who want their voices to be heard in the city,” said Bradley. “I want to put more spotlight on a new class of Santa Barbara artists.” —Ricky Barajas Follow @babymoet on Instagram.


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Blogger Emma Elsworthy wrote her

“Self-Care List.” I’ll tell you a few of her 57 action items, in hopes of inspiring you to create your own list. The coming weeks will be a perfect phase to upgrade your focus on doing what makes you feel healthy and holy. Here are Elsworthy’s ideas: Get in the habit of cooking yourself a beautiful breakfast. Organize your room. Clean your mirror and laptop. Lie in the sunshine. Become the person you would ideally fall in love with. Walk with a straight posture. Stretch your body. Challenge yourself to not judge or ridicule anyone for a whole day. Have a luxurious shower with your favorite music playing. Remember your dreams. Fantasize about the life you would lead if failure didn’t exist.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Some traditional Buddhist monks sit

on city streets in Asia with a “begging bowl” in front of them. It’s a clay or iron container they use to solicit money and food from passersby who want to support them. Contemporary American poet Marianne Boruch regards the begging bowl as a metaphor that helps her generate new poems. She adopts the attitude of the empty vessel, awaiting life’s instructions and inspiration to guide her creative inquiry. This enables her to “avoid too much self-obsession and navelgazing” and be receptive — “with no agenda besides the usual wonder and puzzlement.” I recommend the begging bowl approach to you as you launch the next phase of your journey, Taurus.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Gemini-born Paul Gauguin (1848-

1903) is today regarded as an innovative and influential painter. But his early years provided few hints that he would ultimately become renowned. As a teenager, he attended naval preparatory school, and later, he joined the French Navy. At age 23, he became a stockbroker. Although he also began dabbling as a painter at that time, it wasn’t until the stock market crashed 11 years later that he made the decision to be a full-time painter. Is there a Gauguin-like turning point in your

future, Gemini? If so, its early signs might show itself soon. It won’t be as dramatic or stressful as Gauguin’s, but I bet it will be quite galvanizing.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): A research team found that some

people pray for things they are reasonably sure God wouldn’t approve of. In a sense, they’re trying to trick the Creator into giving them goodies they’re not supposed to get. Do you ever do that? Try to bamboozle life into offering you blessings you’re not sure you deserve? The coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to dare such ploys. I’m not guaranteeing you’ll succeed, but the chances are much better than usual that you will. The universe is pretty relaxed and generous toward you right now.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 2013, the New Zealand government

decided to rectify the fact that its two main islands had never been assigned formal names. At that time, it gave both an English- and Māori-language moniker for each: North Island, or Te Ika-a-Māui, and South Island, or Te Waipounamu. In the spirit of correcting for oversights and neglect, and in accordance with current astrological omens, is there any action you’d like to take to make yourself more official or professional or established? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to do so.

WEEK OF APRIL 22

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran author bell hooks (who

doesn’t capitalize her name) has a nuanced perspective on the nature of our pain. She writes, “Contrary to what we may have been taught, unnecessary and unchosen suffering wounds us, but need not scar us for life.” She acknowledges that unnecessary and unchosen suffering does indeed “mark us.” But we have the power to reshape and transform how it marks us. I think her wisdom will be useful for you to wield in the coming weeks. You now have extra power to reshape and transform the marks of your old pain. You probably won’t make it disappear entirely, but you can find new ways to make it serve you, teach you, and ennoble you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I love people who inspire me

VIRGO

to surprise myself. I’m appreciative when an ally provides me with a friendly shock that moves me to question my habitual ways of thinking or doing things. I feel lucky when a person I like offers a compassionate critique that nudges me out of a rut I’ve been in. Here’s a secret: I don’t always wait around passively hoping events like these will happen. Now and then, I actively seek them out. I encourage them. I ask for them. In the coming weeks, Scorpio, I invite you to be like me in this regard.

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Author Grant Morrison observes

SAGITTARIUS

that our heads are “big enough to contain every god and devil there ever was. Big enough to hold the weight of oceans and the turning stars. Whole universes fit in there!” That’s why it’s so unfortunate, he says, if we fill up our “magical cabinet” with “little broken things, sad trinkets that we play with over and over.” In accordance with astrological potentials, Virgo, I exhort you to dispose of as many of those sad trinkets and little broken things as you can. Make lots of room to hold expansive visions and marvelous dreams and wondrous possibilities. It’s time to think bigger and feel wilder.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Where did last year’s lessons

go?” asks Gillian Welch in her song “I Dream a Highway.” Now I’m posing the same question to you — just in time for the Remember Last Year’s Lessons Phase of your cycle. In my astrological opinion, it’s crucial for you to recollect and ruminate deeply on the breakdowns and breakthroughs you experienced in 2020; on every spiritual emergency and spiritual emergence you weathered; on all the scary trials you endured and all the sacred trails you trod.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn painter Henri Matisse had a revolutionary influence on 20th-century art, in part because of his raucous use of color. Early in his career, he belonged to the movement known as Fauvism, derived from the French term for “wild beasts.” During his final years, he invented a new genre very different from his previous work: large collages of brightly colored cut-out paper. The subject matter, according to critic Jed Perl, included “jungles, goddesses, oceans, and the heavens,” and “ravishing signs and symbols” extracted from the depths of “Matisse’s luminosity.” I offer him as a role model for you, Capricorn, because I think it’s a perfect time to be, as Perl describes Matisse, both “a hard-nosed problem-solver and a feverish dreamer.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The guiding motto in the life of every natural philosopher should be, ‘Seek simplicity, but distrust it.’ ” Aquarian philosopher Alfred North Whitehead wrote that, and now I’m proposing that you use it as your motto in the coming weeks, even if you’re not a natural philosopher. Why? Because I suspect you’ll thrive by un-complicating your life. You’ll enhance your well-being if you put greater trust in your instinctual nature and avoid getting lost in convoluted thoughts. On the other hand, it’s important not to plunge so deeply into minimalism that you become shallow, careless, or unimaginative.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): In ancient Greek comic theater, there

was a stock character known as the eiron. He was a crafty underdog who outwitted and triumphed over boastful egotists by pretending to be naïve. Might I interest you in borrowing from that technique in the coming weeks? I think you’re most likely to be successful if you approach victory indirectly or sideways — and don’t get bogged down trying to forcefully coax skeptics and resisters. Be cagey, understated, and strategic, Pisces. Let everyone think they’re smart and strong if it helps ensure that your vision of how things should be will win out in the end.

