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SBIFF MID-FEST REPORT ◆ THIRD WINDOW’S SOURS AND SMASH BURGERS ◆ THURSDAY NIGHT LIGHTS FOOTBALL FREE

Santa Barbara

APR. 8-15, 2021 VOL. 35 ■ NO. 795

Truth Rumor to

Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt Uses Facts to Overcome Vaccine Fears by Nick Welsh

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APRIL 8, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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! Y A D N O M E G R N I A T N E N O @ OP E T A T S 4 3 5 3

Order Online at: SouthCoastDeli.com 2

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APRIL 8, 2021

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Just Added Virtual Events for April & May

Intimate, interactive online events you won’t find anywhere else.

Jane Goodall

Hope Fuels a Better World Sat, Apr 10 / 11 AM Pacific (Note new time) Event Sponsors: Betsy Atwater & Tim Eaton, and Susan & Bruce Worster

Kelly McGonigal

Ephrat Asherie Dance

Speaking with Pico

Mohsin Hamid

The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection and Courage

Odeon

Fri, Apr 16 7 PM Pacific

Tue, Apr 20 5 PM Pacific

(Note special time)

Tue, Apr 13 5 PM Pacific

Lead Sponsor: Jody & John Arnhold

Supporting Sponsor: Siri & Bob Marshall

Arthur C. Brooks

Yo-Yo Ma & Kathryn Stott

National Renewal

Tue, May 11 / 5 PM Pacific

Speaking with Pico

Mira Nair Wed, May 26 5 PM Pacific

Songs of Comfort and Hope Wed, May 5 5 PM Pacific

Corporate Sponsor:

Additional support for Jane Goodall provided by Forces of Nature series sponsor Audrey & Timothy O. Fisher in memory of J. Brooks Fisher Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Bob Feinberg, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay, and Sheila Wald Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Dori Pierson Carter & Chris Carter, Martha Gabbert, and Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor Ephrat Asherie Dance presented in partnership with The Joyce Theater and Moss Arts Center at Virginia Tech, and in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Mira Nair presented in association with the Carsey-Wolf Center at UC Santa Barbara

House Calls - Spring 2021: $70 (Includes the seven virtual events slated for Apr-May)

Community Partners:

Single tickets start at $10 UCSB students: FREE! (Registration required).

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Special Thanks:

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APRIL 8, 2021

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GRAB A PENCIL, LET’S HAVE SOME FUN!

:

Knowing the difference between needs and wants can help you become a smart spender. Needs are things that help us live, like food and clothes. Wants are things that you buy for fun. Look at the items below and circle if it’s a need or want. NEED ice cream

NEED clothes

NEED Soda

NEED

Fancy car

WANT NEED

WANT

candy

WANT NEED

WANT

A house

Help Cito reach his needs of fruits & veggies. Don’t get tempted by the wants!

NEED

WANT

A bed

:

Kids Activity 2 maze

Kids Activity 1 Needs vs. Wants

WANT NEED

WANT

bicycle

WANT

present

Financial Literacy Month

Weekly activities to sharpen your financial savvy!

:

Week Two Needs vs. Wants The 50/30/20 rule can help you balance spending between needs and wants while still keeping your savings goals on track by dividing your monthly income as follows:

Needs • • • • •

Financial Goals

Groceries Insurance Rent/Mortgage Transportation Utilities

• • • •

4

THE INDEPENDENT

Emergency Fund Long-term Savings Repaying Debit Retirement

GOALS 20%

NEEDS 50%

WANTS 30%

APRIL 8, 2021

:

adult Activity 50/30/20 Rule

Wants

• Dining Out • Entertainment • Hobbies

INDEPENDENT.COM

Bank Statement Challenge: Review a recent bank/credit card statement to see how close you are to the 50/30/20 rule. Use highlighters to determine what items on your statement are needs, wants or goals. Coffee

-$3.50

Groceries

-$125.30

Gas

-$32.00

Coffee

-$3.50

Streaming Service

-$7.99

Drive-In Movie

-$42.75

Transfer to Savings Account

-$150.00

If you’re spending over 30% on wants, identify opportunities to make small changes. For example, reduce buying coffee from 5 times a week to 2 times a week.

Want more activities? Use the QR code or visit montecito.bank/FinLit


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volume 35, # 795, Apr. 8-15, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

Truth to Rumor

Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt Uses Science Facts to Overcome Vaccine Fears by Nick Welsh

SECOND FEATURE

SBIFF Mid-Fest Report

20

by Josef Woodard

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  12 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  13

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  29

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 ON THE COVER: Photo by Erick Madrid. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

MEET OUR VETERAN SBIFF CORRESPONDENT Our primary SBIFF correspondent Josef Woodard isn’t new to the film fest — in fact, he’s covered every single one since the annual event began in 1986. Since it kicked off on March 31, Woodard has been filing daily reports on independent.com/sbiff and presents a midfest wrap on page 20. He tells us more below.

PEGGY GROSSMAN

TABLE of CONTENTS

How has SBIFF changed? The festival has always had strong suits and much to offer, going back to the days of founding director Phyllis de Picciotto’s lead. It has really upped its game and bumped up in stature in the festival orbit during Roger Durling’s tenure at the helm. This year, needless to say, is a wild-card anomaly, but this chance to really dive in — at the drive-in and mostly on the home front — is a welcome break from the pandemic void, and a happy hint of an eventual return to regular programming, in life and the arts. What are your thoughts on this year’s pandemic pivots? This is a superchallenging time, in terms of reimagining what can be possible when so many of the old systems shut down — especially in the arts, which, ironically, amounts to a necessary healing and connecting force in this time. Film/TV has had an easier go of it, as a screen medium in the age of streaming and home entertainment gadgetry. Still, film fans desperately miss the roar and stink of the crowd in an actual theater, with actual strangers sharing an experience. INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

In honor of National Poetry Month and Earth Day, 3rd – 6th grade students from Mountain View Elementary, Montecito Union School, and Vieja Valley Elementary School worked with Cal Poets in the Schools, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, and the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden to create nature-themed poetry and art inspired by the monarch butterfly.

View the student artwork in the window of SBMA’s Museum Store now through April 30. SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART 1130 STATE STREET WWW.SBMA.NET

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“It’s Like Banking With Friends”

“I love American Riviera Bank. The level of service is very personalized. It’s like banking with friends that you trust.” — Sasha Ablitt, Owner Ablitt’s Fine Cleaners What does True Community Banking mean? It means working together to find solutions under even the most trying of circumstances. OWNER OCCUPIED REAL ESTATE LOANS | BUSINESS LINES OF CREDIT | EQUIPMENT LOANS

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APR. 1-8, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

YOUR TURN: Newly eligible Santa Barbara residents and workers lined up Tuesday at a Public Health–hosted vaccination clinic at the Hilton.

Santa Barbara Supervisors Grapple with Vaccine Equity Adjusted Case Rate Keeps County in Red Tier by Delaney Smith s more people become eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine, efforts to make the shots more equitable have taken center stage for Santa Barbara County. Due to a large volume of availability, eligibility opened up this week to those 16 and older at Pfizer clinics, the full list of which can be found at publichealthsbc.org/phd -vaccination-clinics. Many people, particularly those who live in the South County, have traveled to North County or even to other nearby counties to get their vaccine when local appointments were all booked.

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“It has been concerning to me to look at the numbers day in and day out, and there seems to be a growing gap between North and South County,” said 4th District Supervisor Bob Nelson on Tuesday. “If you just look at the numbers, in the north, we have about 20,000 people fully vaccinated, yet in the south, we have 47,000.” Nelson added that he didn’t blame others for traveling to North County for vaccines because they are looking out for their own interests. But 1st District Supervisor Das Williams disagreed.

He said the first thing to do in an emergency isn’t to “always think of ourselves first.” He said people contribute to the vaccine disparities when they’re “taking a drive to Dodger Stadium or Hanford or even into North County without regard to what the ramification is. The ramification is that brown people living in the North County are being left behind because they’re not vaccinated in as high numbers as my constituents in the south are.” But this leaves some in the south unsure where to get their dose. Just half an hour after lowering the age eligibility to 16 and older, vaccination appointments at the Santa Barbara Hilton two-day clinic were completely filled. Even with increased vaccine allocation from the federal government, there are more people eligible than there are vaccine appointments. Second District Supervisor Gregg Hart saw the issue differently because of this. “There is a dynamic in this event that’s a little different because everyone getting vaccinated as fast as possible — anyone getting vaccinated as fast as possible anywhere in the county — is helping everybody by reducing the spread of the virus,” Hart said. “Having empty appointments go unfilled isn’t in anyone’s interest.” This week, the county received 4,900 firstdose vaccines from the state. In addition, the federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) allocation brought 14,760 doses to five county health-care centers. It is with this larger allocation that the county is able to support its large community vaccination sites. Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso said that the county’s first weeklong HRSA clinic in Lompoc last week was successful and gave 8,314 first-dose appointments. So far, 138,000 county residents have been vaccinated, or 36 percent of adults in the county. Do-Reynoso also gave an update on the county’s status. The California Department CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

COURTS & CRIME

Suspects Arrested for March Eastside Shooting

S

anta Barbara police have arrested three people in connection with the March 29 shooting on the city’s Lower Eastside that killed 24-year-old Oxnard resident Jesus Espinoza-Maldonado. First responders found Espinoza-Maldonado gravely injured in a black SUV that was riddled with bullets and had crashed into a palm tree in the 1400 block of Eucalyptus Hill Road before catching fire. No one else was hurt. Police spokesperson Lt. Joshua Morton said two Santa Barbara juveniles, ages 15 and 17, have been booked at Juvenile Hall on murder charges with gang enhancements. Their names and other identifying information are being withheld due to their age.

A third suspect — 39-year-old city resident Irene Fernandez — was also arrested and charged with acting as an accessory to a felony as well as gang murder with use of a firearm. “The police department would like to thank the community members who assisted with the investigation, as well as the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Office for their help during the initial shooting,” said Morton in a statement. “Although arrests have been made, the investigation is still ongoing and no further details are being released at this time,” he went on. “Detectives would like to encourage anyone with information about this case to contact Santa Barbara Police Department detectives at (805) 897-2300.”

The shooting, which took place around 5:20 p.m. just below Salinas Street, marked the second time this year that deadly gunfire has erupted in the Eastside neighborhood. In January, two teens were shot and killed on Liberty Street one day before classes were scheduled to resume at Santa Barbara High School. That incident remains under investigation. Elsewhere in the county, two men were gunned down in February near Goleta as they attempted to sell a half pound of marijuana. A pair of alleged Santa Barbara gang members were arrested for the murders, and their arraignment is pending. —Tyler Hayden

ENVIRONMENT The near-quixotic quest to raise $20 million in four months to buy 100 acres of the San Marcos Foothills met its first $4 million goal on 3/24, said attorney Marc Chytilo, through a combination of a kicking social-media push, generosity from the community, and a loan through Montecito Bank & Trust. A new target of $5 million by 4/13 looms — bringing the necessary total to $9 million — and the Foothills Forever Fund (foothillsforever.org) needs a spark from the large donor community, “ideally a $3 million pledge that would kick us into viability,” said Chytilo, who represents the activists. As for the developer, Chuck Lande declined to press charges against the individuals arrested at a protest on 2/25, and the DA’s Office agreed on 4/5.

POLITICS The Democratic Central Committee endorsed all the incumbent candidates in this year’s Santa Barbara City Council race — all Democrats — with the notable exception of Democrat Eric Friedman, who has run afoul of some party activists by endorsing his mother, Celeste Barber, in last year’s election for SBCC Board of Trustees. Barber, a former SBCC instructor, enjoyed a brief moment on Fox News when she spoke up in 2019 in favor of keeping the Pledge of Allegiance. The issue of Friedman’s endorsement has been tabled until next month’s convocation of the party faithful.

CANNABIS DAN I E L DR E I FUSS FI LE PHOTO

JAC KSON F R I EDM AN

CORONAVIRUS

The Farmacy's Graham Farrar

Preliminary rankings were released 4/1 in the county’s search to select six cannabis storefronts for six unincorporated community areas. Of the 20 applicants who have made it to the final round, only the top-ranked applicant in each area will be able to apply for a cannabis dispensary business license. The Farmacy, which already has a dispensary on Mission Street, was ranked first in both areas it applied: Isla Vista and Santa Ynez. For the complete list, see cannabis.countyofsb.org/retail.sbc.

CORONAVIRUS Three S.B.-area community health centers will collectively receive $11.6 million in American Rescue Plan funds to expand their COVID-19 vaccination and treatment operations. American Indian Health & Services will get $1,517,875; S.B. Neighborhood Clinics, $4,911,875; and the county, $5,210,375. The health centers can use the funding to expand COVID vaccinations, testing, and treatment for vulnerable populations; deliver preventive and primary healthcare services to people at higher risk for COVID; and expand health centers’ operational capacity during the pandemic and beyond. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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APR. 1-8, 2021

COURTS & CRIME

COVID Defier Faces Criminal Charges

Locally Owned and Operated

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former police sergeant turned wine-bar owner is the first person in Santa Barbara County to be criminally charged with violating COVID-19 health orders. Kurt Hixenbaugh, 49, faces four misdeGOLETA VOTING US meanor counts for refusing to close Vino et Ave Orcutt, during 5757 Hollister Amicis, located in Old Town the statewide shutdown that was in effect this Mahatma 2# winter. Each charge carries a maximum penalty of six months in jail and/or a $1,000 fine.

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which could also revoke the location’s alcohol license. While Santa Barbara authorities had filed a handful of civil cases Springfield 8 previously oz. against businesses — mainly gyms — that had refused to close early in the pandemic, Hixenbaugh and Vino et Amicis are the first in the county to be criminally prosecuted. In December, Hixenbaugh made no secret of his intention to ignore the latest lockdown,

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by Sunidhi Sridhar n theory, the decennial undertaking of the U.S. Census seems easy enough: Make sure every person is accounted for, in the right place, exactly once. In practice, however, the elaborate and timeconsuming process is met with formidable obstacles, even in the best of times. As the past year saw millions of Americans face some of the most trying circumstances in recent memory, the 2020 U.S. Census called for added diligence and amplified GOLETAoutreach efforts to ensure that 5757 historically disenfranchised groups Hollister Ave of people, including houseless persons Mahatma 2# and undocumented immigrants, were LONG GRAIN includedRICE $ 99in the data used to redraw congressional district lines and allocate federal funding across the country. 

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declaring in a YouTube video that Governor Gavin Newsom’s stay-at-home order was misguided and unfair to small businesses. “We’re gonna defy that order,” he said in his six-minute statement. “We don’t agree with it. We think it’s time that people start taking a stand on this, and I hope others will follow.” Hixenbaugh emphasized that he knew COVID-19 was “real” and that it was “dangerous for certain people.” Even though the bar would remain open, Hixenbaugh said, he pledged to uphold social distancing and mask requirements and maintain a limited capacity. It was Newsom’s insistence on tying Santa Barbara County’s tier metrics to the rest of Southern California that frustrated him, Hixenbaugh said. “It doesn’t make sense,” he declared. Hixenbaugh goes on to falsely claim, however, that “the data doesn’t support that bars and restaurants are where you get COVID. There’s nothing to prove that.” Multiple studies, including one published by Johns Hopkins University and another by Stanford University, found a clear correlation between restaurant and bar openings and the spread of the virus. On his personal Facebook page, Hixenbaugh also frequently shares posts suggesting that people have been brainwashed into believing the dangers of COVID-19 and that the government’s health orders aren’t meant to protect but to lull the populace into a state of complacency and dependency. Hixenbaugh last made news reports in 2017 when, as a member of the San Luis Obispo Police Department, he publicly defended a colleague who claimed sexual assault victims frequently “conjured up” reports of rape after consuming too much alcohol. He blamed the media for taking his colleague’s statements out of context. Hixenbaugh has been ordered to appear in Santa Maria Superior Court on April 29 for an arraignment on his four misde—Tyler Hayden meanor charges.

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In order to encourage residents in “hard-to-count” areas to participate in the 2020 Census, Santa Barbara County officials and the Santa Barbara Foundation launched the Complete Count Committee (CCC) with “the goal of developing and implementing effective outreach strategies while maximizing resources.” By the end of the self-response window on October 15, 2020, the response rate in Santa Barbara County was 71.8 percent, up from 68.5 percent in 2010, ranking 13th out of the 58 counties in California.  “It was an extraordinary effort from everyone involved,” said 3rd District Supervisor Joan Hartmann at the Census report Tuesday. “It is really gratifying that we beat our numbers from the previous decade.”  CONT’D ON PAGE 10 


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D EDUCATION

S.B. Unified Schools to Reopen Full-Time in Person

RECYCLE YOUR USED OIL and FILTERS!

A

Remember, it’s illegal to dump motor oil in the trash or down the drain. Make sure to recycle oil and filters at a center near you.

DEL AN EY SMITH

District Also Gears Up for Summer School Programs

by Delaney Smith fter successfully reopening schools in a hybrid model, the Santa Barbara Unified School District will further reopen its schools full-time. Elementary schools will be open five days a week starting April 12, and secondary schools will open four days a week with one day of remote instruction starting April 19. The shift was able to happen in large part because the Public Health Department changed its guidelines Cynthia Esquivel’s kindergarten class at McKinley Elementary for schools from requiring students to sit six feet apart to only requiring them to sit three feet apart — allowing more room on campuses for students. For elementary schools, this change District staff also gave a presentation on the means going back to the pre-COVID sched- district’s working plans for learning recovule after operating at just two days a week in ery over the summer. person in the hybrid model. Students will Though secondary schools normally still have the same teachers they have now, offer summer school, elementary hasn’t. and the school day will look largely the way This year, there will be specialized summer it used to, except students and staff will be programs for students at each level to make following COVID protocol such as masking up for learning loss throughout the panand distancing. demic. The programs will prioritize students For secondary schools, classes are larger, with the most needs and invite them. and with multiple classes a day, it is more In high schools, the students that will be difficult to fully reopen campuses. Second- prioritized are those who need graduation ary schools will be reopening four days a credit recovery; in junior highs, students week, with Wednesday as a fully remote day. who need additional support in English Another reason the district is able to language arts or math are prioritized; and reopen schools so quickly is because they’ve in elementary schools, students who are proved to be a safe place to be. Frann Wage- earning 1 and 2s (out of 4) are prioritized. neck, assistant superintendent of Student In addition, foster youth, those who are Services, said that of the more than 5,117 housing insecure, and other vulnerable tests conducted in the district so far, there groups are prioritized for summer-school has been a 0.46 percent positive rate. The programs. district tests all employees biweekly, student The programs aim to keep students in athletes within 72 hours of their competi- small cohorts and to focus on the socialtions, and students and staff who are symp- emotional needs of the student along with academic needs. In elementary, the focus tomatic and request a test. Wageneck also shared that 79 percent will be on literacy, math, and language of employees are vaccinated or have an development. In junior high, the focus will appointment scheduled, and 10 percent are be on English language and math. In high looking to make an appointment — creat- school, the summer program will focus on ing a safer atmosphere to further reopen credit and learning recovery for graduation schools. Eleven percent declined a vaccine. and course completion. n

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VACCINE EQUITY CONT’D FROM P. 7 of Public Health just met its goal to administer four million vaccines to those living in the state’s most vulnerable neighborhoods. Because it reached its goal, the standard for entering the red tier will be widened to 6-10 new cases per 100,000 residents — rather than its previous requirement of 4-10. The county would have placed out of the red tier last week when its adjusted case rate was 5.3; however, it has since jumped to 6.8 and is now still in the red tier. Do-Reynoso said the uptick is likely a result of reopening. She also said they are seeing higher than average numbers

of cases in 20-year-olds and in people who identify as college students for their occupation. In addition, she is currently seeing an increase in cases among white residents, although Latinos still make up the majority of cases. Though Do-Reynoso didn’t mention it at the Tuesday meeting, Governor Gavin Newsom announced earlier in the day that California is aiming to fully reopen its economy June 15, though the date isn’t set in stone. It all depends on the state getting a sufficient vaccine supply and having a low number of people hospitalized with n COVID-19.

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he Board of Supervisors passed a resolution Tuesday declaring racism a public health emergency in Santa Barbara County and illustrating the tangible health effects associated with systemic racism. “Over the past year, more than any other time in my professional life, I have heard from our community members of color about their experiences, concerns, and challenges,” said 2nd REACHING FOR RACIAL EQUITY: Supervisor Gregg Hart (above) said the District Supervisor Gregg content of the resolution helps to identify the racial inequities the county Hart. “I’ve also heard must confront directly. dreams and visions about how our community can be a better place However, Kym Paszkeicz, part of the leadership of Showing up for Racial for all of us if racial equity is achieved.” Hart, who said the content of the Justice Santa Barbara, encouraged resolution helps to identify the inequities supervisors to consider that the language the county must confront directly, brought of the resolution was vague and lacked the resolution to the board with 1st District actionable items. She also said the Supervisor Das Williams. Williams said measures were limited to just health he was particularly concerned that early inequities when racism affects every childhood experiences for people of color department, and the county lacks the and poor people can have major health infrastructure to support the resolution. consequences, as large as reducing one’s One supervisor, the 4th District’s lifespan by 20 years. Bob Nelson, disagreed with language “To me it is a gritty fact that being in the resolution. “I’m not denying the a person of color, especially when inequities or the racism that has occurred combined with being poor, is dangerous in our country,” Nelson said. “It is tragic, for your health,” Williams said. “Twenty and I know it does have a ripple effect, percent of the children who have lost a but I guess where I’m coming from is I parent to COVID are Black — a number don’t necessarily believe that all these so wildly out of proportion with their structures are inherently racist.” share of the population.” His fellow supervisors took turns About a dozen people, including giving examples of structural racism to several community leaders, spoke Nelson, but ultimately he didn’t buy it out during public comment about the and abstained from voting. —Delaney Smith resolution — nearly all in support. DAN I EL DR EI FUSS F I LE PHOTO

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The committee, which consisted of 100 representatives from public, private, and nonprofit sectors, received $494,000 from the state government and an additional $366,000 from the Santa Barbara Foundation. Their plan, approved by the state in November 2019, established four objectives, including to engage community resources, to increase community awareness and trust, to eliminate systemic barriers, and to engage with “hard-to-reach” communities. As the statewide lockdown due to COVID-19 forced county officials to cancel all in-person events and adapt to social distancing guidelines, the committee virtually supplemented outreach efforts with expanded use of social media, online outreach, and a media advertising campaign. In addition to the questionnaire being made available by mail, by phone, and

online, multilingual flyers directing residents to the Census website were posted around the county and traditional doorto-door canvassing was replaced with phone canvassing and door-drop campaigns. Census caravans, or multi-vehicle mobile outreach operations, were also used as a new way to reach marginalized or vulnerable groups of people. Of the total budget, 50 percent of the funding was spent on grants to local agencies and coalitions to conduct Census outreach and activities with an additional 39 percent put toward project management and advertising. The remaining 11 percent was spent on web production and marketing collateral. The board unanimously passed a measure to file a wrap-up report of the Census 2020 Complete Count in Santa Barbara County. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

Rainfall at ‘All-Time Low’

W

ith drought-like conditions looming large over the entire state, Santa Barbara County is reporting its lowest 10-year average for rainfall ever. “We’re at an all-time low,” said Tom Fayram, county Water Agency director. Fayram acknowledged the numbers are less dramatic if only the last seven years are counted. Two weeks ago, statewide managers of the State Water Project put participating water agencies on notice they could count on deliveries of only 5 percent of the water to which they are contractually entitled. For agencies south of the Sacramento Delta, they were told they could not expect even that “until further notice.” Making matters worse, Fayram added, most groundwater basins throughout the county have not managed to replenish their supplies to pre-drought levels yet. The larger the groundwater basin, it turns out, the bigger the gap. Even worse, he said, is that much of the water in Lake Cachuma — about 62 percent full — is already spoken for. For example, the City of Santa Barbara has managed to “bank” nearly three years’ worth of its Cachuma allotments by relying on its new desalination plant instead. Thanks to the desal plant, the City of Santa Barbara is sitting relatively pretty,

its aquifers much better off than neighboring Goleta or Carpinteria, for example. Drought conditions vary dramatically; while Ventura County has received just 3.5 inches of rainfall thus far, Santa Barbara reported 10 inches of rainfall at its Gibraltar Reservoir. Even so, it is empty. The debate over just how empty the county’s collective water glass is will no doubt be a factor in the battle between the county supervisors — acting as the fiscal agent for the State Water Project — and all the individual water agencies throughout the county drawing from it. At issue is an arcane but critical measure that has everything to do with the buying and selling of state water entitlements. Fayram and the county supervisors are opposing a measure that would allow individual water agencies to sell their state water rights to entities outside the county and to the highest bidder. That, said Fayram, has never been allowed before. But that makes the county Water Agency the only entity south of the Delta to oppose the provision. In fact, all Santa Barbara water agencies drawing on the State Water Project insist the right to buy and sell water throughout the state is the only thing that’s kept their customers from drying —Nick Welsh out during the drought.

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SBCC Admin on Leave for Controversial Comments

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COU RTESY

high-ranking Santa Barbara Community College administrator, Joyce Coleman, was placed on administrative leave pending an investigation of allegations that she made remarks offensive to members of the Asian-American and Pacific Islander communities and their supporters on campus. Coleman, who took over as vice president of SBCC’s Extended Learning program in December 2020, finds herself embroiled over comments she reportedly made at a meeting of the school’s Equal Opportunity Advisory Committee on March 23 in response to the formation of a new campus affinity group on behalf of Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders. This group was Joyce Coleman formed in the wake of the recent mass shooting in Atlanta that claimed the lives of six Asian people and a stark increase in the number of attacks on people of Asian descent. The complaint alleges Coleman, who is Black, reportedly greeted news of the new group’s formation with the words, “About time,” and then described having visited an internment camp for Japanese and JapaneseAmerican people during World War II and wondering why the prisoners there “did not just leave,” given how small the fence was. By

contrast, Coleman allegedly noted, AfricanAmerican slaves formed the Underground Railroad and actively resisted. Some campus faculty and staff took offense to what they described as “victim blaming,” charging that she inflicted “great harm” by her words and actions. Coleman said she agreed not to comment until the investigation is concluded. Coleman grew up in the segregated South, earning degrees in criminology and sociology before embarking on a 28-year career with various community colleges throughout Oregon, California, and Minnesota. When she was selected to the post as vice president of Extended Education — which includes a wide range of adult education programs including GED and ESL — she expressed confidence that SBCC President Utpal Goswami shared her commitment to equity, inclusion, and diversity and that these words — for him and for her — were more than catchy phrases. In a statement to the Independent, SBCC spokesperson Luz Reyes-Martín said, “SBCC takes this incident and the reported comments very seriously. Superintendent/ President Dr. Goswami promptly reached out directly to impacted members of the campus community and other campus groups. He communicated to the campus that ‘SBCC aspires to be a welcoming and equitable community’ and that this ‘requires us to hold ourselves to high standards and work toward building a community that supports each other.’ ” —NW INDEPENDENT.COM

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

One Very Disturbed Dog

BAD NEWS: It was yet another Zoom meeting. On the line was the mental-health brain trust for pretty much the whole South Coast — high-ranking administrators from Cottage Health and the county’s Department of Behavioral Wellness, a smattering of

frontline workers who deal intimately with those in the throes of crisis and despair, and, of course, the usual coterie of mental-health advocates. These advocates are the unsatisfied customers of a system even the most bureaucratically savvy find impossible to navigate. It was one of many such meetings regularly held to ensure that everyone experiencing a psychiatric crisis is enveloped in the comforting embrace of “wrap-around services” — in the lingo of the profession — and that all “handoffs” are unfailingly “warm.” The meeting — held about a month ago — started out bumpy enough. Cottage Emergency Room workers were really frustrated and upset. During the pandemic,

the ER has been overwhelmed by the high number of involuntary mental-health holds called 5150s — patients deemed a potential danger to themselves or others. They wanted answers to some critical questions. Who was the Behavioral Wellness person they should contact when releasing people whose acuity had subsided just enough to no longer qualify as 5150? What about people who relied on CenCal or MediCal for their insurance — in other words, poor people? What were they

supposed to do with people whose 72-hour holds had expired? The meeting got bumpier still when Isabell Nava joined the meeting. Her 25-year-old grandson had checked himself into the Cottage ER five times in psychiatric distress back in October, she said. He was paralyzed by crippling anxiety. He was hearing voices telling him to hurt himself. He got prescribed medications. On one visit, he was sent to the county’s Crisis Stabilization Unit but then sent back to the ER for medical attention. But what he did not get was placed in a qualified facility treating people needing acute care. There’s not much room in that inn. Instead, he went home and on October 14 stabbed himself 43 times. Then he cut his throat. “You didn’t do what you were supposed to do,” Nava charged. “If we don’t put him behind bars, you release him,” she said. “And if you put him behind bars, then he is treated like an animal.” The facts, no doubt, are more complicated. They always are. Some people just can’t or won’t be helped. But one thing is absolutely certain: Nava’s grandson was asking for help. He was pleading. The real mystery is that such tragedies don’t happen more often. The number of 5150 holds referred to the Cottage ER between last March and October was up 58 percent from the year before. COVID, anyone? The average length of stay for each case increased from 20 hours to almost 29. You try juggling that.

The underlying problem is not one of indifference or incompetence; it’s that there simply are not enough rooms where people experiencing acute distress can be safely placed.

The numbers have undeniably improved in the past six years, but not nearly enough to meet the growing demand. This, unfortunately, is nothing new. Generations of grand jury reports have waxed apoplectic on this problem. The definition of insanity, it turns out, isn’t doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. It’s not doing the same thing over and expecting different results. That was the bad news.  The good news, as usual, was the County Sheriff’s co-response program, in which deputy sheriffs trained in the gentle arts of deescalation accompany clinical case workers out into the field to respond to mental-health-crisis calls. Such calls, typically, are very time-consuming. And they can explode. A disproportionate number of these calls have ended with law enforcement using force, sometimes fatally. In our current post-George Floyd moment, when everyone claims to want to “reimagine” law enforcement, co-response is the best program we currently have going. In 2020, the Sheriff’s Office fielded 2,989 mental-healthcrisis calls. Of those, the co-response team handled 1,606. Of those, fewer than 20 resulted in an arrest.  Co-response may not be perfect, but it helps keep people out of the criminal justice system who should never get into it. It helps prevent

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deadly eruptions of violence against those in acute distress. And it frees up people who wear badges so they can do other things. Naturally, there is a fly in the ointment — more than one. For starters, the guy currently running the county’s crisis response team — which includes the co-response team — just turned in his notice this Wednesday. Conspicuously, he does not have another job lined up. Not a good sign. Then the psychiatric social worker assigned to the Santa Barbara Police Department’s coresponse unit has also just quit. She, I am told, also left without having already secured another job. Another sign of concern.  On top of that, Pam Fisher, the Number Two at Behavioral Wellness, is also leaving, though in her case it is to retire. Fisher happens to be in charge of the guy who’s in charge of the department’s crisis response effort. That’s three levels of crisis response out the door in one fell swoop.  I have, of course, been assured there’s no cause for alarm. I don’t happen to believe that. Nor should the county supervisors. This coming Monday, April 12, the Board of Supervisors will begin discussing this year’s proposed budget. For the first time, they will seriously consider people can be diverted from the county jail and the entire criminal justice system. This is the time to ask a lot of questions about the co-response program. Maybe you should show up, too. After all, it’s —Nick Welsh just another Zoom meeting.

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obituaries

OPINIONS CONT’D

ED WEXLER, C AGLEC ARTOONS.COM

Letters

Another View

I

have known Amanda Rowan for many years, first as a student and later as an active and supportive member of my synagogue and its board of directors. I know her as a person with a deep sense of integrity and honesty. Her perspectives are always insightful and built on a well-honed understanding of the situation at hand gained by diligent investigation. My synagogue went through a challenging period with divisive leadership spreading innuendoes and false accusations. They also kept some of their darker motivations well below the surface. Amanda was one of the first to countermand their efforts, speaking truth to those in power. She was always highly articulate and direct in what she said and wrote regarding our difficulties both with lay leadership and me. I always appreciated her candor. Amanda is a person who wears her heart on her sleeve, a passionate defender of what she knows is right. Amanda Rowan is an unswerving advocate for what is fair and just. She has nothing in mind but the best for her community. Amanda acts with righteous purpose with those who play loosely with their bully pulpits, communal responsibilities, and privilege. She demands the same adherence to morality and ethics from herself that she asks from others. One thing for sure, Amanda does not wait to be called upon to set things right. She knows that injustices take root quickly, and the longer one delays, the deeper those roots become. Those striving for justice and equity can count on Amanda to step up with them and for them. Anyone who has her support is truly blessed. —Rabbi Neil Comess-Daniels, Los Angeles

Seaside Band Shell, Yes!

Bringing the Plaza del Mar band shell back to life sparked interest among Facebook readers: Nick Montoya [Volt per Octaves] Yes! This would be great. I’ve wanted to play this venue for decades. I’d love to get involved to help make it happen. • Robin Unander-La Berge Adelante

Charter School has used this park and the band shell for our annual Diá de los Muertos event for the past few years (2020 excluded). We love this location for our festival and are excited the city is putting money into its restoration. • Dan Seibert Great idea to have music, but who says it needs repair? Oh yeah, the city. They want to spend a half million on it while musicians could use it right now, as is, and save us $500K. Adam Phillips [Folk Orchestra of S.B.] So I’m actually the guy that got this all started back in June. I got ahold of Jill Zachary [head of Parks & Rec] and got a meeting, thinking it just needed a couple boards and a paint job. I thought, “I can raise a few grand and get this going.” Ha ha. It is truly unsafe right now. Lots of rotten boards in the stage floor, and the roof in the back has a massive hole that has rotted other things in the structure. I know because I went back there with the parks manager. No one besides us had been back there in years, and it needs a lot of work. Josie Tores A great place for outdoor theater. El Teatro de la Esperanza de S.B. performed their last show there. It was well attended, and director José Guadalupe Saucedo did a fabulous job along with his actress and actors. It was teamwork that made the dream work. We need that again: community unity. • Jim Eaton Fantastic news, maybe some comedy, as well. • Eric Heidner I’d love to see our S.B. Trombone Society quartet play there sometime — or even the full SBCC Trombone Choir. • Dylan Aguilera I’d love to take SBHS bands to play here. Lynda Martin My friend and I used to plop a boom box down, toss some baby powder on the concrete, and practice our swing dance moves in the shell for hours. The acoustics were amazing, and the park people would sometimes clap.

For the Record

¶ The shooting covered in last week’s news section took place on Eucalyptus Hill Road near Salinas Street, not in the Eucalyptus Hill neighborhood.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

William Walling 1926 - 2021

We lost a great man. William Walling passed away in Santa Barbara in January at the age of 94. He leaves behind his daughter and son-in-law Elizabeth and Victor, grandson Vittorio William, sister-in-law and brother-in law Joan and Baxter, and many beloved nieces and nephews. Bill was predeceased by his wife Judith, and daughters Julia and Jill. He missed them terribly and it comforts us to think they are now reunited. Bill was loving, kind, funny, curious, and had a wide-ranging knowledge of so many things, from classical music to the history of ancient Rome. He worked as an aerospace engineer, retired, then enjoyed a second career as a technical writer in Silicon Valley. Besides his family, his great passion was always writing. After many years of having short science fiction stories featured in Analog and Fantasy and Science Fiction his novel No One Goes There Now was published by Doubleday in 1971. He went on to write more than a dozen published works of science and historical fiction, and continued writing up to the time of his death. Bill was just putting the finishing touches on his last book, The Stockholder, which will be published posthumously. His tonguein-cheek writing mantra, always posted somewhere near his typewriter and later computer, was “Eschew Obfuscation”.  Bill was born in Denver to Sophia and HerINDEPENDENT.COM

bert Walling. In the late 1920s he and his family ventured over the Rockies in a Model T to settle in the San Fernando Valley. An only child, Bill became best friends with two boys at school, Bill and John – they truly became his brothers when Bill Walling married John’s sister Judy, and friend Bill married another of John’s sisters, Mary.  After high school Bill entered the US Army Air Forces, not long before the end of WWII. He attended USC then UCLA on the GI Bill, graduating from UCLA - he was a lifelong Bruins football fan. One day at UCLA Bill ran into Judy, his friend John’s kid sister all grown up, and her sister Mary. Bill and Judy married in 1952, and raised their three daughters in the San Fernando Valley until Lockheed transferred him to the Bay Area in 1964. He soon became a diehard 49ers devotee, and loved taking his family on trips across California and the Western US in Farnsworth, his trusty classic 1966 red-andwhite VW bus. One of his more interesting jobs at Lockheed was being part of a five-year secret assignment to raise and recover a Soviet sub that sank in the northwest Pacific.  Bill and Judy lived in Sunnyvale until Judy’s passing in 2011, when he moved to Santa Barbara to be near daughter Liz. As much as he missed Judy it was a good new chapter for him. He enjoyed living in his cottage home at the Samarkand and the many friends he made there. Sunday dinners with Liz, Victor, Vittorio and friends became a fine new tradition. We will miss him and love him forever.

APRIL 8, 2021

Continued on p.14 THE INDEPENDENT

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obituaries Peter Bryce Appleton 1943 - 2021

Peter Bryce Appleton died peacefully after extended illness, surrounded by his children on February 20, 2020. He was 76. Born in 1943, Bryce was the first child of Francis Henry Appleton III and Ariel Bryce Appleton. He grew up in Los Angeles and Southeastern Arizona. As the grandson of Peter and Angelica Bryce, who built one of the first estates on Hope Ranch, Santa Barbara was an often-frequented place while growing up. He followed family tradition and attended east coast schools, graduating from St. Mark’s School, Yale College, University of Connecticut Law School, and Harvard Business School. Bryce moved around but found a home in Santa Barbara, Crested Butte, CO, and Tucson, AZ. He primarily worked in the airline industry which combined his passion for flying with his love of building teams and starting, operating, and fixing companies. Later in his career, Bryce was a consultant and coach to various corporations on strategy, leadership effectiveness, and general management. Throughout his life, Bryce was passionate about the environment and land conservation. He contributed his time and leadership to several non-profit organizations focused on conservation and sustainability. Bryce was a regular on tennis courts throughout his life and made many friends through the sport. His love for tennis started in Santa Barbara when he learned to play on the municipal courts as a teenager. Bryce was devoted to family and delighted in reaching out to people of all walks of life. He touched many and always made people feel special and appreciated. He is deeply missed. Survived by his daughters Amy, Sarah with partner Nicolas Maillet, son Nathan and wife Heidi, brother Marc, sisters Lynnie and Lili, three loving grandchildren, and extended family. 14

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Donations can be made in his name to the following: Heal the Ocean or Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation

James William Shaw, MD 9/16/1939 - 3/22/2021

Jim passed away quickly and peacefully with his wife Patti by his side. He had a long struggle with Alzheimer’s Disease. He was born in Washington, DC to James and Sylvia Shaw. He followed in his father’s footsteps and became a physician after attending Eastern Michigan University and graduating from University of Michigan Medical School. He moved to Los Angeles for his internship, residency and fellowship at L.A. County/USC Medical Center. While in L.A. he met his wife Patti, who he was happily married to for 54 years. Daughter Kristin was born in 1969. After moving to Santa Barbara in 1973, he set up a private practice as an internist/endocrinologist. Son Mark was born in 1974. He was a well respected physician in Santa Barbara for over 30 years. He was president of the Santa Barbara Medical Society and a member of the Santa Barbara Yacht Club and his beloved WLPA cycling club. Jim was a life-long avid outdoorsman, enjoying backpacking, fishing, sailing, skiing, cycling and golf. Woodworking was another passion of his, it gave him such joy making furniture in his workshop for friends and family. He had a generous heart and was always willing to help a friend in need. He loved being with his children and grandchildren in San Francisco and Marin. He is survived by his wife Patti, daughter Kristin ( Jim ), son Mark ( Kate ), grandchildren Madison, Alexander, Scottie and Ryan, sister Sandra, and sister-in-law Ginny Fraser ( Stu ).

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The world has lost a genuinely good, humble man. We would like to thank the wonderful staff and caregivers in the Grove at Valle Verde and Assisted Hospice. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Cure Alzheimer’s Fund or Assistance League of Santa Barbara.

Nebhut “Neb” Lowe Smith Jr. 6/7/1941 - 3/10/2021

Nebhut Lowe Smith Junior, known as Neb among friends and family, died peacefully at his home in Santa Barbara on March 10, 2021, age 75, of leukemia. Born to Nebhut and Margaret Smith on June 7, 1945 in Beverly Hills, Neb grew up in the communities of Mar Vista and Rossmoor where he surfed and swam the days of his youth away, often with his brother Tommy in tow. He arrived in Santa Barbara as a freshman at UCSB where he was assigned to roommate with Phillip Smith who has been his best friend from then onward. Neb and Phil became pledge brothers at Phi Kappa Psi fraternity and left their mark on Isla Vista in the ’60s. Neb ultimately went on to earn his MBA from Cal State Long Beach and a landed a job as an Accounting Systems Specialist for the County of Santa Barbara. That assignment didn’t last long as a government job didn’t jive well with his hippie spirit, and they wouldn’t let him wear Birkenstocks to work, so he became a property manager and one

of Santa Barbara’s coolest landlords. Neb’s passion for living life to the fullest was contagious to all around him, and he was a true free spirit. His answer to most questions was “No problem” and Neb maintained a peaceful vibe in work and play. Neb was a hands-on single father for his only child, sharing his love of nature as he often took Lorelei sailing, skiing and camping. Traveling to Hawaii, Thailand and the Philippines, Neb scuba dove in some of the most beautiful places around the world. Neb valued experiencing the food, the people, and the music wherever he travelled. Neb always knew which local band was playing where. He leaves behind several dance trophies his long legs and fancy feet earned him. Right up until he was diagnosed with leukemia, Neb was a regular at Gold’s Gym taking daily classes from his favorite instructors. He was doing yoga before it was mainstream. Often in the middle of some DIY home or yard project, Neb considered Crocs an appropriate closed-toe shoe for any job site. Neb married Raveewan “Wan” Livesley in 2000 and they remained inseparable until the end as she lovingly nursed him through his brief hospice care. Together they took more than 15 trips to Thailand and visited dozens of US National Parks. They were avid supporters of local arts, regularly participating in First Thursday and attended performances at all the local high schools. You might have known Neb from the Santa Barbara Ski Club in the ’80s, or as a volunteer with the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in the early 2000s. More recently, he was an active member of the Santa Barbara Horticultural Society. Neb is survived by his wife Raveewan, his brother Tom, his daughter Lorelei, son inlaw Shawn, grandsons Tyler and Gavin, his step-sons Kip and Tony Livesley and stepgranddaughters Mali and Leila, and his extended family in Oregon.

Virginia L. Marquez 11/28/1929 - 3/7/2021

On March 7th 2021 God created another angel when He called our mother Virginia L. Marquez home. Virginia was born in Colton, CA on November 28, 1929. As a child she moved with her family to Santa Barbara where she attended local schools. Virginia married the love of her life Manuel R. Marquez on Sept. 5th 1953. They were married for 48 years until Manuel’s passing in 2001, but are now reunited at the Big Family Dinner Table in Heaven. Known for her beautiful voice, Virginia began singing in the choir and as soloist for the 1st Mexican Baptist Church of Santa Barbara at age 14. She was always accompanied by her mother Lucy Ramirez on piano. Virginia sang for many weddings and church conventions throughout CA, and was a soloist for Welch, Ryce, Haider funeral homes. Virginia’s hobbies were gardening, sewing, adding to her 200+ Christmas nutcracker collection, and traveling with Manuel upon his retirement. Virginia was preceded in death by her mother Lucy V. Ramirez, step-father Simon N. Ramirez, and brother Arthur C. Fernandez. She is survived by her children Brian R. Marquez of Palm Dessert (Tim Mielcarck), Colleen E. Marquez, Tricia G. Marquez, and grandson Kyle A. Marquez of Santa Barbara. A large extended family of in-laws, cousins, nephews, and nieces who miss her greatly, but as a family of Faith, we know we will all be together again with our Lord Jesus Christ!! The Marquez family would like to express many special thanks to our family, friends, and neighbors for their love and support during this time, to Dr. Stanley McLain, Dr. Linda Chen, Dr. Brett Simon, and all of Sansum Clinic who provided excellent and loving care over the years, and to the Assisted Hospice Team for their support and care of Virginia in her last days. Due to Covid restrictions services will be private.


obituaries Arthur Wayne Nelson 9/16/1928 - 3/23/2021

Arthur Wayne Nelson, beloved father and grandfather, was suddenly taken home to the presence of his Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ on March 23, 2021. Arthur was born September 16,1928 to Harry and Edith Nelson in Kingsburg, CA. The family later moved to Santa Maria, CA. where he attended local schools and worked in his father’s auto shop as a mechanic. He graduated from Santa Maria High and Santa Maria Junior College earning an Associate of Arts Degree in Natural Science. Arthur came to Santa Barbara, CA. to attend Westmont College and graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Science in 1952. This is where he met his beloved wife, Martha Patterson Nelson, who passed away in 2007. Immediately after graduation, he was called to serve with the Armed Forces and entered the U.S. Army Vehicle Mechanics School at Fort Ord, CA. where he graduated with honors. He served as a corporal with the U. S. Army, 28th Infantry Division, 110th Regiment until May1954, during the occupation of Germany. Upon his return, Arthur Wayne and Martha married in July of 1954. He then obtained his Master’s Degree in Social Welfare at UCLA in 1957. Their daughter Catherine was born in 1959. He began his career in 1957 with the Santa Barbara County Welfare Department (now known as the Department of Social Services), and also held part-time positions at UCSB and Westmont College for 30 years, teaching classes in social and child welfare. In addition, he served on numerous boards and

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committees, co-authored published articles and State Legislative recommendations, and was active in the community and his church. He also was the recipient of numerous awards and recognitions including a Letter of Appreciation from Governor Ronald Reagan in 1972, the Honorary Paul Harris Fellow Award from the Santa Barbara Rotary Club in 1997, a Lifetime Achievement Award from the NASW, CA Chapter, and a Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition in 2010. During his decades of dedication to his career and his community, he was highly regarded for his professionalism, and also known for being an approachable boss, advisor, and role model. Most of all, however, he was dedicated to his family, his faith, and his friends, and was appreciated for who he was – quiet, kind, thoughtful, patient, abundantly generous; he was a man of deep convictions, good humor, and had a gift for conversation. He was an attentive and giving spouse, father, and grandfather showing his love through faithful commitment and thoughtful actions. He was also a skillful mechanic with hobbies from boyhood on, which included classic cars, boats, and listening to Big Band music. Whether driving a ski boat at the church junior high camps, or giving rides to friends in his classic cars for fun or fundraisers, he was in his element. In recent years, he particularly enjoyed teaching his grandson Cory how to rebuild the engine of the family’s 1965 Chevrolet Malibu Super Sport 327, a car Cory then drove during his high school years. Retirement highlights included first trips to Hawaii and, with cousin Grace, a cruise to Alaska, and a special return trip to Yosemite Valley to share his childhood memories with his daughter and grandson. Other events included attending Cory’s college gradu-

ation at Long Beach State in 2017, and a memorable trip to Washington D.C. in September 2019 made possible by Honor Flight Central Coast, with Cory serving as his “Guardian.” He cherished the opportunity to welcome Cory home at the SB Airport last year with a salute, after Cory graduated Army Basic Training at Fort Sill, OK. with honors, and AIT graduation at Fort Jackson, SC., awarded Soldier of the Cycle. Even into his 90’s, Arthur enjoyed walking Shoreline Park, riding his bike at the beach, attending musical concerts at Westmont College, gathering weekly for Sunday church services, dining with family, friends, and former colleagues, and line dancing at The Samarkand. He lived life fully and humbly, and was a great example to so many. He is survived by his daughter Catherine Nelson, LCSW, and his grandson, SPC Cory J. Nelson, Religious Affairs Specialist, U.S. Army Reserve, each of whom has followed in his footsteps– Catherine with a career in social work having completed the same graduate degree at UCLA as her father received in 1957, and Cory with service overseas. He is also survived by his cousins, Grace Kyle of Orcutt, CA. and her family, and Edna Mae Goble of Sacramento, CA. and her family, and by Martha’s cousins in the Grimm and Greatbanks families. He will be deeply missed as a beloved father, grandfather, cousin, and friend. A special thank you to the Samarkand Community, Montecito Covenant Church, the Westmont College Community, the County DSS Community, Honor FlightCentral Coast, Dr. Kari Mathison, Dr. Zisman, Dr. Goyal, Dr. Lam, Dr. Lash, SBCH staff, and to our family and friends for their support. A private service with limited seating will be held Saturday April 10, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. at Montecito Covenant Church, and livestreamed on

the MCC YouTube channel. A Celebration of Life and the Military Funeral Honors Ceremony will be arranged for next year at this time, and we welcome all to attend. In lieu of flowers, a memorial contribution may be made to: Montecito Covenant Church, Westmont College, Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, or to Honor FlightCentral Coast. Arrangements by Welch-Ryce-Haider.

Malcolm L. Cobb

8/9/1937 - 1/13/2021

Malcolm (known to most as “Mal”) Cobb passed peacefully on January 13, 2021 at Villa Alamar in Santa Barbara. We are thankful for his presence in our lives. Mal was born in the small town of Brawley, California where he lived with his parents until they relocated to San Diego, CA in 1953. Mal graduated for San Diego High School and later San Diego State University having earned a degree in Business Administration. He served in the Army and received an honorable discharge. He began his career with the California Department of Employment in 1962 and rose quickly to become Manager of its Santa Barbara Office in 1966. In 1969 he was loaned to the US Dept of Labor to represent the government in the Lyndon Johnson new government/business partnership. The National Alliance of Business. For the next ten INDEPENDENT.COM

years Mal worked with business leaders in the tri-counties seeking solutions for the hard to employ. He returned as Manager of the Santa Barbara office overseeing services to employers, workers and job seekers until his retirement in 1995. Mal was well known and widely respected for his involvement in many nonprofit organizations related to personnel and job training. He created the Santa Barbara Youth Employment Service which was recognized by the State for its innovative and successful approach to finding jobs for the youth of Santa Barbara. He began the Santa Barbara Employer Advisory Council and was a member and served on the boards of Work Inc., Industry Education Council, The Santa Barbara Personnel Association and the Work Force Development Board. Mal was a devoted father to two girls, Catherine Cobb and Carrie Cobb. He also enjoyed the companionship of a granddaughter, Hannah Cobb, daughter of Carrie Cobb. Catherine, predeceased Mal having passed in December 2019. He was also devoted to his younger brother, Roy Cobb. They had a very special bond between them. Mal loved to go camping and fishing with his tow girls and later with his granddaughter. He was proud of achieving the rank of Eagle Scout and being a Life Guard. He served as a former officer of the Santa Barbara Elks Lodge 613. He was a big believer in giving back to the community. A celebration of life will be held at a later date. He will be missed by all who knew him.

APRIL 8, 2021

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Truth to Rumor

O

ver the years, Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt has

was vaccinated — and the Fulton County Medical Examiner’s office is that an examination of Aaron’s body showed no evidence of an allergic reaction or any “reaction to any substance which might be attributable to recent vaccine distribution.” Mostly, Lyons-Pruitt said, she’s not encountering tidal waves of resistance; to the extent there’s hesitancy out there, she said it’s of the wait-and-see variety. But with the presence of variants throughout Santa Barbara County now well documented — and the disproportionately high incidence of comorbidities among people of color — delay and deliberation are luxuries few can afford. Because of variants, public health experts warn, it will be harder to achieve herd immunity; instead of 70 percent inoculation rates, they now contend the threshold for vaccination Regional NAACP director Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt is a major player on a task force working to close the COVID gap. will be 85 percent. Should those numbers prove accurate, that makes the issue of cine became available in December. She no longer goes “vaccine hesitancy” all the more urgent. that route. “Now, I just give them the information and try to answer their questions,” she said. “I shouldn’t have to tell my story to scare them into making a decision.” The real problem for people of all races Still, it’s a scary story. Essie stayed in Mississippi, where — until recently — has been lack of sup- she worked as a senior administrator at a residential facility ply. That and the exasperation many people for those with mental disabilities. Lyons-Pruitt had always have experienced attempting to navigate assumed the facility where her sister worked had been shut the online application process to secure down by the pandemic. She found out otherwise only a an appointment. When a new shipment of week before her sister died. Essie, Lyons-Pruitt said, laughed vaccine arrives in Santa Barbara County, off her concerns at the time, stating all precautions — temLyons-Pruitt works to get people with lim- peratures, social distancing — were being taken. There was an outbreak at the home, and Essie experiited tech savvy signed up with CVS or Rite by Nick Welsh Aid. enced symptoms severe enough to warrant hospitalization. Mostly, she spends her time reaching out There, she tested negative for COVID but was treated for to pastors of Black churches in hopes that dehydration and released. Relatives, alarmed by the perimmortal Henry “Hank” Aaron. “I just try to get them the they, in turn, will encourage their own congregations to get sistence of Essie’s symptoms, took her to another hospital, real information,” she said. Aaron died peacefully in his vaccinated. Or speaking via Zoom at various Town Hall where this time she tested positive and was treated for nearly sleep on January 22, 17 days after having received his second forums organized by the County Public Health Department. five days. She was released with oxygen only when she could dose. Anti-vaxxers, like Robert Kennedy Jr., seized upon Or finding credible sources of information so that those hold down fluids. For nearly three days, she did fine. But this time proximity to suggest Aaron — who had sought with doubts can make up their own minds. “I try to get them when Essie tried returning to work, she had to return home; to bridge the gap in vaccine acceptance between Black and the latest scientific research,” she said. she couldn’t hold food or fluids down, and breathing was a white Americans — had been done in by his final injection. Early on, she would say, “I wish my sister had had that struggle. A few days later, she was dead. The real information, at least according to officials with the opportunity,” referring to her younger sister, Essie, who “She died with oxygen on her,” Lyons-Pruitt recounted. Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta — where Aaron died of COVID early last August, months before the vac- “It was devastating.” heard pretty much everything. For more than three decades, she functioned as both investigator and chief investigator with the Santa Barbara Public Defender’s Office, during which time she worked intimately with people charged with extremely serious crimes. Some, it turns out, were extremely guilty; some only partially so; and others, it also turns out, were actually and factually innocent. Either way, it was Lyons-Pruitt’s job to make sure they all got the best defense the Public Defender’s Office could possibly give. Today, Lyons-Pruitt — president of the Santa Maria and Lompoc chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) — is a major player in a multipronged, multicultural task force created to make sure people of color get vaccinated against COVID-19 in Santa Barbara County. And she’s still hearing pretty much everything. “One woman I talked with told me she heard 500 people died after taking the vaccine in Los Angeles. ‘They’ didn’t want the word to get out, so ‘they’ were burning the bodies,” she recounted. The woman who told her this, Lyons-Pruitt explained, “heard it from her sister’s girlfriend’s brother, who was a health-care worker.” In conversation, Lyons-Pruitt is calm, deliberate, precise, and inviting — not given to theatrical expressions of incredulity. But this one was a whopper. “Her sister’s … girlfriend’s … brother,” she repeated quietly, leaving space between each word to underscore the point. “There’s a whole lot of misinformation out there,” she said. “A whole lot.” Some people, she noted, have expressed fear that the vaccine will “change their genetics from Black to white.” Others are concerned that some sort of computer chip will be implanted. Or, less fantastically, that the vaccine is simply not safe because it was produced too fast for proper safeguards to have been observed. On occasion, Lyons-Pruitt hears concern — even from some relatives — that it was the vaccine that killed baseball

Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt Uses Science Facts to Overcome Vaccine Fears

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A VERY BAD YEAR


Essie, Lyons-Pruitt noted, was in the first 134,000 Americans to die of COVID. For the first 100,000 victims, public health experts say there just wasn’t enough information available. After that, “A lot of people died deaths that could have been prevented,” Lyons-Pruitt said. “2020 was not kind.”

GOP BIG DOUBTERS

For every white person to be infected with COVID throughout Santa Barbara, there have been more than five people of color to test positive. The same grim disproportionality holds true for people hospitalized, placed in ICUs, and who ultimately die. But when it comes to vaccinations, the numbers skew dramatically the other way. Although Black and Latino people make up 50 percent of the county’s population, they have received 25 percent of the doses — 35,000 — administered so far. By contrast, white people — who make up 43 percent of the population — have received 42,000 doses. Geographically, the tilt is even more striking. While North County has overwhelmingly absorbed the brunt of the COVID crisis in terms of infections and hospitalizations, South County has received the lion’s share of the vaccinations — 47,000 compared to 20,000 in North County — and many white people driving up from South County are among those numbers. But that may be changing. In early California surveys, 50 percent of Black respondents indicated they either would definitely — or probably — not get vaccinated. Today, that number has dropped below 30 percent. Today, Republicans have emerged as clear frontrunners among the most viscerally resistant to vaccination. Thirty-nine percent of Republicans statewide stated they either would definitely or probably not get vaccinated. In Santa Barbara County, that translates to 24,000 adults. While Republicans were not targeted by the COVID vaccine task force — with no “trusted messengers” enlisted to spread the word — County Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso reached out to right-wing government watchdog Andy Caldwell and recently appeared on his radio show.

LIVING IN THE DEEP SOUTH Lawanda Lyons-Pruitt grew up in a small Mississippi community of fewer than 900 inhabitants in Neshoba County. It achieved international notoriety in 1964 when the search for the bodies of three murdered freedom riders — two white and one Black — gave rise to one of the most intensely scrutinized manhunts in civil rights history. When her parents moved to Chicago for work, LyonsPruitt and her sister were raised by their grandparents. Three cousins joined them when they were effectively rendered orphans after their father murdered their mother. Lyons-Pruitt recalls her grandfather as tall, slim, and rockhard, having worked his entire life keeping the railroad tracks “in tip-top shape.” Her grandfather, who had a 3rdgrade education, helped her with her homework by the light of a kerosene lamp. Lyons-Pruitt was born just a few months after Rosa Parks refused to take a seat in the back of the bus, sparking the now-historic bus boycott of Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955. For Lyons-Pruitt, the “Colored” and “White” signs

posted outside of public restrooms and over water fountains are not artifacts of a bygone age but vivid childhood memories. And those signs would still be up when she left Mississippi in 1973. From kindergarten through 5th grade, Lyons-Pruitt attended an all-Black school. From 6th to 9th, she was bused to an all-Black school in the nearby town of Brookhaven. She could have attended an integrated junior high school closer to home. But when a group of school administrators — all white — showed up seeking her grandfather’s permission, he turned them down. District administrators were cherry-picking which Black students they deemed acceptable to mix with white students. Lyons-Pruitt, it turns out, was one of them. Her grandfather would not be party to a charade designed to circumvent a school desegregation decree issued by the United States Supreme Court in 1954. Her schoolbooks, she recalled, bore the smudge marks of a separate-butequal education — old and worn out. It wasn’t until 1970, when Lyons-Pruitt was in high school, that things changed. “It took them 15 years to get around to integrating,” she noted with a laugh. Going to school with white kids, she would be surprised to discover, wasn’t all that different. Black kids, she said, hung out with other black kids; white kids did the same. “Everyone was cordial,” she said. At prom time, however, it got awkward. Would Black and white students be allowed to shake it on the same dance floor? School administrators stepped in to finesse that question. “We had a prom with no dances,” Lyons-Pruitt said. When it came to the history of race in America, Lyons-Pruitt said her education left her clueless. “We were never told about slavery or lynching,” she said. “I didn’t even know about the Holocaust.” What Lyons-Pruitt would learn about the civil rights movement, she said, she picked up from her grandfather. If Martin Luther King Jr. was on the TV, she recalled, he wouldn’t miss it. Watching intently, he’d sit up in his chair, she said, and “just laugh.” Her grandfather grew up at a time when a Black man risked death for looking a white person in the eye when passing on the street.

as a welfare fraud investigator and, in 1984, as an investigator for the Public Defender’s Office. “My philosophy more aligned with the mission of the Public Defender’s office,” she said. “It’s more about treating people with compassion and respect.” By 1995, Lyons-Pruitt was named the department’s chief investigator, making her the first African-American woman in California to serve in that position. Since then, she has worked on many of the department’s hairiest, scariest cases. As an investigator, Lyons-Pruitt described herself as a “fierce advocate for the defense.” She handled a lot of homicide cases and more than a few death penalty defenses. “No matter what happened, I could always see the humanity in people,” she said. “And I could see both sides.” By 2016, the years had taken their toll. “Every part of my body was dragging.” That’s when Lyons-Pruitt pulled the plug on a county career spanning 37 and a half years. But she hardly retired. Instead, she threw herself even more energetically into her work with the Santa Maria and Lompoc branch of the NAACP, of which she’s been president for 14 years.

COURTESY

ERICK MADRID

COVER ◆STORY

CALIFORNIA CHANGES In 1973, Lyons-Pruitt moved to Santa Maria, where her uncle — her mother’s sister’s husband — taught at Santa Maria High School. What did she think of her new home? “I’m sure I loved it,” she said. “It was a lot bigger and had a lot more culture than where I lived before.” Lyons-Pruitt still lives in Santa Maria in the same house she has lived in since 1989. Lyons-Pruitt attended college, first at Allan HanAttending an integrated Mississippi high school in 1970, Lyons-Pruitt said the school held a no-dance prom to stop Black and white students from cock and then at Cal State Long Beach. She studied dancing together. criminology, hoping to become an FBI agent. The FBI was not hiring women, however, except in clerical positions. So upon graduation, she worked as a hostess at a Denny’s in Long Beach, moved back to Santa Maria, and found herself working at a McDonald’s, though not for long. As with COVID, much of her work with the NAACP Lyons-Pruitt quickly snagged a job with the County of has necessarily involved forming partnerships. She Santa Barbara Probation Department evaluating court- remembers a time when Santa Barbara’s Black populamandated drunk-driving programs for the quality of their tion was 14,000; today, countywide, it’s down to 9,000, curriculum and how effectively they kept students from reflecting the severe exodus inflicted by the county’s becoming repeat offenders. She stayed with the Probation ever-escalating housing prices. In many communities, Black people make up less than 2 percent of the populaDepartment about five years. During that time, Lyons-Pruitt was called to serve as a tion. The population is so small that it almost doesn’t juror in a trial for someone accused of murdering a 2-year- show at all in the county’s many COVID tabulations; old child. The experience would spur her to apply for a job the number of Black people vaccinated was zero for

WORKING WITH THE NAACP

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CONT’D P. 18 ª

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Her demand was not so much to “defund the police” but to “reimagine the police.” By that, Lyons-Pruitt called for the abolition of the chokehold and the creation of a civilian review board with subpoena power to investigate officers accused of abuse. Lyons-Pruitt currently sits on the Santa Maria Police Department’s police advisor y board, but advisory boards, she noted, lack real authority. Chauvin had many months, but it has now no doubt received increased to .84 percent. Lyonsall the training he Pruitt contends these numbers needed, she argued, undercount the real impact of and read all the COVID on the Black commuguidelines. Santa nity and that better numbers Maria’s own police need to be kept. department had In spite of — or perhaps been rife with allegations of excesbecause of — this, Lyons-Pruitt makes a point to be everywhere. sive force prior to Or at least she makes it seem that the house-cleanway. It’s not uncommon for her ing administered to make five community meetby the city’s two ings in a day, via Zoom of course: most recent — and multiple school board meetings, Lyons-Pruitt became California’s first Africanreform-minded meetings about changes to Santa American chief investigator for the Public Defender’s — chiefs. “No one Maria’s general plan, meetings Office in 1995 and works to “reimagine the police” to is immune,” she about housing, and, more recently, prevent the killing of unarmed people of color. reminded people in town hall meetings. recent interviews with other media outlets. “Santa The NAACP is part of a coalition working to Maria had its own problems.” ensure proper medical care for inmates in Lompoc’s In a public statement last June, she declared, “It federal penitentiary and at Santa Barbara’s County is time to reimagine a police department where Jail. Well before COVID, the NAACP was working there are rules in place, better rules than we have behind the scenes to push alternatives to incarcera- now.” Only by doing so, she argued, can “the numtion. “When you sentence someone to 10 years and ber of murders against unarmed people of color” lock ’em in a cage, that’s a different culture,” she said. be significantly reduced. Addressing the Santa “It’s survival of the fittest. They come out, and we Barbara County Supervisors a few days later, she expect them to be adjusted to our ways. It’s not going borrowed a line from Benjamin Franklin, stating, “Justice will not be served until those who are happen. ” Club Branch (800)to 741-1605 Your Local Auto On the books, the local chapters boast 690 mem- unaffected are as outraged as those who are.” Lyons-Pruitt was just 25 miles away from bers, but not all pay dues. About half that many are actually active, Lyons-Pruitt said. About 50 can be Sanford, Florida, when a trigger-happy neighcounted to show up at meetings. borhood watch volunteer, George Zimmerman, Of course, nothing is the same since last May’s shot and killed an unarmed 17-year-old named murder of George Floyd, and Lyons-Pruitt makes Trayvon Martin in 2012, claiming self-defense. it a point to call it “murder.” Since the trial of former When the not-guilty verdict came out, “It was officer Derek Chauvin started, it’s come out that he deeply disturbing,” she said. Zimmerman disrekept his knee on Floyd’s neck for nine minutes and garded explicit instructions to back away from 29 seconds, longer even than the eight minutes and Martin, whom he shot principally because he 46 seconds initially estimated last May. “I couldn’t was a Black male wearing a hoodie. Lyons-Pruitt sleep for an entire week after that,” Lyons-Pruitt said. quickly issued a press release denouncing the Especially horrifying, she said, was how Chauvin verdict, but the situation caused her daughter — kept his hands in his pockets the entire time. And now 39 — alarm. “I got hate mail,” Lyons-Pruitt according to the testimony of a lieutenant with the recounted. “You have to be careful. It’s differMinneapolis Police Department, Chauvin kept his ent for me; I’m Black. Some of these people are knee of Floyd’s neck a full two minutes after Floyd crazy.” Lyons-Pruitt said there’s been a significant became unresponsive. Last May, Lyons-Pruitt and the NAACP organized influx of new, younger members in the wake of protests in Santa Maria and Lompoc, among other George Floyd’s death. Some, she noted, are concommunities. “This is happening again. When is it siderably more outspoken and confrontational going to end?” she demanded. “We’re done dying.” than she is. “I’m old-school,” she said.


COVER ◆STORY Nothing could be more old-school than her organization’s name, anchored by the word “colored.” Lyons-Pruitt makes no apologies. “The organization as formed in 1909 in response to all the lynching going on. The word ‘colored’ was better than the N-word.” Since then, the word has shifted from “colored” to “black” to “African American” and now back to “Black.” The NAACP, she said, can’t be changing its name accordingly. “It’s our brand,” she said. If younger members want to change it later on, that’s up to them.

REACHING OUT In the meantime, Lyons-Pruitt is collaborating actively with groups like CAUSE, IMPORTA, and MICOP — short for the Mixteco/Indígena Com‘[Lyons-Pruitt] munity Organizing Projqualifies as a ect — enlisted by county “ health officials to reach out trusted messenger” to underserved and vulnerfor all of able communities in North County such as farmworkers. Santa Maria, Not everyone is enthusiastic about the effort. not just the Fourth District SuperviBlack or minority sor Bob Nelson, whose district includes Orcutt and the communities. surrounding area, said the She is the voice county — and the farmworkers themselves — would have of reason.’ been better served reaching —Steve Lavagnino, out more directly to the 5TH DISTRICT SUPERVISOR growers and farmers than to an organization rooted in the political activist culture of UCSB. “I’m not saying they don’t have a constituency up here,” he said, “but it’s relatively small.” Lyons-Pruitt takes issue with Supervisor Nelson’s assessment; the organizers she knows have long been rooted in North County, not UCSB. Nelson also expressed frustration with the county’s outreach efforts, describing them as disjointed and top-down. “They aren’t asking us; they’re telling us,” he said. North County health officials, he acknowledged, are working closely with the growers and shippers and the Agriculture Commissioner’s office, but not so much with individual growers with hundreds if not thousands of workers. With many growers reporting a 20 percent shortage of workers, he stated, employers can’t afford not to take good care of their workers. “If I’m being a jerk employer, my workers can always get another job across the street,” he said. Fifth District Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, who represents much of Santa Maria, echoed Nelson’s concern that the farmers have not been enlisted as aggressively as they could be. And people are frustrated by how hard it is to sign up. His own father — former Santa Maria mayor Larry Lavagnino — threatened to give up because the process required downloading a screenshot of his insurance card. Lavagnino said, “I don’t know how to make it better, but it’ s far more complicated than it needs to be.” As far as Lyons-Pruitt goes, Lavagnino had nothing but praise. “She qualifies as a ‘trusted messenger’ for all of Santa Maria, not just the Black or minority communities,” he said. “She is the voice of reason. You can build off what she’s telling you.” Last week, county Public Health officers opened a vaccine tent in Lompoc. This week, they’re doing the same in Santa Maria. In a week, the vaccine will be opened up to people 16 years and older. Lyons-Pruitt and the rest of the coalition will be waiting and watching. If not enough people show up, she said, they’ll launch a door-to-door campaign, dropping off brochures, and perhaps get vaccine stations set up in barber shops and hair salons. Even though she’s got both shots now, Lyons-Pruitt has been laying low, leaving home — which she shares with three dogs — only to get groceries. “I still social distance, double mask, and stay within my bubble,” she said. If and when the COVID curtain lifts, she’s pretty clear on how she’ll celebrate. “Take a break, visit family in Mississippi and Chicago, and play bingo in n Vegas!”

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APRIL 8, 2021

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19


SBIFF

COURTESY OF SBIFF

F E AT U R E

Mid-Fest Report One Week Down, One Weekend to Go

I

by Josef Woodard

TACOS AND LAUGHS Bill Murray talked with Leonard Maltin about La Super-Rica and his career.

t’s official: The unofficial cuisine of the 2021 SBIFF is Delroy Lindo, along with some dazzling fellow OscarLa Super-Rica’s rightfully celebrated #16, a k a Super nommed performers in the “Virtuosos” evening. Rica Especial. The legacy of #16 is a commonly Of course, things felt disorienting and depersonalized, known highlight of Santa Barbara life, but its new not being able to share a room/theater and the very air crowning comes courtesy of Bill Murray, who capped a celebrity breathes, but we’ve become late adapters to off his sometimes madcap Modern Master Award tribute the compromise. Mulligan’s Cinema Vanguard Award with a tip of the hat to longtime award host, veteran critic show took place not at the historic Arlington Theatre, but in the Zoom zone on Monday afternoon — from host Leonard Maltin, and the dish in question.  “Leonard,” Murray deadpanned, “I congratulate you for Pete Hammond’s den to the actress’s N.Y.C. hotel room 31 years doing this. I can only imagine how many times (where she was getting ready for her SNL spotlight, her you’ve ordered the #16 at La Super-Rica. It’s the #16. You first acting work since wrapping The Dig in December 2019).  gotta get it.”  Beyond the instant buzz factor and kitschy tanginess of Murray’s foodie comments in chat rooms and around town, the moment was a rare acknowledgment of the street cred of a festival that, by necessity, was restricted mostly to the generic forum of Zooming and streaming. In short, Murray helped put the “Santa Barbara” back into the Santa Barbara International Film Festival and had us longing for the festival’s usual creature “discomforts” of waiting in lines, crowding into theaters with strangers, discussing and arguing the relative merits of this Lithuanian puzzler versus that cheeky indie flick, and generally sharing an experience. That will have to wait. And yet, as led by intrepid executive director Roger Durling, this year’s resourceful variation on the festival has bravely kept the torch in COVID time and given us something to collectively embrace and be — both from the comforts of our homes or in the novel arena of temporary (and free-to-the-public) drive-in screens at Santa Barbara City College.  Murray, the gonzo cult hero and star of mainstream comedies and niche cinema, delivered the goods in STAR SHOW: SBIFF honored Carey Mulligan for her role in Promising Young Woman. his own unique style and kicked off a truly celebrityMulligan, last toasted at SBIFF for her standout work studded series of interviews and panels with filmmakers, screenwriters, directors, and, yes, stars — Carey Mul- in An Education (2009), is riding high with the much-disligan, Sacha Baron Cohen, Amanda Seyfried, and cussed Promising Young Woman, a dizzying hybrid comicthriller-drama that takes on sexual abuse and misogyny — including Hollywood-fueled values — in a bracing, fresh way. “It’s painfully common,” Mulligan told us, “what we’re talking about in this film. It’s been normalized. It’s been a joke for so long. I’ve watched all those [sexist] films, and it reframes those things and makes you think about it.”

FILMS TO FIND

Oscar-timed Hollywood encounters aside, SBIFF 2021 is up to its old high standards, hitting us where it counts with a solid roster of international films, many of which we’ll be hard-pressed to see, even in this film-streaming smorgasbord era. Worthy American independents are in the mix, even with some 805 links, as in Highway One (ostensibly about Cambria, but not really) and Coast (a coming-of-age tale actually about and shot in Santa Maria). Docs are having a field day, starting with the engaging and important festival opener, Invisible Valley, which puts a compelling, personal face on the disparity of farmworkers’

La fortaleza 20

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APRIL 8, 2021

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hardscrabble lives in the Coachella Valley versus the gatedcommunity decadence and the annual transient phenom of the Coachella Festival. The film touches on socioeconomic norms relevant to California, the U.S., and beyond. Recurring themes sneak into the programming, by design or happenstance, as is the case with two impressive films — the French By Your Side (La folie) and the indie film Broken Diamonds — affectingly relating the painful story of mentally ill characters with emotionally shattering impacts on their families. Unconventional and poetic cinematic values can be found in some of the Latin American entries (long a strong sidebar in the festival), including Fortitude

(La fortaleza), The Ghosts (Los fantasmas), and We Will Never Die. The Nordic selection is potent, including two Finnish treats: the black comic Ladies of Steel and the dark dramatic force of The Last Ones (Viimeiset).

MORE FUN TO COME

Other highlights beckon in the last few days of the festival, closing on Saturday night with a roster of homegrown films (another Santa Barbara–centric moment this year, returning to the program, by popular demand). This Thursday features the Women’s Panel and Delroy Lindo’s American Riviera Award, and Friday’s tribute spotlight goes to Amanda Seyfried, nabbing the Montecito Award. A modest proposal in this anomalous year: We should plan to make the obvious pilgrimage and tote a takeout La Super Rica #16 into the drive-in setup down by the beach. It seems a fitting SBIFF ’21 thing to do. Opinions will vary, especially with a festival as intentionally diverse as SBIFF, but here is this festgoer’s Top Ten-in-training: Fear (Strah); The Cinderella Addiction; The Knot (Uljhan); The Last Ones (Viimeiset); Invisible Valley; We Will Never Die; The Pit (Bedre); Poppie Nongena; and n Ladies of Steel.


COURTESY

CLOSING NIGHT Q&A

- VIRTUAL EVENTS -

Gullah Music of the Carolina Coast

Ranky Tanky Thu, Apr 15 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

Winner of the 2020 Grammy for Best Regional Roots Music Album, Ranky Tanky is a dynamo quintet with an inspired take on the soulful songs of South Carolina’s Gullah culture.

CYCLE SHOW: Neil Myers made the documentary Climb to showcase his recovery from a bike crash. It will screen on Saturday during SBIFF’s Closing Night.

Cyclist

NEIL MYERS Directs Climb

A

by Matt Kettmann

s is now tradition, SBIFF’s Closing Night on April 10 will feature a number of short documentaries by filmmakers from the greater Santa Barbara area. One such entry is Climb, the story of how cyclist Neil Myers survived a bicycle crash on Gibraltar Road and used his recovery to get into even better physical and mental shape. He answered a few questions about the film for us.

Why did you make a film about your personal saga? In those first few months, I told the story of the accident so many times. Invariably, people would say, “You have to write a book; you have to make a movie.” But I was dead-set against that — creating a film about yourself seems cringe-worthy. But then Cottage Hospital did a short video about my accident for their annual trauma center fundraiser, the Tiara Ball. I was amazed by the reaction. When I left that night, it took me 45 minutes to get out the door because donors were lined up to talk to me. I realized the story wasn’t about me, but rather it was about the amazing community that got me back to the finish line. I realized that a film could inspire other donors to help improve trauma centers — here in Santa Barbara and in other communities as well.

So I made the film as a way to give back: to help build better trauma centers and to provide money that could allow people less fortunate than I am to get the same kind of care.

This is very much an ode to Gibraltar Road. What makes that so special for cyclists? It is a true, Tour de France–level climb. It is a tough test of your ability. You have to concentrate. For that reason, I find that no matter how much is on my mind at the start, by the end I am clear, happy, and Zen. Do you hope to inspire others with your story? Honestly, I just want people to enjoy the film. It is a story; I hope they enjoy how I told that story. How often do you ride up Gibraltar these days? I’ve paused so I can finish the documentary, but in general I try to get up three to four times a week. I have more rides on Gibraltar since the accident than before! See climbdoc.org.  

See independent.com/sbiff for many more interviews with filmmakers from Santa Barbara and beyond.

The Father of Environmental Justice

Dr. Robert Bullard The Quest for Environmental and Racial Justice Wed, Apr 21 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

With more than four decades of action advocating for racial equality and fair environmental and urban planning, Dr. Robert Bullard is widely considered the father of the environmental justice movement. Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Patty & John MacFarlane, Sara Miller McCune, Santa Barbara Foundation, Lynda Weinman & Bruce Heavin, Dick Wolf, and Zegar Family Foundation UC Santa Barbara Campus Partners:

Department of Black Studies Center for Black Studies Research Division of Social Sciences Division of Humanities and Fine Arts Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences Division of Student Affairs Gevirtz Graduate School of Education Graduate Division Bren School for Environmental Science & Management

College of Creative Studies College of Engineering MultiCultural Center Carsey-Wolf Center The Program in Latin American and Iberian Studies UCSB Library | UCSB Reads Office of the Chancellor Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor

Community Partners: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli Special Thanks:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 8, 2021

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I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE COURTESY

JEAN ZIESENHENNE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit.

4/12:

4/8-4/10:

36th S.B. International Film Festival (SBIFF) Visit the SBIFF website to check out information about the schedule of more than 100 films, celebrity tributes, panel discussions (Women’s Panel, April 8, 2pm; Delroy Lindo, April 8; Amanda Seyfried, April 9, 6pm), filmmaker Q&As, and free beachside drive-in screenings from 8:30am9:30pm daily. Free-$15; passes: $35+. Read more on p. 20. sbiff.org

4/8: Sweet Strings Sisters Listen to a lively and eclectic mix of vocal and acoustic sounds from Christi Hudson and Michele Harris-Padrón on the outdoor patio. 5-7pm. Kimpton Goodland, 5650 Calle Real, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 895-3400.

tinyurl.com/SweetStringSisters

4/10: Live Online: Writers’ Workshop with Lidia Yuknavitch National best-selling author of The Book of Joan and The Small Backs of Children, Lidia Yuknavitch will talk about the craft of writing. Register to receive a link. 12:30-2pm. Free. Call (805) 688-3115.

4/10: Opera SB: Don Pasquale, A Live Drive-In Opera Composer of The Elixir of Love, Lucia di Lammermoor, and other blockbuster opera house hits, bel canto master Gaetano Donizetti has created a hilarious new version of Don Pasquale and turned him into “Donald Pasquale,” a silent-film business mogul in S.B. during the early 1920s. 7:30pm. Ventura County Fairgrounds, 10 W. Harbor Blvd., Ventura. $99-$179. Call (805) 898-3890.

tinyurl.com/BuelltonLibraryLidia

SUNDAY 4/11 4/11: Virtual Author Discussion: Bruce Hale Area author Bruce Hale will discuss his latest

tinyurl.com/OSBDonPasquale

COURTESY

4/8: Virtual Meeting: Nurturing Knowhow: Boosting Science and Math School Readiness Caregivers can learn how children are assessed for school readiness and how to support children in gaining important skills. 1-2pm. Free.

book, Switched, a hilarious story of what happens when 12-year-old Parker and his disorderly goldendoodle, Boof, bump heads. 3:30pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com.

tinyurl.com/BruceHale

tinyurl.com/NurturingKnow-how

Take Note

Explore the final projects by the art majors from the 2021 graduating class of Westmont College. Exhibit shows through May 8. Free. Call (805) 565-6162 or visit museum@westmont.edu.

tinyurl.com/WestmontGraduates2021

Zooper Heroes Month at the Zoo Wear your

FRIDAY 4/9 4/9: Pangea’s Playhouse: Anniversary Show! Pangea’s Playhouse is a #virtualvenue for

tinyurl.com/AprilPangeasPlayhouse

SATURDAY 4/10 4/10: Art From Scrap Parking Lot Sale Find creative reuse materials as you peruse piles of fabric beads, skateboard wheel shavings, and more. Masks are required. 11am-2pm. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. Free. Call (805) 884-0459.

4/10:

House Calls Virtual Event: Jane Goodall Join UCSB Arts & Lectures as it presents founder of The Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace Jane Goodall for Hope Fuels a Better World in conversation with Catherine Remak. 11am. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535.

tinyurl.com/HouseCallsJaneGoodall

tinyurl.com/ParkingLotSale

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. 22

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APRIL 8, 2021

4/12: Virtual Author Discussion: Joel Selvin Rock journalist Joel Selvin will talk about his latest book, Hollywood Eden: Electric Guitars, Fast Cars and the Myth of the California Paradise, about the young artists and musicians who came together in the early 1960s to create the myth of the California dream. 6pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com.

tinyurl.com/HollywoodEden

4/8-4/14: Virtual Exhibition: Untold: Westmont Graduate Exhibition 2021

global artists to perform together from remote locations. The first production of the year will feature acts ranging from music and storytelling to art and cuisine! 7-9pm. $10. Email info@ejiexperiences.com.

MONDAY 4/12

INDEPENDENT.COM

favorite superhero costume and visit the S.B. Zoo through April 29 to learn about amazing animal adaptations and what projects the conservation team is working on. Reserve an entry time online. Masks are mandatory for everyone ages 3+. Mon.-Sun.: 9:30am-5pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free-$19.95; parking: $11.

sbzoo.org

COURTESY

THURSDAY 4/8

Daniel L. Geiger, PhD

Science Pub From Home: Microscopic Oberonia Casual orchid-lovers and professional researchers are welcome as Curator of Malacology Daniel L. Geiger, PhD, uses his scanning electron microscope to reveal the hidden world of micro-orchids and explain how they help us understand broad biological topics. Don’t forget to order dinner from Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant. Register in advance. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Email scoleman@ sbnature2.org. tinyurl.com/MicroOrchids


APR.

8-14 by

TERRY ORTEGA and SOPHIE LYND

TUESDAY 4/13 4/13: House Calls Virtual Event: Dr. Kelly McGonigal Health psychologist and best-selling author Kelly McGonigal will discuss her book The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection and Courage, followed by a Q&A. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535.

tinyurl.com/HouseCallsMcGonigal

WEDNESDAY 4/14 4/14: YMCA Healthy Families Virtual Forum: Behavior, COVID & Schools Discover from Dr. Carey Chronis, respected and practicing pediatrician in

CHUCK GRAHAM

Ventura, why worrying if your child will adapt may be the wrong question to ask. 5-6pm. Free. ciymca.org/healthy-families

We’re Back!

FREE SANTA BARBARA

WALKING TOURS 4/14: Virtual Presentation: Chuck Graham: Hidden Wonders of the Carrizo Plain Photographer and author Chuck Graham will share his experiences photographing the wild landscape and native flora and fauna of the Carrizo Plain over the last 15 years. 4-5pm. Suggested donation: $5. Call (805) 686-8315 or email info@wildlingmuseum.org.

1.5hr FUNK ZONE or 2hr WATERFRONT TOUR

FOR RESERVATIONS VISIT http://freewalkingtoursb.com

tinyurl.com/ChuckGraham

4/14: Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion: James Salzman James Salzman, co-author (with Michael Heller) of Mine: How the Hidden Rules of Ownership Control Our Lives, will discuss the rules of ownership in regard to digital privacy, climate change, and wealth inequality and how it’s up for grabs. 6pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email info@chaucersbooks.com.

Free Wine Tasting Voucher for New Sign-ups for the Funk Zone Tour in April

tinyurl.com/JamesSalzman

Museum

Reopening Beatrice Wood Center for the Arts Please notify the museum in advance to let them know how many people will be coming. Masks are required. Fri.-Sun.: 11am-5pm. Free. 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. Call (805) 646-3381 or email BeatriceWoodCenter@gmail.com. beatricewood.com/index.html

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JOIN US ONLINE & AT TWO FREE OCEAN-FRONT DRIVE-INS

Listen to the year’s best and see over 100 films, all from home. GET YOUR TICKETS NOW AT SBIFF.ORG And stay tuned for signing up for our FREE Drive-In Theatres 24

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Sports

living

THURSDAY NIGHT LIGHTS A Peabody Stadium Homecoming for S.B. High Seniors

Q

MAX ABRAMS

uarterback Deacon Hill faked a sweep to wide receiver Anthony Loza and an inside handoff to freshman running back Koa Herrera before taking off left into the open field. Loza picked up the final block that sprung Hill for a 34-yard touchdown run. The first trip to the end zone in the newly renovated Peabody Stadium came on a beautiful Thursday night in April. “All the pieces came into place on that play,” Hill said of the touchdown run that put in motion the Santa Barbara High Dons’ 34-12 vicHOME SWEET HOME: The Dons notched a decisive 34-12 win over the Hueneme Vikings. tory over visiting Hueneme. For the SBHS seniors, making plays under the lights of their home stadium construction projects, it experienced its fair share of was a dream that finally came to fruition. The last time delays, and even on the day of the first football game, a touchdown was scored in Peabody Stadium more administrators were still putting some of the final than four years ago, the class of 2021 was not yet in high cosmetic effects into place. The result is an athletic school and, due to COVID-19, it appeared they would citadel worthy of the majestic Santa Barbara scenery that surrounds it. never play a game on their home turf. “For us, this season is really to gear up for next season and to allow our seniors to come out and have some by fun,” said Santa Barbara High coach JT Stone. “We “We all kind of moved past it,” Hill said. “Most of haven’t put a W on the board in this stadium in almost the seniors started getting jobs. Practice wasn’t really a five years, so it’s just a good feeling to be at home. I’m happy for the kids and happy for the community.” thing for us anymore.” Without a CIF championship to chase, Stone But once they received word that an abbreviated spring season was indeed going to happen, key has embraced a youth movement. All five starting seniors — including Hill, Noach Wood, Jake Knecht, offensive linemen are juniors. A sophomore, Nathan Justin Perez, and Ty Montgomery — were ready to go. Barrios, and freshman Herrera have taken the bulk Montgomery, who plays offense and defense and is the of the snaps at running back. The receiving core is team’s primary kicker, took a break from baseball to primarily juniors and sophomores after an injury sidelined Knecht. embrace a final opportunity to pursue gridiron glory. Hill is now also a coach on the field. It is a natural “It’s worth it to get to play a couple more games with the seniors and finish it out,” said Montgomery. development for the senior, who could easily already “We were kind of doubtful there’d be a season. It was be at the University of Wisconsin, participating in spring ball like many of the other top quarterbacks a big surprise.” These same seniors helped break Santa Barbara in the country. “It’s definitely a learning experience, a curve, and I High’s 30-year curse of playoff ineptitude in the fall of 2019, making it to the CIF-SS Division 8 championship think it’s the best experience I could have had going game without playing any true home games. They suf- into college,” said Hill of his role in developing the fered a heartbreaking 24-21 loss to Sunny Hills on the younger players. “These guys are going to be really good. Miguel Unzueta is going to be a baller; Trent campus of rival San Marcos. The original goal this year was to take it one step Williams is going to be a baller; all of them are going further: to win a championship. With a once-in-a- to be ballers. They just need to get into that varsity generation quarterback at the helm, it seemed possible rhythm and that varsity speed.” Peabody Stadium will host two more games in this until the season was delayed and then the playoffs were canceled. Now all that remains is for memories to be unusual spring season — only family members are permitted to attend — as the Dons face Dos Pueblos made, and Peabody Stadium is a big part of that. The stadium was originally constructed in 1924, on Friday, April 9, before concluding their season and after nearly 100 years of wear and tear, it was against an undefeated Lompoc team on Friday, April n in desperate need of renovations. Like most major 16.

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SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

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Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with Peter Lee and Felicia Medina (Secret Bao) and Jerry Lee (Empty Bowl Gourmet Noodle Bar) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

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April’s Theme: Poetry

Nature Poem by Tommy Pico

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independent.com/indybookclub for all the details!


FOOD &DRINK

F

ive years ago this month,

MATT KETTMANN

Celebrating Five Years with Wagyu and Flemish Red

LES ELS T T O B BARR &

WINE CHIPS & Santa Barbara Bottles O ne day back in 2017,

Huntington Beach entrepreneur Jonathan Strietzel was chomping on cheesy potato chips with a glass of pinot noir and realized that the snacks’ flavor couldn’t stand up to the wine. He envisioned a stronger-tasting chip, one that could indeed pair with wine, and founded Wine Chips to tackle the challenge, rallying the support of family and CHIPS AND SIPS: Wine Chips’ bold flavors and friends in the test kitchen. thick cuts were designed to pair with wines, and The line, whose chief Santa Barbara County offers endless choices, creative officer is Santa including these bottles by Story of Soil and A Barbara–based brand- Tribute to Grace. ing guru (and cannabis farmer) Sara Rotman, launched in 2020 with four primary flavors — Smoked Gouda, Asiago, Blue Cheese, and Manchego. But they also produce “private reserve” batches like Dry-Aged Ribeye and Spicy Calabrese, released each month to club members. The lattice-cut chips, which come with suggested wine pairings listed on the informative labels, are substantial in both thickness and seasoning, almost creating a creamy mouthfeel into which the wines can settle. They’ve already tallied more than $1 million in online orders and are now starting to show up on the aisles of gourmet grocers. I recently tasted the full lineup and selected Santa Barbara County bottles to pair with each flavors.

FOOD & DRINK

Third Window Brewing Company opened in The Mill on East Haley Street to much fanfare, powered by proprietor Kristopher Parker’s firm vision to craft Belgian-style beers with seasonal and vintage variation. “All my beer ideas are essentially developed from wine — I don’t know how to think any other way,” Parker told me back then, referring HIGH-LOW BURGERS: Sip on Third Window’s tart Flemish red with the brewery’s smashed burgers, in which Wagyu beef gets treated to American cheese, diced onions, to what he’d learned while and special sauce. growing up around the winery founded by his grandfather, the late actor Fess Parker, and still run by his Wagyu/low-brow American cheese formula family. “We will be totally uncompromising in became an instant hit. terms of quality — growth be damned.” “The whole reason we did this is that COVID By and large, Parker held to his word, for hit and we had 48 hours to figure it out,” Parker better — when considering his ever-changing, explained of the menu, which he developed with high-quality beers — and worse, when it comes his wife, Michelline Parker, and chefs Adam Shoeto keeping your original partners and sticking bridge and Nicholas Priedite, who’d been using to the business model. His family bought out the kitchen for their own projects. Michelline and those other partners a couple of years ago, and Kris frequently work the cast-iron griddle themthey’ve used their wine industry acumen to push selves from Thursday to Sunday, churning out four Third Window deeper into retail, among other burgers every 90 seconds. “We’re outpacing the efficiency-minded changes. They also supply of Wagyu,” said Parker, whose burgers helped The Mill spread an alcohol sport that satisfying seared crunch and can permit across the entire be accompanied by fries, sides, and sauces. property, allowing beer to But he’s not interested in cooking forbe served to guests at Potek ever. “I don’t want to be a hamburger Winery and vice versa; for chef,” he said. “I’m here to make beer.” In that vein, and to celebrate years, you couldn’t cross the Third Window’s fifth anniversary, breezeway between the two, which created useless confusion. Parker is releasing a five-year-old NN TTMA E K “We’ve sorted out so many Flemish Red called “Batch One.” It is T T BY M A structural things,” said Parker, indeed the first batch that Parker brewed with though he readily admits that the Tyler King, formerly of The Bruery, back in 2016, year-to-year consistency required by broader and it is being served both on tap and in 500 mL distribution and the many different IPAs that he’s bottles reignited by champagne yeast. Much like made to satisfy consumer demand were not his I recall from those original beers five years ago, original intent. “It’s been nothing like my busi- the sour ale is tart but very full in mouthfeel, and ness plan, nothing like I expected, but it’s been it deftly stands up to the smashed burgers, espean amazing journey,” he said. “I don’t know that I cially the one with avocado and jalapeño. (I’ve yet to try the peanut butter and jelly version.) would do it again, but I’m glad I did.” Those moves proved prescient, as the panThough he’s producing steadier lines of beer demic forced breweries worldwide to focus on and more crowd-pleasing IPA than he planned off-site sales when visitors could no longer come five years in, Parker remains committed to to taprooms. Third Window was also better exploring all of the experiments and Belgianpositioned than many breweries in other ways. born variations that he envisioned for Third Their small kitchen meant that they could make Window. “There are so many beers that I want to the food that public health rules required to be make that only my family could make, because served alongside any alcohol. And the Parkers’ of what’s grown at the ranch,” said Parker, who’ll Wagyu beef herd — which feed on spent brewing run through 20 to 30 iterations of a beer before grains and grape pomace in the Santa Ynez Valley perfecting the style. “We still view every batch as — needed a new home following the family’s late a vintage. That’s how I think of beverages.” 2019 decision to close The Bear and Star restaurant in their Los Olivos hotel. Third Window’s 406 E. Haley St., Ste. 3; (805) 979-5090; “smashed burgers” were born, and the high-brow thirdwindowbrewing.com

Pair These

MATT KETTMANN

THIRD WINDOW’S Superb Sours and Smashing Smash Burgers

p.27

Manchego x Scar of the Sea Rancho de Los Vinos Chardonnay 2019: The sheep’s-

milk cheese flavor is quite potent and stinky in good ways. Mikey Giugni’s briny Santa Maria Valley chardonnay cuts through that with a crushed-seashell minerality. Spicy Calabrese x Melville Sta. Rita Hills Pinot Noir 2019: The kick on this charcuterie-flavored snack, one of the tastiest chips, is balanced by the juicy fruit and long-lingering herb qualities of Melville’s estate cuvée. Smoked Gouda x Jaffurs Bien Nacido VIneyard Syrah 2018: Salty, smoky, and gamey all at once, this flavor needs a powerful counterpart, which this rich, peppery single-vineyard expression from the historic Santa Maria Valley vineyard provides. Blue Cheese x A Tribute to Grace Thompson Vineyard Grenache 2019: The almost painful — though pleasant — funk of this flavor would work well with a crisp or viscous white wine, but Angela Osborne’s grenache from this well-known vineyard near Los Alamos works well too, putting up the bright fruit and zesty acidity to lift the salty character of the cheese.  Asiago x Story of Soil Martian Ranch Gamay Noir 2020: This flavor based on the traditional Italian cow’s-milk cheese proves almost creamy on the palate. Jessica Gasca’s fresh and zippy gamay from the recently recognized Alisos Canyon appellation brings out a cracked-pepper flavor and slices right into the creaminess like a lance.  Dry-Aged Ribeye x Crown Point Relevant 2018: While a meat-flavored chip may sound risky, this savory showcase is quite delicious. Like a seared steak, it requires a red wine with ripe impact, and this Happy Canyon estate blend of cabernet sauvignon, cabernet franc, and petit verdot is —MK lavish in jammy fruits, espresso, and milk chocolate flavors.

Wine Chips cost $20 for three three-ounce bags of one flavor, but package deals also exist. See winechips.com.

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Rosewood Miramar Beach will introduce the Revere Room, a new all-day eatery helmed by the resort’s executive chef, Massimo Falsini. The restaurant, which replaces the recently closed Malibu Farm, will celebrate the best of the American Riviera with a heavy emphasis MORE MASSIMO @ MIRAMAR: The Miramar’s Chef Massimo Falsini, seen here at the on locality, sourcing hotel’s flagship restaurant Caruso’s, is now launching the Revere Room in the former primarily from nearby location of Malibu Farm. farms and purveyors and bringing to life a sustainable concept set etc.]. New Si Chuan Garden has been dark for several days, and a note on the door from The against the backdrop of Miramar Beach. Named in a subtle nod to one of Los Ange- Gas Company indicated the ‘new occupant’ les’s most prolific architects, Paul Revere Wil- should sign up for gas service. Not a good sign. liams, whose work influenced several of the Meanwhile, next door at Santa Barbara Wood resort’s design details, The Revere Room will Fired Pizza, all the kitchen equipment has been bring to Montecito an elegant dining experi- shoved to one side and you can see unclaimed ence, ideal for all occasions. The seasonally mail on the floor. Also not a good sign. Fingers driven menu incorporates the ingredients from crossed that these closures are temporary but I regional farmers, fishermen, and ranchers, as don’t have a good feeling.” well as the resort’s own garden, to offer an array of health-conscious cuisine. Highlights range CHANGES FOR FORMER LOCATIONS: I am told that from plant-based bowls to regenerative elixirs. 370 Storke Road in Goleta, previously known Classical design meets transitional elements as Zizzo’s Coffeehouse & Brew Pub and the in the restaurant’s dining room. Wrapped in Storke Road Drive Inn, will become a pophand-painted Gracie wallpaper, the space up coffee shop for a couple of months so that invites the outside in, with scenic chinoise- the property does not forfeit its drive-through rie depicting a garden setting on an antiqued permit. Zizzo’s closed last June. Word on the blue background. Dark-stained chevron street is that after the temporary java spot has wood floors contrast tones of ivory and cream its run, the building will be torn down and the throughout, and French wood divided light property will become a gas station, possibly doors open up onto a patio, creating a unique a Fuel Depot, while retaining the car wash in indoor-outdoor setting with views of Califor- the back. nia’s coastline. The space at 729 State Street, the longtime home of Pascucci before the eatery moved to IHOP JUMPS AROUND: Edhat reports that IHOP 509 State Street, is now the home of the Santa at 4765 Calle Real in Goleta will be closing its Barbara Urban Flea Market, which is open doors and reopening in the University Plaza daily, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., and closed Tuesday and shopping center, home to Albertsons and the Wednesdays. DMV. There are a few empty spaces, most of Reader Bill let it be known that the buildwhich seem too small for the popular eatery. ing at 10 Winchester Canyon Road in Goleta, There is one unoccupied spot, however, that is where the Timbers restaurant used to be, is huge, and it used to house Pacific Sales and Rite now being tented. “Why” is a question that has Aid. But it doesn’t have any windows on three yet to be answered. The space at 409 State Street, once under sides, and there are just a few small windows in the front that are higher than the Restaurant the banner for M8RX Nightclub & Lounge, Q’s Billiards, and several other brands, might be Guy is tall (61). the future home of Backstage Kitchen & Bar. CAJÉ EXPANDING: Word on the street is that Cajé Reader Primetime tells me that some form Coffee Roasters, already available locally at 416 of construction has started at 801 State Street, East Haley Street, 1316 State Street, and 948 once known as Hoffmann Brat Haus, Snack Embarcadero del Norte in Isla Vista, is com- Shack, Piranha Restaurant & Sushi Bar, and ing to 811 State Street Ste. 1, the former home Rocks, though no sign is up indicating who’s of Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, which closed three coming in. area locations last year. Reader Primetime also sent me an update for 4945 Carpinteria Avenue, Suite A, in CarDE LA VINA CLOSURES? This just in from reader pinteria, formerly known as Crushcakes. I am Brendan: “I noticed worrisome signs at two told that an ABC permit application has been restaurants in the De la Vina shopping cen- posted indicating that the next tenant will be ter [home to Grocery Outlet, Jensen’s Guitar, Carp Kitchen and Grocery LLC.

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

ARTS DISTRICT GALLERIES ASCENDANT THOMAS REYNOLDS, 10 WEST, AND SULLIVAN GOSS PURSUE A GROWING MARKET a rush to collect art through Santa Barbara galleries and, in many instances, by Santa Barbara artists. Case in point: Maria Rendón’s solo debut show at Sullivan Goss: An American Gallery, Rain, which opened on Thursday, April 1, is well on its way to an 80 or even a 90 percent sell-through rate, with the largest (and most expensive) works promised to buyers before they hit the gallery walls. Rendón, who was born in Mexico City and holds fine arts degrees SUPERBLOOM: “Poppy” (2021) by Maria Rendón is from the Sullivan Goss exhibit Rain. from Universidad Anáhuac, Art Cenfunny thing happened on the way to ter College of Design, and UCSB, seems to the reopening of downtown Santa have struck a chord with the community with Barbara following the COVID-19 this show, which was inspired, in part, by the crisis. For years, if not decades, Santa Bar- rain that created 2019’s super bloom event. bara artists have lamented the fact that, Several years in the making, these brightly despite a preponderance of distinguished colored and exquisitely layered abstractions fine art collections in the city’s prolifera- radiate a sophisticated sensibility that’s equal tion of lavish domestic spaces, collectors parts cosmopolitan and spiritual, a perfect have — with few exceptions — tended to combination for the present moment. Elsewhere in the downtown arts district purchase their art elsewhere. Now it seems that, along with what has been described anchored by the Arlington Theatre, the as a significant backlog of unfilled orders Granada Theatre, and the Santa Barbara for new furniture, there is something of Museum of Art, two other outstanding COURTESY

A

ETC PRESENTS AN ILIAD 30

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APRIL 8, 2021

HOMER REDUX: John Tufts performs An Iliad April 15-18 for Ensemble Theatre Company.

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galleries are pursuing the rising market for contemporary art. The newest destination on the map, the Thomas Reynolds Gallery at 1331 State Street, arrives by way of San Francisco. Reynolds is an experienced dealer specializing in California artists who inhabit the border between representational and abstract work. He has dressed up the space with vintage desks, a handsome carpet, and several dozen works by artists such as Stevan Shapona, Terry Miura, Sandy Ostrau, Ken Auster, and Francis Livingston. Equipped with a comprehensive knowledge of California realism and an impeccable pedigree of success in the Bay Area, Reynolds fills an important niche in our art ecosystem. Like the great Frank Goss, founder of Sullivan Goss Gallery, Reynolds bears personal knowledge of the history of art in California with wit and grace. He’s sure to be a major resource for those seeking to better understand what forces have shaped our common aesthetic. Down the block and around the corner at 10 West Anapamu Street, Jan Ziegler provides an invaluable service to some of the city’s most accomplished artists by curating the shows at 10 West Gallery. 10 West employs a different business model from that of most other commercial art galleries, in that it meets expenses through a cooperative dues-paying membership, rather than through sales, although sales are, of course, a key aspect of keeping the members and artists happy. Here’s where you will find some of Santa Barbara’s most experienced and ambitious creators displaying their latest work. Lisa Crane, Madeleine Garrett, Pamela Grau, and Pat McGinnis are just some of the artists currently on view, and all of them are working at the height of their considerable powers. As of the pandemic, all of the work that’s on view in the physical space can also be seen on the 10 West website, a

The original “great book” was not, originally, a book at all. Thanks to the brilliant early-20th-century scholarship of Milman Parry and others, Homer’s Iliad, the 2,500-year-old Bronze Age epic poem, is today understood to be a cornerstone example of oral-formulaic composition, a technique that allows performers to rapidly improvise extended poems. How fitting that today we have An Iliad, an approximately 100-minute-long version of the epic poem created by Lisa Peterson and Denis O’Hare and intended for the 21st-century stage. The“An”in the play’s title recognizes the fact that, before it was written down, the poem was perpetually in flux — every original Iliad was “an Iliad.”It was only the advent of literary culture that fixed the text in the specific order that we read it today. For four days, April 15-18, the virtuosic actor John Tufts will deliver five distinct live performances of An Iliad, as directed by Ensemble Theatre Company Artistic Director Jonathan Fox and

L I F E PAGE 30 decision prompted by both the reduced hours necessitated by quarantine and the increasing prevalence of online sales. The gallery has also recently leased a display window on State Street next to Old Navy, so make sure to check that out next time you are prowling the downtown arts district pedestrian mall. —Charles Donelan

POETRY MATTERS

‘Between the First and Second Dose’ by David Starkey

The ache of that long-sought jab in the upper arm has faded, leaving behind the vertigo of hope. Now, an interim alliance between patience and next week, daydreams of hosting friends in a living room with windows shut, and music made by human beings sweating on their guitar strings. Is it time to begin discarding caution? The almost forgotten things of this world hove once more into our ken — the violet glow of the coast at sunset, the scent of jasmine blooming in a neighbor’s yard.

accompanied by the original cello music of the Santa Barbara Symphony’s Jonathan Flaksman. Although Peterson and O’Hare rely on the Robert Fagles translation for sections of the original poem, what makes the play special is the thrilling way they have reimagined the telling of the tale as something contemporary. The anonymous poet/performer carries with him the entire history of human conflict since the Trojan War. He knows about World War I’s trenches and the American armies of the great wars, with their soldiers drawn from every city and state in the country. The interweaving of these histories gives Homer’s timeless truths about self-destructive masculine wrath an inescapable relevance that takes the ancient story to the heart of modern concerns. For tickets and information, visit etcsb.org. —CD


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Author Susan Sontag defined “mad

people” as those who “stand alone and burn.” She said she was drawn to them because they inspired her to do the same. What do you think she meant by the descriptor “stand alone and burn”? I suspect she was referring to strong-willed people devoted to cultivating the most passionate version of themselves, always in alignment with their deepest longings. She meant those who are willing to accept the consequences of such devotion, even if it means being misunderstood or alone. The coming weeks will be an interesting and educational time for you to experiment with being such a person.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): In the 1930s, Taurus-born Rita Levi-

Montalcini was a promising researcher in neurobiology at the University of Turin in Italy. But when fascist dictator Benito Mussolini imposed new laws that forbade Jews from holding university jobs, she was fired. Undaunted, she created a laboratory in her bedroom and continued her work. There, she laid the foundations for discoveries that ultimately led to her winning the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. I foresee you summoning comparable determination and resilience in the coming weeks, Taurus.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Religious scholar Karl Barth (1886-

1968) wrote, “There will be no song on our lips if there be no anguish in our hearts.” To that perverse oversimplification, I reply: “Rubbish. Twaddle. Bunk. Hooey.” I’m appalled by his insinuation that pain is the driving force for all of our lyrical self-revelations. Case in point: you in the coming weeks. I trust there will be a steady flow of songs in your heart and on your lips because you will be in such intimate alignment with your life’s master plan.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “It is not easy to be crafty and winsome at the same time, and few accomplish it after the

age of six,” wrote Cancerian author John W. Gardner. But I would add that more adult Crabs accomplish this feat than any other sign of the zodiac. I’ll furthermore suggest that during the next six weeks, many of you will do it quite well. My prediction: You will blend lovability and strategic shrewdness to generate unprecedented effectiveness. (How could anyone resist you?)

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Staring at flames had benefits for our

primitive ancestors. As they sat around campfires and focused on the steady burn, they were essentially practicing a kind of meditation. Doing so enhanced their ability to regulate their attention, thereby strengthening their working memory and developing a greater capacity to make long-range plans. What does this have to do with you? As a fire sign, you have a special talent for harnessing the power of fire to serve you. In the coming weeks, that will be even more profoundly true than usual. If you can do so safely, I encourage you to spend quality time gazing into flames. I also hope you will super-nurture the radiant fire that glows within you. (More info: tinyurl.com/GoodFlames.)

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Physicist Victor Weisskopf told us,

“What’s beautiful in science is the same thing that’s beautiful in Beethoven. There’s a fog of events and suddenly you see a connection. It connects things that were always in you that were never put together before.” I’m expecting there to be a wealth of these “Aha!” moments for you in the coming weeks, Virgo. Hidden patterns will become visible. Missing links will appear. Secret agendas will emerge. The real stories beneath the superficial stories will materialize. Be receptive and alert!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Jungian psychoanalyst and folklore expert Clarissa Pinkola Estés celebrates the power of inquiry. She says that “asking the proper question is the central action of transformation,” both in fairy tales and in psychotherapy. To identify what changes

WEEK OF APRIL 8

will heal you, you must be curious to uncover truths that you don’t know yet. “Questions are the keys that cause the secret doors of the psyche to swing open,” says Estés. I bring this to your attention, Libra, because now is prime time for you to formulate the Fantastically Magically Catalytic Questions.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In April 1933, Scorpio-born Afri-

can-American singer Ethel Waters was in a “private hell.” Her career was at an impasse, and her marriage was falling apart. In the depths of despondency, she was invited to sing a new song, “Stormy Weather,” at New York City’s famous Cotton Club. It was a turning point. She later wrote, “I was singing the story of my misery and confusion, of the misunderstandings in my life I couldn’t straighten out, the story of the wrongs and outrages done to me by people I had loved and trusted.” The audience was thrilled by her performance and called her back for 12 encores. Soon thereafter, musical opportunities poured in and her career blossomed. I foresee a parallel event in your life, Scorpio. Maybe not quite so dramatic, but still, quite redemptive.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I love to see you enjoy yourself. I get

a vicarious thrill as I observe you pursuing pleasures that other people are too inhibited or timid to dare. It’s healing for me to witness you unleash your unapologetic enthusiasm for being alive in an amazing body that’s blessed with the miracle of consciousness. And now I’m going to be a cheerleader for your efforts to wander even further into the frontiers of bliss and joy and gratification. I will urge you to embark on a quest of novel forms of rapture and exultation. I’ll prod you to at least temporarily set aside habitual sources of excitement so you’ll have room to welcome as-yet unfamiliar sources.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet John O’Donohue suggested that a river’s behavior is worthy of our emu-

lation. He said the river’s life is “surrendered to the pilgrimage.” It’s “seldom pushing or straining, keeping itself to itself everywhere all along its flow.” Can you imagine yourself doing that, Capricorn? Now is an excellent time to do so. O’Donohue rhapsodized that the river is “at one with its sinuous mind, an utter rhythm, never awkward,” and that “it continues to swirl through all unlikeness with elegance: a ceaseless traverse of presence soothing on each side, sounding out its journey, raising up a buried music.” Be like that river, dear Capricorn!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Is life not a thousand times too

short for us to bore ourselves?” wrote philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. In response to that sentiment, I say, “Amen!” and “Hallelujah!” Even if you will live ’til age 99, that’s still too brief a time to indulge in an excess of dull activities that activate just a small part of your intelligence. To be clear, I don’t think it’s possible to be perfect in avoiding boredom. But for most of us, there’s a lot we can do to minimize numbing tedium and energy-draining apathy. I mention this, Aquarius, because the coming weeks will be a time when you will have extra power to make your life as interesting as possible for the long run.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): I know of four different govern-

mental organizations that have estimated the dollar value of a single human life. The average of their figures is $7.75 million. So let’s say, for argument’s sake, that you are personally worth that much. Does it change the way you think about your destiny? Are you inspired to upgrade your sense of yourself as a precious treasure? Or is the idea of putting a price on your merit uninteresting, even unappealing? Whatever your reaction is, I hope it prods you to take a revised inventory of your worth, however you measure it. It’s a good time to get a clear and precise evaluation of the gift that is your life. (Quote from Julia Cameron: “Treating yourself like a precious object makes you strong.”)

HOMEWORK: Send brief descriptions of your top three vices and top three virtues. FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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Join nearly 50 eco-focused businesses, non-profits and government agencies to share your message during the festival. Prices are $90 for non-profits/ education/government and $175 for businesses. sbearthday.org/exhibit Dedicated booth ‘office hours’ are 11am to noon on April 22, 23 and 24, and one hour following Main Stage close each day (times will vary).

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55 Filmmaker Ephron 58 Math conjecture regarding a quadrilateral inscribed in 1 Life force, to an a circle acupuncturist 4 One of the Three Musketeers 62 “I identify,” in online comments 10 Consumer protection gp. 63 Ear ailment 13 “___ Wiedersehen!” 14 Like the opening letter of 64 Baseball stat 65 “Bill ___ Saves the World” each of the four longest 66 Hastily arrive at, as a answers conclusion 15 “Dog Barking at the Moon” 67 Celebrity chef Martin artist Joan 16 Magazine whose website has a “Find a Therapist” 1 Pen parts feature 2 Period of quiet 19 “Away!” 3 Haunted house challenge 20 Stunned state 4 Hearth leftover 21 How hair may stand 5 Brazilian beach city, briefly 22 Maritime patrol org. 25 “The mind ___ own place 6 “It was ___ blur” 7 “Feed me or I’ll knock your ...” (John Milton) drink over” 26 Offer on eBay 8 “Splendor in the Grass” 28 Japanese grills Oscar winner 32 “Common” chapter of 9 Piglet’s home history 10 High-end hotel amenity 33 Flavor on a German 11 Fiber-rich cereals schnapps bottle 12 “Cheers” bartender Woody 37 Rank between marquis 15 Philosophies that regard and viscount reality as one organic 39 Bell or whistle? whole 40 “Peter Pan” henchman 41 Device that records 17 Lettuce variety respiration 18 “___, With Love” (Sidney 44 Went nowhere Poitier movie) 45 Tightly cinched 23 Golden State traffic org. 46 “How We Do” singer Rita (as seen in an Erik Estrada 47 “Fun, Fun, Fun” car in a TV show) ‘60s hit 24 Philbin’s onetime morning 49 British mil. decorations cohost 51 Breezes (through) 25 “It’s Shake ‘n Bake!” “And 52 Scrooge’s comment ___!” (old ad tagline)

Across

Down

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APRIL 8, 8, 2021 2021 APRIL

26 Pager noise 27 Persian Gulf country 29 Arctic floaters 30 Burning 31 B equivalent, in music 34 Contrite phrase 35 A few feet away 36 Greek consonant 38 Happy fun Ball? 42 Code where B is -... 43 Some TVs 47 Frayed 48 Ecological community 50 “Be My Yoko ___” (Barenaked Ladies song) 51 “Wheel of Fortune” action 52 Eight bits, computerwise 53 One side of the Urals 54 Address abbreviation 56 Country star McEntire 57 Former dictator Idi 59 “Boardwalk Empire” actress Gretchen 60 Battleship score 61 That, in Madrid ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1026

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:JAMES B. NORRIS CASE NO.: 21PR00150 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JIM B. NORRIS, JAMES B. NORRIS, JIM NORRIS, AND JAMES NORRIS A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Nicholas J. Schneider in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that:Nicholas J. Schneider be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 05/13/2021 AT 9:00 A. M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: 1332 Anacapa Street, Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑963‑0669 Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELLEN VIRGINIA SESMA CASE NO.: 21PROO100 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ELLEN VIRGINIA SESMA A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PATRICIA CLAUDINE KIEFERLE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: PATRICIA CLAUDINE KIEFERLE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition

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requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 05/06/2021 AT 9:00 A. M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, ANACAPA DIVISION, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Janet K. McGinnis, Attorney at Law; 924 Anacapa Street, Suite 1‑M Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑2156, (805) 963‑1865. Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RODNEY J. TILLEY Case No.: 21PR00126 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of RODNEY J TILLEY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: JULIE SHERNIUS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: JULIE SHERNIUS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless

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an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/04/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 2 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA 312 E Cook St, Bldg E, Santa Maria 93454; Probate IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Julie Shernius 1406 Dorsett Dock, Point Pleasant Boro, NJ 08742; (201) 927‑3921. Published Apr 8, 15, 22 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: OM SWEET MAMA at 3952 Foothill Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Aida Robana (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000832. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: POETIC PICNICS at 1020 North Nopal Street #4 Santa Barbara. CA 93103; Wendy T Acosta (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000774. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: BOWLINE MEDIA, BOWLINE CONSULTING, BOWLINE FILMS, BOWLINE ENTERTAINMENT at 349 Northgate Dr, Apt C Goleta, CA 93117; Gareth Kelly (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000654. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CURRENT CELLARS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Terravant Wine Company, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000715. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: STOUT & KAUFMAN, A PROFESSIONAL LAW CORPORATION at 5951 Encina Road, Ste. 208 Goleta, CA 93117; Stout & Kaufman, A Professional Law Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000688. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FAMILY GANG MERCH at 317 Arden Rd. Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alexis D Flores (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000685. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: FAERON COMMUNICATION at 660 Tabor Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Jacqueline J Oliveira (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000611. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 50 ACRE RANCH WINES, 50 ESTATE RANCH WINES, ABSTRACTION WINES, ALL TUA WINES, ALLA TUA SALUTE WINES, BARN NO WINES, BAUHOUSE WINES, BUTCHER SHOP WINES, C CELLARS, D’OLIVO VINOS, FIRE & OAK CELLARS, HARVEST STONE WINES, HERMOSO SUENO WINES, HIDDEN TRIAL VINEYARDS, NICE PAIR WINES, PARA SU SALUD WINES, PROMINENCE, SERPENTINE WINES, STEAKHOUSE 55 WINES, TAVOLA RUSTICA WINES, TECHNIQUE WINES, TROMPEUR VINEYARDS, VEVERE E AMARE WINES, VINE TIE VINEYARDS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Terravant Wine Company, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000719. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: IMAGES BY VALERIE at 3940 Maricopa Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Valerie Villa (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000617. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAPITAL PACIFIC DEVELOPMENT GROUP, CAPITAL PACIFIC HOMES at 209 W. Alamar Ave., Ste A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Center Point Development Group, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000592. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: PAC SUBSEA at 529 Hastings Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Nathan F. Perry (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000736. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DRW GLOBAL at 218 Sherwood Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Douglas R. Weinstein (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 3, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000579. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DON CAMELON TAQUERIA LLC at 302 E. Haley Street #B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Don Camelon Taqueria LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000610. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: JANE OF ALL TRADES at 1217 East Rice Ranch Road Santa Maria, CA 93455; Nina L. Russaw (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000791. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: AK AUTO REPAIR at 814 E Cota St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Arsen Kagramanov (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000683. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: ARRAY CREATIVE DESIGN at 414 De La Vina Street Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Erika Bellitt (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000660. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LEFT COAST BRANDS at 819 Reddick Street Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Coastal Manufacturing LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000835. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: RVP CATTLE CO. at 3229 Calle Rosales Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lone Oak Cattle Company LLC 265 Meadowlark Rd Santa Ynez, CA 93460 This business is conducted by a General Partnership County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000704. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SG ASSOCIATES at 1117 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; SG Associates, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000747. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HUSTLE MEDIA at 5511 Ekwill Street Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Master Clean USA Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000786. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EQUIPPED FITNESS SOLUTIONS at 518 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Equippedfs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000818. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRASSLAND GROWERS at 4045 Foothill Road Carpinteria, CA 93013; Robert Abe 1020 ‘D’ Bailard Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000763. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as:ALPHA COATINGD CLEANING at 924 W Apricot Avenue, Unit 102 Lompoc, CA 93436; Jadus Legacy, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000598. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.


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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: THE EDGE APARTMENTS at 6509 Pardall St Goleta, CA 93117; Ladera Townhomes LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000769. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: THYME PLUS BOTANICALS at 14 Oak Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Restorative Organics, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000737. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: PAYJUNCTION at 1903 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Messiahic Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corportion Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000848. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: EFS at 518 E Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Equippedfs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by aLimited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000884. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as:BOARD AND BRUSH at 31 E. Canon Perdido Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Francie Rose, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000828. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as:ALPHA SURFACEPRO at 924 W. Apricot Ave. Unit 102 Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Jadus Legacy LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000824. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OLD COWDOGS at 2273 Alamo Pintado Rd. Solvang, CA 93463; Alamar Media, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000772. Apr 8, 15, 22, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: NOTOWN TAVERN at 5114 Hollister Avenue Santa Barbara. CA 93111; Liquid Essentials LLC 2785 Painted Cave Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000748. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: CHUCK WAGON WINES at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Terravant Wine Company, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000718. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: CREATE ORDER TILE at 228 North Street Lompoc, CA 93436; Karis E. Clinton (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000860. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: SLO CURIO at 1117 1/2 Olive St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jeeyon Roslie (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000888. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: LUQUE TRANSPORT at 4413 Hacienda Dr Guadalupe, CA 93434; Martin Jr. Luque (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000827. April 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: JERROCA at 588 Mills Way Goleta, CA 93117; Charuwan M Pichardo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 30, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000903. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: OA CONSULTING at 4551 Brighton Place Santa Maria, CA 93455; Susan E Gibbons (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000867. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA VINS at 4390 Calle Real #A Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Lorraine Cole 843 Portesuello Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by Lori Cole a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000700. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: ORG‑GARDEN LANDSCAPE at 5832 Mandarin Dr Apt C Goleta, CA 93117; Benedicto Cuevas (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000681. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: METROPOLITAN GANSTER at 27 West Anapamu St, #265 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jonathan P Holmes (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000893. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: MR. DEW DAB at 948 W. Chestnut Ave Apt D Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Meesha Rose (same address) Lafa Jones (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000951. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LEO RICARD VALENCIA AKA RICHAD R. VALENCIA ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00730 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: LEO RICHARD VALENCIA AKA RICHARD R. VALENCIA TO: RICK RICHARD VALENCIA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Apr 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to

the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 01, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF VICTOR PLASCENCIA PLASCENCIA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00848 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VICTOR PLASCENCIA PLASCENCIA TO: VICTOR PLASENCIA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00809 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: PATRICIA ELLEN COTTRELL TO: PAT R I C I A ELLEN COTTRELL‑MARKS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 21, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 25, 2021. by Colleen K. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:21CV00830 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s)

in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK TO: MILES WILLIAM ASHLOCK BURKE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TERRY ANN TABACCHI TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME:

CASE NUMBER:21CV01034 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: TERRY ANN TABACCHI TO: TERRY ANN THOMPSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 11, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COUR T HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 22, 2021. by tHOMAS p. aNDERLE. Superior. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA In the matter of: MCDONALD FAMILY TRUST dated March 30, 2001, as amended Case No. 21PR00149 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF PAULA D. McDONALD, Deceased [PROB C §§19003, 19040(b), 19052] Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Paula D. McDonald (Decedent) that all persons having claims against the Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93121­1107, and deliver pursuant to Section 1215 of the California Probate Code a copy to Catherine M. Brunner, as Trustee of the McDonald Family Trust dated March 30, 2001, as amended, wherein the decedent was the surviving Settlor, at 1000 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1500, Los Angeles, California 90017­1730, within the latter of four months after April 08, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: March 31, 2021. Parisa F. Weiss, Esq., Attorney for Trustee Published Apr 8, 15, 22, 29 2021.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING City Council Meeting 5:30 p.m. April 20, 2021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, April 20, 2021 at 5:30 p.m., at the City of Goleta, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite. B, Goleta, CA to: Consider adoption of resolutions modifying the City of Goleta User Fees and Charges Schedules. The User Fees schedules include but are not limited to all City service, permitting and use fees with the exception of Developer Impact Fees. A list of proposed fees is available for public viewing during normal business hours at the City of Goleta Offices, at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be sent to the City Clerk Group e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: City Council and City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. In order to be disseminated to the City Council for consideration during the Council meeting, written information must be submitted to the City Clerk no later than Monday at noon prior to the City Council meeting. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the City Council prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, April 15, 2021 on City of Goleta’s website www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 9617505 or email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. ATTENTION: Pursuant to of the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council for April 20, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. City Council will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above or via email to the City Clerk at cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish: April 8, 2021 Publish: April 15, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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Santa Barbara Independent 4/8/21  

April 8, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 795

Santa Barbara Independent 4/8/21  

April 8, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 795