__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

FREE

Santa Barbara

APR. 1-8, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 794

SEASIDE & STREAMING CINEMA

SBIFF

Goes Drive-In & Digital During Pandemic

Inside: FILMS

TO FIND, TOP ACTRESSES INTERVIEWED, S.B. FILMMAKERS, and MORE

Food S E C R E T B AO D I V U L G E S A L L • Arts H I G H S C H O O L T H E AT E R R O U N D U P News C OV I D VAC C I N E E L I G I B I L I T Y E X PA N D S INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

1


April & May

JUST ADDED VIRTUAL EVENTS

Spring Virtual Pack $60 (Includes the seven virtual events slated for Apr - May)

Leading activists, creatives and thinkers confront racism in America, guiding us towards racial equality.

UCSB students: FREE! (Registration required)

Apr 21 / 5 PM Pacific Apr 6 / 5 PM Pacific

Dr. Robert Bullard

Apr 15 / 5 PM Pacific

Allyson Felix

Ranky Tanky

Advocacy and Equality in Sports and in Life

Gullah Music of the Carolina Coast

The Quest for Environmental and Racial Justice

May 4 / 5 PM Pacific

Heather McGhee

Apr 30 / 5 PM Pacific

Bryan Stevenson

Apr 29 / 5 PM Pacific

Theaster Gates

American Injustice: Mercy, Humanity and Making a Difference

Artist and Social Innovator

The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together

Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Patty & John MacFarlane, Sara Miller McCune, Santa Barbara Foundation, Lynda Weinman & Bruce Heavin, Dick Wolf, and Zegar Family Foundation UC Santa Barbara Campus Partners: Department of Black Studies Center for Black Studies Research Division of Social Sciences Division of Humanities and Fine Arts Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences Division of Student Affairs

Gevirtz Graduate School of Education Graduate Division Bren School for Environmental Science & Management College of Creative Studies College of Engineering MultiCultural Center

Carsey-Wolf Center The Program in Latin American and Iberian Studies UCSB Library | UCSB Reads Office of the Chancellor Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu 2

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

May 12 / 5 PM Pacific

Patrisse Cullors

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Dialogue Community Partners: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli Bryan Stevenson Event Sponsors: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli Allyson Felix presented in association with UCSB Athletics Dr. Robert Bullard presented in association with the Central Coast Climate Justice Network, Community Environmental Council, UCSB Bren School for Environmental Science & Management and UCSB Environmental Studies Patrisse Cullors presented as part of UCSB Reads, sponsored by the UCSB Library and the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor with additional support from UCSB Arts & Lectures and a variety of campus and community partners Special Thanks:


Just Added Virtual Events for April & May

Intimate, interactive online events you won’t find anywhere else.

Jane Goodall

Hope Fuels a Better World Sat, Apr 10 / 11 AM Pacific (Note new time) Event Sponsors: Betsy Atwater & Tim Eaton, and Susan & Bruce Worster

Kelly McGonigal

Ephrat Asherie Dance

Speaking with Pico

Mohsin Hamid

The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection and Courage

Odeon

Fri, Apr 16 7 PM Pacific

Tue, Apr 20 5 PM Pacific

(Note special time)

Tue, Apr 13 5 PM Pacific

Lead Sponsor: Jody & John Arnhold

Supporting Sponsor: Siri & Bob Marshall

Arthur C. Brooks

Yo-Yo Ma & Kathryn Stott

National Renewal

Tue, May 11 / 5 PM Pacific

Speaking with Pico

Mira Nair Wed, May 26 5 PM Pacific

Songs of Comfort and Hope Wed, May 5 5 PM Pacific

Corporate Sponsor:

Additional support provided by Forces of Nature series sponsor Audrey & Timothy O. Fisher in memory of J. Brooks Fisher Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Bob Feinberg, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay, and Sheila Wald Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Dori Pierson Carter & Chris Carter, Martha Gabbert, and Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor Ephrat Asherie Dance presented in partnership with The Joyce Theater and Moss Arts Center at Virginia Tech, and in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Mira Nair presented in association with the Carsey-Wolf Center at UC Santa Barbara

House Calls - Spring 2021: $70 (Includes the seven virtual events slated for Apr-May)

Community Partners:

Single tickets start at $10 UCSB students: FREE! (Registration required).

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Special Thanks:

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

3


welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls Buellton Whitney Mignon Dicks, 2/18/2021 Goleta Amiya Luz Valdez, 2/2/2021 Sophia Rose Silva, 2/11/2021

“ It was a scary time, but the team at Cottage Children’s Medical Center were amazing and gave us peace of mind as Levi healed.”

Lompoc Frida Araceli Alvarado, 2/15/2021 Gianna Victoria Taitague, 2/20/2021 Oak View June Melody Cokeley, 2/26/2021

– Kristina, Levi’s mother

Ojai Margot James Happy, 2/16/2021 Santa Barbara Kaylee Daisy Herrera, 1/17/2021 Ingrid Birgitte Sorensen, 2/8/2021 Leni Mae Melin, 2/11/2021 Eloise Grace Forman, 2/13/2021 Zadie Eggemoggin Deprez-Lowther, 2/18/2021 Lola Nova Corona, 2/24/2021 Gia Amorette Easterling, 2/25/2021 Annapurna Jennell Sharma, 2/27/2021 Victoria Grace Hayden, 2/28/2021 Charlie Rae Loya, 3/9/2021

Levi | Santa Barbara Ten-year-old Levi was a passenger in an ATV that tipped over, crushed his arm and caused multiple fractures and third-degree burns that required skin grafts. After emergency surgery at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital, Levi began hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an outpatient at Cottage’s Ridley-Tree Center for Wound Care Management. Breathing pure oxygen helped increase the level of oxygen in his bloodstream and promoted wound healing. For inpatients and outpatients, Cottage Children’s Medical Center provides all types of pediatric medical services.

health e baby

Are you expecting or do you have an infant? Sign up for our free newsletter specific to your due date or your baby’s age. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

Learn more at cottagehealth.org/childrens.

Cottage Children’s Medical Center cares for more than 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center, and eleven specialized outpatient clinics.

Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships Occupation and Relationships • •Occupation andCareer Career• Meditation • Meditation Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions• Anxiety • Anxiety GriefSpiritual and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Spiritual Covid-19Issues Issues••Communication Offering Video •&Conflict Phone

Michael H Kreitsek, MA Michael H Kreitsek, MA Michael H Kreitsek, MA Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling Buddhist Perspective Perspective Counseling From From aa Buddhist Counseling From a698-0286 Buddhist Perspective 805 805 698-0286 805 698-0286 4

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Winter Gardening & Cooking Classes

Register for Summer Camp! atozcookingschool.org

Follow us @atozcookingschool and share the love

Santa Ynez Camilla Mae Tewolde, 2/5/2021

Baby Boys

Carpinteria Luke Jackson Hund, 2/5/2021 Adrian Gabriel Cornet, 2/13/2021 Lompoc Izack Nathanael Villaseñor Vasquez, 2/15/2021 Santa Barbara Wesley Cole Gutshall, 2/10/2021 Mavrix Geoffrey Marcus, 2/10/2021 Enrique Romeo Escobedo, 2/16/2021 Benjamin Grant, 2/22/2021 Anthony Ivan Hernandez Velarde, 2/24/2021 Oskar Eugene Brown, 2/25/2021 Jaylen James Rojas, 2/25/2021 San Nguyen-Dang, 3/3/2021 Santa Paula Alexander David Gonzalez, 2/16/2021

Alamar Dental Implant Center sbimplants.com


18

volume 35, # 794, Apr. 1-8, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

Seaside & Streaming Cinema

Film Fest Goes Drive-In & Digital During Pandemic

by Indy Staff

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 28 ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Film Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 ON THE COVER: Illustration by Ben Ciccati. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

OUR SBIFF COVER MASTER Ben Ciccati’s tenure at the Santa Barbara Independent began in 2006, when he started delivering our newspapers around town, and got more serious when he became a staff designer for about a decade, leaving in 2018 as art director. But he still draws for us and has been illustrating our SBIFF covers for the past half dozen years, usually two per festival focused on one of the visiting celebrities. He tells us about this week’s edition, which reflects the pandemic pivot of SBIFF and not a specific actor.

CHLOË BEE CICCATI

TABLE of CONTENTS

What’s special about this year’s cover? It’s different because I didn’t have to nail a celebrity likeness, low pressure — so kind of a “yard-time” edition for me. I did two versions and characterized my dad into one of them, which is very funny to me. And if I can’t entertain myself, how can I entertain others? What have you been up to since leaving our staff? The usual endless stream of art projects, paintings, and I did a kids’ book. Usually I’m messing around in the wood shop. I customized the inside of my VW van in case I need someplace to hide from wild animals. Also, I got really into having outdoor movies with my marvelous neighbors each weekend. Life’s good! INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

ADULT Studio Art Workshops (via Zoom) Explore the basics of drawing in small group, one-hour workshops, led by SBMA Teaching Artists and inspired by works of art in the Museum’s collection. FREE | TICKETS.SBMA.NET

Drawing 5 – 6 pm

SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART Eugene Berman, Composition II, 1940. Inkwash, watercolor, and gouache on paper. SBMA, Gift of Wright S. Ludington.

April 6 April 13 May 6 may 13 June 10 june 17 INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

5


NEWS of the WEEK

MAR. 25-APR. 1, 2021

by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CORONAVIRUS

County Hits COVID Case Rate Flat Line LOMPO C VALLEY MEDICAL C ENTER

Vaccine Eligibility Expands as U.K. Variant Dominates

NAB A JAB: All state residents age 50+ are now eligible to receive the COVID vaccine. Starting April 15, all residents age 16+ can also get the vaccine. by Tyler Haden, Delaney Smith, and Jean Yamamura

S

oon, all adults will be eligible to be vaccinated in Santa Barbara County. The announcement, made last Thursday by state health officials, was followed on Friday by a cold splash of troubling news by county Public Health officials: After weeks of steady decline, the county’s COVID-19 case rate has started to plateau as the deadlier, more contagious U.K. variant of the coronavirus appears to have gained a solid foothold throughout the county. The county has been in the red tier for nearly four weeks, and its entry into the lessrestrictive orange tier hinges on the adjusted case rate, which was at 5.3 as of Tuesday. At the previous Friday’s press conference, Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso said she believes that the county can drop its case rate to below 4 and enter the orange tier within two weeks or so, if the public “doubles down” on COVID precautions.

VACCINE ELIGIBILITY EXPANDING

Citing an expected increase in supply, California health officials announced on March 25 that all state residents age 16 and above will be eligible for COVID-19 vaccines starting April 15. Residents 50 and above could get their shots beginning today, April 1. “The light at the end of the tunnel continues to get brighter,” said Governor Gavin Newsom in a statement. But many older residents have expressed confusion and frustration as they’ve tried to schedule vaccination appointments, an experience acknowledged by county health leaders during a virtual town hall on March 23. Every clinic, pharmacy, and hospital, it seems, uses its own registration system. By the end of the month, Do-Reynoso said, all agencies and organizations across the state will have switched to Blue Shield’s centralized MyTurn platform (myturn.ca.gov). That

should greatly simplify things, she explained. Community members can also always call the county’s 2-1-1 helpline for assistance, she said. The county has so far administered 185,415 doses of the vaccine. Of that quantity, 118,397 are first doses, 59,302 second doses, and 6,851 single doses.

U.K. VARIANT PREVALENT

In an unexpected reversal, the COVID-19 variant first spotted in England appears to be outpacing the spread of the West Coast variant in Santa Barbara. This is a trend opposite to the first set of variant results posted at the Public Health dashboard. The latest set of coronavirus samples that have undergone genetic sequencing at UC Santa Barbara show twice as many of the more deadly U.K. virus than the West Coast virus. The prior week, no U.K. virus had shown up in the UCSB study, but the Centers for Disease Control had reported two U.K. cases in Santa Barbara County. Public Health Officer Dr. Henning Ansorg described the CDC’s samples as being four weeks old during a press conference on March 26. Only a relatively small quantity of coronavirus samples from the county have been sequenced, which is time-intensive and requires painstaking work. As variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID19 have popped up, doctors want to know if the mutations are more contagious and more dangerous. The U.K. variant is considered to be both. For the West Coast variant, however, while more contagious, it remains unclear whether it causes more death or severe disease. Resistance to vaccine is another concern, and both the U.K. and the West Coast variants respond to the three vaccines available in the United States. CONT’D ON PAGE 9 

COURTS & CRIME

Details Scarce in Eucalyptus Hill Shooting

S

anta Barbara police remain relatively tight-lipped with details from Monday evening’s reported shooting by the city’s Eastside near Salinas Street in the Eucalyptus Hill neighborhood. As of press time Wednesday morning, there are no reports of any suspects having been taken into custody, and the victim is in critical condition at Cottage Hospital.

At about 5:20 p.m. Monday, police responded to calls of gunshots fired — at least six. When they arrived at the scene, they found what they described as “an out-of-county” adult male who had sustained serious injuries. It was not stated whether those injuries came from gunshot wounds or from crashing a black SUV into a neighborhood tree. Law enforcement agencies issued a shelter-in-place notice for the neighborhood and dispatched SWAT teams, a Bearcat armored vehicle, and two teams of police dogs to scour the area for two suspects reportedly seen fleeing the scene, one reportedly carrying a handgun. Tear gas was reportedly discharged in the search, and helicopters, provided courtesy

of the Santa Barbara Sheriff ’s Office, were deployed as well. The shelter-in-place alert was discontinued at 11 p.m. Monday’s shooting marks the second time this year that gunfire has erupted in this neighborhood. Early in January, four teens were shot on Liberty Street one day before classes were scheduled to resume at Santa Barbara High School. Two were killed and two wounded. Those killings remain unsolved as of this writing. Police spokesperson Joshua Morton said they remain very much active investigations. Police have told parents of the victims they want to make sure they have an ironclad case before filing charges and taking their case to the District Attorney’s Office.

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. 6

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

—Nick Welsh

COU RTESY OF N EWSN ATION

IMMIGRATION

Rep. Salud Carbajal (pictured) made a visit on 3/24 to Carrizo Springs, Texas, where a camp about 20 miles from the U.S./Mexico border holds 766 children between the ages of 13 and 17 who entered the U.S. without a parent. He told pool reporters accompanying the group of five members of Congress: “We don’t need to have children in a facility like this. We need to expedite the process to make sure that those children are united with their guardians, their family members, and taken out of this facility as soon as possible.” Read more at independent.com/ carrizo-springs.

COURTS & CRIME The victim in the 3/7 Los Olivos homicide is Santiago Maldonado Martinez, 17, of Shandon, California, the Sheriff’s Office revealed on 3/30. Martinez was found deceased in a vehicle along the side of the road on the 6200 block of Foxen Canyon Road. The Sheriff’s Office was initially dispatched there for a car accident, but it was quickly determined that the car with Martinez inside had not been involved in an accident. The investigation into Martinez’s death is still ongoing. An Oxnard man was arrested on 3/26 for alleged sexual battery at his Carpinteria massage business. Sheriff’s detectives had been investigating two independent reports of sexual assaults that occurred at Max Relax in Casitas Plaza, where both victims described similar incidents of sexual battery by the suspect, Xiaodong Mei, 46. As part of the investigation, a detective posed as a customer and was reportedly sexually assaulted in the same way before arresting Mei, who’s being held on $100,000 bail. Anyone with knowledge of additional crimes associated with Mei or Max Relax can contact Detective Cockrell at infoSIB@sbsheriff.org or (805) 681-4175 or leave an anonymous tip at sbsheriff.org/home/anonymoustip or (805) 681-4171.

COMMUNITY A 39-year-old Ventura man was killed in a two-car accident on State Route 154 east of Lake Cachuma Village at 3:50 a.m. on 3/25. The Ventura man was driving a Toyota westbound on the highway while the other driver, 34-year-old Ernest Gilbert of Santa Barbara, was driving a Dodge eastbound. The collision occurred when the Toyota driver made an unsafe turn and crossed over the double yellow lines and crashed into Gilbert, who was taken to Cottage Hospital with major injuries. The crash is still under investigation, and anyone with information is encouraged to call Highway Patrol at (805) 688-5551. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

NOW HIRING Transportation Security Officers Full- and part-time positions starting at $18.85 per hour*

COMMUNITY

Hundreds Protest to Stop Anti-Asian Hate J EAN ZI ESEN H EN N E

N

early 300 people assembled Saturday on the corner of State and Anapamu streets in downtown Santa Barbara to hold a vigil in protest of violence against Asians in the U.S., in particular the six women of Asian descent shot to death in Georgia on March 16. They gathered at a spot known as “Speaker’s Corner,” though no speeches were made. Instead, the silent crowd created a powerful presence of solidarity and solace. The four organizers — Sharon Hoshida, Juliet Velarde Betita, Karena Jew, and Judy Guillermo-Newton — reflect to a small degree the large part of the world known as Asia, their parents and grandparents coming from Japan, the Philippines, and China. Joining them were Indian Americans, Vietnamese Americans, Thai Americans, and more members of the Asian community, as well as other Santa Barbarans allied in sorrow over the killings and the thousands of assaults against Asians and Asian Americans since the beginning of the pandemic and Donald Trump’s repeated conflation of a health crisis with a divisive brand of politics as he named COVID-19 the “China virus” or the “kung flu” to jeering crowds of fans. An invitation to the vigil went to church groups and to workers at restaurants, massage businesses, and nail salons, about 100 of whom attended, joined by another couple hundred people, many from community activist groups. One of the few audible parts of the vigil was a vibrating gong, struck by Betita, and a shaku-

MOURN, GRIEVE, RISE: Many in attendance dressed in white, the color of mourning in some Asian countries.

A Career that Matters Competitive pay. Growth potential. Federal benefits. Paid on-the-job training. TSA is a great place to start a rewarding career. Join our team at Santa Barbara Municipal Airport and be part of a mission that matters.

hachi bamboo flute, played by Komuso monk Bob Nyosui Sedivy, sounds that organizers intended to bring focus to inner stillness and emotion, while the flute echoed the cries and weeping of loss. Holding a vigil that was quiet was a deliberate choice to stay in keeping with the community’s preference. “The Asian American and Pacific Island communities have been invisible as a way to deal with hate,” the organizers said in a written statement, “which implies staying out of harm’s way.” But the two-hour vigil also allowed them to be visible rather than invisible, Betita added. Silence may have protected the Asian community at one time, but the U.S. citizenship required. Equal opportunity employer. *Pay rate varies by location. vigil organizers said the community had been shaken by the deaths in Georgia, concluding there was a greater need for civic and political engagement. “We came together to change AFS-TSA-0282–SBA3-Print-SantaBarbaraIndependent-quarterpage-v2.indd 1 this,” the four women said, “and to make silence a symbol protesting hate.” —Jean Yamamura

Apply online at tsa.gov/TSO

ENSURING

SAFE TRAVELS

3/17/2021 7:40:49 PM

COMMUNITY

S

COU RTE SY

Instagram Travel Influencer Killed by Train anta Barbara Police confirmed that highly followed Instagram personality and world traveler Lee MacMillan, 28, was hit and killed by a train last Friday by the intersection of State and Hollister roads in Noleta. Police had issued an alert that week asking members of the public for any information on MacMillan’s disappearance, noting she had left her home without car, keys, wallet, or cell phone. Although there was no suicide note, police expressed concern that MacMillan’s death had been self-inflicted. Lee MacMillan On December 5 last year, she discussed her struggles with depression, anxiety, and Max & Lee — enjoyed a following of 495,000 suicidal thoughts at some length on an Ins- subscribers on their YouTube channel. They would announce the parting of their tagram video post. In the post, she linked her mental-health struggles to putting her own ways late in 2019, and in early 2020, MacMilneeds last and those of others first. lan set out on a Sprinter tour of Morocco with From the outside, MacMillan’s life would two other social-media-savvy road warriors. have seemed one of adventure, health, COVID, however, would bring that trek to an beauty, freedom, and romance. Since 2016, abrupt halt after three months, and starting MacMillan had been an accomplished glo- about six months ago, MacMillan settled into betrotter, traveling from Canada — where she Santa Barbara. was born — to the tip of South America in In the wake of MacMillan’s death, friends a Dodge Sprinter with her then-boyfriend have expressed shock at her loss while praisand fellow traveler, Max Bidstrup, and their ing her for coming out as a mental-health —Nick Welsh Australian shepherd, Occy. Together they — advocate. INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

7


MAR. 25-APR. 1, 2021

PUBLIC SAFETY

Chris Mailes Is S.B.’s New Fire Chief

Locally Owned and Operated

www.santacruzmarkets.com BEST SANTA BARBARA 20 20

THANK

WINNER

TIP

BANANAS

Chicken

LEG QUARTERS

49

PINEAPPLES ERS T-BONE STEAKS Beef

BACK RIBS

$2.98 lb.

$

$

1

59 ¢

$1.99¢

89

MARINATED CHICKEN

89

Fresh Daily

INSTANT COFFEE $

NCHERA 69¢ $2.98 lb. FUJI APPLES

¢

589

Springfield 15 oz.

BROWN ONIONS lb.

GROUND BEEF

289

HOT TOMATO SAUCE

ROMA TOMATOES

Boneless

199

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

$ 99 $1.29

$5.98 lb.

Beef

LONG GRAIN RICE

¢

69¢

75¢ lb.

T

COU RTESY

BEST CORNER STORE!

COMMUNITY PEAS & CARROTS

¢ 89 39¢ New Life for Waterfront Band Shell? $1.98 MEDIUM YAMS ORIZO ROMA TOMATOES BEEF TRI TIP 59 ¢ WHIP TOPPING $T 49 1 69¢ $3.69 lb.

lb.

Springfield 8 oz.

By The Bag

N IC K WELSH

RA o St

®

A

fter a broad national recruitment process, the City Council appointed Santa Barbara local Chris Mailes as the city’s new fire GOLETA YOU FOR VOTING US chief Tuesday. Ave to be 5757 Hollister “I am honored and humbled chosen to lead the City’s Fire DepartMahatma 2# ment,” Mailes said. “As a lifelong resident of the area and having been born and raised in the city, it is a special CANTALOUPES honor to care for my community.” Since the previous fire chief, Eric lb. Nickel, retired last October, Mailes has served as the interim fire chief. lb. 7# Now taking over the role permanently, Mailes will oversee the Fire RUSSET POTATOES Department’s $30 million budget and 106 employees in eight fire sta5 lb. Bag tions. Mailes was chosen from 37 candidates. ea. El Pato 7 oz. “It was a well-qualified group of finalists, and I chose Chief Mailes due Chief Chris Mailes to his professionalism, team dedicaBLUEBERRIES tion, tenure with the department, and Thomas Fire and 2018’s 1/9 Debris Flow. In 6 oz. excellent performance during his acting his most recent position before interim fire chief assignment,” said City Administrator chief, Mailes served as battalion chief and Folgers 8 oz. Paul Casey. “He is well regarded within the oversaw one of the three shifts that rotate lb. department and by fire professionals in the duty coverage in the city. Prior to that, he served as the training officer and managed region.” MEDIUM YAMS Mailes has quite the background in fire- the training and compliance of the 90 firefighting. He has worked with the city’s fire fighting personnel. department for 28 years, including in multiMailes’s new annual salary will be lb. ple leadership positions and during the 2017 $202,193. —Delaney Smith

here may be new life in store for the dilapidated but invitingly designed public band lb. shell located at the city’s Plaza del Mar Park at the corner of Castillo lb. lb. Street and Cabrillo Boulevard. The Minute Maid Santa 59 oz. Barbara City Council qui805 (12 pk.) (doz.) etly authorized the expenditure of $92,000 for new architectural BEER LARGE EGGS and engineering plans to bring ea. the band shell—originally built in 1919 and declared a city landmark antacruzmarkets.com www.santacruzmarkets.com in 1990 — up to snuff as a posGOLETAltr.) Shasta5757(2 Mesquite (7 lb.) 5757GOLETA SANTA BARBARA sible outdoor performance venue. Hollister Ave Hollister Ave 324 W. Montecito St City Parks czar Jill Zachary said By the bag CHARCOAL ANANAS SODA BANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAIN RICE BEEF TRI TIP ¢ ¢ $ 99 $ 99 COVID has accentuated the need 49 1 49 $ 59 2 EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS 1 D TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES for an outdoor performance space. The band shell stage at Plaza del Mar Park Chicken MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL NEAPPLES OCTOBER PINEAPPLES FROM THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND 89 $ 27TH LEG QUARTERS The band shell stage—designed $ 89 2 2 $ 99 $ 99 ¢ 1 El Pato 7 oz. 1 El Pato 7 oz. 69 by noted Santa Barbara architect Winsor Soule has functioned mostly as a gathering site for HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE ¢ MA TOMATOES to be big enough for 22 musicians to play on homeless people. Today, a chain blocks access PORK BUTT ¢ ROMA TOMATOES 59 Best 59 of $ 59 and for 2,000 people to watch — has fallen into to the stairs to the stage, and the band shell 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 1 Barbara Santa winner $ 89 Thin sliced a state of perpetual disrepair in recent years. It itself is ringed with not one but two fences, one $ 89 5 UJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES � �WINNER CARNE RANCHERA ¢ needs a new roof, repairs to the façade, and a made of plastic and the other a metal chain¢ $ 98 89 PEAS & CARROTS 89 PEAS & CARROTS 5 ¢ new electrical system, and it is far behind code link barrier. Signs warn, “Danger, Keep Off.” ¢ 89 89 Santa Cruz EDIUM YAMS MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO Once upon a time, the band shell was on issues ofGOLETA access. Zachary estimated the total SANTA BARBARA GOLETA ¢ WHIP TOPPING ¢ SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA 59 59 $ 49 2 St St $ 49 price tag could be asAve high as $500,000, though the site of outdoor musical performances, 5757 Hollister Montecito W.W.Montecito 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister 1 324324 1 EAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS no formal estimate exists. She said she hopes to speeches, and community gatherings. ZachHEAD LETTUCE ORANGE JUICE Mahatma 2# ¢ By the bag $ 98 Mahatma 2# 79 ¢ ORANGE$JUICE 79 ary said she’s heard from several music orgathe project with grants. 89 $ 389 Support1local people at3 LONG fund GRAIN RICE LONG GRAINworking RICE that expressed interest in reviving In recent years, the band shell — an underbread daily from Now featuring fresh bread daily from ¢ ¢ sa Bakery 99 located right across Cabrillo nizations $ landmark La Bella Rosa Bakery businesses! 99 $ utilized the tradition, one being the Folk Orchestra of $ locally 59 lb.NOowned lb. SALES TO DEALERS lb. from Los Baños pool, another landmark— Santa Barbara. —Nick Welsh LIMITED STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS

HEAD LETTUCE

OPS

79 $1.69

$14.99

ORANGE JUICE

¢

$

389

featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery Mahatma 2#

Mahatma 2#

99¢

$2.99

lb.

lb.

lb.

7#

ea.

lb.

7#

ea.

2018

Folgers 8 oz.

lb.

®

lb.

lb.

Folgers 8 oz.

®

Springfield 15 oz.

Springfield 15 oz.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Springfield 8 oz.

Springfield 8 oz.

lb.

lb.

lb.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

Minute Maid 59 oz.

BANANAS BEEF TRI TIP

ea.

249

ES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS UGH NOVEMBER 2ND

8

Chicken

SANTA BARBARA THE INDEPENDENT 324 W. Montecito St

By the bag

1

LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

By the bag

49

MESQUITE CHARCOAL PINEAPPLES

$BANANAS ¢99

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

2 LONG GRAIN RICE $

89

INDEPENDENT.COM Mahatma 2#

$

Mahatma 2#

1

7#

7#

FROM APRIL 1 THROUGH APRIL 7

PINEAPPLES APRIL 1, 2021 LEG QUARTERS

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

BANANAS ea.

lb.

MESQUITE CHARCOAL

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

99

$

289


Demoted Principal Loses in Court Again

F

ormer San Marcos High School principal Edward Behrens did not have his due process rights violated two years ago when he was demoted from his post, according to an opinion issued by an appellate court. The opinion, however, does substantiate Behrens’s allegation that former Santa Barbara Unified School District superintendent Cary Matsuoka presented false information to the local media that cast Behrens in an undeniably unflattering light. Behrens was demoted as San Marcos principal amid the public furor that erupted in January 2018 over a private chat room run by several male San Marcos students — with at least one pictured wielding a musket — making sexually disparaging remarks about females, some of whom were Latinx. The Sheriff ’s Office concluded there was no real threat to the students named or the school itself, but San Marcos parents, who were trying to calibrate how alarmed they should be on behalf of their children, were outraged. On March 13, 2018, the district school board voted 4-1 to remove Behrens as principal of San Marcos — a post he’d held for seven years — at the urging of superintendent Matsuoka. Though Matsuoka would later accuse Behrens in the media of not notifying district administrators of the incident for

four days, he conceded under oath when deposed by Behrens’s attorneys that Behrens had, in fact, notified district administrators the same day he learned of it, on January 19. Behrens sued to be reinstated and to get back pay. He argued that he had been unfairly tarred as an incompetent and a racist without being allowed to respond to the charges and that he had not been given the detailed explanation for his reassignment that California’s education code required. Santa Barbara Superior Court Judge Pauline Maxwell rejected all these arguments, arguing the district did not need to cite specific reasons to reassign Behrens. So, too, did the Court of Appeal. In short, the appeal court ruled that the only obligation the district had to a reassigned principal was to be given an explanation. And Matsuoka did just that, the panel of judges concluded, when the superintendent wrote that “a change of leadership” would be in the school’s best interest. Of the board’s 4-1 vote to demote Behrens, Boardmember Laura Capps cast the sole dissenting vote. This marks the fourth legal defeat Behrens has suffered. He is currently assigned to Santa Barbara Junior High School, where he teaches history. —Nick Welsh

COVID CONT’D FROM P. 6 Locally, to speed up the identification of variants, Carolina Arias, a virologist at UCSB, offered to lend her lab and her expertise, and a collaboration between the university, Cottage Health, and Public Health has been ongoing for about two months. The results posted on March 17 of 37 samples showed that 17 were the West Coast variant; zero were the U.K. mutation. Arias went on to sequence 74 more samples, which ranged in collection time from November to March, and released the results on March 24. The earliest samples, which had been preserved by Cottage lab director Dr. Stewart Comer, showed only the West Coast variant was present through

January. In February, out of the 27 samples sequenced, 12 were West Coast, six were U.K., and nine did not contain variants of concern or interest. But of the 11 samples from March, seven were U.K. while three were West Coast. Whether the increase in the more contagious and more deadly U.K. variant in Santa Barbara County will result in a March or April surge remains to be seen. Public Health has advised that wearing a face mask, washing hands, and keeping a distance from others remains a prudent protocol to block these more infectious variants. But many eyes will be on the Public Health dashboard n for the next set of results.

Driver Charged in Cuyama Oil Spill

T

he truck driver who flipped his tank trailer off State Route 166 and spilled crude oil into the Cuyama River a year ago was charged with five misdemeanors by the Santa Barbara County District Attorney and is headed for an arraignment in June. The accident, however, could be another knock against ExxonMobil’s proposal to truck oil along the narrow winding SPILL EFFECTS: An aerial view shows the dams placed to contain the track that is SR 166. oil spill into the Cuyama River on March 21, 2020. After the 2015 Refugio Oil spill shut down Plains All American’s pipeline pling his tractor from the trailer it was pulling. from Gaviota, ExxonMobil proposed in 2017 The trailer and its tank containing 6,678 galto move crude via 140 oil-truck trips up the 101 lons of crude oil rolled down the bank, and and along the 166 to Plains’ Pentland refinery 4,533 gallons broke loose, some of it flowing in Kern County. The proposal was put on hold into the Cuyama River. after Phillips 66 announced last year that it Linda Krop, chief counsel for Santa Barwould switch its refinery in Martinez from bara’s Environmental Defense Center, said the fossil fuels to alternative fuels in 2023, which accident remained very relevant to concerns over Exxon’s proposal, no matter the direction was Exxon’s alternative refinery. Before that announcement and during the of travel. “The road is so dangerous,” she said. finalization of Exxon’s environmental impact “It already has so much truck traffic, including report, the likelihood of a spill was called mini- a lot of oil tanker trucks. That’s the risk, too mal. The final document, released in July 2020, many oil tanker trucks.” stated an “insignificant” statistical likelihood The road customarily sees about 3,650 of increased accidents on SR 166 from the cars, trucks, and rigs coming and going, the additional truck trips. A spill of five gallons or environmental report states. According to more was estimated to occur once in 16 years, the Center for Biological Diversity, the five or once every 24 years if mitigation measures years before the spill saw 216 large truck collisions, including between tanker trucks, were taken. In the oil spill on March 21, 2020, Jesse Vil- tractor-trailers, and box trucks, though none lasana was headed west toward Santa Maria resulted in oil spills. In the various ways oil at about 4:30 a.m., the environmental report moves through the county, including a pipe quotes from the CHP investigation. At a broad from Platform Irene off Lompoc, more than left-hand bend just past Aliso Creek, the trailer 3.3 million barrels of oil were produced in began to sway from side to side. The truck 2018, according to California’s Division of Oil, rolled onto the right shoulder of the 166, and Gas, and Geothermal Resources. —Jean Yamamura Villasana pulled the wheel to the left, uncou-

COURTS & CRIME

Man Gets 16 Years for Attempted Murder

A

Santa Barbara County Jane Doe agreed and man was sentenced allowed Lopez to drive her to the spot. After a few to 16 years in prison Tuesday after he pleaded drinks, Lopez wanted Jane guilty to attempted murder Doe to move to an even in the second degree, more remote location, but assault with intent to she declined. It was at this commit rape, kidnapping, point that Lopez dragged Jane Doe to a location assault with force likely to cause great bodily injury, farther away and said he felony sexual battery, would kill her. He attacked robbery, and dissuasion of Jane Doe and tried to rape a witness. her, but she fought off the The assault took place Fidel Lorenzana Lopez attacks the entire time. in September 2020 in Eventually, Lopez Goleta when 26-year-old Fidel Lorenzana stopped trying to rape Jane Doe and tried Lopez offered to buy alcohol at a 7-Eleven to strangle her to death, but she fought for the victim, Jane Doe, because she did hard against these attacks, too. A Good not have a mask and was denied service. Samaritan was able to see the struggle and He said he would only buy it for her if she called out for Jane Doe, who was able to agreed to go to his favorite drinking loca- run to the Good Samaritan, and they called tion with him — a remote area near the the police together. Lopez initially fled the Seymour Duncan parking lot that was scene but was apprehended a few miles overgrown with trees and shrubs. away. —Delaney Smith SBSO

Former San Marcos High School principal Ed Behrens

ENVIRONMENT

CALI F. DEPT. F ISH & WI LDLI F E, OF F IC E OF SPI LL R ESPON SE AN D PR EVENTION

EDUCATION

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

9


GRAB A PENCIL, LET’S HAVE SOME FUN!

: Draw the piggy bank & write your savings goal inside Kids Activity 1 Savings Goal

: Find all the saving terms listed in the grid below Kids Activity 2 Word Search

A

K

P

Z

N

Y

R

Y

L

N

E W F

I

N A N C

E

A

A

U

A

E

Y

X

B

F

O

L

T

Z

M Q

A N

T

E

D N

S

A

V

I

N G

P

S

E

T

P

R

X

V

Q Q

E

C M P

P

S

I

N A

R W R

X

H O

O

F

Q

I

B

E

E

H

A N M

S

L

L

N A

T

N N G N

E

S

I

I

L

G N

B

I

N

F

G

Y

S

T

R

R

I

Y

T

N

E

E

D

S

K

Bank

Finance

Earning

Money

Change Deposit

T

Goal Interest

Needs

Plan Saving Wants

present

Financial Literacy Month

Weekly activities to sharpen your financial savvy!

:

Week One Get Saving!

:

adult Activity Emergency Savings It’s recommended to have up to 6 months of your monthly expenses in an emergency savings fund.

Monthly Expenses

Amount

Cito, if you want a game console, save your birthday gift cards until you have enough

$

Rent/Mortgage Food Car Payments Phone Bill Utilities Insurance Other (list below)

Total Monthly

Want more activities?

x6

Use the QR code or visit montecito.bank/FinLit

Target Date 10

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Z


NEWS of the WEEK

CONT’D DEL AN EY SMITH

MAR. 25 - APR. 1, 2021

EDUCATION

Cold Spring School District Seeks Restraining Order Against Parent Ongoing Legal Battle Costs $100,000+ to District

by Delaney Smith he Cold Spring Elementary School District has sought a restraining order against a parent whom they allege has been harassing school employees. The parent, Amanda Rowan, alleges through her attorney that she is being targeted and retaliated against because of her calls for more transparency at the school district. The situation is complex and complicated, nuanced and nebulous, but it is clear that the district and its allies are trying to put distance between the district and Rowan — and taking legal action to do so. In the past few months, Cold Spring requested a restraining order against Rowan for allegedly harassing employees. The temporary restraining order was denied, but the judge, Stephen Foley, recommended Rowan only contact the district through legal counsel for the remainder of legal proceedings, which will determine if the district is granted a restraining order. Rowan has a history of contacting trustees, teachers, and district staff with grievances about the district. In Superintendent/Principal Amy Alzina’s March restraining order declaration, she described Rowan as having a history of making “hostile, aggressive, and threatening statements to various members of the staff of the Cold Spring School District and also the Board of Trustees.” She said she witnessed staff members’ fear of opening emails and answering phone calls from Rowan because “they are afraid of where her wrath will turn next and what will happen.” “Amanda Rowan has never engaged in and never would engage in any act of violence against anyone at the school district, nor has she threatened any act of violence, and nothing that the District has submitted constitutes any evidence that she has,” said Timothy Cary, legal counsel for Rowan, who herself declined to comment. The district feels Rowan has bombarded it with cease and desist letters from her attorney, Public Records Act requests, and demands for investigation after the school suspended her daughter. So far, responding to Cary has cost the district over $100,000 in legal fees. “In almost 30 years of practice, I have never seen an angry checkbook and a law degree so devastate a school community,” said the attorney representing the district, Gregory Rolen. “This is nothing less than an advanced placement course in running district legal bills and wreaking havoc on teaching staff. It is obvious and it is odious.” The cease and desists revolved mainly around communication, with several aimed at Superintendent/Principal Amy Alzina. One required Alzina to cease meeting with

T

Rowan’s daughter at the small school nestled in the foothills of Montecito. In a February letter from Alzina to Rowan in which Alzina pleads with Rowan to stop her legal action, she says: “Frankly, I no longer speak with her [the daughter] alone out of fear of what you may do or say. We have heard you might file a third uniform complaint if I so much as talk to her. Staff is also walking on eggshells. I am conflicted because I have a responsibility to support all students and all staff. This is no way to run a school.” The district has described the public information requests as the most troubling move by Rowan. She filed five requests that each had numerous subcategories of information being requested, with one request going back over 10 years. Rowan is interested in uncovering several pieces of information about the district, particularly regarding expenditures from Measure C, a 2008 bond measure that authorized Cold Spring to borrow $2.44 million. Though the district, at its website, accounts for every measure for every Measure C dollar spent, the Public Records Act requests asked for items like bid documentation, bid proposal, contract documents, construction documents, and more. According to Alzina, the requests have been “overburdening and stressing our staff to the point of needing to seek medical attention.” According to Cary, however, the length of time the district is taking to respond to these requests is unacceptable, and the district is making the process more cumbersome than necessary. “Our requests for information about expenditures from the proceeds of the Measure C bond measure are completely reasonable and very common. Normal operating procedure is for a school district to provide public records quickly, in particular if the records sought are for information on construction work, by simply putting them in a room and letting the requestor review them,” Cary said. “It should not require a major expenditure of legal money or time.” Rowan’s inquiries and calls for more transparency at the district began with the previous administration back in 2016. Rowan’s attorney believes the district suspending Rowan’s daughter last year was an act of retaliation for her efforts to expose issues in the school. But for the district, the legal battle began at the point of suspension. In Alzina’s February letter to Rowan, she alleged that Rowan was retaliating against herself and the district for the suspension. The reason for the 5th grader’s suspension has not been made public, although Rowan acknowledged it happened in a NextDoor post in November.

“Amanda, we both know it is not a coincidence; instead, a concerted effort to force the removal of your daughter’s suspension from her file,” Alzina wrote in the letter. “If it was your goal to make the school district and its students hurt, it is working. Set aside the exorbitant amount of general fund dollars expended in response to Mr. Cary’s correspondence, your activities have taken an enormous toll on staff ’s morale.” The battle will continue on for now, but Cary said he feels good about Rowan’s standing with the upcoming hearing on the restraining order. “Amanda Rowan is disappointed that the Cold Spring School community has been subjected to outlandish and unreasonable fearmongering, and welcomes her day in court,” Cary said. “We fully expect that the petition for a restraining order will be denied based on the clear lack of factual support and the complete inability to prove violence, actual violence, or threats of violence, by clear and convincing evidence. There is no such evidence because such acts never occurred. Therefore we believe the petition will be denied.” Despite Foley denying the temporary restraining order, Cary has asked that he be removed from the case. “Stephen Foley, to whom the above matter has been assigned, is prejudiced against Respondent or the interests of Respondent such that I believe that Respondent cannot have a fair and impartial trial or hearing before Commissioner Stephen Foley,” Cary’s declaration read. The turmoil stretches beyond just an issue between Alzina and Rowan. The teachers union sent a letter to Rowan asking her to back away. “The Union is concerned that Cold Spring teachers are again receiving emails from a parent, Ms. Rowan, that again targets [sic] teachers,” the letter from the California Teachers Association read. “This time, the email contained attachments that include false allegations and — as one from Ms. Rowan’s lawyer makes an allegation of defamation against a teacher — again raises the specter of legal action against teachers.” The district’s biggest priority now is to get through the ordeal and move on. “I have an obligation as the superintendent to ensure a safe educational environment for our students and staff,” Alzina said. “Students can’t learn and teachers can’t teach when they feel threatened or unsafe. It is the hope of the governing board, teachers, staff, and greater community that we can get back to focusing on the educational program rather than hurtful threats and attacks on our staff that doesn’t [sic] belong anywhere near our children.” n

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

11


Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

City Skyline Going Sky High?

FAR OUT: For what was a unanimous vote, it

was about as disagreeable as things could get. Little wonder. The hot debate at this week’s Santa Barbara City Council was over housing. Specifically, it was over proposed development rules designed to entice private developers to build rental housing on State Street —and throughout the whole central business district—with unprecedented earnestness. In exchange, we are promised, 10-15 percent of those new units will be made “affordable” to moderate-income households. In the process, we are told, Santa Barbara’s longstruggling urban core will be re-galvanized as hundreds—if not thousands—of new residents begin to live, breathe, work, play, shop, and pray downtown 24/7. It’s an intoxicating image.  The downside here—and it’s a whopper—is that these new rules, known cryptically as the Floor Area Ratio (FAR) approach to development, would all but certainly blow the roof off the city’s existing skyline. The current height limit of 48 feet? Kiss it good-bye. Try 60 feet instead, perhaps even more. It should be noted that these same changes are also proposed for outer State Street by La Cumbre Plaza, and the Milpas corridor, though not as dramatically as downtown.  Nobody really knows whether these proposed changes can deliver as promised or if they are just magical thinking. State Street real estate could prove so expensive that no inducement

will be enough to bring new housing affordable to anyone but the very rich. To find out, the council voted to hire an economic consultant. The down-and-dirty this Tuesday night was over what baseline—in terms of expanded density and height allowances—the economic report should include as its starting point. If that sounds mind-numbingly arcane, that’s because it is. But it also reflects a profound schism within the council as to how hard, how fast, and how aggressively City Hall should gamble with its “small-town charm” and all the subtle things that “make Santa Barbara Santa Barbara” in hopes of getting rental housing. Leading the pedal-to-the-metal faction were councilmembers Meagan Harmon and Michael Jordan, who argued the inducements didn’t go nearly far enough. Leading the go-slow approach were councilmembers Kristen Sneddon, Eric Friedman, and Oscar Gutierrez. In the beginning, it appeared Sneddon was outnumbered, but when Gutierrez weighed in on behalf of skylines, she won the day on Tuesday night. For the record, everyone says they love the FAR approach. In theory, it’s simpler, it’s clearer to all sides, and it allows for more square feet and more units of rental housing than current rules would otherwise allow. Imagine a 10,000-square-foot downtown lot; a one-story structure built lot-line-to-lotline would have a FAR of 1. The same lot built out four stories high would have a FAR of 4. (A typical single-family home has a FAR of .25; a typical apartment complex is a .5.) To encourage

the development of rental housing, the plan is to assign certain neighborhoods, such a downtown and outer State, higher allowable FARs. And to ensure that at least some of the new rentals are affordable—unlike previous planning efforts to encourage the development of rental housing—the council would actually require 10-15 percent of the new units produced be rented to moderate-income households.  If the 99-cent store on lower State Street were assigned a FAR of 2.8, for example, it would be able to add 56 rental units under the FAR scheme. Under the existing rules, that same property could add only 20 rentals. The reality is that no lots can be developed lot-line-to-line. There are set-back and openspace requirements. Given that, the only way to achieve what’s promised by a FAR is to build up. If downtown were assigned a 4 on the FAR scale —as Harmon and Jordan pushed for—then developers would have to build at least five stories to realize the full potential of that designation. And that would clearly exceed the 48-foot limit now in place. If instead, downtown were to be designated a 3—as it provisionally has been under the unanimous compromise Sneddon secured —that opens the door to four-story construction. Although that’s technically allowed already, few developers are willing to absorb the costs and risks of such expansions. But with the new inducements offered by the FAR approach, that could change.

62397

If you walk up State Street from the ocean to Victoria Street, you would pass only 12 buildings higher than two stories. That detail was delivered by Planning Commissioner Sheila Lodge, an avowed skeptic where the virtues of FARs are concerned. However charged politically, that’s a useful baseline for the level of change downtown could experience. Likewise, Lodge noted that a recent survey conducted by the Santa Barbara Chapter of the American Institute of Architects —filled out by 4,500 people—found 54 percent of respondents wanted development limited to three stories on State Street, 29 percent were comfortable with four, and only 18 percent were okay with more than that. No one said it was easy. Santa Barbara’s housing market is —as everyone already knows — certifiably crazy making. One speaker—a supporter of more housing now—recounted that 120 people applied for a studio apartment a friend recently listed for rent. “Scarcity makes applicants behave like supplicants,” he noted. How many stories up must be allowed for such development to be deemed “feasible.” How many affordable units can be secured and at the cost of how many mountain views? The answer to all these questions, we are told, will be delivered by an economic consultant for whom the hiring process is about to start. The budget for this consultant, we are told, is $60,000, and the report, we are also told, should take two months to prepare.  Good luck. We’ll all need it. —Nick Welsh

Price, Postel & Parma is excited to welcome Jeremy Stone as an associate attorney.

Litigation Public Agency Education Law Environmental & Water Law 200 East Carrillo Street, Ste. 400 Santa Barbara, CA 93101-2190 www.ppplaw.com 805.962.0011

12

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


OPINIONS CONT’D

Housing First

T

he “cleanup” of the Pershing Park homeless camp began at 9 a.m. on March 12. The City of Santa Barbara had posted signs warning the encampment residents to clear out within 72 hours. Police officers and sanitation workers arrived and ordered the campers to take down their tents, pack up their belongings, and leave. The police told them, “Go anywhere, except back into the park.” Observers watched as intimidated campers gathered up whatever personal belongings they could carry. Other frightened residents stood around with confused looks on their faces, not knowing what to do or where to go. A woman began to scream as police and sanitation workers took down tents and picked up unattended property to haul to the dump. By the afternoon, many of the campers had left, while those who remained sat on nearby curbs or paced around in shock. At the end of that day, the tent encampment and its residents were gone. The city has dedicated $50,000 toward encampment “cleanups.” Even before the raid on Pershing Park, the city had locked its public restroom and access to clean drinking water. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the breakup of homeless encampments during a pandemic creates unnecessary risks to the health and safety of the community at large and the people who are displaced. The Pershing Park operation forced the campers back onto the streets, potentially exposing themselves and others to COVID. The city has passed ordinances making it a crime to camp and sleep in parks. It has removed public benches on State Street to deter the homeless from sitting or sleeping on them. The city continues to pass punitive ordinances targeting the homeless. A new ordinance bans oversized recreational vehicles, making it unlawful for RV dwellers to park on any city streets. This ordinance is now being challenged in Superior Court by the Committee for Social Justice. The most recent Grand Jury report describes homelessness as a “human crisis,” adding, “Shamefully, Santa Barbara County has one of the highest rates of homeless school-age children and youth in the state.” After decades of harassment and criminalization, the number of home-

JOHN COLE / THE SCR ANTON TIMES-TRIBUNE

Letters

less people in the City of Santa Barbara grew to 914 in the 2020 Point-in-Time count. Santa Barbara’s unhoused residents have come to expect little or nothing from the city, except broken promises. The Grand Jury concludes that the City Council “needs a change in vision.” Housing First has proven to be the most effective model for ending homelessness. It is time for the City of Santa Barbara to act and implement a Housing First plan. —Jaan Landheer, Russell Brown, and Robert Landheer for the Committee for Social Justice; Joseph Biko Doherty for the People’s Justice Project

Stop Dangerous Drilling

M

ore than seven million Californians live within one mile of an oil or gas well. Of those, 362,000 live in Santa Barbara County, the majority in low-income communities or communities of color. Living near oil and gas wells is linked with an increased risk of cancer, asthma, high-risk pregnancies, and learning disabilities in children, as well as greater susceptibility to COVID-19. SB 467 — the “dangerous drilling bill” — was introduced by Senators Monique Limón (D-S.B.) and Scott Wiener (D-S.F.). SB 467 bans fracking, acid well stimulation, cyclic steam injection, steam flooding, and other extreme, highly polluting forms of extraction. These methods are currently used in Cat Canyon, endangering the Santa Maria Valley water basin, on which more than 150,000 residents rely for drinking water. California is one of the largest oil-producing states in the U.S., yet we have no regulations to protect us from drilling. SB 467 includes a 2,500-foot setback between operations and schools, churches, and community centers. The bill also provides a path for oil workers to transition into oil and gas well remediation jobs. Show your support for SB 467 by texting “CA” to —Rachel Altman, S.B. 86799 before April 7.

For the Record

¶ The “1480,000” vaccine doses in last week’s news story on COVID variants was a typo; at the time, roughly 148,000 first, second, and single doses had been given.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

Learn Learnto to

Speak Speak Spanish Spanish

with withAlonso AlonsoBenavides, Benavides,ph.d. ph.d.

ONLINE CLASSES april 6 - june 26, 2020 April 12 to July 2,Classes 2021 Day and Evening

sessions $350 COVID 19 PRICES and Saturdays This is the time to acquire or improve SPECIAL12 sessions $700 Our methodthis callsvaluable for small groups (6 maximum) skill. One 24 Hour/Week for Private $250 $90 hr. and conversation as soon as it is possible 12 weeks: VERY IMPORTANT Special semester package: Two Hours/Week for $980 12 one-hour sessions Language is very personal 12 weeks: $500 Details: so when you study a new one: SPANISH LANGUAGE Private one on one • You need to have the same $75 perSIGLO hour 21 INSITUTE instructor every time you meet. Special package for • Someone who knows you and can 12 sessions: $800 relate to you as a person and not Special package for as a remote impersonal number. 24 sessions: $1,600

spanishschoolsbca.com

805-252-9512

www.sigloxxispanish.com

805-252-9512

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

Santa Barbara

SIGLO XXI SPANISH LANGUAGE INSITUTE THE INDEPENDENT

13


obituaries Edward Rey Gonzalez Jr. 9/24/1929 - 3/17/2021

Edward Rey Gonzalez Jr., a loving husband, father, grandfather, and brother passed away at Cottage Hospital with his daughters by his side on Wednesday March 17th, 2021. Edward was born on September 24, 1929 in Santa Barbara. Edward graduated from S.B. High School then enlisted and served in the U. S. Army. Soon after he and Dolores (Barrera) met and fell in love. They were married on March 17, 1951. Edward passed away on their 70th wedding anniversary. Edward is survived by his children Rachel (Rick) Lopez, David Gonzalez and Yolanda (Pepe) Marquez. 7 grandchildren Ricky and Raymond Lopez, Raquel (Ben) Chrestenson, Jessica and Richelle Villapania, Kristina and Mychal Gonzalez and 6 great grandchildren Austin, Alyssa, Jayce, Bella, Mila, and Gracie. He also leaves many nieces and nephews. Edward was a hardworking man at an early age. He was hired by Ott’s Department Store for delivery and installation for 20 years. Then was employed and retired after 20 years with SBCC. As a grounds man, he was proud to take care of the CC football field. Edward also worked as a part time security guard for SBCC and Earl Warren Showgrounds, he had many side jobs throughout the years. Edward loved to cook/ BBQ and enjoyed cooking for the Santa Barbara Ranchoés for many years. He spent time working in his yard and fixing TVs. Edward (Eddie) had many friends nearby that he would see daily up until the day before he passed. He was great with numbers which kept his mind energized. Most of all he loved family gatherings and as he got older, he began to sit back and observe them with a smile. It was obvious how happy and proud it made him that his children and grandchildren were so close. His favorite saying was “Always remember, family is everything.” Edward is preceded in death by his wife Dolores, his son Ray Gonzalez, daughter in 14

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com law Eileen Cruz Gonzalez, sisters Grace Lugo and Carmen Ramirez, and brother Ozzie Gonzalez all of Santa Barbara. Dad at the age of 91 years you were still so young and full of wisdom. Thank you for everything, we will miss and love you forever and ever. May you rest in peace with all our loved ones. A funeral mass will be celebrated at Our Lady of Sorrows Church at 10:00 AM, Monday April 5th, followed by interment at Calvary Cemetery.

George G. Ward.

to Ryan, Anne, Kyle and Will Gaither (Abby); Adam and Jayne Ward; Seamus, Cate, Max and Owen Herrell; and GreatGrampa to Jessie with twins on the way. George employed a cool demeanor and sly sense of humor, and he had an immeasurable love of music, dogs and family. No services will be held, but his immediate family will gather at the Tee-Off in the near future to celebrate his life.

missed for her caring demeanor, kind heart, sought after blessings, loving smile, and cute laugh. Aurora, Mom, ‘Buelita…we will miss you, love you, and we will never forget you.

Audrey Ross Berman 1934 - 2021

CAMEZ, Aurora Leon 4/11/1924 - 3/3/2021

closer to her daughter. Audrey’s marriage ended in divorce. She is survived by her daughter, Sharon Berman, her son, Alec Berman (and his wife, Kara Donahue); their children, Arthur, Olivia and Ethan Berman; nephews Seton Kasmir, Gray Garrett, and David Ross, and nieces Jan Kasmir and Debbie Ross Shahar. There is no funeral planned. If you would like to make a donation in her memory, please consider a local food bank.