HOMEWORK: I’m in the mood for you to give me predictions and past life readings. Send your psychic insights about my destiny to truthrooster@gmail.com. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

MEDIATION WORKS Vir tual Book Club Discussion Join us as we discuss April’s Book of the Month,

Nature Poem by Tommy Pico

Divorce & Custody Family Conflicts Over Elder Care

Thursday, May 6 at 6p.m. Live on Zoom

Jennie K. Welsh Mediation welshmediation.com (805)259-8097

Go behind the scenes

Visit independent.com/indybookclub to register!

of this week’s Santa Barbara Independent

independent.com/ theindy INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

45


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

| |

PHONE 965-5205 PHONE 965-5205

| |

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

reaching 100,000 readers each week

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

campus floors facilities. responsibility andAssumes carpet cleaning. Ability to

sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any 500‑member trade organization, is the absence of power the manager. custodial equipmentReqs: including other characteristic protected by law. its next Executivehow Director. The ARE YOUseeking interest in learning Bachelor’s degree related area and/ truck mountincarpet machine and high For primary consideration apply by ideal candidate be and an excellent to safely invest in Bitcoin,must Ether PEOPLESOFT or equivalent /training. pressure experience washers. Ability to handle 3/22/20, thereafter open until filled. communicator and also haveora strong other Alt coins but were to confused Thorough knowledge all heavy lifting ofandaccounting moving tasks. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu financial acumen. Expertise in leading BUSINESS SYSTEMS worried how? Let me help you. I first Criminal history background Job #20200109 functionNotes: and assignments. Ability to the association’s legislative efforts is bought Bitcoin at $650 and it is now check required. valid CA independently gather, Maintain organize,a and ANALYST also aI key of this The over $60,000. firstcomponent bought Ether at job.perform driver’s license,related a clean analysis. DMV record accounting BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES have a proven $13 dollarsideal andcandidate it is nowwill over $2000 enrollment in theskills DMV with Employee Excellentandcommunication In the areas of reporting and strategic record of success as well as at least dollars. I believe the Crypto space is proven ability Pull‑Notice Program. Days and to present information in ahours planning, identifying business processes, years of senior just gettingfivestarted. Don’t management miss out clear andmay varymanner to meet operational concise boththe in writing and problem solving through analysis experience inwealth a mediacreating environment or on this generational needs Thorough of the dept. May be required and verbally. knowledge of DIVISION of business systems HELP and userDESK needs. trade association. event. I will share my ownThe Alt compensation coin financialtotransactions wear an UCSB‑provided uniform. and systems, as Documents complex business processes package for teach this position TECHNICIAN portfolio with you and you how includes Multiple positions available. and $18.62‑ well as related policy, accounting, and systems; prepares plans and proposals competitive baseyourpay, a STUDENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS & to buy anda how to safely store $21.79/hr. The University of California regulatory compliance requirements. for the improvement of systems, performance‑based and TECHNOLOGY (SIS&T) Crypto Currency. I live in Santabonus Barbaraplan Proficiency is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative in use of common procedures and processes; writes test attractive benefits package. (See the Serves as a Student Affairs (SA) Division and offer a FREE introductory call after desktopAction andAdvanced all qualified / web Employer, applications. scripts and tests system changes; writes Job Bank at cnpa.com for detailed job Tier 2 Help Desk Technician under the which I will meet face to face in Santa knowledge applicants will receive consideration of analytical procedures functional design documents; ensures posting.) Qualified candidates should supervision of the Help Desk manager Barbara and get you completely set up. used in for employment regard accounting project without of complex business develops forward a cover letter along with and continuity; guidance ofand other SIS&T reports Systems Call me at 617‑610‑9000. Or Email me scope. toNote: race, Satisfactory color, religion,criminal sex, sexual and tools internal and external users clients.at their resume to cnpajobs@gmail.com staff. forSupports all division at kyle.cetrulo@auxocell.com orientation, gender identity, national history background check.$77,005/yr ‑ Maintains a high level of proficiency with (Cal‑SCAN) their locations; installs and configures origin, protected $80,000/yr. The disability University status, of California PeopleSoft FSCMhardware and HCM. Possesses computer and software. veteran status, or any other HEALTHCOMPUTER/TECH & FITNESS is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative solid operational and accounting skills, by law. The Tier 2 Help Desk responds to Action characteristic Employer, andprotected all qualified general ledgerthat reconciliations and by budget requests are escalated Tier 1 LOWEST PRICES on Health Insurance. applicants Forwill primary receiveconsideration considerationapply for by transactions, and campus financial systems. COMPUTER & IT TRAINING We have the best rates from top employment 3/17/20, thereafter open until filled. Help Desk Field Reps. Responsible for without regard to race, Possesses ability of to functional work under deadline PROGRAM! Train at home to the analysis requirements, companies! Call Now! 1‑888‑989‑4807. color, religion, Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu sex, sexual orientation, pressure, handling multiple projects become a Computer & Help Desk and diagnoses, research and resolution (Cal‑SCAN) Job #20200102 gender identity, national origin, disability concurrently, and dealing with sensitive Professional now! Call CTI for details! of problems. Reqs: Experience with confidentialhardware issues.Reqs: 888‑449‑1713 (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET)status, protected veteran status, or any and computer repair,Bachelor’s Windows HEALTH protected & FITNESS HOSPITALITY/ other characteristic by law. degree in Computer Science, Engineering, Operating Systems, MS Office in a For primary consideration apply by Business or related or combination of RESTAURANT Health Network environment. Excellent CONSTRUCTION 4/26/21,LOWEST thereafter PRICES open untilonfilled. relevant professional experience and Insurance. We have the best rates customer service and communication Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu education.Proficiency with MS Office and from top companies! Call Now! skills are essential. Notes: Criminal Job # 17346 Visio.History Experience analyzing large‑scale background check required. 1‑888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN) business processes problems; Maintain a valid CAand driver’s license, a developing solutions involving the in usethe clean DMV record and enrollment NOW HIRING! Mar Monte Hotel LEGAL of computer systems,Pull‑Notice informationProgram. flow Construction Project Engineer DMV Employee in Santa Barbara is currently hiring and $25.19‑ architecture; creating specifications needed for lg. apartment project, DID YOU KNOW that the average $29.75/hr. The University of for opportunities in Food Services, F/T, benefits, 401k. Exp. req’d. Start business spends the equivalent of for California systems tois an meet Equalrequirements; Opportunity/ Restaurant date: General Manager, Servers mid‑March. Email resumes to: nearly 1½ days per week on digital validating requirements needs; Affirmative Action against Employer, and and Bussers, and more. Full time and FINANCIAL awallace@wallacesmith.com, Attn: Ali marketing activities? CNPA can help designing details ofapplicants automatedwillsystems; all qualified receive part time positions are available. Stop WWW.WALLACESMITH.COM developing userfor interface consideration employmentdesign; without save you time and money. For more COORDINATOR by the hotel or call planning unit religion, integration regardandtoexecuting race, color, sex, info emailOFcecelia@cnpa.com or call DEPARTMENT CHEMISTRY & (805) 882‑1234 to inquire. and sexual acceptance testing;gender developing orientation, identity, EDUCATION (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN) BIOCHEMISTRY user national reference origin, materialsdisability and trainings. status, MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here –Primary Get responsibilities are to maintain Notes: Satisfactory protected veterancriminal status, history or any PROFESSIONAL trained as FAA certified Aviation the shadow accounting system background check. UCSB isprotected a Tobacco‑Free other characteristic by law. (GUS) for all departmental (non‑EMF) DENTIST: DIAGNOSE and treataidteeth; Technician. Financial for qualified environment. $60,000‑$67,710/yr. For primary consideration apply by accounts and for the accurate and Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) assistance. students. Job placement The 3/19/20, University thereafter of California an Equal openis until filled. timely monthly billing for the seven degree or related and CAInstitute Dental of License Call Aviation Maintenance Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu req’d; 40 877‑205‑4138. hrs/wk; Apply(Cal‑SCAN) to Ana R. DCB recharge facilities including the and Job all #20200111 qualified applicants will receive Martinez DDS, Inc., 1187 Coast Village distribution of recharges to users of consideration for employment without This includes managing the Rd., Ste. 11, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. each facility. AUDIT EMPLOYMENT regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual reconciliation of departmental PORTABLESERVICES OXYGEN Concentrator monthlyPROFESSIONAL 2 orientation, gender identity, national origin, and accounts while actively May Be Covered by Medicare! Reclaim payroll AUDIT disability status, protected veteran status, AND ADVISORY SERVICES investigating and solving any issues AIRLINES ARE HIRING ‑ Get FAA Performs and documents audits independence and mobility with the or any other characteristic protected by that appear on the monthly general & apply by approved hands on Aviation compact design and long‑lasting batterytraining. and advisory services in accordance law. MARKETING For primary consideration ledger, creating new recharge accounts for qualified of Inogen Financial One. FreeAidinformation kit!students with the International Standards for 4/22/21, thereafter open until filled. Apply SOCIAL MEDIA for both DCB customers and those ‑ Career (Cal‑SCAN) placement assistance. CALL Call 844‑327‑2824. online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 17228 the Professional Practice of Internal outside of the department, processing Aviation Institute of Maintenance Auditing and Practice Advisories COORDINATOR and maintaining the recharge facility 888‑686‑1704 established by the Institute of MULTICULTURAL CENTER PROFESSIONAL billing system, and preparing quarterly Internal Auditors, the UC Internal Develops the program’s marketing cost recovery transfers for review by FINANCE Audit Manual, and UCSB Audit goals and oversees productions the Financial Manager. Reqs: Requires and Advisory Services procedures. and distribution of all marketing. a high level of organizational skills ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE Reports to and is supervised on a Manages social marketing campaigns to detail. Ability to be ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & and bank attention while ensuring all marketing day‑to‑day basis by the Associate SALES CLERKis in Strong analytical skills PERMIT levies, liens & audits, unfiledtask tax oriented. compliance with the departmental Audit Director. Works closely with PARKING SERVICES (PARK) investigating and problem returns, payroll issues, & resolvetowards tax other mission.forResponsible for researching, Audit and Advisory Services staff Responsible customer service relating a solidteam knowledge ASSISTANT debt FAST. Call 888‑626‑3581 solving. inPossess writing,salesediting, and proofreading a collaborative approach to to permit and service for faculty, of University policies and procedures. all materials developed for the complete projects and help ensure OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free students and campus visitors. GENERAL Solid interpersonal skills including staff,MultiCultural Center’sbasedevents. in 24 to 48 months. No upfront that the Audit and Advisory Services Evaluates permit eligibility on verbal and non‑verbal communication. Reqs: Demonstrated experience ACCOUNTING fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call organization meets its goals and classification, employment/student status Acceptsobjectives. responsibility, and possesses in programming and marketing Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. reason for visiting campus. Explains MANAGER accountability. Must business be able administration, to work and events for diverse populations and accounting, parking regulations associated with over BUSINESS &(Cal‑SCAN) FINANCIAL SERVICES under high stress science, situationsor with hard field in a university setting. Experience computer a related 30 different permit options. Outlines Responsible for management of the deadlines. Must have demonstrated with for social media,permit experience and or equivalent combination of years methods payment, renewal, University GENERAL Plant Funds FULL-TIME Group, and excellentof experience. office, clerical, knowledge Adobe replacements, Creative Suite, 3‑5yes analytical + of relevant policies governingofrefunds, for the production of accurate and and computer skills working in Photoshop, and Word. Knowledge experience. Exceptionally strong and exchanges. Coordinates special comprehensive statements of operations Microsoft Office Suite, particularly of marketing principles, concepts, organizational and time management projects such as special event permits and and net position of the University of Excel. skills; Note:proven Satisfactory criminal strategies, and best practices. Keen ability to set priorities special area permits. Processes payment California at Santa Barbara. Recognized history that background check. Starting at sense of political acumen with regard accurately reflect the relative of permits via credit card, cash, check, campus wide technical leader in Plant $23.89/hr. The University of California and to communicating online via social importance of job responsibilities or payroll deduction into sales register. LABORER Fund Accounting. Has significant is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative media on politicized topics such as take into consideration deadlines, Must be able to work as part of a team FACILITIES MANAGEMENT impact and influence on organizational Action competing Employer, and all qualified and race, gender, and systemic oppression. requirements and provide input to management on a variety of custodial applicants tasks policy andPerforms program development. will receive consideration Notes: Criminal history background complexity. Notes: Criminal for history permit sales issues. Must also have the relateddegree duties. ofLaborer(s) Functions and withother a high employment without regard to race, check required. Occasional evening background check required. Maintain ability to work independently, showing handle alllong heavyterm liftingdebt and moving autonomy. will Manages color, religion, sexual orientation, and weekend hours may be required. a valid sex, CA driver’s license, a clean initiative and confidentiality in all matters. tasks, theon moving of bond all furniture service transactions long term gender identity, national origin, disability $25.14‑ $26.82/hr. The University of DMV record and enrollment in the Reqs: Demonstrated exceptional customer out presently of classrooms, offices, and protected veteran status, or indebtedness totaling $814labs status, California is an Equal Opportunity/ DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. service by providing delivering the replacement of all furniture. million. Distributes $58 million in annual any other characteristic by of Affirmative Action and Employer, and $24.52‑ $35.58/hr.protected The University helpful,applicants high quality Required perform oncustodial interest and principal torepayments law. ForCalifornia primary isconsideration apply professional, all qualified will service receive an Equal Opportunity/ and assistance. Ability to work as part of duties in zone and campus wide as 28 long term debt instruments to by 5/2/21, thereafterAction open until filled. and consideration for employment without Affirmative Employer, a team, maintain a positive attitude and Reqs: years similar numerous necessary. departments andTwo funding Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu all qualified applicants will receive regard to race, color, religion, sex, work together to achieve a common goal industrycampus, experience. Must to have Job 6mo# 17550 sources across relating consideration for employment sexual orientation, gender identity, of providing class customer + experience strippingofand the construction or acquisition 54 waxing without regard to race, color, religion, nationalworld origin, disability service. status, Excellent interpersonal skills, including the CALIFORNIA NEWS Publishers BUSINESS for the follow operation and management of written and oral instructions Association (CNPA), a 132‑year‑old, OPPORTUNITY the General Accounting during in English. Must beunit familiar with all

46

54 THE INDEPENDENT MARCH 12, 2020 INDEPENDENT.COM THE INDEPENDENT APRIL 22, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

ability to collaborate students, staff, protected veteran with status, or any faculty the general public. Ability other and characteristic protected by law.to grasp new concepts. Ability toapply maintain For primary consideration by professionalism and open composure under 3/18/20, thereafter until filled. high customer and challenging Apply online demand at https://jobs.ucsb.edu customer interactions. Notes: Satisfactory Job #20200105 criminal history background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Must be able to work evenings and weekends on an as‑needed basis. $20.66 ‑ $23.47/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, PAYROLL ANALYST DEPARTMENT RECREATION and all qualifiedOF applicants will receive Serves as Payroll Path consideration for Coordinator, employmentUCwithout Coordinator, Payroll sex, Manager regard to race,Kronos color, religion, sexual and Timekeeper 1,500+ employees orientation, genderfor identity, national origin, requiring accurate disability status, protecteddetail‑oriented veteran status, payroll timelines andby orattention any othertocharacteristic protected deadlines, attention to apply detail,by law. For primary consideration accuracy, and extensive 05/2/21, thereafter open untilknowledge filled. Apply of University policies and procedures. online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 17455 Payroll includes instructors, career staff, contract employees, casual SKILLED BYA staff, student staff, work study appointments, and summer program REFINISH EXPERT staff. Coordinates the onboarding FULL‑TIME / HR Tracks procedures$25.00 for all‑ $30.00 employees. Restoration, & grout repair, clean, employee tile employment compliance hone, polish and seal stone. have in regards to backgroundMust checks, experience. required certifications, and required (805) 259‑3168 trainings. Works with the marketing staff to ensure vacant positions are advertised. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Working knowledge of payroll processes, policies, and procedures; knowledge of organization‑specific computer MONEY TO LOAN application programs. Note: Criminal history background check required. RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business $24.09‑ $26.50/hr. The University of purpose Realis Estate loans.Opportunity/ Credit California an Equal unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Affirmative Action Employer, and Company Call all qualifiedwww.viploan.com applicants will receive 1‑818‑248‑0000. Broker‑principal DRE consideration for employment without 01041073. loans. (Cal‑ regard to No race,consumer color, religion, sex, SCAN) sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any RENTAL PROPERTIES other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by APARTMENTS & 3/16/20, thereafter open until filled. CONDOS FOR RENT Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20200103 $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San PROF. EDITING and WritingApts Services. Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Quiet turn‑around. Business, NPQuick 687‑0610 Academic, Memoir. 805‑220‑8127 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915

REAL ESTATE

1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts 530 W Cota $1320 SR NP. EXECUTIVE CHEFRosa 965‑3200 RESIDENTIAL DINING SERVICES Serves as a member of the 2BDS $1740+ & 3BDResidential flat or Dining Management in Housing, townhouses $2490.TeamNear UCSB, Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises, shops, park, beach, theater,under golf. the general direction of the Director Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. of Residential Dining Services, sharing Hector 968‑2549 responsibilities for the overall Dining STUDIOS 1BDsresidents $1440+ operations$1320+ serving &5,800 indaily, beautiful garden setting! Pool, 24,000 conferees yearly, 10,000 lndry at Michelle guests& off‑street and 5,300parking off campus meal Apartments. 340yearly Rutherford St. NP. plan participants with an annual Call Erin 967‑6614 operating budget of $28 million and 241 FTE. Leads the culinary efforts of the department and university through HOUSES/DUPLEXES FOR personnel education and training, RENT product development, research, demonstration and audit. BRAND NEW large 1 bed,Provides 1 bath, leadership, and guidancehome in reaching open‑ plan independent with the correct culinary formula; combining bright south facing living room, the rightbedroom mix of and qualified personnel kitchen, walled in and products to attain patio. Top quality new established appliances, operating standardsfullof washer excellence stove, dishwasher, and for all food service operations. dryer. In the bedroom there isSolves a 12 problems related to the production ft. fully fitted closet with shelves and units anddrawers. other areasLarge of the department built‑in and bright and bathroom, demonstratesKitchen leadershipwith in intra tiled high departmental teams and gloss white cabinets. The committees. house is Plans,with develops and oversees fitted separate A/C anda culinary Heating ensure overall consistency and inteam the tobedroom and kitchen/ high quality of food service across living room. All utilities, water, gas, the various and operations. and electricity refuseAssesses collection develops menus based on such factors included. Total privacy. $2,950‑ no as market trends, customer preferences pets, prefer single professional. Call and nutritional considerations, ease 805‑679‑5004

