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MAR. 4-11, 2021 VOL. 35 ■ NO. 790

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COVID ICU Stories of Heartbreak and Hope Photos by Daniel Dreifuss . Text by Tyler Hayden

A&E: Air Guitar Theater? WINE: Climate Positive Cans? NEWS: Tent Cities Forever? ●

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MARCH 4, 2021

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volume 35, # 790, Mar. 4-11, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Copy Editors Alexandra Mauceri, Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Esperanza Carmona, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Staff Photographer Daniel Dreifuss Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

OUR MAN IN THE WHITE HOUSE COURTESY

TABLE of CONTENTS

Inside a COVID ICU Stories of Heartbreak and Hope Photos by Daniel Dreifuss Text by Tyler Hayden

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 28

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

ON THE COVER: Registered Nurse Lois McKinley shares a moment with one of her patients. Photo by Daniel Dreifuss. Design by Ricky Barajas.

From the dry-walled halls of Figueroa Street to the polished lecterns of Pennsylvania Avenue, our newspaper’s former reporter Chris Meagher was named deputy press secretary for President Joe Biden this week, capping a steady rise from scrappy journalism to national politics. “Working for President Biden is a tremendous honor, and with many challenges ahead, there’s a lot of work to do,” said Meagher, who came to Santa Barbara in 2006 and worked for the Independent from 2008 to 2013. He then took a job with Rep. Lois Capps, did a brief stint for General Motors in his home state of Michigan, and turned back to politics to work for Democrats in Colorado and Montana, where he was communications director for the hard-fought 2018 reelection of Sen. Jon Tester. His most prominent national role so far was serving as national press secretary for Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign, as shown in this picture with the candidate. “I miss being a reporter, and I miss the Independent family and community,” said Meagher. “But I’ll be doing my best to represent Santa Barbara well.” INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

What You Become in Flight: A Conversation with Ellen O’Connell Whittet TUESDAY, MARCH 16 | 5 PM | VIA ZOOM In this searingly raw and graceful first book, author Ellen O'Connell Whittet explores both the joy of learning to jump and the safety of landing. Sorrow, violence, love, fear, hunger, and pain run through this memoir that critics have called "enthralling,” "poignant," and "exquisite." Join the author for a conversation that opens out the personal to the universal questions of selfworth, the desire to disappear, the loss and reclamation of our own voice, and what it feels like to look at a body and see a story.

FREE | RESERVE TICKETS ONLINE AT TICKETS.SBMA.NET SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART | WWW.SBMA.NET |

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FEB. 25-MAR. 4, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

CORONAVIRUS

Farmworker Vaccine Pilot a Success

COMMUNITY

by Delaney Smith anta Barbara County’s vaccine allocations have gradually increased in recent weeks, making way for the Public Health Department to begin vaccinating the farmworker population. Public Health successfully vaccinated 496 agricultural workers at the Santa Maria Health Care Center last Sunday as part of a farmworker vaccination pilot— a real feat with just 30 staff, or “bare-bones staff” as Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso put it. The goal for the pilot was to work through the cultural and linguistic barriers faced by the agricultural workers at clinics. The majority of staff were bilingual, and there were also five interpreters on hand to help with Spanish and multiple Mixteco dialects. “Our indigenous farmworker community does not have the same access to information compared to other workers,” said Fernando Martinez, a community organizer with the Mixteco Indigena Community Organizing Project (MICOP), one of several groups that partnered with Public Health on the Sunday pilot. “We look forward to our continued collaboration with lessons learned from Sunday’s clinic so we can vaccinate as many people as possible.” In addition to the vaccines, the pilot served to educate the agricultural workers in their preferred native language. Education was given on legal, medical, and wellness support services offered by Public Health and the partner organizations, which include MICOP as well as the Agricultural Commission, the Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy, Herencia Indígena, and the Growers/Shippers Association. Fourth District Supervisor Bob Nelson said he was a strong supporter of an employer-based system to vaccinate agricultural workers. He said there are several successful models already in use and that many employers would allow workers to get vaccinated on the clock, further ensuring the likelihood that they will be able to receive both doses.

R AN DY DE L A PEÑ A / SANTA M AR I A TI MES PHOTOS

This Week, Educators, Emergency, Food Workers Up for Vaccination

S

A SHOT IN THE ARM: Santa Maria farmworker Roberto Alcaraz receives an initial dose of the COVID-19 vaccine during a vaccination pilot program at the Santa Maria Health Care Center on Sunday afternoon.

Do-Reynoso said that her department has reached out to the county’s agricultural commissioner about exploring an employerbased pilot in addition to the clinic-based one from Sunday. They are also looking at setting up mobile clinics, too. This week, agricultural workers are eligible to schedule a vaccination appointment through Public Health as well. Agricultural workers aren’t the only new group to become eligible for vaccines this week. While medical workers and those age 65 and older are still able to get vaccinated, now emergency workers and education and childcare workers are able to sign up, too. For this week’s allocation, the county is following a 70/30 vaccine distribution plan. This means that of the county’s total allocation, 70 percent will be going to our health-care system to vaccinate health-care workers, those 65 and older, employees in the transitional kindergarten (TK) to 12th grade sector, and employees in higher education. The other 30 percent will be allocated to food and agricultural workers, childcare workers, and those in the emergency services sector. This week, the Public Health Department, in conjunction with Lompoc Valley Medical Center, has set aside approximately 1,100 vaccine appointments for TK-12 educational staff. Due to the vaccine shortage, the first group of vaccines has been reserved for those serving the most vulnerable

students who require “support that does not allow for physical distancing, are medically fragile, and are often unable to wear masks.” Each district, charter, or private school will determine which staff fit into this group. Educators can make appointments once they have received an invitation from their employers. The county’s vaccine allocations have been slowly increasing each week, giving hope that there will be more appointments available in the coming weeks for those who are eligible. Just from last week to this week, there was a 22 percent increase in the allocation. Also coming down the pike, Johnson & Johnson received emergency-use authorization on Saturday for its one-dose vaccine. Though Do-Reynoso estimated that at least 380,000 doses are shipping to California, the exact allocation for Santa Barbara County still remains unclear. Increased vaccine supply is not the only metric worth celebrating in Santa Barbara County. From February 15 to March 1, active cases decreased by 45 percent. Hospitalizations have also decreased by 50 percent, from 119 to 59. Intensive-care-unit rates have decreased by 32 percent. Deaths have increased 17 percent—totaling 413 Tuesday. The death metric lags behind active cases and hospitalizations and oftentimes reflects data from earlier weeks. Santa Barbara County’s adjusted case rate is at 13 cases per 100,000, and its positivity rate is at 5.1 percent. That inches the county closer toward moving out of the purple tier and into the less-restrictive red tier, which requires an adjusted case rate of 7 or less and n a positivity rate of 8 percent or less.

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. 6

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MARCH 4, 2021

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Father Jon-Stephen Hedges, best known for his work ministering to the homeless population of Isla Vista, died 2/25 at age 73 from kidney failure resulting from amyloidosis. Hedges moved to Isla Vista in 1968 to attend UCSB and somehow never left, staying to become one of the longestserving religious leaders throughout Santa Barbara County and one of the most prominent civic leaders to emerge out of I.V. See independent .com/father-jon. Vaccination efforts in the county received a total donation of $300,000 from Direct Relief to the Community Health Centers of the Central Coast and the Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics. Clinics nationwide have received more than $10 million from Direct Relief for the vaccination effort alone, which will reach the 29 million people in the country who use community clinics, among them children, people living in poverty, those in rural areas, members of minority groups, and Medicaid recipients.

CITY Barney Melekian was sworn in by City Administrator Paul Casey as Santa Barbara’s interim police chief on 3/1. Chief Lori Luhnow retired on 2/13. Melekian will serve for the next six months or until a permanent successor is found. He brings with him 46 years of experience in law enforcement, 13 of which he served as police chief of Pasadena, where he also functioned as acting fire chief and interim city manager. More recently, however, he served nearly four years as undersheriff to Sheriff Bill Brown before becoming assistant county executive officer for public safety.

COURTS & CRIME Eladio Herrera, a 63-year-old North County resident, shot and killed his wife, 38-year-old Dolores Reyes, at their family home in Tanglewood on 2/28. When Sheriff’s deputies arrived, Herrera was found sitting in his car in front of the house. He told the deputies that he shot his wife, and he was immediately detained before the deputies entered the residence to perform life-saving measures on Reyes, which were ultimately unsuccessful. Herrera was booked at the Main Jail for murder and is being held on $2 million bail. Ricardo Sanchez, 38, was sentenced on 3/2 to 19 years and four months in prison for a high-speed chase on 1/17/19 that ended in a violent collision that seriously injured an elderly woman and her 10-month-old grandchild. Sanchez pleaded guilty to numerous felony counts and allegations, including assault with a deadly weapon (an automobile) on a peace officer, driving while under the influence of a controlled substance causing injury, evading peace officers in a motor vehicle with reckless disregard, fleeing the scene of a collision causing injury, and possession of n methamphetamine for sale.


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or 92-year-old Shirley Stockero, life is about to get “a little more back to normal.” Stockero is one of thousands who have gotten their COVID-19 vaccination through the Cottage Health community drive-thru vaccine clinic. On the first day it opened last January 15, just 500 vaccine doses were administered. Now, the clinic has steadily increased capacity, providing a total of more than 3,750 vaccine doses at the two clinic dates last week. It has plans to expand the clinic further to provide up to 2,000 vaccines per day, up to six days a week, when vaccine availability increases. “This is a big day for me,” Stockero said about getting her vaccine in the drive-thru line. “And I feel fine. I didn’t even feel it go into my arm. I’m just ready to have a little more normalcy.” But if doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals are needed for patient care in hospitals and doctors’ offices, who is keeping the vaccine operation running? Hundreds of volunteers are. There are over 850 volunteers helping to vaccinate the community, about 120 or so of whom are needed each day to keep the clinic running. “This is my 13th time volunteering because it’s been so much fun,” said Kate Ford, president of the Santa Barbara Unified school board, who spends her spare time volunteering in the pharmacy tent. Though Ford doesn’t have a background in medical work, there are still plenty of jobs for nonclinical volunteers. Ford is responsible for running the doses from the pharmacy tent and distributing them among the nine car lanes. “It’s really gratifying to feel I’m at least doing something to help and to hear the

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welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls Fillmore Austin Edith Ball, 1/21/2021 Goleta Lia Herrera Ramirez, 1/28/2021 Adelena Juliette Montes, 2/6/2021 Santa Barbara Riley Ann Dominguez, 1/7/2021 Hallie Kate Meyer, 1/15/2021 Gemma Rose Taylor, 1/23/2021 Luna Eve Bennett, 1/27/2021 Elora Jean McGinley, 1/27/2021 Santa Maria Jaelyn Faith Arias, 1/28/2021 Solvang Rhone Ryan Yost, 1/7/2021

Baby Boys Buellton Brick Pendry, 1/23/2021

Taylor | Santa Barbara

Carpinteria Ryan Thomas Crooks, 1/15/2021 Goleta Pierson Andre Leisure, 2/2/2021 Lompoc Refugio Ezekiel Garcia, 1/11/2021 Daniel Valentin Romo, 1/25/2021

“ I am thankful for my amazing health care team at Cottage, from the E.R. to Cottage Children’s Medical Center, for caring for me and making my signing day to Stanford an incredibly special event.”

While recovering from emergency surgery for appendicitis at Cottage Children’s Medical Center, Taylor signed her National Letter of Intent to play beach volleyball for Stanford University. Taylor’s health care team surprised her with Stanford-themed decorations for this momentous occasion. Taylor is looking forward to attending Stanford as a freshman this fall. Learn more at cottagehealth.org/childrens.

health e baby

Are you expecting or do you have an infant? Sign up for our free newsletter specific to your due date or your baby’s age. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

Cottage Children’s Medical Center cares for more than 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center, and eleven specialized outpatient clinics.

Support the Zoo

Santa Barbara Leon Jeffrey Workman, 1/14/2021 Timothy Martin Moran, 1/15/2021 Jackson Paul Geller, 1/16/2021 Jordy Alexander Perez, 1/18/2021 Mario Hernandez JR, 1/25/2021 Liam Hunter Kerstiens, 1/27/2021

STAY CONNECTED

Donate today at sbzoo.org

We’ve got a lot of mouths to feed! (805) 962-5339 • sbzoo.org Just off Cabrillo Blvd. at East Beach 8

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MARCH 4, 2021

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

FEB. 25-MAR. 4, 2021

S

anta Barbara County officials announced Tuesday they’re ready to step up enforcement efforts against the county’s “frequent flyer” offenders of COVID-19 restrictions. Kelly Hubbard, director of the Office of Emergency Management, told the Board of Supervisors that while communication and education will remain the tools agencies use most to bring rule-breaking businesses into compliance, she and her colleagues are “currently exploring actions against some of our more egregious and repeat offenders.” Restaurants, bars, and other food facilities are the source of copious public complaints, with 764 logged since last March, Hubbard explained. In most cases, a direct visit by staff is enough to convince a business to clean up their act. But some, she said, continue to flout health orders. The county has now issued formal “Notice to Comply” letters to 22 food facilities and conducted two administrative hearings. The Independent has requested the names of those 22 businesses. Gyms remain among the “major offenders,” Hubbard went on, with one “unfair competition” injunction filed thus far and

five more cases referred to the District Attorney’s Office for prosecution. The Independent has also asked for the names of these locations. Both requests were made by the paper on January 20 through the California Public Records Act. The county has so far failed to provide a complete response. Of the nearly 2,000 total complaints on the books, 43 percent originated from within the county’s unincorporated jurisdiction, Hubbard said, with 26 percent coming from the City of Santa Barbara. Only three administrative citations have been issued to individuals who broke quarantine rules. All three resided in Isla Vista. Supervisor Bob Nelson wondered if the Public Health Department had actively connected any of the county’s known outbreaks to the violators. Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso said they had not—it’s up to owners to self-report outbreaks at their businesses, she said—but the department could look into it. Nelson urged her to do so, noting, “It would be helpful to get people to comply to have a case that actually showed some connectivity, instead of a theoretical connectivity.” —Tyler Hayden

ENVIRONMENT

The San Marcos Foothill Stand-Off

T

he battle over the San Marcos foothills intensified last week when eight people were arrested for blocking two bulldozers leading to land where eight multimillion-dollar homes are slated to be built. This is the latest skirmish in a battle that began 15 years ago. The owners and developers of 377 acres of grazing land along State Route 154 agreed to preserve a good portion of it to sweeten the prospect of 15 large homes and five lower-priced condominiums in 2005. The condos and seven of the homes are complete. The eight remaining homes being contested are each priced at more than $3 million and situated on grasslands with sweeping coastal views. In the interim, the Trust for Public Land took over the 200 donated acres, and Channel Islands Restoration (CIR) has planted natives and mowed the turf with sheep. The new homes could affect sensitive plants and animals, especially if herbicides or rodenticides are used. A preliminary appraisal put the value at $5.5 million of two years ago, said Elihu Gevirtz, an ecologist with CIR, but the property’s developer, Chuck Lande, CEO of the Chadmar Group of Santa Monica, thought the market value was closer to $16 million. Since then, Santa Barbara real estate values have gone up, driven in part by wealthy COVID refugees seeking safer places to live. Lande now sets the value at $22 million, though he said he’d accept $18

million. The Save the San Marcos Foothills activists have raised only about $1.4 million to buy the site. Negotiations continued at press deadline. When four women, drawing on their Chumash ancestry, sang traditional prayers while sitting in front of the bulldozers, were arrested, placed in handcuffs, and taken to County Jail, Lande confirmed he’d asked that the charges be dropped. The project includes 16 acres as a passive park and hang-glider landings, county planner Nicole Lieu described. Nearly 100 acres surrounding the development site will remain open space, said Lande. Altogether, 89 percent, or 314 acres, will be preserved or left as open space. Chadmar spokesperson John Davies asked why, with such a protest showing up so late in the game, any landowner would ever make a deal like this in the future. The protesters cited the lack of a Chumash monitor on site for cultural resources and biological monitors for the nesting birds as the dozers approached. Lieu explained no work was planned, so no monitors were needed, though they would be present when construction began. About 50 activists have remained at the building site, saying they are guarding against a return of the heavy equipment, which a dozer driver said had been scheduled to scrape a three-quarters-of-a-mile, 28-foot-wide swath to begin a construction roadway on March 1. —Jean Yamamura

County Extends State Water Contract to 2085

STATE WATER

Supes Delay Decision on How and Where to Sell Surplus Water by Melinda Burns

CALI FOR N IA DEPARTMENT OF WATER

County Targets ‘Frequent Flyer’ COVID Offenders

CORONAVIRUS

T

he Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 on Tuesday to approve an extension of the county’s state water contract for 50 years, saying it would ultimately save ratepayers money. “The ability to stretch costs over time is a real benefit,” said Supervisor Gregg Hart, who represents the Goleta Valley and western Santa Barbara. Eight water agencies STATE WATER: Eight public water agencies from Carpinteria to Santa Maria in Santa Barbara County, import water from the California Aqueduct, shown here in Kern County. from the Carpinteria Valley to the City of Santa Santa Maria planned to sell water to develMaria, presently import water through the opers in Nipomo, just across the county California Aqueduct. By 2035, their rate- line, a move he suggested would increase payers will have paid off the $575 million urban sprawl. construction debt for the pipeline that the Nelson said the city was required to voters approved in 1991 on the heels of a six- sell water every year to Nipomo under a year drought; it extends from the aqueduct groundwater basin court settlement; both in Kern County to Lake Cachuma. communities share the same basin. In the But reconstruction and maintenance of past, the city has considered selling surplus the aqueduct system itself costs the state state water to Nipomo developers but has Department of Water Resources $350 mil- not yet done so. In an interview after the hearing, Nelson lion per year, and those costs will inevitably continue past 2035, Ray Stokes, execu- said that Santa Maria, the largest importer tive director of the Central Coast Water of state water in the county, has sometimes Authority (CCWA), representing the eight refused to supply water to new developagencies, told the board. The share of those ments in Orcutt unless the property is costs for Santa Barbara County ratepayers annexed to the city. If Santa Maria now after that year will likely be only about one wants something from the county, Nelson said, it should stop stifling growth in uninpercent, Stokes said. Board Chair Bob Nelson, who repre- corporated areas. sents Lompoc and Orcutt, cast the sole vote “They’re happy for us to continue to against the 50-year extension. be their bedroom community,” Nelson “It was not worth it to me to subject said. “I’d appreciate it if they were a better county taxpayers to that risk on their neighbor.” At Tuesday’s hearing, Joshua Haggmark, behalf,” he said after the hearing. “The county is the backstop for liability. What is the City of Santa Barbara’s acting Public the potential blank check that we’re giving Works director, told the board that his city wants the right to sell state water outside the state?” Carolee Krieger, a Montecito resident the county, not for development, but to and the founder of the California Water help other agencies replenish their depleted Impact Network (C-WIN), a watch- groundwater basins. The sales would be for dog group, told the board that a contract 10-20 years at a stretch; if another drought extension would simply pave the way for came along during that time, the city could the Department of Water Resources to buy back some of that water, Haggmark impose billions of dollars in new debt for said. “unwanted infrastructure” on state water Supervisors Williams and Joan Hartcontractors—including the cost of a pro- mann, who represents Isla Vista and the posed $16 billion tunnel through the Sac- Santa Ynez Valley, said that if the county ramento-San Joaquin River Delta. C-WIN allows local agencies to sell state water has sued the state to stop the contract outside the county, the proceeds should extension. be earmarked for conservation and the Also, on Tuesday, the board postponed development of potable recycled water for a decision on whether to allow temporary residents here. sales of surplus state water outside the “Without that, I’m a ‘No, no way,’ ” Wilcounty, pending further negotiations with liams said. “There are many examples of the CCWA. Currently, the water can be situations where it’s in the individual water leased but not sold outright. district’s short-term interests to sell water, Supervisor Das Williams, who repre- but I have never yet in 20 years seen that sents the South Coast from eastern Santa it is in the interest of the people of Santa Barbara to Carpinteria, asked whether Barbara County.” n INDEPENDENT.COM

MARCH 4, 2021

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pen on Now o ys! Sunda m o 3p 10am t

FEB. 25-MAR. 4, 2021

Judy Forshey

COU RTESY PHOTOS

CORONAVIRUS

Mike Martinez

Judith Brown

Loved Ones Lost

Putting Names and Faces to Santa Barbarans Killed by COVID-19 by Tyler Hayden he COVID-19 pandemic has taken a terrible toll on our Santa Barbara County communities — as of Wednesday, 416 of our neighbors are dead. In an ongoing series, the Independent is recognizing and remembering these individuals as people, not just statistics. To share a story of a lost friend or loved one, contact Senior Editor Tyler Hayden at tyler@independent.com.

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Spotlight a virtual interview series Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with Renaud Gonthier (Renaud’s Bakery & Bistro) and Richard Yates (Opal Restaurant & Bar) y Todam in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight ! at 3p

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Judy Forshey was 82 years old when she died January 30 of COVID-19 complications. She loved to dance, especially to country music. Though born in North Hollywood, Judy grew up in Santa Barbara, where she married Reid Forshey and raised four children. Neighbors would hear her familiar call to them at dinnertime: “Leslie, Lisa, Loren, and Lee!” Judy’s family remembered plenty of happy memories during frequent lake trips, where they’d play on the beach, fish, water ski, and ride dirt bikes. After the kids were grown, Judy and Reid traveled cross-country several times in their motor home. “Judy loved people and was quite social yet always content with a good book,” her family said. “She had a strong faith, cherishing good memories that made her feel happy. She always looked for the good in others and in her life.” Due to COVID restrictions, a celebration of life will be held at a later date.

MIKE MARTINEZ

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MARCH 4, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM

The eighth of 12 children born to immigrant parents, Mike Torres Martinez and his family moved to Carpinteria in 1942 as they followed the growing seasons. “He was a loving and caring husband, father, and grandfather,” his family said. “His character was defined by strong values of faith, hard work, honesty, responsibility, respect, being thankful, and getting along with others.” Mike died January 31 at Cottage Hospital from COVID-19. He was 95. During WWII, Mike joined the U.S. Army’s 14th Armored Division — nicknamed the Liberators—which fought across France and Central Europe and freed countless POWs, including those at the infamous Dachau concentration camp. Mike was wounded six days before the war ended and received a Purple Heart.

After he returned to Carpinteria, Mike met and married Ramona Gonzales, and together they raised two sons. He worked many jobs over the years, including for the Carpinteria Lemon Association, as a ranch foreman for Rancho Feliz, and later as a custodian at San Marcos High School. He retired after 22 years with the school district. To Mike, family always came first, they said. He happily spent his retirement side by side with Ramona, traveling, gardening, and visiting garage sales. “The family would like to thank the Cottage Hospital ER staff in Santa Barbara, his medical doctors at Sansum Clinic, and staff members of the GranVida Senior Living and Memory Care community,” they said. “A special thanks goes out to the emergency personnel of AMR and the CarpinteriaSummerland Fire District. You were always there when we needed you.”

JUDITH BROWN

“Judith impressed and charmed everyone she met,” her family said. “She was the kind of person to develop lifelong friendships after meeting someone on a plane or in a grocery store.” Born in Nashua, New Hampshire, in 1929, Judith Brown of Santa Barbara died this month of COVID-19. She is survived by her children Joshua, Ethan, Adam, and Elissa, and grandchildren Jessica, Tawnya, Bryson, Elise, Rebecca, and Leah. After college, Judith’s goal was to become an occupational therapist and move to Alaska, her family said. But life intervened when she met and fell in love with George Brown. The couple and their four kids moved to California in the early 1960s, when George became a professor of education at UC Santa Barbara. Judith accompanied George when he went to the Esalen Institute to study Gestalt therapy under founder Fritz Perls, who was so impressed by Judith that he trained her as well. This started Judith on a path of professional development that eventually included a PhD and a long career as a licensed marriage and family therapist. She also published three books. Athletic and active, Judith was a charter member of the Santa Barbara Tennis and Swim club and took Pilates classes well into n her eighties, her family said.


N IC K WELSH PHOTOS

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOMELESSNESS

SHANTYTOWNS: Along Pershing Park’s parking lot wall stretches a long line of tents, plastic tarps, brightly colored beach umbrellas, folding chairs, sleeping bags, and shopping carts. The dwelling below is one of many along the railroad paths and the city’s waterfront.

Will Tent Cities Be Part of S.B.’s Cityscape Forever? Effective Plans Exist to Bring People Without Housing off the Streets, but Stakeholders Need to Help by Nick Welsh arge Cafarelli is nothing if not outspoken. But for a few moments this Tuesday morning, words would fail her. In recent months, Cafarelli — a successful entrepreneur and the developer and owner of the Public Market in downtown Santa Barbara — has been greeting the dawn by visiting homeless encampments (as they are invariably called) along the railroad paths and the city’s waterfront. Tuesday, it was Pershing Park, where Babe Ruth famously hit a home run while barnstorming his way through Santa Barbara back in 1927. There would be no Sultan of Swat, however, this morning — no echoes of his booming bat or his cheering crowds — as the sun’s warmth started to battle the early chill. Along Pershing’s parking lot wall stretched a long line of tents, plastic tarps, brightly colored beach umbrellas, folding chairs, sleeping bags, and shopping carts, all crammed tightly and disjointedly together amid a cluster of old bicycles. Residents were beginning to stir, emerging from their tents. A woman with hair a color hovering between red and purple got out of the car where she’d been sleeping and began punching the air and swaying. It was early, but already a young man and woman — both wearing official-looking orange plastic vests and exuding an air of urgency — began their rounds. They were working with Doctors Without Walls. Two men in blue municipal-looking vests and wielding large shovels were hoisting mounds of debris by the camp sites into large plastic bags. “When you see this,” Cafarelli began, pointing to Pershing Park’s sprawling shantytown, “alongside places that rent for $1,000 a night …” She never managed to finish the sentence.

M

‘We are one of the richest nations in the world… And yet we have this.’ —Marge Cafarelli (pictured)

Although Cafarelli first moved to the South Coast in the late 1970s, she only recently began focusing on Santa Barbara’s ongoing dance with homelessness. In 2019, she returned from a trip to Africa both astonished and inspired by the intensity of poverty and grace she experienced there. She put the Public Market up for sale and became passionately

engaged with SB ACT, a faith-inspired nonprofit seeking to coordinate efforts of the 45 nonprofits currently trying to help people without housing. To that end, SB ACT’s organizers, Jeff Shaffer, Barbara Anderson, and Rick Sander, have reached out to neighborhood residents, businesspeople, and property owners — stakeholders frequently most impacted and aggrieved by homelessness — in hopes of enlisting them in constructive efforts to get people off the streets. Cafarelli has participated in many Zoom meetings trying to hash out what are called regional action plans, or RAPs for short. At one, she broke down and cried while describing the conditions under which human beings were living along the railroad tracks. “We are the richest nation in the world” and one of the richest counties in the country, she said. “And yet we have this,” pointing to the tent city billowing and flapping at Pershing Park.  The Zoom sessions have proved long on talk and short of action, leaving Cafarelli — a very direct, getthings-done person — impatient and frustrated. Simply wishing homeless people weren’t here, she noted, is neither an effective public policy nor humane. Much of her ire, however, is directed at local government. “Where is the leadership?” she asks. Homelessness, she says, is “Santa Barbara’s dirty little secret.” Except, of course, everyone knows about it. Last week, the county supervisors spent about three hours engaged in a massive institutional brain dump on the issue, detailing all the things that the county is currently doing and all the things that still desperately need to be done. Both, it turns out, are a lot. Where homelessness is concerned, the glass is simultaneously half full and half empty. First, the bad news. In the past two years, the number of homeless people in Santa Barbara County has increased from 1,803 to 2,195. The number living in some form of shelter has dropped significantly — mostly because of COVID — from 670 to 407. In the City of Santa Barbara, 43 percent of the homeless are living in their vehicles. The number of unsheltered individuals connecting with county agencies seeking service jumped by about 1,200. The number of children unhoused increased by about 150. With shelters either shut down or restricted, the number of people living in outdoor camps has grown astronomically, almost doubling in four years to 437 in 2020. County fire officials reported having to put out three fires at encampments each month. Many other calls to service involved drug overdoses and emergency medical treatment. So concerned are fire officials that they’ve taken to conducting inspections of these campgrounds, 21 of them last year.

Based on guidelines issued by the Center for Disease Control, these camps are not to be disturbed during the pandemic. But in Isla Vista, four parks were deemed fire hazards and public health risks and effectively shut down as campsites. In their place, a clustered community of 20 prefab homes made by Pallet were installed at a cost of $1 million for six months of supervised management. Whether the houses will be dismantled on June 30 is not known.

The good news is that in 2020, 585 homeless individuals were actually transitioned from the streets into permanent housing. Last year, 55 new units of homeless housing was either built or is nearing completion. Project Roomkey, an emergency program to house medically fragile people in hotel rooms, provided 20,698 bed-nights of respite, numbers expected to increase as the age restrictions just dropped from 65 to 55. Better yet, reimbursements for participating hotels have gotten more enticing. Even the camp sites — home to some of the most “service-resistant individuals” — has witnessed a surge in “successful exits.” These successes, Supervisor Gregg Hart exclaimed, should be celebrated. The public needs to appreciate, he said, that progress is actually being made. That’s especially true if — as is widely rumored — Santa Barbara voters could soon be voting on a bed tax or sales tax to fund homeless services. In 2020, more than $42 million was spent on various homeless relief efforts by a myriad of Santa Barbara government agencies and nonprofits combined. Of that, the County of Santa Barbara accounted for nearly $20 million. By any reckoning, these are big numbers. The challenge is that much of this money came in the form of onetime funding from state or federal grants. Typically, these grants come with a mass of restrictions and with tight use-it-or-lose-it deadlines. In other words, it does not qualify as a reliable funding source needed to sustain the ongoing — and expensive — grind required to do effective homeless outreach, let alone build the permanent supportive housing everyone agrees is necessary for such programs to work. With the loss of state redevelopment dollars — that

INDEPENDENT.COM

Cont’d on p. 12 >

MARCH 4, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Tent Cities Cont’d from p. 11 formerly funded such efforts—city and county governments find themselves increasingly forced to underwrite the cost of such programs. Often, that translates into local tax measures. Bottom line, the work of getting people off the streets is labor-intensive. The words “plodding” and “slow-slog” got tossed around, and for good reason. Typically, it takes 14 contacts for an outreach worker to convince someone to agree to accept help. Building trust, it turns out, cannot be rushed. Once a person signs on as a client, it takes several months to get them “document ready” and another 90-120 days to get a client housing somewhere. Keeping most clients in housing requires an infusion of services as well. Jeff Shaffer of SB ACT reported that one outreach program targeting a twoblock stretch of State Street was able to help a quarter of chronically homeless people living on the street to find housing within 60 days. Similar outcomes, he said, can be achieved along the waterfront, Milpas Street, Alameda Park, and West Beach. “We know what to do,” he said. “We know how to do it. We don’t need a KEEPING 10-year plan.” Santa Barbara Beautiful FOR 55 YEARS With his 15 years’ experience of working with people without housing, Shaffer

Seeing Green over Bikes

I

n Santa Barbara, the proverbial yellow brick road is now being painted a loud and bright green — at least down the middle of the State Street Promenade — to alert cyclists to hew to the middle of the street and to steer safely clear from pedestrians and dog walkers. The wide green stripes will not be painted down the entire stretch of street but in stutter-step visual sequences starting in each intersection and then ceasing, only to start again at the next intersection. A cyclist on the newly painted State Street Promenade bike lane That same garish green, however, was more than most members of they described as the “goofy” aesthetics of the city’s Historic Landmarks Commission the proposed plan. But all were offended (HLC) could take when evaluating the city’s by what they decried as a take-it-or-leave-it proposal to run a fat wad of green paint attitude by the city planning staff, which down the middle of Sola Street as part of they objected left no room for modification the hard-fought battle to create a new safe or design tweakage. The HLC denial of the Sola Street bikecycling route connecting the city’s Eastside way—an integral component of the city’s and Westside. That, it should be acknowledged, was new bicycle master plan approved by only one of the many problems the HLC the council four years ago—will now be had with what’s now described as the pro- appealed to the City Council later this month. City transportation planners insist their posed Sola Street Paseo, which will require some motorists to dog-leg off of Sola Street proposal is the plan the council approved at certain intersections. Some HLC mem- and that the HLC is seeking to make changes bers objected to any change to the city’s his- beyond its purview and jurisdiction. toric grid. Others objected more to what —Nick Welsh

enjoys rare credibility both with service providers and members of the business community. Yet even Shaffer is growing somewhat panicked by how few stakeholders are accepting the need for the programmatic infrastructure outlined in his multiple RAPs. “We’ve been really listening to their concerns for a while now,” he said. “Defecation, theft, vandalism. But now we need them to step up and show us some love.” Shaffer and SB ACT are hoping to establish “navigation centers” in every district in the city. Hotel owners need to offer rooms. Owners of parking lots need to participate in the highly acclaimed Safe Parking program. “We are on the brink of a lot of businesses having to close,” he said. “What happens when their employees lose their job. Hundreds of new folks could find themselves suddenly homeless.” Marge Cafarelli doesn’t need any convincing. She’s all on board with the SB ACT game plan. Whether that’s good enough, time will tell. “I don’t have all the answers,” Cafarelli said, gazing out at Pershing Park. “I just know animals live better than these people. And that’s not okay.”

Katherine Swartz contributed reporting to this story.

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200 N La Cumbre Road Development 200 N La Cumbre Road Development Virtual Community Outreach Mee=ng

OPINIONS

STEVE SACK / THE MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE

Letters

Virtual Community The Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara Outreach cordially invites all community Meeting

members to a virtual outreach mee;ng regarding the redevelopment of 200 North La Cumbre Road into an affordable apartment complex for families.

The Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara

Housing Authority staff and our collabora;ng organiza;ons, including architectural firm cordially all community members Cearnal Collec;ve, will be available to provideinvites informa;on about the project, answer to a virtual outreach meeting regarding the redevelopment ques;ons, and receive feedback.

of 200 North La Cumbre Road into an affordable apartment complex for families. Date: Thursday, March 11, 2021 Time: 5:30 PM Housing Authority staff and our collaborating Loca,on: Zoom organizations, including architectural firm Cearnal Collective, will be available to provide Please register using one of the following links or byabout scanning theproject, QR code below: information the answer questions, and receive feedback. hOps://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_9zcH6QZLRKqR6roaZKcQZA

To Be Homeless

I

look to the left as I take the Garden Street offramp to downtown and wonder: Is it just me, or is there any way for our city to help these unfortunate people find housing (and health, and sense of purpose), and to restore this little zone back to nature? The city is taking in a lot of funding from the cannabis industry. There must be a way. It may be a gradual path, but to ignore it allows it to grow out of control. Do we want to become like L.A.? Santa Barbara must be more humane than this.

—LeeAnn Morgan, S.B.

COVID Challenge

T

he Santa Barbara Independent, along with the rest of our major media, is saturating the news with an incorrect COVID narrative. It is also suppressing any alternative views that differ from that narrative. With a little hindsight, we can now say that the response to the situation has been a disaster to the nation as well as the rest of the world. The official story, controlled by industry, is that there will be a magic bullet in the form of a vaccine. And it seems that a great majority of folks believe in it. There are too many reasons to go into how and why the current medical paradigm is flawed, as it would take up too much space for a letter. So, in conclusion, the vaccine is a scam that appeals to our false sense of security. And when the virus naturally burns itself out by this summer, the vaccine will get the credit. —Steven Fields, S.B.

Santa Barbara County Public Health replies: For many who may question if COVID-19 is real, it is unfortunate that we have learned that it is real through the deaths of many people in our community. Misinformation or disbelief in the impact of the virus costs lives. Without correct information, the virus will continue to spread in our community, taking even more lives, keeping our children out of school, impacting our businesses, preventing sports in our community, and keeping our community from reopening. We have global data from scientists and medical doctors that tell us the virus is very real, in addition to the deaths being experienced locally and globally.

Date: Thursday, March 11, 2021 Time: 5:30 PM Location: Zoom shorturl.at/fvFY8

We look forward to having a community that is safely vaccinated against the virus and thank every single community member who has played a key If you have anytested, ques;ons regarding this mee;ng, please contact Housing Authority role in practicing safety guidelines, getting Administra;ve Specialist Celia Wright at Cwright@hacsb.org. and now getting vaccinated, as measures to move us If you have any questions regarding this meeting, forward and away from the virus. We look forward We look forward to hearing your feedback. please contact Housing Authority Administrative to the coming months when the virus is gone, our community reopens, and the lives of our loved ones Specialist Celia Wright at Cwright@hacsb.org. are no longer at risk from this disease.

‘Cat’ Crimes

We look forward to hearing your feedback.

B

uellton is a quiet suburban bedroom community. Recently, there have been more breakins and crime, including stealing a vehicle’s catalytic converter. Catalytic converters (also known as “cats”) are being stolen because there are certain metals inside of the cats that are valuable. Palladium, one of the metals, goes for almost $2,500 an ounce. Cats also contain platinum, rhodium, and more. Known as rare metals, they help the cat to catalyze the oxidation of gases. As prices rise, so do thefts. It is the same for copper wire—if prices go up, so do wire thefts from empty or abandoned buildings. This information should be shared to warn readers to be vigilant. Ring cameras work really well if your car is parked within detection range. Some people don’t lock their cars. The age of innocence is over. No one cares more about you than you. —Michael Schlags, Santa Ynez Valley

Ego as Anesthetic

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go is the anesthetic that dulls the pain of stupidity, but unfortunately, only for the Angry Poodle Barbecue. Writer Nick Welsh has demeaned himself by insultingly disparaging a person who cannot defend himself from the grave. He had plenty of time to criticize Congressmember Lagomarsino while he was alive but just had to throw another shovel of dirt at his obituary. No respect was given to his family and no respect should be shown to Welsh by his Independent publisher. The Independent, on your behalf, owes Mr. Lagomarsino’s family an apology. I wonder how he will be remembered? Oh, I know, how about, “What he lacked in common decency, he —J.W. Burk, S.B. made up for in self-esteem.”

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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ORGANIZED CHAOS

Staff spring to action as a case becomes critical.

A COVID-19 patient is hoisted onto a new bed to be intubated.

INSIDE MARIAN REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER’S

COVID ICU BY DANIEL DREIFUSS AND TYLER HAYDEN

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arch 15 will mark one year to the day since the first case of COVID-19 was

detected in Santa Barbara County. In that time, we have witnessed our region suffer and struggle but also bear down and carry on with incredible resilience. We have not, however, been able to see firsthand the work of those truly in the trenches, the ICU doctors and nurses who day in and day out burn the candle at both ends to treat the sickest among us. Until now. For three hours in mid-February, Marian Regional Medical Center, an award-winning hospital located in the City of Santa Maria, where 10,777 cases have claimed the lives of 148 residents, granted Independent staff photographer Daniel Dreifuss unprecedented access to their COVID ICU wing.

A doctor, nurses, and a respiratory therapist discuss a patient outside their room. 14

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Dreifuss shadowed staff as they pushed through another long shift of critical care. He captured their movements — quick dashes down the hall, tender moments of silence with sedated patients — and heard their thoughts of trepidation, determination, and hope. He watched as a man was intubated, a brutal but necessary procedure previously performed once or twice a month and now done multiple times every day. This collection of images is a testament to the unrelenting pressures and continued fortitude of medical staff everywhere. They aren’t meant to shock but to reflect the true reality of what happens when COVID-19 brings a person to the brink of death. They are also a reminder that, despite the lifting of some restrictions, the virus continues to live and breathe in Santa Barbara County. Diligence remains the name of the game. A few days after his visit to Marian, Dreifuss spoke about what he experienced and what he learned.

Registered Nurse Lois McKinley looks in on one of her patients.


Dr. Zach Reagle performs an intubation.

Registered Nurse John Shade gets ready to assist.

You visited the ICU just as the most recent surge was starting to let up. What was the energy like in there? How were the staff feeling? There was still definitely a sense of urgency. I’m trying to find the right way to describe it… I would say there was hope but also discouragement at the same time, because the COVID patients kept coming and the staff were just exhausted. A nurse who’d been working there for 30 years said she never thought she’d see something like this. One doctor had to come in at 6 a.m. on his day off to help out. I was there for only a couple of hours and was tired by the end. They’ve been doing this for a year. What happened in those few hours? Were there spikes in activity, or was it more of a steady hum? I would say it was more like a steady, high hum. One nurse described it perfectly as “organized chaos.” Everybody has their job, and they do it really well to make sure the next person has exactly what they need to do their job — from the nurse who preps patients for intubation to the anesthesiologist who calculates how much of a sedation drug to give to the respiratory therapists who consult with the doctors to the doctor who checks the patients’ lungs, and so on. Not to mention the IT staff who make sure the machines are working right and the cleaning crews who prep and sterilize everything. It’s definitely a team effort. It’s constant communication, and there’s always something happening. The pressure is unbelievable. Plus, every patient is different. This person might be diabetic; that one might have a heart problem. To be able to do that kind of work on a consistent basis at such a high level, well, I think it’s quite amazing. Let’s back up a little bit. ICUs are highly restricted places, especially during COVID. How were you able to get access? Has Cottage or anyone else allowed you to document what’s actually happening inside their facilities? No. Cottage won’t even let us on the property. They got mad when we tried to photograph a delivery of donated wine. When I talked to Marian’s media person, I explained to her that the Independent thought it was really important to show what the doctors and nurses are doing and how they’re literally working around the clock. I said we wanted to help the public understand how serious this virus still is and how we’re not out of the woods yet. The New York Times wanted to use some of the images too. One actually recently appeared on their front page. Marian had a few concerns about privacy and HIPAA, so we talked through them. They wanted to make sure I didn’t identify any patients. Of course I agreed to that.

Registered Nurse Bethany London puts on a protective shield before entering a patient’s room. Below, she updates patient information.

Did you have any personal reservations about the assignment? Yeah, because family members aren’t allowed in the ICU, and I was worried they’d be upset that a media photographer was given access over them. But I talked to a photographer friend of mine who spent several days in the ICU up in Salinas. One of the people he photographed passed away, and he posted the note that he got from the family, which thanked him for his coverage and said they were glad their loved one could help tell the story. That made me feel a little better.

CONTINUED ¢

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Staff monitor the intubated patient.

A doctor explained to me how they would look for small wins, like taking someone off a ventilator or seeing their status improve. They would remember those moments and try to keep moving forward. 16

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Respiratory Therapist Jim Wahlig checks on a COVID-19 patient.

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COVER STORY Were you concerned about getting infected? Was your wife? My wife was really supportive of the project, and she knows that I try to be safe when I go out and shoot. She also recognized the importance of going in there and documenting this. I had on full PPE and didn’t actually enter patients’ rooms. They were sealed off. I also had a doctor with me the whole time to make sure I didn’t compromise my safety or anyone else’s. I got tested a couple days later, which came back negative, and then again the next week. I’ve been trying to get tested every week. You’ve been in war zones and other hairy situations. How did this experience compare? It’s difficult in any situation to watch sick people or people dying. But this wasn’t like a war zone, where I have to be diligent and check behind me all the time. And it wasn’t like a fire or natural disaster, where I also have to be on my toes and constantly aware of my movements. In this situation, I concentrated a lot more on everybody else. I felt more focused on what they were doing instead of what I was doing. There were some moments that were just really sad, though. One nurse said to me, “Last week, we had a day where five people died.” That was hard on everyone, she said. It made me stop and think about my grandparents and family members, and it was like, “This is a real thing. This can happen to anyone.” For instance, my sister got it and was very sick. She recovered, but she’s in the category of underlying conditions, so it could have gotten real bad real fast. Did anything surprise you? It was a little shocking to watch one of the nurses talk to the family of a sedated patient on an iPad. It was pretty surreal. Watching someone being intubated was intense, too. I’ve seen it on TV shows and stuff, but it’s a lot different in real life…. The doctors said they’ve gone from performing a couple of them a month to sometimes multiple a day.

Dr. Barry Feldman interacts with a patient.

Were there any positive moments? A doctor explained to me how they would look for small wins, like taking someone off a ventilator or seeing their status improve. They would remember those moments and try to keep moving forward. One of the nurses, Lois McKinley, just had so much care, so much honor being there and treating patients. She’s the one in the picture holding the patient’s hand. That person was sedated on a ventilator. When she came out of the room, she turned the lights off and just stood outside and watched them for a minute before speaking with the doctor. I mean, she really cared about each individual patient. I don’t want to speak for her, but seeing some of her patients die — that has to take a toll on her. But she’s doing everything she can. Dr. Barry Feldman was the one who was there on his day off. He was really concerned about the recent spike. I felt like he knew everything about each patient, and he seemed to have a good sense of everything that was going on. He stood out to me as someone who was just very passionate and very knowledgeable and doing everything he could to keep everyone alive, and hopefully recover. Some of these images are hard to look at. Why is it so important for people to see them? For one, I think there’s still a lot of people who still don’t take COVID seriously enough. There’s a lot of people who say, “Oh well, I might get minor symptoms, but I’ll be okay.” But I saw patients in the ICU who were normal and healthy before they went in and now they’re fighting for their lives on a ventilator. I also think it’s important to recognize that it’s selfish to not take it seriously. “I don’t have to wear a mask, I can go party with people I don’t know, yada, yada.” There are repercussions. It’s not just about you. If you get sick, it affects these people who are working in these hospitals and are burned out. They’re working 12-hour shifts and then have to go home to their family or partner and put on a happy face and try to go to sleep. Day in and day out. I honestly don’t feel like we give them enough credit. And I want people to see — to really see — what they go through. n

At left, a respiratory therapist monitors his patient; at right, a registered nurse inserts a PICC line. INDEPENDENT.COM

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obituaries Nathaniel Michael Dovgin 10/12/1976 - 3/3/2011

We’ve loved you and missed you every day for the past ten years. You are forever in our hearts. Adriana, Mateo and Natalia

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com ask for. His love for his two sons and wife was abundant. He could not have loved his little brother more and he so adored his two sister. We were all blessed to have him in our lives and will miss him terribly. Mark was an avid golfer which started in his young teens and continued through his adult life. A precious limb has fallen from the family tree. Mark will be missed every day by all who loved him. A private memorial service will be held once the Covid-19 has subsided.

Emilie McMinn Sears 2/23/1932 - 2/6/2021

Mark Sanford

8/27/1955 - 1/9/2021

Mark Sanford passed away peacefully at Ventura Memorial Hospital on January 9,2021. Mark was first born to Nick and Claire Sanford at Travis Air Force base in California. Mark is survived by his two sons, Connor and Kirby, his wife Denise and Parents Nick and Claire. He also leaves behind his devoted brother Eric and sisters Colleen and Laura. Included in this loss are many cousins, nieces, nephews, aunts and many longtime friends and business associates. Mark spent his school days in the San Fernando Valley which included Garden Grove Elementary, Northridge Junior High School and Cleveland High School. He graduated from California State University Northridge with a degree in Psychology. Soon after Graduation from College, Mark and his wife Denise moved to Santa Barbara the home of his Parents, Nick and Claire. Soon after settling in Santa Barbara, Mark began his career in the Loan Mortgage business primarily with McAdams Financial for about 24 years. Mark was the most loving caring son any parent could 18

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Emilie McMinn Sears (née Martin) was born in McGill, Nevada on February 23, 1932. She passed away peacefully on February 6, 2021 in San Diego, CA. Emilie’s family settled in Santa Barbara in 1946, where her parents James and Mary Martin owned the Busy Bee Cafe on State Street, and were pillars of the Greek Orthodox Community. Emilie attended SBHS where she served as Drum Majorette and, along with her brother Nick, built lifelong friendships. A highly accomplished businesswoman, Emilie’s uniqueness of character allowed her to flourish in several different careers, including in retail fashion merchandising and management (Macy’s, Kimo’s Polynesian Shop, and Diane’s in La Cumbre Plaza). Along with her first husband, Brooklyn Dodger Pitcher, Glenn McMinn, she traveled extensively to Triple A Ballparks, where they counted among their friends, Sparky Anderson, Sandy Koufax, and Joe Amalfitano. As many Santa Barbarans will remember, Emilie’s magnetic personality and professionalism proved to be the perfect match for a career in Real Estate. She listed and sold count-

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less high end properties throughout Santa Barbara and Montecito, with Sunset Company, Coldwell Banker, Village Properties, and Horizon Real Estate, which she co-owned with her business partner Sondra Buschman. In the 1990s, Emilie reconnected with Sondra’s brother, Jack Sears, whom she had known for many years, and would prove to be the love of her life. In 1998, Emilie and Jack traveled to the island of Rhodes, Greece, and were married by Emilie’s great uncle, a Greek Orthodox Priest. Alex Haimanis, longtime bartender at Harry’s Plaza Cafe served as the best man in their intimate ceremony. Upon their return, Jack and Emilie settled further into their roles as the proprietors of the Cafel Del Sol at the SB Bird Refuge. “The Cafe” was a favorite spot among locals and tourists alike, and as Emilie went from table to table greeting customers, Jack handled the day to day operations, and relished the opportunity to let her shine. Thanksgiving soon became a special time for family and customers alike, when in the early 2000’s, Jack and Emilie began hosting a Thanksgiving Day Feast that they provided completely free of charge to those who would otherwise be without family (including The Cafe’s famous margaritas!). Emilie and Jack’s generosity was limitless, and their kindness was felt by all who experienced this special era at the Cafe Del Sol. In their later years, Emile and Jack relocated to San DIego to live with Jack’s sister Sondra. Jack Sears passed away in January 2019. May his memory be eternal. Emilie’s memory will live on through the many people whose lives she touched. She leaves behind her nieces Nikki Martin Van Winkle and Jamie Chamberlin, who was also her God-daughter and whom she helped raise. She will always be remembered by her sister Artis Chamberlin Pattison, and her brother Ted Martin and his wife Cynthia. May her memory be eternal! Rest in Peace dear Emilie, we will miss you always.

John Michael Craviotto 11/22/1956 - 1/17/2021

John Michael Craviotto went to be with the Lord on January 17th, 2021. He passed away peacefully at home surrounded by loved ones following a recurrence of brain cancer. He was gone too soon at 64. John’s courage, love for others and zest for life was never more apparent than during the last two years. He refused to let a diagnosis define who he was or how he lived. John was born to Daniel and Carmen Craviotto in Santa Barbara. ‘Johnny,’ as he would be known to family and friends, had a twinkle in his eyes and a grin on his face from the beginning. The joyous spirit and mischievous sense of humor that God blessed him with would be a hallmark of who he was for the rest of his life. John’s early school years were spent at Harding School and Vieja Valley Elementary School. He graduated from San Marcos High School (class of 1974), where he was a 3-sport athlete in football, wrestling and baseball. He was the team captain of the football team his senior year of high school. He attended and played baseball and football at Santa Barbara City College, played baseball at UCSB for a year, and graduated from California Lutheran College, where he also played baseball and was the captain of the football team. Forever a loyal Royal & Kingsman, he cherished the lifelong friendships forged with his football and baseball buddies. In 1982, John began chiropractic school where he met, fell in love with and married Lori Allison Grace. Together, they had Kristin, Michael, and Brianna. John was a devoted husband and a wonderful father and he loved being a grandfather to the newest additions to the family tree. Following graduation from

Western States Chiropractic College in Portland, Oregon in 1986, John was an associate in Ashland, Oregon prior to returning to Santa Barbara to begin practice in 1988. He found great joy and fulfillment in caring for his patients while serving the Santa Barbara community for over 30 years. In addition to work, John and Lori were involved with their local church community and enjoyed hosting home groups and coming alongside the poor in Haiti and Mexico. John also loved any type of travel, woodworking, welding and spending time with his family. On any given summer Saturday, he and Lori could be found at the beach, biking around Santa Barbara, BBQing tri-tip, or playing cribbage and enjoying a good glass of wine with friends and family. John was a man of integrity who deeply loved God, his family, and friends. It was very important to him to finish the race well, and he felt that “to live is Christ and to die is gain” (Phil. 1:19-23). His positivity, sense of humor, and courage in his final months was a testament to all who witnessed it. John is preceded in death by his father Daniel Craviotto. He will be sorely missed by all those he leaves behind including his wife, Lori Craviotto, his children, Kristin and Adam Rupert, Michael and Kate Craviotto, and Brianna Craviotto, his grandchildren Grace, Olive, Jonathan and Sylvia, his mother, Carmen Craviotto, and his siblings, Daniel Craviotto, Cathleen Craviotto, Eileen Craviotto and their spouses, his in-laws and his many nieces, nephews and cousins. John’s family is humbled and incredibly grateful to all the friends and family who have supported them during the last few weeks. There will be an outdoor celebration of his life in June. In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the Haitian community engagement organization dear to John and Lori at www.COFHED.org, or COFHED, PO Box 4094, St. Paul, MN 55104 or San Marcos Alumni Foundation (in memory of John Craviotto-in the memo line) 4957 Yaple Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA. 93111.


obituaries Kenneth K. Kuether 10/13/1934 - 2/23/2021

Kenneth K. Kuether was born October 13, 1934 in Sheboygan, Wisconsin and sadly passed away February 23, 2021 at the age of 86 at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, California. Ken was born on his family’s farmstead in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. He was the last of four children born to Albert W. and Ella Zimbal Kuether. He was preceded in death by his three siblings; Milton, Ethel and Albert Kuether. Ken was a devoted husband to his wife Carol, they were happily married for two months short of 61 years. He was a very proud father of his five daughters, nine grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Ken and Carol’s children and families include: ~Karin Montoya and husband Bobby Montoya of Lompoc, CA and their two daughters Davia McNamara and husband Jesse McNamara and their three children Liam, Fiona and Edwin and daughter Brianna Montoya. ~Laura Siegel Greco and husband Steve Greco of Lompoc, CA and Laura’s three daughters Brittany Siegel, Ashlee Siegel and Tiffany Siegel. ~Shelly Barton and husband Scott Barton of Vandenberg Village, CA and their three children Grace Barton, Kenny Barton and Hanna Barton. ~Lisa Hosseinpour and husband Mohammad Hosseinpour of Westlake Village, CA and their daughter Ella Hosseinpour. ~Kelly Gowing and husband Mark Gowing of Lompoc, CA. As a youngster Ken grew up on his family’s farm in Sheboygan, WI and graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from Lawrence University in Appleton, WI. He then went on to serve in the United States Air Force from 1956-1959. He was promoted to 1st Lt. and served one year

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com as an Interceptor Controller in Morocco, Africa. He subsequently joined the AF Reserve in Milwaukee, WI, attained the rank of Captain and flew C119s. After service, Ken joined AC Spark Plug, Division of General Motors, in Milwaukee, in 1959 and worked on Thor, Titan II, and Titan III Missile Programs. Ken married the love of his life, Carol, on April 30, 1960 in Sheboygan. They moved to New Berlin, a suburb of Milwaukee and by 1970 he was the proud father of their five girls. He enjoyed his career as an engineer and in 1973 he was transferred to the General Motors branch Delco Electronics in Goleta, CA.. Here he continued to work on Titan III and Titan IV and as a Program Manager for Buick, Oldsmobile, Cadillac and Motor Sports for Corvettes. In 1992 Ken was offered early retirement and with Carol by his side every step of the way, they were able to enjoy so much that life has to offer. Since their move to California in 1973 they were devoted parishioners at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church in Goleta where he served as an Usher for close to 20 years. It was here that he met Monsignor Steven Downes. “Father Steve” was a special mentor for Ken in regards to his faith. He was there for family weddings, baptisms, illnesses and became a very sincere, close friend; visiting Ken at home during the last month of his life. Another important figure for Ken was Rev. Monsignor Jon Majarucon. Over the last 9 years they built a special friendship, they just got each other and filled their time with laughter, life stories and a love for big families. He was also an active member of the Knights of Columbus Council 5300 since joining in 1980 and held a dozen positions leading to the highest honor of Grand Knight in 1991-92. As well, he enjoyed his involvement with the Santa Barbara Elks Lodge 613 and the SB Elks Caravaneers where he served in five different offices over the years, culminating as Wagon Master in 2008. Ken believed in helping out, giving back and volunteering and wanted to teach his girls by example. Weekly church attendance and participation year after year from the mid-70’s to the early 2000’s, the Kuether’s,

with Ken as the lead, would happily chip in to help with Fun-A-Rama, Oktoberfest, the Fiesta Pepsi Booth, Spaghetti Dinners, and picnics at both St. Raphaels and the Elks. It was through these volunteer opportunities that so many memories and friendships were made and where life lessons were taught. Ken was dependable, loyal and a hard worker. He was an avid Green Bay Packer and Chicago Cub fan; and happy tears were plentiful in 2016 when he witnessed the Cubs win the World Series. Ken enjoyed traveling and with Carol as his co-pilot they enjoyed a couple cruises, a trip to Germany, attending Air Force reunions throughout the US and year after year driving across country to Wisconsin. Back in the day Ken enjoyed bowling, golfing, RVing and owning fantasy baseball teams. He loved to watch a fly over and never missed a missile launch from Vandenberg AFB. He challenged his mind with daily crossword puzzles, weekly bridge games with friends and had a love for suduko. Ken and Carol always had dogs in their lives but for the last 14 years their shih-tzu Sophie held a special place in his heart. Ken was a people person. He struck up conversations with everyone he encountered. He was a legendary joke teller, he laughed a lot and always made those around him feel included and important. He had so many lifelong friends from all facets of his life. His five girls often told him that he and their mom had a busier social life than all five of them combined. If you were lucky enough to know Ken then you should think of him and smile. He was an honest man who loved his family deeply, treasured his friends and had an amazing life. He will be greatly missed by so many. Services will be announced at a later date.

Richard Everett French 8/5/1944 - 2/19/2021

Richard Everett French, 76, of Los Osos California, passed away peacefully at home into the arms of his loving Lord with his beloved wife by his side. Dick was born in Austin, Minnesota and came to California when he was 2 years old. He grew up in Santa Barbara, across the street from where the new Municipal Golf Course was being built. He hung out there, earned some change as a caddy, and then picked up the game of golf, which became a life-long passion. Dick attended San Marcos high school where he met his high school sweet heart Linda Barnes. They graduated together in 1963 and were married 55 years. Dick is survived by his wife, Linda; sister Joanne Glaves of Soldotna Alaska; his two sons, Kevin French, wife Shannon, children Cameron, Caleb, and Chaley of Omaha, Nebraska and Darrell French, daughter Kara of Black Hawk, South Dakota; two sistersin-law, Leslee Johnson of Santa Barbara and Louann Barnes of Figueroa Mountain California and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He was a loving father and a proud grandfather known as “Pops” to all. Dick is preceded in death by his parents, Everett and Marcella French and his brother, Robert French. Dick served in the United States Air Force and was very patriotic and supportive of his fellow veterans. He returned to Santa Barbara, then went to PGA school and became an assistant golf professional at the newly formed Sandpiper Golf Course. He later went to The Valley Club golf course in Montecito and became the head golf professional. In 1978 he moved his family to Ventura where he became an active member of the First United MethodINDEPENDENT.COM

ist church, East-End Lions club, and the Retired Business Men’s club. He dedicated many years of his life helping others and serving in the beloved Emmaus Community. After retiring from professional golf Dick worked at Vulcan Materials for 25 years in sales and dispatch, retiring in 2005. He had a strong work ethic and an undeniable competitive spirit that came alive while watching a good football game or college baseball and was able to enjoy his passion for golf up until his final years. Dick and Linda traveled in their 5th wheel all over the USA always meandering through Nebraska and South Dakota to see their family on their way home. They explored out-of-the-way places, played golf along the way, and watched spring training baseball games. One of their favorite memories was a mission trip to St. Lawrence Island where they visited Native relatives that were raised by Linda’s grandparents and Nome Alaska where they worked on several service projects at KICY Christian Radio Station and Nome Community Methodist church. They then took two months and traveled via ferry down though Alaska visiting Dick’s sister and family in Soldotna. His family and friends knew him as a gentle, mild-mannered, and a quiet, kind man who always put other’s needs before his own and whose actions spoke louder than his words. He will be remembered for his caring heart, loving embrace, and unconditional love. A Celebration of Life service will be announced in the future to honor a life well lived. The family wishes to thank their faith families at El Morro Nazarene church in Los Osos and First United Methodist church in Ventura California, the team at Wilshire Hospice and the many doctors who cared for him, their friends at Daisy Hill Estates in Los Osos and the many other friends who reached out during this difficult time. Memorial donations may be made in honor of Dick French to the El Morro Nazarene Church, 1480 Santa Ysabel, Los Osos, CA 93402.

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obituaries Vidal Torres

4/28/1923 - 2/17/2021

Vidal Torres passed away peacefully in his home on Wednesday, February 17,2021. Vidal was born in Santa Barbara on April 28,1923 the second of eight sibling born to Jesus and Maria Leon Torres. Vidal attended local schools and graduated with the Santa Barbara High School class of 1942. Vidal was a WWII veteran. He was drafted into the Army-Air Force and served his duties with the U.S. 8th Air Force, 654 bomb squardron in England. Upon returning home he started a family life in Santa Barbara and Goleta which included raising his six daughters. Some of his best family memories included boating and water skiing on a boat he refinished, driving the entire girls baseball team to old pershing park in his station wagon and spending days at Goleta beach with the family. Later in life,always wih camera in hand, he enjoyed taking pictures of his large family. Vidal worked as a printer, working for Schauer Printing,Santa Barbara News Press and assisted student learning to print the school newpaper at SBCC. A job he loved. He enjoyed the ocean,traveling,swimming, his garden and was a avid photographer. He was an adventurous man who loved to climb. Vidal achieved the summits of Mt Lassen and Mt Whitney; traversed the Grand Canyon and hiked along the south rim; and almost climbed Mt Shasta, but was not dressed for the seasonal cold temperatures. After retiring he pursued his love to travel, crossing the United States twice in his van with his second wife Rosemarie. After her passing, a trip to Germany gave him the traveling bug to see the world, he traveled to France, Spain, Peru, Hawaii, South Pacific, England, Italy and Alaska. 20

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Yet with all his travels one his favorite places was going to the breakwater sitting on “his bench” and enjoying the breeze and smell of the ocean he loved right here at home. Vidal is preceded in death by his parents, his wife Rosemarie, his daughter Joanne Hernandez, his brothers Jose,Jesse,Alex and Alberthis sister Rosemarie Pico, his grandson John Hernandez, great grandchildren Larry Phillip and Corrina Hernandez and his companion Beverly Troon. Edward Hernandez joined his grandfather in passing on the some day. He is survived by his sister Carmen Roman and brother Alfred, his children Carolyn Apodaca (Albert), Nancy Stronach (hove), Kathleen Roczey (bon), Lorraine Gonzales and Theresa Jimenez as well as 16 grandchildren, 31 great grandchildren and 17 greatgreat grandchildren as well as numerous nieces and nephews.

Marjorie Sherman

12/12/1919 - 2/19/2021

Marjorie Sherman, age 101, died Feb 19th in Ventura, CA. She faced death the same way she faced life – head on, never complaining, always thinking of others and fearless. Marjorie was preceded in death by her husband of 65 years, Cedric Ira in 2007. She is survived by daughters, Virginia TurnerScholl (Rich), Santa Barbara, CA, Gerri Ream, Simi, CA, grandchildren, Greg Turner (Brenda) Forney, TX, Richard Soucy (Lori) Simi, CA, Kathleen Magazino (Michael) Santa Barbara, CA, 4 great-grandchildren, 3 great-great-grandchildren and her niece, Joan Arnold, Webster, NY. Marjorie was born in W. Webster, NY but lived most of her life in the West. She loved to travel, sew, read and knit. Her humor and wisdom will be missed by all. No services are planned.

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Jesse R. Valdez

3/24/1965 - 2/21/2021

Stepdad – Edward Woolfolk Stepdad – Tom Perreault And Lastly, Jesse’s mother Enedelia Woolfolk who he adored and respectably loved very much. Viewing 3-5 Thursday March 4 At Moreno Mortuary in Santa Maria. Private service at Santa Barbara Cemetery.

Antonio Bisol Jr.

9/2/1927 - 2/11/2021 Jesse left this world after a lengthy illness and was called to finally rest with the Lord. Jesse was born on 3/24/1965 in Corpus Christi Texas. At an early age the family moved to Santa Barbara in 1967. He attended local schools in Carpinteria and in Santa Barbara. Jess was very adventurous and had outgoing energy. He excelled in many sports and activities. Jess was known for his amazing balance and loved extreme sports – which led him to love riding motorcycles, surfing, skating and riding his bike. But most of all he enjoyed cruising around Santa Barbara with his music “bumping “as he would say. He really had a love for music and was also a talented dancer. There was nothing Jesse couldn’t do. He was a respectful son and checked every box of a cool older brother. In his youth you could see him pop a wheelie all along the west beach wall– from the Arlington theater all the way to the beach down State Street. He had a rarity of a magnetic personality. Friendships and conversations were given genuinely. This came in hand with his varied interests, especially in automotive. He had an appreciation and love for muscle cars to low riders. Working for the many shops throughout Santa Barbara as a mechanic allowed him to live close to his passion. Despite of the problems Jesse had gone through – he was always loving and caring to his family and friends. He was very proud and loved all of his children and talked highly of each and every one of them. He sincerely did love every family member and friend. Jesse will truly be missed. But forever with us in our hearts and souls. He is preceded in death by his brother Thomas Perreault and survived by: Sons – Joseph and Tomas Valdez Daughters – Gabrielle,Anjelica, Enedelia, and Blanca Valdez His Brother – Kyle Libby

It is with great sadness that we announce the loss of a father, grandfather, greatgrandfather, brother, uncle, and friend, Antonio Bisol Jr. Tony, at the age of 93, went home to be with the Lord, passing away peacefully in his home on February 11th with his devoted daughters by his side. Tony was born in Santa Barbara on September 2, 1927, the second oldest of six children born to Antonio Sr. of Treviso, Italy and Guadalupe Cota of Santa Barbara. Tony grew up on “the west side” and was an athlete for Harding Varsity Club, part of the “Candy Kids” coached by Gordy Gray. He later became a proud “Don” and graduated from Santa Barbara High School as part of the class of 1945. Shortly after graduation, at the age of 17, Tony joined the Merchant Marines and served during the final year of WWII. Following his service in the Merchant Marines, Tony enlisted into the California National Guard and was assigned to service battery of the 981st Field Artillery Battalion. As a member of that organization, he deployed to Korea with the 40th Infantry Division during the Korean War where he achieved the rank of Sergeant First Class. Additionally, he is a recipient of the Army of Occupation Medal (Japan), the Korean Service Medal and the United Nations Service Medal. After being honorably discharged from the service, Tony met and married the love of his life, Janice Mae

Nichols and, as he said, spent the best 56 years of his life. Tony was employed for 35 years at Golden State/Foremost Dairy as foreman of the shipping and receiving department. After Foremost was bought out by a private company, he transitioned to Delco Electronics where he worked the next seven years until retirement. Tony and Jan spent many of their early years square dancing, and during their golden years they took up golf and enjoyed traveling with the Elks Club, discovering new golf courses. Tony was also an avid fisherman, spending many retired Wednesdays fishing at Lake Cachuma with his childhood friend Eddy Robles. You could also find Tony and Eddy every Thursday morning at Cody’s, sitting in their favorite booth, drinking coffee, and eating their favorite breakfast. Tony was a gentle giant who always had a positive spin on life and never complained. He often said, “A hundred years from now no one will know the difference.” He was a father who supported his children in whatever they were pursuing and did the same with his grandchildren, attending many of their youth activities and all of their graduations. He was a very proud grandpa and was so happy to live long enough to meet his first great-grandchild. Tony was preceded in death by his parents, wife Jan, son David, and sisters Reggie Venegas, Barbara Batastini, and Angelina Smith. He is survived by his brother George (Karen), sister Mary Walton, and by daughters Diane BisolKalstrom (John) and Darla Maciel (Marty) as well as grandchildren Christopher Brostek-Maciel (Jessica), Carly Martinez (Blane), Tatum, and great-granddaughter Brooks Mae Martinez. He also leaves behind many nieces and nephews. The family would like to extend its heartfelt appreciation to VNA Health, Hospice for their compassionate care and support during Tony’s last days. He especially appreciated his nurse Laura who would sing his favorite song,” Laura.” The family is also grateful for Clint, a dear fam-


obituaries ily friend who loved and cared for Tony. Tony called him his “best friend.” One of the more recent highlights of Tony’s life was a trip with his daughter to Washington, DC on an Honor Flight for veterans. In lieu of flowers please consider a donation to this organization that became so dear to him. Honor Flight Kern County, 8200 Stockdale Hwy. Suite M-10, Box 255, Bakersfield, CA 93311. www.honorflightkerncounty.org/donations Due to the COVID pandemic, a celebration of life service will likely be in the fall. If you would like to be notified, please email mardarrun@ sbcglobal.net with your contact information. Thank you

Marsha Lois Ackland Sorensen 6/4/1947 - 2/21/2021

Marsha Lois Ackland Sorensen passed away February 21, 2021 at the age of 73. Marsha was born in Adrian Michigan on June 4, 1947 to Bruce and Frances (Irwin) Ackland. The family soon moved to Santa Barbara, CA where Marsha grew up. She attended Franklin School, Santa Barbara Junior High and Santa Barbara High School, graduating in 1965. Marsha had a lifelong love of equines. Over the years she had many horses and mules and loved riding the back country in Paradise Canyon, where she had a home for many years, and made many friends. She was known to many in the canyon as Marsha LaBudde. She later moved to Marvel, Colorado, with her husband Ed. There they had 40 acres where Marsha and Ed had horses, mules and some draft horses, and plenty of room to ride. She also loved restoring little travel trailers, and had a real flair for decorating them in various themes. She and her friends sometimes took these little trailers out on camping trips, where they loved to hike and look for arrowheads and pretty rocks. Marsha’s other passion was thrift-store shopping. She had an

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com uncanny knack for finding the most unique treasures and using them in her many art projects. She was a very talented artist, making beautiful jewelry, bird houses, painted treasure boxes, paper flowers, and countless other projects. In late 2018 Marsha was diagnosed with non-small cell cancer. She moved to Las Vegas, NV to her sister’s home in order to undergo treatment that wasn’t readily available to her in Marvel. She had always hoped to return home again. Marsha is survived by her husband Ed Sorensen, her son Micah Pearlman and his partner Dianne Morey, her daughter Gillian Stott and her husband Tim, her sisters Judy Ryan and Catherine Meredith and her husband Don, her grandsons Norman and Hunter Stott, nephews David, Steven and Paul Ryan, and nieces Jennifer Meredith Dodd and Ariel Knox. The family would like to acknowledge the wonderful care Marsha received from the caregivers of Hospice. At Marsha’s request, there are no funeral services pending. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you give to the charity of your choice in her memory.

Gregorio Lorenzo De Alba 8/10/1954 - 2/5/2021

Gregorio Lorenzo De Alba was a man of many words. While they were mostly profanities, there was no doubt in anyone’s mind that he could speak his own so proudly. Regardless if you hated it or you loved it, that was Greg. Whether or not his stubborn self could ever admit it, he DID have a soft spot in his heart. He loved his grandchildren dearly and spoiled them whenever given the chance. On early mornings, while driving them to school, he’d blare Guns n’Roses, hoping that they’d acquire his taste in music even if it meant that their ears would bleed from the volume. And then after school, he’d pamper them with their favor-

ite snacks and Redbox movies. Even so, he refused thank you’s from any of them . As he would famously say, “Don’t thank me, thank the Lord.” He had a gift for sending them to school with smiles as wide as the mouth of his wallet. Which, as observed by many, only opened it for them and those who he felt close to. His grandchildren, who he lovingly nicknamed the “stinkers”, and “knuckleheads”, were arguably the luckiest in the world to have the affection of a notoriously stern man. Born August 10th, 1954, Gregorio spent the majority of his days in the Goodland, tossing the pigskin in high school and causing ruckus wherever he pleased. After proving to be an incredible athlete, he left his old stomping grounds and instead moved on to Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, where he was a promising member of the Mustang football team. After college, he began a life of many trades to support his growing family, experiencing more out of life than the average Joe. Ranging from a stint in the local abalone industry, which took him briefly to South Korea, to a relentless security guard with authority and dedication wherever he was assigned, he proved to be much more than his humble appearance implied. Staying true to his athletic roots, he spent time coaching local football and baseball teams before retiring as just “Pop”. Finally, after years and years of looking death in the eyes, convincing himself that “God loved idiots”, and fighting lengthy battles with the nurses who annoyed him and the ailments that plagued him, he eventually succumbed to its inevitability on February 5th, 2021 at the Serenity house. He is survived by his sisters Tish and Beckie and his four children John, Jill, Jennifer and Jackie. He will especially be missed by his grandchildren Ernesto, Isaiah, Junior, Nevaeh Angel, Lenaiya Rain, Makaio John, Jessica, Melissa, and Isabel. Many others will remember him as their coach, colleague, teammate, friend and in the most affectionate way possible, their local crazy old man. Adhering to his wishes, the unforgettable Gregorio De

Alba was cremated. Services will be held on ZOOM at 1:00 on March 6th, 2021. All are welcome. Please contact the family for further information. Obituary written by Granddaughter Nevaeh Angel De Alba

Emma Mary Riffero 2/27/1921 - 2/17/2021

With family at her side, Emma passed away peacefully at her home in Santa Barbara Calif. on February 17, 2021 ten days before her 100th birthday. Emma filled her life in its simplest of moments and the love she found there – her family. Emma was born in Dunsmuir, Calif. along with her twin sister Norma to parents Antonio and Maria Brun on February 27,1921. She is predeceased by her mother and father, twin sister Norma Peters, older sister Louise Golin, brother Guido Brun, and brother-in-law Richard Riffero. Emma is survived by her loving husband of 80 years, John H. Riffero. son John H Riffero II (Pamela), daughter Norma Jean Leifer (Vincent), and eight grandchildren John, Rochelle, Erin, Ashley, Leslie, Autumn, Erica, Emma Nadine, and her twelve great grandchildren Jasmine, Justin, Dakota, Christian, Aiden, Elena, Evryn, Madeline, Bryn, Lily, Arianna, and Tobin, as well as, her brother-in-law Steve Riffero, and nephews Richard Riffero II, Fred Golin, and Michael Durbiano, nieces Deanne PeterPace and Marie Modler and cousin Sharon Ross. Emma was the first Executive Secretary of The United Boys and Girls Club of Santa Barbara. Emma volunteered for many local organizations including her church, Our Lady of Sorrows. In retirement she was an avid volunteer in her community and her children and grandchildren’s’ endeavors. Emma adored her family and is remembered for her INDEPENDENT.COM

delicious traditional Italian cooking and her famous patio barbecues. She was a model of resilience, devotion, selflessness and unconditional love. As the matriarch, Emma’s legacy lives on in her family. She will be missed immensely but will always be with us deep in our hearts. We are grateful for the International Caregivers Corp. and especially to Vicky Jallores who has been lovingly devoted to Emma and an excellent caregiver. In Lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Santa Barbara Meals on Wheels, VNA Health on Gutierrez St., and the United Boys & Girls Club of Santa Barbara. These were all dear to Emma’s heart. Due to the Covid Pandemic immediate family will gather privately.

Kim Rene’ Selberg (Szafranski) 1955 - 2021

Kim Rene’ Selberg (Szafranski) passed away unexpectedly on Friday February 19th, 2021 at the young age of 65. She was born in Pomona, CA in 1955 and moved to Pasadena shortly after. In 1966 she moved to Santa Barbara where she attended San Marcos High School and met her future husband Jim. She graduated in 1973 and married her husband Jim in 1974. In 1973 she attended SBBC where she became a Secretary to Detectives at the SBSO until 1975. She then worked at Cottage Hospital until she moved to Ventura in 1985. In 1986 she worked at CMH as a Unit Secretary on the 5th Floor until her retirement in 2016. Since her retirement she has enjoyed many activities such as making flower pens, spending time with her Grandchildren and animals Roxy, Harley, Chloe, Toby, TB, Spunky, Deacon and Caine. She was a loving Wife, Mother, Grandmother and Friend. She is survived by her loving husband of 46yrs Jim, Children-Kristina, Kelly, Daniel and Geniveve, Grandsons Weston and Travis. She will be reunited with her father Edwin, mother Jeannine and brother Mark. She will be greatly missed by many. A graveside service will be held on Thursday March 4th at the Santa Barbara Cemetery at 3pm. In lieu of flowers you can make a donation to The Hospice of Santa Barbara.

MARCH 4, 2021

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DR. PETER J. LEVY 1944-2021 A hole opened in the universe on the morning of February 15, 2021, when Dr. Peter Joseph Levy left his generous contributions to the world, for those of us lucky enough to have known him - to remember and to cherish. Peter passed peacefully at Serenity House in Santa Barbara, CA where the team of “Angel Nurses” conscientiously provided him with a high level of comfort care. Few individuals exude joy, look always to see if they can ease another’s pain, enquire into one’s well-being and, whenever possible, provide help and insights.  Few bring interest to every conversation with a determination to ensure that wit, humor and culture are a part of the offering. Few lead by being a devoted husband, father, brother, and friend. Such a person was Peter. 

For 25 years, Dr. Levy has been nationally and internationally acclaimed as a Master Teacher and Educator of NMRsm. He taught the technique in more than 400 seminars, to approximately 3500 health care professionals for which he was highly respected throughout the USA, Europe, Africa, India and Australia. Peter’s legacy changed the course of peoples’ lives forever. With his loving personality, he forged many deep connections with influential health care professionals who span the globe. While Peter loved his work, the biggest gifts of his life were his three beautiful girls with Sonya Levy: Julia, Kira, and Marissa - and as of late, the bright star of Guylaine Therrien (Ghee), his recent wife. Peter and Ghee met late in life, marrying just a year ago, their bond was deep and their love for each other palpable for all to see. During the past months, Ghee nurtured and cared for Peter, providing the encouragement and playfulness on which he thrived. Among Peter’s first passions were Ancient Greece and Rome, an interest cultivated by his grandmother who took young Peter and his sister to Greece for a summer vacation in the 1950’s. This trip had a tremendous influence on Peter’s approach to life, creating an endur-

Born to Richard M. Levy and Barbara Mindlin on October 11, 1944 in Boston, Massachusetts, Peter grew up in a rich cultural and intellectual environment among parents, grandparents, and friends who traveled the world and took the Levy/Lee children with them. His extended family lived in Brookline, MA, with Peter attending Deerfield Academy, before beginning his college years at Bard College. Taking a break after his sophomore year, Peter enlisted in the US Marine Corps and spent eighteen months in uniform in Quantico, VA, before being honorably discharged to return home to attend Emerson College, where he completed his undergraduate degree in History, writing his senior thesis on the Orations of Pericles. Peter worked with his father in the family business, Diamond Union, where he was groomed to run operations. It was the late 1960’s when the warmth of California was beckoning that Peter moved to Santa Barbara where his first wife Mary is from. He studied photography at Brooks Academy and became an avid photographer for life, he later began a career in real estate and, with his love of the ocean, sailed whenever possible. ing fascination with Greek and Roman history that was a vital part of his intellectual endeavors. On that trip, his Grandmother took a picture of young Peter sitting on a throne at the Parthenon. As a father, Peter always sought to endow his daughters with this fascination and love for people and places beyond the United States.  Walking into Peter’s office in Santa Barbara, his patients were greeted by a special photo taken in 2103, of Peter with his three cherished girls, Julia, Kira, and Marissa, alongside their Dad, sitting on the same throne.   Peter was the adored Godfather of Ryan and Justin Shand, and was sustained through his difficult last months by his Godson Joseph Garrigan, a fisherman who shared Peter’s love for the ocean. Peter had various circles of friends including those who granted him entry to memorable dinners for which he was cherished for the intelligent conversation he brought to the table, and of course the relationship he had to his close “brothers” with whom he shared biking, hiking, playing squash and sailing. Most of us spend our lives trying to do good work, good deeds, to be creative, loyal, and loving. To be interested in others, and to learn from them. To jump when it’s scary, to accept falling when it can’t be helped. Peter was there for so many, always, in every possible way. It was in the late 70’s when Peter participated in a volunteer medical mission to Mexico that his profession was defined. During that trip, he could not help but notice that out of the team of MD’s, dentists, eye doctors and chiropractors, it was the chiropractors that were having an immediate healing impact on those who lined up to be treated. This was a pivotal moment for Peter, for he had found his calling, and went on to obtain his Chiropractic degree from Cleveland College of Los Angeles in 1984. Peter’s knowledge of anatomy was so extensive that he frequently was invited to teach pre-med students at UCLA.   He went on to start his own Chiropractic Center where he practiced in Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, CA. He would continue for the next thirty-six years, touching and healing many in the Santa Barbara community and those who travelled the distance to be treated by Dr. Levy. Peter’s most valuable gift was his “healing hands”. The thousands of patients, including professional athletes whom he treated from injuries and chronic conditions, not only improved, but many were able to return to full function, and resume their favorite activities. Easing others’ pain through treatment was Peter’s gift. His humor, charm, and consistent concern for others’ welfare - their loves and lives - had its own healing effect.

In addition to his daughters and his wife, Ghee, Peter is also survived by his sister Susan Woodman of Waltham, MA, Thomas Lee of Waban, MA, and Constance Eby of Kentucky, their children and grandchildren. In the last months of his life, Peter found great connection and comfort through the healing of equine therapy. Peter’s last days were enhanced when Serenity House graciously granted permission to allow Peter a visit from Shannon, his devoted equine coach along with her horse, creating a memorable experience for Peter, other patients and their families to share joyful moments . If Peter’s spirit invokes a feeling of contribution, a donation can be made in “Memory of Peter Levy” to: VNA Health-Serenity House at 509 E. Montecito Street, Suite 200, Santa Barbara, CA 93103, or by visiting their website at www.vna. health. 

You always felt better for having spent time with Peter.

Due to Covid, a small memorial will be held for the family.

Ever learning, broadening and deepening his skills, Peter became trained in Neuro Muscular Reeducationsm, also known as NMRsm, a unique deep tissue healing technique, proven to be successful with a vast majority of individuals suffering from chronic pain and lack of flexibility. Through Peter’s hands, NMRsm allowed most patients to regain their full range of motion. Those who have had the “excruciating pleasure” of Dr. Levy’s NMRsm sessions would know exactly the value of his well-defined expertise.

Should you wish to leave a note for the family, you can do so by going to: https://www.wrhsb. com/obituaries/ - Find Peter’s obituary where there will be an option to enter a message.

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In Memoriam

obituaries

Gerald McCall Franklin

Joy Eleanor McDaris 12/6/1924 - 10/13/2020

1934-2020

A

The Howitzer COURTESY

BY L AU R E L P H I L L I P S

brilliant writer, a wonderfully capable appellate lawyer, a kind and humble man — all these words describe my father, Jerry Franklin, a well-respected deputy district attorney in Santa Barbara for 35 years. He chose the law, or the law chose him—it’s hard to know which, but it was definitely in his blood, as my aunt Sheila Benson said: Given our family’s dedicated political bent for generations, going well beyond our mother, a groundbreaking labor leader, or our cousin, a fixture in the New York State Assembly, Jerry’s first legal choices seemed almost pro forma. He was a public defender (check), sharing offices with Legal Aid (check check), with no shortage of clients (check check check) in those days of unrest and protest that defined the late ’70s. As we were catching up on the state of our lives by phone one afternoon, Jerry mentioned with the smallest shade of pleasure that his office had a great new addition: a donated couch. It gave his clients somewhere to sit. “Ummm… Where had they been sitting, Jer?” “On the floor.” Sure. Absolutely. Silly of me to ask. Jerry’s mother, Mary McCall Jr., was a screenwriter and the first female president of the Screen Writers Guild. His father, Dwight Franklin, was an artist, costumer, and set designer. Jerry was born in Los Angeles, a twin, and he was preceded in death by his brother, Alan. He received his JD from Boalt Hall in 1966. He then joined the Los Angeles Public Defender’s Office but left in 1968 to take up life in a VW van with his wife, Alison Reitz. They headed for Alaska but only made it as far as Argenta, British Columbia, where they lived for a year in a log cabin. They returned to Santa Barbara for my birth in 1970, just in time for Jerry to happily take up the defense of protesters in Isla Vista. His friend Stan Roden was elected the county’s District Attorney in 1975, and when he was considering hiring Jerry, Roden recalled the reaction from the “hardliners” in the office and among law enforcement: He’s a radical. Never. No way. “We hired Jerry,” Roden said. “He soon became an office favorite. Over the next 35 years, Jerry became the paragon of intellectual muscle for the DA’s Office. He researched and wrote many if not most of the important writs, appeals, motions, and trial briefs. He won praise from the bench and from other DAs as well.” Ron Zonen, a formidable deputy district attorney who tried Michael Jackson and Jesse James Hollywood, among other high-profile cases during his career, said Jerry had a special place in his heart for con men. Jerry wanted them in jail and pursued them relentlessly. He frequently helped other trial attorneys, Zonen said; in fact, it was common for a panicked lawyer in the midst of trial to ask for Jerry’s help to respond to a newly filed defense motion. Jerry would work late into the night and leave the finished brief on the lawyer’s desk: beautifully crafted, logical, and compelling. Assistant DA Pat McKinley once told a defense attorney who threatened to “paper him to death,” or file lots of motions, “You haven’t met Jerry. You have a peashooter; I have a Howitzer.” Jerry lived humbly and gave away much of his

Joy Eleanor McDaris passed away on October 13, 2020. A lifelong resident of Santa Barbara. Joy was bprn on December 6, 1924 to Joy and Ralph Hiestand. She was preceeded in death by her beloved husband Jim. Surviving are her two children Kelly McDaris and Patrick McDaris. Her nephew Todd Cicchi and his wife Dawn Peters. At her request there will be no service. Donations in Joy’s memory can be made to a charity of choice.

Gilbert “Curly” Calzada

12/20/1961 - 1/27/2021

INTELLECTUAL MUSCLE: For 35 years, Jerry Franklin was the go-to writ and research attorney in the DA’s Office; for even longer, he was a loving father.

earnings. One of his defendants, Zonen recalled, who took full responsibility for his crime and accepted his prison sentence gracefully, discovered that Jerry had put $50 per month in his prison account until he was paroled. “If someone was in need, Jerry pulled out his checkbook. If a staff member was dealing with prolonged illness, Jerry donated vacation time,” Zonen said. For me, my father’s greatest gifts were his sense of play and delight in the world, a bottomless generosity, and his deep love of language. I absorbed his suspicion of authority and his parallel if not idiosyncratic love of the spirit of the law. He wanted to be a police officer but was kicked out of the police academy for being a smart-ass. My dad had my back. He supported my every passionate inclination. The only caveats I remember were that I not get a tattoo and that I not sign up for “underwater basket-weaving” in college. My parents divorced when I was 5, and my weekends with my dad were filled with fun. He taught me about “hiding in plain sight”: During one of our evening games of hide-and-seek at the Santa Barbara Mission, he completely stumped me by simply sitting on the edge the fountain with all the tourists while I looked in all the shadows for him. He would spend patient hours with me at the YMCA pool, teaching me to hold my breath and throwing dimes into the deep end for me to fetch. I was only 14 when he taught me how to drive, determined that I learn to work a manual transmission and parallel park to perfection. Graduation was the 101 freeway at night, all the way to Los Angeles and back. He would pick up every hitchhiker we came across with a friendly, “Hey, brother!” A selfappointed first responder for any traffic accident, he would pull out the flares in his trunk and commence to direct traffic before the Highway Patrol arrived. Jerry’s memory left him during his final years, and caring for him enabled me to attempt to repay his lifelong kindness. His love of wordplay and sense of humor remained to the end. The last conscious gesture he made was to give me the finger, which reassured me that although he was slipping away, both his humor and his awareness of my presence were intact. n I miss him every day.

On December 20, 1961, in Santa Barbara, California, Lydia Robles gave birth to a baby boy and named him Gilbert Edward Calzada, after his father, Gilbert Anthony Calzada. Days later when they returned home from the hospital, his grandfather, Jesus Robles, took Gilbert into his arms and held his tiny hands in his own. “These are the hands of an artist,” he said. And so they were. Gilbert, known to most as Curly, grew up in Carpinteria and moved to Santa Barbara after graduating from Carpinteria High School. He went on to attend Santa Barbara City College, where he played on the Vaqueros football team. He discovered his passion for art at age 9, and began his career as a tattoo artist at the age of 16. He painted murals, did cloth drawings, and used various other mediums, but only tattooing combined his love of people with his drive to create. His work days consisted of venturing out, striking up conversations with strangers, and making lifelong friends whom he collaborated with to create personally meaningful, original designs. There are thousands of people walking around the planet that have his art proudly etched into their skin. INDEPENDENT.COM

Spending time with Curly was like attending a special event. He would sit in the midst of his art supplies and vast music collection, DJ’ing and telling stories, “bagging,” or acting out his favorite moments from Cheech and Chong and Bruce Lee movies. He wasn’t short on passions or interests. He was a dedicated member of the Raider Nation, loved to play basketball, and for years he played in dart leagues in Hawaii. Extroverted as he was, Curly was also a good listener, known for being compassionate and kind. He enjoyed teaching and mentoring young people, and small children were drawn to “Uncle Curly” because he was so sweet, funny, and genuinely interested in their quirks and personalities. He stood 6’0″ tall, was sturdily built, and covered in tattoos. Yet Curly only demonstrated how intimidating he could be when someone he loved needed his protection. Those of us who knew him count ourselves blessed for having been on the receiving end of his unconditional love and friendship. Curly was a man of faith and his relationship with God only deepened throughout the years. It was a shock to us all when the Lord called him home on January 27th, 2021, but we anxiously await the day that we will be with him once again. He is survived by his only daughter, whom he adored: Ashley Cuevas Cruz, and her husband Erick, his four grandchildren: Monica Rojas, Erick, Avianna and Annalise Cruz; His beloved mother, Lydia Daniel; his siblings: James and Paul Contreras, Dolores Daniel, and Yvonne Avila-Gildea; and his nieces and nephews: Paul David Chu, Dominique Razo, Isabelle Andrews, Jaden Contreras, and Sienna and Shane Gildea. Details regarding any services will be shared on Curly’s Facebook page.

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TH AN K YOU T O O U R A NN UA L A WA RD S SP O N SO RS PRES E NTI NG SPONS OR

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MAR.

I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

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T HE

by TERRY ORTEGA and SOPHIE LYND

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have virtual events coming up, submit them at independent.com/eventsubmit.

3/4:

3/7:

Virtual Event: 2021 Black History Month Indy Book Club Discussion Discuss

Parallel Stories (via Zoom): A Conversation with Claudia

Rankine Acclaimed author Claudia Rankine will

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join the S.B. Museum of Art for a conversation “on the path to understanding.” See a screening of selections from Situations, a series of 10 short videos collaboratively produced by Rankine and documentary filmmaker John Lucas that emerged from and are in dialogue with Rankine’s 2014 hybrid prose-poetry book Citizen: An American Lyric. 2-3pm. Free. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@ sbma.net.

the February selection of Reads by Black Women, Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, about a young woman named Lauren Oya Olamina, who has the ability to feel pain and other sensations she witnesses in a collapsed society due to climate change. 6-7pm. Free. email mwetta@ santabarbaraca.gov.

tinyurl.com/ClaudiaRank Conversation tinyurl.com/PurchaseBookSBMA

tinyurl.com/IndyBookClub

MONDAY 3/8

THURSDAY 3/4

3/8:

3/4: Online Webinar: Homesteading, Vegetable & Herb Gardening Join local

tury, the African penguin population has plummeted due to various human-related causes. Join global conservationist and filmmaker Stephanie Arne as she shares about the development and deployment of artificial penguin nests. Don’t forget to order dinner from Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant. Register in advance. 6:30-7:30pm. Free. Email scoleman@sbnature2.org.

3/4: S.B. Museum of Natural History Virtual Workshop: Climate Communication Learn from Emmy Award–winning meteorologists Bernadette Woods Placky and Anthony Yanez, and UCSB Bren School Environmental Communication Program Director Lisa Leombruni, PhD, as they discuss the relationship between weather and climate and how they deliver relevant and accurate information in an accessible way. 7-8pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/CllimateCommunication

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herbalist and horticulturist Mary Andrews from Rusty Barn Farm to learn more about gardening and homesteading and participate in a Q&A for your plant and craft questions. 5-5:30pm. Free. artemisiaacademy.com/

free-herb-classes

tinyurl.com/SciencePubPenguins

speare’s Henriad because the male actors have left to fight in WWII. A talkback will follow. Fri.: 5-7pm; Sat: 1:30-3:30pm. $10 per viewing. Call (805) 922-8313.

FRIDAY 3/5 3/5: PCPA InterPlay Virtual Reading Series: Into the Breeches! Hear a reading of this

pcpa.org/IntotheBreeches

hilarious and moving play by George Brent about what happens when a group of unexpected troupe of players assemble an all-female version of Shake-

SATURDAY 3/6 3/6: Online Seminar Series: Ocean and Underworld: Selections from Inferno by Dante — Part One This seminar will consider the ocean and the underworld as depicted in classic literary texts. Reading: Dante, Inferno: Cantos 1-16. 12:30-2:30pm. $25-$125. Email greatbooksojai@gmail.com.

3/5:

UCSB MCC Drag Queen Virtual Story Hour with Miss Angel Part 2: Angel D’Mon Chil-

agorafoundation.org/currentseminars

dren and adults are welcome to this story time where four books that highlight diverse voices and authors and focus on empathy, acceptance, equity, identity, and kindness will be read. Also gather markers, pencils, or crayons, scissors, glue or tape, and blank paper to join in a fun activity. 5-7pm. Free.

TUESDAY 3/9 3/9: House Calls Virtual Event: Chris Thile Punch Brothers and Nickel Creek band member, composer, vocalist, and mandolin virtuoso Chris Thile will bring his broad musical outlook that encompasses classical, rock, jazz, bluegrass, and more to this evening’s performance. 5-6pm. UCSB students: free; GA: $10. Call (805) 893-3535. Read more on p. 30.

tinyurl.com/MissAngelStoryHour U CO

Fundraiser

Science Pub From Home: Saving Penguins Over the past cen-

RT

ES

Y

tinyurl.com/ChrisThileVirtual

3/9:

Chaucer’s Virtual Author Discussion with

Bonnie Marcus Dr. Lois Frankel and awardwinning entrepreneur and author Bonnie Marcus, MEd, will discuss Marcus’s 2021 book, Not Done Yet! How Women Over 50 Regain Their Confidence and Claim Workplace Power, an invaluable guide for women over 50 that combines practical advice and exercises that inspire readers to beat ageist limitations, own their careers, and go from “sadass to badass.” 6pm. Free. (805) 682-6787.

tinyurl.com/NotDoneYetDiscussion

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

MARCH 4, 2021

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Sports

My Life

Inoculation and Inosculation What to Do When You’re Vaccinated but Your True-Blue COVID Companion Is Not?

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which I very much wanted to participate in unison was COVID vaccination. The challenges of trying to secure an appointment online are too tedious to describe here, but somehow, I managed to score. Then, before I could book my partner, I was bumped off the website, and there were no additional appointments available. I stood in the line at the CVS, six feet away from the woman in front of me, who guiltily confessed that she was from San Luis Obispo County. She was friendly enough — turns out she too is a new grandmother, and her kids are in Portland. We muttered through our masks about the absurdity of things, but we also acknowledged how lucky we were to be here. Before long, it was actually my turn, and now the deed is done. My second dose is scheduled for a month from now, assuming there is supply on hand. It should be a relief, a jig-dancing delight — all I wanted for my 70th birthday was this vaccine. But it’s inherently confusing, me being vaccinated while my true-blue inosculation companion is not. The joy is greatly diminished. I’m not going anyplace without him, anyway. When we got back home, he decided to head for the ocean, and I thought I’d go for a hike in case I might be feeling crummy the next day. Our recreational pursuits on such occasions — he as an aquatic being, me strictly terrestrial — are among the primary times when we differentiate and go our separate ways. And I can’t speak for his experience with the surf, but oh, what a walk I had! Picture me, a WomanWho-Has-Been-Vaccinated, striding into the wind, gazing out at an ocean of silver and white, embraced by the green of the hills. I stopped and listened to a creek rushing by, frogs were singing, and sunlight was pouring down through the leafy branches of trees, making everything sparkle and glint, and I felt high, as I sometimes do. I cannot understand how the world continues to be so beautiful and so gracious. Replenished by our separate forays, we returned to this grove we share. The internet isn’t working. His back hurts. I have once again misplaced something and I’m turning things upside down to find it, and this happens many times each week. We yearn to see our little family in England, but who knows when that can happen? And only one of us scored the vaccine. We look at the little digital cards from the wildlife camera for amusement, hoping to glimpse a fox or a lion, but all we see is ourselves. We lean into one another. n CYNTHIA C ARBONE WARD

aptured on the wildlife camera as we walked along the creek-side trail to the well, we look like we’re on holiday, enjoying a hike in light rain, perhaps in England. We are wearing tall rubber boots, each holding an umbrella, and I’m pretty sure I’m laughing. Something about the memory card gives a dreamy pink cast to the umbrellas and a soft glow to our little procession of two. And it is dreamlike, this life we are living. I don’t mean dreamlike in the sense of bliss, although there are elements of that. I mean dreamlike in that we have become so untethered to any logical framework. Sometimes the anxieties, frustrations, and sadness permeate, and these emerge during sleep as disturbing nightmares with familiar themes. By day, however, the dreaming is of a different sort, drifting along in a state of suspension.

But notice how often I use the pronoun “we.” My husband and I are doing this together, and I’m thankful for that. It has occurred to me that we are together so constantly, we are like two trees, leaning into and entwining about each other until their separate identities are difficult to distinguish. Wikipedia, that source for lazy researchers everywhere, describes inosculation as “a natural phenomenon in which trunks, branches, or roots of two trees grow together … referred to in forestry as ‘gemels,’ from the Latin word meaning ‘a pair.’ ” Maybe he and I are inosculating, which sounds vaguely sexual and graphic, and perhaps there’s a prettier term for it, but I am grateful nonetheless for my companion. And we certainly are a pair. Sometimes, all this togetherness erupts into silliness. Other times, we drive each other crazy, and sparks do fly, but our conflicts are so stale and repetitious, it’s hard to get too worked up over them. But one occasion for 26

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MARCH 4, 2021

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VICTOR BRYANT PHOTOS

by Cynthia Carbone Ward

Let the

GAMES BEGIN Again After a Year of COVID Cancellations, High School Sports Are Back by Victor Bryant

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or the cross-country runners at Dos Pueblos High and Santa Barbara High, the sun was a little brighter and the air a little crisper as they approached the starting line on this particular Saturday morning. The long-awaited return to high school athletic competition in Santa Barbara was finally realized on February 26, nearly a year after the COVID-19 pandemic brought the world to a standstill. The joy was palpable. “We are two weeks away from reaching the year mark of not having kids on campus, so this is symbolic,” said Dos Pueblos High principal Bill Woodard at the conclusion of the dual meet. “You can see the smiles behind their masks today. It was cathartic, it was happy, it was joyful, and it is the beginning of hopefully a lot more joy for these teenagers who have lost so much.” It would be a stretch to call this crosscountry meet a return to normal, as spectators were barred from the threemile course, which sprawled throughout the Dos Pueblos campus. Parents lined up along a barrier to catch a glimpse of their kids competing. Temperature checks were required for all volunteers, and masks were mandatory for athletes at the start of the race. “It means we are headed in the right direction, and I can’t wait for more events and for kids to come back to school,” said Santa Barbara High principal Elise Simmons. “Wear your masks, social distance, wash your hands, and no large gatherings. Please help get us back to school.” Among the competitors on the boys’ side, it was curly haired freshman Blaise Snow of Santa Barbara High who stole


living

the show in his first high school race. He pulled away from the pack and maintained his stride across the finish line with a time of 16:36. Snow’s sophomore teammate Drew DeLozier wasn’t far behind as he finished with a time of 16:53. “At first, the Dos Pueblos kids were going really fast, so I was just trying to hang behind them,” said Snow. “They all went out way too fast and died. Around the forest, I started to pass all of them, and at the third mile, I was out in front and I knew if I held the pace they wouldn’t be able to catch me. It feels good because we have been training for a while, and we haven’t ever been able to run in an official race.” In the girls’ competition, experience was an asset for senior Ella Kenly, who took first place with a time of 19:57 and led Dos Pueblos to a victory. It was her first win. The graduating class of 2021 has been hit the hardest by all of the pandemic-related cancellations and postponements, and the excitement to finally compete was evident in Kenly’s words. “It’s such a relief because every step of the way this whole year has been up and down,” she said. “The fact that I am a senior really helped me push through this race.” Kenly was happy to finally put on her pink socks and custom earrings for the race, two of the small things that were missed during the extended offseason. Once the race began, she was ready to seize the moment. “I am more of a distance runner, so I kept behind the Santa Barbara girl [Daisy McToldridge] for the majority of the track, and then she really pushed it out for that first mile, so I just tried to hold onto her,” Kenley said. “I was probably 50 feet back. With about two-thirds left in the last mile up that hill — at DP, we really train a lot on

NIKKI DONER

MARK SHERWOOD

hills — I finally got in front of her for the rest of the race. “I thought to myself, ‘This could be your last race, so just go for it.’ ” The specter of COVID-19 cancellations is still on the mind of every participant, and the athletes have the mindset that every competition could be their last. “I don’t know if I’ve necessarily taken a moment to step back and look at the big significance of this, just because of how crazy it’s been with online school,

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GVGSA Update The Goleta Valley South Girls Softball Association (GVGSA) has opened registration and will begin team formation this week in preparation for its upcoming season. Games are currently on hold, but GVGSA president Julie Hastings is hopeful that competition will start in the near future, based on the latest announcement from the California Department for Public Health. “We are confident that we will begin games in mid- to late March or after spring break,” she explained. “Our COVID plan already implements the requirements outlined by the state of California, and we were successful in executing a fun and effective clinic during the fall/winter season. Softball is considered a moderate contact sport and falls in the red tier. We will monitor the numbers closely but are encouraged by the possibility of having games again soon.” Prospective participants can register at gvgsa .com. n

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MARCH 4, 2021

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FOOD&DRINK Protector Cellars: p.28

FIRST CLIMATE-POSITIVE WINERY?

ALEX KATZ MOVES FROM FINE WINE TO SUSTAINABILITY every harvest season in Santa Barbara County to make wine, Alexander Katz is keenly aware of his travel schedule. “Our picks for pinot kept backing up and up,” said Katz, who co-owned the brand Timbre Winery (formerly La Fenêtre) with his good friend Joshua Klapper from 2010 to 2019. “That was very apparent for me, because I’m scheduling my harvest trip, and every year it’s getting earlier and earlier. It’s making this connection in my mind: What’s going on here?” Even mentors like Au Bon Climat’s Jim Clendenen and Qupé founder Bob Lindquist, who’ve been making wine for four decades, were perplexed by N N TTMA how the wild E K T T BY M A and warming effects of climate change affected grape development. “This is not a normal thing,” CANS FOR CLIMATE: Although canned wines are not the endgame for said Katz. “This is not something they’ve seen Alex Katz of Protector Cellars, they are the most sustainable packaging before.” choice right now. He plans to explore other options as they evolve. After spending nearly a decade making and selling fine wine the traditional way— packaged in heavy glass bottles that are trucked to retailers tor’s aren’t just a trendy or bargain plonk and restaurants, adding three pounds of carbon dioxide to play — the wines are fresh, textural, and the atmosphere per bottle—Katz thought it was time for clean in flavor, quite a counterpoint to the competition. They cost between $5 the wine industry to take a smarter tack.  “I was just starting to think about the impact of climate and $7 depending on quantity ordered, change on the industry and impact of the industry on the and a tree is planted for each can purclimate,” said Katz. “To ignore the fact that we have an chased, thanks to a partnership with Trees impact on the climate when we 100 percent depend on for the Future.  the climate and environment seemed crazy to me. There’s The shift away from bottles was the most critia major shift happening, and it didn’t seem like people were cal move. “It became pretty clear pretty quickly that paying attention or doing much about that.” the glass bottle was the biggest offender,” said Katz, surSo after years of plotting, Katz parted ways with Klap- prised to learn that 50 percent of greenhouse-gas emissions per to start Protector Cellars, which he is positioning to be per bottle come from the production of that bottle alone.  the world’s first “climate-positive” winery. “Carbon neuHe investigated the available options, such as bags and tral didn’t feel like enough,” said Katz. “Getting to zero is a still-emerging fiber market (check out this beer bottle not enough impact. We have to reverse the damage we’ve from Carlsberg), and found cans to be the best choice right now, as they do not seem to impact wine flavor. “My backalready done.” Last spring, Katz released his first three wines, mostly ground is in making high-quality wines, so it was parafrom Paso Robles fruit, but processed at Central Coast mount that whatever packaging I used was not something Wine Services in Santa Maria: a white made from sauvi- that would have a negative impact on the wine,” he said.   gnon blanc and a little viognier; a rosé, with a splash of sauBut he is ready to shift to something better than cans vignon blanc; and a red, mostly cabernet sauvignon. The when that’s available. “I don’t actually see it as a canned grapes come from certified sustainable vineyards — about wine brand,” he said. “The fact that it’s in a can right now is 40 percent of greenhouse-gas emissions caused by a bottle because, at the moment, that’s the best ecological option for of wine come from conventionally farmed vines — and all packaging. But I don’t see that as the endgame.” three come in sleek and lightweight 250mL cans (a third of And he readily admits that the bottle is still the right a bottle), adorned with climate-focused art.  option for more expensive wines. “If I was making a wine Unlike many canned options on the market, Protec- that should be aged five to 10 years, I would still put it

ES LS L T T BO BARRE &

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MARCH 4, 2021

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in glass—there’s no question for me,” said Katz. But given that the vast majority of wines are drunk within a week of purchase—some say as many as 90 percent — there’s plenty of room for alternative packaging. “The way we drink wine, and the way most wineries in California are making wine, is for immediate consumption,” he said. Katz got into wine while studying at Cornell University but worked on the financial side of the magazine industry as journalism went through its own crisis in the mid-2000s. When Klapper—who’d been his best friend since their freshman year of high school in New York City—invited Katz to be part of the La Fenêtre launch, the timing was right. After working his first harvest at Au Bon Climat in 2010, Katz began coming to Santa Barbara for about four months every year. He and Klapper parted ways so that Katz could start Protector in 2019, but they still work side by side.  Canning his first vintage of Protector Cellars in March 2020 as the lockdown landed was not ideal, and Katz could not return to Santa Barbara until October. “That was the longest time I’d been away from the winery in 10 years,” he said. It’s also been a tepid time to launch a brand that will depend on retail to survive, but Katz knows the market is there. “There are a lot of people out there who care about the environment and like wine,” he said. “There’s plenty of people who would like to have this wine if they knew about it.” Whether the industry takes notice and makes meaningful changes is more of a question. “I know what it’s like to be a small producer, when it’s hard to see more than 10 feet in front of you,” said Katz. “There’s always some kind of emergency. It’s hard to have long-term planning.” He appreciates that there is a lot of conversation now about how to survive through climate change, like planting in higher elevations or shifting to more heat-resistant varieties, such as planting mourvèdre in Burgundy.   “That makes sense, but it’s also missing the underlying issue,” said Katz. “You can only move so high in elevation. There are only so many heat-resistant varieties. At some point you have to address the problem, and I didn’t see that happening. I felt like there was an opportunity for me to step in and at least start the conversation.” COURTESY PHOTOS

A

s a lifelong Manhattanite who spends

See protectorcellars.com.


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BAKED GREATS: Bossie’s colorful doughnuts appeal to both eye and appetite.

ust a few blocks from the Funk Zone, Mil-

pas Street is now something of a Dunk Zone. For doughnut lovers, not only are old-school Eller’s and Winchell’s a block apart on Santa Barbara’s Eastside, but just up the street, Bossie’s Kitchen has been proffering new-school, high-end morsels such as chocolate-glazed crullers with pistachio and pomegranate-rhubarb brioche doughnuts for the past two years. Bossie’s built its name on comfort foods crafted by Lauren Herman, such as Korean fried-chicken sandwiches and a chicken pot pie you want to curl up inside of just to eat your way out. But since Herman’s partner in business and life is the Cordon Bleu–trained pastry chef Christina Olufson, the bakery side of the business offers something for kiddos and connoisseurs alike.

Olufson’s first food-industry job just so happened to be at a doughnut shop, but it was at the renowned Lucques restaurant in her native

Los Angeles that she developed her reputation. “I spent a long time making plated desserts with a lot of textures and flavors going on all on one plate, and now I try and incorporate those things into something as simple as a doughnut,” explained Olufson from Bossie’s sun-warmed patio. “I’ve been baking as long as I can remember. From the time I was 12 years old making crepes, I was obsessed.” You cannot, in good consciousness, call Bossie’s a doughnut shop as, truth be told, Olufson doesn’t make more than three dozen of them a week — and even that’s mostly on weekends when they’re more popular. But whether enjoying her simple vanilla-glazed creation that’s analogous to pull-apart monkey bread but with doughnut holes or her more mature cardamom-glazed yeast doughnut topped with candied kumquats, Bossie’s is indeed a doughy destination. Spices, like that cardamom, and herbs, such as the rosemary married with candied grapefruit, are inventively employed with regularity, but it’s the seasonal fruit that dazzles in the center ring. (Actually, Bossie’s doughnuts aren’t ring-shaped so much as squares with holes in them, a design that’s less laborious to shape in a pan.) If Olufson can’t purchase fruit at the farmers’ market, she’s not baking with them. “Every season is my favorite,” said Olufson, “and every fruit is my favorite.” Just as right now, her tangerine-ginger glazed doughnut is my favorite, until strawberry or kumquat season returns. —Brian Yaeger

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

L I F E

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GUITAR HEROES: Cast of Airness, from left, Michael Seitz, Harut Simonian, Ethan Kim, and Frances Domingos

ACHIEVING AIRNESS ACHIEVIN ACHIEVI N G AIR GUITAR AS A SOURCE OF FREEDOM AND JOY

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ast spring, Kate Bergstrom was set to direct Airness, Chelsea Marcantel’s comedy about people entered in an airguitar competition. It would have been her debut as a guest artist/lecturer in the UCSB Theater program. Then COVID hit, and suddenly everything was, well, up in the air — until she got a call from the playwright. “The faculty at UCSB asked if I’d be willing to do it on Zoom, and these two digital designers, Vickie Scott and Corwin Evans, jumped in, really game to make something wild happen,” Bergstrom said. “And as soon as the UCSB students came in, I was inspired by their resilience.” Although Marcantel wrote Airness prior to COVID-19, Bergstrom emphasizes that its message will resonate strongly with audiences who are grappling with how to get through the pandemic. “Achieving ‘airness’ in Chelsea’s script is achieving the freedom you feel dancing to your favorite song as a child, or jumping on your bed,” Bergstrom said. “It is the internal landscape that we all deserve to know from one another as adults that we keep hidden away. The play is about bringing that out and finding that radical joy.”

Bergstrom continued, adding, “We don’t only need each other to better one another’s lives; we need the fullness of ourselves…. A big part of the play is forgiveness and forgiving ourselves and one another for the times we couldn’t do it.” Bergstrom, who co-teaches a course called “Performing the Internet” at New York University, describes Airness as a “collectivist art project” that has, through trial and error, turned into a hybrid live-action animated feature. By utilizing the program Open Broadcaster Software (OBS), the Airness team has created a performance that goes beyond being just another Zoom reading. “The actors’ Zoom screens are being interfaced with these other faces that are either being filmed in real life or are animated,” Bergstrom said. “The actors are in their own homes, filming on a Zoom screen, and they have been composited with projection video designs of these moments of air guitar.” Bergstrom praised Airness’s animation and graphic designer Maison “Bub” Bray for having a “radical attitude about life” and for embodying “airness,” which is the “spirit underneath the show.” Through OBS, the set, an animated bar

INDY BOOK CLUB

THE TRAUMA CLEANER

MARCH READ

Sandra Pankhurst has been many people throughout her life, but professionally she is a trauma cleaner in Melbourne, Australia. Sandra, assigned male at birth, has lived a harrowing life. Sarah Krasnostein’s biography alternates between Sandra’s past, present, and the path that has led her to her current work and clients in the uncommon trade of trauma cleaning— cleaning, ordering, and sanitizing a space after traumatic events have occurred, such as, but not limited to, a ghastly death, fire, flood, hoarding, or meth lab. Sandra experienced extreme abuse as a child and then abuse from the outside world due to her identity as a transgender woman and, later, a sex worker. But the descriptions of Sandra’s clients and her interactions with them, no matter what the state of their homes may be, are respectful, thoughtful, and empathetic. Krasnostein ultimately

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that Bub Bray created, is projected as a background for the actors’ Zoom screens, making it appear to viewers that they are all looking at and interacting with each other in the same space. Although it was an adjustment to rehearse and prepare for such a new kind of performance, Bergstrom expressed feelings of gratitude and pride for her cast and crew, who “have gone above and beyond. They are brilliant young actors who are all just pros at making things work in a brand-new medium.” Part of the art is not hiding how the show has been made and how it is being performed. Bergstrom explained that the piece “was made during the pandemic for a pandemic audience, and it’s all about keeping spirits up and keeping people feeling engaged and warmed by everyone’s goodwill and presence.” Airness will go live on March 4 at 5:30 p.m., followed by a live Zoom Q&A. The performance will be available to watch or rewatch until March 7. For more information, visit theaterdance.ucsb.edu. To watch the opening night performance and participate in the Q&A, go to bit.ly/37oYmBE. To watch the play on demand from March 4 through March 7, go to bit.ly/37o8LgQ. —Aura Carlson

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BY SARAH KRASNOSTEIN paints a portrait of a person who is multifaceted, with faults and flaws, as well as an almost superhuman dedication to her work and life. This book examines gender identity, the impact of trauma on mental health, the search for belonging, the phases of a life, and much more. I warn the reader, however, that there is a particularly graphic description of sexual assault in the middle of this book, and some depictions of death and decay may be difficult to read. The Indy Book Club’s March theme is Biographies and Memoirs. Join us live on Zoom for a discussion of this book on April 1, 2021, at 6 p.m. You can find more recommendations on this theme and others at independent.com/indybookclub. —Caitlin Fitch

Chris Thile

A LIVING-ROOM COMPANION CHRIS THILE’S SANTA BARBARA CONNECTION

For the renowned mandolinist and Brooklyn-based raconteur Chris Thile, Santa Barbara also feels like home. In addition to being a frequent and popular guest with UCSB Arts & Lectures, Thile has appeared at the Lobero Theatre multiple times with his bands Nickel Creek and Punch Brothers. As recently as February 21 and 28 of this year, Thile and Nickel Creek originated their “livecreek” virtual performances on the streaming service Mandolin from a private home in Santa Barbara. His upcoming solo recital for the UCSB Arts & Lectures’ House Calls series on Tuesday, March 9, will be “like a living-room concert,” says Thile, “because we have a context.” Enthusing about the pleasure he’s taken in creating an original set list for that performance, Thile exclaims, “I can picture y’all!” A child bluegrass prodigy, in his musical maturity, Thile has transcended genre and category. He’s won multiple Grammys; he has recorded with Brad Mehldau, Edgar Meyer, and Yo-Yo Ma; and he earned a MacArthur Fellowship grant when he was only 31. In October 2016, Thile took over as host of A Prairie Home Companion, bringing a new vision to one of public radio’s all-time most popular shows. Despite a brilliant start that resulted in his renewal for a second season, circumstances beyond Thile’s control conspired to make the show, which he renamed Live from Here in December 2017, a casualty of the COVID pandemic’s restrictions on live performances in 2020. Thile cites the “sense of ritualistic communion” he felt as host of a live radio show as a profound inspiration, and he is looking forward to sharing some of the magic he was able to create on air with audiences online. For anyone who has attended one of Thile’s solo shows in the past, the decision to tune in for this upcoming production has likely already been made. For newcomers to Thile’s unique art, this is a great chance to catch him at his most direct and personal. For tickets and information, visit artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. —Charles Donelan


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF MARCH 4

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): In late April of 1969, Cambridgeshire,

(June 21-July 22): During World War II, the Japanese

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “How much has to be explored and

U.K., hosted the first-ever Thriplow Daffodil Weekend: a flower show highlighting 80 varieties of narcissus. In the intervening years, climate change has raised the average temperature 3.24 degrees Fahrenheit. So the flowers have been blooming progressively earlier each year, which has necessitated moving the festival back. The last pre-COVID show in 2019 was on March 23-24, a month earlier than the original. Let’s use this as a metaphor for shifting conditions in your world. I invite you to take an inventory of how your environment has been changing, and what you could do to ensure you’re adapting to new conditions.

island of Ōkunoshima housed a factory that manufactured poison gas for use in chemical warfare against China. These days, it is a tourist attraction famous for its thousands of feral but friendly bunnies. I’d love to see you initiate a comparable transmutation in the coming months, dear Cancerian: changing bad news into good news, twisted darkness into interesting light, soullessness into soulfulness. Now is a good time to ramp up your efforts.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Scars speak for you,” writes author

among ancient Egyptians, two specific questions were key in evaluating whether a human life was well-lived. They were “Did you bring joy?” and “Did you find joy?” In accordance with your current astrological potentials, I’m inviting you to meditate on those queries. And if you discover there’s anything lacking in the joy you bring and the joy you find, now is a very favorable time to make corrections.

Gena Showalter. “They say you’re strong, and you’ve survived something that might have killed others.” In that spirit, dear Leo, and in accordance with astrological omens, I invite you to authorize your scars to express interesting truths about you in the coming weeks. Allow them to demonstrate how resilient you’ve been, and how well you’ve mastered the lessons that your past suffering has made available. Give your scars permission to be wildly eloquent about the transformations you’ve been so courageous in achieving.

GEMINI

VIRGO

(May 21-June 20): At age 11, the future first President

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): According to novelist Doris Lessing, “Everybody in the world is thinking: I wish there was just one other person I could really talk to, who could really understand me, who’d be kind to me.” She implied that hardly anyone ever gets such an experience — or that it’s so rare as to be always tugging on our minds, forever a source of unquenched longing. But I’m more optimistic than Lessing. In my view, the treasured exchange she describes is not so impossible. And I think it will especially possible for you in the coming weeks. I suspect you’re entering a grace period of being listened to, understood, and treated kindly. Here’s the catch: For best results, you should be forthright in seeking it out.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Author Leo Buscaglia told us that

of the United States, George Washington, became the “owner” of 10 slaves. A few years later, he “bought” 15 more. By the time he was president, 123 men, women, and children were struggling in miserable bondage under his control. Finally, in his will, he authorized them to be freed after he and his wife died. Magnanimous? Hell, no. He should have freed those people decades earlier — or better yet, never “owned” them in the first place. Another Founding Father, Benjamin Franklin, not only freed his slaves but became an abolitionist. By my count, at least 11 of the other Founding Fathers never owned slaves. Now here’s the lesson I’d like us to apply to your life right now: Don’t procrastinate in doing the right thing. Do it now.

discarded before reaching the naked flesh of feeling,” wrote composer Claude Debussy. In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll regard his words as an incitement to do everything you can to reach the naked flesh of your feelings. Your ideas are fine. Your rational mind is a blessing. But for the foreseeable future, what you need most is to deepen your relationship with your emotions. Study them, please. Encourage them to express themselves. Respect their messages as gifts, even if you don’t necessarily act upon them.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You may never wander out alone into

a dark forest or camp all night on a remote beach or encounter a mountain lion as you climb to a glacier near the peak of a rugged mountain. But there will always be a primeval wilderness within you — uncivilized lands and untamed creatures and elemental forces that are beyond your rational understanding. That’s mostly a good thing! To be healthy and wise, you need to be in regular contact with raw nature, even if it’s just the kind that’s inside you. The only time it may be a hindrance is if you try to deny its existence, whereupon it may turn unruly and inimical. So don’t deny it! Especially now. (P.S.: To help carry out this assignment, try to remember the dreams you have at night. Keep a recorder or notebook and pen near your bed.)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “What damages a person most,” wrote

philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, “is to work, think, and feel without inner necessity, without any deep personal desire, without pleasure — as a mere automaton of duty.” Once a year, I think every one of us, including me, should meditate on that quote. Once a year, we should evaluate whether we are living according to our soul’s code; whether we’re following the path with heart; whether we’re doing what we came to earth to accomplish. In my astrological opinion, the next two weeks will be your special time to engage in this exploration.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What are your edges, Capricorn? What

aspects of your identity straddle two different categories? Which of your beliefs embrace seemingly opposed positions? In your relations with other people, what are the taboo subjects? Where are the boundaries that you can sometimes cross and other times can’t cross? I hope you’ll meditate on these questions in the coming weeks. In my astrological opinion, you’re primed to explore edges, deepen your relationship with your edges, and use your edges for healing and education and cultivating intimacy with your allies. As author Ali Smith says, “Edges are magic; there’s a kind of forbidden magic on the borders of things, always a ceremony of crossing over, even if we ignore it or are unaware of it.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): According to intermedia artist Sidney

Pink, “The idea of divine inspiration and an aha moment is largely a fantasy.” What the hell is he talking about?! That’s fake news, in my view. In the course of my creative career, I’ve been blessed with thousands of divine inspirations and aha moments. But I do acknowledge that my breakthroughs have been made possible by “hard work and unwavering dedication,” which Sidney Pink extols. Now here’s the climax of your oracle: You Aquarians are in a phase when you should be doing the hard work and unwavering dedication that will pave the way for divine inspirations and aha moments later this year.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): For you Pisceans, March is Love Yourself

Bigger and Better and Bolder Month. To prepare you for this festival, I’m providing two inspirational quotes. (1) “If you aren’t good at loving yourself, you will have a difficult time loving anyone, since you’ll resent the time and energy you give another person that you aren’t even giving to yourself.” —Barbara De Angelis (2) “Loving yourself does not mean being self-absorbed or narcissistic, or disregarding others. Rather, it means welcoming yourself as the most honored guest in your own heart, a guest worthy of respect, a lovable companion.” —Margot Anand

HOMEWORK: What’s your theme song for 2021 so far? FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Calling all bookworms!

March’s Theme: Memoirs and Biographies The Trauma Cleaner: One Extraordinary Life in the Business of Death, Decay, and Disaster

by Sarah Krasnostein

in partnership with

the Santa Barbara Public Library

Join Our

2021

News and Commentary from SB & Beyond

READING CHALLENGE

Newsmakers’ Zoom Chats Conversations with people in politics and media who are making and covering the news. Check out recent coverage of the pandemic, policing, and politics local and national, including interviews with SB School Board President Laura Capps and the Independent’s Tyler Hayden, with a look behind his current reporting on local police use-of-force incidents.

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LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: GAYLEN J. NORTON Case No.: 21PR00058 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of GAYLEN NORTON, GAYLEN JON NORTON A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SHARON ZAMORA in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: SHARON ZAMORA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 3/18/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date

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crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Some Good Things From 2020” -- it’s been a tough year, but...

54 “Foundation” author Asimov 56 Evil-___ (witch and ally of Skeletor) 1 Time’s 2020 Entertainer of 58 Drive-___ menu the Year 61 Former British Army captain 4 Goose variety who walked laps for charity 10 Go without eating in April 2020, raising over 14 Catch a bug 32 million pounds by his 15 Cover-ups 100th birthday 16 Daily Bruin publisher 65 Dull routine 17 ___-Caps (candy for moviegoers, when we went 66 Poet Pound 67 Noisy pig out to movies) 68 “Death ___ Salesman” 18 Country singer who donated $1 million to Covid 69 Element #10 70 Buddhist temple vaccine research 71 Initialism that became 20 Warmonger increasingly prevalent in 22 “Over here” 2020 23 Ronan of The Irish Tenors 24 Programming language with a coffee-cup logo 26 Ewe in the movie “Babe” 1 Shindig 28 Square root of 2, rounded 2 “Bob’s Burgers” daughter 3 Downtempo R&B songs down 4 Callous fellow 29 “Gone With the Wind” 5 Word on Hawaiian license surname plates 31 Give a big hand 6 “Blue” or “White” river 33 Got hitched 34 Pioneering Vice President- 7 Efficiently Elect of the United States 8 Crafty initials? 9 “Cleopatra” animal 37 Network (abbr.) 10 Boxer Tyson 38 Digital watch maker 11 “Don’t hesitate!” 39 “That’s a relief” 12 “Citizen Kane” actor Everett 43 Show with an unprecedented sweep of 13 Soaked up some sun 19 Game maker since 1972 seven Emmy Awards 21 Units of purity 46 “___ longa, vita brevis” 25 “Batman Forever” actor 49 Fine-tunes Kilmer 50 Oven controls 26 Deserves 51 “Cold Mountain” extra 27 Defunct Houston hockey team 52 Apple phone software 29 Approvals 53 “It ___ what you think”

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

MARCH 4, 4, 2021 2021 MARCH

30 Bale stuff 31 Winter driving needs 32 Rash action 35 Outburst usually acknowledged by others 36 Run at full speed 40 London hub 41 “Electric” fish 42 Calendar units (abbr.) 44 A Marx brother 45 Floppy followers 46 Gotten up 47 Blow up, perhaps 48 Mall pizza eatery 53 How errors may be noted 55 Words with “early age” or “impasse” 56 Like some odds 57 “Oh ___!” (song from the “Imagine” album) 59 Elizabethan collar 60 Home of Arches and Zion National Parks 62 Swabbie’s swabber 63 “Mamma ___!” (musical based on ABBA songs) 64 “Golden” time ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1021

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

33 33


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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215 Published Feb 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JANE S. DYRUFF, also known as MARGARET JANE STIVERS DYRUFF Case No.: 21PR00063 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JANE S. DYRUFF, also known as MARGARET JANE STIVERS DYRUFF A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: BRADLEY S. DYRUFF in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: BRADLEY S. DYRUFF be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in

the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 03/18/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg;1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published Feb 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PATRICIA ANN KANDLER HILES Case No.: 21PR00072 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of PATRICIA ANN KANDLER HILES A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: MARILYN D. ANTICOUNI in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: MARILYN D. ANTICOUNI be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) PROGRAM 2021-2022 Program Year Goals, Projects and Funding Allocations NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the date and time set forth below to consider the following: The purpose of this public hearing is to gather public input and obtain Council direction regarding housing and community development needs, goals and priorities, and funding allocations for the 2021-2022 program year. The City Council will consider the recommendations of its Grant Funding Review Standing Committee regarding funding allocations based on applications the City received from social service providers and identified City-sponsored capital projects. As a CDBG Entitlement Community, the City of Goleta receives funding annually from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The primary objectives of the CDBG program are the development of viable communities, decent and affordable housing and expanded economic opportunities for persons of very low, low and moderate income. The City of Goleta is required to prepare an annual Action Plan which identifies activities that will be undertaken to address public services, housing and community development needs. All interested citizens, residents, and public or private agencies serving the Goleta community are invited to attend the public hearing, which will take place virtually due to public health recommendations. MEETING DATE AND TIME:

Tuesday, March 16, 2021 Meeting begins at 5:30 p.m.

MEETING LOCATION: Pursuant to of the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular meeting of the City Council March 16, 2021, will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. City Councilmembers will be participating telephonically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. PUBLIC COMMENT: IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may be submitted as instructed above via email to cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by other electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to the conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit a comment or to call in during the hearing will be available on the City’s website: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/news-and-updates/ government-meeting-agendas-and-videos Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, at (805) 961-7500. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the meeting will enable City staff to make reasonable accommodation arrangements. For more information, please contact Claudia Dato, Senior Project Manager, by email at cdato@cityofgoleta.org or at (805) 961-7554. Information is also available on the City’s website: www.tinyurl.com/GoletaCDBG Date of Publication: March 4, 2021 (Santa Barbara Independent) 34

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MARCH 4, 2021

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Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 03/25/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: FIVE SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Marilyn D. Anticouni;1234 Santa Barbara Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 882‑9255. Published Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: BETSY L. O’GRADY Case No.: 21PR00071 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of BETSY L. O’GRADY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SHAWN W. O’GRADY in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: SHAWN W. O’GRADY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 03/25/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: Five SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to

consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Marilyn D. Anticouni;1234 Santa Barbara Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (805) 882‑9255. Published Mar 4, 11, 18 2021.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CALIFORNIA PROPERTY GROUP at 351 Hitchcock Way, Suite 110 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 3/18/2016 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2016‑0000860. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: American Dream Acquisition Group Inc. (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOACOM at 508 East Haley Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Loacom, Social Purpose Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000225. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: GOLDEN ARROW GOODS at 755 Firenze Pl Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lindsay M. Gould (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000085 Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRUISE IT at 7388 Calle Real, Unit 10 Goleta, CA 93117; Dylan J Tighe (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000259. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA PROPERTY GROUP at 351 Hitchcock Way Suite 110 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; California Property Group, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000273. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SOON CANDLE CO at 4860 Calle Real Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Brooke Thuna 1884 Ave Soltura Camarillo, CA 93010 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000280. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LEE & NEAL SEPTIC SERVICE at 136 North Quarantina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Marborg Industries (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000083. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: FEMME FATALE BEAUTY at 7098 Scripps Crescent St Goleta, CA 93117; Bahar Roxanna Bina (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000330. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COASTAL ROSE EVENTS at 6548 Covington Way Goleta, CA 93117; Emily RS Greig (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000210. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE WRITE CONTEST, THE WRITE CONTEST AND COMMUNITY at 1520 San Miguel Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Tawnya Bragg (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000096. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DIVINE HAIR STUDIO at 1810 Cliff Drive B Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Sarah L Jonas 535 East Arrellaga 18 Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000275. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND GARDENS at 2246 Lilly Ave Summerland CA 93067; Peter Berkey 931 Castillo Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000325. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUSINESS CONSULTING, MARKETING, AND CONTENT SERVICES, INC., HOME AND GARDEN DIY PROJECTS. INC., MANIFESTING YOUR DREAMS, INC. at 1524 Dutton Avenue Apt 8 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Your Real Estate Solution, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000336. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: HERB at 25 East Anapamu Street Third Floor Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Flora Media, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000362. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THREAD AND GLUE at 227 West Valerio Street Apt 3 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ian M. Wilson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000367. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TEMPEST at 136 W. Canon Perdido Street Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tempest Telecom Solutions, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000404. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUNTAIN VIEW PRODUCTIONS at 1156 N. Fairview Goleta, CA 93117; Dana B Driskel (same address) Patricia A Devlin‑Driskel (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000212. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: DANCE UNLIMITED at 5370 Hollister Ave. Suite One Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Lisa Walsh 4534 Auhay Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000110. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROSE AND SKYLER PRESS at 7297 Padova Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Theodore S Kisner (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000246. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CORRIGAN AND COMPANY at 32 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Protective Financial & Insurance Services (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000440. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021.


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LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ASK COACHING, ANGIE SWANSON‑KYRIACO COACHING, ASK LIFE COACHING at 47 Dearborn Place, #19 Goleta, CA 93117; Angela B Swanson‑Kyriaco (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000189. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HUNNYFLY WELLNESS at 103 West Walnut Ave. Lompoc, CA 93436; Martena Rachel Wilson 127 N J St. Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000218. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HUNNYFLY YOGA STUDIOS at 103 West Walnut Ave. Lompoc, CA 93436; Vihal S Yadav 127 N J St. Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000220. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIERBERG VINEYARDS, STAR LANE VINEYARDS, THREE SAINTS at 2121 Alisos Rd Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Star Lane & Dierberg Vineyards (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000468. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: LARNER VINEYARD & WINERY, LARNER VINEYARD, LARNER WINERY, LARNER WINE COMPANY, EARTHFLUENCE at 955 Ballard Canyon Road Solvang, CA 93463; Stevan Larner, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000484. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA CLEAN, SB CLEANING COMPANY at 2939 De La Vina St, Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Santa Barbara Cleaning Company (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000338. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 19 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: THE SANTA BARBARA CANDLE MAN at 1503 Clifton Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Dane M Angus (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 23, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000504. Mar 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: 2735 DE LA VINA LLC at 2735 D La Vina St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; 2735 De La Vina LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000535. Mar 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: BURKE CONSTRUCTION ADVISORS at 4141 State St., Suite C 4 1 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Burke Advisors, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000544. Mar 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JOHNATHON MICHAEL GEDSTAD ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00222 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JOHNATHON MICHAEL GEDSTAD TO: JOHNATHON MICHAEL LOYA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 3, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF CHRIS NICOLE KULIGOWSKI ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00223 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CHRIS NICOLE KULIGOWSKI TO: CHRIS NICOLE LOYA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 15, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four

successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 4, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF CONNIE AGUIRRE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04337 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CONNIE AGUIRRE TO: CONNIE SPEAR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 16, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 3, 2021. by Thomas P. Anderle. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MARIA CRISELDA VALENCIA CRUZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04059 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MARIA CRISELDA VALENCIA CRUZ TO: MARICEL VALENCIA CRUZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 8, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 29, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KAIA JOYE MOYER WESOLOWSKI and GRAHAM JAMES WESOLOWSKI ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04017 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: GLORIA BERET JUNA WESOLOWSKI TO: JUNA BERET WESOLOWSKI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes

described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 04, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF SALE OF ABANDONED PERSONAL PROPERTY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and pursuant to Sections 1993 et seq. of the California Civil Code, the property listed below, which has been abandoned by David Budlong whose last known address was 4745 Calle Camarada Santa Barbara, CA 93110 The undersigned will sell at public auction and will sell for cash in lawful money of the United States the following described personal property at the hour of 10:00a.m. on the 12th day of March, 2021 on the premises where said property has been stored and which is located at 2328 De La Vina St. #2 REAR Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Tools, ladders ,paint, shelves and other misc. items sold in lots. Auction conducted by Barry Sweet Auctioneer, Bond #70489167 CASH ONLY,Same Day Removal. Dated Feb. 19 th , 2021. Wolfe & Associates by: Kathy Palacio, 173 Chapel St. Santa Barbara, CA 93111. (805)618‑3226. Feb.25, Mar.4, 2021. FACE MASKS MUST BE WORN!

TRUSTEE NOTICE TRUSTEE SALE No. 124893 Title No. 2840904 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 09/05/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03/24/2021 at 1:00 PM, The Mortgage Law Firm, PLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded 10/17/2006, as Instrument No. 2006‑0081103, in book xx, page xx, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Santa Barbara County, State of California, executed by Franklin Y. Nicolas and Marlyn M. Nicolas, Husband and Wife as Joint Tenants, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States), At the main entrance to the County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. All right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State, described as: FULLY DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE DEED OF TRUST. APN 077‑431‑011 The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 6454 Camino Viviente, Goleta, CA 93117 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed

of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $315,651.80 If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused a Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. Dated: 2/23/2021 THE MORTGAGE LAW FIRM, PLC Adriana Durham/Authorized Signature 27455 Tierra Alta Way, Ste. B, Temecula, CA 92590 (619) 465‑8200 FOR TRUSTEE’S SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714‑730‑2727 The Mortgage Law Firm, PLC. may be attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained may be used for that purpose. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a

junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714) 730‑2727 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site ‑ www.servicelinkASAP.com ‑ for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case: 124893. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best

way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. NOTICE TO TENANT: You may have a right to purchase this property after the trustee auction pursuant to Section 2924m of the California Civil Code. If you are an “eligible tenant buyer,” you can purchase the property if you match the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. If you are an “eligible bidder,” you may be able to purchase the property if you exceed the last and highest bid placed at the trustee auction. There are three steps to exercising this right of purchase. First, 48 hours after the date of the trustee sale, you can call (714)730‑2727 for information regarding the trustee’s sale, or visit this internet website www. servicelinkASAP.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case Ts# 124893 to find the date on which the trustee’s sale was held, the amount of the last and highest bid, and the address of the trustee. Second, you must send a written notice of intent to place a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 15 days after the trustee’s sale. Third, you must submit a bid so that the trustee receives it no more than 45 days after the trustee’s sale. If you think you may qualify as an “eligible tenant buyer” or “eligible bidder,” you should consider contacting an attorney or appropriate real estate professional immediately for advice regarding this potential right to purchase.A‑4730088 03/04/2021, 03/11/2021, 03/18/2021

NOTIFICACIÓN DE AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA PROGRAMA DE SUBVENCIONES GLOBALES PARA EL DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO (CDBG por sus siglas en inglés) METAS, PROYECTOS Y ASIGNACIONES PARA EL ANO DEL PROGRAMA 2021-2022 SE NOTIFICA que el Concejo Municipal de la Ciudad de Goleta llevará a cabo una audiencia pública en la fecha y hora indicadas abajo para considerar lo siguiente: El propósito de esta audiencia es recibir opiniones del público y obtener la dirección del Concejo Municipal relativo a necesidades de viviendas y desarrollo comunitario, objetivos y prioridades, y la asignación de fondos para el año del programa 2021-2022. El Concejo Municipal considerará las recomendaciones de su comité de revisión de financiamiento de subvenciones con respecto a las asignaciones de la financiación basadas en aplicaciones recibidas por La Ciudad de proveedores de servicios sociales y de proyectos Ciudad-patrocinados identificados. Como una comunidad de CDBG de derecho, la Ciudad de Goleta recibe fondos anuales de los EE.UU. Departamento de Vivienda y Desarrollo Urbano (HUD). Los objetivos primarios del programa de CDBG son el desarrollo de comunidades viables, vivienda decente y asequible y oportunidades económicas ampliadas para las personas de ingresos muy bajos, bajos y moderados. Se requiere que la Ciudad de Goleta elabore un Plan de Acción anual que identifique las actividades que serán emprendidas para dirigir servicios públicos, necesidades de la vivienda y del desarrollo de la comunidad. Todos los interesados ciudadanos, residentes y agencias públicas o privadas sirviendo a la comunidad de Goleta están invitados a asistir a la audiencia pública, que se llevará a cabo virtualmente debido a las recomendaciones de salud pública. Reunión FECHA Y HORA:

Martes, 16 de Marzo 2021 Reunión comienza a las 5:30 PM

UBICACIÓN DE LA Reunión: De conformidad con la Orden Ejecutiva del Gobernador N-29-20 con fecha del 17 de marzo de 2020 que autoriza a las jurisdicciones locales sujetas a la Ley Brown a realizar reuniones públicas de forma telefónica y electrónica para responder a la pandemia de COVID-19, la reunión ordinaria de la Ciudad de Goleta el 16 de marzo de 2021 se llevará a cabo de forma telefónica y electrónica. Se transmitirá en vivo en el sitio web de la Ciudad y en Cable Goleta Canal 19. Las Cámaras del Concejo no estarán abiertas al público durante la reunión. Los Concejales de la Ciudad participarán telefónicamente y no estarán presentes físicamente en las Cámaras del Concejo. COMENTARIO PÚBLICO: DEBIDO A LA NECESIDAD DE LA CIUDAD DE REALIZAR REUNIONES PÚBLICAS ELECTRÓNICAMENTE Y TELEFÓNICAMENTE DURANTE LA PANDÉMICA DEL COVID-19, también se pueden enviar comentarios por escrito, como se indica arriba, por correo electrónico a cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org o por otros medios electrónicos durante la Audiencia Pública (fecha y hora mencionado anteriormente), siempre que se reciban antes de la conclusión de la sección de comentarios públicos de la Audiencia Pública. Las instrucciones sobre cómo enviar un comentario o llamar durante la audiencia estarán disponibles en el sitio web de la Ciudad: https://www.cityofgoleta.org/iwant-to/news-and-updates/government-meeting-agendas-and-videos Para más información, póngase en contacto con Jaime Valdez, a (805) 961-7568 o por correo electrónico a jvaldez@cityofgoleta.org. Información está disponible en la página web de la Cuidad: www.tinyurl.com/GoletaCDBG Nota: En cumplimiento con la Ley de Estadounidenses con Discapacidades (ADA), si usted necesita asistencia especial para participar en esta reunión, por favor póngase en contacto con Deborah Lopez, Secretario Municipal, al (805) 9617500. Notificación al menos 72 horas antes de la reunión permitirá a personal de la Ciudad a tomar las medidas razonables de alojamiento. Fecha de publicación: 4 de marzo, 2021 (Santa Barbara Independent) INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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March 4, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 790