12/7/1931 - 3/8/2021

With great sadness we announce the passing of George Gilbert Ward on March 8, 2021 in Santa Barbara, CA. He was 89 years old. George was born in Los Angeles in 1931 to George and Lucille, graduating in 1950 from James A. Garfield High where he ran track and played football. He grew up alongside his two younger brothers, Richard and Robert, and married his high school sweetheart, Mary Sparks, in 1951. George served in the First Marine Division during the Korean War before embarking on a career in banking. He spent over twenty-five years with Bank of America in various management roles. He and Mary raised their three kids in La Mirada before moving to San Marino in the early 1970’s. Here George enjoyed local sports, banging out a tune by ear on his baby grand piano, and mixing cold martinis for lucky friends and neighbors. For many years, George travelled regularly to the eastern Sierras to fish Rush Creek and several secret spots. He and Mary also enjoyed wonderful trips to Great Britain and Italy, where he was able to see the great masterworks of Michelangelo and Da Vinci that had enchanted him for years. They eventually settled in Santa Barbara, where they enjoyed over twenty years of ocean breezes and the many activities of their local grandchildren. George was a devoted husband of nearly seventy years to Mary; Dad to Kathleen Gaither (Donald), Greg (Susan) and Laura Herrell (Jim); Grampa

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

Aurora passed away peacefully at her home in Santa Barbara on March 3, 2021. Born in Minatare, Nebraska to Felipe and Luisa Leon, Aurora moved to Santa Barbara, California in 1940 where she soon after met and married the love of her life Gilberto Reyes Camez. Aurora and Gilberto raised a family of five children whom they loved and cherished dearly. Aurora is survived by her four daughters; Irma Camez, Martha Pardo (Ricardo), Margaret Jimenez (Jose Guadalupe), and Gloria Tejeda (Jesus). She is also survived by her sister Maria Zavala. Aurora is preceded by her beloved husband Gilberto, her son Arthur, and her grandsons Gilbert Reynoso and Joe Jimenez. Aurora worked at the Biltmore and retired from Cottage Hospital. Her favorite pastimes were watching her novelas, crocheting warm blankets, having conversations over coffee and pastries, and…of course…shopping! She was a classy dresser, too. Aurora, affectionately known as ‘Buelita by her grandchildren, always made sure when you visited that you were happy and fed. Whether it was pozole, pan dulce, or her famous delicious handmade flour tortillas, she always aimed to please and never missed the mark. Aurora was a woman of few words but of kindness and smiles that would warm a room. Aurora’s legacy is her 11 grandchildren, 10 great grandchildren, and 3 great great grandchildren. She will surely be

Audrey Ross Berman, age 87, died peacefully on the night of March 24, 2021, after a long and valiant struggle with dementia. Audrey was born in 1934 in Brooklyn, NY to Sybil and Harry Ross, younger sister to Babette Kasmir and Marvin Ross. Around 1939, the family moved to Washington, D.C. Audrey attended American University for a year, before meeting her future husband, Stanley Berman. The couple moved with their young son, Alec, to New Rochelle, NY, where he was joined by his younger sister, Sharon. Audrey began work at The Village Voice in Manhattan in the late 1960s, where she rose through the ranks from secretary to Managing Editor. During her time at The Voice, Audrey emceed the Obie Awards, OffBroadway’s equivalent to the Tony’s, where rumor has it, she was propositioned (unsuccesfully) by Groucho Marx! Audrey left The Voice in 1977 and served as Managing Editor at the short-lived magazine, Politicks & Other Human Interests. She then became managing editor at Channels of Communications, a TV-trade magazine, from 1978 until 1985, when it was bought, and killed, by Norman Lear. Audrey then took the opportunity to move to Santa Barbara, CA, where she became founding executive editor of the Santa Barbara Independent, serving as Managing Editor until her retirement in 2004. She created the Independent Theater Awards, affectionately known as the Indys. Audrey retired from the Independent around the year 2004, when she began to experience cognitive difficulties. Eventually, she moved to the Bay Area to be

Earl R. “Rob” Johnson, Jr. 6/11/1954 - 2/23/2021

Earl R. “Rob” Johnson, Jr., 66, died peacefully at Serenity House, Santa Barbara on February 23, 2021, following a long illness. Rob was the son of Earl R. and Laura H.Johnson of Lime Rock, Ct. He was born in Sharon, Ct. on June 11, 1954, and live in Lime Rock for 26 years. Rob was educated at Salisbury Central School and Oliver Wolcott Vocational & Technical High School in Torrington, Ct. Rob then moved to Santa Barbara where he resided and worked as a member of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters for Santa Barbara County of 40 years . He was a true craftsman, avid cyclist, good samaritan, devoted Bucket Brigade volunteer, cheerful friend and much more during his years here. Rob is survived by his parents Earl R. and Laura H.Johnson, of Lakeville, Ct., his brother, Eric Johnson, of Sheffieild, Ct., his sister Elisa MacKendree of Baker, Florida. and his niece, Arielle MacKendree of Niceville, Florida. Rob is leaving a loving family and a “family” of friends in Santa Barbara. He will be greatly missed by all.


obituaries Mary Susan Lucas

9/13/1951 - 3/21/2021

After a long struggle with Alzheimer’s Disease, Susan Lucas passed peacefully on the morning of March 21, 2021. Mary Susan Lucas was born on September 13, 1951 at Seaside Hospital in Long Beach, California. She grew up in Downey, California, the oldest of 4 children of James and Dorothy Ricketts. She attended Rancho Santa Gertrudes Elementary School, East Junior High School and Downey High School. Lifetime friends were made in Blue Birds and Camp Fire Girls. Growing up, Sundays were spent with the family at the Methodist Church in the morning, with paternal grandparents at their beach house in Alamitos Bay in the afternoon, and at “supper” with her maternal grandparents in Long Beach. Susan was a full-blown Beatlemaniac, and got to see the Beatles twice at the Hollywood Bowl, the second time from front row seats! She met her future husband, Gene Lucas, in the 8th grade, invited him to a Johnny Mathis concert the following summer, and despite an on-and-off start, they were a steady couple by the 11th grade. Susan attended Cerritos Junior College, getting her AA in English with a Spanish minor before joining Gene at UC Santa Barbara. They married in 1972 before their senior year, and she graduated with a BA in English. They then moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts for Gene’s graduate studies at MIT. While Gene attended grad school, Susan worked first as a receptionist/ secretary for a soils engineering firm, then as a secretary in the MIT Provost’s office, then as an administrative officer for a team of biologists working on recombinant DNA at MIT. She bore their first son during their last year at MIT. They returned to Santa Barbara after Gene graduated from MIT with his doctorate, and moved back to Santa Barbara in 1978 for Gene to begin his career as an assistant professor at UC Santa Barbara. They had two more boys in their

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com first 4 years in Santa Barbara, and while Gene pursued his academic career Susan raised the three boys. But this mom also served as a Den Leader for each of the three boys in Cub Scouts, co-president of the PTA at Kellogg elementary school, secretarial gigs to two different lawyers, and secretary and office manager for Cambridge Drive Community Church, which they joined in 1982. She also mothered Luca, a foreign exchange student from Italy, in his senior year at the boys’ high school. In his last 11 years at UC Santa Barbara, Gene had become the Executive Vice Chancellor for the campus, raising Susan to the status of UCSB’s Second Lady. Throughout her life, Susan was an organizer and a planner. She had a big, beautiful smile and an even bigger heart. She maintained correspondence with many, many friends and all the relatives. She loved music (especially the Beatles), family, dancing, camping, hiking, parties, walking, sewing, scrap booking, photos, traveling, sea glass, heart-shaped rocks, chocolate and cheese. A tragic fall a year after Gene’s retirement led to a traumatic brain injury, from which she did not fully recover before dementia set in. She spent the last years of her life in Gene’s care and then as a resident of the memory care facility at Villa Alamar. Susan is preceded in death by her father and mother, her brother-in-law Steve Rietfors, and her nephew Jordan Smith. She is survived by her husband, her three sons, Kelly, Ryan and Shannon Lucas and their families, her sisters Patti Rietfors and Carolyn Smith, her brother Randy Ricketts and their families and her grandchildren Kier, Camden, Ashlan, and Ezra. She will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved her. A memorial service will be announced when large congregant gatherings are safe again. Donations to the Alzheimers Association in her memory would be greatly appreciated.

Duane Rosenheim 8/31/1932 - 1/24/2021

Duane Rosenheim died on January 24, 2021 at home, surrounded by people he loved. Born August 31, 1932, in Waukesha, Wisconsin, Duane was the son of Olive Molly Grasser and James Rosenheim. After James’ death, Duane was much like a second father to his younger siblings, though he himself was only 18. Graduating from Waukesha High School, he worked for the Ford Motor company until drafted into the Korean War. He saw considerable action while stationed in Japan, none of it military. Thanks to the GI Bill and to pressure from his fiancé Marlene Lutzow, he became the first in his family to go to college, graduating from the Milwaukee School of Engineering in 1960. Hired by Delco Electronics, he spent much of his career building guidance systems for NASA and the military, first in Wisconsin, and after 1972 in Santa Barbara. When oxygen tanks exploded on Apollo 13, crippling its controls, it was the intact gyroscope his team created that brought the astronauts safely home. (NASA gave him a small part of the capsule in thanks.) Later, he and son Shane both worked for Delco on a topsecret military project designed to make tanks invisible. (In the end, nothing beat covering the tank in branches.). Following retirement from Delco, he briefly owned a moving company – big mistake – and then joined Turbodyne Technologies in Carpinteria, rising to the post of Chief Operating Officer. Throughout his adult life he donated blood, delivered meals to the elderly, and helped support both friends and family when they needed a hand. But what was he like? He was exceptionally stubborn, but quick to joke around. He had a jealous and bad-tempered Chihuahua named Mister who loved him, and him alone. He loved to gamble, and in the end probably made more money in Vegas than he did on Wall Street (for twenty years he led a run-

ning family poker game, but no one ever found his tell). He was a rock to his family (“immutable, if not immortal,” in the words of his niece Amy Van Zant.). He found the Big Bang more plausible than the Bible. He was brave. When, many years ago, the house across the street from his motherin-law exploded in smoke, Duane, wearing just his underwear, instantly dashed inside, emerging first with a German Shepard, then with two toddlers, and finally with the children’s mother, just as the house became an inferno. He loved jumping off of the roof of his house into the pool, grandchild in hand, a habit he continued until he was 78. He threw loud backyard barbecues. When he said “the more, the merrier,” he meant it. But Duane was equally comfortable sitting alone at night on the patio, smoking and watching the International Space Station pass overhead. He didn’t care about possessions. He was more honest, and more comfortable in his skin, than anyone we know. After his wife Marlene came down with dementia, he visited her nursing home every single day for the years that she survived. His kindness, his patience, his generosity did not depend on external sanctions or rewards. As he wrote in Confessions of a Depression-Era Baby, a short memoir: And what do I believe? “If you tell someone you’re going to do something do it.” I have many times not lived up this advice, but it is the closest thing to a religion that I have ever subscribed to. The memoir concludes like this: I expect that the grim reaper will be paying me a visit ere long. I neither look forward to it, nor do I fear it. I have lived a blessed life, thanks in large part to the people I have dedicated this screed to. Duane is survived by his children Shawn, Shane and Kelly Rosenheim, his son-in-law Marco Andrade, his dear friend Kerry McCoy, his ex-daughtersin-law Jennifer Zoltanski and Cassandra Cleghorn, and his beloved grandchildren Oliver and Jasper Rosenheim, Eve and Ripley Cleghorn, and Ava and Aidan Andrade. He remained close to all his brothers and sisters, and their spouses: Rita (James) Robinson; James (Amelia) Rosenheim; Jennie (Robert) INDEPENDENT.COM

McIntyre; Katherine (Walter) Van Zant; Emanuel (Carole) Rosenheim; and Victoria (Richard) Penstein, and to his many nieces and nephews. He will be greatly missed. Donations may be made in his name to the Santa Barbara Red Cross.

Hugh David Mandeson 3/30/1957 - 3/14/2021

Hugh David Mandeson, born March 30, 1957, died in his home on March 14, 2021, at the age of 63. Hugh was the owner-operator of Human Solutions Computer since 1990, a 4-time winner of the Independent Reader’s Poll for PC Repair. Many of his clients became friends and appreciated Hugh’s exceptional knowledge and experience of computers and electronics, as well as his gentle manner. Hugh also recorded and produced CDs as Santa Barbara Recording & Sound. His love for music was consummate and for the past 10 years he DJ’d as MC Human in Second Life. His collection of LPs and CDs is staggering, most notably the largest and possibly unrivaled collection of Frank Zappa recordings. He shared his passion for music, electronics, UFOs, the paranormal, and other esoteric subjects with many of his friends. Hugh is predeceased by parents Bob and Deedy Mandeson and brother Evan Mandeson; survived by stepmother Marion Mandeson of Glendale, CA, sisters Jilly Mandeson of Chico, CA and Trouble Erin Mandeson and her wife Cathy Gouch of Greenfield, MA, aunt Iris Hurbert of Richmond, CA, and his beloved cat Echo. If so moved, donations to your favorite animal shelter in Hugh’s name are encouraged. Continued on p.16

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

15


obituaries Dr. Richard Herbert Frei, D.D.S. 5/12/1927 - 9/9/2020

Dr. Richard Herbert Frei, D.D.S. May 12,1927 to Sept, 9, 2020 Married to Suzanne Dugal for 62 years . Children Richard, John, Elizabeth, and Katie. Eight Grandchildren, John J. ,Jeannie , Julia, Ricphard Dominic, Brian ,Colin, Shane, and Grade. Married late in life to Sheila Bryan. What a fascinating life you led! Born in North Hollywood, Calif, with lithe sister Beverly, you helped your father and mother, Bess and Herbert Frei raising exotic birds, and fruit trees. You created beautiful kites and balsa wood airplanes and you dreamed of flying. Another childhood pastime was swimming at the local plunge. You discovered the art of holding your breath underwater, this was a useful tool to gain the awe of bullies—and you gained that rapidly. Your love of the ocean’s waters and the mysteries of the sky would never leave you. Your lifetime quest for learning was nurtured by the great teachers at North Hollywood High School. Mathematics and science became a focus for you. You came to regard Mathematics and Calculus as the only universal and unchangeable language. Graduating in January, 1945, you won many honors and entered UCLA attending pre-dental classes. You Joined the U.S. Naval reserves in July 1945. During enlistment you were In V-5 Naval pilot training. The Navy then required all naval pilots to have two years of college before pilot training. The first year in the Navy was at Cal Tech. Second semester, 100 students were sent to Cal Tech to carry 19 months, heavy in mathematics. Third semester was back to USC. You were beginning to realize the dream of becoming a Navy pilot was not too be. The war was over! Along came Susie! One date and Suzanne Dugal was to be your future bride, right out of high school! Susie was anxious to support your quest to become a dentist. Back to UCLA for 2 years. Times were rough, you were turned down for USC dental school. Only way to get in was to get a high-grade point average at L.A. City College. You never worked so hard for good grades! You did it! You became a USC dental student! In June 1949, you and Susie were married! Without financial help from either family, 16

THE INDEPENDENT

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Susie worked as a Doctors aide, and studies became your life. in the learning process, you became a Renaissance Man. You found interest in all realms of science. After graduation from USC Dental School, you interned for four years. Part of that time was spent hitch-hiking to Los Angeles County General Hospital gaining valuable experience. Susie gave you a son, Richard at this time. Armed With your D. D.S. Degree you and Susie moved to Hawaii, with first born, Richard, where you worked at a clinic for underprivileged children with cleft palate, doing facial macular surgery. These years took you into a life of free style diving, with your spear gun, caught fish served for dinner that night. Times were tough. Your future depended on your brain. An opportunity to be accepted at Washington University was offered and Susie encouraged you to try for it. Moving to Seattle, Washington, took courage. Still, out of three hundred applicants –ten were accepted. You were one of them! WOW! During your studies at Washington University, you and Dr. William Wise, Dr. Bertham Kraus, won first prize from the prestigious Milos Hellman Research group. “Heredity and the Cranial Facile Complex”, was an original study of identical triplets. It was later reprinted in the American Journal of Orthodontics. You were awarded MSC degree in Orthodontics. Now Susie yearned for Sunny California. No more Seattle fog for her! Soon son John was born. Time had come to open your dental practice in Covina. The office schedule would save weekends for family and sports activities. The staff was encouraged to run during the lunch hour, you along with them. At the age of 45, running had become an important part of your life. You left the track at Citrus College for the hills and trails of cross country running. You ran countless long marathons, steep hills, some as long as 18 miles. Though you won many ribbons, and medals, the real reward was the euphoric freedom from the bonds of earth, as you once described iElizabeth was born, first girl!. Life was good and you took your two boys into Scouting. Eleven stalwart fathers called “The Dirty Dozen” led 27 scouts to the tap of Mount Whitney, teaching survival skills and disallowed any whining! It took eight days and seven nights. They were well prepared on many weekends before this rigorous trip. A life progression none of them ever forgot! They all became Eagle Scouts! During your thirty eight years of children’s orthodontics, you constantly preached the virtues of good health, running, and never smoking! Soon, second daughter Katherine was born, and the

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

family was complete! . Running the earth was not enough for you! Now flying the skies was added to your life. Your Cesna 185 accommodated Susie and all four kids. Flying the family and friends to football games, camping in Big Sur, and Baja, skiing in Tahoe—what a childhood they had. Waking young Richard up early one morning to get ready to go camping, Richard said “Oh No not again!”. They all leaned survival skills and safety methods during these flying experiences. So many other talents were part of your life. Many years of art classes at Mount Sac., with watercolor as your special love. Stained glass, and etching, was used as you built an underground wine cellar with your own stained glass lighted ceiling. You had an appreciation of fine wines, shared with your friends. Many dinner parties , with you as the chef, were held there. Beautiful music was part of the joy of your life. In Santa Barbara, going to The Garvin Theater for great concerts, The Granada and other stage presentation,’s or to Soho for spontaneous Jazz concerts, all lit up your eyes and delighted you. Running the earth—flying the skies,— now you were diving deep into the seas. Hawaii, California coasts, and Baja were hunting grounds for Eel, lobster and then a worlds record or two for you. First an award from the International Underwater Spearfishing Association for a wor;ld record 128 lb. Gulf Grouper! Wit your speargun, you broke the record of 76 Ibs! The natives of Baja were enjoying the meat for days! Not enough? You then speared another world record of a 620 lb. Maru I Tough getting it into the boat! Natives again celebrating with banquets on the beach! Hooray for Dooctor Frei! So many other talents. Remarkable thesis on the atmosphere, the moon, the stars, Greek philosophy, and even CLOG dancing to strengthen your legs for running! Building so many projects for the house, even stained-glass windows, there was a saying in the family, “It’s Frei built, meaning IT WILL NEVER FALL DOWN! Sadly Susie became crippled from a fall, and after months of loving care, passed on. Sixty two years of marriage was over. Her ashes were sprinkled in the garden she loved with her family around her. Your mourning and loneliness led you to seek old friends. During Susie’s illness, many phone calls were made between Susie and myself, with you on the line You wanted to share Susie’s paints and brushes with me. Susie and I both loved oil painting. Our mothers were friends who painted together. I spent many days and nights at Susie’s house, as a teen ager, 1 called her

mom, Gracie, “MY second mom” A visit from you was warm and pleasant, remembering old times we shared with both Susie and my Freddy as our kids grew up. Freddy (my husband of 62 years) had passed on two years before. Both Susie and Freddy were gone and both of us alone, made renewing our old friendship easy. You were 85 years old and I was 81. We both had good health and years left to enjoy together. Almost eight years of love and sharing, building on to the house in Santa Barbara, were delightful years. The Lutheran church on Murdoc Rd. welcomed us together, and I was baptized there at age of82.. Three years later we were married in our beautiful garden we had nurtured together, with our two families in attendance. Our dear pastor, Paul Nelson, married us there! My heart breaks that you are in Heaven without me, my darling. I will love you forever and thank you for the gift of YOU. The wonderful, unique, amazing person you were, will never leave me. Ninety-three years of WOW

Judith Sutcliffe

1/15/1941 - 3/3/2021

Judith Ann Sutcliffe, age 80, died March 3, 2021 after a long history with breast cancer came to a close. She passed away peacefully surrounded by loving friends at her home in Mineral Point, Wisconsin. Judy was born on January 15, 1941, in Hays, Kansas, to John and Marjorie Sutcliffe. The family, including younger sister Juanita, moved to Audubon, Iowa, in 1946. Judy’s father, a veterinarian and woodcarver, and mother, a journalist, encouraged Judy from early childhood in arts and crafts. Judy graduated from the University of Iowa with a double major in English and Chinese. She worked as a journalist in Chicago, a substitute teacher in Germany, then returned to her Iowa home town of Audubon where she started Greentree Pot-

tery producing collectors plates for historical societies throughout the state. She also worked as advertising manager for TCI, an Audubon agricultural firm. In 1976 she and Lorraine Larsen of Audubon designed and produced the Iowa First Lady Doll Collection, still on view at the State Capitol in Des Moines. In 1978 Judy relocated to Santa Barbara and started a business making art tiles and tile murals. She produced hundreds of murals for private homes plus many public murals around Santa Barbara, including a commissioned tile mural honoring the visit of Queen Elizabeth II to the city in 1983. It can be viewed today on the exterior of the Santa Barbara County courthouse. In the 1980s Judy started designing type fonts for the new Macintosh computers and began writing and designing books. Judy designed a centennial biography of German soprano Lotte Lehmann, who lived in Hope Ranch for many years, and was active in the Lotte Lehmann League. In 1996 Judy met Sandra Scott, director of the Donna Reed Foundation of Performing Arts. The two became friends and partners. During a visit to Galena, Illinois, in 1997 they purchased a stone and brick historic home. In 2000 they purchased a historic stone building in nearby Mineral Point, Wisconsin, and created Longbranch Gallery. In 2004 Judy and Sandy founded Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts, the non-profit school for arts and crafts in Mineral Point. Judy served on the board and taught many classes for Shake Rag Alley for years. She also wrote and published several books; Iowa Lyric, A Collection of Old Men, An Old House in Galena, Memories of an Iowa Veterinarian, Grandma Cherry’s Spoon, An Open Sky, Evie and Me, Carmela Ascending, and Old Teddy’s Travels. Judy is survived by her life partner, Sandy Scott. No services are planned; a memorial celebration will be announced at a future date. Friends may visit judithsutcliffe.com to share memories. Memorial donations in Judy’s honor will be welcomed at Shake Rag Alley Center for the Arts, 18 Shake Rag Street, Mineral Point, WI 53565, or at www. ShakeRagAlley.org.


Opinions

voices

CONT’D

Shooting in Boulder Victim Advocates Comfort the Survivors. But Who Will Comfort Them?

I

BY ROBBIE VITRANO

see a man on the ground. The man with the gun put his foot on his shoulder to push him down. Boom! Boom! Boom! Boom! Into his head.” My wife, Tricia, was sharing the story of a shaken employee who had taken shelter behind a counter inside the King Soopers grocery store where, on Monday, March 22, a man armed with a military-style semiautomatic rifle and pistol shot and killed 10 people. There were no “injured”; everyone who was shot died. Boulder, Colorado — perennial “Best,” Fittest,” “Greenest,” “Happiest,” and “Most Educated” place to live. On Monday afternoon, more people were murdered in Boulder than the previous nine years combined. Tricia works as a victim advocate for the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office, a volunteer first responder role designed to support the cops by allowing them to focus on the crime. The advocate provides assistance to the victims of a crime or trauma, assuring that their rights are honored. Employees and shoppers from the store had been brought to a large room at the Boulder Police Department where they were offered coffee, blankets, and access to counseling resources. Comfort. Statements were taken.

That searing image. I wondered how it registers in her body and if an arm’s-length trauma might metastasize. “No one cried,” Tricia told me. “They all stared, numb and glassy-eyed.” She said the people in the room included a Tibetan man who had recently moved to Colorado “to be in a happier place” and a young girl with her mother. “We’re supposed to go into a closet,” the little girl had told her mother during the assault, something she had learned in the active shooter drills she had practiced in her elementary school. She and her mother took shelter in a storage room at the King Soopers. A 9-year-old child knows how to respond to man in a grocery store with an automatic weapon. Tricia came home late the Monday night of the shootings. She was activated since 2:30 that afternoon when the pager she wears when on-call began to vibrate, displaying a cold, gray-on-gray digital readout: “ACTIVE SHOOTER.” It was her first day back to on-site duty since the pandemic had relegated all advocate work to phone and Zoom. Now, slumped into the couch, her eyes red from the spasms of emotion hidden behind her mask and between the detail work of professional crisis intervention and active listening, she needed comfort. But I am useless. Tricia is violently empathetic, an excellent listener, and fearless — classic run toward the fire. Right now there was nothing left, only a thousand-mile stare. She has worked as a victim advocate for more than three years. In that time, she had been called out to crime scenes across the county, supporting dozens of victims of domestic abuse, robbery, fraud, dog attacks, and suicide. Things people were surprised to learn

happened in Boulder. But Colorado is also famous for mass shootings. Additionally, the suicide rate is more than twice the national average. This doesn’t seem to be unrelated. I’ve never been fully comfortable with Tricia’s decision to become a victim advocate. I worry about her being so intimate with violent acts and people in a state of imbalance. Weird things happen between fight and flight. I know how she shows up, how much she leaves of herself, and how she carries the pain. Like with the family of a young high school teacher who hung himself from a tree near a popular trailhead. It was her first month as an advocate. Tricia was brought to the scene to counsel the family members. The advocate must be available, and they phoned frequently over the following days. Gut wrenching and senseless. That searing image. I wondered how it registers in her body and if an arm’s-length trauma might metastasize. Victim advocate work is also part of police reform, relevant to efforts to shift funding to more appropriate types of law enforcement response and services. Unsurprisingly, Boulder has been proactive and has a well-run, well-funded, highly effective victim assistance system in place. I was mindful, as the protests and calls to defund the police inflamed, that Tricia is helping to actively model a part of the solution. Her team spans the political spectrum (Colorado is still a “purple” state), and the thorough training protocols drill the disciplines of unbiased listening, consultative inquiry, and understanding. Buzz words, but also uncommon, unpracticed, and perhaps our only hope of crossing angry divides. The first big energy following the attack, amplified in this far left town, is for gun control. I’ve learned that “control” is a conservative dog whistle and the emerging euphemism is “gun safety.” Regardless, such legislation was rejected only six days prior to the shooting. That insulting fact will inflame the reform. It will move. However, in the rawness of this moment, toggling problem and symptom, my mind goes to how we’ve given up on our most vulnerable. The cruel irony has gone cliché to the point that people classified as essential workers in the pandemic are paid the lowest wages, exposed to the most illness and the least safe conditions, the worst health care if at all, and they die. On Monday, these same people found themselves herded into that gray room after the attack. I’m relieved to know, after that afternoon of hell, some of them sat across from my wife and that they were seen. Tricia told me how timid and shrunken they appeared, many speaking accented English and likely immigrants, perhaps thinking how dismissed and powerless they are. There’s a term familiar to people here: The “Boulder Bubble,” a state of enlightened obliviousness.   Maybe that’s the problem with bubbles; they burst. Too insulated from raw emotion and everyday messiness — abundance overplayed — the fall becomes too steep, more unexpected and violent. I don’t know how this will impact Boulder and its golden aura, but I suspect it will be changed. As a relatively new resident, a native of New Orleans, one of America’s most violent cities, and as the brother of a murder victim, I know that the many lives touched by the 10 people killed on Monday are the ones who need our full attention right now. My instinct is that we must also, with fidelity, answer the question of “why?” For n us, not for the shooter.

SBCC THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT

SBCC presents

Stories Stories written and performed by members of the SBCC Community; students, staff and faculty. Presented in 3 different chapters. DIRECTED BY MAGGIE MIXSELL

AN ONLINE STREAMED PRODUCTION MARCH 31-APRIL 17, 2021 Thank you to our season sponsor:

TICKETS: 805.965.5935 www.theatregroupsbcc.com

San Ysidro Pharmacy INDEPENDENT 3.667" wide x 6.166" high

UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP Compounding Pharmacy Call us to transfer your prescriptions and experience our personalized friendly, small town service! Delivery in Montecito, Carpinteria and Santa Barbara. We offer curbside pick-up or walk in We care about your safety and well-being Monday-Friday 9-6pm | Saturday 9-3pm 1498 East Valley Rd. Montecito CA, 93108 805-969-2284 sanysidropharmacy.com

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

17


C O V E R

S T O R Y

This Year’s SANTA BARBARA FILMMAKERS SBIFF’S VIRTUAL YEAR

Mostly

P

eruse the movie menu (on your smartphone). Buy those tickets (on your laptop). Grab some popcorn (from your microwave). And get comfortable (on your couch) for the Santa Barbara International Film Festival’s 2021 incarnation, a mostly virtual, pandemic-proof program of streaming films, celebrity tributes, and filmmaking panels that can be enjoyed easily from your own home. We say “mostly virtual” because there is the revolutionary, hopeit-sticks option to head down to the SBCC parking lots by Leadbetter Beach and check out two pop-up drive-in theaters, where movies can also magically be seen during the day. These screenings are free, albeit limited to 50 cars per screen, and must be booked in advance.  Beyond those COVID compromises, the rest of SBIFF 2021 is much the same great fare we’ve come to expect. The core offering remains the more than 125 films that provide intimate and colorful views from so many corners of our complicated world, running from beautiful landscapes and touching tales to fear, tragedy, and in-depth analyses of our most controversial conundrums. We offer a sneak peek to a small selection of those films on page 19. Then there is the slate of celebrities being feted, including stars such as Sacha Baron Cohen, Delroy Lindo, and Bill Murray as well as three of the five women nominated for the Best Actress Oscar: Carey Mulligan, Andra Day, and Vanessa Kirby. See our interviews with all three of them, and one with Amanda Seyfried, a nominee for Best Supporting Actress, on pages 19-20 and 22-23. This year’s “Outstanding Directors” will gather online for their always lively panel, as well as producers, writers, and prominent women in film. And, in what seems to be an ever-growing category—no doubt due to the festival itself, whose educational programs we highlight on page 20—the Santa Barbara Filmmaker offerings are robust, particularly in the shorts division. See our roundup on this page.  Of course, our work is only just beginning. Our team, including Josef Woodard, who’s covered every single SBIFF yet, will be reporting daily on Independent.com, where we’ve also posted more than one dozen interviews with filmmakers from near and far. That’s just one more way to tune in virtually to SBIFF during these strange days of ours. To buy tickets and see the full schedule of events, films, and more, go to sbiff.org. —Matt Kettmann

Santa Barbara International Film Festival Confronts COVID with Full Slate of Films, Tributes, and More

I

t’s impossible to accurately measure SBIFF’s impact on the growth of Santa Barbara’s filmmaking community, but the festival’s increased emphasis on education and exposure to cinema for all ages seems to bear more fruit every year. Even in the pandemic times of 2021, SBIFF is showcasing five feature films in the Santa Barbara Filmmaker category (and there’s a sixth with strong ties), as well as 25 shorts, broken into screenings of Live-Action, Mixer, and Documentary collections. Seven short docs

Five Features and 26 Shorts Made by Our Hometown Helmers BY MATT KETTMANN will get bright-lights treatment as Closing Night’s centerpiece screenings. Here’s the rundown, and head to independent.com/sbiff for extended filmmaker interviews on many of these.

Features Of all the features, none feels more “Santa Barbara” than Climb, a documentary by avid cyclist and triathlete Neil Myers, who was nearly killed in a bike-meets-windshield crash on Gibraltar Road. Instead of withering Electric Lady away, Myers tackles his recovery like an Olympian, and this doc—featuring interviews with family and medical pros and tons of iconic views of the Santa Ynez Mountains — recounts his odyssey to get back in the saddle and compete again. Myers said it felt “cringe-worthy” at first to turn his tale into a film, and then he saw a short video that Cottage Hospital produced about his story that wowed a fundraiser crowd. “I realized the story wasn’t about me, but rather, it was about the amazing community that got me back to the finish line,” he said. “So I made the film as a way to give back—to help build

better trauma centers and to provide money that could allow people less fortunate than I get the same kind of care.” Evan Wood is a collaboration of Laguna Blanca graduates Niki Byrne, who directed the film, and Austin Danson, who scored it. The story follows a young writer who must return home after her grandmother’s passing, only to become caught up in helping her brother battle mental illness and addiction. “Although Evan Wood is the lead, and it is his story, it’s told from the perspective of his sister, who tries to help him,” said Byrne, who is also a race car driver, helicopter pilot, and still photographer, and who took acting classes to better understand directing. “One of the ideas that the film communicates is that sometimes the friends and family of a person with these issues actually need to go back to their own lives and not try to fix the situation by making sacrifices.” Mixing up sexuality, youth, homecoming, and escape, Highway One is about a New Year’s Eve party set in Cambria, where long-lost friends and messed-up lovers connect and disconnect. “This movie is such a love letter to California, and although mainly filmed in Southern California, I wanted it to be set somewhere rural, a small town that had a fishing village mentality but also felt like a fairy tale, an escape—a representation of something,” said director Jaclyn Bethany. “To me, Cambria stands in for a place we leave and go back to in our

lives as changed people.” Written and directed by Lane Michael Stanley, who was inspired by the six months they spent in rehab after the sudden death of a fiancé, Addict Named Hal is a wellacted dive into addiction and recovery. It was produced by the S.B.-based company S.B. FILMS CONTINUED ON P. 21

GO TO INDEPENDENT.COM/SBIFF FOR YOUR FILM FEST COVERAGE & SCHEDULE UPDATES. 18

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


FILMS to FIND by CELINA GARCIA, TYLER HAYDEN, MATT KETTMANN, and JOSEF WOODARD

Oscar Favorite CAREY MULLIGAN

We got a sneak peek at some of the more than 130 films screening at SBIFF in 2021, and here are some of our favorites so far, listed alphabetically.

I

n a year in which viewers have been restricted to screening everything at home, certain films may have actually benefited from the focus provided by this more intimate setting. For example, Promising Young Woman, the first feature written and directed by Emerald Fennell and starring Carey Mulligan, might not have reached such a broad audience if it had been given a traditional theatrical release. The film’s category-resistant combination of romance, comedy, suspense, and allegory would have made it a gamble for distributors looking to cash in on more easily grasped material. But at home, where quirky streamers like Stranger Things and Schitt’s Creek rule, Promising Young Woman fit right in. In fact, the film did so well by word of mouth that Mulligan is now

Akilla’s Escape

Carey Mulligan in Promising Young Woman

learn about Nina [Cassie’s friend who was sexually assaulted and who is now dead], and the more you learn about Cassie’s past and what she’s actually doing with these men, that affects how you’re playing those scenes. It’s such a pleasure to play with really good writing. I loved the way that the film was shot, and I felt like the cinematography, with all the symmetry and centering of the actors, conveyed a sense that this was a moral universe in which justice would be done, almost like Dante’s Inferno. And then when Cassie confronts the Dean played by Connie Britton, the trick she plays on her reminds me of Jonathan Swift’s “A Modest Proposal.” Was that something you were aware of as you made the film, the literary basis for it? I think what Emerald enjoys so much about filmmaking in particular is this sort of chance to be allegorical, and to draw in these things. Certainly, there were lots and lots of biblical references. And I think that’s why the film is so interesting on a second and third viewing, because it’s hard to see these details [the first time around] because of the pace of the film.

Cinema Vanguard Award Goes to Promising Young Woman Star BY CHARLES DONELAN favored by Vegas oddsmakers to take home the Academy Award for Best Actress. Having already captured the Critics Circle Award and the SBIFF’s Cinema Vanguard Award, Mulligan has nominations pending with both the Screen Actors Guild and the Oscars. The performance that has everyone talking (and voting) allowed Mulligan to display an unusually broad range of talents. In some scenes, she’s cute in a rom-com kind of way, while in others, she’s hard as nails. And in the movie’s defining moments, she’s both, alternately. It’s these breathtaking turnabouts, in which the character Cassie reveals that she is not what she at first appears to be, that structure a plot that’s chock-full of all sorts of surprises. I spoke with Carey Mulligan last week about her year and about what this particular film has meant to her. Promising Young Woman is full of these shocking wake-up calls where Cassie surprises the men she’s with by revealing that she’s not what they think. What was it like to play these scenes? A lot of the time you read stuff, and it can be great writing, but you can still sort of have a good sense of where the story is going. But with this, I just had no idea where we were going to end up. It’s so intricate, the way that she [Emerald Fennell] designs this and the way that the story unravels. The more you

In part because of the issues raised, and by the way they are handled, the film has been somewhat controversial. Could you talk about the reception of it? We kind of always expected that. When you talk about a subject like this, that is so close to people, people are going to have incredibly strong feelings, as rightly they should. You have to expect a certain amount of debate. Either way, it’s something that we’ve always felt very comfortable with. That’s great, because it’s Emerald’s truth, and it’s mine as well. It’s the way that we both wanted to talk about this subject, but it’s not for everyone, you know, and I think we both feel very comfortable with that. So I think, you know, that it’s been really interesting to hear both sides of it.

Carey Mulligan will receive the Cinema Vanguard Award on Monday, April 5, at 2 p.m.

Akilla’s Escape: Broken into “Exhibits,” this emotive crime feature explores the lingering impacts of Jamaica’s tumultuous political scene of the late 1970s and 1980s on the gang-strewn streets of Toronto. In the aftermath of a marijuana robbery gone haywire, we watch as the protagonist, played by spoken word star Saul Williams, tries to right wrongs that began many years before. (MK) Alaska Nets: Beautifully filmed and tenderly told, this documentary sticks in the mind long after the credits roll. While exploring the two sacred pastimes—basketball and fishing—that define the state’s last native reserve of Metlakatla, it respectfully bears the heart of a proud but troubled people. No need to understand (or even like) the sport or the industry to appreciate this one. It’s all about human grit and hope through tragedy—something we can all relate to. (TH) Baby: Surface storyline details only go so far in this surreal Spanish film (with echoes of Darren Aranofsky’s Mother). A young junkie struggles to exist, compounded by her baby’s arrival and the dark lure of a baby-trafficking demimonde. Written, directed, and virtually dreamed-up by Juanma Bajo Ulloa, the film pulls you into a hermetic, dialogue-free “other” world, a bad dream in some fairytale-like backwoods. Enter at your own risk. (JW) Conservation Game: Jack Hanna a fraud? Say it ain’t so. The way Blackfish blew the lid off SeaWorld, the upcoming world premiere of The Conservation Act will rip back the curtain on the dishonest and sometimes criminal practices of celebrity conservationists who care far more about their airtime than they do the animals they drag onto talk shows. Mark our words—the world premiere of this absolute bombshell of a documentary, directed by Michael Webber, will change the big business of animals on TV forever. (TH)

Fear (Strah)

Fear (Strah): This sneakily charming film from Bulgarian director Ivaylo Hristov somehow broaches timely subjects of refugee dynamics and Black Lives Matter sensibilities, all in the tale of interracial love in a small town on the Turkish/Bulgarian border. Dry, Kaurismäki-like humor and light cinematic touches counterbalance xenophobia and tragedy-in-the-making, alongside a surreal wink of a color camel cameo (think the finale of Palm Springs). (JW) FILMS TO FIND CONTINUED ON P. 21

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

19


C O V E R

The

Singer/Actress Being Honored as Virtuoso BY RICKY BARAJAS

nished by her issues with drugs and alcohol. The film follows Holiday as she struggles to navigate the space in between being a human and being a star. The FBI saw her 1939 song “Strange Fruit” as a threat, for the early example of a civil rights protest song describes the Black victims of lynching in the South as “strange fruit hangin’ from the poplar trees.” Despite being warned, Holiday continued to perform the song and eventually spent time in jail in 1947. After her release, she performed to a sold-out, inte-

COURSES Go On

W

hen the 35th annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival wrapped at the end of January 2020, no one could have anticipated how completely transformed life would be in a matter of weeks. The festival’s suite of offices and screeningequipped classrooms at the Barbakow Family Center for Film Studies on State Street across from the Arlington Theatre was thriving, the winners of the 10-10-10 student film competition were celebrating, and the 2020-21 class of the festival’s Rosebud program was gearing up for a robust season of sneak previews and Q&A sessions. Then, thanks to BY CHARLES DONELAN COVID-19, everything ground to a halt. Actually, that’s not what happened. Thanks to the ingenuity of SBIFF education coordinator Claire Waterhouse and the rest of Roger Durling’s dedicated staff, these ambitious programs, which now ordinarily reach as many as 14,000 people per year, kept rolling, albeit virtually. In fact, thanks to the flexibility with regard to location inherent in digital meetings, some aspects of the work even ramped up. For example, the festival’s film society increased the number of sneak previews it offered, giving film-starved fans access to top talent through live Q&A sessions on Zoom. And almost immediately upon lockdown, the festival began publishing daily emails written by Durling and Waterhouse that offered detailed criticism and analysis of recommended films. The latter undertaking has gathered numerous fans over the course of the year that it’s been in operation. Applying the same habits of productivity that have made him so successful as director of the festival and as a professor of film at SBCC, Durling has written hundreds of these notso-little essays in just one year. It’s as though Andrew Sarris or Pauline Kael were to compress a decade or more of reviewing into a single long season. According to Durling, these arti- Roger Durling and cles are typically written seven days Claire Waterhouse in advance, but there has to be room for improvisation, because “the writing is affected by current events. So like when Christopher Plummer died, I told everybody to stop the presses.” The same thing happened with Chadwick Boseman, and with Ruth Bader Ginsburg. For Durling, the process of writing these essays is bound up in a long-standing routine of screening films virtually every day. “I have a regimen,” he said, “and, typically, by 6:30 in the evening, I will be at home in front of the TV watching something that I feel will help get me through the day, or that I am planning to teach.” Most significantly, and like any good teacher, Durling never writes about a film from memory. When he sits down to compose his recommendations, “it’s always from a fresh viewing that night, or the night before.” In upcoming weeks, you can expect to receive many more of these film recommendations, along with news of the 10-10-10 competition, which has continued virtually, and all of the SBIFF’s other educational n programming.

Education Programs Expand During COVID

Andra Day

grated audience at Carnegie Hall in 1948. However, her vices had caused her health to severely deteriorate, and she died of cirrhosis in 1959. Day said part of the challenge in playing the role was making Billie Holiday loveable. “We’re not allowed to reflect these layers and cultivate these layers, and I think that these are what makes her story important, especially for a queer Black woman in the ’30s,” said Day. “She loved women, and she was often attracted to very violent men. What’s the trauma that causes her to make these decisions? I wanted to vindicate her legacy. She wasn’t just a drug addict or an alcoholic.” Day and I didn’t get to speak for very long on Zoom, as her assistant told us time was up after about 10 minutes. But the singer/actress let me sneak one more question in, so I asked about how embodying Holiday might influence her music and acting to come. “Her spirit colors my work,” replied Day. “It’s colored it since I was 11 or 12. Whatever I do, I want it to have weight. There are so many suppressed narratives. It’s going to dictate the roles that I choose from now on. Music can be fun, but I want to show narratives that have been suppressed.”

Andra Day will be honored with Riz Ahmed, Maria Bakalova, Kingsley Ben-Adir, Sidney Flanigan, Vanessa Kirby, Tahar Rahim, and Zendaya with SBIFF’s Virtuosos Award on Saturday, April 3, at 6 p.m.

GO TO INDEPENDENT.COM/SBIFF FOR YOUR FILM FEST COVERAGE & SCHEDULE UPDATES. 20

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

A

lready an esteemed artist due to her Grammy-nominated debut album, Cheers to the Fall, in 2015, Andra Day can now add “actress” to her repertoire—and she’s a decorated one at that. In her first role as a lead actress, starring as the iconic Billie Holiday in Hulu’s biopic The United States vs. Billie Holiday, Day scored a Golden Globe win and an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. Day chuckled when I asked what the transition was like from her past film experiences — namely, a pre-recorded song at the end of Cars 3—to her exalted status today. “There was no transition,” she said. But she knew the subject matter well, having idolized Billie Holiday since age 11. Even the “Day” part of Andra’s stage name is a reference to Billie, who was affectionately known as “Lady Day.” She was reluctant to step into the cinematic shoes of her idol. “I didn’t want to ruin her legacy by being bad,” she joked. But she felt the call and rose to it, crediting “heavy prayer, the script, and daily conversations with [director] Lee [Daniels]” for her growing comfort in the role. “For people of color, and especially Black women, you don’t often get to show the layers that a person can have,” said Day. “A lot of them are one-note characters. Can she be selfish? Can she make mistakes? Can she be sad?” Born in 1915, Holiday was a legendary jazz singer whose voice was piercing but whose legacy was tar-

COURTESY

My 10 Minutes with

ANDRA DAY

S T O R Y


FILMS to FINDCont’d from p. 19 S.B. FILMS Cont’d from p. 18 Light Brigade Entertainment, run by Lowell Blank and Thane Swigart. “We have many film and TV projects in development, but Hal is our first production,” said Blank, who read Stanley’s play and started turning it into a short film four years ago, and then it blossomed into a feature. “I feel so incredibly lucky to have gone on this journey with Lane. We found an amazing cast of mostly unknowns and shot the film in Austin, Texas, in January 2020 before the lockdowns.” The most politically powerful film in this collection is Revolution Generation, a documentary about the strong and expansive impact of the oft-ridiculed millennial generation on American society. Narrated

by actor Michelle Rodriguez and directed by Ojai residents Josh and Rebecca Tickell (whose recent film Kiss the Ground won much acclaim), it’s a deeply reported, stereotype-slaying film about generational cycles. They hope the film helps breed empathy between people of all ages. “This is ultimately a film about connecting with one another in new ways so we can work together to do great things,” said Josh. “The ‘revolution’ that the film speaks about is really a revolution of love, of the heart, and of deep opening. When we learn to love people who we typically judge, the world shifts.” And though not technically filed under the Santa Barbara Filmmakers section, the world premiere of Coast will be very familiar to Central Coast viewers. Penned by screenwriter Cindy Kitagawa and produced by Wendy Guerrero — both Santa Maria natives — the film is about a 16-year-old girl who wants to leave her Santa Maria home with her rock-star boyfriend, so the filmmakers Jessica Hester and Derek Schweickart shot the film in that city as well as in Guadalupe, Grover

Beach, and Avila Beach. “We wanted the writer’s Santa Maria experience to be on the screen, so to be able to give it back to the community is fun and very rewarding,” the directors said. Added Kitagawa of the storyline, “It was important for me to tell a story about girls from communities that we didn’t get to see growing up on screen.”

Closing Night Shorts Five of the seven shorts showing on Closing Night are Shepherd’s Song, Abigail Fuller’s visual stunner about the couple behind Cuyama Lamb, whose sheep are moved across the region to restore landscapes, provide firebreaks, and Climb grow wool; Homecoming: Journey to Limuw, Nick Zachar’s doc about the Chumash legends around the Channel Islands that are celebrated during the annual paddle to Santa Cruz Island in a traditional tomol; Dist-Dance!, Michael Love’s reflection of the S.B. Dance Coop’s socially distanced gatherings that have gone down during the pandemic; Hospice of Santa Barbara Presents: Manuel’s Story, a touching doc by Greg Kroes about Manuel Figueroa, whose love of music, memories of his recently passed wife, and help of Hospice S.B. helped him heal; and Santa Barbara Weed Country, an examination of the county’s growing cannabis scene by SBIFF’s own Benjamin Goedert. The remaining two films — Vuja De, about the miniature art of Michael Long, and Electric Lady, about the roller-skating legend Ana Marie Coffey and the recent rise of the S.B. Rollers—are both by Santa Barbara–raised filmmaker Casey McGarry. “Finding an inspiring, unique, and local story about an ordinary person who lives among us here in Santa Barbara has become an enjoyable hobby and pastime for me,” said McGarry, who’s been screening his shorts at SBIFF for the past half-dozen years. “There’s something really special about the now-running tradition—since 2017—of the best local docs playing Closing Night, especially at a packed Arlington Theatre surrounded by all familiar faces. I think this year will be just as magical in such a cool and inventive space, like a drive-in at n the beach.”

Fellinopolis: Rather than being a fully-fledged portrait of the late, great cinemagician Federico Fellini, this documentary zeroes in on his 1980s films City of Women, Fred and Ginger, and The Ship Sails On. Directed by Silvia Giulietti—drawing heavily on period, on-site footage by Ferruccio Castronuovo—the doc, though limited in scope, manages to convey Fellini’s mastery of cinema as “circus, a magical circle, where anything can happen.” (JW) Fortitude (La fortaleza): Venezuela’s problems get big-screen attention in this revealing feature about an alcoholic (played masterfully by Jorge Thielen Hedderich) who flees his big-city problems to find his old shack in the jungle. But his old friends there are caught up in the dangerous hunt for gold, as portrayed in rugged mining scenes that take on an almost documentary feel. Things don’t go well, but the movie grips until the finish. (MK)

Last Call: The Shutdown of NYC Bars

Last Call: The Shutdown of NYC Bars: Impressive enough alone for turning around a compelling documentary in such a short time span, this doc covers the impact of COVID closures to the bar scene in Astoria, Queens, a homey district of New York City. Using commentary from bartenders, bar owners, doctors, journalists, and social workers, director Johnny Sweet presents a moving portrait of an industry thrown back on its heels, revealing how integral that industry is to life itself. (MK)

My First Summer: A coming-of-age and sexual awakening tale Down Under, this is an affecting portrait of a tightening relationship between adolescent girls—one the reclusive daughter of a late writer mother, the other an enabling free spirit/rescuing agent. Writer/director Katie Found, working with the sensitive actresses Markella Kavenagh and Maiah Stewardson, achieves tenderness, folding in sentimentality in the right ways. (JW) One-Way to Moscow (Moskau Einfach!): An excellent example of films that highlight forgotten segments of history, this dramedy dusts off Switzerland’s widespread surveillance campaign near the end of the Cold War, when the paranoid government spied on nearly one million free citizens. The story follows a cop gone underground into a supposedly left-wing theater troupe, where he finds love and truth as the Berlin Wall comes down. (MK)

The Pit (Bedre)

The Pit (Bedre): Set amid the seemingly idyllic suburbs and beautiful forests of Latvia, this dramatic feature follows a scarred child being raised by his struggling grandmother. She tries to hide him from the town’s big secret—that her transgender stained-glass artist friend lives in a remote barn—but that’s who the bullied boy befriends, leading to both happiness and heartache. (MK)

FILMS TO FIND CONTINUED ON P. 23

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

21


C O V E R

I

n a way, it’s unfortunate that the much-heralded film Mank came out when it did, limited to home screens and deprived of its rightful perch on the big screen. Here, after all, is an artful filmabout-film, which also poses some major historical assertions. Primarily, Mank affirms the controversial notion that screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz essentially wrote Citizen Kane, rather than presumed auteur Orson Welles, and also that Marion Davies deserves more love and respect then she’s gotten as the paramour of William Randolph Hearst (and, by fictional proxy, Charles Foster Kane) and as a talentchallenged singer/actress. Enter versatile actress Amanda Seyfried, whose performance as Davies has rightfully earned her wide praise and her first Oscar nomination—not to mention the celebratory hot seat of SBIFF’s Montecito Award honor. Seyfried’s new spotlight is well-deserved, for an actress, 35, whose filmography ranges from Mean Girls to flexing her singing savvy in Mamma Mia! and Les Misérables, to Atom Egoyan’s Chloe, Paul Schrader’s masterpiece First Reformed, and now the Mank award season buzz.

Amanda Seyfried

A few years ago, you made a strong impression in Paul Schrader’s Last Reformed, a wild ride and possibly Schrader’s masterpiece. How was that experience? Thank God for the opportunity to work with him. Like Fincher, he knows what movie he’s making in his head. It’s a dream for an actor because there are no questions. It’s a great movie. I was at dinner with Paul and Ethan [Hawke], who we had seen onstage in True West. Paul was talking to Ethan about his new idea and that he really wanted Ethan to do it. And I felt so left out. [Laughs.]

Montecito Award Winner Discusses Her Chameleon Career BY JOSEF WOODARD We caught up with Seyfried while she was decamped in Georgia, where her husband, actor Thomas Sadoski, was working (they have two children, one born last September). She admitted to looking forward to returning to their beloved home farm in Upstate New York, and to Zooming in, virtually, to Santa Barbara for a night. As for the Oscar carrot, she is philosophical: “I don’t look to the win. I look to the nod, the little tip of the hat from my fellow Academy members.” Mank is such a fascinating and complex project, a filmbehind-a-film which also readdresses history, not only Mankiewicz, but also Marion Davies, who you lend some respect. The role moves beyond the stereotype. Were you aware of that process? Yeah. [Director] David Fincher’s father, Jack Fincher [screenwriter], captured this perspective and dimension of a woman we thought we knew. She’s not like Citizen Kane’s character, or just Hearst’s mistress. She had a lot to offer, especially as an actress. Watching her, studying her, she was formidable. This was the most beautiful opportunity. It was just laid out in the script, and it was very clear that Jack Fincher had done all her research and really respected her. I didn’t have to do any work in terms of revamping her legacy. Love the woman. I love to hang out with her. My job is to fall in love with my characters in some way, but it wasn’t hard.

Vanessa Kirby

COURTESY

Keeps ’Em Guessing

COURTESY

AMANDA SEYFRIED

Your career so far has included a great variety of roles. Is that sort of a sign of success for you that you’ve been able to be this chameleon? I think that has been very deliberate for sure. I make the choice about how hard I’m going to work to get something; it’s like, it’s very deliberate. I always want to do something different. It’s important to disappear. And I think that’s another thing about Marion, is that I really got to truly disappear. Speaking of chameleonic twists, we’ll next see you in Things Heard and Seen, a horror thriller on Netflix next month, right? Yes. It is actually coming a couple days after the Oscars. I love the thriller genre so much. It really is my favorite. I love working with Netflix, and I love the producer and directors so much, I just had to do that. And it was a shot upstate close to where I live. So it was just a dream. Movies all have their challenges. And then, after that, I have a movie very close to my heart called A Mouthful of Air, which we did just before that movie. That’s a tiny passion movie drama. I’m trying to keep them guessing. There’s the headline: keep them guessing. Yeah, that can be my motto.

Amanda Seyfried will be honored with SBIFF’s Montecito Award on Friday, April 9, at 6 p.m.

THE BODY TAKES OVER

P

ieces of a Woman takes a topic that might have been routine in other hands and, through the alchemy of theater, turns it into something startlingly new. Vanessa Kirby plays Martha, a young Massachusetts woman caught between her middle-class husband, Sean (Shia LaBeouf), and the expectations of her patrician mother, Elizabeth (Ellen Burstyn). The scene that sets the story in motion has already become something of a cinema legend. For nearly 30 minutes, a single long take captures the homebirth and accidental death of Martha’s first child. Attended by Sean and the midwife Eva (Molly Parker), Martha experiences a spectacular range of physical and emotional states, as she screams, cries, grimaces, pants, and groans through life’s most elemental moment. About twothirds of the way through the scene, Eva loses confidence in the home procedure and asks Sean to call 9-1-1. The baby is born alive but doesn’t survive the trip to hospital.  The plot that unfolds from there pits the reactions to this tragedy among Martha’s family members against her own BY CHARLES DONELAN numbness, confusion, and overwhelming grief. The decision to bring manslaughter and negligence charges against Eva is made against Martha’s wishes, and in its second half, the film moves from the living rooms of Boston to its courtrooms. Throughout this journey, Vanessa Kirby keeps Martha vitally present on screen even as she often suffers in silence. As for the birth scene—there’s never been anything like it.  I spoke with Vanessa Kirby from her home in England last week about the role and the honors of being an SBIFF Virtuoso and an Academy Award nominee.

Vanessa Kirby’s Oscar-Nominated Role in Pieces of a Woman

GO TO INDEPENDENT.COM/SBIFF FOR YOUR FILM FEST COVERAGE & SCHEDULE UPDATES. 22

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

S T O R Y

INDEPENDENT.COM


FILMS to FIND

The Cinderella Addiction: This deceptively sensuous and visually stylish Japanese love story gradually takes detours into mysterious places, for its characters and viewers alike. Melodrama and thriller tactics entwine, and in keeping with the tease of the title, fairy-tale dimensions keep abutting our assumptions of realism in the works, keeping us guessing and enchanted. (JW)

The Cinderella Addiction

Pieces of a Woman

Pieces of a Woman started life as a play. Could you talk about that aspect of the development of the project? When Kata [Wéber, screenwriter and life partner of the director, Kornél Mundruczó] wrote the play, it was originally just two scenes: the birth and the dinner party. The whole thing was just an hour and a half long, and it was quite controversial. It really emotionally hit people. Kata was writing from a place of personal experience, and she talks a lot about how it was frightening for her to write about because it was something that is rarely spoken about, even among women. When you hear the fact that one in four pregnancies end in miscarriage, you have to wonder why is something that’s happening to 25 percent of women not the subject of open conversation? So I think she was brave to tackle it, and right to take the approach she did, because if you were to cut it down to two frames—you know, an actor is pushing and then the baby’s out—that would not be reflective of the true experience. So their ambition to show it in real time, and put it all in one take is quite theatrical to me.  I was so excited by that, because to me, I thought it just really requires you to be brave and kind of fearless, and there’s something really liberating about that. When you go onstage, once you’re out from behind the wings, you can’t go off then, and it’s the same with this scene. There’s a reference that is always there. Labor happens, and no loss of thinking can stop the process. The body takes over. As the film goes on, Martha has to navigate through some challenging scenes with the other characters, particularly her mother and her husband. Did you feel you got a lot of support from the other actors? Since the story covers several months in these people’s lives, we all had to go through multiple stages together, and this was so important to the film because that was a beautiful experience, and everybody felt like it was something bigger than normal. In the end, one is left with the sense that tragedy has left this couple isolated from one another, even when they are most desperate to connect. Does that go along with your sense of what happens? Yes, talking about stillbirth is not easy because of the way that people feel they have to hide their grief and pain. A grieving process for anybody is so different, so unpredictable, and so deep that you really are on your own with it. If you don’t have the tools or the support to be able to share and know how to begin to talk about it, you can end up unable to find each other or connect. And I do think that’s behind some of the more intense later scenes between Martha and Sean—they are trying to find each other and hold space for each other, but they don’t have the instruments to do so.

Vanessa Kirby will be featured in SBIFF’s Virtuosos Awards on Saturday, April 3, at 6 p.m.

Cont’d from p. 21

The Flood Won’t Come (Tvano nebus): War, as something painfully specific even as it is chaotic and ambiguous, is the underlying theme of this unusual Lithuanian film, a hypnotic and nonlinear evocation of wartime—and war film culture. A world-weary colonel is the protagonist, of sorts, in a narrative conveyed through vignettes rather than an easily comprehended storyline. Consider it a fable about the fever-dream-like absurdity, cyclicality, and volatility of war. (JW) The Ghosts (Los fantasmas): This impressive, impressionistic Guatemalan film follows our young protagonist, enmeshed in prostitution and robbery schemes, languishing in pool halls and the wrestling world, and escaping to the roof. Sebastián Lojo’s unsparing yet artful slice-of-life tale boasts a heightened visual and cinematic sensibility and resists filmic cliches—a unique, poetic film, conveying a lot without having to explain itself. (JW)

The Ghosts (Los fantasmas)

The Knot (Uijhan): This engaging Indian film aims its loaded title in separate but tautly entwined directions: the sometimes-knotty complications of marriage/family planning and socio-economic and caste-system conflicts endemic to India (and far beyond). In writer/director Ashish Pant’s morality play, an upward-mobility-aspiring man’s conniving efforts to secure a loan for a family home entangles with an accident that flings his wife into secret dealings in the poverty zone. Associated tensions take their toll. (JW) The Last Ones (Viimeiset): Dark forces are at work in the extreme north, where minors in Lapland face off with machismo power plays, fueled by greed and a will to sacrifice reindeer herding culture for progress and profit. Director Veiko Õunpuu’s saga on the far global fringes manages to be both viscerally edgy and ambiguous, with poetic touches all along the rugged path of its narrative. (JW)

The Last Ones (Viimeiset)

The Man with the Answers: A road trip flick of a different nature, this film follows the accidental tourist alliance of a Greek man in search of his mother, and a prepossessed stranger—the “answer” man—on a ferry and then his car and, at some point, a common bed. It’s a pleasant-enough feelgood number, savoring the sights in Greece, Italy, and Bavaria, on a trek toward family redemption and personal discovery. (JW) Trees of Peace: Inspired by true events, four women take shelter in a crowded bunker that locks from the outside for 81 days during the Rwandan genocide. With an arresting soundscape reaching your ears before the first image flashes the screen, and the majority of the film spent in a singular, claustrophobiainducing location, I could not help but hold my breath from start to finish. (CG) We Burn Like This: Macro- and microaggressions against Indigenous and Jewish people pop up throughout this dramatic feature about a young woman trying to find herself in Billings and Butte, Montana. Partying and parenting issues form the moral backdrop, with troubling revelations emerging by the n end. (MK)

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

23


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

T HE

COURTESY

FRIDAY 4/2

COURTESY COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit. 95.5 KLOS. This year’s keynote speaker will be USC Trojans football player and pediatric cancer survivor Jake Olson. Registration is required. 7pm. Free.

teddybearcancerfoundation.org/events 4/1: 91.9 KCSB-FM Presents a Virtual Livestream Concert: Indigo de Souza

Listen to emerging Southern artist and guitarist Indigo de Souza, who will perform her eclectic array of music, ranging from indie-rock to neosoul. With lyrics that depict the experiences of a young woman of color growing up in rural North Carolina, she will perform from her historic home in Asheville, NC. 8pm. Free. kcsb.org

tinyurl.com/YouTubeKCSB

SATURDAY 4/3

THURSDAY 4/1 4/1-4/7: 36th S.B. International Film Festival (SBIFF) Visit the SBIFF website to check out information about the schedule of more than 100 films, celebrity tributes (Bill Murray, April 2, 6pm; Virtuosos Award, April 3, 6pm; Carey Mulligan, April 5, 2pm; Variety Artisans Award, April 5, 6pm; Outstanding Directors of the Year, April 6, 6pm; and Sacha Baron Cohen, April 7, 6pm), panel discussions, filmmaker Q&As, and free beachside drive-in screenings. GA: Free-$15; passes: $350+. Read more on p. 18. sbiff.org

4/1-4/2: Egg Hunt Scavenger Hunt Follow on @ShopPaseoNuevo to get clues for the location of brightly colored plastic eggs that will be hidden at a different time and in different locations daily. Eggs will contain a token to be redeemed at the Management Office for a $50 gift card to one of the stores. Also, visit the website to send a postcard to the Easter Bunny. 11am-5pm. Paseo Nuevo, 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free. tinyurl.com/ScavengerEggHunt

Easter at Rosewood

Miramar Beach Celebrate Easter with an array of activities, festive Easter brunch at Caruso’s, and of course, a visit with the Easter Bunny himself for the chance to take a distanced photo on Easter Day! Visit the website for a full schedule and brunch pricing. 11am-3pm. Free. tinyurl.com/RosewoodEaster

local markets, and dinner for six in your home. Call (805) 966-9668 or email gwhitefoot@transitionhouse.com.

transitionhouse.com/mad-hatter

to the drive-through Easter egg hunt for a treat bag filled with candy eggs and other goodies to those ages 12 and under (while supplies last), and a photo of the Easter Bunny near your car. Roll down the windows if you are wearing masks. 10am. Ryon Memorial Park, 800 W. Ocean Ave., Lompoc (enter from Cypress Ave. and South O St.). Free.

tinyurl.com/LompocEaster

4/1: Online Event: Spring Weeds for Spring Health, Seasonal Herbalism Learn what common and often-overlooked spring weeds and herbs can provide for wellness and health from herbalist Lindsay Kolasa. 5-6pm. Free. Call (805) 769-4926 or email info@ artemisiaacademy.com.

tinyurl.com/SpringWeedsClass 4/1: Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation’s (TBCF) BIG Little Heroes Join this inspiring event that will benefit TBCF’s programs and services, led by Brian Phelps from The Mark & Brian Show on L.A.’s

April Food Drive Drive

through a pandemic-safe drivethrough in the church parking lot and drop off canned and other non-perishable goods to support community families that are facing food insecurity. All donations will be given to the Foodbank of S.B. County. 10am-noon. Waypoint Church S.B., 3942 La Colina Rd. Free. Call (805) 448-3239 or email melanie@averyaccounting.com.

adult; $45/children 12 and under. Egg Hunt: 9am. $250/family. 800 Alvarado Pl. Call (805) 845-5800 or email elencanto@belmond.com.

tinyurl.com/ElEncantoEaster

4/4: Easter Brunch at San Ysidro Ranch 10am-2pm. 900 San Ysidro Ln., Montecito. $145. Call (805) 565-1720. tinyurl.com/SanYsidroEaster

MONDAY 4/5 4/5: S.B. Video Speed Dating Meet people face-to-face on Monday nights. Each date lasts 12 minutes or less with a short break in between. If you like them, log into Bloom after the sesh and click the heart on their profile; if it’s mutual, you’ll get each other’s numbers. 7-8pm. Free.

4/1-4/7: Transition House Auxiliary Mad Hatter Virtual Fund-

raiser Transition House Auxiliary will have an

online and silent auction through April 15 with every dollar raised matched by a donor up to $100,000. Funds raised will go toward Transition House’s programs for families with children. Bid on an overnight stay at Rosewood Miramar Beach, gift cards from

tinyurl.com/SBSpeedDating

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. APRIL 1, 2021

4/4:

tinyurl.com/WaypointFoodDrive

Bell will describe the research for the catalogue raisonné (a comprehensive, annotated listing of all the known works of an artist) and provide observations that have influenced a new understanding of abstract expressionist Agnes Martin’s art. 3-4pm. Free. tinyurl.com/AgnesMartinLecture

THE INDEPENDENT

Race to Justice Virtual Event: Allyson Felix: Advocacy and Equality in Sports and in Life Allyson Felix, the most decorated track and field Olympian in history, will speak on pregnancy discrimination, discrimination, and racism in athletics. A Q&A will follow with Dr. Ingrid Banks, UCSB chair of Black Studies. 5pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535. tinyurl.com/AllysonFelix

4/4: Easter Brunch and Egg Hunt at Belmond El Encanto Brunch: 10am. $95/

4/1: Art Matters Virtual Lecture: The Art of Agnes Martin: Between the Lines of the Catalogue Raisonné Independent scholar Tiffany

24

4/6:

SUNDAY 4/4

CALLE MACARONE

4/2-4/4:

4/3: The Lompoc Kiwanis Easter Egg Hunt Drive-Through Hop in the car and get

INDEPENDENT.COM


Rising in Love!

APR.

unity of sb

1-7

Easter Celebration at Unity of Santa Barbara

by TERRY ORTEGA

Sunday, Apr. 4, 10 AM

and SOPHIE LYND

with Rev. Heidi Alfrey

TUESDAY 4/6 4/6: Adult Studio Art Virtual Workshop: Drawing Be inspired by one of Joseph Anthony Mugnaini’s lithographs from the Age of Fable series (1958) and examine how line, shape, and shading can create suspense and theatrical scenes as you give it a try with assistance from teaching artist Tina Villadolid. The supply list is on the website. 5-6pm. Free . Call (805) 9634364. tinyurl.com/VirtualDrawingWorkshop

Inspirational message & live music, plus Easter bonnet contest w/ prizes! Indoor and Outdoor Seating • Register to Attend

COURTESY

227 E. Arrellaga St. SB | Call (805) 966-2239 or visit santabarbaraunity.org for more info!

4/7:

AWC-SB Virtual Meeting: Starshine Roshell: Truth Decay – The Battle to Prevent Lies and Misinformation from Overwhelming Reality

WEDNESDAY 4/7 4/7: Special Yom HaShoah Commemoration Virtual Program: Violins of Hope Commemorate

NIKKI DONER

MARK SHERWOOD

The Association for Women in Communication presents award-winning journalist and S.B. Independent columnist Starshine Roshell, who will share insight about the smallbut-powerful things you can do to combat the current deluge of misinformation, misleading memes, and conspiracy theories. The meeting will also include its Member Spotlight portion. 5:30-7pm. Free-$10.

Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) by watching a short film and a live musical performance and taking the opportunity to engage with the virtual tinyurl.com/AWC-Starshine audience for questions and answers. Included will be a violin played in the Auschwitz orchestra as well as one used on the Kindertransport (the nine-month rescue effort of 10,000 children under age 17 from Nazi Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Poland, and Danzig to the U.K.). 6-7pm. Free. Email rvargeson@sbjf.org.

tinyurl.com/ViolinsOfHopeProgram

4/7: Virtual Workshop: Stick Puppet Pals Let Rachel, art coordinator, assist you with making your own puppet. Gather crayons, cardboard food containers such as cereal or mac and cheese boxes, sticks, glue, tape, and decorations such as yarn scraps, pipe cleaners, fabric scraps, or anything you might find at home. Register to receive a link. 3-4pm. Free . Email rachel@ exploreecology.org.

tinyurl.com/StickPuppetWorkshop

Museum

Reopening S.B. Maritime Museum Along with four new exhibits — Arthur Beau-

mont: Art of the Sea (through May 31), Santa Cruz Acoustic Range Facility, On This Spot in History with Erin Graffy de Garcia, and Love Letters to the Sea — there are virtual programs that people of all ages can enjoy at home and in-person with new safety protocols in place. Thu.-Sun.: 10am-5pm. 113 Harbor Wy., Ste.190. Free-$8. Call (805) 962-8404. sbmm.org

Fundraiser INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

25


living

CEC’s CEC 2021

Virtual April 22–24 Earth Day Festival

A HITTER’S GAME

Earth Day Environmental Hero Annie Leonard CEO, Greenpeace USA Watch this year’s hero in conversation with CEC CEO SIGRID WRIGHT and UC Santa Barbara Environmental Studies Professor DAVID PELLOW on Saturday afternoon (time TBA), April 24.

COVID Couldn’t Stop a Weekly Competition Between Two Old Friends

Earth Day Every Day Campaign Launches April 1 - personal pledge for carbon footprint reduction April 1-22. Tag your commitment photos for a chance to win cool prizes! For Earth Day - Every Day campaign details, event schedule, a list of virtual exhibitors and much more, visit SBEarthDay.org

We’re Redefining Safe Senior Living in Carpinteria. At Carpinteria’s only assisted living and memory care community, you’ll meet people of similar interests and common goals. Express yourself in art class. Enjoy a friendly game of bocce. Sip your afternoon high tea with fellow neighbors on the outdoor patio. We’re pleased to announce that all staff and residents have been given the opportunity to receive both doses of vaccinations. Everyone will continue to follow the guidance of the CDC and Santa Barbara County Health Department. It’s a great life here at GranVida. For more information or to schedule your personal or virtual tour, please call 805.324.6534. NOW ACCEPTING NEW RESIDENTS Apartments start at $4,500 per month.

Small town. Great life. 5464 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, CA 93013 | GranVidaSeniorLiving.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

26

SSL204-01-01en.01 040121

RCFE# 425802114

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAX ABRAMS

Sports

EVENT HIGHLIGHTS

by John Zant

T

hroughout the year that COVID forced a retreat from most playing fields, Buck Paulson and Tom Woodring kept up their weekly ball game. It was a form of T-ball, customarily played by kids ages 4-6, but in this case, the two participants were a combined 170 years old. “Oh, sugar!” Paulson shouted when the softball squirted at an angle off his bat. “Let’s call it a foul,” Woodring said. “We give ourselves every break we can,” Paulson said. He placed another ball on the tee. His next swing made solid contact, and the ball rocketed toward the fence, hitting it on the fly. “A triple,” said a beaming Paulson, his 1.000 batting average preserved. The two old friends started this game almost 20 years ago. They used to play in a senior softball league, but Woodring said, “We were standing around too much.” So they devised this one-on-one competition. Initially they pitched to each other, but now, using a tee, it was strictly a hitter’s game. They put the tee on the outfield grass at Elings Park late last month. They have set it up closer and closer to the fence with each passing year. Now it was 180 feet away. Each man took four swings an inning. Paulson, 86, led off with a double (bouncing to the fence), triple, home run, and single. Woodring, 84, went double, single, single, triple. It was 3-3 after the inning. Aside from some strollers beyond the outfield fence — who kindly tossed homerun balls back onto the field — Paulson and Woodring were usually alone in the park, making their sport ideal during the pandemic. “This means everything,” Paulson said. “I love the outdoors. I love the energy it takes. I love the feeling of success.” Don Paulson was his name as a ballplayer who grew up on a small Minnesota farm. In 1952, at age 17, he was a part-time relief pitcher for the Fargo-Moorhead Twins of the Northern League. He remembers seeing young Hank Aaron go up to bat for the Eau Claire Bears. “Howard Simmons and I were

on the bench,” Paulson recalled. “We said, ‘Hit a home run and we’ll give you a dollar.’ We gave him a dollar.” Paulson’s dreams of becoming a major leaguer never materialized, and he became a city recreation supervisor in Santa Barbara, the hometown of his wife, Carolyn, whom he met at BYU. He took up an interest in painting and was encouraged by master painter Claude Buck. Paulson asked to use his mentor’s name on the first work he signed, and thereafter he has been known as Buck. Danny Litwhiler, his manager at FargoMoorhead, was a lifelong friend. He liked to say Paulson was inspired to take up brushstrokes by his instruction to “paint the corners of the plate” with his pitches. Paulson illustrated the cover of Litwhiler’s biography. Woodring grew up in Santa Barbara. He was a sprinter and pole vaulter at Santa Barbara High, graduating in 1954. He also attended BYU and furthered his studies to become a psychologist. He competed in national and international senior trackand-field meets. He cleared 111¾ to place among the top age 60-64 pole vaulters of all time. Paulson and Woodring became friends through their church, and their mutual affinity for sports led them to the tee at Elings Park. Paulson recorded their hits — no outs — in a scorebook. Momentarily distracted, he asked Woodring, “What did you just get?” “Oh, my gosh,” Woodring said uncertainly. “Come on. It was just five seconds ago.” Paulson had a collection of some 100 softballs, and most of them were scattered deep in the outfield when the second game of their doubleheader ended, maybe, in a tie. Then they gathered up the balls, packed everything up in a modified golf cart, and headed home, refreshed from another fine morning at the ballpark. n


My Life

Running in Place:

living

ISLA VISTA

STOP THE VIRUS WITH

FAR-UV LIGHTING

T

Old Memories, Forgotten Beauties, Bikes, and Beer Bongs by Emily Henderson This is when I discovered running. There used to be a huge field where the San Clemente Village now stands. I’d run around its circumference, blasting Alanis Morissette, trying to hold my Discman flat to keep it from skipping. At 18 I didn’t have the emotional tools to even recognize, let alone process, the trauma of losing my mother. Running helped me to pass the time and clear my head. On the outside, Isla Vista today looks different from when I was here in the late 1990s. Some of the buildings have been remodeled. The Blue Dolphin Café is gone. Homeless men and women have set up a tent city in the middle of People’s Park. Del Playa looks shorter to me now, but more beautiful. I guess when you’re young, everything feels bigger and more difficult to appreciate. During my years in I.V., I was in survival mode, but I didn’t know it. I’d shuffle along to the next class

Safe for all areas, by Healthe/Lighting Science

healthelighting.com EMILY HENDERSON PHOTOS

his past month, I took a break from running the streets of Santa Barbara and headed out to my old neighborhood, the unincorporated community of Isla Vista. I moved there in 1998, my second year of college, and lived in rented apartments. When I recently joined a Facebook Group called, “I Partied in IV ’98-02,” I started to become nostalgic for that time in my life between youth and adulthood. I first arrived in I.V. only a few months after my mother passed away from breast cancer, and since my father had died when I was 4 years old, I was feeling all alone in the world. The moment I unlocked my apartment door and stepped into that apartment, it hit me that my life was very adult. Too adult. I felt as though some grown-up should be with me, helping to unload my car and set up my bed. I was an SBCC student, but my roommates were all going to UCSB, which didn’t start until the following month, so I spent the next four weeks in the apartment alone.

or the next party, but I never stopped to ask myself what I needed or what the town had to offer. Despite all the changes between then and now, the streets still feel familiar. I ran past a group of students sitting in the sunshine, laughing and eating burritos out of Styrofoam boxes, Lauryn Hill blasting in the background. The patio at Sam’s to Go is still packed, beer pong tables sit in almost every front yard, and surfers ride around on cruisers with boards tucked under their arms. If it weren’t for the haircuts and masks, I might think it was still 1998. When I ran down to Sands Beach and saw the exposed rocks and tide pools, I flashed on a field trip I took long ago with my Marine Biology class. The professor walked along the rocks, talking a mile a minute, when suddenly she reached down into the water and pulled up an octopus. My mouth hung open as I wondered how on earth she knew it was there. Now, when I take my kids to explore the same tidepools, I tell them what I learned about limpets, clams, and mussels. I’ve shown them how a sea anemone closes up at the slightest touch, but I have yet to find an octopus. Last month marked the 20-year anniversary of the vehicular homicides from 2001. I ran past the memorial in Little Acorn Park dedicated to the victims. I didn’t know any of them personally, but I was in I.V. that night and felt the emotional shift on campus that lasted for months afterward. As I read each of their five names, I said a prayer for the lives lost and for their families and friends. It was nice to see a few roses and candles there, keeping them company. My run through I.V., spread across four days, ended up close to 19 miles. With every step, I was reminded how much Isla Vista is a place of contrast. Beautiful, it is filled with the wonder and curiosity of young people whose whole lives lie ahead. I felt a little bit of youth breathing into my 41-year-old soul, but I also know darkness lives here too.  In this roughly one square mile of densely packed houses and apartments, Isla Vista is one of the most expensive places to rent in the nation, with constant battles between landlords and tenants. Students have always faced substance abuse and sexual assault, but with the fallouts from the pandemic, they are now experiencing more uncertainty than ever. Despite all this, as I jogged back to my car, thinking I should come here more, I realized I was coming away with the feeling that Isla Vista still remains, and truly is, a place of Endless Summer. n

OPEN HOUSE 4621 Carpinteria Ave. Carp. CA

Friday, April 9th

1pm to 6pm, with Demo’s at 3pm, & 5pm RSVP to design@energyfreedom.solutions - Refreshments, Appetizers and Raffle -

energyfreedom.solutions SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT AND DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA PRESENT

Downtown Business

Spotlight a virtual interview series Charles Donelan in conversation with

y Todam ! Nathan Vonk (Sullivan Goss), Jan Ziegler (10 West), at 3p

and Thomas Reynolds (Thomas Reynolds Gallery).

Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with t Nexek! e W

PETER LEE AND FELICIA MEDINA

JERRY LEE

Empty Bowl Gourmet

Secret Bao

Noodle Bar

Food & Drink: Asian Cuisine Thursday, April 8 | 3pm Live on Zoom

Register at independent.com/spotlight

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

27


openings

Peter Lee and Felicia Medina Open Restaurant After Year of Pandemic Pop-Ups BY MATT KETTMANN

C

onsider the bao. Chinese in origin, it’s most easily described as a steamed bun filled with something savory. Yet, like the American concept of a sandwich, the bao exploded into a flexible format of untold bounds — served at any meal, filled with you-name-it, completely closed or wide open, with endless regional variants from across Asia and far beyond. “We like the idea that it’s generic because we can do whatever with it,” explains Peter Lee, co-proprietor/chef of Secret Bao, which he just opened with his fiancée, Felicia Medina, on the corner of Anapamu and Anacapa streets after nearly a year of pandemic-prompted pop-ups. “Our bao itself is kind of Chinese-style, but the inside is everything.” “Everything” on the intentionally modest menu currently runs from the maitake bao (a crunchy tempura mushroom amped by ginger, scallion, and sunomono cucumber) and the fried shrimp with sweet chili and sesame slaw to the six-hour roasted pork belly with pickled pineapple and the KFC, a Korean-style fried chicken with dragon sauce that would draw lines if that were all Secret Bao ever served. But they serve more than bao, with flavors stretching from Tokyo to Rome. “Snacks” include prawn chips, gyoza, baby bok choy, and kalbi meatballs; “Rice” rocks bibimbap, bacon kimchi, miso black cod, and katsu options; and “Noods” delivers japchae, udon carbonara, and curry yakisoba noodles. There’s also an extensive kids’ menu that may inspire

age-fibbing: PB&J bao, grilled cheese bao, sticky noodles, and the ever-satisfying chicken and rice. The Korean influences are rooted in the upbringing of Lee, who was born in Seoul but grew up from one year old in Cupertino, where his mom only made traditional food and the family rarely ate at restaurants. The polished techniques and gastronomic flare, meanwhile, come from Lee and Medina’s professional career in Michelin-starred kitchens under such names as Joël Robuchon and José Andrés. “Neither one of us have worked in an Asian restaurant, so this is very new to us,” said Lee, who was the opening executive chef for Loquita in Santa Barbara in 2016, where ENGAGED IN ALL WAYS: Peter Lee and Felicia Medina are engaged to Medina also worked as executive sous chef. “The style of be married while heavily engaged in running Secret Bao together. It’s their first restaurant and first time cooking Asian food after years of how you run the kitchen is very different.” While fancy New working in fine dining kitchens, often enduring racism and sexism American and haute Mediterranean restaurants prep a lot along the way. of entrées, sauces, and so forth in advance, Asian cooking is much more “à la minute,” combining the raw ingredients only when something is ordered. Said Lee, “We’ve been throwing “I found out very quickly that everyone there was stealing away everything we’ve learned.” from the previous owner,” said Lee. “We lost everybody.” He Both have learned a lot, both about international cui- stayed three years, and then trained his recovered father. “I sine and cutthroat kitchen culture — the latter occasionally hated fast food — I just did it for my family,” said Lee, who presenting painful lessons for a Korean male and Cuban/ had things thrown at him by customers “because I was the Chinese-Mexican/Indigenous female working as minorities Asian guy in Lancaster.” in fine dining over the past 15 years. He returned for a final class at Le Cordon Bleu and then Originally from the San Gabriel Valley, Medina grew up in 2009 headed to Sandals in Jamaica, where the people pulled their eyes back into squints every day to make loving the food of her grandmother while her phlebotfun of him for being Chinese. “I’m Korean!” omist mom and electrician dad worked long he’d have to correct them, even occasiondays. Grandma was from Cuba, married to Medina’s Chinese grandfather, who ally showing them a map. It was a horfled his homeland and opened a resrible few months, and he declined taurant and laundry in Havana. taking a full-time job. “I think it (“He got on the wrong boat!” prepared me for what was comquipped Lee of swapping ing in kitchens,” he explained. one Communist regime for “They could have at me all another.) “I appreciate that they wanted.” kind of food,” said Medina, The couple returned to recalling childhood Cuban California together, only meals of lechon and arroz able to find jobs at con pollo, “that homey, chain restaurants super-rustic, stick-to-yourbefore moving to the bones-type food.” Avalon Grill on Catalina Island, where they She excelled in a home economics class in high school excelled for more than two and was encouraged to take an years. Then they worked jobs advanced class in which students prein Sonoma, Los Angeles, and Trio of bao pared meals for teachers every day. That Las Vegas, which is where they were led her to Le Cordon Bleu cooking school in plotting a move to Chicago or New York City when the call came from the Acme Hospitality Pasadena, and then to Sandals in Jamaica for her manteam to help open Loquita in 2016. datory externship, where she met Lee. By that point, Lee had already lived quite a life. He’d ditched They only expected to stay in Santa Barbara for a couhis economics major at UC Davis — last straw: shadowing a ple of years, but they got sucked in and started to look at grad whose favorite part of his cubicle-stuck day was decid- every available restaurant space about three years ago. ing where to eat lunch — and then enrolled at Le Cordon Preparing to pull the trigger, they gave the Loquita team Bleu in 2006 after taking a quick tour. “Man, that salesman a year of notice before leaving — and actually stayed lonwas really good!” said Lee, who was not super into food, but ger than that — while preparing to take over the former thought it would make an interesting career. “I enrolled liter- Downey’s space, briefly occupied by Roost. The fine dining concept was to be called Prolific and serve the ally a week after.” Then his father, who’d worked for Samsung in the Silicon creatively boundless New American cuisine they knew Valley for decades before starting his own hardware com- so well. After all, as Lee explained of their combined pany in China, decided to buy over a Wienerschnitzel in ethnicities, “We are the New Americans.”  Lancaster. Two months into the corporate training, his dad Cue COVID-19, and Prolific was kaput before it suffered from a brain aneurysm and went temporarily blind. started. “We had this concept in our back pocket,” said Lee, being the 21-year-old son with less on his plate than his Lee of what became Secret Bao, inspired by the Asianinspired family meals they prepared over the years for brother, offered to take over.  

Udon carbonara 28

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

MAX ABRAMS PHOTOS

FOOD &DRINK Secret Bao Divulges All p.28

INDEPENDENT.COM


1201 Anacapa St.; (805) 259-3226; secretbaosb.com

Super CuCaS 2018

Best of

Santa Barbara

®

Runner-Up

VOTED SANTA

BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 27 YEARS

IN A ROW!

BREAKFAST

EVERY DAY!

BURRITO $639 Micheltorena & Mesa Locations

e Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Fre Mesa Locations) (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena &

DAILY $799 LUNCH

SPECIALS 2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863 626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028

FOOD & DRINK

the staff at Loquita. After a month of pandemic pondering, Lee and Medina started making fivecourse takeout meals in their 600-square-foot Coast Village Road apartment, running down the stairs for curbside pickups. “It was a secret because it was in our apartment!” said Lee of the Secret Bao name, a weekly meal offering that was quickly selling out within hours. “We had no more of our own food in the fridge,” said Medina, laughing as she remembered the 45 pounds of Korean hibachi that Lee grilled on their patio hibachi one week. “They thought our apartment was on fire,” she said. “That’s when we said we had to find somewhere else to do this.” Secret Bao’s trial run at Handlebar Coffee Roasters on De La Vina Street led to perhaps the café’s busiest day ever. The owners let them set up shop in their kitchen, and Secret Bao thrived from Friday to Sunday for seven months, powered pri-

marily by social media. Their evolution to brick-and-mortar is happening on the normally bustling corner across from the library, county building, and courthouse in the longtime home of Coffee Cat, which briefly became Café Ana. The Ana owners spruced up the place, but the Secret Bao menu required pricy investments in equipment, namely the Rational iCombi Pro oven—which can slow-roast pork belly, quick-steam bao, and do everything else in between — and a dough dividerrounder, which cuts 36 bao per minute, formerly a multi-hour task. “More than anything, this will allow us to have a very consistent product,” said Lee.  The fast-casual, affordably minded Secret Bao formula is designed for these current pandemicemerging times, but nothing is set in stone. “As things get better, we will evolve as needed,” said Lee, who envisions a future morning menu of upscale Asian pastries and reenvisioned Mexican conchas, among other ideas. “We want to start small so we can control the concept and then expand.”   Given their experiences, Lee and Medina are striving for a nontoxic kitchen environment with a tip system that benefits everyone. But expect some friendly competition among cooks to get their own items served. “If their thing is on the menu, they’ll care more about it,” said Lee.  For a couple that’s had to manage family tragedies and racism/sexism from both customers and fellow cooks, opening a restaurant during a pandemic is more blessing than burden. “Having to do this is like nothing,” said Lee. “We have a lot of money on the line, but it’s not life or death. Life is just too short to be angry.”

6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806

Dine Out DITO

TAKE OUT

SUPPORT LOCAL RESTAURANTS WHILE YOU STAY AT HOME OR DINE SAFELY OUTDOORS

Andersen’s Danish Restaurant & Bakery. Menu available for curbside or walk-up pickup. For dining in, order inside and we’ll bring you everything you need at an outside table. Open Daily 10am-6pm, closed Tuesday. Breakfast served until 2pm, Lunch & Dinner 12- Close. We also deliver through restaurant connection. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

Enjoy delicious French comfort food and savory Ethiopian cuisine. We are now providing dine-in service at 50% capacity and for take-away. Please call to make a reservation. We appreciate your support LUNCH: French lunch: Tuesday - Friday, 11:30 am - 2 pm Ethiopian Cuisine: Sat & Sunday 11:30 am - 2 pm DINNER: French Cuisine: Tuesday - Sat, 5 pm - 8 pm | Sunday Prix-Fixe 5 - 7:30 pm BAO BUN FUN: Secret Bao invested in a dough divider-rounder to pump out 36 bao a minute, a process that used to take hours to do by hand.

1114 STATE STREET #14 (IN LA ARCADA PLAZA) (805) 966-0222 • PETITVALENTIEN.COM PAID ADVERTISEMENT To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205. INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

29


JOIN US ONLINE & AT TWO FREE OCEAN-FRONT DRIVE-INS

Listen to the year’s best and see over 100 films, all from home. GET YOUR TICKETS NOW AT SBIFF.ORG And stay tuned for signing up for our FREE Drive-In Theatres 30

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


LOUIE CALDWELL

STAY CONNECTED

pivots

THE SUPERBERS: The Soup Herb team includes, from left, Grace Slansky, Vicken Tavitian, David Fainberg, and, being held, Lucas Bird.

SOUP HERB Comforts Customers

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Featuring

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

ently An indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! hop since ently ASn indepenpedrated Owned & O 1986! Shop since

Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

FOLLOW US ON FOLLOW US ON

@sbindynews

FOLLOW US ON

INSTAGRAM

FOOD & DRINK

@sbindependent

FACEBOOK

hen the pandemic hit, bouchon server Lucas Bird,

@sbindependent

AND

201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

BY REBECCA HORRIGAN

TWITTER

Order Soup Herb via Instagram at @soupherbsb.

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location

Lucas Bird and Friends Craft Creative Soups and Sides

W

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

Generous Portions - Free Parking - Outdoor Patio Convenient Location Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

A RESTAURANT PROS

like many food industry professionals, faced the emotional and financial challenges of months without work. Bird’s girlfriend, Grace Slansky, who works at the Wildcat Lounge, suggested starting a pop-up out of Little Kitchen next door when the restaurant is closed on Mondays. When the couple realized that some of their favorite quarantine meals were, unsurprisingly, comfort food — specifically soups and sandwiches — Soup Herb was born. Slansky stepped in to help with marketing, and Bird’s restaurant industry friends David Fainberg and Vicken Tavitian jumped into the kitchen. “I couldn’t ask for a better team,” Bird said. “What started as a group of out-of-work food service workers has grown into an opportunity to lift up other people in the industry and give our friends an outlet to cook and make a little cash.” Every other week, they come out with a new menu, featuring several selections of creative soups and sides, advertised primarily through Instagram. Customers pre-order through direct message and come by on Mondays to pick up their meals.  I sampled a decadent cream of broccoli soup, topped with bacon and served with cheddar grilled cheese “dippers.” These clever accompaniments round out the soup for a full meal, and past pairings have included roasted red pepper quesadillas with chicken tortilla soup, goat cheese egg rolls with carrot ginger soup, and mozzarella-filled pizza sticks with tomato soup. I also enjoyed the Lebanese-style red lentil soup with bulgur wheat and wild rice, a hearty vegan soup that tantalized with bright flavors and worked well with the house-made pita chips. “One of the things I’m most proud of is that we’ve been able to incorporate flavors from so many different cultures, and that definitely drives our menu,” said Bird, who strives to use fresh produce and support small businesses such as Shalhoob’s, European Deli Market, and Indo-China Market. Bird has worked in the kitchen of Petit Valentin and Elements, for catering companies, and as a private chef. When he speaks of his time at bouchon, his eyes light up with palpable passion.  “This is really a business born out of necessity for the restaurant industry,” explained Bird. “We pride ourselves on camaraderie. At the end of the day, we just want to bring people together over comfort food.”

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street

805.569.2323

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

Milpas 216 South Milpas Street

Lompoc 1413 N H Street

Downtown 628 State Street

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Buellton 209 E Hwy 246

Santa Maria 985 E Betteravia Road

Gift Certificates Available Support SOhO SOhOSB.COM

1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

31


EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

HIGH SCHOOL THEATER

PERSISTS

tages have been dark for over a year, but our city’s high school drama programs are nevertheless meeting the challenge of putting on shows and creating opportunities for students to perform even in these strange times. Enter the creative minds behind this year’s spring productions: Justin Baldridge, who is directing The Iliad, The Odyssey and All of Greek Mythology in 99 Minutes or Less at Santa Barbara High School; Shannon Saleh, who is directing Mamma Mia! at San Marcos High School; San Marcos High students prepare for Mamma Mia! and Clark Sayre, who is directing San Marcos High School Presents: Pippin at Dos Pueblos High School.

Santa Barbara High School Presents: Mamma Mia! The Iliad, The Odyssey, and All of Greek Mythology in 99 Minutes or Less

April 8-10, 15-17 Tickets at www.sbhstheatre.com As one can imagine, fitting all of Greek mythology into 99 minutes is a hilarious challenge that necessitates speedy, precise performances by the student actors. With a clock onstage counting down the minutes, the audience can feel the pressure of the ticking time. Baldridge chose this play to give audiences a much-needed laugh: “With this play, it’s one joke after the other. Punch line after punch line. Nothing serious going on over here!” The production will be live-streamed in real time with all actors wearing masks and social distancing throughout the performance. A straight play has its benefits in the time of COVID, says Baldridge: “With all the COVID restrictions on singing and not knowing what our world would look like in April, choosing a (straight) play allowed us to keep a sense of normalcy for the students.”

May 6-8, 13-15 Tickets at smhstheaterdept.com Mamma Mia! is a jukebox musical full of the bouncy tunes of ABBA, which dictate the pace of this effervescent pop spectacle. On a Greek isle, Sophie is getting married and has secretly invited three of her mother’s ex-lovers (her potential fathers) to the wedding. San Marcos High School has an outdoor amphitheater where the production will take place, and COVID-based precautions are being taken. “This show actually calls for pre-recording on some numbers,” explains Saleh. “We are using this to our advantage, as we do not know what the rules will be for student singers at the time of the show…. Recording the ensemble vocals may allow our dancers to do their choreography in a regular formation and allow all of our ensemble on the stage at the same time.” As regulations change, San Marcos may be able to move their production inside the performing arts theater; depending on

COURTESY

S

L I F E

SANTA BARBARA, SAN MARCOS, AND DOS PUEBLOS CONTINUE TO PRODUCE PERFORMANCES the word from the top, Saleh and her company are prepared to alter their staging to apply to the new space. “It’s a risk to even have planned this musical,” says Saleh, “but I simply cannot allow another spring to go by without having students do what they deserve to do, to perform.”

INDY

BOOK CLUB

APRIL READ

Dos Pueblos High School Presents: Pippin May 21-22 Tickets at dptheatrecompany.org Originally directed by Bob Fosse on Broadway, Pippin is a classic musical coming-of-age story featuring Pippin, the son of Charlemagne. The show is a collaboration between Sayre and his students and includes both real-time and pre-recorded elements. The production will be available via livestream — but you’re going to want to see it in person, where the live performance will be projected on the outside wall of the theater for drive-in patrons. Interspersed throughout the show are live appearances and solos on an outdoor stage. This multimedia approach has allowed for certain luxuries that can be achieved on film: for instance, the ability to (safely) see the actors’ faces. “I knew we could probably rehearse and perform a show like Pippin under almost any circumstances,” said Sayre, referring to how COVID safety precautions have restricted the theatrical process. He also says producing a show during these times has challenged his assumption of what theater is. “It’s helped me teach students that they can take any limitation or boundary and create something unique and new.” —Maggie Yates

DON PASQUALE ZACH MENDEZ

at the Drive-In

Unusual circumstances demand extraordinary measures. Nowhere is this truer than at the Ventura County Fairgrounds, when Opera Santa Barbara shows up to perform. Following on their successful “Carmen for Cars” production in December, the company will present another classic work, this time in the evening, at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 10. In this version of Gaetano Donizetti’s Don Pasquale, the leading role will be sung by bass Andrew Potter, and the location of the action will be shifted to Santa Barbara’s silent film community in the 1920s. As directed by Kostis Protopapas and the Pacific Opera Project’s Josh Shaw, audiences can expect a wildly funny and musically ravishing night at the drive-in. For tickets and more information, visit operasb.org. —Charles Donelan

PAGE 32

NATURE POEM BY TOMMY PICO In the second book of his “Teebs Cycle,” award-winning poet Tommy Pico explores his reluctance—as a citydwelling, Indigenous writer—to craft a“nature poem.” The book-length poem follows its narrator, Teebs, on his journey of writing just that. Combining deft lyricism with the text-messaging vernacular from his preceding volume, IRL, Pico spills Teebs onto the page in all his messy humanity and linguistic complexity. The stylistic mixture feels restless but authoritative, and it speaks to Teebs’s refusal to contain himself within the confining grammatical structure of a colonial language and poetic medium. While capital-N “Nature” may be a theme throughout, Pico examines human nature in depth. He balances discussions of Beyoncé and the dating scene in N.Y.C. with explorations of racism, misogyny, and his particular experience of indigeneity. Not all the pages of this book are comfortable. In fact, most of them aren’t—these stanzas have teeth. They’re brash and vulnerable and look you in the eye while they tell you the truth. They reserve the right to flow between laugh-out-loud funny and staggeringly serious without the respite of a line break. The book is a highly self-aware exploration of identity, culture, and the world in which we all strive to survive. In the midst of his protestations that he feels unable, and more specifically, unwilling, to write a nature poem, Pico crafts a book that examines humanity and the natural world while declaring his place within them both. —Lisa Neubert, Programming Librarian at Santa Barbara Public Library

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 32

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


a&e | FILM REVIEW

MINARI

I

n the midst of rising anti-Asian violence during the global pandemic, the positive recognition Minari received from viewers shines a light on humanizing and representing Asian experiences today. Inspired by filmmaker Lee Isaac Chung’s own life, Minari depicts the dynamic of a Korean family living in Arkansas: a notBY SAEHEE JONG so-forthcoming husband, a disappointed wife, two children adapting to a rural lifestyle, and a crass grandma. As a first-generation, American-Korean child myself, I resonated most with the mannerisms of Anne, the eldest child of the Yi family, played by Noel Kate Cho. The guilt I felt growing up was reaffirmed when I saw Cho play a younger version of me on the screen. Torn between cultures, navigating through assimilation, and playing the role of a “parent” was personal and all too familiar to me. The film develops its storyline slowly but captivatingly through its cinematography. Minari examines the strained and bonded relationships, burning disappointments, and small triumphs an immigrant family may face in an unfamiliar setting. The organic acting of Steven Yeun and Han Ye-Ri gave me perspective on what my parents sacrificed when they came to America. To b e h o n e s t , this film is not refreshing, or metaphorical, or ultraclimactic. This is real life. It is a subtle but intentional emotional drama h i g h l i g ht i ng t he realities of life for your Asian neighbors. And if you think otherwise, you have missed the point. It may have won the Best ForeignLanguage Film award at the Golden Globes, but this is a powerful story of the American Dream, and it’s as American as it can get. n

FILM EXPLORES

KOREAN FAMILY’S EXPERIENCE IN ARKANSAS

THANK YOU SPONSORS

Stay up to date on everything the SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT is doing beyond our pages. Sign up for our weekly

EXTRA! NEWSLETTER Independent.com/newsletters

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

33


This is a moment that calls for Optimism, Resilience, Courage and Vision. Santa Barbara needs Hope, and Arts & Lectures is uniquely positioned to respond. Our 2021-2022 CREATING HOPE initiative will inspire our community with shared experiences – online, outdoors, in the schools, in theaters and in alternative spaces. By engaging thought-leaders, creative problem-solvers and arts visionaries, CREATING HOPE programs will strengthen human connection, bridge our partisan divides, promote emotional well-being, joy and compassion, and envision positive change. Jane Goodall

His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Allyson Felix

Bryan Stevenson

Join us this spring, and beyond!

Book Giveaways

Yo-Yo Ma

Community Dance Classes

FREE Film Screenings

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu 34

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 1, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF APRIL 1

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Playwright August Strindberg (1849-

(June 21-July 22): Provocation specialist Lydia Lunch

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here are affirmations that will serve

1912) was a maverick innovator who loved to experiment with plot and language. One of his stories takes place in a dream, and the hero is the Christ-like daughter of a Vedic god. He once said that he felt “an immense need to become a savage and create a new world.” Given your current astrological potentials, Aries, I suspect that might be an apt motto for you right now. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. There’s no need for you to become a savage. In fact, it’s better if you don’t. But the coming weeks will definitely be a good time to start creating a new world.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Who says all Tauruses are gentle, risk-

avoidant, sensible, and reliable? Taurus author Mary MacLane (1881-1929), known as the “Wild Woman of Butte, Montana,” authored shocking, scandalous books. In I Await the Devil’s Coming, she testified, “I am not good. I am not virtuous. I am not generous. I am merely a creature of intense passionate feeling. I feel — everything. It is my genius. It burns me like fire.” Can I convince you, Taurus, to make her your role model for the coming weeks? APRIL FOOL! I don’t think you should be EXACTLY like MacLane. Please leave out the part about “I am not good. I am not virtuous. I am not generous,” as well as the “I await the devil’s coming” part. But yes, do be a creature of intensely passionate feeling. Let your feelings be your genius, burning in you like a fire.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Poet Emily Dickinson had a good

sense of humor, so she was probably making a wry joke when she wrote, “The lovely flowers embarrass me. They make me regret I am not a bee.” But who knows? Maybe Dickinson was being a bit sincere, too. In any case, I advise you to make a list of all the things you regret not being — all the qualities and assets you wish you had, but don’t. It’s a favorable time to wallow in remorse. APRIL FOOL! I was totally lying! In fact, I hope you will do the reverse: Engage in an orgy of self-appreciation, celebrating yourself for being exactly who you are.

is a singer and poet who’s skilled at generating interesting mischief. She testifies, “My daily existence is a battlecade of extreme fluctuations where chaos clobbers apathy, which beats the s--- out of depression which follows irritability which slams into anger which eclipses ecstasy which slips through my fingers far too often.” In the coming weeks, Cancerian, I recommend you adopt her melodramatic approach to living the intense life. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Please don’t be like Lydia Lunch in the near future. On the contrary: Cultivate regal elegance, sovereign poise, and dynamic equanimity.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1692, a Swedish man named Thiess

of Kaltenbrun was put on trial for being a werewolf. He claimed to be a noble werewolf, however. He said he regularly went down to Hell to do holy combat against the Devil. I suggest you make him your inspirational role model in the coming weeks. Be as weird as you need to be in order to fight for what’s good and right. APRIL FOOL! I half-lied. What I really meant to say was: Be as weird as you need to be to fight for what’s good and right, but without turning into a werewolf, zombie, vampire, or other supernatural monster.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “I want to hear raucous music, to

brush against bodies, to drink fiery Benedictine,” wrote author Anaïs Nin. “Beautiful women and handsome men arouse fierce desires in me. I want to dance. I want drugs. I want to know perverse people, to be intimate with them. I want to bite into life.” All that sounds like perfect counsel for you to consider right now, dear Virgo! APRIL FOOL! I lied. Nin’s exuberant testimony might be an interesting perspective to flirt with — if the COVID-19 virus had been completely tamed. But it hasn’t. So I must instead suggest that you find ways to express this lively, unruly energy in safe and sublimated ways.

you well in the coming days. (1) “I am willing to make mistakes if someone else is willing to learn from them.” (2) “I am grateful that I’m not as judgmental as all the shortsighted, self-righteous people.” (3) “I assume full responsibility for my actions, except those that are someone else’s fault.” (4) “A good scapegoat is as welcome as a solution to the problem.” APRIL FOOL! All the preceding affirmations are total bunk! Don’t you dare use them. Use these instead: (1) “I enjoy taking responsibility for my actions.” (2) “Rather than indulging in the reflex to blame, I turn my attention to fixing the problem.” (3) “No one can make me feel something I don’t want to feel.” (4) “I’m free from believing in the images people have of me.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to author Kahlil Gibran,

“If we were all to sit in a circle and confess our sins, we would laugh at each other for lack of originality.” But I challenge you Scorpios to refute that theory in the coming days. For the sake of your sanity and health, you need to commit highly original sins — the more, the better. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Save your novel, imaginative sinning for later. The truth is that now is an excellent time to explore the joyous and healthy practice of being extremely virtuous. Imitate author Susan Sontag: “My idolatry: I’ve lusted after goodness. Wanting it here, now, absolutely, increasingly.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The coming months would be a

great time to start your own university and then award yourself a PhD in Drugless Healing or Mathematical Reincarnation or Political Metaphysics — or any other subject you’d like to be considered an expert in. Hey, why not give yourself three PhDs and call yourself a Professor Emeritus? APRIL FOOL! I’m just joking. The coming months will indeed be an extremely favorable time to advance your education, but with real learning, not fake credentials.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): After his Nirvana bandmate Kurt

Cobain committed suicide, Capricorn drummer Dave Grohl was depressed for months. To cheer himself up, he wrote and recorded an album’s worth of songs, playing almost all the instruments himself: drums, lead guitar, rhythm guitar, bass, and vocals. I think you should try a similar spectacularly heroic solo task in the coming weeks. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Here’s my true and actual advice: Now is a time when you should gather all the support and help and cooperation you can possibly garner for an interesting project.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Argentine poet Alejandra Pizarnik

told her psychoanalyst León Ostrov that if she were going to steal something, it would be “the façade of a certain collapsed house in a little town called Fontenay-aux-Roses [near Paris].” What was so special about this façade? Its windows were made of “magical” lilac-colored glass that was “like a beautiful dream.” In accordance with astrological omens, I invite you, too, to decide what marvel you would steal — and then go steal it! APRIL FOOL! I halflied. Yes, definitely decide what you would steal — it’s important to give your imagination permission to be outrageous — but don’t actually steal it.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): I’ve never understood the appeal of singer-songwriter Morrissey, especially since he began endorsing bigoted far-right politicians. However, I want to recommend that you adopt the attitude he once expressed in a letter to a friend. “It was a terrible blow to hear that you actually worked,” he wrote. “It’s so old-fashioned to work. I’d much rather lounge about the house all day looking fascinating.” Be like that in the coming weeks, Pisces! APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, you’d be making a silly mistake to lie around the house looking fascinating. It’s a highly favorable time for you to find ways to work harder and smarter.

HOMEWORK: Send the secrets you could only tell a stranger. FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

SBIFF HOUSE

SBIFF

Virtual Ticket

Giveaway

We’re giving away 12 Celebrity Tribute tickets! Enter at independent.com/sbifftickets for your chance to win!

March 18 - April 5

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

35


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

| |

PHONE 965-5205 PHONE 965-5205

| |

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

reaching 100,000 readers each week

EMPLOYMENT EMPLOYMENT

budget floors forecasts necessary for to or an equivalent combination of and carpet cleaning. Ability sex, sexual orientation, gender identity,

protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 500‑member trade organization, is term fiscal decisions. Serves as a liaison analytical skills and protected an abilityby to custodial power equipment including other characteristic law. 3/18/20, thereafter open until filled. its next Executivehow Director. The ARE YOUseeking interest in learning betweentruck themount multiple prioritize multipleconsideration tasks with minimal carpetdepartments machine and high For primary apply by Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu ideal candidate be and an excellent to safely invest in Bitcoin,must Ether and various campus entities IHC work supervision. of accounting pressure washers. Ability to handle Job #20200105 TEAM 3/22/20, Knowledge thereafter open until filled. ICHANGE communicator have a strong other Alt coins but wereand to also confused with. Works Businesstasks. principles. Excellent communication all heavyclosely lifting with and moving Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu acumen. Expertise PROJECT MANAGER or worriedfinancial how? Let me help you. inI leading Criminal history background #20200109 skills, ability to OfficersNotes: to provide overall consistency and Job interpersonal the Bitcoin association’s legislative first bought at $650 and efforts it inis implementation check required. Maintainthrough a valid CA of policies work independently, and with critical CENTER FOR BLACK STUDIES also$60,000. a key component of this job. The is now over I first bought license, a cleanthat DMV trainingdriver’s endeavors. Ensures staffrecord attention to detail. Ability to exercise RESEARCH ideal candidate have over a proven Ether at $13 dollars and itwill is now and enrollment in theunderlying DMV Employee members understand good judgment, common sense, and Supports UC Santa Barbara’s record of success as well as at least as an ANALYST Aspire IChange $2000 dollars. I believe the Crypto policies Pull‑Notice Program. and hours and agency rules Days pertaining discretion. Creative problem solving role PAYROLL five years of senior management Institution through the space is just getting started. Don’t to departmental may vary toprocedures. meet the operational DEPARTMENT OF RECREATION Reqs: abilities. Ability to work effectively and Network experience in a media environment or coordination of the many activities miss out on this generational wealth Bachelor’s needs of theindept. May bearea required Serves as Payroll Coordinator, UC Path degree a related cooperatively as a staff team member. DIVISION HELP DESK and trade association. deliverables that are creating event. I will share The my compensation own and/or to equivalent wear an UCSB‑provided uniform. Coordinator, Kronos Payroll produced Manager combination Notes: Satisfactory criminal history packagewith for you this and position by the IChange Team for internal TECHNICIAN Alt coin portfolio teach includes Multiple positions available. $18.62‑ and Timekeeper for 1,500+ employees of a experience/training. Working background check. $24.09/hr ‑ a buy competitive base and submission the IChange STUDENT SYSTEMS & use you how to and how to safelypay,knowledge $21.79/hr. The experience University of with California requiring accurate todetail‑oriented of and $27.30/hr. TheINFORMATION University of California performance‑based bonus plan and Network and provides (SIS&T) store your Crypto Currency. I live financialis an Equal Opportunity/ attention leadership, to payroll timelines and accounting, analysis Affirmative and is anTECHNOLOGY Equal Opportunity/Affirmative attractive and benefits the assistance to alltoaspects Serves as a Student Affairs Division integral in Santa Barbara offerpackage. a FREE(Seereporting Action Employer, Intermediate and all qualified deadlines, attention detail,of techniques. Action Employer, and all (SA) qualified Job Bank at cnpa.com for detailed job program. Aspire IChange Tier 2 Help Desk Technician under the the introductory call after which I will knowledge applicants will receive consideration accuracy, and The extensive knowledge and understanding of applicants will receive consideration is policies one ofandthree Aspire of thewithout Help Desk regard manager Network meet face posting.) to face Qualified in Santacandidates Barbara should forcontrol employment regard of University procedures. practices without and their for supervision employment forward a cover along internal with change instructors, initiatives,career and and guidance of other SIS&T Systems Alliance and get you completely set letter up. Call color, religion, sex, sexual Payroll includes impact to onrace,protecting University to race, color, religion, sex, sexual their resume Or to Email cnpajobs@gmail.com is designed to catalyze change staff. Supports all division users at me at 617‑610‑9000. me at resources. orientation, gender identity, national staff, contract employees, casual Ability to perform financial orientation, gender identity, national (Cal‑SCAN) by work providing theirdisability locations; installs configures atBYA institutions kyle.cetrulo@auxocell.com disability status, protected staff, student staff, study analysisorigin, and customized reporting. origin, status,andprotected computer hardware comprehensive, systematic or and anytheother and summer program Possess veteran attentionstatus, to detail veteran status, or and any software. other a appointments, COMPUTER/TECH ability tocharacteristic The Tier 2 Help Desk responds to approach to organizational protected by law. staff. Coordinates the onboarding COMPUTER/TECH assess and adjust priorities characteristic protected by law. requests that are escalated by Tier 1 procedures for allusing a structured primarybalancing consideration apply by employees. Tracks adeptly,Forwhile a high For primary consideration apply by transformation COMPUTER & IT TRAINING Help Desk Field Reps. Responsible for employee employment process PROCORE TECHNOLOGIES, Inc. volume 3/17/20, thereafter open until filled. complianceto workload. Ability to interface 04/06/21, thereafter open until filled. self‑assessment PROGRAM! Train at home to the analysis of functional requirements, theto development and has an opening in Carpinteria, CA professionally Apply online https://jobs.ucsb.edu in regards background checks, with aatbroad range of Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu inform become a Computer & Help Desk and diagnoses, research and resolution implementation of anand institutional for a Senior Software Engineer to staff, faculty, Job #20200102 required certifications, required students, and others Job # 16453 Professional now! Call CTI for details! of problems. Reqs: Experience with action plan. Aspire’s Institutional work with PostgreSQL / Snowflake on behalf of the departments. Ability trainings. Works with the marketing 888‑449‑1713 (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET) computer hardware repair, Windows Change initiative (IChange) datastore and use data mining to exercise staff to ensure vacant positions are HEALTH & FITNESS independent judgment. Operating Systems, MS Office in a seeks to cultivate post‑secondary techniques to prepare dataset for Possess strong organization and advertised. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree where faculty LOWESTskills, PRICES on Health Network environment. Excellent institutions training ML (Machine Learning) communication in related area and / STEM or equivalent CONSTRUCTION and a customer customer service and communication from underrepresented groups We havebroad the best models. *Telecommuting permitted service Insurance. experience / training. Working focus across and rates skills are essential. Notes: Criminal (URGs) recruited, companies! Call isNow! from anywhere in the U.S. Mail diverse from knowledgeare of widely payroll processes, subjecttopareas. Notes: This History background check required. hired andandretained, andknowledge all STEM 1‑888‑989‑4807. resume to Attn: Human Resources a limited policies, procedures; appointment (Cal‑SCAN) with an end FINANCIAL Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a faculty employ inclusive teaching, of organization‑specific computer (P1‑David), Procore Technologies, Inc., date of 6/30/21 and will be analyzed clean DMV record and enrollment in the advising, and research mentoring. application programs. Note: Criminal 6309 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria, for continuation LEGAL based on funding SERVICES ANALYST Construction Project Engineer DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. history Manager helprequired. to set backgroundwill check CA, 93013. and approval. Satisfactory criminal II $25.19‑ $29.75/hr. The University of Project needed for lg. apartment project, DID YOU KNOW that the average the direction $24.09‑ $26.50/hr.ofTheconversations University of background check. Due to DEPARTMENT F/T, benefits, 401k. Exp. req’d. history Start business OF PHYSICS California is an Equal Opportunity/ spends the equivalent of and documents amongst the California is an Equal Opportunity/ EDUCATION pandemic, incumbent PlaysAffirmative date: mid‑March. Email resumestheto:COVID‑19 a key role in the efficient Action Employer, and IChange nearly 1½ days per week on digital Team, as well as manage Affirmative Action Employer, and willAli be on boarded remotely and functioning awallace@wallacesmith.com, Attn: of theapplicants Physics Department will receive and marketing activities? CNPA can help all qualified coordinate the will tasks and all qualified applicants receive able to work remotely for financial WWW.WALLACESMITH.COM must besave and for purchasing employment units. without communications you time and money. For more consideration assigned consideration for employment withoutto an undefined period of time, until Analyzes, to race, color, religion, sex, team and implements info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call regard interprets regard to race, color, religion, sex, members and support the campus leadership deems it safe to newsexual identity, co‑leads EDUCATION and orientation, frequentlygender changing (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN) sexual orientation, identity, in ensuringgender effective time return to work on campus. $24.09 ‑ ANTIOCH UNIVERSITY Santa national campus and origin, federal disability policies status, and and national disability status, task origin, management. Project The University of California procedures Start Here –$28.29/hr. Get protectedin veteran or any Manager Barbara hasAIRLINE been a CAREERS part of part of the regard status, to financial, protected will veteranalso: status, or any Coordinate PROFESSIONAL trained as FAA certified Aviation other by law. UC dynamic and diverse community over is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative payroll andcharacteristic purchasing protected administration. other Santa characteristic protected broader by law. Barbara’s Action Employer, and all qualified Administers Technician. Financial aid for qualified For primary consideration 40 years and is seeking a community personnel payrollapply andby engagement For primary consideration by with the apply IChange students. placement 3/19/20, thereafter until and filled. Network, minded person forJobthe positionassistance. of applicants will receive consideration timekeeping including open student 3/16/20, thereafter open until filled.an including through for employment without regard academic Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Campus Director to provide leadership research titles on both established Apply online atMicrosoft https://jobs.ucsb.edu Teams 877‑205‑4138. (Cal‑SCAN) Job #20200111 and support for all aspects of AUSB to race, color, religion, sex, sexual departmental and extramural funds. Collaboration Job #20200103 or similar software activities and operations. The orientation, gender identity, national In collaboration with the Payroll platform; Organize and support AUDIT PROF. EDITING and Writing Services. EMPLOYMENT Campus Director will be responsible origin, disability status, protected Manager and Purchasing Coordinator, UC Santa turn‑around. Barbara’s IChange team Quick Business, status, or any other for operations and management of veteranPROFESSIONAL SERVICES co‑develops templates to facilitate efforts, various project tasks: self 2 Academic, Memoir. 805‑220‑8127 protected law. gathering and use of information facility maintenance and operations characteristic AUDIT AND ADVISORYby SERVICES assessment and action planning consideration apply byaudits AIRLINES ‑ Get For FAA primary of the AUSB campusARE andHIRING represent Performs and documents across the financial/extramural/ processes, including coordinating MARKETING & 03/30/21, open until filled. purchasing hands onmeetings, Aviation training. AUSB inapproved community andthereafter advisory services in accordance units. Co‑coordinates the completion of the Aspire Apply online at International https://jobs.ucsb.edu for qualified with the Standards for events andFinancial other Aid activities; expandstudents purchasing functions using Gateway Institutional Self‑Assessment for SOCIAL MEDIA Job # 16008 ‑ Career placement assistance. the Professional Practice of Internal relationships with community leaders, CALL across multiple departments and Inclusive Faculty Recruitment, Aviation Instituteto promote of Maintenance Auditing and Practice Advisories COORDINATOR organizations and groups extramural funds. Reqs: Bachelor’s Hiring, & Retention; SR EXECUTIVE CHEFand 888‑686‑1704 MULTICULTURAL CENTERexperience established by the Institute of campus visibility in the greater Santa degree and/or equivalent coordinate the completion and RESIDENTIAL DINING SERVICES Develops the program’s marketing Internal Auditors, the UC Internal Barbara community. and training. Working experience compilation of relevant materials Serves as a member of the Residential oversees productions FINANCE Audit Manual, and UCSB Audit The position requires the candidate withgoals financeandpolicies, practices, and required for UC Santa Barbara’s and distribution all marketing. Dining Management Team in Housing, and Advisory Services procedures. to have Master’s degree, a minimum systems. Ability to ofindependently IChange Network Annual Reports. YOU BEHIND OR MORE Reports to and is supervised on research social gather marketing required campaigns Dining & Auxiliary Enterprises, under a Managesand of sevenAREyears’ senior$10k level Reqs: Strong communication and ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage bank day‑to‑day basis by the Associate while ensuring all marketing is in the general direction of the Director administrative responsibilities with & FINANCIAL information to organize and perform interpersonal skills toServices, communicate of Residential Dining sharing liensto& the audits, unfiled tax Audit Director. Works closely with compliance with the departmental experiencelevies, relevant position financial analysis assignments. Strong effectively with staff responsibilities for all thelevels overall ofDining returns, payroll issues, resolveANALYST tax other Audit and Advisory Services staff mission. Responsible forthe researching, and demonstrated deep ties with&and analytical skills to evaluate quality and influence, both verbally PROFESSIONAL AND CONTINUING operations serving 5,800 residents debt FAST. Call 888‑626‑3581 writing, editing, and proofreading in a collaborative team approach to understanding of the Santa Barbara EDUCATION/EXTENSION and cost effectiveness of multiple and writing Advanced project conferees yearly, 10,000 allcomplex materialspurchasing developed options. for the daily,in24,000 free complete projects and help ensure community.OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt Analyzes, skills. Abilitymealto guests and 5,300 off campus and Advisory tracks Services all and MultiCultural Center’s events. management thatmonitors, the Audit and in 24 to 48 months. For a complete review of the No job upfront Proficient in the use of spreadsheet use and with maintain plan discretion participants yearly an annualall financial transactions for UNEX, Reqs: Demonstrated enroll. go A+toBBB rated. Call organization meets its goals and descriptionfees and to to apply, https:// software for experience financial Analytical operating budget of $28 million and / including payroll, staffing, travel, and and indatabase programming and marketing confidentiality. National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. objectives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in www.antioch.edu/santa‑barbara/ analysis and reporting. Demonstrated skills. efforts Strong 241 FTE. Leads the culinary of entertainment, events for diverse populationsskills and problem‑solving accounting,account business receivable administration, (Cal‑SCAN) website under Work at Antioch and payable. ability to use organizational skills in analyzing, researching the department and university through daily credit field in a university setting. Experience computerProcesses science, or a related section of the website. to multi‑task in a high volume and synthesizing large amounts card reconciliations, reviews with social $24.09‑ media, experience and personnel education and training, or equivalent monthly combination of years environment. $27.44/hr. GENERAL FULL-TIME and reconciliation data fordevelopment, preparing sound and research, ledgers, knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite, ofproduct of experience.of3‑5yes + ofand relevant Notes: Satisfactory criminal history PROFESSIONAL proposals Ability demonstration and/ analyses. audit. Provides ensuresexperience. compliance Exceptionally with University, Photoshop, and Word. Knowledge relevant strong check. This is a career multi‑task with demanding and guidance in reaching Federal,organizational and State accounting policies background of marketing principles, concepts, toleadership, and time management position with an end date of one year timeframes. Notes: formula;Satisfactory combining and procedures on ability all transactions. strategies, and best practices. Keen the correct culinary skills; proven to set priorities after the date of hire. The University the righthistory mix of background qualified personnel check. Makes that recommendations PaCE sense of political acumen with regard criminal accurately reflectto the relative of California is an Equal Opportunity/ and products attain established a validtoCA driver’s license, management on ofimprovements to and to communicating online via social Maintain importance job responsibilities Affirmative Action Employer, and LABORER operating standards of excellence financial/record systems deadlines, and media on politicized topics such as a clean DMV record and enrollment take intokeeping consideration all qualified applicants will receive inforthe FACILITIES MANAGEMENT all food operations. Solves DMVservice Employee Pull‑Notice procedures. Assists with budgetary and race, gender, and systemic oppression. competing requirements consideration for employment Performs a variety of custodial planning tasks problems Mandated related to the production reporting req and the preparation of the Notes: Criminal history background Program. complexity. Notes: Criminal history FINANCIAL without regard to race, color, religion, ofunits and other related duties. Laborer(s) and other areas of the department Dependent Adult Abuse. Salary UNEX annual reports to required. campus and check required. Occasional evening background check Maintain sex, sexual orientation, gender upandto demonstrates will handle all heavy lifting and moving leadership in intra $90,000/year, commensurate ANALYST other reports Budget, and weekend hours may be required. a valid submitted CA driver’s by license, a clean identity, national origin, disability todepartmental tasks, the moving of all furniture committees. experienceteams andand qualifications. INTERDISCIPLINARY HUMANITIES FinanceDMV andrecord Personnel managerin the $25.14‑ $26.82/hr. The University of and enrollment status, protected veteran status, or and the Dean. Processes scheduled Plans,University develops and a culinary of oversees California is an CENTER out of classrooms, offices, labs and California is an Equal Opportunity/ The DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. any Affirmative other characteristic protected by replacementextramural, of all furniture. team to ensure overall consistency and Opportunity/Affirmative Manages the departmental, student$24.52‑ data transfers andUniversity from of Action Employer, and Equal $35.58/hr.toThe law. For primary consideration apply Required to perform custodial high quality of food service across center, and gift accounts and financial Campus. Maintains California is anand Equalmanages Opportunity/ all qualified applicants will receive Action Employer, and all qualified by 4/7/21, thereafter open until filled. zone department, and campus wide the variouswill operations. Assesses and receive consideration operationsduties of inthe consideration for employment without applicants theas FileMaker database trains and Affirmative Action and Employer, Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu necessary. Reqs:release Two of years develops menus based on such factors employment without regard including the review and all similar other Finance staff applicants on the usewilland all qualified receive regard to race, color, religion, sex, for Job # 16686 industry experience. Must have maintenance 6mo marketcolor, trends,religion, customer preferences sex, sexual financial transactions and reconciling of the database. consideration for employment sexual orientation, gender identity, toasrace, + payroll experience stripping and waxing and nutritional gender considerations, ease identity, general and ledgers. Prepares Reqs: Bachelor’s degree accounting without regard to in race, color, religion, national origin, disability status, orientation, CALIFORNIA NEWS Publishers BUSINESS financialfollow planning the education workdisability experience. writtenand andadvises oral instructions national and origin, status, Association (CNPA), a 132‑year‑old, OPPORTUNITY Businessin Officer and long Proficiency Excel.status, Strong English. on Mustshort be familiar with all protected inveteran or any

36

54 THE INDEPENDENT MARCH 12, 2020 INDEPENDENT.COM THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT APRIL APRIL 1, 1, 2021 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM THE INDEPENDENT.COM

MUSIC MARKET MUSIC LESSONS PLACE

origin,anddisability status, ofnational preparation established of position dependent on funding. protectedandveteran or any procedures, budgetarystatus, constraints. $28.91‑ $29.47/hr. The University of other characteristic Monitors menu planning, protected purchasing by California is an Equal Opportunity/ law. For primary consideration WONDERFUL specifications, product and recipeapply Affirmative Action Employer, and by 4/4/21, thereafter open until testing and menu development. all qualified applicants will receive ANNOUNCEMENTS TEACHER WORKPLACE filled. Apply online atdetermines https://jobs. Designs new recipes, consideration for employment without AT&T INTERNET. Starting Enjoy Piano, Voice ator $40/ Harp Lessons. appropriate and specifies regard to race, color, religion, sex, ucsb.edu ingredients Job # 16443 month w/12‑mo agmt. approach Includes 1 to a full Exciting new individual serving portions for each sexualACCOMMODATIONS orientation, gender identity, TB of data per month. Get More Formemorize, musical experience. Read, recipe. Reqs: 10+ years as senior national origin, disability status, SPECIALIST Your High‑Speed Thing. any Ask music w/ compose Internet or improvise executive and/or multi‑site culinary protected veteran status, or any HUMAN RESOURCES us how ease. to bundle and SAVE! Geo Vocal audition prep.&$52/hr. 1st senior leader in the restaurant industry otherThe characteristic protected by law. Workplace Accommodations svc restrictions Call usChristine today Holvick, lesson apply. 50% off!! or in college and university food For primary consideration apply by Specialist works with managers/ 1‑888‑796‑8850 BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com service. Culinary degree or equivalent 3/17/20, thereafter open until filled. supervisors and employees Call 969‑6698 A Published Author. We required. Advanced knowledge in Applytoonline at https://jobs.ucsb.edu TECHNICAL develop, implement BECOME and want to Read Your Book! Dorrance food preparation, culinary trends, Job #20200104 monitor temporary reasonable SUPPORT ANALYST Publishing‑Trusted by Authors vegetarian, vegan and raw cuisine, accommodation plans to support NOW PLAYING BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL Since 1920 Book manuscript nutrition, special dietary needs, allergy SALES/MARKETING staff, faculty, academic and student SCIENCEand & MANAGEMENT submissions currently being awareness sanitation regulations. employees with disabilities/injuries/ HARPIST VIRTUOSO Supports reviewed. Comprehensive Services: EVERY BUSINESSMaintains has a story and to tell!updates Ability to lead student, and advice staff in food and illnesses. FOR ALL EVENTS. Weddings, faculty computing for the Consultation, Production, Promotion Get your out with purchasing contracts, needs experience the message case management database; Concerts, Parties, Churches, and Distribution. Call for Your Free Master of Environmental PRMedia Release – the only innew building and maintaining quality California’s produces a variety of reports. Assists Recording Studios. Classical, pop, Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or Data Science program, Releaseimplementation Service operated of training vendor relationships. Abilityincluding to Press with folk, jazz...Christine Holvick, BM, MM visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali installing software, press tofor get managers, press! For more work effectively as troubleshooting a member by the modules supervisors www.sbHarpist.com 969‑6698 (Cal‑SCAN) software hardware Cecelia @ 916‑288‑6011 ofpc/mac an Executive Team and as well as info contact and employees. Reqs: Excellent problems, troubleshooting network or http://prmediarelease.com/california inter‑departmentally. Demonstrated oral and written communication connectivity, desktops, (Cal‑SCAN) skill in leading workimaging groups, managing skills. Ability to interpret, apply, some server support, supporting and supervising complex projects, and explain policies, procedures audio/video equipment,students. managing leading and supervising and regulations. Organized, detail ServeSafe certification. Note: Criminal inventories of equipment. Support oriented with excellent follow up/case history background required. provided in check dual‑locations, management skills. Ability to prioritize $91,400‑$108,500/yr. on campus and downtown workload with frequent interruptions. CAR CARE/REPAIR The University of California Santa Barbara (NCEAS).is an Reqs: Demonstrated experience working Equal Opportunity/ Bachelor’s degree in Affirmative related field, with a diverse population with tact AIS MOBILE AUTO REPAIR‑ 20 Action Employer, and all qualified or equivalent experience. Strong FAMILY SERVICESProficiency with yrs. exp. I’ll fix it anywhere! Pre‑Buy and sensitivity. applicants will receive for technical skillsconsideration in computing Google Workspace (gmail, drive, docs, Inspections & Restorations. 12% OFF! employment regard to support. race, A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over hardware without and software slides, sheets) and database programs. 805‑448‑4450 color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, a million families find senior living. Excellent communication, $24.52 to $26.65 /hr. Notes: Criminal gender identity, and national origin, Our trusted, local advisors help find organization, interpersonal history background check required. LUXURY CARS disability status, Satisfactory protected veteran solutions to your unique needs at no skills. Note: criminal UCSB Campus Security Authority status, or anybackground other characteristic cost to you. Call 855‑741‑7459 history check OLD Porsche 356/911/912 of WANTED! ALL friends of Roger protected by law. The For University primary of under Clery Act. The UniversityCALLING $25.95‑$32.90/hr. California is an Equal Opportunity/ Runjavac!for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 consideration by Opportunity/ 3/22/20, HOLISTIC California is apply an Equal HEALTH Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE and himOnly. a birthday greeting at thereafter openAction until filled. Apply and Affirmative Action Employer, Send Affirmative Employer, LEAVE MESSAGE 1‑707‑339‑5994. all qualified applicants will receive happybdayroger@yahoo.com online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu all qualified applicants will Job receive Email: porscherestoration@yahoo.com consideration for employment Herbal Health‑care Happy Birthday, Pops! #20200093 consideration for employment without regardfor to race, color, religion, (Cal‑SCAN) Herbal treatments weight‑loss, DID YOU KNOW 7 in 10 Americans or without regard to race, color, sexual orientation, heartsex,conditions, inflammation gender 1158 Million U.S. Adults read content religion, sex, sexual orientation, & pain, bloodnational sugar conditions, identity, origin, disability from newspaper media each week? gender identity, national origin, digestion, detox. Naturopath, status,liver protected veteran status, or Discover the Power of Newspaper disability status, protected veteran Ayurveda KhabirSouthwick, any Herbalist, other characteristic protected by Advertising. For a free brochure call status, or any other characteristic 805‑308‑3480, www.KSouthwick. law. For primary consideration apply STAFF RESEARCH 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa. protected by law. For primary com by 04/05/21, thereafter open until com (Cal‑SCAN) consideration apply by 04/7/21, ASSOCIATE filled. Apply online at https://jobs. thereafterSCIENCE open until filled. Apply COMPUTER DID YOU KNOW that newspapers ucsb.edu Job # 16571 MASSAGE (LICENSED) online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Responsible for developing the Job serve an engaged audience and that # 16613. prototypes and platforms experimental 79% still read a print newspaper? for blockchain‑based database systems. DEEP TISSUE QUEEN Newspapers need to be in your mix! The blockchain‑based database Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Discover the Power of Newspaper systems will also require the building Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. Advertising. For more info email of a scalable distributed caching layer 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) in the cloud computing substrate. available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN) Responsible for the implementation 886‑8792 DIRECTV NOW. No Satellite Needed. and integration of such a distributed $40/month. 65 Channels. Stream caching layer developed in the WELLNESS Breaking News, Live Events, Sports laboratory. Supervises the algorithmic research work of the two new doctoral ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain & On Demand Titles. No Annual students in the laboratory; in particular freedom with a Portable Oxygen Contract. No Commitment. CALL bringing them up‑to‑speed with both Concentrator! No more heavy tanks 1‑866‑825‑6523 the permissioned and permission‑less and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! DISABLED AND unable to work? blockchain technologies. Assists the Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: Bills beginning to pile up? Call Citizens Disability! We can help you Faculty co‑Directors in the development 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) of research funding proposals. VIAGRA 100MG, CIALIS 20mg. 100 get the benefits you deserve. Call 800‑804‑5883 Today! Will lead a team of undergraduate tabs $99 includes FREE SHIPPING. and graduate students to provide 1‑888‑836‑0780 (Cal‑SCAN) DISCOUNT AIR TRAVEL. Call Flight engineering programming and Services for best pricing on domestic system support for the investigation WANT TO get your brain mapped & international flights inside and of blockchain infrastructure that span for free? from the US. Serving United, Delta, public and private cloud computing American & Southwest airlines. Call infrastructure. Duties include software Nutritional scientists at Nutrient for free quote now! Have travel dates design, development, testing, and (a Reno‑based food company), ready! 855‑638‑3462 empirical evaluation of the system. in collaboration with the team at Work includes repetitive, specialized Neurofield Neurotherapy Inc, are ONLY THE Highest quality CBD experimental procedures in database recruiting 10 adults to participate in products from AceWellness! We systems, distributed algorithms, a 1‑day research study. The purpose guarantee highest quality, most transaction processing, concurrency of the study is to measure changes competitive pricing on CBD products. control, and cloud computing. Reqs: in brain activity as measured by the Softgels, Oils, Skincare, Vape & Bachelor of Science in Computer Neurofield qEEG (non‑invasive brain more. Coupon Code: PRINT20 and Systems Engineering and/or mapping device) after consuming a 1‑855‑681‑3113 equivalent education and experience. brain‑targeted Nutrient shake. ORLANDO + Daytona Beach Florida Advanced software development Vacation! Enjoy 7 Days and 6 Nights experience. Large scale software The study takes place at the with Hertz, Enterprise or Alamo Car infrastructure configuration and Neurofield office (1836 State St). 2 Rental Included ‑ Only $298.00. 12 management. Distributed systems EEGs (plus analysis), the BrainShake months to use 1‑866‑903‑7520. deployment, testing, experimentation, are provided free of charge. There is (24/7) (Cal‑SCAN) and empirical evaluation. Note: no financial compensation. Criminal history background check To learn more and apply, please visit SAVE BIG on HOME INSURANCE! required. Position currently funded this link: https://nutrientlife.com/ Compare 20 A‑rated insurances companies. Get a quote within through 09/30/2021. Continuation pages/nutrient‑neurofield‑study minutes. Average savings of $444/

WELL BEING

AUTO


| | INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHONE 965-5205 E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M | | INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHONE 965-5205 E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

REAL ESTATE

APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

ROOMS FOR RENT

PRIVATE ROOM with private bath in shared condo. Available April 1. Close to LogMeIn and Ellwood Butterfly Grove in Goleta. Includes smart TV, use of kitchen and living room. Sliding glass door opens onto a balcony overlooking a wooded ravine in a gated complex with many large trees. Washer/ dryer, pool, jacuzzi, sauna, gym, off‑street parking. $1,500 including utilities. (805) 450‑3574.

WANT TO RENT

LEGALS

ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ROBERT H. GLOGOW Case No.: 21PR00092 To all heirs, b e n e f i c i a r i e s , creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ROBERT H. GLOGOW, ROBERT HEYWOOD GLOGOW A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: GINA N. NARGIE & SANTA BARBARA MARITIME MUSEUM in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: STEPHEN T. FRANK, ESQ. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the d e c e d e n t ’s will and c o d i c i l s , i f a n y, b e admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. T H E P E T I T I O N requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent

Administration of Estates Act. (This a u t h o r i t y w i l l allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, h o w e v e r, t h e p e r s o n a l representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent a d m i n i s t r a t i o n authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not g r a n t t h e a u t h o r i t y. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 04/08/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P. O B o x 2 1 1 0 7 S a n t a Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Quiet female, 800+ Experian, great refs, PERSONAL SERVICES TECHNICAL SERVICES retired long‑term MAC AND PC repair, network Cottage Health 55 Yrs or Older? specification and installation, virus Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP removal and mitigation, Home employee, seeks because this Non‑profit matches Theater and smart home specification long‑term apt./ workers to your needs. 965‑1531 and installation private space, 600+ REPAIR SERVICES sq. ft, patio/yard, SANDERSAMPS.COM. Guitar and smoke‑free, starting Amplifier repair. Vintage gear a late May. Please email specialty. 805‑220‑8127. athykw@yahoo.com.

with the court before the hearing. Yo u r appearance may be in person or by your a t t o r n e y. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal r e p r e s e n t a t i v e appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a c re d i t o r. Yo u may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James P. Griffith;Howell M o o r e & G o u g h L L P, 812 Presidio Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 962‑0524 x6. Published Mar 18, 25. Apr 1 2021.

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Thu 1

12:23 am 5.6

7:29 am -0.4

2:01 pm 3.3

6:38 pm 1.9

Fri 2

1:11 am 5.4

8:42 am -0.3

3:44 pm 3.0

7:26 pm 2.5

Sat 3

2:12 am 5.1

10:08 am -0.2

5:49 pm 3.1

8:58 pm 2.9

Sun 4

3:34 am 4.9

11:32 am -0.3

7:09 pm 3.5

11:12 pm 2.9

Mon 5

5:05 am 4.7

Sunrise 6:41 Sunset 7:22

High

12:39 pm -0.4

7:51 pm 3.8

Tue 6

12:41 am 2.5

6:22 am 4.08

1:30 pm -0.5

8:24 pm 4.1

Wed 7

1:37 am 2.0

7:23 am 4.9

2:11 pm -0.4

8:52 pm 4.3

Thu 8

2:21 am 1.5

8:14 am 4.9

2:45 pm -0.2

9:17 pm 4.5

28 D

4

11 D

19 H source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Start to Change” -- out with the old, in with the new.

.

58 Actress Cornish of “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” 1 Door frame component 62 Berry that’s not so exotic 5 Roadside digital display? since it’s seemingly in 10 “Doubtful” everything 14 Laos’s locale 63 Prank where a link leads to 15 Concrete strengthener a video of “Unforgettable”? 16 “Scream” actress Campbell 65 ___ packing (oust) 17 “Bring on the carillons”? 66 “A League of ___ Own” 19 James of “The Godfather” 67 City in northern Nevada 20 Actress Keanan of “My Two 68 Barely beat (out) Dads” 69 Alex of “Taskmaster” 21 English actor McKellen, who’s releasing new when traveling? #Hometasking challenges 23 The NBA’s Thunder, on during the pandemic scoreboards 70 Much-needed partner of 25 Rising and falling relaxation periodically 26 Pink Floyd box set released in 1992 1 Vaccine shots, in the U.K. 30 “___ Rae” (Sally Field 2 “I’d hate to break up ___” movie) 3 Kunis of “Black Swan” 34 Actor Danza 4 Theater level 35 Service group for GIs 5 Three, in Italian 37 “Yup” 6 Prefix before sphere 38 Before, in verse 7 Undersea WWII threat 39 Dish set with a double helix 8 Movie soundtrack singer pattern? Nixon 41 Partnering word 9 Ciabatta, e.g. 42 Liveliness 10 Like most modern movies 44 Pen end 11 Actor Bridges 45 Otherwise 12 “Dear ___ Hansen” 46 Fix the names attached to 13 Care for the picture? 18 Karaoke night need 47 Burma, today 22 Major kitchen appliance 49 “___ something I said?” 24 Tally 53 Healing spring 26 Take the wheel 54 Descriptor for about 79% 27 Mister Ed, for one of a certain group of 28 Blundering Dalmatians? 29 Cryptanalysis org.

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

31 Royal domain 32 Group of geniuses, supposedly (I mean, what is this trying to prove?) 33 Snake with a puff variety 36 Pay for completely 37 “We Have the Meats” chain 39 Probe persistently 40 Dart thrower’s asset 43 Chew toy material 45 One who shouldn’t be helping 48 “Be ___!” (“C’mon, help me out!”) 50 New wave instrument, for short 51 Pocatello’s state 52 Luggage lugger 54 Move with care 55 Secured 56 The Sugarhill ___ 57 Happy reaction 59 Bitter humor 60 Stamp pad fillers 61 Quadruple awards honor, for short 64 Mine extraction ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1025

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

37 37


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara (HACSB) is soliciting proposals for a Request for Proposal (RFP) for its Supportive Housing Program, a site-based case management and service coordination program for residents of HACSB’s four Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) developments. HACSB is seeking to collaborate with a local social service agency or qualified organization specializing in case management, behavioral health, and harm reduction services. Supportive services will be provided to a variety of PSH residents with limited incomes, including formerly homeless individuals, as well as persons with disabilities and/ or special needs. Qualified organizations are encouraged to submit proposals that reflect their capacity to provide the scope of services outlined in the RFP. The RFP package is available electronically upon request by contacting the undersigned at (805) 897-1036; or via email at aredit@hacsb.org; and/or by accessing it on our website @ www.hacsb.org. Proposals are due no later than 5:00 PM, May 10, 2021. Alice Villarreal Redit, Resident Services Supervisor, Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara. AVISO DE DISPONIBILIDAD DEL PLAN ESTRATÉGICO PARA PERSONAS SIN HOGAR Y NOTIFICACIÓN DE REUNIÓN PÚBLICA SE NOTIFICA que el Plan Estratégico Final para Personas Sin Hogar está disponible para su revisión y el Concejo Municipal de la Ciudad de Goleta llevará a cabo una reunión pública en la fecha que se establece a continuación para considerar lo siguiente: La Ciudad de Goleta preparó este Plan Estratégico para Personas sin Hogar para ayudar a guiar y coordinar los esfuerzos para prevenir y abordar la falta de hogar dentro de la Ciudad, reconociendo al mismo tiempo la naturaleza regional de este problema. El propósito de desarrollar este Plan fue analizar el estado de las personas sin hogar que afecta a la ciudad de Goleta, identificar metas y objetivos significativos, proporcionar orientación para las prioridades de financiamiento, aprovechar los recursos existentes e identificar las mejores prácticas basadas en investigaciones para abordar la falta de hogar. Este Plan Estratégico también proporciona un análisis de las tendencias y la demografía en las poblaciones de personas sin hogar del Condado de Santa Bárbara y Goleta. El Plan Estratégico para Personas Sin Hogar está disponible en el sitio web de la Ciudad en la siguiente dirección: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/projects-programs/studiesand-other-projects/homelessness-strategic-plan Todos los interesados ciudadanos, residentes y agencias públicas o privadas que sirven a la comunidad de Goleta están invitados a asistir a la reunión pública, que se llevará a cabo virtualmente debido a las recomendaciones de salud pública. REUNIÓN FECHA Y HORA:

Martes, 20 de Abril 2021 Reunión comienza a las 5:30 PM

UBICACIÓN DE LA Reunión: De conformidad con la Orden Ejecutiva del Gobernador N-29-20 con fecha del 17 de marzo de 2020 que autoriza a las jurisdicciones locales sujetas a la Ley Brown a realizar reuniones públicas de forma telefónica y electrónica para responder a la pandemia de COVID-19, la reunión ordinaria de la Ciudad de Goleta el 20 de abril de 2021 se llevará a cabo de forma telefónica y electrónica. Se transmitirá en vivo en el sitio web de la Ciudad y en Cable Goleta Canal 19. Las Cámaras del Concejo no estarán abiertas al público durante la reunión. Los Concejales de la Ciudad participarán telefónicamente y no estarán presentes físicamente en las Cámaras del Concejo. COMENTARIO PÚBLICO: DEBIDO A LA NECESIDAD DE LA CIUDAD DE REALIZAR REUNIONES PÚBLICAS ELECTRÓNICAMENTE Y TELEFÓNICAMENTE DURANTE LA PANDÉMICA DEL COVID-19, también se pueden enviar comentarios por escrito, como se indica arriba, por correo electrónico a cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org o por otros medios electrónicos durante la Reunión Pública (fecha y hora mencionado anteriormente), siempre que se reciban antes de la conclusión de la sección de comentarios públicos de la Reunión Pública. Las instrucciones sobre cómo enviar un comentario o llamar durante la audiencia estarán disponibles en el sitio web de la Ciudad: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/iwant-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendas-and-videos Para más información, póngase en contacto con Jaime Valdez, a (805) 961-7568 o por correo electrónico a jvaldez@cityofgoleta.org. Información está disponible en la página web de la Cuidad: www.tinyurl.com/GoletaCDBG Nota: En cumplimiento con la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA), si usted necesita asistencia especial para participar en esta reunión, por favor póngase en contacto con Deborah Lopez, Secretario Municipal, al (805) 9617500. Notificación al menos 72 horas antes de la reunión permitirá a personal de la Ciudad a tomar las medidas razonables de alojamiento. Fecha de publicación: 1 de abril, 2021 (Santa Barbara Independent)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: OM SWEET MAMA at 3952 Foothill Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Aida Robana (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000832. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BURKE CONSTRUCTION ADVISORS at 4141 State St., Suite C 4 1 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Burke Advisors, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000544. Mar 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOUL CENTERED GROWTH at 30 West Mission Street #5 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Marilyn J Owen (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000444.Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: AUGIE’S at 700 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 700 Statae, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000551. Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: S A N TA B A R B A R A S PA at 4 W Calle Laureles Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Shelby M Rowe 4589 Camino Molinero Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Married Couple County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000553. Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: AMERICAN RIVIERA POOLS at 5651 Ekwill St. #103 Goleta, CA 93117; American Riviera Pools (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000589. Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: B IS FOR BOOKKEEPIN at 250 W Constance Ave, Apt B Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Bonnie A Keinath (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000591.Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: CENTENNIAL BEER HALL at 5871 Hollister Ave Goleta, CA 93117; Batdorf Beverageworks Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000596.Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLUE WHALE, BBDESIGN+ BETTINA BLEY DESIGN+BETTINA BLEY at 133 E De La Guerra St #255 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Blue Whale (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000519.Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021.

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY FOR 30-DAY PUBLIC REVIEW: DRAFT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) 2021-2022 CDBG ACTION PLAN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta is conducting a 30-day public review period on the Draft 2021-2022 CDBG Action Plan. The Draft Action Plan outlines the City’s strategy for pursuing the overall goals of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to provide decent housing; to establish and maintain a suitable living environment; and to expand economic revitalization opportunities. The Action Plan also contains identifiable benchmarks for measuring progress through goals, objectives and community development strategies to meet the City’s housing needs and to provide services to the lowincome, homeless and special needs populations within the City. The Draft 20212022 Action Plan also sets forth funding allocations for the 2021-2022 planning period. The review period provides an opportunity for the public to offer their views and recommendations to the City on the subject of CDBG funded housing and community development related activities. The Draft 2021-2022 CDBG Action Plan is posted on the City’s website at tinyurl.com/goletacdbg and copies will be available for review at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta; and the Goleta Community Center located at 5679 Hollister Avenue if and when those locations are open. PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD: Comments on the Draft Action Plan are being accepted during a 30-day public review period beginning Friday, April 1, 2021, and ending Monday, May 3, 2021, at 5:00 pm. Comments should be submitted to: City of Goleta, Neighborhood Services & Public Safety Department, Attn: Claudia Dato, 130 Cremona Drive Goleta, CA 93117 or emailed to cdato@cityofgoleta.org. For more information you may contact Claudia Dato, Senior Project Manager, at cdato@cityofgoleta.org or at (805) 961-7558. Publish: Thursday, April 1, 2021 Santa Barbara Independent

38

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT APRIL APRIL 1, 1, 2021 2021 THE

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

F I C T I T I O U S BU S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SKINNY SUZIE FOODS at 21 Camino De Vida, Unit 130 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Suzanne Bozic (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2 0 2 1 ‑ 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 . M a r 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: 50 ACRE RANCH WINES, 50 ESTATE R A N C H W I N E S , A B S T R A C T I O N WINES, ALL TUA WINES, ALLA TUA S A L U T E W I N E S , BARN NO WINES, BAUHOUSE WINES, B U T C H E R S H O P WINES, C CELLARS, D’OLIVO VINOS, FIRE & OAK CELLARS, HARVEST STONE WINES, HERMOSO S U E N O W I N E S , H I D D E N T R I A L VINEYARDS, NICE PAIR WINES, PARA SU SALUD WINES, P R O M I N E N C E , SERPENTINE WINES, S T E A K H O U S E 5 5 W I N E S , TAV O L A RUSTICA WINES, T E C H N I Q U E WINES, TROMPEUR V I N E YA R D S , V E V E R E E AMARE WINES, V I N E T I E V I N E YA R D S at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Te r r a v a n t W i n e C o m p a n y, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000719. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: FAERON COMMUNICATION at 6 6 0 Ta b o r L a n e S a n t a Barbara, CA 93108; Jacqueline J Oliveira ( s a m e a d d r e s s ) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000611. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing b u s i n e s s a s : F A M I LY GANG MERCH at 317 Arden Rd. Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alexis D Flores (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000685. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: STOUT & KAUFMAN, A PROFESSIONAL LAW C O R P O R AT I O N a t 5 9 5 1 Encina Road, Ste. 208 Goleta, CA 93117; Stout & Kaufman, A Professional Law Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000688. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: BOWLINE MEDIA, BOWLINE C O N S U L T I N G , BOWLINE FILMS, B O W L I N E ENTERTAINMENT at 349 Northgate D r, Apt C Goleta, CA 93117; Gareth Kelly (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000654. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CURRENT CELLARS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Te r r a v a n t Wine C o m p a n y, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 15, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000715. Mar 18, 25. Apr 1, 8 2021.

F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: IMAGES BY VALERIE at 3940 M a r i c o p a D r i v e Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Valerie Villa (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000617. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. F I C T I T I O U S BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: SG ASSOCIATES at 1117 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; SG Associates, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000747. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. F I C T I T I O U S BUSINESS NAME STAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAPITAL PACIFIC D E V E L O P M E N T G R O U P, CAPITAL PA C I F I C H O M E S at 209 W. Alamar Ave., Ste A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; C e n t e r P o i n t Development Group, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000592. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: DRW GLOBAL at 218 Sherwood Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Douglas R . W e i n s t e i n ( s a m e a d d r e s s ) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 3, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000579. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: DON CAMELON TAQUERIA LLC at 302 E. Haley Street #B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Don Camelon Ta q u e r i a LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000610. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: PAC SUBSEA at 529 Hastings Dr Goleta, C A 9 3 1 1 7 ; N a t h a n F. Perry (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000736. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business a s : A R R AY C R E AT I V E DESIGN at 414 De La Vina Street Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Erika Bellitt ( s a m e a d d r e s s ) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000660. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: RVP CATTLE CO. at 3229 Calle Rosales Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lone Oak Cattle Company LLC 2 6 5 M e a d o w l a r k Rd Santa Ynez, CA 93460 This business is conducted by a General Partnership County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000704. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: HUSTLE MEDIA at 5511 Ekwill Street Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Master Clean USA Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000786. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JANE OF ALL TRADES at 1217 East Rice Ranch Road Santa Maria, CA 93455; Nina L. Russaw (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 18, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000791. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person­ (s) is/are doing business as: EQUIPPED FITNESS SOLUTIONS at 518 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Equippedfs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000818. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: A K A U T O R E PA I R a t 814 E Cota St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Arsen Kagramanov (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000683. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LEFT COAST BRANDS at 819 Reddick Street Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Coastal Manufacturing LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021­0000835. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021.

AVISO DE DISPONIBILIDAD AVISO DE DISPONIBILIDAD PARA LA REVISION PÚBLICA DE 30 DIAS: PROPUESTO PROGRAMA DE SUBSIDIOS GLOBALES PARA EL DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO (CDBG) 2021-2022 PLAN DE ACCIÓN DE CDBG El AVISO SE DA que la Ciudad de Goleta está conduciendo un período de revisión público de 30 días acerca del Propuesto Plan de Acción de 20212022. El Propuesto Plan de Acción resume la estrategia de la Ciudad para perseguir las metas generales del Departamento de Vivienda y de Desarrollo Urbano (HUD en inglés) de los E.E.U.U., para proporcionar la vivienda decente; para establecer y mantener un medioambiente sostenible; y para ampliar oportunidades económicas de la revitalización. El Plan de Acción también contiene los puntos de referencia para medir progreso por las metas, objetivos y estrategias de desarrollo de la comunidad para realizar las necesidades de la vivienda en la Ciudad y para proporcionar servicios a la gente de bajos ingresos, a los desamparados y a la gente con necesidades especiales dentro de la Ciudad. El Propuesto Plan de Acción también dispone asignaciones de financiación específicas para el período de planeamiento de 2021-2022. El período de revisión proporciona una oportunidad para que el público ofrezca sus opiniones y recomendaciones a la Ciudad a propósito de actividades por medio de CDBG relacionadas al financiamiento de la vivienda y del desarrollo comunitario. El Propuesto Plan de Acción de 2021-2022 CDBG está disponible en el sitio web de la Ciudad en: tinyurl.com/goletacdbg, y copias también están disponibles para la revisión en El Ayuntamiento, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta; y el Centro Comunitario del Valle de Goleta situado en 5679 Hollister Avenue. Para información en español, por favor llame al (805) 961-7555 y pregunte por Jaime Valdez o jvaldez@cityofgoleta.org PERÍODO DE REVISIÓN PÚBLICA: Los comentarios sobre El Propuesto Plan de Acción para 2021-2022 se están aceptando durante un período de revisión de 30 días empezando el viernes, el 1 de abril de 2021 y concluyendo el lunes, el 3 de mayo de 2021, a las 5:00 P.M. Los comentarios se deben someter a: City of Goleta, Attn: Claudia Dato, 130 Cremona Drive Goleta, CA 93117 o por correo electrónico a cdato@cityofgoleta.org. Publica: El jueves, 1 de abril de 2021 (Santa Barbara Independent)

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF HOMELESSNESS STRATEGIC PLAN AND NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Final Homelessness Strategic Plan is available for review and the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct a public meeting on the date set forth below to consider the following: The City of Goleta prepared this Homelessness Strategic Plan to help guide and coordinate efforts to prevent and address homelessness within the city, while recognizing the regional nature of this issue. The purpose of developing this Plan was to analyze the state of homelessness as it affects the city of Goleta, identify meaningful goals and objectives, provide guidance for funding priorities, leverage existing resources, and identify research-based best practices in addressing homelessness. This Strategic Plan also provides an analysis of trends and demographics in the Santa Barbara County and Goleta homeless populations. The Homelessness Strategic Plan is available on the City’s website at the following address: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/projects-programs/studies-and-otherprojects/homelessness-strategic-plan All interested citizens, residents, and public or private agencies serving the Goleta community are invited to attend the public meeting, which will take place virtually due to public health recommendations. MEETING DATE AND TIME:

Tuesday, April 20, 2021 Meeting begins at 5:30 p.m.

MEETING LOCATION: Pursuant to of the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council April 20, 2021, will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. City Councilmembers will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. PUBLIC COMMENT: IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted as instructed above via email to cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by other electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit a comment or to call in during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, at (805) 961-7500. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting will enable City staff to make reasonable accommodation arrangements. For more information, please contact Claudia Dato, Senior Project Manager, by email at cdato@cityofgoleta.org or at (805) 961-7554. Date of Publication: April 1, 2021 (Santa Barbara Independent) INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

39 39


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS NOTIFICACIÓN DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA DE LA COMISIÓN DE PLANEAMIENTO PARA REVISAR LAS ENMIENDAS A LA ORDENANZA DE ZONIFICACIÓN (TÍTULO 17) (A realizarse electrónicamente y por teléfono) ATENCIÓN: conforme con la Orden Ejecutiva N-29-20 del Gobernador con fecha del 17 de marzo, 2020 que autoriza a las jurisdicciones locales sujetas a la Ley Brown a realizar reuniones por teléfono y electrónicas en respuesta a la pandemia COVID-19, la reunión especial de la Comisión de Planeamiento del 12 de abril de 2021 se realizará por teléfono y electrónicamente. Se transmitirá en vivo en la página web de la Ciudad y en el Canal 19 del Cable de Goleta. Las Cámaras del Consejo no estarán abiertas al público durante la reunión. Los Comisionados de Planeamiento de la Ciudad participarán telefónicamente y no estarán presentes físicamente en las Cámaras del Consejo. POR LA PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA que la Comisión de Planeamiento de Goleta realizará una audiencia pública para revisar las enmiendas al Título 17 para eliminar las provisiones relacionadas con eventos temporarios. Las provisiones del código municipal sobre eventos temporarios se agregarán al Título 9 y tales provisiones se presentarán en una reunión futura debidamente anunciada del Consejo de la Ciudad. La agenda de la audiencia pública de la Comisión de Planeamiento se publicará en la página web de la Ciudad (www.cityofgoleta.org) por lo menos 72 horas antes de la reunión de la Comisión de Planeamiento. La agenda tendrá instrucciones sobre cómo participar en la audiencia pública. La fecha, hora y ubicación de la audiencia pública de la Comisión de Planeamiento son según se describe a continuación: FECHA Y HORA DE LA AUDIENCIA: Lunes, 12 de abril, 2021 a las 6:00 P.M. LUGAR:

Dado el estado de emergencia local, estatal y nacional, esta reunión será una reunión de teleconferencia con instrucciones detalladas para la participación incluidas en el orden del día publicado

UBICACIÓN Y DESCRIPCIÓN DEL PROYECTO: la enmienda al Título 17 para eliminar las provisiones relacionadas con eventos temporarios (“Proyecto”) es parte del esfuerzo de la Ciudad de separar los requisitos para permisos de eventos temporarios, que son las reuniones en la propiedad durante no más de 5 días y usos temporarios, que son usos de la propiedad que no alterarán permanentemente el carácter o rasgos físicos de la propiedad. Los eventos temporarios, que están actualmente clasificados como usos temporarios en el Título 17 se eliminarán y, en una enmienda separada de la ordenanza, se agregarán al Título 9 del Código Municipal de Goleta. La enmienda al Título 17 se aplicará en toda la ciudad, incluyendo todas las áreas de la Ciudad dentro de la Zona Costera. En la reunión del 12 de abril, 2021, la Comisión de Planeamiento considerará la enmienda al Título 17. REVISIÓN AMBIENTAL: conforme con las Normas §15061(b)(3) y §15378(b) (5) de la CEQA, la Ordenanza propuesta no califica como un “proyecto” para los propósitos de la CEQA porque la Ordenanza no resulta en cambios físicos directos o indirectos en el medio ambiente. Las enmiendas propuestas no tienen, por sí mismas, el potencial de causar un efecto significativo en el medio ambiente. Por definición, la Ordenanza propuesta está exenta de una revisión de la CEQA. COMENTARIO DEL PÚBLICO: se anima a todas las personas interesadas a que participen en la reunión y ofrezcan comentarios escritos y/u orales. Todas las cartas/comentarios deben dirigirse a la Secretaria Municipal en cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org. Las cartas deben ser recibidas por la Secretaria Municipal en o antes de la fecha de la audiencia o entregadas durante la audiencia. CONSIDERANDO LA NECESIDAD DE LA CIUDAD DE REALIZAR LAS REUNIONES PÚBLICAS EN INTERNET O POR TELÉFONO DURANTE LA PANDEMIA DE COVID-19, los comentarios escritos también pueden ser presentados por correo electrónico como se indica arriba en cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org o por otros medios electrónicos durante la Audiencia Pública (fecha y hora indicados arriba) siempre y cuando se reciban antes de la finalización de la porción del comentario del público de la Audiencia Pública. Habrá instrucciones disponibles sobre cómo entregar comentarios o llamar durante la audiencia en la página web de la Ciudad: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/governmentmeeting-agendas-and-videos NOTA: si usted denuncia la naturaleza de la acción descrita arriba en los tribunales, usted podría estar limitado solamente a aquellos asuntos que usted o alguna otra persona mencionaran en la audiencia pública descrita en esta notificación o en la correspondencia escrita entregada a la Ciudad en la fecha de o con anterioridad a la audiencia pública (Sección del Código de Gobierno 69009[b][2]). PARA MÁS INFORMACIÓN: hay información adicional en un expediente en la oficina de la Secretaria Municipal, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 o puede obtenerse llamando a Deborah S. López, Secretaria Municipal al (805) 961-7505. Para preguntas específicas sobre las enmiendas propuestas al Título 17, póngase en contacto con la Abogada Asistente de la Ciudad Winnie Cai llamando al (805) 961-7533 o en wcai@cityofgoleta.org Nota: conforme con la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades, si necesita asistencia para participar en esta audiencia, por favor llame a la Oficina de la Secretaria Municipal al (805) 961-7505. Una notificación por lo menos 72 horas antes de la audiencia permitirá al personal de la Ciudad hacer arreglos razonables. Fecha de publicación: Santa Barbara Independent, 1 de abril, 2021

40

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT APRIL APRIL 1, 1, 2021 2021 THE

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: T H E E D G E A PA RT M E N T S at 6509 Pardall St Goleta, CA 93117; L a d e r a To w n h o m e s L L C (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000769. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: EFS at 518 E Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Equippedfs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by aLimited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000884. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as:ALPHA SURFACEPRO a t 9 2 4 W. A p r i c o t Av e . Unit 102 Santa Barbara, CA 93436; Jadus Legacy LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000824. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GRASSLAND GROWERS at 4045 Foothill Road Carpinteria, CA 93013; Robert Abe 1020 ‘D’ Bailard Ave. Carpinteria, CA 93013 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000763. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as:BOARD AND BRUSH at 31 E. Canon Perdido Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Francie Rose, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000828. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business a s : PAY J U N C T I O N a t 1903 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Messiahic Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corportion Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000848. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THYME P L U S B O TA N I C A L S a t 14 Oak Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Restorative Organics, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Serena Berry County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000737. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as:ALPHA C O AT I N G D CLEANING at 924 W Apricot Avenue, Unit 102 Lompoc, CA 93436; Jadus L e g a c y, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 04, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000598. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE M AT T E R OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F SUSAN FERGUSON AND MARK FERGUSON ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00563 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: K A LY N ELIZABETH PENELOPE FERGUSON T O : K E E LY N P E N E L O P E FERGUSON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons

for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Apr 16, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 25, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F DANE CHRISTOPHER HOLROYD ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV03496 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): F R O M : D A N E C H R I S T O P H E R HOLROYD T O : D A N E CHRISTOPHER DEL DEO THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Jan 11, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this c o u n t y, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 3, 2020. by Colleen K.Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F C E S A R CAUDILLO LIZAMA ORDER TO SHOW

CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00656 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CESAR CAUDILLO LIZAMA T O : C E S A R CAUDILLO‑LIZAMA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, i f a n y, w h y t h e p e t i t i o n for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Apr 13, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this c o u n t y, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 2, 2021. b y T h o m a s P. A n d e r l e . of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F S H I VA U N K A N E D U R A N ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00564 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): F R O M : S H I VA U N K A N E DURAN TO: SIOBHAN KANE DURAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, i f a n y, w h y t h e p e t i t i o n for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Apr 13, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this c o u n t y, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 2, 2021. b y T h o m a s P. A n d e r l e . of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 11, 18, 25. Apr 1 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F L E O R I C A R D VA L E N C I A A K A R I C H A D R . VA L E N C I A ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00730 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: LEO RICHARD VALENCIA AKA R I C H A R D R . VA L E N C I A TO: RICK RICHARD VA L E N C I A THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, i f a n y, w h y t h e p e t i t i o n for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Apr 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 01, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 25. Apr 1, 8, 15 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F VICTOR PLAXCENCIA TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: C A S E NUMBER:21CV00848 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: VICTOR

PLASCENCIA TO: VICTOR PLASENCIA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, i f a n y, w h y t h e p e t i t i o n for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two

court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing May 10, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to

Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this c o u n t y, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 19, 2021. by Colleen K. S u p e r i o r. of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 1, 8, 15, 22 2021.

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING TO REVIEW AMENDMENTS TO ZONING ORDINANCE (TITLE 17) (Held Electronically and Telephonically) ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the special meeting of the Planning Commission to be held on April 12, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. City Planning Commissioners will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing to review amendments to Title 17 to delete provisions relating to temporary events. Municipal code provisions regarding temporary events will instead be added to Title 9 and such provisions will be presented in a future dulynoticed City Council meeting. The Planning Commission agenda for the public hearing will be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org) at least 72 hours prior to the Planning Commission meeting. The agenda will have instructions regarding how to participate in the public hearing. The date, time, and location of the Planning Commission public hearing is set forth as follows: HEARING DATE AND TIME: PLACE:

Monday, April 12, 2021 at 6:00 P.M. Given the local, state, and national state of emergency, this meeting will be a teleconferenced meeting with detailed instructions for participation included on the posted agenda.

PROJECT LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION: The amendment to Title 17 to delete provisions regarding temporary events (“Project”) is part of a City effort to separate the permit requirements for temporary events, which are gatherings on property for no more than 5 days, and temporary uses, which are uses of property that will not permanently alter the character or physical features of property. Temporary events that are currently classified as temporary uses in Title 17 will be deleted and, in a separate ordinance amendment, be added to Title 9 of the Goleta Municipal Code. The amendments to Title 17 would apply citywide, including all areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. At the meeting of April 12, 2021, the Planning Commission will consider the amendment to Title 17. Environmental Review: Pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15061(b)(3) and §15378(b) (5), the proposed Ordinance does not qualify as a “project” for the purposes of CEQA because the Ordinance does not result in direct or indirect physical changes in the environment. The amendments proposed do not, by themselves, have the potential to cause a significant effect on the environment. As such, the proposed Ordinance is exempt from CEQA review. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to view the meeting and to provide written and/or oral comments. All letters/comments should be addressed to City Clerk cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by City Clerk on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed above via email to cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org or by other electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit a comment or to call in during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/governmentmeeting-agendas-and-videos NOTE: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 69009[b][2]). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the City Clerk’s office, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or can be obtained by calling Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk (805) 961-7505. For specific questions regarding the proposed Title 17 amendments, contact Assistant City Attorney Winnie Cai at (805) 961-7533 or wcai@cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, April 1, 2021

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE RECTANGULAR RAPID FLASHING BEACON (RRFB) IMPROVEMENTS AT SCHOOL CROSSWALKS PROJECT NO. 9088 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., April 15, 2021, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 non-refundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http://www. cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/view/city-bid-opportunities. The work includes all labor, material, supervision and equipment necessary to construct and deliver a finished Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon (RRFB) Improvements at School Crosswalks Project No. 9088. Work includes installation of Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacons, and associated improvements including paving, sidewalk, curb, gutter, ADA access ramps, signage, striping, and pavement markings per the project plans and specifications at three intersections within the City of Goleta, CA. The contract period is Twenty (20) Working Days for the Base Bid, an additional Ten (10) Working Days for Bid Alternate “A”, and an additional Ten (10) Working Days for Bid Alternate “B”. A Pre-Bid Meeting is not scheduled for this project. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed or submitted to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received or postmarked within three (3) City business days after the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR RRFB IMPROVEMENTS AT SCHOOL CROSSWALKS (PROJECT NO. 9088).” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class “A” Contractor’s license, Class “C” Electrical specialty, or specialty licensing in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 22300, the successful bidder may substitute certain securities for funds withheld by CITY to ensure performance under the Contract or, in the alternative, request the CITY to make payment of retention to an escrow agent. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 961-7505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact Michael Winnewisser in writing at mwinnewisser@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA _____________________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: March 18, 2021 and April 1, 2021 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 1, 2021

THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT

41 41

Profile for SB Independent

Santa Barbara Independent 4/1/21  

April 1, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 794

Santa Barbara Independent 4/1/21  

April 1, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 794