SERVICE DIRECTORY MARKET BUILDING/ PLACE CONSTRUCTION

on the dependent go. Mobileon Pendant of preparation and established of position funding. w/GPS. Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391 Free$29.47/hr. first aid The kit University with subscription. procedures, and budgetary constraints. $28.91‑ of 877‑537‑8817 freeOpportunity/ brochure. Monitors menu planning, purchasing California is an Equal MAC AND PC repair, network SERVICESproduct and recipe Affirmative Action Employer, and specifications, specification and installation, virus MEDICAL SERVICES testing and menu development. all qualified applicants will receive ANNOUNCEMENTS removal and mitigation, Home BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. Designs new recipes, determinesEASY, consideration for employment without Theater andStarting smart home specification AT&T INTERNET. at $40/ ONE DAYingredients updates! andWespecifies specialize DIABETICS! appropriate regardATTENTION to race, color, religion, Save sex, money and installation month w/12‑mo agmt. Includes 1 in safe bathing. Beautiful new on your diabetic supplies! Convenient individual serving portions for each sexual orientation, gender identity, TB of data per month. Get More For walk‑inReqs: showers flooring. homeorigin, shipping for monitors, recipe. 10+ with yearsnoasslipsenior national disability status, test Your High‑Speed Internet Thing. Ask Also, grab bars multi‑site and seated showers strips, veteran insulin pumps, catheters executive and/or culinary protected status, or any and us how to bundle and SAVE! Geo & available. for a free in‑home To learn more, call now! senior leader inCall the restaurant industry othermore! characteristic protected by law. svc restrictions apply. Call us today 844‑242‑1100. 1‑855‑702‑3408. (Cal‑SCAN) orconsultation: in college and university food(AAN For primary consideration apply by CAN) Culinary degree or equivalent 3/17/20, thereafter open until filled. 1‑888‑796‑8850 service. ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY BECOME A Published Author. We required. Advanced ApplyUSERS! online atInogen https://jobs.ucsb.edu THINKING ABOUTknowledge installing ain new One G4 is capable MUSIC LESSONS food preparation, culinary trends, Job #20200104 shower? American Standard makes of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Onlywant 2.8 to Read Your Book! Dorrance by Authors vegetarian, vegan design and rawconsultation. cuisine, it easy. FREE pounds. FREE information kit. Publishing‑Trusted Call Since WONDERFUL 1920 Book manuscript nutrition, needs, allergy Call Enjoy special your dietary shower again! SALES/MARKETING 877‑929‑9587 submissions currently being awareness and sanitation 1‑866‑945‑3038 todayregulations. to see how ATTENTION:VIAGRA reviewed.TEACHER Comprehensive Services: BUSINESS has a story toand tell! CIALIS Ability to lead advice food EVERY you can save and $1,000 on ininstallation. Enjoy Piano, Voice or Harp Lessons. USERS! A cheaper alternative to Consultation, high Production, Promotion purchasing (Cal‑SCAN) contracts, experience Get your message out with Exciting Call newforapproach drugstore prices! 50 Pill $99 Distribution. Your Free to a full PRMedia Release – theSpecial only ‑ and in building and maintaining quality California’s experience. Read,ormemorize, FREE Service Shipping! 100% guaranteed. Author`s musical Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 operated vendor relationships. Ability to Press +Release FINANCIAL SERVICES compose or improvise any music w/ CALL 888‑531‑1192 visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali press NOW: to get press! For more (AAN work effectively as a member by the ease. Vocal audition prep. $52/hr. 1st CAN) Cecelia @ 916‑288‑6011 (Cal‑SCAN) info contact ofARE an YOU Executive Team $10k as well BEHIND OR as MORE lesson 50% off!! Christine Holvick, inter‑departmentally. DENTAL INSURANCE ‑ Physicians ON YOUR TAXES?Demonstrated Stop wage or & http://prmediarelease.com/california BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com (Cal‑SCAN) skill in leading groups, managing Mutual Insurance Company. Covers bank levies,work liens & audits, unfiled Call 969‑6698 and complex projects, tax supervising returns, payroll issues, & resolve 350 procedures. Real insurance ‑ not a leading and FAST. supervising students. discount plan. Get your free tax debt Call 855‑970‑2032. ServeSafe certification. Note: Criminal dental info kit! 1‑888‑623‑3036 NOW PLAYING (Cal‑SCAN) history background check required. www.dental50plus.com/58 #6258 AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $91,400‑$108,500/yr. HARPIST VIRTUOSO $49/University MONTH!ofCall for youris fee The California an rate HEARING AIDS!! Buy one/get one FOR ALL EVENTS. Weddings, comparison to see how much you FREE! High‑quality rechargeable Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Parties, Churches, Nano hearing aids priced 90% less Concerts, can save! Call: and 855‑569‑1909. Action Employer, all qualified(AAN FAMILY SERVICES Nearly invisible! Recording Studios. Classical, pop, than competitors. CAN) will receive consideration for applicants 45‑day moneyhas helped back over guarantee! folk, jazz...Christine Holvick, BM, MM employment without regard to race, A PLACE FOR MOM www.sbHarpist.com 969‑6698 1‑833‑585‑1117 HOME color, religion,SERVICES sex, sexual orientation, a million families find (AAN seniorCAN) living. gender identity, national origin, Our trusted, advisors help USERS! find VIAGRAlocalAND CIALIS 50 DISH TV $64.99 For 190veteran Channels disability status, protected solutions to your needs at no Generic Pillsunique SPECIAL $99.00 + $14.95 Internet. status, or any High other Speed characteristic cost to you. Shipping! Call 855‑741‑7459 FREE 100% guaranteed. CALLING ALL friends of Roger Free Installation, HD DVR 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 protected by law. Smart For primary Runjavac! Included, Freeapply VoicebyRemote. consideration 3/22/20,Some HablamosHEALTH Espanol HOLISTIC Send him a birthday greeting at restrictions apply. Promo Expires thereafter open until filled. Apply happybdayroger@yahoo.com 7/21/21.1‑833‑872‑2545 online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job REPAIR SERVICES Herbal Health‑care Happy Birthday, Pops! #20200093 WELLNESS ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning Herbal treatments for weight‑loss, SANDERSAMPS.COM. Guitar DID andYOU KNOW 7 in 10 Americans or forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced heart conditions, inflammation ATTENTION: Users! Gain U.S. AdultsOXYGEN read content Amplifier repair. Vintage gear1158a Million debris‑blocking gutter protection. & pain, blood sugar conditions, freedom media with each a Portable from newspaper week? Oxygen specialty. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate digestion, liver805‑220‑8127. detox. Naturopath, more heavy tanks DiscoverConcentrator! the Power of No Newspaper today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Ayurveda Herbalist, KhabirSouthwick, and For refills! Guaranteed a free brochure Lowest call Prices! Senior & Military Discounts. Call TECHNICAL SERVICES Advertising. 805‑308‑3480, www.KSouthwick. STAFF RESEARCH Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa. 1‑855‑995‑2490 com 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) com (Cal‑SCAN) ASSOCIATE LIFE ALERT. One press of a button COMPUTER MEDIC COMPUTER SCIENCE DID YOU KNOW that newspapers sends help fast, 24/7! At home MASSAGE & Virus/Spyware (LICENSED) Removal, Install/ Repair, Responsible for developing the serve an engaged audience and that experimental prototypes and platforms 79% still read a print newspaper? for blockchain‑based database systems. DEEP TISSUE QUEEN Newspapers need to be in your mix! The blockchain‑based database Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Discover the Power of Newspaper systems will also require the building Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. Advertising. For more info email of a scalable distributed caching layer 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) in the cloud computing substrate. available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN) Responsible for the implementation 886‑8792 DIRECTV NOW. No Satellite Needed. and integration of such a distributed $40/month. 65 Channels. Stream caching layer developed in the WELLNESS Breaking News, Live Events, Sports laboratory. Supervises the algorithmic research work of the two new doctoral ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain & On Demand Titles. No Annual students in the laboratory; in particular freedom with a Portable Oxygen Contract. No Commitment. CALL bringing them up‑to‑speed with both Concentrator! No more heavy tanks 1‑866‑825‑6523 the permissioned and permission‑less and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! DISABLED AND unable to work? blockchain technologies. Assists the Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: Bills beginning to pile up? Call Citizens Disability! We can help you Faculty co‑Directors in the development 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) of research funding proposals. VIAGRA 100MG, CIALIS 20mg. 100 get the benefits you deserve. Call 800‑804‑5883 Today! Will lead a team of undergraduate tabs $99 includes FREE SHIPPING. and graduate students to provide 1‑888‑836‑0780 (Cal‑SCAN) DISCOUNT AIR TRAVEL. Call Flight engineering programming and Services for best pricing on domestic system support for the investigation WANT TO get your brain mapped & international flights inside and of blockchain infrastructure that span for free? from the US. Serving United, Delta, public and private cloud computing American & Southwest airlines. Call infrastructure. Duties include software Nutritional scientists at Nutrient for free quote now! Have travel dates design, development, testing, and (a Reno‑based food company), ready! 855‑638‑3462 empirical evaluation of the system. in collaboration with the team at Work includes repetitive, specialized Neurofield Neurotherapy Inc, are ONLY THE Highest quality CBD experimental procedures in database recruiting 10 adults to participate in products from AceWellness! We systems, distributed algorithms, a 1‑day research study. The purpose guarantee highest quality, most transaction processing, concurrency of the study is to measure changes competitive pricing on CBD products. control, and cloud computing. Reqs: in brain activity as measured by the Softgels, Oils, Skincare, Vape & Bachelor of Science in Computer Neurofield qEEG (non‑invasive brain more. Coupon Code: PRINT20 and Systems Engineering and/or mapping device) after consuming a 1‑855‑681‑3113 equivalent education and experience. brain‑targeted Nutrient shake. ORLANDO + Daytona Beach Florida Advanced software development Vacation! Enjoy 7 Days and 6 Nights experience. Large scale software The study takes place at the with Hertz, Enterprise or Alamo Car infrastructure configuration and Neurofield office (1836 State St). 2 Rental Included ‑ Only $298.00. 12 management. Distributed systems EEGs (plus analysis), the BrainShake months to use 1‑866‑903‑7520. deployment, testing, experimentation, are provided free of charge. There is (24/7) (Cal‑SCAN) and empirical evaluation. Note: no financial compensation. Criminal history background check To learn more and apply, please visit SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! required. Position currently funded this link: https://nutrientlife.com/ Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within through 09/30/2021. Continuation pages/nutrient‑neurofield‑study minutes. Average savings of $444/

MUSIC

WELL BEING

WELL BEING


| | INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHONE 965-5205 E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M | | INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHONE 965-5205 E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/ mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844‑511‑1836. (AAN CAN) BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920 Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV ‑ Every live football game, every Sunday ‑ anywhere ‑ on your favorite device. Restrictions apply. Call IVS ‑ 1‑888‑641‑5762. (Cal‑SCAN)

Call 877‑266‑0681 (AAN CAN) ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑424‑7581 (Cal‑SCAN) GENERAC GENERATORS. Weather is increasingly unpredictable. Be prepared for power outages. Free 7‑yr ext warranty. Schedule free in‑home assessment 1‑844‑334‑8353. Special financing if qualified. HEARING AIDS! Bogo free! High‑quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45‑day money back guarantee! 833‑669‑5806 HUGHESNET SATELLITE Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1‑844‑416‑7147 (AAN CAN) HUGHESNET SATELLITE Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1‑844‑863‑4478

DIRECTV NOW. No Satellite Needed. $40/month. 65 Channels. Stream Breaking News, Live Events, Sports & On Demand Titles. No Annual Contract. No Commitment. CALL 1‑866‑825‑6523

INVENTORS ‑ FREE INFORMATION PACKAGE. Have your product idea developed affordably by the Research & Development pros and presented to manufacturers. Call 1‑844‑752‑8272 for a Free Idea Starter Guide. Submit your idea for a free consultation. (Cal‑SCAN)

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1‑855‑380‑2501

LIFE ALERT. One press of a button sends help FAST, 24/7! At home and on the go. Mobile Pendant with GPS. FREE First Aid Kit (with subscription.) CALL 833‑518‑1049 FREE Brochure. (Cal‑SCAN)

DO YOU owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855‑955‑0702. (Hours: Mon‑Fri 7am‑5pm PST)

NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 866‑951‑7214

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Help Find Missing Kids! Call 1‑888‑491‑1453. (CalSCAN)

SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within minutes. Average savings of $444/ year! Call 1‑844‑410‑9609! (M‑F 8am‑8pm Central) (Cal‑SCAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation –

STILL PAYING too much for your MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on RX refill! Order today and receive free shipping on 1st order ‑ prescription required. Call 1‑855‑750‑1612 (AAN CAN)

AUTO THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. We deliver the largest consortium of trusted news publishers in California and beyond. For more info on multi‑market solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing an election is how campaign dollars are spent. Get the best ROI by using our deep relationships in every community in California. Our on‑the‑ground knowledge is indispensable to campaigns that want results. For more info on multi‑market ethnic and non‑ethnic solutions call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@ cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. CNPA’s Advertising Services’ power to connect to nearly 13 million of the state’s readers who are an engaged audience, makes our services an indispensable marketing solution. For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing market share is how businesses use their advertising dollars. Mark Twain said, “Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising”. So why spend your hardearned dollars on social media where you already have an audience? For more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com

AUTO PARTS CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1‑800‑864‑5960.

Tide Guide

Sunrise 6:14 Sunset 7:38

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN)

Day

CAR CARE/REPAIR

Sat 24

2:16 am 1.0

8:14 am 4.8

2:28 pm 0.0

8:52 pm 5.1

DONATE YOUR CAR OR TRUCK TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

Sun 25

3:00 am 0.3

9:06 am 4.8

3:02 pm 0.3

9:21 pm 5.6

Mon 26

3:46 am -0.3

10:00 am 4.6

3:36 pm 0.7

9:53 pm 5.9

Tue 27

4:34 am -0.8

10:55 am 4.3

4:11 pm 1.1

10:29 pm 6.2

Wed 28

5:25 am -1.1

11:55 am 3.9

4:48 pm 1.6

11:08 pm 6.2

Thu 29

6:20 am -1.1

1:01 pm 3.6

5:27 pm 2.1

11:52 pm 6.0

DOMESTIC CARS

Low

High

Low

High

Thu 22

12:47 am 2.4

6:25 am 4.6

1:18 pm -0.1

8:05 pm 4.3

Fri 23

1:32 am 1.7

7:21 am 4.7

1:53 pm -0.1

8:27 pm 4.7

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! 2002 and Newer! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! Free Towing! We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1‑888‑416‑2330. DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT OR RV to receive a major tax deduction. Help homeless pets. Local, IRS Recognized. Top Value Guaranteed. Free Estimate and Pickup. LAPETSALIVE.ORG 1‑833‑772‑2632 (Cal‑SCAN)

High

26 D

3

10 D

19 H source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Gimme a Reason” -- when you know...

THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1‑855‑270‑3785 THINKING ABOUT installing a new shower? American Standard makes it easy. Free design consult.1‑888‑674‑3005 today to see how to save $1,000 on installation or visit www.newshowerdeal.com/ display

WANT TO BUY WANTS TO purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

SPECIAL COLOR “Merlot” 2004 with tan leather interior & convertible top. 76K miles & is a single owner vehicle. Well maintained by Ford service & records available. Hard top storage rack & cover included. $13,500. Call or text 805‑451‑8305.

LUXURY CARS WANTED! OLD Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE 1‑707‑339‑5994. Email: porscherestoration@yahoo.com (Cal‑SCAN)

58 Discover (or how to determine what the four circled answers have in 1 Heat source? common) 6 “Isn’t that ___ much?” 10 Clinton preceder or follower 64 Swedish store to get lost in 65 “My Life as ___” (1985 14 “Quaking” tree Swedish film) 15 City NNE of Lake Tahoe 66 Add to the pot 16 Capri or Elba 67 Macedonian’s neighbor 17 Copper-colored coin last 68 “Ermahgerd Gersberms!”, minted in 1958 for one 19 Karmann ___ (classic VW 69 Time on a job model) 20 Part of S&L 21 Knight’s transport 1 It may be gaping 22 My reaction to this ice 2 “Black-___” (ABC sitcom) storm I’m stuck in right now 3 Magilla Gorilla, really 25 Alfred E. Neuman line 4 Brunch, e.g. 29 Scan in 5 Being dragged along 31 Show announcer 6 Hockey site, maybe 32 Overabundance 7 Actor Whishaw 35 “March Madness” sponsor, 8 “Newhart” establishment for short 9 Stocking stuffer 36 Relaxing sound 10 It may get stubbed 39 Sport featured in the 2005 11 “The Fall of the House of ___” documentary “Murderball” 12 Comparatively cunning 13 Intoxicating, as liquor 42 Heart-wrenching 18 Oom-___ bands 43 Actor Bailey of “Band of (Oktoberfest Brothers” and “Almost entertainment) Famous” 21 Contributes to the jar? 44 E flat’s alias 45 Skim, like with homemade 22 Makes some tea 23 Singer Bebe chicken stock 46 Follow closely, these days 24 Competed at Daytona 47 “Never in a million years!” 26 Renters 53 Dashboard Confessional 27 80 years into the future, in movie credits (will we even genre have movies?) 54 Tiniest bits 28 Animated alternative to 55 Roswell crafts mailing a greeting 57 ‘80s-’90s German 30 “Don’t Go Breaking My chancellor Helmut Heart” vocalist Kiki

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 22, 2021 2021 APRIL

33 Catches some Z’s 34 “Futurama” genre 36 Colorful quartz 37 Former U.S. President James ___ Garfield 38 Prefix with therapy 40 “Ashes to Ashes” novelist Tami 41 Conversation lapses 45 Crime investigation facility 47 Collaborative websites 48 Robert who introduced the term “cell” to biology 49 Air beyond the clouds 50 Chocolate candy cut into cubes 51 “Summer Girls” boy band 52 Succinct letter signoff 56 Fantasy football figure 58 Kinfolk, for short 59 Ending with fluor60 ___ de plume 61 Nintendo Switch predecessor 62 Channel for buying stuff from your couch 63 By this point ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1028

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

47 47


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:JAMES B. NORRIS CASE NO.: 21PR00150 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JIM B. NORRIS, JAMES B. NORRIS, JIM NORRIS, AND JAMES NORRIS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Nicholas J. Schneider in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that:Nicholas J. Schneider be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/13/2021 AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: 1332 Anacapa Street, Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑0669 Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RODNEY J. TILLEY Case No.: 21PR00126 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of RODNEY J TILLEY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: JULIE SHERNIUS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: JULIE SHERNIUS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration

48

of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/04/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 2 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA 312 E Cook St, Bldg E, Santa Maria 93454; Probate IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Julie Shernius 1406 Dorsett Dock, Point Pleasant Boro, NJ 08742; (201) 927‑3921. Published Apr 8, 15, 22 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELLEN VIRGINIA SESMA CASE NO.: 21PR00100 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELLEN VIRGINIA SESMA A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PATRICIA CLAUDINE KIEFERLE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: PATRICIA CLAUDINE KIEFERLE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 05/06/2021 AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, ANACAPA DIVISION, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 22, 2021

before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Janet K. McGinnis, Attorney at Law; 924 Anacapa Street, Suite 1‑M Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑2156, (805) 963‑1865. Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: POETIC PICNICS at 1020 North Nopal Street #4 Santa Barbara. CA 93103; Wendy T Acosta (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000774. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as:ALPHA SURFACEPRO at 924 W. Apricot Ave. Unit 102 Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Jadus Legacy LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000824. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRASSLAND GROWERS at 4045 Foothill Road Carpinteria, CA 93013; Robert Abe 1020 ‘D’ Bailard Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000763. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as:BOARD AND BRUSH at 31 E. Canon Perdido Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Francie Rose, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000828. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as:ALPHA COATINGD CLEANING at 924 W Apricot Avenue, Unit 102 Lompoc, CA 93436; Jadus Legacy, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000598. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE EDGE APARTMENTS at 6509 Pardall St Goleta, CA 93117; Ladera Townhomes LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000769. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THYME PLUS BOTANICALS at 14 Oak Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Restorative Organics, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000737. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PAYJUNCTION at 1903 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Messiahic Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corportion Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000848. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EFS at 518 E Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Equippedfs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by aLimited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000884. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OLD COWDOGS at 2273 Alamo Pintado Rd. Solvang, CA 93463; Alamar Media, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000772. Apr 8, 15, 22, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LUQUE TRANSPORT at 4413 Hacienda Dr Guadalupe, CA 93434; Martin Jr. Luque (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000827. April 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MR. DEW DAB at 948 W. Chestnut Ave Apt D Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Meesha Rose (same address) Lafa Jones (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000951. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: METROPOLITAN GANSTER at 27 West Anapamu St, #265 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jonathan P Holmes (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000893. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SLO CURIO at 1117 1/2 Olive St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jeeyon Roslie (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000888. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ORG‑GARDEN LANDSCAPE at 5832 Mandarin Dr Apt C Goleta, CA 93117; Benedicto Cuevas (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000681. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: NOTOWN TAVERN at 5114 Hollister Avenue Santa Barbara. CA 93111; Liquid Essentials LLC 2785 Painted Cave Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Jill Tucker, Managing Member County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000748. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CALIFORNIA VINS at 4390 Calle Real #A Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Lorraine Cole 843 Portesuello Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by Lori Cole a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000700. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: OA CONSULTING at 4551 Brighton Place Santa Maria, CA 93455; Susan E Gibbons (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000867. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JERROCA at 588 Mills Way Goleta, CA 93117; Charuwan M Pichardo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000903. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CHUCK WAGON WINES, CIRCA 55 CELLARS, HERITAGE RANCH CELLARS, MIMICRY WINES, PARA EL ALMA WINES, SADDLE RANCH CELLARS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Terravant Wine Company, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000718. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: CREATE ORDER TILE at 228 North Street Lompoc, CA 93436; Karis E. Clinton (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000860. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STEPPING STONES CONSULTANTS at 758 Via Miguel Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Michiel A De Bruin (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Michiel A De Bruin County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0000978. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AMPLIFY WINES at 2320 Thompson Way, Ste F Santa Maria, CA 93455; Cameron Michael Porter (Same Address) and Marlen Sosa Porter (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Married Couple Signed: Marlen Porter, Co‑Owner County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0000847. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BABYSITPRO LLC at 1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 1‑440 Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Babysitpro LLC (same address) (same address) This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed:Austin Jessie Davidson County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001098. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LITTLE LADY BUTTERFLY at 1436 Santa Fe Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Valerie A Selvaggio (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Valerie Selvaggio County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001010. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THOUGHTBOX PHOTO BOOTH at 4545 Atascadero Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Jacob Pighetti (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Jacob Pighetti County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARCADIAN WINERY at 300 Central Avenue #6 Lompoc, CA 93427; Joseph Davis (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed:Joseph Davis County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ADOBE PET HOSPITAL at 3230 State Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Mission City Veterinary Hospital, Inc (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed:Evelyn Brand County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0000880. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SOLEIL RESIDENTIAL at 5387 Paseo Cameo Santa Barbara. CA 93111; Tracey Messner (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Tracey Messner, Owner County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0000851. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAS ALLA WINES at 84 Industrial Way, Unit C Buellton, CA 93427; Bravo West Wines LLC 400 Adena St Pasadena, CA 91104 This business is conducted by An Limited Liability Company Signed:Cleo De La Torre County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001035. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: WILD SPELLCRAFT at 115 W Gutierrez St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Payge A Bellini (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Payge Bellini County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0001076. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA TOURS & EXPERIENCES, SANTA BARBARA PARANORMAL EXPERIENCES at 1501 Santa Barbara St ., Apt C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Joseph S Soltis, III (same address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Joseph S. Soltis, III County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001049. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACROAMATICS TELEMETRY SYSTEMS at 7230 Hollister Ave #100 Goleta, CA 93117; Acroamatics, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed:Terri L Didion County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E956. FBN Number: 2021‑0001107. Apr 22, 29, May 06, 13 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF VICTOR PLASCENCIA PLASCENCIA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00848 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VICTOR PLASCENCIA PLASCENCIA


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS TO: VICTOR PLASENCIA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00809 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL TO: PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL‑MARKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 21, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 25, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00830 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this

county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TERRY ANN TABACCHI TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01034 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TERRY ANN TABACCHI TO: TERRY ANN THOMPSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 11, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 22, 2021. by Thomas p. Anderle. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JOANIE SHONETTE VOGEL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV01422 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JOANIE SHONETTE VOGEL TO: JOANIE SHONETTE SAFFELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing June 1, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 16, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF VICTOR HUGO ANDRADE TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01356 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VICTOR HUGO ANDRADE TO: VICTOR JAKE ANDRADE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any

person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 24, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 13, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LESLIE BAXTER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01361 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: LESLIE ANN BAXTER TO: LESLIE JADE BAXTER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 28, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 10, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 22, 29. May 6, 13 2021.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA In the matter of: MCDONALD FAMILY TRUST dated March 30, 2001, as amended Case No. 21PR00149 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF PAULA D. McDONALD, Deceased [PROB C §§19003, 19040(b), 19052] Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Paula D. McDonald (Decedent) that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, and deliver pursuant to Section 1215 of the California Probate Code a copy to Catherine M. Brunner, as Trustee of the McDonald Family Trust dated March 30, 2001, as amended, wherein the decedent was the surviving Settlor, at 1000 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1500, Los Angeles, California 90017‑1730, within the latter of four months after April 08, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: March 31, 2021. Parisa F. Weiss, Esq., Attorney for Trustee Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA

ANACAPA DIVISION In re Shirley J. Otto Revocable Trust Case No. 21PR00146 NOTICE TO CREDITORS [PROB C §§19040(b), 19052] Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Shirley J. Otto (Decedent) that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file

them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver a copy to Joe Bourdeau, as trustee of the Shirley J. Otto Revocable Trust dated June 12, 2015, of which Decendent was the settlor, c/o the Law Offices of James F. Cote, P.O. Box 20146, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146, as provided to

Section 1215 within the latter of four months after April 15, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate

Code §19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: March 30, 2021. Law Offices of James F. Cote Published Apr 15, 22, 29 2021.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING City Council (Held Electronically and Telephonically) May 4, 2021 at 5:30 pm DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT FOR GOLETA GARDENS (SYWEST) CASE NO. 20-0004-ORD Located at 907 S. Kellogg Avenue APN 071-190-035 ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings electronically and telephonically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council for May 4, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. City Councilmembers will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the date set forth below to consider the below described project. The public hearing is scheduled as follows: HEARING LOCATION: Teleconference Meeting; Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting (with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda) HEARING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, May 4, 2021 at 5:30 pm

Project Description: The subject property (APN 071-190-035) is an 11.71-acre parcel located at the south terminus of Kellogg Avenue at 907 S. Kellogg Avenue, within the California Coastal Zone. The site is currently operating as the Westwind Drive-In Theater and Public Market. The property is zoned Service Industrial (I-S) and the land use designation is Service Industrial (I-S). The applicant proposes a Development Agreement to grant a license to the City of Goleta to use a private access road to the San Jose Creek Channel along a part of the subject site, in exchange for extension of the deadline to use the City’s former zoning ordinance (Article II, Chapter 35 Coastal Zoning Ordinance) for the applicant’s pending development proposal (Case No. 17-121-DP-DRB) from December 31, 2021 to December 31, 2023. On March 29, 2021, the Planning Commission recommended against the City Council entering into the proposed Development Agreement with the applicant to extend the deadline for using the City’s former zoning ordinance for the applicant’s pending development proposal (Case No. 17-121-DP-DRB). The City Council is the City decisionmaker for the Development Agreement for the City. The Development Agreement would also need Coastal Commission approval. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: Pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code, §§ 21000 et seq.), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 Cal. Code of Regulations, §§ 15000, et seq.), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines, the project has been found to be exempt from CEQA and a Notice of Exemption (NOE) is proposed. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency for this project. The NOE is appropriate pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15061.b.3 because the act of approving a Development Agreement will not cause development of the project site itself, but adjust the deadline to use the City’s former zoning ordinance (Article II, Chapter 35 Coastal Zoning Ordinance) until December 31, 2023. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (TSC) in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code §65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The hearing documents and all documents referenced therein may be obtained by contacting the Planner listed below (see the “For Further Information” section). The City Council staff report and the draft Notice of Exemption will be posted on the City’s website at least 72 hours prior to the hearing. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted as instructed above or via email to Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/governmentmeeting-agendas-and-videos. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information including the application and project file can be viewed by contacting Kathy Allen, Supervising Senior Planner, at 8059617545 or at kallen@cityofgoleta.org. REVIEW PROCESS AND APPEAL: As noted above, on March 29, 2021, the Planning Commission recommended against the City Council entering into the Development Agreement. The next step in the review process is a City Council hearing, which is the subject of this notice, to consider the request and render a decision on the Development Agreement. The City Council decision cannot be appealed. Consideration and action on the Development Agreement by the California Coastal Commission would be required following the City Council’s action on the Development Agreement. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505 of cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]). Note: The complete application and project file, including any environmental analysis prepared in connection with the application, are currently only available electronically due to the temporary closure of City Hall to the public in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. You may request a copy of these materials from the staff planner as instructed above. Published: Santa Barbara Independent April 22, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 22, 22, 2021 2021 APRIL

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

49 49

Profile for SB Independent

Santa Barbara Independent 4/22/21  

April 22, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 797

Santa Barbara Independent 4/22/21  

April 22, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 797

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded