__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1


! N PE RE

O A T N W O @ NSOTATE

4 3 35

Order Online at: SouthCoastDeli.com 2

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Virtual Events

- VIRTUAL EVENTS -

Leading activists, creatives and thinkers confront racism in America, guiding us towards racial equality

Intimate, interactive online events you won’t find anywhere else Critically-acclaimed Novelist

Mohsin Hamid

Speaking with Pico Fri, Apr 16 / 7 PM Pacific (Note special time) $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required) Mohsin Hamid takes on identity and mass-urbanization in his bold, inventive novels including Exit West, The Reluctant Fundamentalist and Moth Smoke. Supporting Sponsor: Siri & Bob Marshall Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Dori Pierson Carter & Chris Carter, Martha Gabbert, and Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor

Urban Dance Innovators

Ephrat Asherie Dance Odeon

Tue, Apr 20 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required) A New York-based b-girl with extensive training in ballet and modern dance, Ephrat “Bounce” Asherie and her company reveal and explore the complexities of street dance forms. Movement Workshop: Shake-a-Leg with Archie & Ephrat Thu, Apr 22 / 5 PM - 6 PM / Zoom FREE and open to the public. Register online.

Lead Sponsor: Jody & John Arnhold Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Bob Feinberg, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay, and Sheila Wald Presented in partnership with The Joyce Theater and Moss Arts Center at Virginia Tech, and in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance

The Father of Environmental Justice

Dr. Robert Bullard The Quest for Environmental and Racial Justice Wed, Apr 21 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

With more than four decades of action advocating for racial equality and fair environmental and urban planning, Dr. Robert Bullard is widely considered the father of the environmental justice movement.

Artist and Social Innovator

Theaster Gates Thu, Apr 29 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

An artist, musician and cultural planner, Theaster Gates draws on his training in urban planning to redeem spaces that have been left behind, upturning art values, land values and human values. Dr. Robert Bullard presented in association with the Central Coast Climate Justice Network, Community Environmental Council, UCSB Bren School for Environmental Science & Management and UCSB Environmental Studies

Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Patty & John MacFarlane, Sara Miller McCune, Santa Barbara Foundation, Lynda Weinman & Bruce Heavin, Dick Wolf, and Zegar Family Foundation UC Santa Barbara Campus Partners:

Department of Black Studies Center for Black Studies Research Division of Social Sciences Division of Humanities and Fine Arts Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences Division of Student Affairs Gevirtz Graduate School of Education Graduate Division Bren School for Environmental Science & Management

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

College of Creative Studies College of Engineering MultiCultural Center Carsey-Wolf Center The Program in Latin American and Iberian Studies UCSB Library | UCSB Reads Office of the Chancellor Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor

Community Partners: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli Special Thanks: INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

3


LEGO MASTERS • ARTS @ LAGUNA • BATTLEFIELD NERF • STEM • SPORTS PERFORMING ARTS • ACADEMICS • SUPER HERO ACADEMY • DANCE • AND SO MUCH MORE! PRIORITIZING HEALTH & SAFETY | MORNING & AFTERNOON CARE AVAILABLE | SNACKS & LUNCH PROVIDED 4

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi

COVER STORY

20

A Homegrown Health Revolution

Evidation Is S.B.’s New Billion-Dollar Baby by Tyler Hayden

Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

SECOND FEATURE

24

Poems from the Pandemic

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 ON THE COVER: Photo by Max Abrams. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

LOOKING AHEAD Vieja Valley Elementary teacher David Nelson said that writing poems with his 6th-grade class this year was unexpectedly therapeutic amid the pandemic rules. He followed Amanda Gorman’s footsteps — calling her a “superhero, super poet, and super role model” for this generation — and used her powerful work as a guide for his class to hear, discuss, and read. Five of the poems they wrote appear on page 24.

COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

volume 35, # 796, Apr. 15-22, 2021

Was this a deep dive into poetry? I wrote my own poem with them, and it was actually cathartic. It felt like therapy to share all the struggles we were feeling. It was so uplifting. I’m just a regular teacher, I teach about a lot of things, but this made me a better poetry teacher. How has this school year been? The natural human tendency is to be close to people, and especially for kids who are 11 or 12; it makes them sad to be apart. I’ve taught every grade, and friends and social activities are the most important thing in the 6th grade. In the beginning of the year, we met remotely, then in an a.m./p.m. model, and soon everyone will come five days a week, all day, three feet apart. And graduate from 6th grade together!

INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

THREE PERSPECTIVES ON CONTEMPORARY PAINTING A CONVERSATION WITH SUZANNE HUDSON, MATH BASS, AND CHRISTINA QUARLES FRIDAY | APRIL 30 | 5 PM | VIA ZOOM In her forthcoming book Contemporary Painting, Los Angeles-based art historian and critic Suzanne Hudson considers painting as a vibrant and sometimes contentious medium. Two esteemed painters, Math Bass and Christina Quarles, who are discussed in Hudson’s book, join the author in a conversation about painting. This virtual event is moderated by curators from the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara.

FREE | RESERVE TICKETS ONLINE AT TICKETS.SBMA.NET SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART | WWW.SBMA.NET

Images left to right: Suzanne Hudson, Math Bass (photo cropped: Steven Taylor, 2021); and Christina Quarles (photo cropped: Erik Carter, Courtesy Regen Projects, Los Angeles, 2021)

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

5


GRAB A PENCIL, LET’S HAVE SOME FUN!

:

Kids Activity Cito’s $100 Dog budget

Cito is very excited about his new puppy! Monty gave him $100 to buy things to help take care of his dog. Help Cito make a budget (a plan for how to spend your money), by choosing from the pet store items below. Remember to think about how much you have to spend, and what is really a need (food) and what is really a want (dog toys).

Dog Carrier: $30

Water Bowl: $20

Collar: $10

Dog House: $30

Food Dish: $5

Dog Food: $30

Pajamas: $20

Dog Bed: $30

Treats: $5

Animal Toys: $5

Necklace: $30

Leash: $20

Cito’s Dog Budget $100

Income from Monty Total Items Purchased at Pet Store

minus $

Total Leftover for Future Expenses

present

Financial Literacy Month

Weekly activities to sharpen your financial savvy!

:

Week Three budgeting

:

adult Activity Spending journal Tracking your purchases on a daily basis can make you more aware of how you are spending your money and help identify areas for improvement. People often believe they are spending money one way, but an exercise like this can reveal that they are spending it differently. A good rule of thumb is to target your monthly spending to align with the recommended monthly spending amounts, shown on the right. When paired with a monthly spending journal, you can track and see what categories your spending falls into and review how closely your monthly purchases align with the recommendations.

Access the Spending Journal Use the QR code or visit montecito.bank/FinLit

6

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Housing 25%

Personal Items 15% Savings 10%

Other 5%

Food 20%

Transportation 15% Utilities 10%


APR. 8-15, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK AF P VIA G ETTY IM AG ES

by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

CORONAVIRUS

COUNTY SUSPENDS USE OF JOHNSON & JOHNSON VACCINE

T

he much-sought-after single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine was pulled on Tuesday from the State of California’s vaccine program after a federal recommendation due to “rare and severe” blood clots developed in six patients nationwide. “We are recommending a pause in the use of this vaccine out of an abundance of caution,” read the statement from Dr. Anne Schuchat of the Centers for Disease Control and Dr. Peter Marks of the Food and Drug Administration. Santa Barbara County will also suspend the use of Johnson & Johnson, the Public Health Department said, following the state’s lead. “Any clinics scheduled this week that originally planned to use the Johnson & Johnson vaccine will not be canceled, but instead use the Moderna vaccine,” Public Health said in a statement. Six women between the ages of 18 and 48 had developed a certain type of blood clot

six to 13 days after they received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. This specific type of clot — a cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) — would be treated differently than other clots, the joint CDC/FDA statement warned. One woman died, and a second is hospitalized, the New York Times reported. Johnson & Johnson issued a statement that said the company was “aware of the extremely rare disorder involving people with blood clots in combination with low platelets.” The pharmaceutical giant also stated it was reviewing the cases with health authorities in Europe. In Santa Barbara County, 12,409 people have received the J&J vaccine. Lompoc Valley Medical Center and Marian Regional Medical Center held hundreds of doses that it hadn’t yet administered. Marian spokesperson Sara San Juan noted that blood clotting after J&J vaccine was given appeared to be either equal to or less than the incidence in the general population.

Drs. Schuchat and Marks’s statement regarded the clots as extremely rare, but more than 6.8 million people have received doses of the vaccine. Symptoms of severe headache, abdominal pain, leg pain, or shortness of breath within three weeks of the vaccine could presage the adverse reaction, and patients are advised to contact their doctor. A federal advisory committee on immunization practices will meet on Wednesday to review the cases and determine their significance, the statement said. Dr. Lynn Fitzgibbons, an infectiousdisease specialist with Cottage Health, took the federal intervention as a sign that health authorities were reacting appropriately as information came to light. “Everyone I’ve spoken to today is concerned to hear this news,” she said. “It’s clearly anxiety provoking for anyone who’s received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine so far, and it clearly has big implications to our ongoing vaccine efforts.” —Jean Yamamura

HOMELESSNESS

Green Light Given to Tow Homeless Campers

Council to Spend Half a Million on Motel Space for Chronically Homeless by Nick Welsh n a striking display of moving in opposite directions simultaneously, the Santa Barbara City Council voted to crack down on homeless people living in their vans while authorizing the expenditure of nearly half a million to provide motel rooms for up to six months for up to 25 homeless people now living on the streets. At the request of city Parks and Recreation czar Jill Zachary, the council authorized the removal of vans and cars illegally parked in the city’s 60 parks. A

I

staff report itemized in some detail the abuses park patrons, park employees, and park facilities have endured at the hands of some people who’ve been using the parking lots as their de facto four-wheeled campgrounds. Zachary sought to assure councilmembers that the authorization would not be used to target houseless individuals down on their luck, so much as people using illegally parked vans to sell drugs or engage in prostitution. On occasion, broken-down vans have been towed into parking lots at the parks unauthorized and just left there.

The towing provision could be helpful when dealing with owners not deterred by citations or tickets. The city resolution authorized any city officer to remove any vehicle parked in any park in violation of any ordinance wherever signs have been posted to that effect. Councilmembers Meagan Harmon and Kristen Sneddon expressed concern that the authorization language was way too broad and opposed it. Sneddon wondered where those displaced might wind up going. Kristine Schwartz of New Beginnings, which offers shelter for 150 people living in their vehicles, suggested partnering with City Parks and Recreation Department to provide supervised parking space for vehicle dwellers. Schwarz said Parks and Rec has been lukewarm about partnering with New Beginnings, citing potential security concerns. She estimated there are 10 people currently living out of vehicles

NEWS BRIEFS CORONAVIRUS The county announced on 4/13 that it has met the state’s orange tier case rate and positivity rate for one week and could move into the orange tier as early as 4/21 if these metrics are met for one more week. The orange tier requires that the county have a case rate of six cases per every 100,000 residents and a test positivity rate is under 4.9 percent for two weeks. The county’s adjusted case rate is currently 4.6 cases per 100,000 residents, and its local test positivity is 1.9 percent.

TRANSPORTATION S.B. city buses will increase the number of passengers allowed on board on 4/15. The new capacity will be 20 people on a 40-foot bus, and 15 on a 30-footer. Masks are required onboard and while waiting. Transport has been free during the pandemic, but the free ride ends 5/10, and the Transit Center reopens 4/26 for tickets and passes. The S.B. Metropolitan Transit District website (sbmtd.gov) contains all schedules, and the SBMTD BusTracker app is a handy way to know when a bus will arrive.

CITY Three years after a trial ended in the appointment of a receiver to take over management and repair of eight Dario Pini properties in Santa Barbara, as of March, the landlord regained control over six of them. One other was sold, and the last is a hotel at 26 Chapala Street still under renovation. Repairs have cost Pini $4.1 million so far, and the court record runs to over 40,000 pages. The city has expended more than half a million dollars in attorney time alone and is asking for compensation, which Judge Colleen Sterne advised must wait until all proceedings have finished.

COURTS & CRIME After hours of negotiation, a sexual assault suspect who had barricaded himself inside an apartment surrendered himself to S.B. Police officers on 4/11. The police were initially called to the 200 block of Ladera Street when they received a report from the victim that the suspect, Eduardo Adrian Mendoza, 29, had sexually assaulted her and brandished a handgun at her. When officers searched the area and found the suspect, he fled into an apartment with two uninvolved bystanders inside. The SWAT and Crisis Negotiation Response teams worked alongside SBPD officers to get Mendoza to come out, and he was arrested and charged with attempted rape, false imprisonment, brandishing an imitation firearm, and resisting/obstructing arrest. He is being held in County Jail on $100,000 bail. Goleta residents Jesus Coronado, 20, and Carter Chavez, 25, were arrested 4/9 after allegedly shooting a handgun into the air from a backyard on San Milano Drive. Neither was in possession of a firearm when authorities arrived, prompting deputies to serve a search warrant on the residence. Inside they discovered a .22 caliber handgun reported stolen in Mercer County, Missouri. Both were charged with negligent discharge of a firearm, among other offenses, and are being held in jail on $35,000 bail.

n

CONT’D ON PAGE 8 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

7


APR. 8-15, 2021

CANNABIS

Glass House Farms Going Public

Locally Owned and Operated

T

RA o St

THANK

SANTA BARBARA

®

WINNER

TIP

BEST CORNER STORE!

BANANAS

Chicken

DRUMSTICKS

98¢ lb.

49

$

$1.29

PINEAPPLES

ERS

FILET MIGNON

T

PORK SPARE RIBS

$

1

59 ¢

69¢ ¢

89

& TOMATILLOS

NCHERA $2.98 lb. FUJI APPLES 2 lbs. for $1

89 ¢

Marinated

ROMA TOMATOES lb.

PORK ADOBADA

289

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

ROMA TOMATOES

TILAPIA FILLET

199

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

99 4 $for $3

$7.98 lb. $2.98 lb.

LONG GRAIN RICE

¢

INSTANT COFFEE

5

$ 89 HOMELESS CAMPERS CONT’D FROM P. 7 Springfield 15 oz.

PEAS & CARROTS in city parking lot

89 ¢

parks. She said her program is in deslb. lb. perate search of parking lot owners Springfield 8 oz. willing to partner Boneless SEEDLESS GRAPES with the Safe Parking MARINATED CHICKEN program, especially lb. near the city’s waterfront. The council — lb. lb. led by CouncilmemMinute Maid 59 beroz. Eric Friedman (doz.) 805 (12 pk.) and Mayor Cathy Murillo — voted 5 to LARGE EGGS BEER 2 in favor. ea. In the same meeting, however, city councilmembers antacruzmarkets.com www.santacruzmarkets.com enthusiastically endorsed a proposal to Guerrero (80 ct.) La Fortaleza (14 oz.) give $480,000 in federal housing grants to CityNet to pay for 15 motel rooms in By the bag TORTILLA CHIPS ANANAS CORN BANANAS LONG GRAINTORTILLAS RICE LONG GRAIN RICE BEEF TRI TIP ¢ ¢ $ 99 $ 99 the hopes of getting 25 chronically home49 1 49 $ 59 2 EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS 1 D TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES less people off the streets, under a roof, Chicken MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL NEAPPLES OCTOBER PINEAPPLES FROM THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND 89 $ 27TH LEG QUARTERS and prepped to make the move into some $ 89 2 2 $ 99 $ 99 ¢ 1 El Pato 7 oz. 1 El Pato 7 oz. 69 more permanent form of transitional HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE ¢ MA TOMATOES housing. City Councilmember Mike JorPORK BUTT ¢ ROMA TOMATOES 59 Best 59 of $ 59 dan said that amount might seem “like an 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 1 Barbara Santa winner $ 89 Thin sliced obscene amount of money” to some, but $ 89 5 UJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES �WINNER� CARNE RANCHERA ¢ added, “I don’t know another method that ¢ $ 98 89 PEAS & CARROTS 89 PEAS & CARROTS 5 ¢ has a proven track record.” ¢ 89 89 Santa Cruz EDIUM YAMS MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO Councilmembers were told the tranSANTA BARBARA GOLETA ¢ WHIP TOPPING ¢ GOLETA SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA 59 59 $ 49 2 St St $ 49 sitional of motels was about half as Ave 5757use Hollister Montecito W.W.Montecito 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister 1 324324 1 EAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS expensive and twice as effective as the 20 HEAD LETTUCE ORANGE JUICE Mahatma 2# ¢ By the bag $ 98 Mahatma 2# 79 ¢ ORANGE$JUICE 79 Pallet homes installed in Isla Vista. That 89 $ 389 Support1local people at3 LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAINworking RICE program cost $900,000 to install and bread daily from Now featuring fresh bread daily from ¢ ¢ sa Bakery $ 99 La Bella Rosa Bakery businesses! 99 $ reportedly provided housing for only 26 $ locally 59 lb.NOowned lb. SALES TO DEALERS lb. people. LIMITED STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS

69¢ $2.98 MEDIUM YAMS ORIZO $2.98

OPS

59 ¢

WHIP TOPPING $

$1.99

HEAD LETTUCE

149

ORANGE JUICE

79

¢ $14.99

$1.39

$

389

featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery 2 for $3 2 for $5 GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

Mahatma 2#

Mahatma 2#

lb.

lb.

lb.

7#

ea.

7#

lb.

ea.

2018

Folgers 8 oz.

lb.

®

lb.

lb.

Folgers 8 oz.

®

Springfield 15 oz.

Springfield 15 oz.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Springfield 8 oz.

Springfield 8 oz.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

BANANAS BEEF TRI TIP

ea.

249

ES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS UGH NOVEMBER 2ND

8

49

MESQUITE CHARCOAL PINEAPPLES

By the bag

$BANANAS ¢99

2 LONG GRAIN RICE $

5757 Hollister Ave

89

INDEPENDENT.COM

Mahatma 2#

$

Mahatma 2#

1

7#

7#

Chicken FROM APRIL 15 THROUGH APRIL 21GOLETA

SANTA BARBARA THE INDEPENDENT 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

1

LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

PINEAPPLES APRIL 15, 2021 LEG QUARTERS

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

BANANAS ea.

lb.

E R I K A CA R LOS FI LE P HOTO

BEST 20 20

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

oronto-based Mercer Park Brand Acquisition Corp. bought Glass House Farms, a Carpinteria-based cannabis company, to create YOU FOR VOTING US the state’sGOLETA biggest cannabis Ave 5757 Hollister brand-building platform. “I’m really excited for the Mahatma 2# next chapter,” said Graham Farrar, cofounder and president of Glass House Group. “I think it’s RUSSET POTATOES validation that what we built is 5# Bag important and exciting. And I Glass House Farms’ Graham Farrar lb. think it’s validation that cannabis is becoming more mainstream. I look cannabis products and the answer was, no, 7# forward to having more resources to fund you’re still talking to me,” Farrar said. “I run the mission of Glass House, which is to the show no different than yesterday. We just YELLOW MANGOS bring the good of cannabis to the good of now happen to be a publicly traded stock on the people, and now we’re going to be able the Canadian exchange.” But other parts of its business will change. to do that for even more people.” Mercer Park Brand acquired Glass House With the new acquisition, Glass House does ea. intend to expand its operations. It currently El Pato 7 oz.Farms for $567 million. Farrar said that consumers shouldn’t worry operates more than 500,000 square feet of because they won’t be affected by the move. Far- greenhouse space. The company’s long-term BROCCOLI CROWNS rar and his cofounder Kyle Kazan are expected goal of six million square feet is expected to to continue to serve as president and CEO, and be the largest cultivation capacity in California. Farrar said the expansion would not be their products aren’t going anywhere. lb. “I was asked by a neighbor in Carpinteria in the Santa Barbara area, however. Folgers 8 oz. lb. if now he’ll be talking to some guy in Canada Visit the Glass House Farms website at who doesn’t care about him when ordering glasshousefarms.org. —Delaney Smith JALAPENOS

www.santacruzmarkets.com

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

99

$

289

According to a street census taken of the homeless in Santa Barbara County in 2020, the City of Santa Barbara has 914 homeless people, of whom 542 are living an unsheltered life. This number does not include people living in their vehicles. The hotel-motel housing model was adopted as a statewide program; to date, 173 homeless people have been put up in Santa Barbara motel rooms during COVID, 57 of whom have reportedly transitioned into more permanent housing. According to the estimates embraced by City Hall, the City of Santa Barbara would need 262 temporary shelter beds, 120 shortterm housing units, and 232 permanent supportive housing units to meet the demands of the city’s current homeless n population.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COURTS & CRIME

County Settles Wrongful-Death Lawsuit for $850,000 by Tyler Hayden

T

DAN I EL DR EI FUSS F I LE PHOTO

Bryan Carreño Was Shot 20 Times by Deputies in 2017

he County of Santa Barbara reached a $850,000 settlement agreement with the family of 26-yearold Bryan Carreño, who was fatally shot by Sheriff ’s deputies in 2017. Carreño at the time was suicidal and holding a knife when a group of five deputies cornered him — and themselves — on the small back patio of a La Cumbre–area home he’d broken into. The deputies fired a total of 27 shots, 20 of which struck Carreño. Sheriff Bill Brown Carreño’s family had filed a wrongful-death lawsuit against the Sheriff ’s with no admission of guilt on the part of the Office in federal court, arguing the depu- Sheriff ’s Office or Sheriff ’s deputies, was a ties used excessive force to subdue Car- business decision made by the County and reño when less-lethal means were available, its insurance carrier. The Sheriff ’s Office including a K-9 unit at the scene. They also continues to extend its deepest sympathies presented evidence that two of the deputies to the Carreño family.” had firsthand knowledge of Carreño’s suiThe settlement was finalized in August cidal tendencies, as they’d been dispatched 2020, but only recently came to light during to his home twice in the year prior when he correspondence between the Independent was threatening to kill himself. The depart- and the attorney representing the family, ment ought to have taken Carreño’s mental- William L. Schmidt. health issues into greater consideration as The County of Santa Barbara has now they formulated their response, the lawsuit paid nearly $9 million to settle multiple misconduct lawsuits filed against the Sherargued. According to internal county records iff ’s Office since 2010. Last March, it paid — obtained last year by the Independent as $950,000 to a man whose back was broken part of a public records request — a Sher- as he attempted to flee from deputies during iff ’s Office Shooting Board convened after a traffic stop. the incident found “supervisors did not One active-duty deputy — Jeremy Rogers implement basic emergency incident man- — has been involved in five fatal incidents, agement protocols” that night. It was also including a wrong-way collision and three “unclear if a perimeter was established prior shootings, that have so far cost taxpayto making contact with the subject,” when ers $5.5 million. The most recent of those all five deputies found themselves trapped shootings is now the subject of another with Carreño in a tight outdoor space that wrongful-death lawsuit filed against the offered little means of maneuvering. “Pro- Sheriff ’s Office by the family of 30-yearvide training emphasizing in establishment old Cameron Ely, who was shot 22 times at of inner and outer perimeter,” the board point-blank range by four deputies in 2019.  recommended. Ely had allegedly stabbed his mother Despite these apparent tactical errors, to death earlier in the evening but was Santa Barbara County District Attorney unarmed and, according to the family’s Joyce Dudley found no fault with the depu- complaint, posed no threat at the time he ties’ actions and ruled Carreño’s killing a was killed outside their Hope Ranch home. justifiable homicide. In public statements, They cite body camera audio recordings of Sheriff Bill Brown also claimed that the the incident that don’t match statements shooting was “within Sheriff ’s Office pol- given by the deputies, who told investigators icy.” Nevertheless, Brown told the paper this Ely had yelled and lunged at them before week, Carreño’s death was “a tragedy.”  they opened fire. Authorities claim the “Mr. Carreño,” Brown continued, “who microphones worn by the deputies — which suffered from mental illness and co-occur- captured clear audio immediately before ring substance misuse, threatened deputies and after the shooting — failed to pick up with a large knife at the time of the shoot- that particular moment of the interaction. ing. The settlement, which was made for The case remains in its early stages, and a the benefit of Carreño’s minor daughter, and hearing is scheduled for later this spring. n

WANTED OLD COINS & PAPER MONEY

WE BUY: · Coin Collections (US and Foreign) · US Proof Sets & Mint Sets · All Gold & Silver Coins · Gold & Silver Bars

By Appointment Only Call Ron Gillio · Cell #(805) 637-5081 or email rjgillio@gmail.com GILLIO COINS · 1103 State Street Serving Santa Barbara Since 1971 For Jewelry, contact: Bella Rosa Galleries phone #(805) 966-1707 INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

9


APR. 8-15, 2021

CORONAVIRUS

New Vaccination Availability

A

r rtunity fo rs an oppo io unseling n o se C d h n lt ies a l He a ta n e M g Give famil n supporti ervices Future by Support S a Brighter a & F mily

With a $125 donation You’ll be entered in a May 14, 2021 drawing

50 winners receive a gift cer

tificate valued at $50, $100 or

Your contribution supports ma

$150

ny of the establishments that have supported us in the past!

and

You’ll also receive a recipe boo klet featuring scrumptious dishes from local chefs

Visit CookingUpDreams.org for more information

fairly large allocation of vaccine arrived in Santa Barbara County this week, some of it courtesy of the state’s new MyTurn vaccination appointment system. Cottage Hospital announced it had 10,000 doses of Pfizer to give this week, but residents must go to myturn.ca.gov to make appointments. The MyTurn system also automatically sends emails or texts to people who are signed up and yet to be vaccinated. The Cottage press release notes the MyTurn website states up top that no appointments are available, but if you scroll down further to “other locations,” the Cottage appointments for its Goleta hospital will appear. As well, Lompoc Valley Medical Center has 250 vaccines scheduled for each day this coming week, second doses for this week and first doses after April 19, CEO Steve Popkin said. The hospital is also using the MyTurn scheduling system.

No Eek, but U.K. Variant on Rise closures. The March samples showed the U.K. variant at 33 percent — it’s 50 percent more contagious than the “wild” variety of coronavirus — 42 percent for the West Coast, which dominates Southern California and is 20 percent more contagious; and 24 percent variants of lesser concern. One reason Arias carefully examined the new samples is the newly named “double mutant,” or the appearance of the Eek mutation on the B.1.1.7 variant. Infectious disease specialist Dr. Lynn Fitzgibbons explained that what is now called the E484Q variant was first reported a few weeks ago. “It was a pattern recognized in India,” she said, “the B.1.1.7 variant, which is concerning because of its c o nt a g i o u s ness as well as the increase in death and severity of disease, and speBRITISH INVASION: The most recent genetic sequencing of March samples show the cific mutations U.K. (gray) and West Coast (green) variants vying for dominance. seen in other variants from Like the previous set of tests results, South Africa and Brazil.” The South Africa posted on March 24, those from last Thurs- and the Brazil variants contain the Eek day show that the U.K. variant is increasing virus, and California health authorities in Santa Barbara County. Despite its pres- counted 51 cases in the state. Neighborence, no serious outbreak has occurred ing Ventura County had one case of the here, unlike the B.1.1.7-induced hospi- South African strain and five cases of the —JY talizations in the northern central and Brazilian. eastern United States and across Europe, where some countries have reimposed Read more at independent.com/coronavirus-news.

Wednesday, April 21, 2021 6:00 PM - 7:30 PM (PST) followed by virtual networking w/ guest panelists 7:30 PM - 8:00 PM (PST)

Jacob Tell Founder & CEO Oniracom

Bassem Hamdy Founder & CEO Briq

Karen Feeney Business Development Manager Allen Construction

Josh Blumer Owner AB design studio

Mark Weeks Group Product Manager ServiceTitan (Moderator)

To learn more and sign-up, visit www.mitcentralcoast.org

Special Thanks to Our Premier Sponsors

10

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

mong the mutations the clever coronavirus has developed is one that researchers call the “Eek” variant after its scientific designation E484K. It’s an apt name because the mutant has shown a disturbing ability to evade antibodies, including those induced by vaccines. Fortunately, Eek has not yet been found in Santa Barbara County, but virologist Carolina Arias looked for it very carefully among the most recent set of COVID-19 samples her lab at UC Santa Barbara sequenced. S.B. COU NTY P U B LI C H EA LTH DE PA RTME NT

FREE ONLINE EVENT

—Jean Yamamura

CORONAVIRUS

A PROPERTY TECHNOLOGY IN THE ERA OF COVID

Thorough lists of locations that should be offering vaccines, including Costco and Walmart, are at the website for Santa Barbara County Public Health (publichealthsbc.org/vaccine). One set of locations offered by Public Health is listed at the green bar (County Public Health Department Vaccination Clinics), and others are the blue bar (Additional Community Vaccination Sites). Public Health spokesperson Jackie Ruiz said 2,400 new allocations came through the state and are reflected by appointments available at the DeWees Center in Lompoc and at Allan Hancock College in Santa Maria. Thousands more were expected in coming weeks as second doses. A number of pharmacy locations are listed at both the county and state sites, but as many have learned, searchers must go through a multistep process that may or may not result in appointments actually being available.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D EDUCATION

Raza Educators Unite by Delaney Smith

A

C H UCO F RONTER A

New Teachers Association Has 16 Members and Growing new teachers association aiming to transform public education around issues of racial and social justice in Santa Barbara Unified School District (SBUSD), the Association of Raza Educators (ARE), has formed. The group has 16 members so far, the majority of whom are first-generation residents and whose families have lived the immigrant experience. The Santa Association of Raza Educators co-chairs Carlos Estrada and Raquel Barbara chapter is the smallest Frausto so far, with other chapters in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Sacramento. labor agreement if someone from SBTA were The founding leadership and membership in the room. That does not, however, mean are current and former members of the she isn’t open to working with Raza Educators Santa Barbara Teachers Association (SBTA) and learning more about their mission. executive board, Political Action Committee, “I’m here to listen and learn and lead,” and the now-defunct Equity Ad Hoc Maldonado said. “To do so, I need to hear Committee. ARE leadership have claimed directly from people, so people shouldn’t that they have been pushed out of the union. shy away from asking for a meeting…. We ARE formed in response to what it calls may not always agree, but I will certainly give the teachers union’s unwillingness to work people the time to listen to their concerns.” with them and create equitable change. Developing anti-racist curriculum in SBTA President Karen McBride said that this district schools is a major part of ARE’s work. Community liaison Alejandra Tashma talked statement was simply not true. “We advocate for equitable work about a self-care program called social justice conditions, resources, and training that will healing, which ties in one of ARE’s central help make our members better prepared concepts: identity work. For example, when to meet the needs of our diverse student she teaches her 4th graders that every wave population,” McBride said. “With the of immigrants was discriminated against, she California Teachers Association, we are said she talks through it in a developmentally developing our Equity Committee and our appropriate way that allows them to learn Racial Equity Affairs Committee, and a about their own identities. new Special Education Committee to help Among the unique differences between enable members to address the needs of ARE and the union is community many underserved groups in the community involvement. The union operates in the through  improved teaching and learning traditional model of bargaining for teacher conditions.” conditions, whereas ARE conditions McBride added that any certificated are contingent upon the wellness of the employee with the district may be a member community as a whole. Mark Alvarado, a of the union and no one has ever been parent who serves as community outreach “pushed out” of an elected position. “While for ARE, said the parental engagement piece our roles within the community may differ, is a night-and-day difference from SBTA. our work intersects in service to the educators “The pandemic exposed a lot of the and students we serve,” she said. inequities that students of color and their But this is not how members of the families had to endure with technology, food Association of Raza Educators see the issue. security, and what have you,” Alvarado said. ARE co-chair Raquel Frausto said, “But a lot of times, how that message was “[T]he goal is getting us into that executive getting out varied from campus to campus. board position, making the changes, being There wasn’t really an umbrella strategy.” able to work with bargaining, fighting for the ARE’s main objectives include fighting for a democratic education that allows parents things that we know we need to.” Her co-chair, Carlos Estrada, added that and community members the same rights as SBTA “doesn’t want to advocate in a deliberate teachers, counselors, and administrators in way for working-class folks and marginalized the education of their children; promoting people.” ARE can accomplish this, he said, community activism among teachers and by “organizing and mobilizing teachers, developing student activists; reclaiming developing critical, anti-racist liberation spaces in schools for developing politically curriculum, and working with community active teachers; and promoting critical organizations to ignite change.” pedagogy, a teaching philosophy, as the For the school district, ARE will not be principal means of teaching students. viewed as a teachers’ union like SBTA. “How long can arguing continue to be Superintendent Hilda Maldonado made centered on a white, middle-class kind it clear that only one union represented of perspective?” asked co-chair Estrada. n teachers, and she could only discuss their “Enough is enough.”

THANK YOU TO OUR AUCTION COMMITTEE AND ROOM REPS: MORGAN MCDONALD, NIKKI MURRAY, SARAH NGUYEN, EMMA MALINA, IVETTE GUINTU, ESTHER LI, JOSEPHINE LIN, ROYCE BORGESON, HEATHER VAN BUREN, RACHEL AND ATESHIM DEMSAS, KARA BYRNE, ALANNA SNOWDEN, JENNIFER JEFFREY, NATALIE MUTZ, ERIN FOSTER, SARAH ANTHONY, ROBIN DEINHARD, ANNE SHAW HEY, NIKKI BOWEN, BRIDGET GARDNER

THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS SPONSORS A GREAT LESSON - $1,000 DAVID KIM GROUP FERRIS ORTHODONTIC GROUP FORAGE FLORALS MANCHESTER CAPITAL MANAGEMENT NASIF, HICKS, HARRIS & CO., LLP SANTA BARBARA CHILDREN’S DENTISTRY

GOLDEN BEADS - $500 BEACH FRONT CONSTRUCTION CIO SOLUTIONS HENDERSON AND BORGESON, ATTORNEYS AT LAW NEAT METHOD - SANTA BARBARA

THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS UNDERWRITERS & IN-KIND DONORS MAMMOTH MOVING & STORAGE SNOWDEN VINEYARDS MIEKO KUSANO & ROBERT LAMBOURNE

NOW HIRING Transportation Security Officers Full- and part-time positions starting at $18.85 per hour*

A Career that Matters Competitive pay. Growth potential. Federal benefits. Paid on-the-job training. TSA is a great place to start a rewarding career. Join our team at Santa Barbara Municipal Airport and be part of a mission that matters.

Apply online at tsa.gov/TSO

ENSURING

SAFE TRAVELS U.S. citizenship required. Equal opportunity employer. *Pay rate varies by location.

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

AFS-TSA-0282–SBA3-Print-SantaBarbaraIndependent-quarterpage-v2.indd 1

THE INDEPENDENT

11

3/17/2021 7:40:49 PM


APR. 8-15, 2021

COUNTY

Reengineering Santa Barbara’s Criminal Justice Machine Can Savings from Jail Be Used to Fund Prevention Programs Instead?

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTOS

by Nick Welsh he supposed to square the 11 percent s of April 9, there were only 635 the supervisors had been told earinmates in the Santa Barbara lier in the hearing with the 55 perCounty Jail. From February cent they were told later in the day? 2020 to February 2021, the Supervisor Hart’s frustration was average daily count was lower still more palpable. “There’s no informa— just 611 inmates. For the three tion I can look at in advance. There’s county supervisors most intent on no way I can verify these numbers,” dramatically reengineering Santa he complained. Everyone testified they support diversion and agreed Barbara County’s sprawling $400 they could do more, he said. “So million criminal justice machine, why aren’t we doing more?” he these numbers are bursting with staggering possibility. demanded. DUELING NUMBERS: Public Defender Tracy Macuga (right) and her staff reported that only 11 percent of all cases are set aside for one That’s because in a typical non- of the county’s eight jail-diversion programs. DA Joyce Dudley (left) and her staff countered that 55 percent of all criminal defendants For years, the criminal jusCOVID year, the County Jail — until either entered a diversion program or had their charges dismissed or reduced to infractions. tice system has been the statistical recently the focus of protracted jail equivalent of a big black box. Law overcrowding litigation — was home to about 1,000 inmates. Miyasato — always careful to remain above the political enforcement agencies have complained of being hampered Even as the COVID curtain lifts, supervisors Gregg Hart, fray — has convened an ongoing Criminal Justice Working by antiquated data management systems that rendered any Das Williams, and Joan Hartmann are pushing hard to keep Group and appointed a retired judge to head it to examine efforts to share meaningful breakdowns on who’s behind bars and for what prohibitively labor-intensive. In the wake the jail population down. Their plan is to spend the savings just such issues. of COVID, old-school record keeping became not just techderived from cuts to the jail’s budget to fund a host of pronically archaic but medically threatening. grams — prevention, mental health, and rehabilitation — to New ways were forced upon all members of the criminal help keep people out of jail entirely. At an all-day public hearing on this upcoming year’s bud- If the supervisors found themselves to be confused as to justice partnership. In the wake of George Floyd, uncomfortget held Monday, April 12, Supervisor Williams threatened basic facts at the end of Monday’s nine-hour meeting, they able questions relating to systemic racism within the crimito vote against any budget plan that did not make substan- are to be excused. Statistics flew fast and furious from every nal justice system became much harder to ignore. tial cuts to operations at the county’s main jail. With the vantage point. In Yolo County, Macuga told the supervisors, a very connew North County Jail about to open up, he said Sheriff Public Defender Tracy Macuga — who described the servative DA led the charge to create a statistical dashboard Bill Brown could make significant cuts to the main jail, spe- current system as the judicial equivalent of “a conveyor that could show at any given time how many people were cifically to two of the wings where expensive repairs are belt” — used one set of numbers, while DA Dudley stressed in county jail and on what charges, their races, and their required. For far too long, Williams charged, the supervisors that her deputies pursue diversionary opportunities “when- opportunities for diversion. Such a tool, Macuga argued, have been “shoveling millions and millions into keeping ever and wherever appropriate.” Defendants charged with would lay to rest impressionistic and anecdotal perceptions people incarcerated.” “I want a plan,” he repeatedly stated misdemeanor-level drunk driving and domestic abuse, for about Santa Barbara’s criminal justice system. For example, to Brown. Earlier in the day, he and District Attorney Joyce example, are not eligible for diversion. if criminal defendants in North County actually do get hit Williams pushed Dudley, arguing that a larger num- with tougher charges and longer sentences for the same Dudley traded exchanges on much the same theme. While none of the other supervisors were so nakedly con- ber of misdemeanor charges involved people facing minor crimes and have fewer available diversionary services — as frontational in their approach, Hart and Hartmann made it drug charges, driving with suspended licenses, and pub- Macuga contends is the case — such a dashboard would lay clear the status quo wouldn’t suffice when it came to incar- lic intoxication. Dudley pushed back, stating that the lack out the facts. Such a dashboard won’t be enough to satisfy the activceration and diversion rates. Clearly, the specters of George of consideration afforded crime victims during Monday’s Floyd and, now, Daunte Wright hovered over the day’s delib- deliberations “hurts my heart.” She said deputy DAs evalu- ists who urged the supervisors to slash the Sheriff ’s budget erations, adding a new sense of urgency to questions that have ate candidates based on a totality of factors, including other by $26 million, but it was clearly the crucially needed first long simmered about Santa Barbara’s criminal justice system. crimes in which they’ve been involved. “I will never make a step. As basic as it sounds, it will prove to be more challengSo too, obviously, was the threat of COVID, without which decision based on the numbers,” she stated. ing than it seems. While all the criminal justice partners the reductions to the County Jail populations — “dramatic Macuga and her public defenders reported that only 11 — Macuga, Brown, Dudley, and Probation Chief Tanja Heitand drastic” in Brown’s words — would never have occurred. percent of all cases are set aside for one of the county’s eight man — expressed support for such a data-sharing endeavor Neither Brown nor Dudley was about to roll over; both diversion programs. Macuga also noted that 85 percent of all in concept, that support was far from unequivocal. Dudley expressed concern about the accuracy of some insisted they already were actively engaged in diversionary the cases filed by the DA’s Office were misdemeanor cases, a efforts. Dudley claimed it was she who brought diversion number, she said in a gathering of mental-health advocates of the data in the system; if the supervisors set public policy to the county nine years ago, while Brown insisted, “This last week, that “should shock the conscience.” based upon erroneous information, she warned, public is not some flash in the pan,” after he had outlined various Her deputies talked of spending 10-12 hours per brief safety could suffer. Brown, likewise, expressed some conjail-based education and rehab programs. Brown warned the on legal filings submitted on behalf of clients whose infrac- cerns about data accuracy. Heitman, by contrast, suggested supervisors that the jail’s population is now artificially low, tions stemmed largely from mental-health or substance- her department’s database could provide a valid starting abuse issues. They complained of having to wage legal battle point. and that the crime rate is already on the rise. Brown also sought to dispel the impression that the county with their counterparts in the DA’s Office to get clients into In the 60 days before the supervisors meet again to disjail was bursting with low-level offenders. Of the 635 there on treatment programs rather than jail. In the meantime, they cuss diversion and the county jail, this is one nail they hope April 9, he said 68 were charged with murder or attempted charged, it would take four months to get a schizophrenic to have nailed down. murder; 592 were accused of felony-level crimes. Only 41, he client who hears voices an appointment to see a psychiatrist. While North County supervisors Steve Lavagnino and Ann Bramsen, an experienced criminal prosecutor, Bob Nelson expressed concern about the spike in violent said, were facing misdemeanor charges. Both Brown and Dudley, it should be understood, are inde- painted an entirely different picture. Of 87 case filings she crimes Brown warned about, both expressed interest in pendently elected by the voters and do not answer to the super- handled over a three-week timespan early this year, she said, making fundamental changes to what they described as visors on how they run their departments. The supervisors do, 52 of the defendants had their charges dropped, reduced “the status quo.” Nelson, new to the board and as the sole Republican the however, wield the power of the purse. This week’s weeklong to infractions, or placed in a jail-diversion program. Chief budget preview qualifies as a dress rehearsal for the down-and- Deputy DA John Savrnoch stated 55 percent of all cases most obviously conservative, expressed pride the board was referred for criminal prosecution were removed from the tackling such big issues. “We’re swinging for the fences with dirty deliberations that will take place later this summer. this one,” he said, adding, “We’re the 800-pound gorilla; we For the first time ever, the county’s executive officers, led traditional criminal justice system in 2020. Supervisor Williams commented on the “incongruity” have the purse strings. Maybe we have the political will to by Mona Miyasato, scheduled a special hearing to brief the n supervisors exclusively on jail diversion programs. In fact, of the information the supervisors were given — how was tie it all up with a bow.”

A

MEASURE TWICE, CUT ONCE

12

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


NEWS of the WEEK

CONT’D

MEG B ROWN

AGRICULTURE

New Front in the Pot Wars Cannabis Gains a Foothold in the Parched Cuyama Valley by Melinda Burns he county’s most depleted water basin, the Cuyama Valley, is fast becoming the latest battleground in the fight over how — and whether — to address the negative impacts of the cannabis industry on farming and residential communities. The giant groundwater basin underlying this sparsely populated, heavily farmed valley is one of California’s 21 most critically over-drafted basins. For 75 years, the Cuyama Valley has been a mecca for water-intensive farming on an industrial scale — first, alfalfa, and now, carrots. To comply with state law, studies show, pumping in the Cuyama Valley may have to be reduced by as much as two-thirds by 2040. That’s because, most years, twice as much water is pumped out of the basin as is replenished by rain — a formula for a Dust Bowl. The cannabis industry, the newcomer on the block, will drop new straws into the over-drafted basin. More than 740 acres of outdoor cultivation has been proposed for the Cuyama Valley and is under review for zoning permits. Over-drafted groundwater in the Cuyama Valley is only one of the battles being waged over cannabis in Santa Barbara County. On the South Coast, Carpinterians want stronger regulation of the cannabis greenhouses that are stinking up their neighborhoods. In the Sta. Rita Hills wine region between Buellton and Lompoc, vintners are demanding curbs on outdoor “grows.” Farms in Cuyama Valley that are for sale are being advertised as “cannabis-zoned land.” But the waterguzzling carrot fields run by two major corporations are seemingly not for sale or lease. Most of the cannabis “grows” are being proposed for foothill grazing land or unplowed land that is not presently being irrigated. And that worries conservationists, who fear that cannabis will further deplete the water supply and undermine smaller-scale farms. “There seems to be little respect for the Cuyama Valley and for dealing with the really severe water issues and the fact that there are people living there,” said Roberta Jaffe, who grows wine grapes and olives on five acres in Cottonwood Canyon. “We’d like to see projects on irrigated JOAN NA K AU FM A N

T

land that would actually reduce the amount of water use on that land.” Jaffe serves on an advisory committee that was convened two months ago by county supervisors Das Williams and Steve Lavagnino to draw up a list of voluntary water-use guidelines for the industry — most notably, how to set up water offsets, or transfers. These could include paying farmers to fallow land or replace their sprinklers with drip lines. Zoning permits for cannabis in the valley would not otherwise require such conservation measures. The growers view cannabis as a net benefit for the Cuyama Valley; they say it will reduce the overall water use and generate jobs — a scenario that some conservationists agree may be possible, depending on the size and location of the offsets. The growers say cannabis may use half as much water as alfalfa or carrots.

‘MOE & MOE’

On March 31, the water question came to a head when the county Planning Commission unanimously approved a proposal for 35 acres of cannabis in hoop-houses on grazing land at 2225 Foothill Road. That’s within a stone’s throw of the carrot fields in the valley flatlands, where the water levels in irrigation wells are dropping as much as eight feet per year. The applicants, Moe Essa and Moe Jawad, a k a “Moe and Moe,” are partners in real-estate development in the Central Valley and residents of Fresno and Merced, respectively. They plan to process their Cuyama Valley cannabis at an industrial park they hope to build in Woodlake, California. Doing business as “Cuyama Farms,” Essa and Jawad have submitted applications for 133 acres of cannabis in the Cuyama Valley, and they share a seat on the county’s advisory committee. Essa and Jawad estimate that their 35-acre project on Foothill will need 104 acre-feet of water per year. For context, that’s enough water to supply three-quarters of the town of New Cuyama, population 700. At the same time, though, the two growers are proposing to voluntarily offset their projected new water use on a one-to-one ratio. They have entered into a contract to pay a farmer in Ventucopa, more than five miles away, to fallow 28 acres of alfalfa, thus cutting his water use by at least 104 acre-feet per year. “If you grow up in the Central Valley, you have empathy for the water situation,” Essa said. “This is a strong commitment from us.”

HOMEGROWN OPPOSITION

WATER SWAP: Moe Essa, left, and Moe Jawad, Central Valley real estate developers, have won county Planning Commission approval to grow 35 acres of cannabis on unirrigated grazing land on Foothill Road in the Cuyama Valley. They plan to offset their water use by paying a farmer in Ventucopa to fallow his alfalfa field.

WATER DRAINED: Jean Gaillard, a Cuyama Valley vegetable farmer, fears the cannabis industry could further deplete the critically over-drafted groundwater basin in this high-desert region. He has appealed Essa and Jawad’s project to the county Board of Supervisors.

Still, some Cuyama Valley farmers are dreading the coming influx of cannabis; they view the water offset for Essa and Jawad as bad precedent, and they wonder whether the advisory committee is a waste of time. On Monday, Jean Gaillard, the owner of Cuyama Homegrown, a one-acre vegetable farm at 1381 Foothill, 1.5 miles west of Essa and Jawad’s proposed “grow,” filed an appeal, asking the county Board of Supervisors to deny the project. Gaillard noted that Essa and Jawad plan to drill a new well 1,200 feet deep, while his own well is only 500 feet deep. The offset with the Ventucopa farmer, he said, is undemocratic and shortcuts local efforts to reduce pumping. “If you want to come here, you have to play fair with everybody,” Gaillard said. “My water well level is already

dropping two feet per year, and there’s no cannabis. In terms of us little growers, we already know we’re going to struggle in the future because we might be subject to water pumping restrictions.” At the very least, Gaillard said, the commission should have delayed a decision on the permit for a couple of months, until the advisory committee could agree on some guidelines. On March 31, the commissioners said that water regulation in the valley was best left to the local groundwater agency that will oversee future pumping reductions. They noted that Essa and Jawad had the right to grow alfalfa or carrots without permits. “Things are changing in Cuyama,” said commission Chair Larry Ferini, a Santa Maria strawberry farmer. “None of us really like change. A water exchange of one-to-one is just amazing. I hold the applicants in high regard for just doing that, without being asked.”

KNOCKING ON DOORS

Paying for offsets, conservationists say, would work best if the cannabis crop and the crop to be fallowed were in the same part of the Cuyama basin — not miles away from a new cannabis well, as Essa and Jawad are proposing. The two growers said their agents knocked on a lot of doors, trying to find a closer partner for water offsets. But they didn’t find any takers. “That doesn’t mean we’re giving up,” Essa said. Essa added that he did not “at all” view his critics as his opponents. “The opposition usually wants us to leave town,” he said, adding that, in the Cuyama Valley, “We’re kind of working with each other.” But conservationists remain adamant that the water transfers should be larger, given the enormity of the overdraft. “How can a one-to-one offset for a new operation make any progress?” asked Brenton Kelly, chair of the Cuyama Valley Community Association and watershed advocacy director for an educational farm near Ventucopa. “It should be one-to-one-and-a-half, not just bringing in a new use and playing with ‘paper’ water,” Kelly said. “When can we get beyond the ‘Department of Do No Worse’? We n know we may have to be cutting back by 67 percent.”

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

13


JOIN US! APRIL 17 & 18

CEDRIC BERRY

FANFARE FOR THE COMMON MAN DIGITAL LIVESTRE AM RECORDED AT THE GRANADA THE ATRE

SAT U RDAY, A PR I L 17 • 7: 0 0 p m { P R E -S H OW 6:30 P M } S U NDAY, A PR I L 18 • 3: 0 0 p m { P R E -S H OW 2:30 P M } Join us for an All-American Concert Rooted in the Tradition of "Fanfare for the Common Man” and celebrating the resilience of the Santa Barbara community. Baritone CEDRIC BERRY joins the Symphony under the Baton of Maestro Nir Kabaretti for a program spotlighting the diversity of influences that make up the American musical landscape.

"Cedric Berry wields a bass-baritone of considerable power and agility."

-THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE

FE ATURING Aaron Copland, Fanfare for the Common Man and selections from Old American Songs. George Walker's Lyric for Strings, Robin Frost’s Serenade for Strings, and Samuel Barber’s Summer Music Wind Quintet. With Joan Tower’s Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman No. 1, and the world premiere of George N. Gianopoulos: ‘Polarity’ specially orchestrated for - and dedicated to - the Santa Barbara Symphony.

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY! Visit theSymphony.org

SE AS O N S PO NS O R :

14

THE INDEPENDENT

2020/21 SEASON SPONSOR, VIDEO & AUDIO TECHNOLOGY SPONSOR:

SARAH & ROGER CHRISMAN

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

P R I N C I PA L C O N C E RT S P O NS O R:

SAMUEL M. & ALENE S. HEDGPETH

G R A N D V E N U E S P O NS O R:


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Case of the Ill-Manored Dog

HUNTING HOUSING: On the way home

the other night, I ran into a neighbor jogging down Valerio Street. Naturally, we had to do the COVID catchup. You vaccinated? he asked. You doing okay? I asked him back. All the usual. He and his wife, it turns out, had been hoping to break into the housing market, which, it turns out, is like trying to windsurf a tornado. They recently put in a bid for an attractive fixer-upper on the Westside —no, not the Alta Baja Mesa or any of those other gloppy real estate euphemisms—in need of some serious infrastructure work. The list price was $960,000. They also had to sell themselves to the seller, who wanted to make sure the new buyer would be a good fit for the neighborhood. When my neighbor — a conscientious soul — showed up to the beauty pageant, there were about 30 others on hand to do the good-neighbor booty shake as well. Ultimately, all was for naught. The house sold for $1.3 million, nearly $400,000 above the asking price. The top two bidders included provisions indicating they’d pay a few thou over whatever the top bid was. After exchanging fist bumps and elbow taps, we went our ways, both humming, strangely enough, Elvis Costello’s “All This Useless Beauty.” Dirt, as we all know, never sleeps. The

ground under your feet is always working. And it makes much more money than you ever will. That’s Santa Barbara. What goes up never

comes down. Or if so, only temporarily. And never for long. That’s why the governmental entity known as the County of Santa Barbara is doing so well that its reserves—weighing in at $38 million —are practically spilling over, while the governmental entity known as the City of Santa Barbara is looking for widows and orphans to throw overboard. Why the dramatic discrepancy? The county is funded to a much larger extent by property taxes —which are derived from real estate—not to mention a helpful infusion from cannabis, while the city relies more on bed and sales taxes. My curiosity piqued, I called a real estate guy I know. How many single-family homes are on the market, I wondered, for a million bucks or less? Between Carpinteria and Gaviota he said, there were three. And six condos. That

was a week ago. Things could have changed. But not likely. Between a million and $1.5 million, he said there were 12. And eight condos. Yikes, I said. How’s a person supposed to get a toehold? “It helps if you have a million in the bank,” he said. No wonder Santa Barbara seems to have more Teslas per square inch than any place on the planet. Between January and last week, there were 1,200 properties listed. Of those, more than 800 sold. More than half got more than their list price. Most went in less than two weeks. According to my real estate friend, they could have gone even faster, but agents wanted to slow it down.

This Tuesday, the City Council went eyeball to eyeball with how many new housing units

the state government says we have to make theoretical room for if we want to be eligible

for all kinds of state funding. Every city and county in the State of California goes through this every eight years. Countywide, we need to have the zoning in place to allow 24,856 new units to be built. That’s twice as many as the previous eight-year cycle. For the city of Santa Barbara, it’s 8,001 new units. That’s also about twice as many as last time.  Councilmember Kristen Sneddon wondered if the fact that there was no available land within city limits entered into this equation. No, she was told, it did not. What about building near high-fire zones where housing should not be built? No, she was told, it was not. The new numbers — technically known as the Regional Housing Needs Allocation or RHNA, for short — are so much bigger because this time they reflect the overcrowding and cost burden that exists in each jurisdiction’s housing market, not to mention the socioeconomic problem of the jobs-housing imbalance. Guess what? We’re in the purple zone. High rents, overcrowding, and long commutes.  By law, the council must adopt new RHNA numbers. But in many ways, the council was told, it’s an academic exercise, akin to a skinny guy buying an oversized belt in the off chance he experiences a sudden weight gain. 

The new numbers, more than anything, reflect existing realities, not something looming. “These numbers are already here,” said Councilmember Meagan Harmon, and paying too much to live in housing that’s fundamentally unsafe. Councilmember Michael Jordan was, as usual, his confoundingly contradictory self. “This is certainly not the time to do nothing,” he said. He then added, “To do nothing is to do something.” It’s worth noting that the city of Santa Barbara has already done a lot. We changed our zoning in many places to allow three times as many units with only half the parking spaces. We embraced the invasion of the granny flats — albeit belatedly and reluctantly. But all that got us was 1,328 new units since 2015, a far cry from the paper goal of 4,100. And now, we are poised to make more changes that will sacrifice the downtown skyline in hopes of enticing developers to defy gravity and build affordable rental housing on the world’s most expensive land. What any of this really means I don’t pretend to know. It turns out with our existing zoning, we can already accommodate the theoretical new goal of 8,001. In the meantime, my house-hunting neighbor and his wife splurged on a top-of-the-line tandem bike. It was a consolation prize. Last time I saw them, they were zooming down the Valerio Street Speedway, grinning like fools in love. So much for useless beauty. —Nick Welsh

The book people are discussing when talking about the weather In Drought & Flood – The History of Water in Santa Barbara and Montecito, Michael F. Hoover – a water engineer in Santa Barbara for over 40 years – brings to life the story of water in the county. Of special interest are his explanations of the mechanisms and factors leading to local fires, floods, and even debris flows. The charts, maps and fascinating historic photos make this book a great reference for locals. For this reporter, who has covered water in Santa Barbara for 35 years, Drought & Flood deftly pulls together local water history, science and data from multiple sources into one handy reference book. Melinda Burns Santa Barbara Independent Michael F. Hoover’s Drought & Flood is a book you as a homeowner should not only read but should add to your library.......an easy and enjoyable read. Jim Buckley Montecito Journal

A vailable: Chaucers & Tecolote Bookstores, Mischief (1225 Coast Village) and at Hoovergeo.com INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

15


obituaries Dorothy McKenzie 1/21/1943 - 4/1/2021

Dorothy McKenzie passed away peacefully in her sleep on 04/01/2021. She leaves behind her daughter Sheelah Smith and Sheelah’s husband Doug Smith, her son Doug McKenzie, his wife Marian McKenzie, and their son, Dorothy’s cherished grandson Ian McKenzie. Dorothy was the only child of William Houston Millar and Ruth Millar (Ellis), and was born in Glasgow, Scotland on 01/21/1934. She met her beloved husband James in the British Royal Air Force. They were married on Dorothy’s 21st Birthday, and celebrated their 60th Wedding Anniversary just days before Jim’s passing in 2015. Dorothy is most known for her career as a prolific “Plein air” landscape artist. Mostly self-taught, she studied at the Regional College of Art in Manchester, England, and the Vancouver Art School in British Columbia, Canada. She exhibited paintings in the Paisley Art Museum and Glasgow Gallery of Fine Arts in Scotland, and has work in the British National Collection. She has pieces in private collections all over the world, and had many shows locally over the years, including Soho and the Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum. She was one of the four artists who started the Santa Barbara beach art show, and was known there by her iconic straw hat. She joined other local artists in environmental efforts to preserve open spaces, notably the Oak Group. She gave art classes at her studio, and some of her students continue in her footsteps, showing their work at the beach art show. Dorothy was a “fey” Scottish lass with untold skills and talents, not least of which was always knowing who was on the phone before it rang. She became a Chiropodist (Podiatrist in this country), and fixed 16

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com the corns of an Archbishop shortly before he helped crown Queen Elizabeth II. When she joined the RAF, a special session of Parliament opened a new trade group because of her. As the first, she was given her choice of transferring to any RAF station in the world, but remained at the training base where she had just met Jim. She became a rifle sharpshooter there. She loved birds, and rescued many. Her children remember finding grubs and earwigs to feed the nestlings, teaching a mockingbird to fly, and seeing Mum visiting with a friend, a baby pigeon tucked in one arm, chewing up birdseed to poke down its throat in between sips of tea. She spent days (in the rain) at the Child’s Estate Foundation Zoo helping save the lives of seabirds after the horrific 1969 oil slick, and was surprised to find pictures of herself washing birds in the Los Angeles Times. Dorothy was unique, creative, and completely inimitable. She gave great parties, where she had everyone up dancing, leading the way with her purple dress, tiara, parasol and “floozy feathers.” She loved Dixieland Jazz and Johnny Cash. Her imagination was always bringing something new, from the Millenium obelisk her neighbors so enjoyed, to a Mad Hatter’s tea party for friends inside the new shed Jim had built. She loved “bling,” fairies, chocolate— oh,yes, chocolate–and above all, people. Truly a people person, she became best friends with everyone she met, learning their story and that of all their family within minutes. Dorothy of the brilliant blue eyes, our own sparkling, vibrant fairy, our beloved Mum and Grandma, we will miss your most-special light in our lives more than we can ever say. We love you dearly, Mummy, and send you on your way to re-join your darling Jim, where the first thing we know you will do (because you told us yourself) is give a “bop on the nose” to any Angels foolish enough to flirt with him… Celebration of Life postponed due to Covid-19. Please contact family members or mcdermottcrockett.com for updates and tribute page.

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Margie Brown

3/12/1930 - 3/20/2021

The angels danced – and perhaps Margie did too – as Margie’s Lord and Savior ushered her into her eternal home in heaven on March 20, 2021. Margie had a long and beloved life on earth, and will be greatly missed; we will rejoice together when we see her again! Margie was born Margot Diemer on March 12, 1930, in Karlsruhe, Germany, the eldest of four children born to Karl Philip and Maria Diemer. From her earliest years, she helped take care of others; her siblings, her cousins, her mom. She grew up in the midst of WWII: her father was killed early in the war; her home was bombed (more than once!), her mother was seriously ill and hospitalized; and she and her siblings were sent to the countryside for safety, separated from mom and each other. Margie helped her mom gather the family together again, and the family continued to face bombings and separations, trying to stay together as much as they could during the war. After the war, Margie started working as an administrative assistant in a local company and helped take care of her siblings. Then in 1950, Margie was a bridesmaid at the wedding of a friend, and there she met Earl Brown, a young US soldier who changed her life direction. In April 1952, she sailed alone from Germany to Canada, to wait for Earl to return from active duty in Germany. When she arrived, she knew no one, had a total of $15, and got a job as a nanny. Earl returned to the US in July 1952, headed to Canada, and they were married in August in Toronto. Earl’s younger brother Fred lived with Margie while Earl returned to the US to find work; Margie and Fred joined Earl in the US in early 1953. Margie proudly became a US citizen. They lived in Blythe,

CA, then later in Beaumont, where their two children, Karl and Inge, were born, and then in Oceanside. In 1970 the family moved to Santa Barbara. Margie and Earl were involved for many years at Calvary Baptist Church; Margie began working in the children’s department from the day they started attending and stayed for almost 30 years. She was involved in many other church ministries, including Helping Hand, and could usually be found helping in the church kitchen. Later, she joined Emanuel Lutheran Church, where she helped with ministries for the blind. Once the children started school, Margie worked in food service at a private dorm for students at UCSB. A few years later, she started her own business as an independent sales representative for promotional items; she managed her business for 34 years, finally retiring at the age of 88! Margie and Earl also hosted foreign exchange students in their home. Margie and Earl traveled to Europe every few years to visit with Margie’s family, to see Inge after she moved to Germany, and to travel in Europe. After Earl’s death in 2006, Margie continued to visit family there. Margie always had time to help others; visiting the homebound; chauffeuring others to appointments; calling and caring for those in need; and she enjoyed many afternoons of board games with her friends! Margie was active and involved in service until shortly before her death. Margie was a strong lady, strong in her faith, her ambition, her integrity, her generosity, and her love and service to others. Margie leaves her beloved children, Karl and Inge (Dirk), her adored grandchildren, Tim, Andy and Lucy, and her many, many friends. Memorial contributions may be made to Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Foundation or Serenity House, part of VNA Health in Santa Barbara, in memory and appreciation of their excellent care for Margie in her last days. A memorial gathering may be held in the summer.

Richard Dale Canley 5/29/1954 - 3/21/2021

Ricky Canley passed away at his home in Ventura, CA after battling cancer. Ricky was the 4th of 8 children born to LV and Louise Canley in Santa Barbara, CA. Ricky was shy but always had a smile on his face. He attended local schools and graduated from SBHS in 1973. He also attended SBCC. In 1977 Ricky married his childhood sweetheart, Jasmine Young and together they had 4 daughters. Although the union ended after 26 years, they remained very close friends. He worked for Santa Barbara County, 7-Up and Pepsi where he was well liked by his coworkers. Sadly, due to Covid-19, Ricky’s family and friends could only speak to Ricky by phone. While in the hospital, he spoke daily with every family member and friends ending every call with “I love you”. He is survived by his 4 beautiful daughters, Andrea Dantzler (DeAngelo) of Sturgis, MS, Adara Philpot (Romell) of Gwynn Oak, MD, Aliyaha Canley (William) of Newport News, VA and Ariana Canley (Anthony) of Oxnard, CA, their mother Jasmine and 15 grandchildren. Ricky was preceded in death by his father LV and oldest brother LaVell. He is survived by his mother Louise Canley, siblings Lee (Juanita) of Ventura, CA, Donald (Peggy) of Santa Barbara, CA, Linda Thompson of Santa Barbara, CA, Doyle Canley (Magdalena) of San Diego, CA, Teresa Courtney of Lompoc, CA and Debbie Stephens (Zeb) of Oxnard, CA, wife Juanita Hayes, and a host of cousins, nieces and nephews. The Canley family will plan a celebration of Ricky’s life at a later date.


obituaries Emma McFanwy Goodman

1/13/1965 - 3/13/2021

On Saturday, March 13th, 2021, Emma Myfanwy Goodman, devoted mother of two, and adoring grandmother passed away suddenly from anaphylactic shock, at age 56. Emma was born January 13th, 1965, in Kent, England to Sandy & Anne Goodman, the second born of five children. From a young age, she had an adventurous spirit, moving to Paris in her late teens. She moved to Santa Barbara with her two small children, Hannah and Rufus in 1996. She will be greatly missed by her daughter Hannah, granddaughter Harper, her father Sandy, three sisters, brother, a loving clan of nieces and nephews, cousins and her dog, Poppy. A true visionary, Emma created Alchemy Wellness Spa, a healing sanctuary that provided transformational treatments, bioactive foods and medicinal elixirs to support a dynamic lifestyle. The cafe & spa offerings were ahead of their time. Emma was a master healer, specializing in craniosacral therapy and energy medicine. She had a profound and positive impact in Santa Barbara, inspiring a vibrant community of healers locally. She was a magnet for inspirational leaders from around the world. Emma was elegant and stylish, strong-minded and charismatic. She was a dear friend to many, and made friends wherever she went. Among many things, she had a natural gift for creating extraordinarily beautiful interiors and gardens. She spent many days at her favorite beach, Butterfly, where she loved to swim along the buoys. She will be remembered especially for her thoughtful, generous nature and vivacious personality. Emma was a beautiful being and her light will be with us forever. Her essence will live long in our hearts.

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

James Gordon Folks 3/12/1944 - 3/29/2021

James Gordon Folks was born on March 12, 1944 in Starke, Florida and died on March 29, 2021 of several health issues. His parents were Gordon Folks and Hazel Anderson Folks. Within a year of his birth, Jim and his mother traveled to her home in Long Beach, Ca, where they waited for his father to return from fighting in Europe. In 1951, his father built a home in Palos Verdes where Jim grew up. He was a member of the first graduating class of Palos Verdes High School. He continued his education at UCSB where he met his wife, Gretchen Clark, in a social dancing class. After graduation, Jim went to Hastings Law School in San Francisco. He passed the Bar and got married in 1969. Jim and Gretchen moved to Santa Barbara in 1970. They had 2 children, Victoria and Kyle. He practiced law until 1995 and then maintained a wine store until he retired in 2006. Jim had many interests which he pursed with a passion. First and foremost was his family. He loved golf and was part of a wonderful group of friends at Sandpiper during the 90s until Rancho San Marcos opened. He played golf there until he had to give up the game. He had a prolific vegetable garden. In 2008, Kyle suggested that his father make wine in the basement. That became the all consuming passion. Some of the wines were totally fantastic. Jim and Gretchen enjoyed travel. His favorite destination was Scotland where they played famous and not so famous golf courses. His second favorite destination was the south of France. Jim’s wit and intellect will

be missed. In addition to his wife and two children, he is survived by son-in-law Brian Wyatt, grand daughter Iris Wyatt and step grand children, Cassidy and Chaia CherquesWyatt. Any donations in Jim’s name should be made to Foothillsforever.org or the Sierra Club. A celebration of life may be held in the summer.

Roberta George 4/3/2021

Roberta George, 94, a resident of Santa Barbara, Calif., died peacefully at Cottage Hospital on April 3. She moved last month to Alexander House after five years with her friends at Wood Glen Hall. Born on a family farm in North Star, Ohio, to Norbert F. and Irene (Goubeaux) Henry, Roberta was the third of nine children and the oldest girl. Her surviving siblings are Marlene A. Litten, Joan C. (Neil) Shearer, Robert L. Henry, LaJeanne M. (Darryl) Burk, and Rebecca C. (Melvin) Swiger. Preceding her in death were her brothers John, Richard, and Donald. Roberta graduated from Greenville (Ohio) High School in 1946. On Jan. 15, 1949, in Greenville, she married Richard M. (Dick) George of North Star, Ohio. They soon moved to South Bend, Ind., where they began to raise a family while Dick worked on the Studebaker assembly line. They moved to Santa Barbara in 1961, for his work as a technical writer and editor for General Motors Defense Systems Division (later Defense Research Laboratories). Roberta resumed her working life in the mid-1960s at Regal Cleaners, and then managed a dry cleaning agency on upper State Street. In 1970, she debuted a women’s consignment shop, Roberta’s, on De la Vina Street. She made it one of the premier consignment

shops in the city, due both to her friendly but businesslike manner and to her fairness to consigners and customers alike. Roberta sold her store in 1990. It has since operated as Jessica’s. She was a member and proud board member of the local chapter of Business and Professional Women. In retirement, she became a 13-year member of the volunteer corps at St. Francis Hospital downtown and at Unity Shoppe. Dick died in 1993. In 1997, Roberta married Denver Besecker of Arcanum, Ohio. Mutual friends helped the widow and widower become reacquainted. They married in Our Lady of Sorrows, and Denver moved to Santa Barbara. Being retired, they traveled often and well, visiting Israel, Hawaii, and locations in Europe where Denver served the army in World War II. They also enjoyed annual car trips back to Ohio to see their relatives and friends. Together, they were volunteers at Arlington Theater and Goleta Valley Hospital, and they never lacked a home improvement project hatched by Roberta or one of her kids. Denver died in 2007 of a heart attack while working on a local Habitat for Humanity home. Roberta is survived by her six children and two granddaughters: Katherine L. George (John Duclos); Deborah S. George (Chris Pikus) and daughter, Rachel; Michael T. George, Terrance W. George; Constance R. (Steven) Bellamy; and Mary E. Koenig and daughter, Mallory. This summer, a Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated at San Roque Church. The inurnment will be private. Donations to Unity Shoppe in Roberta’s memory are welcomed by the family. Arrangements are entrusted to Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapels. Anyone desiring to send condolences may direct them to: The George Family, c/o Connie and Steve Bellamy, P.O. Box 656, Summerland, CA 93067. INDEPENDENT.COM

Peter D. Richards 9/19/1957 - 3/25/2021

Peter D. Richards, born on Sept. 19, 1957 in Lafayette, California passed away on March 25, 2021 at his home in Carpinteria, where he was cared for by his loving family. Pete was diagnosed in October 2019 with squamous-cell carcinoma, and throughout his courageous battle with an aggressive cancer, he remained true to himself- unwaveringly optimistic and unbelievably stoic. Pete’s life story reaches far and wide – his light and love have touched so many, the ripple effect of his embrace for every human he encountered shifting the world for the better. Music, typically as loud as was socially acceptable, existed in every corner of his life. The ocean was and is his spirit’s home. And his family – we were it. We were his everything, his purpose, and he made sure we felt it every day. There was nothing he loved more than sharing stories, making others laugh, and turning every occasion possible into a celebration. “You only live once,” he would say, and he made his one shot count, big time. Peter was a beloved husband, father, brother and grandfather. He is survived by his wife, Laurie, his daughter, Rio, his son, Tanner, and his granddaughter, Opal, as well as his four older brothers, Mike, Chris, Joe and Gyani. His incredible humor, love and playfulness will be deeply missed by so many. A local memorial and celebration of his life will be planned for 4/25/21 at 11AM. More information about his memorial can be found at peterdrichards.com.

APRIL 15, 2021

Continued on p.18

THE INDEPENDENT

17


obituaries Robert Alan Turley

his challenges, never believing that they meant he could not live a meaningful and important life – and that he most certainly did. He will be dearly missed. A memorial service at Jodi House will be announced when large gatherings can safely resume. Online tributes to Alan can be shared at www. alanturley.remembered.com.

9/2/1957 - 4/5/2021

Robert Alan Turley, known to most as Alan, died on Monday, April 5, 2021 in Santa Barbara. He was born on September 2, 1957 to Betty Lou and Hobart Turley in Los Angeles County. He lived much of his life in the Santa Barbara community where he spent many of his working years. Whether it was assisting with home improvement projects, caring for a ranch in Santa Ynez, or cooking for a local shelter, he loved to work and spoke of these experiences fondly. In 2002, Alan sustained a traumatic brain injury after being hit by a drunk driver. He lost the ability to work due to the cognitive and physical impacts of his injury; he ultimately became homeless. In 2012, Alan found Jodi House, a local nonprofit program for brain injury survivors. He began attending the program every day and took every class offered. He was the first one to arrive each morning and would carefully tend to the ailing garden box while he waited for the doors to open. On any given day at Jodi House, you could hear his booming laugh no matter where you were in the house — and he laughed often! Every holiday, he would bring Reese’s candies to share and always made sure to bring dog treats for the faithful companions of staff and members. He worked hard towards achieving many of his recovery goals – just this past year, he had even secured stable housing after years of homelessness. Alan was open about his experiences, often expressing how outside of Jodi House living with a disability and being homeless made him feel invisible to the rest of the world. But Alan was far from invisible to those who had the privilege of knowing him as the nurturing friend and teacher he was to all. He learned to live with 18

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Barbara Anne Davis Wells 3/15/2021

Barbara Anne Davis Wells passed peacefully on March 15, 2021, at the age of 89 years. She is survived by her three children, Hilary, Linda and Michael Wells, her son-inlaw, K.C. Williamson and daughter-in-law Kendra Wells, and her three grand children, Michael Joseph Wells, Madison Wells and Lauren Williamson. Barbara was the only child of Grace and Donald Davis and was raised in Oakland and Los Angeles, California. She attended UCSB for one year, then attended UCLA for the remainder of her undergraduate years. She met her husband, Harry Wells, who was a Naval Officer, in Hawaii. Soon after they married she became a teacher and taught elementary school, first in Hawaii and later in Long Beach, California, for over 40 years. In 2013, Barbara moved from her townhome in Southern California to an independent living apartment at Vista Del Monte Retirement Community. She lived there for seven years, where she enjoyed a full and active lifestyle participating in campus activities and spending time with her neighbors, friends and family. In May of 2020, after living in Vista Del Monte’s assisted living program for a year, she moved to Oak Cottage Memory Care in Santa Barbara. Barbara was very independent, picking up skiing at age 50, and traveling to multiple countries. She enjoyed close, life-long friendships and spent lots of time with her family, including her twin daughters who lived nearby. We want to thank and are very grateful for the wonderful Vista Del Monte and Oak Cottage communities and care providers, who have been so supportive and caring of her over these many years.

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Leonard Richard Woods 11/28/1951 - 4/1/2021

Born in Erding Germany, Leonard was naturalized and served in the United States Navy for 6 years as a medic technician. He graduated from St Johns University with a BA, although a student all the days of his life. Leonard was a caregiver for many years. He was well known throughout the Santa Barbara community as a guardian and was loved by his Lucidity Festival family and The Guardian Team / SITREP that he worked with. He passed peacefully in his sleep. He is survived by sisters Helene Woods of Santa Maria and Christine Hagel of Orcutt as well as all of those who loved him. He will be missed and never forgotten.

Clarence E. Willis

5/30/1967 - 3/23/2021

Clarence Willis was born in the city of Jackson, MS. and the oldest son of Verlean Willis. Clarence was a graduate of Wingfield High School, where he played drums in the marching band all four years. He immediately entered the US Navy after graduation, and served as a Machinist Mate and Military Police Officer. He left the U.S. Navy in 1992 and worked as a supervisor in various government and aviation jobs in Lompoc, Santa Maria and Santa Barbara. He

finally found a home with the Metropolitan Transit District of Santa Barbara, where he worked in total of 17 years. The community fondly nicknamed him, “The Singing Bus Driver”. Clarence is survived by his wife of 20 years, Elizabeth Willis, sons: Joshua and Nathaniel Willis, and Daughter: Nayada Ponce (Daniel) and three grandchildren: Isaiah, Elijah and Leonardo. His mother Verlean and brother James Willis. Clarence was a believer in Christ Jesus and shared his beliefs to everyone he came across. He will truly be missed. Services will be held at: McDermott-Crockett & Associates Mortuary 2020 Chapala St Santa Barbara, CA 93105 On Saturday April 17, 2021 at 11 am Live stream of the services will also be available.

Joe R. Gonzalez

3/13/1924 - 3/26/2021

Joe R. Gonzalez, 97, of Santa Barbara passed away peacefully on Friday, March 26, 2021, at 9:50 p.m. He was a devoted husband, father, brother, and uncle. Joe was also a generous and loving grandfather, great-grandfather, and great-great-grandfather to 27 grandchildren. Above all else he was a positive inspiration to his family and friends, and a warm, caring person to all who knew him and called him their friend. When Joe met people out in the community at retail stores, restaurants or people walking by, he would bless them and tell them he saw God looking back at him through their eyes. This would bring smiles and nods of agreement even from complete strangers. Joe was born in Quinlan, Woodward, Oklahoma on March 13, 1924. He was the second son of Jose and Magdalena Godinez-Sanchez. His mother passed away when he was 10 years old, and at that

point he went to live with his Aunt Guadalupe and her husband Joe Gonzalez. He lived with them and their 3 children, Manual, Rose, and Lloyd until he enlisted in the Army during World War II. After an honorable discharge from the Army, Joe moved to Chicago, Illinois, where he took courses in electricity and metal plating. He met his loving wife, Lois, who resided in the same boarding house as he did. After dating for about a year, Joe knew this was the woman of his dreams. They tied the knot in a simple ceremony at the Cook County courthouse in 1946. Joe and Lois lived in Chicago until 1951, when they decided to move to the west coast and settle in the beautiful city of Santa Barbara, California. Joe and Lois had four children, Raymond, Linda, Steven, and Janette. A very resourceful husband and father, Joe supported his family working in the metal plating business, and as a retail clerk with the Santa Cruz Markets. Joe started his own metal plating business, Joe’s Plating, prior to retiring from the retail clerk’s union. In 2000 he sold Joe’s Plating to his son, Raymond, and wife, Alison. In December of 2017, after 57 years of serving the Santa Barbara community, Joe’s Plating finally closed its doors. Joe is preceded in death by his mother and father, Jose and Magdalena Godinez-Sanchez, and brothers Raymond, Manual and sister Rose. His loving wife Lois, and children Raymond, Linda and Steven Gonzalez are also awaiting him in the heavens and are delighted to be reunited. Joe leaves behind daughter, Janette Johnson, his brother, Lloyd, and many nieces, nephews, grandchildren, greatgrandchildren, and great-great grandchildren. The family will have a celebration of Joe’s life at the Santa Barbara Mission. Internment will be at Calvary Cemetery. Flowers can be sent to Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapels located at 15 E. Sola St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 – (805-965-5145), or in lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Santa Barbara Dream Foundation located at 1528 Chapala St., Suite 304, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 or through their website, www. dreamfoundation.org.


OPINIONS CONT’D

BOB ENGLEHART

Letters

HOURS 9:00-4:00 Monday-Saturday Closed Sunday

Holding the Unwilling

N

AMI has been tracking the number of involuntary holds at the Cottage Hospital ER since last October. In addition to the statistics in the “CoResponse Unit in Peril” article, the number of 5150 holds that expire without bed placement has also increased, as has the wait time for a bed, when someone is able to secure one. We are hearing more often from family members about lack of access to mental-health care at all levels. The success of our county’s considerable investment in mental-health diversion from the jail is ultimately dependent upon the treatment those diverted are able to secure. This is a difficult and challenging time for all of us. We have to work together to solve our mentalhealth treatment crisis. The first step is to acknowledge the problem. Then we can work together to —Lynne Gibbs, solve it. Chair, S.B. County, National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), Public Policy Committee

Vax Track

South Coast residents getting vaccinated in North County blew up at the Board of Supervisors, and Facebook readers had plenty to say about it: Carmen Benz I waited my turn to get a vaccine here in S.B., but it is extremely frustrating to learn our vaccination rate is lower than both Ventura and S.L.O., and to hear about friends driving to North County to be vaccinated. True vaccine equity involves outreach, education, and access. Increasing vaccination rates in the more vulnerable communities benefits the community at large. • Dan Rhodes The signups this week showed there were hundreds available. That’s not inequality, that’s a lack of demand. Load up a few ambulances, vans, or even ice cream trucks with nurses and needles and cruise the east and west sides, offering vaccines to everyone. Zoeann Varner-Lyle Why should it matter where in S.B. County residents go to get their vaccine? As long as we are staying within our own county, I’m not sure what all the outrage is about. I work in a health-care setting and gratefully went to Santa Maria to get a vaccine required for my job. Enough with all the vaccine shaming. We should be more concerned about anti-vaccine propaganda

if we have any hope of returning to some sense of normalcy. Lucy Sharon Byrne It’s the Hunger Games, except we’re playing Vaccine Hunt. Sign up here, do MyChart, check CVS, go to Rite Aid’s site, oh wait, Marian in Santa Maria is offering them, now Cottage Goleta. Hurry! Whoops, they’re filled. The county could have done a whole lot better at getting the vaccines out to all communities rather than watch them seemingly go to only the tech-savvy in English.

165 S. Patterson

964-9944

Patterson Ave

OUR ROSE FIELD 2021 IS OPEN!

Hollister Ave

A name synonymous with quality and service.

www.lasumida.com

Such Is Progress

Though Joyce Coleman, the new leader for Adult Ed, awaits the end of an SBCC investigation before commenting on statements she allegedly made about the imprisonment of Japanese Americans, Facebook readers didn’t hold back: Celeste Barber Manzanar is out in the high desert outside Lone Pine, in the middle of nowhere, and had armed soldiers. One could be shot for attempted escape. Truly racially insensitive. But I agree about the now-acceptable impulse to make this public straightaway and try people in the most public arenas. This was a committee meeting, correct? In a room where the meeting was not recorded. Did anyone there correct her? Explain the truth of life for Japanese Americans in those camps? That her statement was racially insensitive? Did they have a discussion, allowing her to apologize and end it there, in that room? What has happened to civility? For me, that’s the issue. But her comparison of slavery to forcible internment (and loss of property, too) was beyond the pale. Sheridan Rosenberg So let me get this straight. She says something stupid and uninformed, but without ill will or malice, and they ruin her life. Behold the petty tyrants. She has lost her reputation because of this and will be pressured to resign. If she stays, it will be an untenable situation. • Emily Zacarias Why do the history and background of a particular people’s struggles have to be a competition? • Dwayne Newton Wasn’t so long ago that the words or very existence of Joyce Coleman weren’t considered or heeded, as were the words and lives of Asian/Pacific Islanders and a host of other historically oppressed people. It’s amazing how far we’ve progressed. INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

19


C O V E R S T O R Y WORK HARD, PLAY HARD: When they were starting out, it wasn’t unusual for Alessio Signorini (left) and Luca Foschini to work 16-hour days with a couple-hour break in the middle to play some beach volleyball.

Our New

BILLION-DOLLAR BABY

America’s Largest Digital Health Network Started Around a Kitchen Table on Voluntario Street

I

BY TYLER HAYDEN • PHOTOS BY MAX ABRAMS magine an app that pays you to exercise. That can detect

the hidden beginnings of Alzheimer’s disease or the early warning signs of a stroke long before it strikes. That allows researchers to conduct large-scale clinical studies much faster and cheaper and gives pharmaceutical companies the knowledge they need to make better drugs. Imagine an app that harnesses the power of mass data and machine learning, not to optimize Facebook ads for a quick buck but to build a superhighway of information that flows between individuals, doctors, and scientists so the world becomes a healthier place. Evidation Health — a Santa Barbara start-up born nine years ago around a kitchen table on Voluntario Street — and its accompanying app, called Achievement, is the means by which those dreams will be realized. At least that’s what some of the country’s biggest and most respected institutions and philanthropists believe. Late last month, Evidation announced it raised $153 million in venture capital from Kaiser Permanente and a private equity firm. That’s on top of a previous infusion of $106 million and existing working partnerships with Johnson & Johnson, the American College of Cardiology, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, and others. Today, Evidation is the largest digital health network in the United States, with more than 4.5 million people using Achievement to track and share their steps, heart rhythms, sleeping patterns, and other health indicators via wearable devices like Fitbits and Apple Watches. Participants receive reward points that they can convert into cash or donations to charities of their choosing. They can also opt into anonymous studies or answer questionnaires for even more rewards. But it was this latest round of funding that officially meta-

20

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

morphosed Evidation into a “unicorn” — that rare breed of private company valued at $1 billion or more. It got a write-up in Bloomberg. European wire services picked up the news. People far and wide took notice. Especially locally. Only a handful of South Coast businesses — Procore, AppFolio, Apeel, and a few others — have achieved such coveted status. To learn more about this rising tech giant in our midst, we spoke with its creators, a pair of computer prodigies from Europe who could have lived and worked anywhere in the world but chose to make Santa Barbara their home. In fact, they say, the city has been critical to their success. They employ 50 people out of their recently renovated office on Figueroa Street, and with the new capital, they are looking to hire 50 more.

CODING BEFORE IT WAS COOL Luca Foschini and Alessio Signorini were born just a few days apart in 1982 but on opposite sides of Italy. Foschini grew up on a farm outside Bologna, where Bolognese sauce gets its name. (“They just call it sauce,” he said.) The farm produced apples and pears and was one of the first in the region to plant kiwis. Foschini’s father was an innovator. “He was always tinkering,” Foschini said. He even built a produce-moving machine that caught the eye of engineers with Lamborghini, which also makes farming equipment. One day, Foschini’s dad brought home one of the earliest computers to come on the market. His son was hooked. But he wasn’t satisfied with just playing the one game the tiny hard drive held, Gorillas, where two big apes took turns flinging bananas at each other. Foschini wanted to do some tin-

INDEPENDENT.COM

kering of his own. So he figured out how to modify the game’s source code, which allowed him to manipulate its design and physics and opened a world of infinite possibilities. Foschini never lost that fascination with the power and potential of programming. “To me, the computer is like a painter’s canvas,” he said. “My passion is not typing on the keyboard. It’s thinking of something in my mind and figuring out how to make the computer do it.” Gorillas, it turns out, is also what opened the digital gates for 8-year-old Signorini. Except he didn’t own the computer he’d eventually master. It belonged to the elderly couple in the apartment below his, who ran an IKEA-like store and used the loud and bulky machine to track inventory. The deal was that Signorini could use the computer during the store’s offhours, and “as long as I didn’t break it,” he explained. Signorini remembers the painstaking process of translating the English user’s manual into Italian. “I couldn’t pronounce anything, but little by little I figured out what every word meant,” he said. “That’s how I learned.” Gorillas was fun, but what really captured his imagination was creating. He’d change a number here, add a line of code there, and marvel as his keystrokes came alive on the screen. Like Foschini, Signorini has never stopped making things. Even today, in his limited free time, he’s building a network of climate-control sensors for his home. At Evidation’s original office on Mission Street, Foschini put together a small outdoor hydroponics system, where Signorini would find him munching on vegetables. It was their formal education in “informatics” — the European term for what we call computer science — that brought the pair together when they were 18-year-old high school students. By this point, they’d both gotten so good at


programming they were selected to represent their country at the annual International Mathematical Olympiad. They trained together for a month for the competition, during which teams are presented with three unsolvable “problems” and given a certain amount of time and disc space “to write the best possible program that approximates as best possible the solution,” Foschini explained. The preparation was intense, but the friendships they formed with likeminded teenage coders — way before coding was hip — was life-changing. Eventually, Foschini and Signorini started seeing the world in terms of “problems” and “solutions.” They’d walk around their Olympiad host cities in China and Finland and talk about how to improve stoplights or “anything else we saw that we thought we could make better,” Signorini remembered. Little did they know, America’s bloated and broken health-care system would eventually become the biggest problem they would try to solve.

ASSEMBLING THE DREAM TEAM

At first, before they gained any kind of financial momentum, they paid the cash for redeemed user points straight out of their personal bank accounts. They heard a lot of “no”s from investors. Then the positive reviews started rolling in. Users said they were exercising for the first time in years. More than a few said they’d used the cash to buy new running shoes. “It was wonderful to see,” said Foschini, “because we really believed in what we were doing.”

DO NO HARM, AND DON’T BREAK THINGS While Evidation’s potential applications are vast, the basic philosophy behind its platform is relatively simple and builds on the longstanding technological concept of the “quantified self,” or “lifelogging” your body’s signals with wearable devices. Foschini palmed a grip-strength tester as he explained this. What if that concept could be used as a preventative health tool to catch undiagnosed medical conditions before they became dire, the four wondered? Wouldn’t that save people a lot of pain, doctors a lot of work, insurance companies a lot of money, and on down the line? “My worst fear is that one day I don’t feel great and the doctor tells me I have a tumor the size of a tennis ball in my abdomen that took a year and a half to grow,” Signorini said by way of example. “Could we have detected it when it was the size of a marble? My car has a sensor that tells me when the left front tire is low. Can’t we have something like that for our bodies?”

After the Olympiads, the Italian team parted ways but stayed in touch with some of the Internet’s very first email addresses. Yet Foschini and Signorini’s paths continued to crisscross, first at the University of Pisa, then at an early search-engine company, Ask Jeeves. Signorini went on to get his PhD in artificial intelligence from the University of Iowa and worked for a software company that customized digital billboards based on who was looking at them and for how long. He also partnered with Kimbal Musk, Elon’s brother, to create a search engine specifically for social media sites. Meanwhile, after stints at Google and CERN, Foschini was lured to UC Santa Barbara by the opportunity to work with fellow Italian Giovanni Vigna, a rock star of the cybersecurity world, who also taught him to surf. The two old friends always knew they wanted to partner on a project together. With their credentials, they could have had nearly any Big Tech job they wanted (and with a handsome salary), but what they really craved was to create something of their own. They just needed the right idea. It was Signorini who first planted the seed of Evidation while he was in New York. He also brought on board the company’s financialand health-care-minded cofounders: Christine Lemke and Mikki Nasch, who remain with the business as its co-chief executive officer and president, and vice president of business development, respectively. But it was Foschini who convinced the three of them to grow the concept with him in Santa Barbara. The 72-degree February days helped his argument. In 2012, the four rented a house on VolunSWISS ARMY APP: The applications for the Achievement platform are varied and tario Street and got to it. They originally considvast, from helping people lose weight to conducting large-scale clinical studies. ered building their own device before deciding on software. “The first year was a lot of heads down, just working,” said Signorini. “You don’t Evidation’s goal is to establish a baseline for users and create talk to anybody. You just work all the time.” There were distractions. Former colleagues, for instance, were retiring at 30 a “longitudinal context of health,” explained Foschini. That after striking it rich with algorithmic stock trading. There were offers a much more complete picture of a person’s physiology moments of panic, too. What if they failed? “But we just pushed compared to the brief snapshots one gets by sporadic trips harder,” he said. to the doctor and blood tests every few months or years. For The home wasn’t the kind of grungy tech incubator you see instance, it can be especially useful for sleep apnea studies, in episodes of Silicon Valley, but it fostered the same kind of as wearing a device at home is likely to yield more accurate creative energy and camaraderie that gives rise to true inno- results than a fitful night at some clinic. vation. Most of the meetings and coding sessions took place In one of its biggest undertakings, Evidation recently partin the living room or around the kitchen table, oftentimes nered with Johnson & Johnson and Apple for the Heartline between bites of food.

Study to determine if Apple Watches can accurately detect atrial fibrillation (AFib), a leading cause of strokes in the United States. It will also reveal if the app — with its incentive system that awards points for participation and delivers gently worded nudges and reminders at optimal times of the day — is able to effectively encourage people to take their medications. “Heartline is a study that has the potential to fundamentally change our understanding of how digital health tools could lead to earlier detection of AFib, helping patients understand and directly engage in their heart health, prompting potentially life-saving conversations with their doctors,” said Harvard Medical School’s Dr. C. Michael Gibson in a statement. Just a few months ago, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) tapped Evidation for a similar quest to better understand heart failure by continuously tracking patients’ activity levels, sleep patterns, and blood pressure. One of ACC’s leaders, Dr. John S. Rumsfeld, said the combination of Evidation’s platform and ACC’s clinical and scientific expertise offered “groundbreaking opportunities.” Earlier studies have already yielded important and eyeopening results. In one, the incentive system and its messaging — referred to as “digital intervention” — successfully motivated a cohort of people with diabetes to get their yearly flu shot. It showed how the same behavioral psychology tools and snappy user interfaces that companies like Netflix and Spotify use to attract ad-clicks can actually get people to engage with their health. In yet another trial, Evidation and Lyft Healthcare proved how difficult it can be for poor and elderly individuals to secure transportation to and from their doctor’s offices. The companies are now exploring ways to improve ride availability among Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries. Regular brain exercises on the app may reveal the onset of Alzheimer’s or dementia. High blood pressure could be caught before it wreaks havoc. Migraines might be better managed. The possibilities seem endless. Athletes are also using Achievement to optimize their performance on the field, while citizen scientists enjoy contributing to a growing body of knowledge. At the outset of any study, Achievement’s participants agree to share their data, and they are asked again for their consent when researchers decide they want to use it. Anonymity is guaranteed. But the company isn’t reinventing the wheel when it comes to cybersecurity, Foschini stressed. It’s only recently that privacy has become a commodity. Evidation just abides by the same safeguards and procedures that clinical research has followed for the past 50 years, he said. Successfully navigating the checks and balances of the health-care industry has been no easy task, Signorini and Foschini readily acknowledge. There were major liability hurdles to overcome, and the company is still constantly being audited by potential partners and investors to ensure its software is properly encrypted and can accurately handle the gobs of data it collects, synthesizes, and distributes. As a technology company, gaining the trust of the people within the medical establishment has also been a challenge. “It’s really a clash of two cultures,” Foschini explained. “In medicine, you have ‘Do no harm.’ But in tech, you have ‘Move fast and break things.’ Those two concepts don’t really play well together.” Right now, Foschini went on, America is experiencing the fallout of Big Tech moving way too fast and breaking far too many things, with data breaches and plagues of misinformation troubling regulators and alienating users. Meanwhile, the country’s health-care system remains a structural mess, with its IT infrastructure in desperate need of upgrades. “Health care is generally behind other things,” said Foschini. “It has a lot to do with the regulations, which

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

>>>>

THE INDEPENDENT

21


RESET YOUR MIND, BODY, AND SOUL THIS SPRING! ENTER OUR

g R n i r eset p S

w a y a e ! v i G

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series

y Todam ! at 3p

Join Robin Elander in conversation with Todd Stewart & Felix Felix (Dune Coffee Roasters), and Marek Nold (Hustle & Grind Coffee Company) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

Join Robin Elander in conversation with t Nexek! We

Win prizes from local businesses to get you on track this season.

April 15 - 28

SIGRID WRIGHT

Community Environmental Council

HILLARY HAUSER Heal the Ocean

DEBORAH SCHWARTZ Santa Barbara Beautiful

Earth Day Celebration Thursday, April 22 | 3pm Live on Zoom

independent.com/springreset

Register at independent.com/spotlight

E R F E C T G I F T S F O R T H E H O L I D AY S E A S O N Choose from our wide variety of premium olive oils, balsamic vinegars, gourmet foods as well as our selection of beautiful homeware items including handmade olive wood products and Italian ceramics. We have a little something for everybody!

13 th

WE SHIP TO ANYWHERE IN CONTINENTAL USA • ORDER IN STORE OR ONLINE 927 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 | (805) 886 4342 | www.VivaOliva.com

Presented by

H o n o re e s , Lu z R eye s - M a r t i n a n d B a r b a ra B e n - H o r i n “Vision, Voice, and Advocacy for a New Generation”

Friday April 30 12pm on Zoom register for this FREE event at awcsb.org Emcee, Starshine Roshell 22

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


COURTESY PHOTOS

C O V E R S T O R Y

STARTING YOUNG: By the time he was 8, Signorini (left) was learning how to code. Foschini started a little later because his family needed his help around the farm.

are obviously important but also very cumbersome. Even transferring small amounts of data between two hospitals, especially when you’re still using CDs, can be difficult.” The two worlds need to find a way to meet in the middle, Foschini declared. “Technology needs to become more responsible in order to be appealing to the health-care industry, and health care needs to finally listen and embrace the technologies that can truly save and improve lives.”

MAKING GRANDMA PROUD

Evidation may have a serious jump on most of its competitors, but it’s not the only game around. In fact, Bloomberg recently reported that equity investments in digital health companies reached $26.5 billion globally in 2020, a 45 percent jump from the year before. And just this week, Microsoft announced it’s buying a company called Nuance Communications, which uses hand-free Siri technology to record doctor-patient conversations, for a whopping $19.6 billion. But what Evidation has that many other companies lack is the continued die-hard dedication of its original founders, nine full years after they first got together. That’s nearly unheard of in the tech start-up universe and is a testament to how driven they are by their mission, Signorini said. He and Foschini are also particularly proud that half of their leadership team is female, another anomaly in their line of work. “We sponsor local initiatives like Womxn/Hacks,” UCSB’s all womxn-identifying and nonbinary hackathon, Foschini explained, “and really care about making tech a more welcoming place for women and people with diverse backgrounds. … We’ve seen enough tech bros.”

THE INDY PODCAST In this week’s episode of The Indy podcast, host Molly McAnany talks with author Tyler Hayden about this week’s cover story. Listen at independent.com.

In their early days, the pair had considered headquartering Evidation up in the Bay Area, where they now have a second office. But Santa Barbara, with its beaches and a steady stream of computer science hotshots coming out of UCSB, was too good to pass up. Signorini swears the company simply wouldn’t have survived if they didn’t have their choice of sunny days to get outside and blow off steam when they needed to. “With all the hours of grinding and all rejections, we absolutely would have burned out,” he said. So what does it really mean for Signorini and Foschini to have a billion-dollar feather in their caps? Did they go out and buy Montecito villas and a couple of flashy Ferraris? “No, definitely not,” laughed Foschini, noting that both men still live within a block of each other on the Westside. “Our lives haven’t changed much. I still drive a 2005 Pontiac Sunbird with dents on every side. But it’s the best car for surfing.” For his part, Signorini is content on his Vespa. “The money is for the company and will help us build what we want to build,” he said. “It’s not for us.” But it may help convince his grandma that he’s on the right track. “Until pretty recently, she used to ask me: ‘Alessio, when will you stop playing with computers? Come home and find a real job.’ ” The duo have no plans to sell Evidation, either. At least, not anytime soon. That’s not what it’s about, they explained. “I like what I do,” Foschini said. “I know it sounds cheesy, but I care more about optimizing the journey. I don’t obsess about the destination.” They do, however, want to get back to working shoulder to shoulder with their colleagues in their Figueroa Street space, and they’re counting the days until COVID finally blows over. “One advantage of starting your own company is that you get to decide how it takes shape,” Signorini said. “We tended to hire people that we wanted to work with. Of course they’re smart and have skills, but fundamentally, they’re people we wanted to work with. I miss being with them.” See evidation.com.

For more recycling information please visit:

LessIsMore.Org INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

23


N AT I O N A L P O E T R Y M O N T H

POEMS from the pandemic

Sixth Graders at Vieja Valley School Describe an Extraordinary Year

COURTESY PHOTOS

Inspired by Amanda Gorman’s reading of her poem “The Hill We Climb” at President Biden’s inauguration, David Nelson’s 6th-grade class at Vieja Valley Elementary School in Santa Barbara began to write their own poems. They first analyzed Gorman’s poems for the many poetry elements she used and then brainstormed ideas, talking about their struggles and sadness over being separated from their friends during the Year of COVID. In so doing, said Nelson, it became a shared experience: “Poetry is a powerful tool that brought us all together,” he said. “We hope these poems give you reason to hope and smile.”

Miss Corona by Phoebe Caldwell I wake up one morning getting ready for school. and I hear my mom saying there’s a new virus called Corona Virus I blow it off but little did I know that the Corona Virus would change 2020. School gets canceled for two weeks, two weeks turn into months, we start something called Zoom. The next few months I am stuck inside, nothing to do and extreme boredom. When I go on walks I hear six feet please. I think why does this have to be me. When I go to stores I have to wear masks. I can’t see my friends. Now having to make sure we have a mask before we leave the house. I ask myself why this virus? Will it ever end? But then I thought there’s hope. I think about times with my sisters. Them being home from college, spending time with family. Learning new dances. Learning how to curl my hair. Getting into makeup. Texting my friends. Playing with my dog Lucy. Finding new songs to listen to. I go on a lot of walks with my family. My mom and I go to the grocery store. Now I think without the pandemic none of this would have happened. So now I’m kinda thankful for the pandemic.

24

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

The Golden Morning

The Soccer Player

by Kalae Anderson

by Cecilio Carachure

Seeing friends makes me smile. The way they smile with their eyes through the masks. The bright and warm sunlight on my face, It feels as if nothing bad has ever happened. The dirt on my hands feels great, It seems as if I have gone to another world, Where nothing bad happens, And everyone just has a good time.

I miss playing soccer with my friends And going to the beach and watching the sunset Tired of waiting to have fun getting bored staying in my house Sad that I can’t see my friends It makes me smile when I Think of being with friends Again.

The animation I dream of, A big scary monster coming, Slowly creeping up on me then…. Covid comes, It makes me feel like everything is so far away. Stores are closed, People are forced to stay inside, People that lost their jobs have to beg for food and starve. We have to wear masks all day long, No one can do anything. But on that golden morning, Everything will be gone, no more hunger, no more fright no more anything. Everything will go on to being normal.

INDEPENDENT.COM


Changing your own motor oil is low-cost, easy, and can be done right at home.

Hope is breath in the cold Although there is only a sliver of it It’s there; and that’s enough And it’s born within us

The Art of Living by Cameron DePaco We are committed to a life of happiness Not a life of division A life that brings purpose to our country, our people, and our world A life that will never be broken by those who do not stand with us This beast has torn us apart Only for us to find that we’ve never been so close together To find that through this hardship is hope for a more peaceful world As we reach into the sunlight And take flight, as we ignite So we can fight for this love that will never be lost What we want is so simple Yet so, so complicated Unity, self-love, feeling safe, hope If only we had the courage to fight for it To stand for it To live for it It would always be in our grasp

RECYCLE YOUR USED OIL and FILTERS! Remember, it’s illegal to dump motor oil in the trash or down the drain. Make sure to recycle oil and filters at a center near you.

Everything feels gray Like there’s no point anymore But we are surrounded by color Color that will save us all If we only look for it and share it with one another This wall that encloses us Has us calling for help Falling for freedom Crawling for courage We must fix what we broke Repair what we shattered We are not perfect But life does not have to be perfect for it to be wonderful So while we once wondered: How can this disease be shattering our society? Now we wonder: How can our society be shattering this disease? We are strong people Who are fighting for a strong country A country that will keep us tethered A country that will never let us break We are committed to a life of happiness Not a life of division A life that brings purpose to our country, our people, and our world A life that will never be broken by those who do not stand with us

Internet and COVID-19 by David Duarte

When the internet glitches, that is a flaw in the system. Having harsh conditions having rain the damp water making its way throughout your receiving end of antenna wirelessly connecting to the box of internet. Giving joy, sadness, despair, aggression, embarrassment bringing down the internet The flaws of the internet are like a human. Many make mistakes no one’s perfect, glitches the world calls them. They may happen every so often. But I call them learning steps. It might be the trigger that sets you off and gets you in a bad mood. But in the tech world With every flaw there’s an update, new model of a device. So as it is in life make a mistake and learn from it. We will overcome this desperate time of covid 19. Fixing the mistakes that have been made will bring others but in doing so bringing new learning steps will help the world to be a better place. Learn from them but in the end it all passes soon enough and in time this pandemic will pass as well. This pandemic may leave a few scars but it never lasts forever.

FREE Collection Centers in Goleta Auto Zone at 5799 Hollister Ave., (805) 770-4019 Fast Lane Oil Change at 180 N. Fairview Ave., (805) 683-9640 Jiffy Lube at 6015 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-4100 MarBorg Industries at 20 David Love Place, (805) 964-1498 O’Reilly Auto Parts at 5754 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-1318 Toyota of Santa Barbara at 5611 Hollister Ave., (805) 967-5611 UCSB Campus at Mesa Road, Building 565, (805) 882-3602

Please call ahead, wear a mask, and practice social distancing when turning in your used motor oil and filters. Provided by:

In partnership with:

FOR MORE RECYCLING INFORMATION

(805) 882-3603 www.LessIsMore.org

PLEASE CALL: OR VISIT:

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

25


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

4/15-4/21:

Exhibit: Maria Rendón: Rain See 18

works of vivid acrylic colors, biomorphic forms, and visual cues associated with the mountains, cliffs, ocean, and spring bloom of S.B. in the debut solo exhibition of Mexico City–born Maria Rendón. Visit the gallery website or in person for socially distant viewing through May 24.10am-5:30pm. Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery, 11 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 730-1460.

tinyurl.com/MariaRendon

4/20:

House Calls Virtual Event: Ephrat Asherie Dance’s

Odeon Join UCSB Arts & Lectures as they present these Urban Dance Innovators. Ephrat “Bounce” Asherie (formerly of Dorrance Dance) and her dance company will perform new work for seven dancers and four musicians that will bring together and remix street and club dances set to a mix of early-20th-century romantic music and popular Afro-Brazilian rhythms. A moderated Q&A will follow. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535. tinyurl.com/EphratAsherieDance

SATURDAY 4/17 4/17: S.B. Symphony Livestream: Fanfare for the Common Man Live from The

THURSDAY 4/15 4/15: Race to Justice Virtual Event: Ranky Tanky Listen to Gullah Music of the Carolina Coast from this Grammy Award–winning quintet that will introduce you to the language, rhythm, and music of the region with a distinctly American sound that incorporates jazz, blues, gospel, and R&B. A Q&A moderated by Santa Barbara Independent Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan will follow. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535. Read more on p. 34.

tinyurl.com/RankyTankyShow

FRIDAY 4/16 4/16: Big Joe’s Tacos at Draughtsmen Aleworks Happy hour will get happier with fresh food for purchase from Big Joe’s made on-site. 4-5pm. Draughtsmen Aleworks, 53 Santa Felicia Dr., Goleta. Free. tinyurl.com/BigJoesTacos

4/17:

COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

“Rain” by Maria Rendón

Granada Theatre will be Aaron Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man, an American standard, and its updated response, Joan Tower’s Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman, which will spotlight the talented symphony brass section. The symphony will also perform Copland’s setting of Old American Songs, a new work by composer George Gianopoulos, and works by Robin Frost, Samuel Barber, and Charles Ives. 7pm. $65. Call (805) 898-9386. Read more on p. 34. tinyurl.com/SymphonyFanfare

Downtown Santa Ynez Painted Horse

Round-Up Area artists have created and dispersed a collection of painted wooden horses throughout downtown. See them all and qualify for a prize drawing. Meet the artists on the corner of Meadowvale Road and Highway 246 and visit artisan booths and enjoy activities at participating shops. Don’t miss trainer Ramon Becerra with his miniature horse performance. 10am-2pm. Free. Email linda@santaynezchamber.org. tinyurl.com/SYPaintedHorses

4/17: Donation Yoga Class: Save the San Marcos Foothills Join this yoga class hosted by Divinitree to reconnect with your body, reconnect with the earth beneath your feet, and help raise money for S.B.’s last remaining native grasslands and Chumash ancestral land. All proceeds will go toward the Foothills Forever campaign. 11am-noon. Leadbetter Beach, Shoreline Dr. $15.

divinitreesantabarbara.com/events

SUNDAY 4/18 4/18: Party Proper Production Join the Sunday “funday” vibe as you listen to the perfect soundtrack to accompany a great brunch. 11am-2pm. S.B. Wine Collective, 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C. Free.

Horse by Laurie Owens

tinyurl.com/PartyProperDJ

MONDAY 4/19

ANGELINA HERNANDEZ

4/19: Beachside Sculpt This dynamic (nonheadphone) class is for all levels and will combine vinyasa flow, challenging core-work, and bursts of cardio and strength training exercises, culminating with a relaxing Savasana (gradually relaxing one body part at a time). Bring a mat, water, a towel, and weights 3-10 lbs (optional). 5-6pm. East Beach Cabrillo Pavilion Bathhouse Rooftop, 1118 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $15.

tinyurl.com/BeachSculpt 2

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 26

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

4/20: Virtual Author Discussion with Local Authors Josef Woodard and D.J. Palladino Longtime entertainment journalist Josef Woodard will talk about his new novel, Ladies Who Lunch, a satirical taste of L.A., with D.J. Palladino (Nothing That Is Ours). 7pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com. tinyurl.com/

JosefWoodard 4/20, 4/21: Maker Challenge: Create Your Own Book/Desafío de la Creatividad Crea Tu Propio Libro Create your own book using the Maker Challenge kit in celebration of Día de los Niños! Kits will be available for pickup during Grab ’n’ Go services at the Central, Eastside, Carpinteria, and Montecito libraries, while supplies last. Visit the website for library addresses. ¡Crea tu propio libro usando el kit Desafío de la Creatividad para celebrar el Día de los Niños! Los Kits estarán disponibles para recoger durante nuestros servicios Grab ’n’ Go en las bibliotecas Central, Eastside, Carpintería y Montecito, hasta agotar existencias. Visite el sitio web para las direcciones de las bibliotecas. Pick up hours/ Horario de recojo: Tue.: 2-5pm; Montecito Library. Wed.: 10am-4pm; Central Library. 2-5pm; Carpinteria Library. 2:30-5:30pm; Eastside Library. Free/gratis. Ages 6-12.

tinyurl.com/BookKit-KitDeLibro


APR.

15-21 by

TERRY ORTEGA and SOPHIE LYND

WEDNESDAY 4/21 4/21: Dine and Donate for Friendship Center The S.B. Association of Realtors invites you to

order a Los Agaves family meal (choose from enchiladas, taco bar, or chicken fajitas) with all the fixings and margaritas for two. Proceeds will go to support Friendship Center S.B. 4:30-6:30pm. Los Agaves, 2911 De la Vina St. $75. tinyurl.com/DineLosAgaves

4/21: Virtual Event: Pulse Art Club Host Brendan Briggs will introduce you to artist Adonna Ebrahim,

BEN CROP

and then you will listen to her playlist and respond by creating your own individual art piece. Bring you sketch pad, blank canvas, paint implements, or any media you prefer. No experience necessary. Register to receive a Zoom link. 11:30-12:30pm. Free/donations to JBR Visual accepted. tinyurl.com/PulseArtClub

4/21:

Streaming Event: The Theatre Group at SBCC presents The Thin Man Radio Play This

production of Dashiell Hammett’s mystery based on his 1934 novel features society couple Nick and Nora Charles and their dog, Asta, who are drawn into the underbelly of crime as amateur sleuths in 1930s San Francisco. This production will be performed as a live radio drama with sound effects and commercials. Directed by Katie Laris. Stream through May 8. $5-$15. Call (805) 965-5935 (10am-3pm, weekdays).

theatregroupsbcc.com/shows

A TALE OF

TWO ILIADS

4/15-4/17: S.B. High School Livestream: The Iliad, The Odyssey and All of Greek Mythology in 99 Minutes or Less Watch in real time as each performer will portray more than 10 characters as they speed through all of Greek Mythology with the countdown from 99 minutes happening in front of the at-home audience. Thu.-Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 4pm. $12/single stream; $22/ family stream. sbhstheatre.com/tickets

STAY CONNECTED

Lanksmini Wyantini

presents

Dashiell Hammett’s

4/15-4/18: An Iliad: A Live Performance An Iliad is a lively, updated telling of Homer’s epic

STAY CONNECTED tinyurl.com/IliadLiveETC

TWITTER

@sbindynews

FOLLOW US ON

INSTAGRAM @sbindependent

FOLLOW US ON

@sbindependent

in 90 minutes with one actor, John Tufts, and one musician, Jonathan Flacksman. The show will be performed live on the stage of The New Vic. The specific performance you select must be viewed at FOLLOW US ON that time. Thu.: 5pm; Fri.: 7:30pm; Sat.: 2 and 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. $30.

FACEBOOK @sbindependent

#sbindy

A Live Radio Play DIRECTED BY KATIE LARIS

AN ONLINE STREAMED PRODUCTION APRIL 21-MAY 8, 2021

John Tufts

Fundraiser

Thank you to our season sponsor:

TICKETS: 805.965.5935 www.theatregroupsbcc.com

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

27


Environment CDFW

living p. 28

Home

Where Plants Meet Their People Idyll Mercantile Sprouts on Chapala Street by CELINA GARCIA

W

CELINA GARCIA

hen you find something you love, you share it with someone else,” says Hannah Bangs, the name and face behind Santa Barbara’s newest plant and crafted goods shop, Idyll Mercantile. Bangs’s introduction to selling house plants was an accidental yet fateful occurrence. One day, as she was in the process of moving, she suddenly found herself needing to find a new home for her many, many plants. (If she had to guess, there were somewhere between 30 and 60.) What she didn’t know at the time was that this dilemma would one day lead to having her own storefront. The first-time small business owner has now taken root on the 700 block of Chapala Street, where she recently celebrated two months of business and bliss. When coming up with a name to best suit her store, Bangs knew she wanted to circle back to the word “idyll,” meaning an extremely happy scene or a short poem descriptive of rural life. “It’s kind of an ode to old crafts and homemade goods,” she said. “Idyll felt like it encapsulated the happiness and joy but also the timelessness of handmade things. I want it to be a happy place.”  Having cultivated a space for plants and the work of local craftspeople to shine, Bangs has a very infectious joy when sharing the art she carries and the makers behind them — the majority of which are women and smallbusiness owners themselves.  Idyll Mercantile’s assortment of goods includes works by several area ceramicists, such as Sarah Klapp of Klapp Ceramics, Erica Ales of Ale Ceramics, and Lyndsie Harris of Ceramic Saguaro, all Hannah Bangs of whom have their own distinct and earthy style. Printmaker Amy Berenbeim captures scenic beauty through her linocuts and has been featured in publications such as National Parks magazine and High Country News. Idyll Mercantile also carries jewelry by Deer Trails Studios and Indigo Garden. Bangs even sells her own artwork. Like countless others, the self-proclaimed extrovert was hit hard by the pandemic, and she hopes Idyll Mercantile will be a way to help foster connection again through art and helping “plants meet their people.”  Something Bangs finds interesting about the houseplant boom of the past several years and our isolation during the pandemic is that “when you care for a plant, your brain releases oxytocin, which is the chemical responsible for relationships and bonding. So I think people’s obsession with houseplants can be somewhat explained by our deeper desire to form meaningful connections.”

Find your plant at 703 Chapala Street, and follow @Idyll.Mercantile on Instagram. 28

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

ON THE PROWL: OR-93, born in Oregon two years ago and fitted with a radio collar, is looking for love and greener pastures.

Meet the Central Coast’s

FIRST WOLF IN 100 YEARS OR-93 Is Currently in S.L.O. County and Appears Headed for S.B. by TYLER HAYDEN

A

young male gray wolf who broke from his Oregon pack in search of new territory and a mate has made his way to California’s Central Coast, marking the first time in more than a century that the species has been detected here. In an epic journey that took less than two months, the wolf — known as OR-93 and fitted with a radio collar — traveled 600 miles and crossed multiple highways to reach San Luis Obispo County on April 6. Experts say if OR-93 continues his southeast trajectory through the Los Padres National Forest, he could enter Santa Barbara County in a matter of days or weeks.  “It’s really exciting,” said Jeff Kuyper, director of Los Padres ForestWatch, a wilderness protection organization. “We certainly hope he stays safe out there.”  California’s gray wolf population was wiped out in the early 1900s during a nationwide eradication effort led by the livestock industry. In the 2000s, a handful made their way from Canada back into Washington and Oregon, and in 2011, OR-7 was the first to cross California’s border. OR-93 is the 17th wolf known to have entered the state since then. According to the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, fewer than a dozen wolves currently live in California. That includes the Lassen pack, which consists of five wolves; a new pair spotted late last year in Siskiyou County; and now OR-93. The Shasta pack and its seven members disappeared within months of its discovery in 2015. Scientists feared poaching. OR-93 was born two years ago southeast of Mt. Hood as part of the White River Pack,  according to research done by Los Padres ForestWatch. He was fitted with a tracking collar by federal biologists and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. Like many young wolves, he eventually split from the group to stake his own claim. The Los Padres would provide a good permanent range and plenty of food sources for OR-93, Kuyper said. In 2016, Fish & Wildlife scientists identified it as one of the California regions that would be a suit-

able habitat for the species. “But the big question is, is he going to stick around and keep foraging?” Kuyper asked, “or is he going to return from whence he came?” The other big question is the matter of a mate. With no evidence of any female wolves in the area, “He may be looking for love in all the wrong places,” Kuyper said. But it’s not impossible that a northern wolf could pick up OR-93’s scent and follow him south, he explained. Wolves, Kuyper stressed, pose very little safety risk to humans, and he pointed to several steps landowners can take to reduce the risk of livestock loss, including fladry, range riders, night penning, and foxlights. For safety and research purposes, Fish & Wildlife asks anyone who spots a wolf to report it at wildlife.ca.gov. Evidence suggests gray wolves were once endemic to Santa Barbara County. A forest ranger reported seeing one in 1910 in the Upper Santa Ynez watershed, according to ForestWatch, and another was later spotted at a large lemon ranch in Montecito. The Chumash have their own word for wolf (miy), which is distinct from their terms for coyote (xoxau) and dog (tsun). While biologists have believed for some time that wolves would eventually repopulate California, no one expected to see one this far south this soon. “If you had asked a scientist if they thought there would be a wolf in Central California in 2021, they would have scoffed,” Kuyper said. Around the state, the slow but steady reintroduction of elk — a favorite prey item — could entice lasting residency for future packs, Kuyper said. Gray wolves are formally protected as endangered under state law, making it illegal to harass, harm, shoot, capture, or kill them, Kuyper went on. Violations are thoroughly investigated, and the penalties can be severe. “If you see something that looks like a really big coyote with a purple collar on,” Kuyper said, “don’t shoot at it, or there will be consequences.”

Track OR-93’s progress at wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/ Mammals/Gray-Wolf/Updates and report any wolf sightings at wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Mammals/Gray-Wolf/ Sighting-Report.


living | Starshine

ENOUGH WITH THE LIES

I

t was January 6, and I stood watching my television screen with both hands over my mouth. My gut was roiling. My body shivered with random surges of fight-or-flight adrenaline as a flag-waving mob tried to lay siege to our center of government. How can this be happening? I kept saying. Is this … real?? The answer, of course, was yes. And more importantly: no. But by day’s end, I had come to a realization even more frightening than the makeshift gallows erected on the Capitol lawn: This could just as well have been us. My political party won this time, as confirmed by every relevant authority at every level of government. But if it had gone differently? If we’d genuinely believed that something nefarious had undermined our votes and stolen the election from us? You’d better believe I’d be storming our Capitol with flak vest, bullhorn, and battle cry. I don’t do face paint and horns, but the point is this: I disagree ideologically with the people who rioted that day — but I understand their reaction as citizens. They were not idiots. They were not maniacs. They were impassioned citizens who were lied to and lied to effectively. Consistently. Masterfully. And they won’t be the last. Truth is hard to come by these days. Polls show 10 percent of Americans believe QAnon’s whackadoodle conspiracies about cannibalistic, satanic pedophiles. Intelligence reports show Russian and even Iranian bots have fiddled with our elections. And anyone with a smartphone can now make a deepfake video; a Philadelphia mom recently harassed members of her daughter’s cheerleading team by producing a clip that supposedly showed them nude, drinkemail: starshine@roshell.com ing, and smoking. Part of the problem is we’ve made socialmedia giants our information gatekeepers. The job used to fall to journalists whose livelihoods demand strict standards of accuracy, transparency, fairness, independence, and accountability. But Facebook? Twitter? They’re built to prioritize content engagement—regardless of that content’s integrity. “Our ability to vet information matters every time a mother asks Google whether her child should be vaccinated and every time a kid encounters a Holocaust denial on Twitter,” Time magazine wrote of our growing inability to parse reality from fiction online. News Literacy Project founder Alan Miller told the magazine, “It’s the equivalent of a public-health crisis.” So while Congress continues trying to blame everything on the Internet, let’s look at how the rest of us can take some responsibility for the information we consume and share.

ReSource CENTER

Santa Barbara County Public Works

REDEFINING WAS TE RECOVERY KEEPS YOUR EXISTING THREE BIN SYSTEM AND RECOVERS MORE. DIVERTS 60% OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD TRASH FROM THE LANDFILL MOSTLY BY PULLING OUT ORGANICS AND WET PAPER.

by Starshine

ROSHELL

(1) First, check your emotions. If you find yourself angry or shocked in reaction to something you read online, it may be designed to inflame rather than inform you. Agendas matter. (2) Adopt a slow news strategy. It’s like slow food, but you’re consuming carefully crafted media instead. Pause before believing — and, dear god, before sharing! — news that is still developing. (3) Use lateral reading to research an unfamiliar website. Rather than poking around on the site itself to assess it, Google that thang to see what others have to say about it. Who’s behind it? What’s their deal? (4) Correct false information publicly. When a friend posts something untrue, resist the urge to tell them privately. Commenting publicly (and kindly) not only informs others who may see it, which prevents it from spreading further, it also reminds us all to think twice about what we share. These issues aren’t going away, but neither are they new. Political theorist Hannah Arendt, a German-born Jew who was imprisoned by the Gestapo, wrote this in 1974—and her words make me shiver all over again: “What makes it possible for a totalitarian or any other dictatorship to rule is that people are not informed… If everybody always lies to you, the consequence is not that you believe the lies, but rather that nobody believes anything any longer.… And a people that no longer can believe anything cannot make up its mind. It is deprived not only of its capacity to act but also of its capacity to think and to judge. “And with such a people you can then do what you please.” Starshine Roshell is the author of Lather, Rage, Repeat: Frank Talk on Night Sweats, Day Drinking & Twitler.

YOUR RECYCLABLES WILL BE MORE EFFECTIVELY PROCESSED.

TO LEARN MORE, VISIT

LessIsMore.org Winter Gardening & Cooking Classes

Register for Summer Camp! atozcookingschool.org

Follow us @atozcookingschool and share the love

We’re Back!

FREE SANTA BARBARA

WALKING TOURS 1.5hr FUNK ZONE or 2hr WATERFRONT TOUR

FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT http://freewalkingtoursb.com Free Wine Tasting Voucher for New Sign-ups for the Funk Zone Tour in April INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

29


FOOD &DRINK

p.30 MAX ABRAMS PHOTOS

HIGH SEAS Spins Honey into Carbonated Gold Austin Corrigan’s Fruit-Spiked, Sparkling Meads

H

ead-on collisions have a way of putting life into

focus. When Austin Corrigan’s 2018 car crash at the intersection of State and Alamar streets totally shattered the Santa Barbara native’s right leg, his journey through a full year of recovery wound up rerouting his career from itinerant chef to maker of mead, the fermented honey wine that many believe to be humankind’s first alcoholic beverage. Today, he’s selling four all-organic flavors of his carbonated High Seas Mead to a growing number of stores and restaurants around Santa Barbara, recently launched a mead club, and is already eyeing HONEY WINE TIME: Austin Corrigan produces four flavors of carbonated, organic, fruit-infused High Seas Mead at a facility in expansion. “I never thought I would be doing this,” said the Old Town Goleta. 27-year-old, who brewed his first commercial batch A few years ago, I wrote last October in an Old Town Goleta facility. “I was so all over car when someone driving a big truck tried to take that the place just a few years ago. It’s so fun watching this thing tricky left on Alamar but instead smashed into Corrigan. an article about American BY MATT KET TMANN mead for Wine Enthusiast, blossom and grow. Driving on the Mesa and seeing people “You can imagine who won that fight,” he said. His right patella and femur were dusted. “At the time, tasting 24 meads from 10 differat Corner Tap with my can in their hand? It makes me smile it was so terrible,” he recalled. “I was not in a good place. ent producers across the country, which maybe from ear to ear. It’s so cool.” Admittedly a troublemaker in his youth, Corrigan gradu- Being a very athletic individual, it just wiped all that off the made me, for a very brief period, the country’s leading ated from Santa Barbara High in 2011 and by 21 was attend- table for a while.” expert on mead. I’m happy to report that High Seas is beting the Culinary Institute of America in Napa, where he While Corrigan regained strength, a friend and trainer of ter than every single one of those that I tasted back then. worked for restaurants, caterers, and winerhis suggested they make some mead, which, at its most All four flavors — Cosmic Bandito (pineapple/blackberry), ies. A six-month gig in Jackson Hole, simple iteration, is honey fermented with yeast in Cheap Thrills (coconut/raspberry), Mystic Vibrations Wyoming, led to a full-time job, water. The drink’s human history stretches back (watermelon/lemon), and Meadacolada (pineapple/cocowhich he’d just started when he to East Africa, where early humans likely nut) — are refreshingly light with just enough fruit flavor to returned to Santa Barbara to found rain-soaked hives full of a sweet, keep them interesting. see his parents for Thanksgivslightly funky liquid that made them feel The honey impact, which imparts a generic sameness to ing. He was on his way back funny.  many other meads on the market, is happily quite muted. from Whole Foods in a Corrigan only knew mead as a sweet, Finding regionally harvested honey to be prohibitively small higher-alcohol beverage, but his friend expensive, Corrigan sources Brazilian wildflower honey said it could be made dry and lighter, so from a family-owned company called Bee Seasonal Honey. they gave it a try in a makeshift garage For fruit, he buys some from Whole Foods and Sprouts lab. This first batch was “awful,” but the but also takes the culled berries from Driscoll’s that would second wasn’t so bad. They considered otherwise go to waste. For yeast, he’s opting for a gluten-free starting a business together but parted ways cider yeast, which is quicker and crisper than the champagne or white wine yeasts typically used in mead. due to differing visions. Corrigan kept trying new recipes for more He’s looking into buying a facility down near the Funk than a year. “I saw the hard kombucha market and Zone, where he could increase production by 30 barrels. hard cider market really exploding,” he explained of the “That would allow us to grow outside of this 50-mile range potential for mead, but he needed a fresh angle. “How can that we are focused on right now,” explained Corrigan, who I make mead modern? How can I make it approachable is also going through the organic certification process to get for younger individuals, people who are seeking these into the farmers’ market. “I’m committed to this, and I’m gonna keep going for as long and as big as I can.” alternative, more health-minded alcohols?” He found the Goleta warehouse in August — He’s confident that the mead market will grow in the right around the time he was also working as a fire- same sharp trajectory that cider and kombucha recently fighter for the Los Padres National Forest — and experienced. “I believe it’s gonna be the next big product,” used money that he got from his car-crash settlement said Corrigan. “It’s ultimately the world’s oldest fermented “to make this dream and this vision happen.” Corri- beverage. Let’s bring it back. Let’s keep it around. Let’s not gan named the new brand High Seas to acknowledge let it get lost as we evolve. We can’t lose that.” his “love affair” with the ocean, which was strained due to his injuries. “I’ve missed being out there so much,” he See highseasmead.com or follow on Instagram said. “It was fitting.” @highseasmead.

BOTTLES & BARR ELS

30

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


MAX ABRAMS PHOTOS

pivots

BUYING GOLD COINS TOP DOLLAR PAID · American 1oz. Gold Eagle · Canada 1oz. Gold Maple Leaf · South Africa 1oz. Gold Krugerrand · USA Twenty Dollar Gold PCGS Certified MS63-64 · All other USA and World Gold Coins By Appointment Only Call Ron Gillio · Cell #(805) 637-5081 or email rjgillio@gmail.com

RESTAURANT VETS: Elaine and Alberto Morello broke into the Santa Barbara restaurant scene with Olio e Limone in 1999 and recently pivoted their six-year-old Olio Crudo Bar into Olio Bottega, which sells sandwiches and supplies.

GILLIO COINS · 1103 State Street Serving Santa Barbara Since 1971

OLIO BOTTEGA’S Sandwiches and Supplies A

fter nearly six years in business, the Olio Crudo

Bar was finally becoming a regular stop for Santa Barbarans interested in raw Italian dishes of “finesse and quality,” explains coowner Alberto Morello, a veteran of downtown’s restaurant scene. After years of cooking around Southern California, the Sicilian chef first broke into Santa Barbara with his wife, UCSB alum Elaine Morello, by opening the still-thriving white-tablecloth restaurant Olio e Limone in 1999. They doubled down with Olio Pizzeria next door a decade later, and then creatively remodeled the slim, adjacent storefront on West Victoria Street into Crudo in 2014. Then came COVID in March 2020, and the Crudo Bar’s intimate indoor setting felt doomed. “This will be the last place to be reopened,” Morello thought to himself. “Who’s gonna want to sit next to each other so close?” Instead, Morello decided to embrace his dream of running a simple panini shop, like the many sprinkled across his homeland, from Milan to Palermo, enhanced with various imported, hard-to-find ingredients. They cracked open the doors to Olio Bottega in September. “The focus is the sandwich,” confirmed Morello over a long lunch last week, and those are primarily based on the high-quality cured meats that he’s either buying or, in the case of the porchetta, making himself. “Finally, after 30 years in this country, we finally get some good salumi!”  There’s pillow-soft mortadella and firm bresaola, spicy coppa and salty prosciutto, all finding their way onto focaccia baked in-house, usually paired with just a few enhancements each. “In Italy, we like just two things together,” said Morello, but he’s adapted to American tastes by adding a couple more.  Young pecorino winds up on a few of them, as do spreads, such as the artichoke paste served on the fennel-flavored finocchiona salami, so flavorful yet delicate in razor-thin slices. The porchetta, which Morello makes with pork belly and shoulder, is the star, also cut thin and served with sweet onions, crispy peppers, and a zesty lemon Dijon. Vegan and vegetarian panini also exist.  The bottega’s core menu of nine sandwiches is bolstered by an espresso bar and breakfast in the

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

morning, and fast and savory street snacks like olives, caponata, lasagna, and arancini all day long. “You like the olives?” inquired Eva Tsiapali as I grazed the cracked Sicilian olives known as nocellara, with garlic, oregano, and vinegar soaked throughout. I mumbled something in the affirmative to Tsiapali, who’s a constant presence at Oilo Bottega, so much that Morello affectionately calls her the “bottegaia.” She smirked in support of my oily fingers, “It’s an addiction, actually.”

Crudo Bar Now a Market of Italian Meats and More BY MATT KETTMANN

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Featuring

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

ently An indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! hop since ently ASn indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! Shop since Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS! Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

Sweets come into play through traditional pastries, from classic sheep’s-milk-filled canolo to sfogliatella, a crunchy, clamshell-shaped treat filled with orange rind and cinnamon crema. “We’ve been making pastry since day one,” he explained of starting the Olio empire way back in 1999 as we ate through three of them, including the ravioli-like cassatelle trapanese, all made today by Claudia Garcia. “We don’t buy pastry.” Meanwhile, the shelves, windowsills, and, well, all available flat areas are stocked with a wide array of goods from across Italy that Morello selected himself: pastas, olive oils, pastes, mushrooms, wines, liquors, and much more. “These are not just things you find in a normal market—it’s like Macy’s versus a boutique,” said Morello, who works with eight different importers. “I love to find and sell this stuff,” he said. “To me, it’s like a collection. It gives me satisfaction, and I can share it with customers.” 

11 W. Victoria St.; (805) 899-2699; olioelimone.com/olio-bottega; @oliobottega

805.569.2323

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

Milpas 216 South Milpas Street

INDEPENDENT.COM

Lompoc 1413 N H Street

Downtown 628 State Street

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Buellton 209 E Hwy 246

Santa Maria 985 E Betteravia Road

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

31


READER STEVE H.

Dine Out

TAKE OUT

SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY AT HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS

NEW PIZZA PLACE AND MORE: Fatte’s Pizza is coming to the Grocery Outlet strip mall in May, while Juice N Things is opening in Carpinteria, and South Coast Deli opened in San Roque.

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm | Sunday Prix-Fixe 5 - 7:30 pm

Fatte’s Pizza Opening on De la Vina Barbara Wood Fired Pizza, 2840 De la Vina Street, appeared to be closed, reader Steve H. reported that the eatery next to Grocery Outlet will be replaced by Fatte’s Pizza. They hope to be open by May 1. Steve H. adds that the wood-burning oven is gone. In February 2011, the business changed from long-time occupant Pizza Hut to Nicky D’s Wood-Fired Pizza. In June 2018, it was rechristened as Lilsey’s Wood-Fired Pizza before becoming Santa Barbara Wood Fired Pizza in February 2020.

2018

Best of

Santa Barbara

®

Runner-Up

VOTED SANTA

BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 27 YEARS

IN A ROW!

BREAKFAST

EVERY DAY!

LUNCH

SPECIALS 2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863 626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028 6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806

WOODY’S TO WINCHESTER? Reader Elizabeth heard

SUSHI TYME FIRE: On April 8 at about 3 a.m., a fire

a rumor from a longtime Winchester Canyon resident that the eternally popular Woody’s BBQ at 5112 Hollister Avenue in Goleta wants to open a location across town at 10 Win Winchester Canyon Road, the former home of Timbers restaurant. Reader Bill recently told us that the building is being tented, so something is hap happening, even if smoked, savory ribs are not on the

IM

DAILY $799

PR

(Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena &

WINGMAN IN OLD TOWN GOLETA: Reader Ted

R

e Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Fre Mesa Locations)

says that 5892 Hollister Avenue in Old Town Goleta, formerly Gimeal Café and The Natural Café, is going to be a Wingman Rodeo, according to a sign on the window. I’m told that they are applying for permission to put their sign on the building, and Ted says it looks like they’ve painted and are ready to open any day. In March 2020, a Wingman Rodeo location started serving food during evenings at 730 North Milpas Street, which, to the best of my knowledge, is the home of The Shop Kitchen during the day.

lar South Coast Deli opened April 12 at 3534 State Street, near Ontare, the former home of Noemi Pizza Romana, Pizza Guru, and Little Alex’s. In addition to the new San Roque location, other locations include 10 East Carrillo Street, 1436 Chapala Street, and 185 South Patterson Avenue in Goleta. In addition to making some of the best sammies and salads in the Santa Barbara area, South Coast Deli says they are committed to doing the right thing with respect to the environment. All their single-use products are made from sustainable, renewable, and compostable materials such as switchgrass, bagasse, and PLA, a plant-based polymer. Paper products such as napkins, paper towels, letterhead, and business cards, are made from 100 percent recycled materials. South Coast Deli also participates in city and county programs, where available, in order to divert waste from landfills back into the soil. DE

Micheltorena & Mesa Locations

SOUTH COAST HITS UPTOWN: Santa Barbara’s popu-

REA

BURRITO $639

FOOD & DRINK

Super CuCaS

the word that a sign for the all-organic Juice N Things has been posted at 4991 Carpinteria Avenue in Carpinteria, the former home of Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, which closed in May 2020. That same month, Coffee Bean closed at 811 State Street (soon to be Cajé coffee house), then shut down their 3052 De la Vina Street location last July. The sometimes-reliable Google says that the principal owner of Juice N Things is Laura Samperio of Oxnard. Business hours will be 7 a.m.-7 p.m. Call (805) 750-0618.

horizon. As always, this rumor might be completely false or a brilliant forecast of future events. Your call.

E

PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205.

JUICED IN CARP: Reader Primetime sends us

IM

Andersen’s Danish Restaurant & Bakery. Menu available for curbside or walk-up pickup. For dining in, order inside and we’ll bring you everything you need at an outside table. Open Daily 10am-6pm, closed Tuesday. Breakfast served until 2pm, Lunch & Dinner 12- Close. We also deliver through restaurant connection. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

ET

1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM

READER PRIMETIME

A

fter last week’s column revealed that Santa

alarm rang inside a structure in the 800 block of State Street, the home of Sushi Tyme restaurant. The Santa Barbara City Fire Department responded to find the restaurant full of smoke inside with water flowing from the front door. Firefighters forced entry to the business and made an aggressive interior attack. Fire sprinklers contained the fire to the kitchen area. The fire was determined to be accidental in nature; damages were estimated at approximately $40,000 dollars. The business will be closed until repairs can be made.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. 32

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


ABOUT US Established in 2000, Habitat for Humanity of Southern Santa Barbara County (Habitat Santa Barbara) is a local nonprofit dedicated to helping individuals and families build and improve a place to call home. We work in partnership with those in need of safe, sustainable and affordable housing.

We build strength, stability and self- reliance through shelter

WHAT WE DO Habitat for Humanity is working locally to: • Build new, affordable homes • Repair homes • Maintain existing affordable housing • Provide education, community classes and mentoring on affordable homeownership • Advocate for the importance of affordable housing • Mobilize volunteers • Partner with area nonprofits.

A HAND UP NOT A HAND-OUT

PROGRAM SPOTLIGHT: HOME REPAIRS Habitat Santa Barbara helps preserve homeownership, prevent homelessness and aid in aging-in-place by providing critical home repairs through our Neighborhood Revitalization and Home Repair programs. Volunteers and staff provide repairs both internally and externally to the home that support the health and safety of all occupants.

Who is eligible?

Partial list of what we do: • Internal and external repairs • Safety and accessibility modifications • Aging-in-place adaptations • Siding and roofing repair • Appliance replacement and much more.

• Low-income homeowner with total household income at or below 80% AMI • Residents in Southern Santa Barbara County • Demonstrate a need for health and safety repairs • Have a willingness to partner with Habitat Santa Barbara

LEARN ABOUT ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS & APPLY TODAY: mail@sbhabitat.org / 805-692-2226 Application can be found at sbhabitat.org/home-repair-application


PROGRAMS & LOCATION

OUR PROGRAMS INCLUDE: • NEW AFFORDABLE HOME CONSTRUCTION — Habi-

tat Santa Barbara’s homeownership program assists individuals and families in need buy a home with an affordable mortgage. Homeowners also invest sweat equity hours by building their future Habitat homes alongside volunteers and professional builders.

• NEIGHBORHOOD REVITALIZATION — Habitat offers

• FAMILY SERVICE PROGRAMS — Each Habitat Home-

owner is required to participate in and complete curriculum that provides the resources and tools for each family to be successful and long-term homeowners. Curriculum topics include budgeting, insurance, predatory lending, house repairs, wills and retirement planning and much more. Habitat Santa Barbara provides ongoing family support and mentorship.

home repairs to help homeowners in-need remain safely in their homes as well as contribute to neighborhood projects ranging from supporting community nonprofits with capital improvements to beautifying public spaces and parks.

• A BRUSH WITH KINDNESS HOME REPAIRS — external home repairs include exterior wall repair, accessibility improvements, fullhouse painting, deck replacement and more; • CRITICAL HOME REPAIR — larger internal or whole-home repairs, accessibility modifications, aging-in-place support in critical need areas.

• AFFORDABLE HOUSING ADVOCACY — As rent and

mortgage prices continue to rise throughout the state of California, we advocate for additional funding sources, regulatory reforms and the creating of more homeownership opportunities for lowerincome, working families.

HOME REPAIR PROFILE The Lee Family Last winter as the rain was coming down, a friend of Janice and James Lee reached out to Habitat Santa Barbara to learn about what assistance might be available as a hole in their roof was causing considerable damage to the inside of their modular home. The roof was leaking to the point that the flooring was disintegrating, the walls were being damaged and rain was dripping on their bed. At the time James was receiving cancer treatment at UCLA’s hospital, and Janice was struggling with her own chronic illness. In the fall of 2020, Habitat Santa Barbara worked with a small team of volunteers to repair the Lees' home. Volunteers safely replaced the flooring and subflooring (using donated materials!) throughout the home, and a professional roofing company replaced the roof. The Lees are now able to safely remain in their home, assured that their home is no longer an unsafe place to live. The Covid-19 Pandemic has highlighted the importance of home as a place for health care and safety.

“We had no money to replace the floors and roof…. It was a matter of the roof coming down or the floor collapsing. We just didn’t feel safe living in this house anymore.” — Janice Lee


“It’s easy to stay stuck, to be stuck in poverty. Some people inherit money, but some people inherit poverty. To think outside the scope of poverty is hard. So when you have a hand up — what Habitat offers — that hand up turns out to be a different kind of inheritance: hope.”

Jose,

who moved into his family’s Habitat Home when he was 15

"Behind the veneer of prosperity, there are so many people in Santa Barbara who are scrambling to meet basic needs. The city is home to a vast working poor population, including families living in substandard housing, elderly people who can't afford repairs imperative to their health and those with disabilities who need modifications to stay in their homes. It is an honor to address this critical community need."

Jessica de L'Arbre,

CEO, Habitat Santa Barbara

WAYS TO HELP DONATE FINANCIALLY • • • •

Give a monthly or annual gift at sbhabitat.org Sponsor a repair project Donate stock Give a planned gift through our Legacy Program

• Join the Cornerstone Club with a generous gift and join a community and network of philanthropists making a lasting difference • Join the Carpenter’s Circle with a recurring, monthly gift adding to Habitat’s sustainability

DONATE YOUR TIME Volunteer in our community. Opportunities may include: • Construction volunteers, when safety allows • Administrative projects • Committee positions and advisory council For more information:

Follow Us @SBHabitat

(805) 692-2226 sbhabitat.org

Homecoming Gala Habitat

HONORING INDIVIDUALS & ORGANIZATIONS WHO PROVIDED EXEMPLARY SUPPORT AND PARTNERSHIP FOR 20 YEARS!

MONTECITO BANK & TRUST | UNION BANK | YARDI SYSTEMS HABITAT HOMEOWNER HIGHLIGHTS

MAY 22, 2021 | 6:00-7:00PM TICKETS ON SALE NOW: WWW.SBHABITAT.ORG

mail@sbhabitat.org Habitat for Humanity of Southern Santa Barbara County is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. PO Box 176, Goleta, CA 93116 | (805) 692-2226 www.sbhabitat.org | EIN: 77-0518264

SCAN YOUR PHONE FOR EVENT DETAILS AND TICKETS


2021 Virtual Earth Day Festival CEC’s

April 22–24 | 12 noon - 5:30pm

SBEarthDay.org

See the full lineup and stream the event at SBEarthDay.org ART CONTESTS

INTERACTIVE EXHIBIT HALL

MUSICAL PERFORMANCES

INSPIRATIONAL SPEAKERS

2021 EARTH DAY SPONSORS

ARMAND HAMMER FOUNDATION

2021 EARTH DAY PARTNERS

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

33


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

RANKY TANKY

A

Gullah Culture in Musical Form

PETER FRANK EDWARDS

t a moment when authenticfeeling for phrasing and ity has become a flashpoint in tempo. He argues convinc-discussions of cultural identity, ingly for Gullah’s centrality, the Gullah community of America’s saying, “People know it well; southeastern Lowcountry provides a they just don’t know that it’s useful entry point for those wishing Gullah.” As examples, he cites such songs as “Kum to understand the African roots of African-American experience. Coastal Bah Yah” and “Michael Row Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, and the Boat Ashore,” along with the Sea Islands have for centuries been the entire Ranky Tanky rephome to the continent’s most undiluted ertoire, which does sound familiar at the same time fount of African cultural retention. Named for the Creole language spothat it feels fresh. The track ken throughout the region, the Gullah “Stand by Me” on Good community arose when, for reasons Time is not a cover — it’s an both economic and environmental, original — yet it stakes as white slave owners withdrew from the strong a claim to that three rice fields along the Atlantic seaboard, word phrase as Ben E. King’s leaving thousands of recently enslaved classic does; no mean feat. Africans to develop a creole culture in For listeners new to Ranky which elements of African life were Tanky’s music, perhaps its most noticeable quality is preserved to a high degree. the propulsive swing that On Thursday, April 15, at 5 p.m., animates every song. Fast UCSB Arts & Lectures will combine the musical excellence of the House or slow, these players never Calls series with the high-minded neglect to groove. In the official video for the Good Time mission of its yearlong Race to Justice GULLAH AMBASSADORS: The members of Ranky Tanky are, from album’s title track, family and project by presenting Ranky Tanky, left, Kevin Hamilton, Charlton Singleton, Quiana Parler, Clay Ross, and the Grammy-winning Gullah group friends gather at a Charleston Quentin Baxter. from Charleston, South Carolina. juke joint for a night of dancLayering infectious jazz and funk-based immediately appealing as a heavenly duet ing that arrives just in time to save the prorhythms on a foundation of traditional between Miles Davis and Aretha Frank- prietor from eviction for unpaid rent. Not Gullah songs and chants, Ranky Tanky lin. The rhythm section of Quentin Baxter only does the landlord accept a fistful of crafts music for dancing that leaves a and Kevin Hamilton enjoys a syncopated wrinkly, sweat-stained cash as payment, he distinct impression of spiritual renewal chemistry with guitarist/vocalist Clay winds up on the dance floor with everyone in its wake. Good Time, the group’s 2019 Ross that allows them to modulate from else. While it may not yet be possible for album that was named the Best Regional deep blues to drumline sizzle in the space us to get down in person, there’s no reason Roots Recording by the 2020 Grammy of a single track.  why audiences for Thursday’s virtual rent Awards, bobs and weaves along pathways As an ambassador not only for the party can’t turn it up and bust a move at forged by groups like Chic and the JBs. band, but for Gullah culture more gen- home. We could all use some of what these Trumpeter Charlton Singleton’s musical erally, Singleton speaks in cascading folks have got, and this show will bring it. For tickets and to tune in, visit artsand dialogue with lead singer Quiana Parler paragraphs packed with local knowledge lectures.ucsb.edu. is simply delicious — as universally and and buoyed by a musician’s instinctive —Charles Donelan COURTESY

TAYLOR C’MONE

w

@MUSIC ALLEY

At just 9 years old, Taylor C’Mone recorded her first song — a cover of Mariah Carey’s “H.A.T.E.U.” — and was accepted into the American Musical Dramatic Academy’s Performing Arts College in Hollywood at age 18. Last October, the 21-yearold R&B/neo-soul singer released her first single “Reckless” off of her debut album, Womxn, which came out on January 5. Though raised in Camarillo, C’Mone boasts numerous Santa Barbara connections, working with filmmaker Roberde Madhere on the music for his first short film and performing during virtual shows hosted by The805Live Project in Lompoc. And she’ll be performing live on State

Street on April 16, 5-8 p.m., at Music Alley, 423 State St., in a concert aimed at supporting bars and restaurants. As an artist who released her first album during the pandemic, she’s found it to be a creative time. “There is a lot of really great music right now, especially from the indie artist and underground world,” said C’Mone. “The lockdown forced me to be focused, and the process was very inspiring to work with a great team of producers, co-writer, and recording studio. Live performances have been affected heavily, which has forced us artists to do a lot, social media wise, which is dope.” Follow her on Instagram at @taycmonesings and find her album at smarturl.it/listenwomxn. —Matt Kettmann

L I F E PAGE 34 COURTESY

IN THE HOUSE

UNCOMMON MAN: Bass-baritone Cedric Berry is the featured soloist in the Santa Barbara Symphony’s April 17 program.

FANFARES FOR A

NEW CENTURY Through a remarkable team effort involving the orchestra, its leaders, The Granada Theatre, and digital patrons all over the world, the Santa Barbara Symphony has continued to record live onstage and stream brilliant programming despite the constraints imposed by COVID. This month’s installment highlights the talented members of the orchestra’s brass section with one of the most popular and transcendent compositions in the history of American music, Aaron Copland’s “Fanfare for the Common Man.” This brassladen masterwork has earned its reputation as the country’s alternative instrumental national anthem, and, in a spirit of 21st-century openness, maestro Nir Kabaretti has constructed a program around it that reflects the diversity of America as it is today and as it aspires to be in the future. The symphony will be joined by the awardwinning African-American bass-baritone Cedric Berry, a young singer whose career has taken off since his graduation from the USC Thornton School of Music with multiple appearances with the Los Angeles and Long Beach operas. As Yusef Salaam, one of the main characters in Anthony Davis’s opera The Central Park Five, Berry shared in the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Music, and on Saturday, April 17, Santa Barbara Symphony’s online audience will get to hear him sing another groundbreaking new work, this one a setting of poetry by Harlem Renaissance figure Claude McKay that was composed by George N. Gianopoulos. Joan Tower, long a favorite of the S.B. Symphony, will be represented by her answer to Copland, “Fanfare for the Uncommon Woman No. 1.” A wind quintet by Samuel Barber, some “Old American Songs” as arranged by Copland, and pieces for strings by George Walker and Robin Frost lend balance to the evening, while “The Unanswered Question” by Charles Ives fittingly gives the program’s last musical word to the solo trumpet, which asks, against a cosmic musical background, nothing less than the eternal question of existence. To tune in to the symphony’s “Fanfare” celebration at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 17, go to thesymphony.org. —CD

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 34

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


DANIEL DREIFUSS FILE PHOTO

ARTS L I F E

PLAY ON: The Shuttered Venue Operators Grant will provide aid to the Santa Barbara Bowl (above) and other live event venues that have been closed due to the pandemic.

HELPING VENUES THROUGH PANDEMIC

C

oncert venues across the country have shuttered operations due to the coronavirus pandemic, and Santa Barbara’s arts scene has not been excluded from the tough economic hit. The Shuttered Venue Operators Grant, launched last week, is a national aid program meant to help carry venues through the COVID-19 pandemic until concerts and other events can be held again. The grant provides a total of $16.5 billion through the U.S. Small Business Administration to aid live venue operators and promoters, theatrical producers, museum operators, movie theater operators, and more. These operators can receive up to 45 percent of lost earned revenue by Katherine Swartz from the past year, up to $10 million.  Congressmember Salud Carbajal spoke in a press conference last Thursday afternoon from the Scranton Overlook of the Santa Barbara Bowl to discuss how the grant would benefit Santa Barbara–area venue operators such as the Bowl.  “This facility is symbolic of so many other venues that day in and day out enrich our culture and our communities with arts and entertainment,” Carbajal said. “I’m glad to serve as a federal partner to ensure that cultural institutions in our region not only survive, but thrive.”  The Shuttered Venues Operators (SVO) Grant is one part of greater COVID-19 relief passed in December 2020 meant to help business owners, such as the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). Unlike with previous grants, venue operators are able to receive both PPP and SVO funding.  For the first time since opening in 1936, the Santa Barbara Bowl has been closed for an extended period of time, due to local, state, and national guidelines prohibiting concerts and other large gatherings. The Bowl employs 14 year-round staff members, who have all kept their jobs over the past year, but funding those salaries meant the Bowl was forced to dip into its reserve funds.  As Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation Executive Director Rick Boller explained in the press conference, the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant will help the Bowl replenish expenses incurred over the past year, along with funding operational costs to prepare for opening back up to the public. Boller said they hope to open the Bowl back up by this fall, with the goal of full capacity, but that setting an opening date entirely depends on guidance from local and state officials. If COVID-19 hospitalization rates continue to drop and vaccination rates continue to rise, venues across the county can open up sooner.  “The best thing we can do as a community, if we want to help venues and businesses get back on their feet, is to get vaccinated as soon as possible, because that will allow us to go back to a sense of normalcy that will allow venues like the Bowl and other businesses thrive and prosper,” Carbajal said.   Venue operators can now apply for funding through the grant, and applications will remain open until funds are depleted. See svograntportal n .sba.gov/s/.

REP. CARBAJAL URGES OPERATORS TO

APPLY FOR NATIONAL FUNDING

THANK YOU SPONSORS

Alamar Dental Implant Center sbimplants.com

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael MA Michael H H Kreitsek, Kreitsek, MA

Michael HCounseling Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

35


MEDIATION WORKS

NIKKI DONER

MARK SHERWOOD

Divorce & Custody Family Conflicts Over Elder Care

Jennie K. Welsh Mediation welshmediation.com (805)259-8097

Get fresh news from

Samta Barbara Independent’s Annual

SUMMER CAMP & FAMILY FUN GUIDE Publishes

Thursday, April 29

Advertising Deadline

Monday, April 26 at noon

Contact your advertising representative today advertising@independent.com 36

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

INDEPENDENT.COM in your inbox, every morning.

Sign up for

INDY TODAY! Independent.com/ newsletters


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF APRIL 15

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): “Today I feel the whole world is a

(June 21-July 22): Cancerian poet Denis Johnson

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Kublai Khan, ruler of the Mongol

door,” wrote poet Dennis Silk. In a similar spirit, 13thcentury Zen master Wumen Huikai observed, “The whole world is a door of liberation, but people are unwilling to enter it.” Now I’m here to tell you, Aries, that there will be times in the coming weeks when the whole world will feel like a door to you. And if you open it, you’ll be led to potential opportunities for interesting changes that offer you liberation. This is a rare blessing. Please be sufficiently loose and alert and brave to take advantage.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Taurus philosopher Ludwig Witt-

genstein was called a genius by Nobel Prize–winning author Bertrand Russell. His Philosophical Investigations was once voted the 20th century’s most important philosophy book. Yet one of Wittgenstein’s famous quotes was “How hard it is to see what is right in front of my eyes!” Luckily for all of us, I suspect that won’t be problem for you in the coming weeks, Taurus. In fact, I’m guessing you will see a whole range of things that were previously hidden, even though some of them had been right in front of your eyes. Congrats! Everyone whose life you touch will benefit because of this breakthrough.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Why don’t rivers flow straight? Well,

sometimes they do, but only for a relatively short stretch. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, no river moves in a linear trajectory for a distance of more than 10 times its width. There are numerous reasons why this is so, including the friction caused by banks and the fact that river water streams faster at the center. The place where a river changes direction is called a “meander.” I’d like to borrow this phenomenon to serve as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks. I suspect your regular flow is due for a course change — a meander. Any intuitive ideas about which way to go? In which direction will the scenery be best?

eventually became a celebrated writer who won numerous prizes, including the prestigious National Book Award. But life was rough when he was in his twenties. Because of his addictions to drugs and alcohol, he neglected his writing. Later, in one of his mature poems, he expressed appreciation to people who supported him earlier on. “You saw me when I was invisible,” he wrote, “you spoke to me when I was deaf, you thanked me when I was a secret.” Are there helpers like that in your own story? Now would be a perfect time to honor them and repay the favors.

Empire and China in the second half of the 13th century, kept a retinue of 5,000 astrologers on retainer. Some were stationed on the roof of his palace, tasked with using sorcery to banish approaching storm clouds. If you asked me to perform a similar assignment, I would not do so. We need storms! They bring refreshing rain, and keep the earth in electrical balance. Lightning from storms creates ozone, a vital part of our atmosphere, and it converts nitrogen in the air into nitrogen in the ground, making the soil more fertile. Metaphorical storms often generate a host of necessary and welcome transformations, as well — as I suspect they will for you during the coming weeks.

LEO

SCORPIO

(July 23-Aug. 22): What do you believe in, exactly,

VIRGO

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Sometimes when a disheartening

SAGITTARIUS

PISCES

Aptowicz wrote a poem titled “Not Doing Something Wrong Isn’t the Same as Doing Something Right.” I propose that we make that thought one of your guiding themes during the next two weeks. If you choose to accept the assignment, you will make a list of three possible actions that fit the description “not doing something wrong,” and three actions that consist of “doing something right.” Then you will avoid doing the three wrong things named in the first list and give your generous energy to carrying out the three right things KEEPING in the second list.

fies, “I write poems to untie myself, to do penance and disappear through the upper right-hand corner of things, to say grace.” What about you, Virgo? What do you do in order to untie yourself and do penance and invoke grace? The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to use all the tricks at your disposal to accomplish such useful transformations. And if you currently have a low supply of the necessary tricks, make it your healthy obsession to get more.

been treating yourself like a royal child. I hope you’ve been showering yourself with extra-special nurturing and therapeutic treatments. I hope you’ve been telling yourself out loud how soulful and intelligent and resilient you are, and I hope you’ve delighted yourself by engaging with a series of educational inspirations. If for some inexplicable reason you have not been attending to these important matters with luxurious intensity, please make up for lost time in the coming days. Your success during the rest of 2021 depends on your devout devotion to self-care right now.

die,” declared trailblazing psychologist Sigmund Freud. “They are buried alive and they will come forth, later, in uglier ways.” I agree, which is why I advise you not to bury your emotions — especially now, when they urgently need to be aired. Okay? Please don’t allow a scenario in which they will emerge later in ugly ways. Instead, find the courage to express them soon — in the most loving ways possible, hopefully, and with respect for people who may not be entirely receptive to them. Communicate with compassionate clarity.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian author Cristin O’Keefe

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Virgo poet Charles Wright testi-

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the past few weeks, I hope you’ve

kind of darkness encroaches, we’re right to be afraid. In fact, it’s often wise to be afraid, because doing so may motivate us to ward off or transmute the darkness. But on other occasions, the disheartening darkness that seems to be encroaching isn’t real, or else is actually less threatening than we imagine. Novelist John Steinbeck described the latter when he wrote, “I know beyond all doubt that the dark things crowding in on me either did not exist or were not dangerous to me, and still I was afraid.” My suspicion is that this is the nature of the darkness you’re currently worried about. Can you therefore find a way to banish or at least diminish your fear?

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Unexpressed emotions will never

Leo? The coming weeks will be a fine time to take an inventory of your beliefs — and then divest yourself of any that no longer serve you, no longer excite you, and no longer fit your changing understanding of how life works. For extra credit, I invite you to dream up some fun new beliefs that lighten your heart and stimulate your playfulness. For example, you could borrow poet Charles Wright’s approach: “I believe what the thunder and lightning have to say.” Or you could try my idea: “I believe in wonders and marvels that inspire me to fulfill my most interesting dreams.”

CAPRICORN

Santa Barbara Beautiful

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): “Some people, if they didn’t make it

hard for themselves, might fall asleep,” wrote novelist Saul Bellow. In other words, some of us act as if it’s entertaining, even exciting, to attract difficulties and cause problems for ourselves. If that describes you even a tiny bit, Pisces, I urge you to tone down that bad habit in the coming weeks — maybe even see if you can at least partially eliminate it. The cosmic rhythms will be on your side whenever you take measures to drown out the little voices in your head that try to undermine and sabotage you. At least for now, say “NO!” to making it hard for yourself. Say “YES!” to making it graceful for yourself.

FOR 55 YEARS

WE ARE YOUR FRIENDS, NEIGHBORS, AND FAMILY.

HOMEWORK: Tell me about your most interesting problem — the one that teaches you the most. FreeWillAstrology.com WE ARE JODI HOUSE.

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

We ar e

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Cour age,

THE MANY FACES OF BRAIN INJURY IN THE SANTA BARBARA COMMUNITY

Conf

iden

ce &

Char acte

r

“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.”

Insert FP Template.indd 1

“My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

We are

Jodi House is the only nonprofit organization in Santa Barbara County that is solely dedicated to supporting brain injury survivors in their continued recovery and ongoing rehabilitation.

Rachel, Age 17

Change a Child’s Story

Media Grants

what we do!

for Santa Barbara County Nonprofit Organizations

5/23/19 3:43 PM

SBCASA.ORG

And this is

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

SLEEPING BEAUTY

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for localINSPIRING nonprofit agencies. This unique ALL GIRLS TO BE STRONG, SMART, ANDmessage BOLD opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their to the th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020 greater Santa Barbara community.

Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre

DAVID BAZEMORE

BUNNIES U R G E N T LY l NEEDING S H E LT E R

25

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary a sterling year of performances & events

AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up healthy,

y Bab

& is is chosen each month. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and Casa, with delthe Herrero distributed in the Santa Barbara Independent cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation.

Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

educated independent.

The GranadaTheatre

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

S

ni easo

sH

ere!

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222

Rescuing & re-homing animals in your community since 1992 statestreetballet.com

Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

DAVID BAZEMORE

ROSE EICHENBAUM

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

SB Wildlife Insert.indd 1

2/22/19 3:20 PM

RODNEY GUSTAFSON & WILLIAM SOLEAU, ARTISTIC DIRECTORS

We are here for you!

Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

State Street Ballet’s newest story ballet is part of the Family Series.

SLEEPING BEAUTY Saturday, March 14, 7:30 pm at The GranadaTheatre DAVID BAZEMORE

25

th Anniversary Season 2019 /2020

State Street Ballet 25th Anniversary l a sterling year of performances & events Join us for a gala evening honoring Sara Miller McCune and benefiting State Street Ballet Sunday, September 22, 2019 at the Four Seasons Biltmore

Need support?

AMERICAN MASTERS

THE NUTCRACKER

SLEEPING BEAUTY

Bernstein + Copland + Lauridsen

A Holiday Tradition

A Family Series Premiere

A Triple Bill featuring State Street Ballet and Santa Barbara Choral Society & orchestra Jo Anne Wasserman, Conductor Choreography by William Soleau

State Street Ballet Gustafson Dance Opera San Luis Obispo Grand Orchestra Brian Asher Alhadeff, Conductor

Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky

Sat l Oct 12 l 7:30 pm

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application. “There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

Sat l Mar 14 l 7:30 pm

Rachel, Age 17

Change a Child’s Story

Sat l Dec 21 l 2:00 & 7:30 pm Sun l Dec 22 l 2:00 pm

SBCASA.ORG

The GranadaTheatre

For reservations, call 805 845 1432

granadasb.org l 805 899 2222 Plus MODERN MASTERS choreography showcase

statestreetballet.com

At the New Vic Fri l May 8 l 7:30 pm Sat l May 9 l 7:30 pm

805.964.5245 info@dvsolutions.org dvsolutions.org

DAVID BAZEMORE

Good Work Lives On

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

ROSE EICHENBAUM

April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

4/12/19 9:46 AM

ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION OF SANTA BARBARA

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with the goal of enhancing our community’s awareness and appreciation of architecture and the built environment. A public nonprofit charitable organization

SHINING A LIGHT IN OUR COMMUNITY

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

YOUTH AND FAMILY SERVICES YMCA 105 East Carrillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805.569.1103 • ciymca.org/youthandfamilyservices Youth and Family Services YMCA operates four core programs that provide a continuum of care to underserved at-risk youth. Youth, young adults, and families that participate in our programs experience greater safety and well-being while they develop skills and lasting relationships to improve their resilience and build a successful, independent future.

St. George Youth Center provides critical family, community and afterschool programming to keep youth away from high-risk behaviors.

INSPIRING ALL GIRLS TO BE STRONG, SMART, AND BOLD INDEPENDENT.COM Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to

APRIL 15, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

37


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

| |

PHONE 965-5205 PHONE 965-5205

| |

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

reaching 100,000 readers each week

MUSIC

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

and tools for internal and history background is a compliance Proficiency floors requirements. and carpet cleaning. Ability toreports protected veteran check. status, UCSB or any sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, Tobacco‑Free environment. other characteristic protected $77,800/ by law. yr.For‑ primary $128,500/yr. The University consideration apply byof 500‑member trade organization, is custodial procedures power equipment HCM.characteristic Possesses solid operational 3/18/20, thereafter open Opportunity/ until filled. protected by law. California is an Equal of analytical usedincluding in and other its next Executive how Director. The ARE YOUseeking interest in learning truck mount carpetofmachine and highand Foraccounting Apply online Action at https://jobs.ucsb.edu primary consideration apply by Affirmative skills, general Employer, and accounting projects complex ideal candidate must be an to safely invest in Bitcoin, Ether andexcellent washers. Ability to handleledger #20200105applicants will receive 3/22/20, thereafter open filled. allJobqualified reconciliations and until budget scope. pressure Note: Satisfactory criminal communicator have a strong other Alt coins but wereand to also confused heavy liftingcheck.$77,005/ and moving tasks.transactions, Apply online https://jobs.ucsb.edu andat campus financial consideration for employment history allbackground acumen. Expertise or worriedfinancial how? Let me help you. inI leading Notes: Criminal background Job #20200109 Possesses ability to work without regard to race, color, religion, yr ‑ $80,000/yr. The history University of systems. the Bitcoin association’s legislative is first bought at $650 andefforts it California checkis required. a valid CAunder deadline pressure, handling sex, sexual orientation, gender an EqualMaintain Opportunity/ also$60,000. a key component of this job. The is now over I first bought driver’sAction license, Employer, a clean DMVand recordmultiple projects concurrently, and identity, national origin, disability Affirmative ideal candidate have aover proven Ether at $13 dollars and itwill is now and enrollment in the DMV Employee record of success the as well as at all leastqualified applicants will receive dealing with sensitive and confidential status, protected veteran status, or $2000 dollars. I believe Crypto Pull‑Notice Program. Days and hoursissues.Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in any PAYROLL ANALYST other characteristic protected by consideration for employment five years of senior management space is just getting started. Don’t withoutmay varytotorace, meet thereligion, operationalComputer Science, Engineering, law. DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION For primary consideration apply regard color, experience in a media environment or miss out on this generational wealth sex, sexual needs of orientation, the dept. May gender be requiredBusiness as Payrollthereafter Coordinator,open UC Path or related HELP or combination 05/09/21, until DIVISION DESK byServes trade association. creating event. I will shareThe my compensation own identity,to national wear an UCSB‑provided uniform.of relevant professional experience filled. Coordinator, Manager Apply Kronos online Payroll at https://jobs. origin, disability package with for you this and position TECHNICIAN Alt coin portfolio teachincludes positions and Timekeeper for 1,500+ employees Job # 17149 status, Multiple protected veteranavailable. status, $18.62‑ or and education.Proficiency with MS ucsb.edu competitive base STUDENT INFORMATION you how ato buy and how to safelypay, anya other $21.79/hr. The University of California and Visio. Experience SYSTEMS analyzing& requiring accurate detail‑oriented characteristic protected by Office plan and TECHNOLOGY (SIS&T) store yourperformance‑based Crypto Currency.bonus I live is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative attention to payroll timelines and law. For primary consideration apply large‑scale business processes and SKILLED benefits Serves as adeveloping Student Affairs (SA) Division deadlines, attention to detail, in Santa attractive Barbara and offerpackage. a FREE(Seebythe4/26/21, Action thereafter Employer, and qualifiedproblems; solutions openall until Job call Bankafter at cnpa.com job Tier 2 Help Desk Technician under the accuracy, and extensive knowledge introductory which for I detailed will filled. applicants will receive considerationinvolving the use of computer Apply online at https://jobs. EXPERT supervision of the Help Desk meet faceposting.) to faceQualified in Santacandidates Barbara should forJobemployment without regardsystems, of University policies and procedures. information flowmanager and REFINISH # 17346 forward a cover along ucsb.edu with $25.00 instructors, ‑ $30.00 / HR and guidance of otherspecifications SIS&T Systems FULL‑TIME and get you completely set letter up. Call to race, color, religion, sex, sexualarchitecture; Payroll includes career creating their resume to cnpajobs@gmail.com staff. Supports all division users at Restoration, tile & grout repair,casual clean, me at 617‑610‑9000. Or Email me at orientation, gender identity, nationalfor systems to meet requirements; staff, contract employees, (Cal‑SCAN) their locations; installs and configures hone, polish and seal stone. Must kyle.cetrulo@auxocell.com origin, disability status, protectedvalidating BYA staff, student staff, work study requirements against computer hardware and software. have experience.and summer program veteran status, or any otherneeds; appointments, designing details of automated COMPUTER/TECH The Tier 2 Help Desk responds to (805) characteristic protected by law.systems; staff. 259‑3168 Coordinates the onboarding HEALTH & FITNESS developing user interface requests that are escalated by Tier 1 procedures for all employees. Tracks For primary consideration apply bydesign; planning and executing unit COMPUTER & IT TRAINING Help Desk Field Reps. Responsible for employee employment compliance LOWEST PRICES on Health 3/17/20, thereafter open until filled.integration and acceptance testing; PROGRAM! Train at homeCOMMUNICATIONS to the analysis of functional requirements, in regards to background checks, Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edudeveloping Insurance. We have the best rates user reference materials become a Computer & Help Desk and diagnoses, research and resolution required certifications, and required #20200102 from top companies! Call Now! ANDJobSPECIAL and trainings. Notes: Satisfactory Professional now! Call CTI for details! of problems. Reqs: Experience with trainings. Works with the marketing 1‑888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN) criminal history background check. 888‑449‑1713 (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET)EVENTS ASSISTANT computer hardware repair, Windows staff to ensure vacant positions are HEALTH & FITNESS UCSB is a Tobacco‑Free environment. SCIENCE Operating Systems, MS Office in a advertised. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE COMPUTER $60,000‑$67,710/yr. The University of Helps develop the Computer Network environment. Excellent REAL ESTATE SALE LOWEST PRICES on HealthCalifornia in related area and FOR / or equivalent CONSTRUCTION an Equal Science department’s outreach and customeris service and Opportunity/ communication experience / training. Working Insurance. We have the best ratesAffirmative PORTABLE OXYGEN Concentrator Action Employer, and communication. Assists in planning skills are essential. Notes: Criminal from top companies! Call Now!all qualified applicants will receive MONEY knowledge TO of payroll May Be Covered by Medicare! Reclaim LOANprocesses, departmental History background check required. policies, and procedures; knowledge 1‑888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN) independence and mobility with the and implementing consideration forCA driver’s employment conferences, colloquia and special Maintain a valid license, a of organization‑specific compact design and long‑lasting RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ forcomputer business to race, religion, including the annual CS without cleanregard DMV record and color, enrollment in the purpose application Note:Credit Criminal battery of Inogen One. Free events LEGAL Realprograms. Estate loans. sex, DMV sexual orientation, Construction Project Engineer Employee Pull‑Notice gender Program. unimportant. history background check required. information kit! Call 844‑327‑2824. Summit. Maintains the department identity, V.I.P. Trust Deed national origin, disability needed for lg. apartment project, websiteDID andYOU social mediathatpresence. KNOW the average $25.19‑ $29.75/hr. The University of Company $24.09‑ $26.50/hr. The University Call of (Cal‑SCAN) www.viploan.com status, protected veteran status, or F/T, benefits, 401k. Exp. req’d. Start Assists business in development efforts. California is an Equal Opportunity/ spends the equivalent of California is an Broker‑principal Equal Opportunity/ 1‑818‑248‑0000. DRE any Affirmative other characteristic protected by date: mid‑March. Email resumesReqs: to: Ability Action Employer, and to organize, coordinate nearly 1½ days per week on digital AffirmativeNoAction Employer, and consumer loans. (Cal‑ PROFESSIONAL law. For primary consideration apply 01041073. awallace@wallacesmith.com, Attn:and Ali prioritize marketingworkload activities? and CNPAwork can help all qualified applicants will receive SCAN) all qualified applicants will receive by 4/22/21, thereafter open until WWW.WALLACESMITH.COM independently under save you time and pressure money. Forofmore consideration for employment without consideration for employment without filled. Apply online at https://jobs. deadlines. be detail oriented info Must email cecelia@cnpa.com or call regard to race, color, religion, sex, regard to race, color, religion, sex, # 17228 gender identity, RENTAL PROPERTIES sexualJob orientation, EDUCATION with a (916) high degree of (Cal‑SCAN) accuracy. Must ucsb.edu 288‑6011. sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, national origin, disability status, possess strong problem solving skills. AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here – Ability Get to work collaboratively with protected veteran status, or any APARTMENTS & or any protected veteran status, PROFESSIONAL trained as FAA certified Aviation a diverse pool of faculty, students other characteristic protected by law. CONDOS FORprotected RENTby law. other characteristic Technician. Financial aid for qualified For primary consideration apply by For primary consideration apply by and staff and provide excellent ASSISTANT students. Job placement assistance. 3/19/20, thereafter open until filled. $1320 Corner open of Hope San customer service. Demonstrated 3/16/20,1BD thereafter until & filled. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance GENERAL Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Remo‑N State atSt‑Barbara Apts Quiet experience multi‑tasking with Apply online https://jobs.ucsb.edu 877‑205‑4138. (Cal‑SCAN) ETHICS, Job #20200111 NPJob687‑0610 frequent interruptions. Excellent time POLICY, #20200103 ACCOUNTING management skills. Notes: This is a AND COMPLIANCE 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W AUDIT PROF. EDITING and Writing Services. EMPLOYMENT MANAGER 50% time career position. Satisfactory Alamar. among beautifulBusiness, oak trees Quick Setturn‑around. BUSINESS SERVICES & FINANCIAL SERVICES 2 OFFICER criminalPROFESSIONAL history background check. across the street Oak Park. NP. Academic, Memoir.from 805‑220‑8127 Responsible for management of UCSB isAUDIT AND ADVISORY SERVICES OFFICE OF VICE CHANCELLOR, $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 a Tobacco‑Free environment. AIRLINES HIRING ‑ Get $23.89 FAA Performs the University PlantARE Funds Group, and The documents auditsADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES to $25.55/hr. University MARKETING & degree 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla approved hands on and for the production of Aviation accuratetraining. and advisory services in accordanceOperating with a high of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Financial Aid forstatements qualified students and comprehensive with the International Standards inMEDIA the fields of UC Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa Affirmative Action Employer, and forof knowledge SOCIAL ‑ Career assistance. of operations andplacement net position of CALL the Professional of Internaland local policy, ADA/Section 504, 965‑3200 all qualified applicantsPractice will receive Aviation ofInstitute of Maintenance COORDINATOR the University California at consideration Auditing and Advisoriesprivacy, records management, and 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or for Practice employment SR EXECUTIVE CHEF 888‑686‑1704 MULTICULTURAL Santa Barbara. Recognized campus withoutestablished by color, the religion, Institute ofethics compliance CENTER issues including townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, regard to race, RESIDENTIAL DINING SERVICES Develops the program’s marketing shops, Internal orientation, Auditors, the UC Internal wide technical leader in Plant Fund sex, sexual and delegations gender conflict of interest park, beach, theater, golf. Serves as a member of the Residential goals andthe oversees productions FINANCE Manual, and disability UCSB Auditof authority, Accounting. Has significant impact identity,Audit position reports to Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. national origin, distribution ofof Administrative all marketing. Dining Management Team in Housing, Advisory Services procedures. and influence on organizational status, and Vice Chancellor protected veteran status, or the and Hector 968‑2549 YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE marketing campaigns Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises, under Reports to and isprotected supervisedbyon Services a Manages policy andAREprogram development. and social functions as a resource any other characteristic the general$1320+ direction& of1BDs the Director $1440+ YOUR Stop wage while ensuring areas all marketing is in STUDIOS basis by the apply Associateleader Functions ON with a TAXES? high degree of & bank for multiple of policy and law. Forday‑to‑day primary consideration Residential garden Dining Services, setting!sharing Pool, liens long & audits, unfiled tax Audit Director. Works closely with compliance with the departmental inof beautiful autonomy.levies, Manages term debt by 04/14/2021, thereafter open until compliance. Ensures campus policy is responsibilities for parking the overall Dining & off‑street at Michelle returns, payroll resolve tax other Audit and Advisory Services staff mission. Responsible for researching, lndry service transactions on issues, long &term filled. Apply online at https://jobs. in alignment with federal and state operations serving 5,800 residents Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. debt FAST. presently Call 888‑626‑3581 editing, and proofreading in Job a collaborative bond indebtedness totaling ucsb.edu as well as systemwide University # 16917 team approach tolawswriting, daily, 24,000 conferees yearly, 10,000 Erin 967‑6614 all Represents materials developed for on the Call $814 million. $58 million OVERDistributes $10K in Debt? Be debt free complete projects and help ensurepolicy. the University guests and 5,300 off campus meal MultiCultural in annualin interest principal 24 to 48and months. No upfront that the Audit and Advisory Servicesmultiple systemwide Center’s committeesevents. and plan participants yearly with an annual Reqs: workgroups Demonstrated experience ROOMS FOR RENT repaymentsfeesonto28enroll. long A+ term BBBdebt rated. Call organization meets its goals andconvenes to formulate in programming and administer marketing operating budget of $28 million and instruments to numerous departments National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. objectives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree instrategies to develop and 241 FTE. $995 Leads the culinary efforts & ROOMS $795of& events for diverse populations and STUDIO accounting, business administration,policy, (Cal‑SCAN) and funding sources across campus, processes, and resources within the department & lower. and (or university $25/$49through nightly) in a university setting. Experience $300 computer science, or a related fieldthe policy relating to the construction or and compliance framework personnel education and Patterson/ training, TV, frg, micro with social media, experience and +Util.FURN.w/ or equivalent combination of yearsat UC acquisitionGENERAL of 54 campus facilities. PEOPLESOFT Santa Barbara. Must daily FULL-TIME product development, research, knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, Magnol. Ctr. up to 2 ppl. Lic. In‑home of experience. 3‑5yes + of relevantexercise Assumes responsibility for the discernment, confidentiality, demonstration and audit. Provides Photoshop, and Word. Knowledge provider on site.Txt/ph: 805‑452‑4608 experience. SYSTEMS Exceptionally stronginitiative, operation and management of the BUSINESS professionalism, and of marketing principles, concepts, leadership, and guidance in reaching organizational and time managementdiplomacy. General Accounting unit during Decisions have campus ANALYST and best practices. Keen the correct culinary formula; combining skills; proven ability to set prioritiesand strategies, the absence of the manager. Reqs: UC‑wide ramifications of a high BUSINESS FINANCIAL reflect SERVICES sense of political acumen with regard the right mix of qualified personnel that& accurately the relativedegree. Bachelor’s degree in related area and/ Reqs: Familiarity of ADA In the areas of reporting and strategic and to communicating online via social and products to attain established importance of job responsibilities or equivalent experience /training. campus‑wide compliance with federal LABORER planning, identifying business media on politicized topics such as operating standards of excellence take into consideration deadlines, Thorough FACILITIES knowledge of accounting and state laws as well as University MANAGEMENT processes, and problem solving and race, gender, and systemic oppression. for all food service operations. Solves competing requirements function and assignments. to tasks policies and procedures. Legal Performs a variety Ability of custodial throughcomplexity. analysis ofNotes: business systems Notes: Criminal history background problems related to the production Criminal historyexperience/ independently gather, organize, and J.D. strongly preferred. and other related duties. Laborer(s) units and other areas of the department and user needs. Documents complex check required. Occasional evening WELLNESS background check required. MaintainIn lieu perform accounting analysis. of legal experience/ J.D., a will handle allrelated heavy lifting and moving business processes and license, systems; a valid CA driver’s a clean and weekend hours may be required. and demonstrates leadership in intra Excellent tasks, communication skills with Bachelor’s degree in a related field the moving of all furniture departmental OXYGEN teams and Users! committees. Gain preparesDMV plans and and proposals for the record enrollment in the $25.14‑ $26.82/hr. The University of ATTENTION: proven ability to classrooms, present information or an equivalent combination of out of offices, labs improvement and Plans, develops oversees a culinary with and a Portable Oxygen of systems, procedures DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. California is an Equal Opportunity/ freedom in a clear the and replacement concise manner education and professional experience of allboth furniture. team to ensure overall consistency and and processes; writes test scripts Affirmative Action Employer, and Concentrator! No more heavy tanks in writingRequired and verbally. Thoroughcustodial $24.52‑ $35.58/hr. The University ofis required. Notes: UCSB Campus and to perform quality of food Lowest service across Guaranteed Prices! and tests system changes; writes all qualified applicants will receive highrefills! California is an Equal Opportunity/ knowledgeduties of financial transactions Authority Clerywithout Act. Call in zone and campus widefunctional as the the various operations. AssessesStore: and Oxygen Concentrator design documents; ensures andSecurity consideration for under employment Affirmative Action Employer, and systems, as well Form 700 Statement of Economic necessary. Reqs: asTworelated years similar develops menus based on such factors (Cal‑SCAN) businessall continuity; and develops qualified applicants will receive regard to race, color, religion, sex, 1‑844‑653‑7402 policy, accounting, and regulatory Interest Filer. Satisfactory criminal industry experience. Must have 6mo consideration for employment sexual orientation, gender identity, as market trends, customer preferences + experience stripping and waxing without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, disability status, and nutritional considerations, ease CALIFORNIA NEWS Publishers BUSINESS clients.origin, Maintains a high status, level in use follow of common web external written desktop and oral /instructions national disability Association (CNPA), a 132‑year‑old, OPPORTUNITY PeopleSoft FSCM applications. Advanced in English. Must be knowledge familiar with allof proficiency protected with veteran status, or any

REAL ESTATE

WELL BEING

38

54 THE INDEPENDENT MARCH 12, 2020 INDEPENDENT.COM THE INDEPENDENT APRIL 15, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

MARKET PLACE

any music w/ ease. Vocal audition Recording Studios. Classical, ofMUSIC preparation and established of position dependent on funding. LESSONS prep. $52/hr. 1st lesson 50% off!! pop, folk, jazz...Christine Holvick, procedures, and budgetary constraints. $28.91‑ $29.47/hr. The University of www.sbHarpist.com Christine Holvick, BM, MM, 30 yrs BM, MM Monitors menu planning, purchasing California is an Equal Opportunity/ 969‑6698 exp sbHarpist.com Call 969‑6698 WONDERFUL specifications, product and recipe Affirmative Action Employer, and testing and menu development. all qualified applicants will receive ANNOUNCEMENTS TEACHER NOWforPLAYING Designs recipes, determines consideration employment without Enjoy new Piano, Voice or Harp AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/ appropriate regard to race, color, religion, sex, Lessons. ingredients Exciting and newspecifies approach month w/12‑mo agmt. Includes 1 individual serving portions for each sexual orientation, gender identity, HARPIST VIRTUOSO to a full musical experience. Read, TB of data per month. Get More For recipe. Reqs: 10+ years or as improvise senior national disability status, FOR origin, ALL EVENTS. Weddings, memorize, compose Your High‑Speed Internet Thing. Ask executive and/or multi‑site culinary protected veteran Parties, status, or Churches, any Concerts, us how to bundle and SAVE! Geo & senior leader in the restaurant industry other characteristic protected by law. svc restrictions apply. Call us today or in college and university food For primary consideration apply by 1‑888‑796‑8850 service. Culinary degree or equivalent 3/17/20, thereafter open until filled. required. Advanced knowledge in Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance food preparation, culinary trends, Job #20200104 Publishing‑Trusted by Authors vegetarian, vegan and raw cuisine, Since 1920 Book manuscript nutrition, special dietary needs, allergy SALES/MARKETING submissions currently being awareness and sanitation regulations. Ability to lead and advice in food EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion purchasing contracts, experience Get your message out with in building and maintaining quality California’s PRMedia Release – the only and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or vendor relationships. Ability to Press Release Service operated work effectively as a member by the press to get press! For more visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali of an Executive Team as well as info contact Cecelia @ 916‑288‑6011 (Cal‑SCAN) inter‑departmentally. Demonstrated or http://prmediarelease.com/california skill in leading work groups, managing (Cal‑SCAN) and supervising complex projects, leading and supervising students. ServeSafe certification. Note: Criminal history background check required. $91,400‑$108,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified FAMILY SERVICES applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, a million families find senior living. gender identity, national origin, Our trusted, local advisors help find disability status, protected veteran solutions to your unique needs at no status, or any other characteristic cost to you. Call 855‑741‑7459 CALLING ALL friends of Roger protected by law. For primary Runjavac! consideration apply by 3/22/20, HOLISTIC HEALTH Send him a birthday greeting at thereafter open until filled. Apply happybdayroger@yahoo.com online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job Herbal Health‑care Happy Birthday, Pops! #20200093 Herbal treatments for weight‑loss, DID YOU KNOW 7 in 10 Americans or heart conditions, inflammation 1158 Million U.S. Adults read content & pain, blood sugar conditions, from newspaper media each week? digestion, liver detox. Naturopath, Discover the Power of Newspaper Ayurveda Herbalist, KhabirSouthwick, Advertising. For a free brochure call 805‑308‑3480, www.KSouthwick. STAFF RESEARCH 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa. com com (Cal‑SCAN) ASSOCIATE COMPUTER SCIENCE DID YOU KNOW that newspapers MASSAGE (LICENSED) Responsible for developing the serve an engaged audience and that experimental prototypes and platforms 79% still read a print newspaper? for blockchain‑based database systems. DEEP TISSUE QUEEN Newspapers need to be in your mix! The blockchain‑based database Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Discover the Power of Newspaper systems will also require the building Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. Advertising. For more info email of a scalable distributed caching layer 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) in the cloud computing substrate. available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN) Responsible for the implementation 886‑8792 DIRECTV NOW. No Satellite Needed. and integration of such a distributed $40/month. 65 Channels. Stream caching layer developed in the WELLNESS Breaking News, Live Events, Sports laboratory. Supervises the algorithmic research work of the two new doctoral ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain & On Demand Titles. No Annual students in the laboratory; in particular freedom with a Portable Oxygen Contract. No Commitment. CALL bringing them up‑to‑speed with both Concentrator! No more heavy tanks 1‑866‑825‑6523 the permissioned and permission‑less and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! DISABLED AND unable to work? blockchain technologies. Assists the Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: Bills beginning to pile up? Call Citizens Disability! We can help you Faculty co‑Directors in the development 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) of research funding proposals. VIAGRA 100MG, CIALIS 20mg. 100 get the benefits you deserve. Call 800‑804‑5883 Today! Will lead a team of undergraduate tabs $99 includes FREE SHIPPING. and graduate students to provide 1‑888‑836‑0780 (Cal‑SCAN) DISCOUNT AIR TRAVEL. Call Flight engineering programming and Services for best pricing on domestic system support for the investigation WANT TO get your brain mapped & international flights inside and of blockchain infrastructure that span for free? from the US. Serving United, Delta, public and private cloud computing American & Southwest airlines. Call infrastructure. Duties include software Nutritional scientists at Nutrient for free quote now! Have travel dates design, development, testing, and (a Reno‑based food company), ready! 855‑638‑3462 empirical evaluation of the system. in collaboration with the team at Work includes repetitive, specialized Neurofield Neurotherapy Inc, are ONLY THE Highest quality CBD experimental procedures in database recruiting 10 adults to participate in products from AceWellness! We systems, distributed algorithms, a 1‑day research study. The purpose guarantee highest quality, most transaction processing, concurrency of the study is to measure changes competitive pricing on CBD products. control, and cloud computing. Reqs: in brain activity as measured by the Softgels, Oils, Skincare, Vape & Bachelor of Science in Computer Neurofield qEEG (non‑invasive brain more. Coupon Code: PRINT20 and Systems Engineering and/or mapping device) after consuming a 1‑855‑681‑3113 equivalent education and experience. brain‑targeted Nutrient shake. ORLANDO + Daytona Beach Florida Advanced software development Vacation! Enjoy 7 Days and 6 Nights experience. Large scale software The study takes place at the with Hertz, Enterprise or Alamo Car infrastructure configuration and Neurofield office (1836 State St). 2 Rental Included ‑ Only $298.00. 12 management. Distributed systems EEGs (plus analysis), the BrainShake months to use 1‑866‑903‑7520. deployment, testing, experimentation, are provided free of charge. There is (24/7) (Cal‑SCAN) and empirical evaluation. Note: no financial compensation. Criminal history background check To learn more and apply, please visit SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! required. Position currently funded this link: https://nutrientlife.com/ Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within through 09/30/2021. Continuation pages/nutrient‑neurofield‑study minutes. Average savings of $444/

WELL BEING


| | INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHONE 965-5205 E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M | | INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHONE 965-5205 E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

AUTO

LEGALS

ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490

AUTO PARTS

LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM

LIFE ALERT. One press of a button sends help fast, 24/7! At home & on the go. Mobile Pendant w/GPS. Free first aid kit with subscription. 877‑537‑8817 free brochure.

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN)

SERVICE DIRECTORY BUILDING/ CONSTRUCTION SERVICES BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Beautiful new walk‑in showers with no slip flooring. Also, grab bars and seated showers available. Call for a free in‑home consultation: 844‑242‑1100. (AAN CAN) THINKING ABOUT installing a new shower? American Standard makes it easy. FREE design consultation. Enjoy your shower again! Call 1‑866‑945‑3038 today to see how you can save $1,000 on installation. (Cal‑SCAN)

EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION DIABETICS! Save money on your diabetic supplies! Convenient home shipping for monitors, test strips, insulin pumps, catheters and more! To learn more, call now! 1‑855‑702‑3408. (Cal‑SCAN) ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION:VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! A cheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special ‑ $99 + FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. CALL NOW: 888‑531‑1192 (AAN CAN)

ITALIAN in the PARK: Beginner lessons or Intermediate conversation group. Covid‑safe, affordable fun! monirod@aol. com

DENTAL INSURANCE ‑ Physicians Mutual Insurance Company. Covers 350 procedures. Real insurance ‑ not a discount plan. Get your free dental info kit! 1‑888‑623‑3036 www. dental50plus.com/58 #6258

DONATE YOUR CAR OR TRUCK TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

DOMESTIC CARS CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! 2002 and Newer! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! Free Towing! We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1‑888‑416‑2330. DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT OR RV to receive a major tax deduction. Help homeless pets. Local, IRS Recognized. Top Value Guaranteed. Free Estimate and Pickup. LAPETSALIVE.ORG 1‑833‑772‑2632 (Cal‑SCAN)

VIAGRA AND CIALIS USERS! 50 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 Hablamos Espanol

PERSONAL SERVICES

ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 855‑970‑2032. (Cal‑SCAN)

55 Yrs or Older?

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855‑569‑1909. (AAN CAN)

REPAIR SERVICES

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21.1‑833‑872‑2545

CAR CARE/REPAIR

HEARING AIDS!! Buy one/get one FREE! High‑quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45‑day money back guarantee! 1‑833‑585‑1117 (AAN CAN)

FINANCIAL SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1‑800‑864‑5960.

Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531

SANDERSAMPS.COM. Guitar and Amplifier repair. Vintage gear a specialty. 805‑220‑8127.

TECHNICAL SERVICES MAC AND PC repair, network specification and installation, virus removal and mitigation, Home Theater and smart home specification and installation

SPECIAL COLOR “Merlot” 2004 with tan leather interior & convertible top. 76K miles & is a single owner vehicle. Well maintained by Ford service & records available. Hard top storage rack & cover included. $13,500. Call or text 805‑451‑8305.

LUXURY CARS WANTED! OLD Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE 1‑707‑339‑5994. Email: porscherestoration@yahoo.com (Cal‑SCAN)

ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:JAMES B. NORRIS CASE NO.: 21PR00150 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JIM B. NORRIS, JAMES B. NORRIS, JIM NORRIS, AND JAMES NORRIS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Nicholas J. Schneider in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that:Nicholas J. Schneider be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/13/2021 AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the

Tide Guide Day

High

Sunrise 6:22 Sunset 7:34

Low

High

Low

High

Thu 15

6:33 am 0.3

1:07 pm 3.1

5:20 pm 2.3

11:51 pm 4.8

Fri 16

7:21 am 0.4

2:20 pm 2.8

5:30 pm 2.6

7:46 pm 3.3

9:59 pm 3.3 11:51 pm 2.9

Sat 17

12:24 am 4.6

8:20 am 0.5

Sun 18

1:08 am 4.4

9:34 am 0.5

Mon 19

2:19 am 4.2

10:52 am 0.4

Tue 20

3:54 am 4.2

11:54 am 0.2

7:33 pm 3.6

Wed 21

5:18 am 4.3

12:40 pm 0.0

7:46 pm 3.9

12:47 am 2.4

6:25 am 4.6

Thu 22

19 H

26 D

3

1:18 pm -0.1

8:05 pm 4.3

10 D source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“True/False Test” -- either way, it’s correct.

54 Internet connection device 57 “Heads up!” (or advice to crossword speed-solvers) 1 A name by any other name? 60 A fire sign 6 ___-pitch softball 9 Gradually withdraw 61 “Yikes!” 13 Country singer Griffith 62 High-ranking 14 Place first 63 “Edward Scissorhands” star 15 Titular “Pinhead” of comics 64 Ham sandwich bread 16 Short, effective set for a 65 Like some bathwater stand-up comedian 18 Pissed 19 Gain again, as trust 1 Colony resident 20 Former Quebecois premier 2 Dragon’s den ___ Levesque 3 “Picnic” playwright 22 Cosecant, for one 4 Really wish you could 27 “Citizen Kane” studio 5 Instrument that can play 29 Grant temporary use of quarter tones 30 “Frozen” princess 6 Refrain for a “sweet chariot” 31 Raphael’s weapon, in 7 Letters for the 2020 Super “Teenage Mutant Ninja Bowl Turtles” 8 Margin in a close game, maybe 32 Molecule unit 9 Bugs 34 Held for possible sale, 10 Green-minded org. maybe 11 Fitting 36 Midwestern NBA follower, 12 Bill who appears in the maybe 2021 Amazon movie “Bliss” 39 Japanese period for over 15 Much of a penny 250 years (headquartered 17 Part of some three-day in what is now Tokyo) weekends, for short 40 Oboe, for one 21 Belgian salad green 41 Suffix for trick 23 Artery along the thigh 42 Leakes of reality TV 24 “Be back ___” 43 Final Four initials 25 2020 Pixar movie 45 Post-apocalyptic zombie 26 Au pair series, to fans 27 Oakland athlete 46 Tank dwellers that need a 28 Kyoto garment lot of care 31 Blood flow facilitator 50 “Cinderella Man” 32 ___ Lingus (carrier based antagonist in Dublin) 51 Feature of some interesting 33 Techno offshoot big in the stories 1990s

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 15, 2021 2021 APRIL

35 Ryerson who shows up (again!) during repeat viewings of “Groundhog Day” 37 Traffic noise 38 How some flat, green insects are described 44 Oldest ever U.S. ex-president 45 It’s still a good idea to get a shot for it 47 Pet food brand 48 The Lightning Seeds lead singer Broudie 49 Wanda of “Curb Your Enthusiasm” 52 Mass movement of viewers to another Twitch stream 53 Air France assets, once 54 Magazine with a final print issue in 2018 55 Mineral-rich source 56 Quick swim 58 “Pay attention!” 59 Scottish mystery writer Josephine ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1027

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

39 39


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONTINUED)

court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: 1332 Anacapa Street, Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑0669 Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:ELLENVIRGINIA SESMA CASE NO.: 21PR00100 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELLEN VIRGINIA SESMA A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PATRICIA CLAUDINE KIEFERLE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara

THE PETITION for probate requests that: PATRICIA CLAUDINE KIEFERLE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an

MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1‑888‑519‑0171 (AAN CAN) AT&T INTERNET. Starting at $40/month w/12‑mo agmt. 1 TB of data/mo. Ask how to bundle & SAVE! Geo & svc restrictions apply. 1‑888‑796‑8850 BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 844‑511‑1836. (AAN CAN) BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920 Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http:// dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV ‑ Every live football game, every Sunday ‑ anywhere ‑ on your favorite device. Restrictions apply. Call IVS ‑ 1‑888‑641‑5762. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV NOW. No Satellite Needed. $40/month. 65 Channels. Stream Breaking News, Live Events, Sports & On Demand Titles. No Annual Contract. No Commitment. CALL 1‑866‑825‑6523 DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1‑855‑380‑2501 DO YOU owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Let us help! Call 855‑955‑0702. (Hours: Mon‑Fri 7am‑5pm PST) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Help Find Missing Kids! Call 1‑888‑491‑1453. (CalSCAN) DONATE YOUR CAR TO KIDS. Your donation helps fund the search for missing children. Accepting Trucks, Motorcycles & RV’s , too! Fast Free Pickup – Running or Not ‑ 24 Hour Response ‑ Maximum Tax Donation – Call 877‑266‑0681 (AAN CAN) ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑424‑7581 (Cal‑SCAN) GENERAC GENERATORS. Weather is increasingly unpredictable. Be prepared for power outages. Free 7‑yr ext warranty. Schedule free in‑home assessment 1‑844‑334‑8353. Special financing if qualified. HEARING AIDS! Bogo free! High‑quality rechargeable Nano hearing aids priced 90% less than competitors. Nearly invisible! 45‑day money back guarantee! 833‑669‑5806 HUGHESNET SATELLITE Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1‑844‑416‑7147 (AAN CAN) HUGHESNET SATELLITE Internet – Finally, no hard data limits! Call

40

|

Today for speeds up to 25mbps as low as $59.99/mo! $75 gift card, terms apply. 1‑844‑863‑4478 INVENTORS ‑ FREE INFORMATION PACKAGE. Have your product idea developed affordably by the Research & Development pros and presented to manufacturers. Call 1‑844‑752‑8272 for a Free Idea Starter Guide. Submit your idea for a free consultation. (Cal‑SCAN) LIFE ALERT. One press of a button sends help FAST, 24/7! At home and on the go. Mobile Pendant with GPS. FREE First Aid Kit (with subscription.) CALL 833‑518‑1049 FREE Brochure. (Cal‑SCAN)

objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 05/06/2021 AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, ANACAPA DIVISION, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Janet K. McGinnis, Attorney at Law; 924 Anacapa Street, Suite 1‑M Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑2156, (805) 963‑1865. Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 2021.

NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self‑publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RODNEY J. TILLEY Case No.: 866‑951‑7214 21PR00126 SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent Compare 20 A‑rated insurances creditors, and persons who may otherwise companies. Get a quote within minutes. be interested in the will or estate, or both of Average savings of $444/year! Call RODNEY J TILLEY 1‑844‑410‑9609! (M‑F 8am‑8pm Central) A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed (Cal‑SCAN) by: JULIE SHERNIUS in the Superior Court of STILL PAYING too much for your California, County of Santa Barbara MEDICATION? Save up to 90% on THE PETITION for probate requests that: RX refill! Order today and receive free JULIE SHERNIUS be appointed as personal shipping on 1st order ‑ prescription representative to administer the estate of the required. Call 1‑855‑750‑1612 (AAN decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the CAN) THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted market share is how businesses use their to probate. The will and any codicils are advertising dollars. Mark Twain said, available for examination in the file kept by “Many a small thing has been made the court. large by the right kind of advertising”. THE PETITION requests authority to So why spend your hardearned dollars administer the estate under the Independent on social media where you already have Administration of Estates Act. (This authority an audience? For more info call Cecelia will allow the personal representative to @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing actions, however, the personal representative an election is how campaign dollars are will be required to give notice to interested spent. Get the best ROI by using our persons unless they have waived notice deep relationships in every community in or consented to the proposed action.) The California. Our on‑the‑ground knowledge Independent administration authority will be is indispensable to campaigns that want granted unless an interested person files an results. For more info on multi‑market objection to the petition and shows good ethnic and non‑ethnic solutions call cause why the court should not grant the Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or cecelia@ authority. cnpa.com A HEARING on the petition will be held in this THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing court as follows: 05/04/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. market share is how businesses use their Dept: 2 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA advertising dollars. We deliver the largest 312 E Cook St, Bldg E, Santa Maria 93454; consortium of trusted news publishers in Probate California and beyond. For more info on IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, multi‑market solutions call Cecelia @ (916) you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with 288‑6011 or cecelia@cnpa.com the court before the hearing. Your appearance THE DIFFERENCE in winning and losing may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU market share is how businesses use their ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of advertising dollars. CNPA’s Advertising the decedent, you must file your claim with Services’ power to connect to nearly 13 the court and mail a copy to the personal million of the state’s readers who are an representative appointed by the court within engaged audience, makes our services the later of either (1) four months from the an indispensable marketing solution. For date of first issuance of letters to a general more info call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 personal representative, as defined in section or cecelia@cnpa.com 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) THE GENERAC PWRcell solar plus 60 days from the date of mailing or personal battery storage system. Save money, delivery to you of a notice under section reduce reliance on grid, prepare for 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other outages & power your home. Full California statutes and legal authority may installation services. $0 down financing affect your rights as a creditor. You may want option. Request free no obligation quote. to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. 1‑855‑270‑3785 THINKING ABOUT installing a new YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the shower? American Standard makes it easy. Free design estate, you may file with the court a Request consult.1‑888‑674‑3005 today to see for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing how to save $1,000 on installation or visit of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in www.newshowerdeal.com/display Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court WANT TO BUY clerk. Petitioner: Julie Shernius 1406 Dorsett WANTS TO purchase minerals and other Dock, Point Pleasant Boro, NJ 08742; (201) oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. 927‑3921. Published Apr 8, 15, 22 2021. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 15, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OM SWEET MAMA at 3952 Foothill Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Aida Robana (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000832. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: POETIC PICNICS at 1020 North Nopal Street #4 Santa Barbara. CA 93103; Wendy T Acosta (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000774. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: IMAGES BY VALERIE at 3940 Maricopa Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Valerie Villa (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000617. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LEFT COAST BRANDS at 819 Reddick Street Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Coastal Manufacturing LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000835. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PAC SUBSEA at 529 Hastings Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Nathan F. Perry (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000736. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DON CAMELON TAQUERIA LLC at 302 E. Haley Street #B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Don Camelon Taqueria LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000610. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DRW GLOBAL at 218 Sherwood Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Douglas R. Weinstein (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 3, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000579. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SG ASSOCIATES at 1117 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; SG Associates, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000747. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAPITAL PACIFIC DEVELOPMENT GROUP, CAPITAL PACIFIC HOMES at 209 W. Alamar Ave., Ste A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Center Point Development Group, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000592. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RVP CATTLE CO. at 3229 Calle Rosales Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lone Oak Cattle Company LLC 265 Meadowlark Rd Santa Ynez, CA 93460 This business is conducted by a General Partnership County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000704. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HUSTLE MEDIA at 5511 Ekwill Street Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Master Clean USA Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000786. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARRAY CREATIVE DESIGN at 414 De La Vina Street Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Erika Bellitt (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000660. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JANE OF ALL TRADES at 1217 East Rice Ranch Road Santa Maria, CA 93455; Nina L. Russaw (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000791. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: EQUIPPED FITNESS SOLUTIONS at 518 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Equippedfs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000818. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as:BOARD AND BRUSH at 31 E. Canon Perdido Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Francie Rose, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000828. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as:ALPHA COATINGD CLEANING at 924 W Apricot Avenue, Unit 102 Lompoc, CA 93436; Jadus Legacy, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000598. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THYME PLUS BOTANICALS at 14 Oak Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Restorative Organics, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000737. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PAYJUNCTION at 1903 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Messiahic Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corportion Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000848. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHUCK WAGON WINES, CIRCA 55 CELLARS, HERITAGE RANCH CELLARS, MIMICRY WINES, PARA EL ALMA WINES, SADDLE RANCH CELLARS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Terravant Wine Company, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000718. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OA CONSULTING at 4551 Brighton Place Santa Maria, CA 93455; Susan E Gibbons (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000867. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MR. DEW DAB at 948 W. Chestnut Ave Apt D Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Meesha Rose (same address) Lafa Jones (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000951. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JERROCA at 588 Mills Way Goleta, CA 93117; Charuwan M Pichardo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000903. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EFS at 518 E Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Equippedfs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by aLimited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000884. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CREATE ORDER TILE at 228 North Street Lompoc, CA 93436; Karis E. Clinton (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000860. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AK AUTO REPAIR at 814 E Cota St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Arsen Kagramanov (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000683. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: OLD COWDOGS at 2273 Alamo Pintado Rd. Solvang, CA 93463; Alamar Media, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000772. Apr 8, 15, 22, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SLO CURIO at 1117 1/2 Olive St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jeeyon Roslie (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000888. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE EDGE APARTMENTS at 6509 Pardall St Goleta, CA 93117; Ladera Townhomes LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000769. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ORG‑GARDEN LANDSCAPE at 5832 Mandarin Dr Apt C Goleta, CA 93117; Benedicto Cuevas (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000681. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as:ALPHA SURFACEPRO at 924 W. Apricot Ave. Unit 102 Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Jadus Legacy LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000824. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRASSLAND GROWERS at 4045 Foothill Road Carpinteria, CA 93013; Robert Abe 1020 ‘D’ Bailard Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000763. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: METROPOLITAN GANSTER at 27 West Anapamu St, #265 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jonathan P Holmes (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000893. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA VINS at 4390 Calle Real #A Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Lorraine Cole 843 Portesuello Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by Lori Cole a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000700. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NOTOWN TAVERN at 5114 Hollister Avenue Santa Barbara. CA 93111; Liquid Essentials LLC 2785 Painted Cave Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Jill Tucker, Managing Member County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000748. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LUQUE TRANSPORT at 4413 Hacienda Dr Guadalupe, CA 93434; Martin Jr. Luque (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000827. April 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ADOBE PET HOSPITAL at 3230 State Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Mission City Veterinary Hospital, Inc (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Corporation Signed:Evelyn Brand County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0000880. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONTINUED)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOLEIL RESIDENTIAL at 5387 Paseo Cameo Santa Barbara. CA 93111; Tracey Messner (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Tracey Messner, Owner County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0000851. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STEPPING STONES CONSULTANTS at 758 Via Miguel Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Michiel A De Bruin (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Michiel A De Bruin County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 06, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0000978. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AMPLIFY WINES at 2320 Thompson Way, Ste F Santa Maria, CA 93455; Cameron Michael Porter (Same Address) and Marlen Sosa Porter (Same Address) This business is conducted by A Married Couple Signed: Marlen Porter, Co‑Owner County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E24. FBN Number: 2021‑0000847. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LITTLE LADY BUTTERFLY at 1436 Santa Fe Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Valerie A Selvaggio (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Valerie Selvaggio County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 08, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001010. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THOUGHTBOX PHOTO BOOTH at 4545 Atascadero Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Jacob Pighetti (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed: Jacob Pighetti County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 02, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E953. FBN Number: 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARCADIAN WINERY at 300 Central Avenue #6 Lompoc, CA 93427; Joseph Davis (Same Address) This business is conducted by An Individual Signed:Joseph Davis County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. E35. FBN Number: 2021‑0001007. Apr 15, 22, 29, May 06 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LEO RICARD VALENCIA AKA RICHAD R. VALENCIA ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00730 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: LEO RICHARD VALENCIA AKA RICHARD R. VALENCIA TO: RICK RICHARD VALENCIA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Apr 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent,

a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 01, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF VICTOR PLASCENCIA PLASCENCIA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00848 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VICTOR PLASCENCIA PLASCENCIA TO: VICTOR PLASENCIA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TERRY ANN TABACCHI TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV01034

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TERRY ANN TABACCHI TO: TERRY ANN THOMPSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 11, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 22, 2021. by tHOMAS p. aNDERLE. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00830 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before

this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00809 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL TO: PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL‑MARKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (Electronically and Telephonically) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, April 27, 2021 at 3:00 P.M. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Conceptual/Preliminary Final One Plant Signage 290 Storke Road (APN 073-100-030) Case No. 21-0006-DRB Wingman Rodeo Signage 5892 Hollister Avenue (APN 071-052-014) Case No. 21-0007-DRB Parking Lot Shade Canopies and Equipment Pad Screening 1 S. Los Carneros Road (073-330-074) Case No. 21-0005-DRB Advisory Review Goleta Train Depot Project 27 South La Patera (APN 073-050-033) ATTENTION: Pursuant to of the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the Design Review Board for April 27, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. Design Review Board Members will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically (by phone) as described above. You may also request your written comments to be read into the record during the hearing. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice are new items. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, April 15, 2021

objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 21, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 25, 2021. by Colleen K. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA In the matter of: MCDONALD FAMILY TRUST dated March 30, 2001, as amended Case No. 21PR00149 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF PAULA D. McDONALD, Deceased [PROB C §§19003, 19040(b), 19052] Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Paula D. McDonald (Decedent) that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107, and deliver pursuant to Section 1215 of the California Probate Code a copy to Catherine M. Brunner, as Trustee of the McDonald Family Trust dated March 30, 2001, as amended, wherein the decedent was the surviving Settlor, at 1000 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1500, Los Angeles, California 90017‑1730, within the latter of four months after April 08, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. A claim form may

be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: March 31, 2021. Parisa F. Weiss, Esq., Attorney for Trustee Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ANACAPA DIVISION In re Shirley J. Otto Revocable Trust Case No. 21PR00146 NOTICE TO CREDITORS [PROB C §§19040(b), 19052] Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Shirley J. Otto (Decedent) that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver a copy to Joe Bourdeau, as trustee of the Shirley J. Otto Revocable Trust dated June 12, 2015, of which Decendent was the settlor, c/o the Law Offices of James F. Cote, P.O. Box 20146, Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146, as provided to Section 1215 within the latter of four months after April 15, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: March 30, 2021. Law Offices of James F. Cote Published Apr 15, 22, 29 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery

Drive, Goleta CA. 93117. February 25, 2021 at 3:30 PM Cynthia Bollinger furniture, art, piano, household goods, boxes Kaci Prati Household, Tools, Personal, Sporting Santa Barbra Technology X Containers, Bins, Mechanical parts The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. EXTRA SPACE Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta CA. 93117. April 29, 2021 at 3:30 PM Donald Young Boxes Home goods Julian Hayes Personal, clothes, shoes, bed, sports equip. Jonas Meisenheimer Surf boards, bed, personal Christine Barrios Bags, boxes, tv, couches, furniture, clothes, shoes, personal The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures.com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property. Published April 15, 2021

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING City Council Meeting 5:30 p.m. April 20, 2021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, April 20, 2021 at 5:30 p.m., at the City of Goleta, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite. B, Goleta, CA to: Consider adoption of resolutions modifying the City of Goleta User Fees and Charges Schedules. The User Fees schedules include but are not limited to all City service, permitting and use fees with the exception of Developer Impact Fees. A list of proposed fees is available for public viewing during normal business hours at the City of Goleta Offices, at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be sent to the City Clerk Group e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: City Council and City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. In order to be disseminated to the City Council for consideration during the Council meeting, written information must be submitted to the City Clerk no later than Monday at noon prior to the City Council meeting. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the City Council prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, April 15, 2021 on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 9617505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. ATTENTION: Pursuant to of the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council for April 20, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. City Council will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the City Clerk at cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish: April 8, 2021 Publish: April 15, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 15, 15, 2021 2021 APRIL

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

41 41

Profile for SB Independent

Santa Barbara Independent 4/15/21  

April 15, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 796

Santa Barbara Independent 4/15/21  

April 15, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 796

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded