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ALSO INSIDE!

Elementary Schools Reopening FREE

Samin Nosrat Talks Food & Fame

UCSB Presents: Fires in the Mirror, Don Giovanni

Santa Barbara

FEB. 25-MAR. 4, 2021 VOL. 35 • NO. 789

PURPLE URCHIN POSSIBILITIES Fishermen Team with Shellfish Farmers to Build New Industry, Help Kelp Forests BY MATT KETTMANN

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FEBRUARY 25, 2021

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SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 2021

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TABLE of CONTENTS

16

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Copy Editors Alexandra Mauceri, Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Esperanza Carmona, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Staff Photographer Daniel Dreifuss Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Katie Lydon, Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

COVER STORY

PANTS THE CAT DANIEL DREIFUSS

volume 35, # 789, Feb. 25-Mar. 4, 2021

Purple Urchin Possibilities

Fishermen Team with Shellfish Farmers to Build New Industry, Help Kelp Forests by Matt Kettmann

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

Starshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

ARTS LIFE.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

ASTROLOGY.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

ON THE COVER: from left: Sea urchin diver Stephanie Mutz, hatchery director Devin Spencer, and hatchery technician Becca Troske. Photo by Daniel Dreifuss. Design by Caitlin Fitch.

About 14 years ago, the feline brothers now known as Pants and Cap’n were found in the trunk of a car in downtown Los Angeles by Dr. Jessica Cooper Dreifuss, today the wife of our staff photographer, Daniel Dreifuss. “Pants is the sweetest kitty,” said Dreifuss, who fears his feline friend isn’t long for this world. “He loves people and will be happy to meow until you pet him or give him belly rubs. He likes to lie in the sun to get a tan and chases strings.” Pants is an early riser, expecting treats by 6 a.m., and likes to play “headbutt paw,” in which he headbutts people and then places his paw on them until they pay attention. “Pants loves to play with strings and will graciously attack strings, cords, and shoelaces,” said Dreifuss. “He will often sit in the kitchen window to look outside and sleep in a ball on your lap, especially if you are trying to do work.” INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE

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Virtual Events

- VIRTUAL EVENTS -

Leading activists, creatives and thinkers confront racism in America, guiding us towards racial equality

Intimate, interactive online events you won’t find anywhere else

Visual Artist, Photographer and Advocate

LaToya Ruby Frazier Art as Transformation: Using Photography for Social Change

Thu, Feb 25 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required)

Chefs in Conversation

Samin Nosrat and Yotam Ottolenghi

Pre-order Brunch from

Moderated by Sherry Villanueva, Managing Partner/Owner of Acme Hospitality

MacArthur Fellow LaToya Ruby Frazier discusses the transformative power of images and how she uses photography to fight injustice and create a more representative self-portrait.

The Lark

by 2/26 at 5 PM

Sun, Feb 28 / 11 AM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required) Chefs Samin Nosrat and Yotam Ottolenghi will share their passion for everything food, inviting the audience along for a mouthwatering evening as they dish secrets from the kitchen.

From Parnassus Books in Nashville

Ann Patchett

Legal Scholar and Social Justice Advocate

Michelle Alexander

The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness Thu, Mar 4 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required) Michelle Alexander explores the modern legal system, revealing how mass incarceration has come to replace segregation.

in Conversation with Lily King, Author of Writers & Lovers Sun, Mar 7 / 11 AM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required) A celebrated author, devoted reader and a champion of literary culture, Ann Patchett has written 13 books, including The Dutch House.

Grammy-winning Mandolin Virtuoso

Chris Thile

Tue, Mar 9 / 5 PM Pacific $10 / UCSB students: FREE! (UCSB student registration required) Chris Thile is a mandolinist, composer and vocalist with a broad outlook that encompasses classical, rock, jazz, bluegrass and more. Major Sponsors: Marcia & John Mike Cohen

Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Patty & John MacFarlane, Sara Miller McCune, Santa Barbara Foundation, Lynda Weinman & Bruce Heavin, Dick Wolf, and Zegar Family Foundation UC Santa Barbara Campus Partners:

Department of Black Studies Center for Black Studies Research Division of Social Sciences Division of Humanities and Fine Arts Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences Division of Student Affairs Gevirtz Graduate School of Education Graduate Division Bren School for Environmental Science & Management

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College of Creative Studies College of Engineering MultiCultural Center Carsey-Wolf Center The Program in Latin American and Iberian Studies UCSB Library | UCSB Reads Office of the Chancellor Office of the Vice Chancellor for Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor

Community Partners: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli Special Thanks:


FEB. 18-25, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

EDUCATION

S.B. Unified Elementary Schools Reopening

COMMUNITY

by Delaney Smith

A

fter nearly a year, Santa Barbara Unified elementary schools will be reopening to in-person instruction on Monday, March 1. The school board unanimously voted Tuesday night after the Santa Barbara County COVID case rate dropped to 16.9, which is lower than the 25 threshold required for elementary reopening. Secondary schools may reopen once it drops below 7. “There has been a tremendous amount of work done in preparation for this day,” Superintendent Hilda Maldonado said. “We continue to advocate for all of our teachers and school staff to get vaccinated. But with BACK TO SCHOOL: Franklin Elementary students have only been able to see their teachers for a few minutes a week outside of Zoom, all of this, I realize that when they pick up their schoolwork packets on Fridays. Starting Monday, elementary students will be allowed to attend class in person there will still be people two days a week. without vaccines, people who haven’t had equitable access to testing, or who feel isolated from “So keep in mind, they’re preparing for When the district re-surveyed parents on students they don’t know yet,” McBride said. their learning model preference, nearly 76 their loved ones.” For months, teachers have called on the “They need to track down their [reading] percent kept their initial choice of in-person district to continue with distance learning levels while simultaneously still teaching the learning, and 14 percent kept their distanceuntil they are able to get vaccinated. With the children that are in their classes right now.” learning choice. Some families changed their March 1 reopening, most teachers will still be McBride had more concerns but was cut minds. Six percent switched their choice unvaccinated when they return to campus. off at the two-minute public comment limit. from in-person learning to in-person and 3 Though this issue has been a driving force Boardmember Laura Capps said she would percent vice versa. against the effort to reopen schools, it isn’t hear the rest of her concerns outside of the With elementary schools reopening, midthe only issue teachers are facing with the meeting. dle and high schools are just around the corner. switch to a hybrid model. The new hybrid model has three “In terms of facilities and safety considerKaren McBride, president of the Santa cohorts — two that alternate days of in- ations, we are ready,” said Frann Wageneck, Barbara Teachers Association, said that person and online instruction, and a third assistant superintendent of student services. “The secondary principals are leading their schools right now through the processes required to begin in-person learning.” She said that this week, families of secondary students will receive notifications to confirm their learning model choice. Next week, principals will work to place students in their cohorts. In addition, earlier on Tuesday, Wageneck said secondary teachers received their 10-day notice to return to work in person. —Superintendent Hilda Maldonado Wageneck also said that new youth sports some teachers have not received teaching for families that opt to keep their child in guidance was released last week that allows assignments or class rosters—making prep- distance-only learning. Group A will attend high-contact outdoor sports to continue arations for March 1 challenging. She said school in person on Mondays and Thurs- under certain COVID precautions and after that teachers in the district have to create days while group B will attend Tuesdays and the case rate drops to 14. For Santa Barbara individualized reading materials for each Fridays. Both cohorts will attend online for a Unified, this means that soccer, football, and child in their class. short day on Wednesdays. water polo can resume. n

‘ There has been a tremendous amount of work done in preparation for this day.'

DAN I EL DR EI FUSS F I LE PHOTO

Secondary Schools Expected to Reopen Once COVID-19 Case Rate Drops Further

The county coroner concluded that nationally renowned anti-vaccine activist Brandy Vaughan, 44, died in her home on 12/7/20 of natural causes, specifically bilateral pulmonary thromboembolus, otherwise known as a blood clot in an artery. Police investigators determined there was no sign of foul play, but due to Vaughan’s high profile, Coroner’s Office officials opted to give her death more careful scrutiny. Her remains were subjected to an autopsy, “an in-depth panel of toxicology screenings,” and a review of her medical record. S.B. County Jail inmate Michael Anthony Remijio, 30, died from an apparent suicide on 2/19 after he was found unresponsive in his cell and taken to Cottage Hospital, where he succumbed to his injuries. Remijio was booked into County Jail the night before his death, which is under investigation, for a Ventura County warrant issued for failure to appear on charges of driving on a suspended license and DUI.

PUBLIC SAFETY New regulations for smoke detectors, emergency exits, and Safety Management Systems aboard overnight passenger ships are now being written by the Coast Guard, largely in response to 2019’s deadly Conception disaster. Rep Salud Carbajal, who introduced many of those safeguards in the Small Passenger Vessel Safety Act, was pleased with the actions now being taken. “The Conception boat fire was an avoidable incident,” he said, “and I’m thankful the Coast Guard is taking the necessary and imperative steps to protect lives by ensuring a similar incident does not happen again.”

COURTS & CRIME The Sheriff’s Office reported an increase in violent and property crimes from 2019 to 2020. Violent crime — including homicide, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault — increased as a whole by 7 percent, with rape up 71 percent. Instances of theft were higher in 2020 than any other year in the previous decade, with 2,010 instances over the year, a 27 percent increase, and vehicle theft up 73 percent. While violent crimes and theft increased, lesser criminal and juvenile offenses decreased by 15 percent. The EPA announced an $80,000 settlement with Golden Valley Transfer, whose tanker truck overturned on State Route 166 in March 2020, spilling 4,600 gallons of crude into the Cuyama River. Quick containment measures by S.B. County Fire, the EPA, and Caltrans kept the oil from reaching downstream stretches of the Cuyama River, including Twitchell Reservoir, which provides drinking and irrigation water to the City of Santa Maria and to the aquifer for the city of 106,000 persons. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 25, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

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FEB. 18-25, 2021

CORONAVIRUS

T

he COVID-19 pandemic has taken a terrible toll on our Santa Barbara County communities — as of this writing, 398 of our neighbors are dead. In an ongoing series, the Independent is recognizing and remembering these individuals as people, not just statistics. To share a story of a lost friend or loved one, contact Senior Editor Tyler Hayden at tyler@independent.com.

COU RTESY

Loved Ones Lost

CHRISTINA PEREZ

Christina A. Perez, affectionately called Gi-Gi by her four great-greatgrandchildren, died February 4 from COVID-19 at Cottage Hospital, where she worked for many years as a nursing assistant before her retirement. She was 93. Earlier in life, Christina had worked at a lemon-packing plant in Carpinteria. She met and married her husband of 50 years, Leopoldo, and together they raised two sons, Raymond and Robert. In addition to her boys, daughtersin-law, and her great-great-grandchildren, Christina is survived by six grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren, and many nieces and nephews. Christina had a passion for flowers and delighted in her garden on Ogan Road, her

ART MATTERS LECTURES

—— Tiffany Bell

Independent Scholar, NY

The Art of Agnes Martin: From the Perspective of Making a Catalogue Raisonné Thursday, April 1 3 pm

All lectures free via Zoom, register at tickets.sbma.net Donations welcome. 6

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FEBRUARY 25, 2021

PAU L WE LLM A N FI L E P HOTO

Thursday, March 4 3 pm

Berthe Morisot, The Mother and Sister of the Artist (detail), 1869/170. Oil on canvas. Chester Dale Collection, National Gallery of Art, 1963.10.186.

Expert Hands, Infectious Touch: Painting and Pregnancy in Morisot’s The Mother and Sister of the Artist

—Tyler Hayden

COURTS & CRIME

Mary Hunter

Associate Professor Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University

family said. Friends and relatives always looked forward to her delicious Mexican feasts. “She was known for her sweet smile, and her kind and compassionate spirit,” her family said, and her devotion to her Catholic faith was witnessed weekly at Saint Joseph Church. “Rest in peace, dear Christina,” they said.

INDEPENDENT.COM 2/17/21 12:06 PM

Teen Charged with Attempted Murder

C

ora Vides, an 18-year-old senior at Santa Barbara’s Laguna Blanca School, has been charged with attempted murder after police say she viciously stabbed a fellow student the evening of Saturday, February 13. The attack reportedly took place at Vides’s family home on the Mesa while her parents were inside the house. Authorities have released few details about the case, other than to say it was an “isolated incident.” The female victim sustained severe injuries to her throat and neck but is expected to survive. She has been transferred to a Los Angeles–area hospital for continued medical care. Vides was booked in County Jail, where she is being held on $1 million bail. She pleaded not guilty to the attempted murder charge during her February 17 arraignment

and is due back in court March 8. The charging documents described the stabbing as “willful, deliberate, and premeditated.” The private K-12 school is grappling with the shock and brutality of the crime. Questions abound, as Vides had reportedly not exhibited any warning signs. Court records reveal no previous arrests. Crisis counselors were dispatched to the campus February 16, the day after the President’s Day holiday, as instruction was temporarily suspended. In a press statement, school officials said their “hearts and thoughts” are with both families and that all possible resources will be made available to “provide the support and care needed for our community to process this difficult information.” —TH


COU RTESY

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D POLITICS

Celebrate the Santa Barbara Community Seed Swap 2021

LOCAL FOOD HERO AWARD

BIG BLUE: The 3rd Supervisorial District, shown in darker blue, is the largest in the county.

Supes’ Balance of Power at Stake

Santa Barbara Farm ers Market

New Independent Redistricting Commission Beset by Partisan Wrangling

S

by Melinda Burns

anta Barbara County’s first-ever independent redistricting commission has begun its work with the kind of partisan conflict and maneuvering that the voters had hoped to avoid when they approved the new system in 2018. The stakes are high as the County of Santa Barbara Citizens Independent Redistricting Commission embarks on the difficult task of redrawing the boundaries of the county’s five supervisorial districts, based on 2020 Census data. The supervisors ostensibly are nonpartisan; as a political matter, however, the outcome of the redistricting will determine which party and which fundamental values — liberal or conservative — control the powerful county Board of Supervisors and the $1 billion budget that it oversees. The key question: the fate of the 3rd Supervisorial District, the largest in the county, is in play. It includes both Isla Vista, a monolithic Democratic enclave of 27,000 people, mostly students, living on the coast next to UCSB; and the agricultural, more conservative, Santa Ynez Valley, on the other side of the Santa Ynez Mountains. This is the swing district that for 30 years has given Democrats a 3-2 majority on the board, along with Santa Barbara and Goleta. In the past, redistricting was done by the board itself, every 10 years. Now, the North County population, estimated at about 234,000 in 2019, has surpassed that of the South Coast, at 210,000; and the Republican Party sees its chance to gain the upper hand.

POLITICAL DIVERSITY

Republicans make up only 25 percent of registered voters in the county, but their representation on the fledgling 11-member commission has been a major topic of discussion since the group began forming itself last October. In December, the county Republican Party and the California Hispanic Chambers of Commerce sent a joint letter threatening to sue the group unless it added two Latinos, for a total of four; and one or two Republicans, for a total of up to three, to reflect the ethnic and political diversity of the county. “We need to stick to the rules,” said Bobbi McGinnis, who signed the letter as the Republican Party chair. So, on Monday, the commission unanimously named a third Republican as its 11th

member, filling a vacancy left by a Democrat who resigned in protest earlier this month. Cheryl Trosky of Montecito, a retired nurse and home health-care service owner, replaces Lollie Katz, a nurse practitioner and Carpinteria resident who quit her post on February 2, saying she lacked the “endurance or strength of belief to continue.” “I didn’t have the stomach for it,” Katz said this week. “I felt we were being pushed beyond what was reasonable by the Republican Party. I had no idea how political this was going to be.” Katz was chosen by lottery last fall as one of the first five commissioners from a pool of 45 applicants provided by the Registrar of Voters. Early on, she said, someone filed a public records request with the county to obtain her iPhone records, in case she had been texting about public business during a meeting. Katz said she had not been texting, period, and the complaint was withdrawn, but it left her feeling as if she had been targeted. “I think I was identified from the very beginning as being a lifelong Democrat,” Katz said. “I represent that with a lot of pride, frankly.”

Santa Barbara, Califor

nia, USA

We honor the Santa Barb ara Farmers Market & the exemplary grow & nourished with the ers who have kept our highest quality produce community fed & food for many decad pandemic, that made es, including during the locally grown food more COVID important than ever. stewardship of the land We honor & deeply thank & commitment to provi them for their ding a viable foodshed for the Santa Barbara community.

Santa Barbara Perm

aculture Network

January 31, 2021

Honoring the Santa Barbara Farmers Market Saturday, February 27, 11am

At the Downtown Farmers Market Info Booth

Please join us! | sbpermaculture.org VIRTUAL FOR 2021 Month long event Jan 31–Feb 28 follow us on Facebook

COMMISSION MAKEUP

Under the rules approved in the 2018 ballot initiative, the makeup of the commission is supposed to reflect the ethnic, geographic, and age diversity of the county and be “as proportional as possible” to the percentages of voters registered with each party — without applying “formulas or specific ratios.” Since last October, when the commission began forming itself, Glenn Morris, a Republican who is president and CEO of the Santa Maria Valley Chamber of Commerce, has served as its chair, winning praise from all sides. And besides Katz, another Democrat resigned; he voluntarily gave up his seat last month to a Republican. With Trosky’s appointment on Monday, the commission is now made up of four Democrats (36 percent of the 11 members); four (another 36 percent) who stated “no party preference”; and three Republicans (27 percent). That compares to 46 percent of registered voters in the county who are Democrats, 28 percent who are unaffiliated, and 25 percent who are Republicans. Nearly 40 percent of the county’s population is Latino. The commission now includes one Latino and two Latinas; they represent 27 percent of the 11 members. n

Local Food Hero Award 2021 Honors the Santa Barbara Farmers Market

13TH ANNUAL 2021 SANTA BARBARA COMMUNITY

Community Seed Grow-Out Project features the Potimarron Squash

L VIRTUA

SEED SWAP A Celebration to Bring Seeds & People Together DUE to COVID, there won’t be a physical gathering this year. We will miss you! But please join us virtually: SB Annual Community Seed Swap Facebook page. Stay tuned for online ideas and creativity. Your participation is encouraged! INDEPENDENT.COM

A community event sponsored by Santa Barbara Permaculture Network

More info: sbpermaculture.org

FEBRUARY 25, 2021

THE INDEPENDENT

7


LEN WO OD / SANTA M AR IA TIMES

FEB. 18-25, 2021

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against a Buellton gym very early in the pandemic, and minor charges against a few infected people who broke their mandatory quarantine, Santa Barbara authorities have not taken any punitive measures against either businesses or individuals. That means no criminal charges for violating the safety orders of the county’s public health officer, Dr. Henning Ansorg, or administrative remedies, such as revoking a restaurant’s license for breaching guidelines set forth by the Environmental Health Services (EHS) department. But that doesn’t mean meaningful action hasn’t been taken, explained Kelly Hubbard, director of the Santa Barbara’s Office of Emergency. Instead, she said, the county has been diligently working hand-in-hand with businesses who may, knowingly or unknowingly, run afoul of the ever-shifting landscape of COVID-19 regulations. “I think there’s a sense out there that nothing is being done,” Hubbard said. “But there is a huge task force of staff working on this every day, every week.” Hubbard stressed that the task force— composed of representatives from city governments, attorneys’ offices, law enforcement agencies, and other entities — documents and follows up on every citizen complaint. Some, however, can be difficult to verify. Others may prove totally unfounded. “We can’t issue enforcement unless it’s substantiated by a government official,” she explained. When there’s enough evidence that a violation did occur, Hubbard explained, the county’s standard response is to dispatch ambassadors of their RISE (Reopening in Safe Environment) program, who help operators understand where they slipped up and what corrections need to be made. Sometimes, a deputy will tag along. “The majority of people we talk to, we don’t see complaints there again,” Hubbard said. Last month, the Independent filed a request for statistics related to these outreach efforts, including how many house calls have been made, to which businesses, and so on. CONT’D ON PAGE 11 


COU RTESY PHOTOS

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COMMUNITY

‘THE BEST SMILE’: As a child, Angel Castillo was calm, sweet, and shy. “He had the best smile,” said his mother, Rita Castillo. As a teen, she said, “he got into trouble. Everybody does. But he was never in a gang.”

A Mother’s Grief Over Her Son’s Murder ‘My Son Had His Whole Life Ahead of Him, Too’

by Nick Welsh ita Castillo was 17 years old when she gave birth to her son Angel Leon Castillo on April 15, 2003. One month later, Castillo, a Santa Barbara native, graduated from Santa Barbara High School and then attended Santa Barbara Business College. Today, she works as a pastry chef. “We kind of grew up together,” Rita said of Angel in a recent interview. As a child, Angel was calm, sweet, and shy. “He had the best smile,” she said. “Everyone would say, ‘Yeah, I remember his smile.’ ” Just after sunset on January 3 — one day before he was scheduled to resume classes at Santa Barbara High School — Angel Castillo’s smile was extinguished with a bullet through the back, fired by an unknown assailant by the corner of Liberty and Canada streets on Santa Barbara’s lower Eastside. Angel Castillo was 17 years old. Another boy, Omar Montiel-Hernandez, was also killed. Two other teens were shot and wounded in the same incident, which the police investigators characterized as gang related. “I need to set the record straight,” said Rita Castillo. “Angel wasn’t perfect. He got into trouble. Everybody does. But he was never in a gang. You can ask anyone who knew Angel; he was never in any gang.” This matters, Rita Castillo said, because it’s the truth. It matters more because she doesn’t want the general public — and especially the police — shrugging off her son’s slaying as “just another gang shooting.” Angel was excited about his life. After struggling with learning challenges over the years, he was pulling straight A’s at school and had just been hired at an auto body shop run by his great-uncle, just a block from the family home on Haley Street. To celebrate the new job, Angel’s father, Sergio Castillo, had bought his son a new pair of brown work boots, which Angel put under his bed to keep them perfect until he began work. As a young kid, Rita Castillo said, Angel was so shy he’d look down when grown-ups called his name. As a student, he did well in math but struggled with reading and writing. He could learn things that he could visualize or imagine but needed help with words. As he moved up the educational ladder — from Cleveland Elementary to Santa Barbara Junior High School to Santa Barbara High School — school got harder for Angel Castillo. At times, he grew discouraged. Why work so hard, he wondered, if the results did not reflect it? But recently things seemed to fall into place.

R

All his life, Angel loved animals, and they loved him back. He had a pet rabbit named Chunky for whom he built a house. As he got older, he started a garden, planting vegetables, corn, and tomatoes. “We’d go to ACE Hardware and buy seeds,” Rita recalled. It turned out Angel had an intuitive flair in the kitchen. His father liked to fish and catch crabs, and when he brought home his catch, Angel would conjure up his own special sauces. “I don’t like seafood — not at all,” Rita confessed. “But he’d make us try it. My husband thought he should go to culinary school.” About two years ago, Rita said, Angel started hanging out with new friends. He started to like drinking. And he felt the pull of gang life. One of Rita’s brothers was a gang member. Angel knew people involved with gangs, and they knew him. He was interested. He and his parents argued about it, and then one day, “I don’t know what happened, but Angel said, ‘No, I don’t want to be part of it,’ ” his mother said. “He saw for himself what it was all about.”

It’s true that Angel and a few friends once rushed into a liquor store on Milpas Street, hoping to steal a few sixpacks, she said, but for his efforts, he was caught, handcuffed, and placed on unsupervised probation for six months. That was stupid, his mother admitted, but it was the sort of dumb trouble lots of teenagers get into, not just gang members. What Angel Castillo was doing at Liberty and Canada streets on the night of January 3, Rita Castillo said she doesn’t know. But she does know this: Her son was shot in the back while trying to flee. Because of COVID, she and Sergio were not allowed in the hospital. They learned their son died when one of the two teens who’d been wounded in the shooting texted his mother, who was waiting with them outside Cottage Hospital. “Angel didn’t make it.” At first, Rita refused to believe it. Later a police detective confirmed the worst. Grief and disbelief, anger and suspicion have pummeled her in the months following her son’s killing. Why haven’t the cops arrested her son’s killers yet? There were two witnesses, after all. What about all the ubiquitous security cameras? she wondered. Not one image? It was frustrating when detectives working the case didn’t return her calls in a timely fashion early on. Was her son’s death considered “just another gang shooting?” she asked. “I didn’t want to think so, but now I’m wondering.” When Sheriff ’s Office investigators claimed to have cracked a double-homicide case in Noleta that left two teenagers dead just one week after her son and Omar were killed, she watched Sheriff Bill Brown holding a press conference announcing that the alleged killers had been captured. Rita Castillo was hardly the first to notice that the victims in the case were white. News stories about the Goleta shooting tended to highlight the victims’ educational goals and ambitions. That they’d been involved in “a drug deal gone bad” seemed to Castillo as if it were stuck in as an afterthought at the end of the articles. But most of the articles about Angel’s death highlighted the gang-related aspects of the violence. “My son had his whole life ahead of him, too,” she said.  But Castillo acknowledged she’s been in a fog since her son’s murder. She can’t remember everything that’s happened and who she’s spoken to. City Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez stopped by her house, offering to be of assistance. Mayor Cathy Murillo participated in a healing ceremony on the sidewalk where the shootings took place to pacify the spirits of the slain teens.  CONT’D ON PAGE 11 

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FEBRUARY 25, 2021

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BECAUSE MASKS MAKE US STRONGER. SANTA BARBARA COUNTY COVID COALITION PARTNERS Working to prevent the spread of COVID in our community MaskedandMighty.org

In the fight against COVID, we all have a part in protecting those around us. One of our best tools is a face mask. Use a mask to cover both your nose and mouth. Wear one whenever you leave home, and you’ll be protecting your family, yourself and your community. Together we are stronger.

ALSO MIGHTY: Clean hands. Physical distancing. Mighty up, Santa Barbara.


COVID-19 CONT’D FROM P. 8 The county has so far not given a full response, but Hubbard said she would be providing the information to the Board of Supervisors at their March 3 meeting. Gyms remain an especially difficult business sector to manage, Hubbard went on. The task force discovered early on that, unlike restaurants, who answer to EHS, or salons and barbers, who are overseen by the California Board of Barbering and Cosmetology, gyms have no such regulatory body. Therefore, no clear administrative option exists. “This is a really weird one that’s taken a while to figure out,” said Hubbard. A large portion of the 2,000-plus public complaints are related to gyms. John Savrnoch, Santa Barbara’s chief deputy district attorney, said the county is keenly aware of the intense headwinds all business operators face and hesitates to do anything that would add to their problems. “We continue to be very sympathetic to the pressure that businesses are under,” he said. “Particularly small businesses. This is people’s lives, their life savings.” And it’s

not just the county that is taking a light touch with enforcement, Savrnoch explained. Individual cities and their police departments haven’t shown an appetite to drop the hammer, either. “There is not one entity involved in this that is looking to pursue criminal or punitive penalties,” he said. Savrnoch believes Santa Barbara County isn’t alone in this strategy, as jurisdictions up and down the state try to balance public health with their economic lifeblood while navigating the uncharted legal territory that has come with the pandemic. “There are still a number of cases working their way through the courts that will help define a legally correct response to an alleged violation,” he said. In the meantime, Savrnoch said, he and his colleagues will continue working behind the scenes to bring businesses up to speed on the latest regulations. “People should know the rules, but the rules change,” he said. “We don’t want to punish anyone. We just want to keep them n safe.”

ANGEL CASTILLO CONT’D FROM P. 9 Santa Barbara police detective Lieutenant Josh Morton stressed that the department is fully pursuing the murder investigation. All murders, he stressed, are taken seriously, but he can’t speak about specific details of ongoing investigations. Some murders are just harder to solve than others. Sheriffs’ investigators, for example, had the benefit of incriminating cell phone communications linking the Goleta victims with one of the accused killers. The lack of evident progress on Angel’s shooting, nevertheless, has elicited anger from many Eastside residents. “I hear the frustration out there,” said Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez, who represents that district. She has stressed the importance of good communications with the victims’ families, even when there’s little information that can be shared. Eventually the police investigators met with the families of the two murdered teens and explained why they were limited in what they could say. They asked for more patience so they could amass the evidence needed to secure an actual conviction. Castillo said the meeting helped. “We were able to ask questions and express what we were really feeling,”

she said. “I felt better afterward, but I’ll feel better after there’s an arrest.” The shooting has deeply concerned the City Council and staff about a possible chain reaction of gang retaliation and escalation. It’s a reality Rita Castillo readily acknowledges. “I know the gangs are just waiting for the cops to pull back so they can get revenge.” More killing, she said, will just beget more killing. “Angel was an innocent in this, and he got killed. Look, nobody wants these guys more than I do, but killing them isn’t going to bring Angel or Omar back. It will just mean more innocents get killed. I want them arrested, tried, and convicted. That’s what I want.” In the meantime, Rita Castillo said she has a hard time stumbling through her grief. She’s back to work. She and Sergio have a 2-year-old son to care for, but it’s hard for her to muster the energy to cook these days without Angel and his voracious appetite. And the other day, her husband came home with five crabs. For a moment Sergio was all excited about showing his catch to Angel, who would create one of his amazing sauces. Then he caught himself. Angel’s not here anymore. “What’s the use of fishing?” he asked. n

COU RTESY PHOTOS

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

FEB. 18-25, 2021

‘WHAT’S THE USE?’ Angel’s father, Sergio, liked to fish and catch crabs, and when he brought home his catch, Angel would conjure up his own special sauces. With Angel gone, Sergio now says, “What’s the use of fishing?”

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2/19/2021 5:33:21 PM


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Jon Gathercole

7/11/1948 - 3/1/2019

REMEMBERING JON GATHERCOLE July 11, 1948 to March 1, 2019 His legacy: He made us smile, He made us laugh, He made us happy. Let us resolve to make others happy, to keep Jon’s legacy alive. Jon’s legacy survives in our hearts and through his Bright Star Foundation at BrightStarGives.org

Katrina Kay Brugmann Perez 2/6/1961 - 1/28/2021

This past week we lost Katrina – dear wife, mother and friend – to metastatic breast cancer. She was just shy of celebrating her 60th birthday. Katrina was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Jean and Bruce B. Brugmann. In 1964 the Brugmanns moved to San Francisco where they founded and published the San Francisco Bay Guardian. During her high school years, Katrina worked at the newspaper doing entertainment listings and design in the art department. She attended Bradford College in Bradford, Massachusetts and graduated from Cornell University with a major in Political Science. She moved to Santa Barbara in 1982. She met and married David Perez, an electrical engineer in 1988. They raised two children, Madeline and Nicholas. Madeline is a student in Yale University’s Physician Associate Program and Nicholas is an engineer in Ventura. Katrina’s professional career included time working in marketing at KBLS 990 Radio, an education coordinator at Educational Foundation (known as EF) working with foreign exchange students, Santa Barbara Designs, and most recently at Trinity Episcopal Church in Santa Barbara, CA. At Trinity, she was an office administrator. This recent position at Trinity is what she loved the most. It was often said that the Trinity office was the heartbeat of the church. Katrina loved 12

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the staff and members of the church. She made everyone feel comfortable whenever there was a request for services or help. Homeless would often show up outside her office window and she would provide food, money or referral to a local shelter for those who needed it. As a result, she had many repeat customers. She loved working with the Santa Barbara Warming Center to provide Trinity’s space for those who would otherwise be in the inclement weather for the night. She also volunteered at the Transition House where she would prepare meals for unfortunate families in need of assistance. Katrina loved to travel. Among the many places that she traveled to were Kenya, Tanzania, Chile, the Galapagos Islands, Trinidad and Tabago, Brazil, Germany, England , France, Italy, Croatia, Canada, Hawaii, Honduras, Belize, Mexico, Ecuador, Turkey, New Caledonia, and Peru. Of these, the safari in Africa was the most memorable. She enjoyed the giraffes, white rhinos, lions, elephants, and zebras. She fondly remembered the Maasai people with their colorful robes of bright red and beautiful beaded jewelry. She created photo albums of each of these trips so that she could re-live them over and over. The day before she died, knowing the end was near, she told her mother and father with whom she traveled extensively, “We had fun, didn’t we?” Katrina was a prodigious reader, and her children loved her to read to them from the plethora of children’s books she acquired or borrowed from the Goleta Library. While her kids were attending La Patera Elementary School, she dedicated much of her free time to the La Patera Book Fair where she helped raise money for the school’s library. One of her favorite monthly gatherings was with the members of her book club to which she belonged for more than 27 years. She was also a member of the San Francisco Bay Guardian Board of Directors. Katrina loved to walk around Lake Los Carneros’ numerous paths and marvel at the flora and fauna. The view of the Santa Ynez Mountain Range was one of her favorites while on those walks. This was her daily routine rain or shine. Her family has created a Go-Fund-Me page for donations that will be used to place a bench in her honor at Lake Los Carneros. Please go to this link if you’d like to contribute: https://www. gofundme.com/f/katrina-perezmemorial-bench-at-lake-los-car neros?qid=5ee943dfd81409dd1e1 26630705adce4 She is survived by her loving husband David, daughter Madeline and son Nicholas of Santa Barbara, CA and her parents Jean and Bruce, and brother Dan Brugmann of San Francisco, CA. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to Trinity Episcopal Church 1500 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.

FEBRUARY 25, 2021

Madalyn Nadine Kelsey 1925 - 2021

BORTOLAZZO, Rosetta 1/21/1926 - 2/15/2021

will be private. Family requests that in lieu of flowers , donations be made in Rosetta’s name to Our Lady of Guadalupe Church.

Refugio P. Cortez

7/15/1927 - 2/5/2021

Former Goleta resident Madalyn Nadine Kelsey, age 95, quietly passed away in her sleep on February 13, 2021 to be embraced & reunited with her many loved ones who proceeded her. Madalyn lived a long fulfilling life, one of travel & adventure and for 62 of those years, was married to the love of her life, Charles “Chuck” Kelsey. She was born in the Northern Indiana town of Laporte, Indiana to Wilnetta & Walter Deako in 1925. She graduated from Laporte HS and attended William Woods University in Fulton, Mo. She met her future husband at a young age and they corresponded while he was overseas in World War II. Upon his return, she became a ‘war bride’ when they married in July of 1945. After Charles graduated from Indiana University in 1947, the young couple moved West to California in 1950 and lived in San Gabriel, La Cañada, San Luis Obispo, Goleta, Hawaii, Anaheim Hills, San Diego & Tucson, Az. In Santa Barbara, Charles was a teacher at Adams Elementary School and was a counselor at Dos Pueblos HS in Goleta for 10 years. One of her fondest memories was spending two summers living in a tent cabin with her ‘Ranger Chuck’ in Yosemite National Park in the 70’s. She baked bread & cakes in a wood burning stove and traded for K-rations with the Hot Shot fire crew they shared camp with at Hodgdon Meadows. Along the way, the Kelsey’s raised three children who all graduated from Dos Pueblos High School. She was active with the Methodist Church wherever she lived and became Regent of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Santa Barbara, CA. where she owned her beloved antique store, ‘The Loft’. She was an avid baker and her breads, cakes & pies were always the highlight of any family gathering. Madalyn also loved to knit and was a prolific quilter. She donated many hundreds of knitted caps each Christmas for newborn babies at St. Joseph Hospital in Orange, CA. She spent her final years in Murrieta, California. She is survived by her three children, Thomas Kelsey of Murrieta, CA; Jonathan Kelsey of Grants Pass, OR and Deborah (Kelsey)Miller of Anaheim Hills, CA.; six grandchildren & six great-grandchildren. Private services will be held at Riverside National Cemetery. In remembrance, please make a donation to the Susan G. Komen Foundation for Breast Cancer.

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It is with great sadness that we share the news of the death of Rosetta Bortolazzo on February 15, 2021. And yet, it is with great joy and love that we also celebrate the life of Rosetta. She was 95 years old. Rosetta Reginato was born in Paderno, Northern Italy on January 21, 1926. She grew up in Italy surrounded by mountains, fields and farms. It was there, when she was 27 years old, that she met the man who would become her husband, Antonio Bortolazzo. Antonio -“Tony” was from the neighboring town of Crespano del Grappa. They married on April 30, 1952 in the Basilica of San Antonio in Padova. Thereafter they moved to the United States where Tony had established himself as owner of the Italian Bakery in Santa Barbara as a well-known bread baker. They lived behind the bakery on Olive Street for several years before moving to Alisos Street, where Rosetta would call home for 64 years until her death. She lost Tony in 1971 to cancer. She raised her two children while continuing to work as a housekeeper for several families in Montecito. Rosetta maintained a very active and healthy lifestyle walking to the Santa Barbara shoreline daily! She was an active and faithful member of her beloved parish church Our Lady of Guadalupe-where she volunteered countless hours in many church activities. She was also a proud member of the local Sons of Italy club and the Italian Catholic Federation-giving once again of her time and talents to the numerous fundraising activities of both organizations. Rosetta was the first to lend a hand to whoever needed it. She was also the family historian and truly loved sharing her experiences of the “Old Country”. She is survived by her daughter Anna (Granddaughter Catherine/Corrado Franini, Great Grandsons Louis and Julian of Oregon and Granddaughter Margaret/Seth Hawthorne of Virginia) and son Tony/ Jeanne(Grandson Connor/Alison and Granddaughter Bianca). Rosetta is also survived by several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents Erminia and Giosue’ Reginato, sisters Bianca Siben, Maria Bernardi, Bruna Lucchese, and Norma Gaetan-brothers Berto Reginato and Bruno Reginato. Burial and graveside services

Remembering Refugio P Cortez Refugio was born on July 15, 1927 in Michoacan, Mexico. From a young age, Refugio was hardworking and determined. In Mexico, while working at one of his first jobs, in a corner grocery store, he used magazines to learn how to read. He traveled to America and picked lemons in the orchards of California to take care of his wife, Angelina, and two sons back in Mexico. His time away from his loved ones was difficult, but he wanted to offer his family the best life possible. In 1968 he was able to bring his entire family to live in Santa Barbara, California and they all became American citizens. In Santa Barbara, Refugio, worked for Marborg for over 30 years, and was one of their best and most beloved staff members. Refugio bought his home in Santa Barbara, which will forever be a symbol of his legacy. Because of his bravery his sons were able to live the American dream and prosper. Leo, his eldest son, owns his own small business locally and his youngest, Ernesto, became a Doctor in Long Beach, California. Refugio was extremely proud of his sons. Refugio was devoted to his family and beyond that was humble, extremely kind, giving, and full of positivity. You could often see him smiling or giggling, which would instantly warm anyone’s heart. He will be greatly missed! However, his courageous life and the decisions he made changed the path of each and every member of the Cortez family. Refugio passed away on February 5th, 2021 at the age 93 at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital and reunited with his wife, Angelina Cortez, in heaven as well as their third son, Javier. He lives on through his sons, Leo & Ernesto; his seven grandchildren; Alicia, Thomas, Lorena, Anavaleria, Andres, Angelica, Leonardo, his five great-grandchildren, whom he was fortunate to meet, as well as a huge extended family, all of whom love him dearly. A private, small family funeral will be held at Santa Barbara Cemetery Association in February 2021.


To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Steven Sanders Rosenthal 3/4/1936 - 2/12/2021

man, Calvin and Griffin. We love you Steve. You will forever be in our hearts. Condolences may be sent to Masha Rosenthal, 6020 High Street, Clayton, CA 94517 Donations in Steve’s honor may be made to: Tony La Russa’s Animal Rescue Foundation, 2890 Mitchell Drive, Walnut Creek, CA 94598 (925) 296-3156 www. arflife.org

Gail McBride Kenny Accomplished pianist Steven Sanders Rosenthal lived a life enriched by his love of music, art, food and animals. He was born on March 24, 1936 and passed away the morning of February 12, 2021 at the age of 84. Introduced to the piano at a young age, it became his lifelong love and shaped his life’s journey. Growing up in Santa Barbara, he attended Jefferson Elementary School, Santa Barbara Junior High, and High schools. As a teen, his first job was as a ballet class pianist for the famed Madame Kedrina’s Ballet School. Steve received his Bachelor of Arts Degree from UC Santa Barbara, later earning his Master’s Degree in Musicology from Brandeis University, was a Fulbright Scholar at the Sorbonne University in Paris, and pursued his Ph.D. at the University of Washington. Steve moved to New York where he enjoyed a remarkable 40 year career as the rehearsal pianist for the American Ballet Theater. He also worked with The Joffrey Ballet, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and Steps on Broadway, New York City’s premier dance studio. Steve was honored to work with Rudolf Nureyev, Jerome Robbins, George Balanchine, Mikhail Baryshnikov, and other artistic luminaries. He was an unusually gifted musician and performed ballet classics with particular precision and respect. Steve retired to Santa Barbara in 2010 and settled into a quiet life with his beloved cats. His love of music was only surpassed by his love of animals. This passion made for some memorable stories. Steve famously raised a baby raccoon as his pet while a young child and cared for many animals throughout his life. He enjoyed feeding the birds and rabbits that visited his garden daily. Steve was an accomplished chef, making exquisite and intricate dishes. It brought him great joy. An avid reader, he was often seen at the Santa Barbara Public Library. Steve’s last public performance was at the Santa Barbara Women’s Club in October 2010. Steve was loved by his family and friends and will be deeply missed. The son of Maurice and Joyce Rosenthal, and brother of Judy Swimmer, Steve is survived by his sisters, Masha Rosenthal and Holly Lindenthaler, his brothers-in-law Scott Kambic and Jonathan Lindenthaler, and his nieces and nephews Hill, Deborah, Aaron, Justin, and Jarusha, and his great nephews, Tru-

2/23/1954 - 1/31/2021

Local Artist, Gail McBride Kenny passed away at Serenity House in Santa Barbara on January 31, 2021 after a long illness. Gail was born in Houston, Texas on February 23, 1954. Growing up, Gail lived in many different parts of the country, as her father was a Navy chaplain who was reassigned every two years. Gail’s parents instilled in her a love of art and music, as well as a polite kindness that she carried with her throughout her life. In 1975, Gail came to Santa Barbara to attend UCSB. She graduated with a BA in Oriental Art History in 1978. In 1979, she started a long career with the US Postal Service with positions in payroll, accounting, operations support and budget. She retired in 2009 serving as district budget manager. She married her longtime partner and best friend, Brian Kenny in 1986. From an early age Gail produced a variety of artworks, but her work blossomed in the late 1990's when she discovered watercolor. She developed her own style with luminous images of the world around her. Gail was a member of several local art organizations and a founding member of Women with Paint, a critique group of ten local artists. She showed her work at many local shows and was a longtime member of Gallery Los Olivos. Gail shared a love of adventure with her husband. They enjoyed travelling the world together, whether visiting the major cities of Europe, backpacking in Yosemite or sailing to the Channel Islands. Gail is survived by her husband, Brian Kenny, her sister, Dr Anne McBride of New York, her brother David McBride of Michigan, her stepmother Nancy McBride of Santa Clarita, stepsisters, Merle Pettiford and Nancy Chancellor of Santa Clarita and her stepbrother Chris Selby of Michigan. If you knew her, please keep her memory alive. Due to the current pandemic, a celebration of Gail’s life will hopefully be held on a beautiful Santa Barbara day this summer. If Gail’s gentle kindness

invokes in you a feeling of generosity, please give in her memory to Serenity House/VNA Health or Ridley-Tree Cancer Center.

Patrick Allen Miller 7/25/1953 - 12/31/2020

Arthur (Art) Andreatte 3/1/1938 - 1/1/2021

Art Andreatte was a life-long Californian and baseball fanatic. He lived in Santa Barbara much of his life. Art enjoyed the beach, Chuck’s Steakhouse and talking, playing and coaching baseball. Art worked in the construction trade for many years, before studying to become a licensed electrician. He opened his own business in Santa Barbara, Grand Slam Electric, and was known for helping friends with their electrical problems. He spent time at the gym, loved being active and keeping in touch with friends. Art died of COVID-related complications a few weeks before his 83rd birthday.

Alice Mendoza

11/4/1929 - 12/1/2020

Alice Mendoza was born November 4, 1929 in Bakersfield, Calif. and sadly passed away December 1, 2020 at the age of 91 at Mission Terrace in Santa Barbara, Calif. In her later years, she suffered from kidney disease. Last December she became suddenly ill with kidney failure and couldn’t pull through. She was married to Samuel Mendoza for 57 years before Sam passed away, 17 years ago. Alice and Sam moved to Carpinteria, Calif. in 1961 from Bakersfield, Calif. with 7 children, David Mendoza deceased, Christopher Mendoza deceased, Eva Lopez married to Lupe Lopez, Andew Mendoza, Steven Mendoza deceased, Roberta Vega married to David Vega and Samuel Mendoza Jr. deceased. Has 15 grandkids, 25 great grandkids and 2 great great grandkids. Alice’s favorite pastime was reading and gardening. She also loved going to church and reading her bible daily. She loved her family! Each year we would gather and celebrate her life on her birthday! In her last days, her spirit was alive and joyful. She rested in assurance that the Lord had open arms for her. Her prayer for all of us is that we would let Him into our hearts and receive His everlasting love forever! Amen. Alice’s celebration of life and going home to be with her Lord will be February 27, 2021, 11:00 AM at South Coast Church, 5814 Cathedral Oaks Dr., Goleta. Because of COVID19 Virus we will be able to view the service outside.

On December 31st, 2020, we lost Patrick Allen Miller (“The Hammer”), husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle and friend to many, from complications due to asbestosis during open-heart surgery. He was a resident of Santa Barbara, CA for the past 20 years. Pat was born in Bakersfield, California on July 25, 1953. He served in the Navy, including a deployment in Vietnam, from 1970 until his honorable discharge in 1972. It was in the Navy where he trained as a machinist, a calling that he would pursue for most of his adult life. For nearly the last two decades he served as the in-house machinist at Asylum Research, a scientific instrument company in Santa Barbara. He not only loved creating intricate microscope parts for his job, he revered in making exquisite pieces for his own enjoyment like parts for his motorcycles, homemade chess pieces, and even funny little gadgets just for laughs. He passed on his extensive knowledge to the next generation while serving as a mentor at the Engineering Academy at Dos Pueblos High School, Santa Barbara. During a brief hiatus from machining in the late 70s and early 80s, Pat owned Escondido Cycle Supply where his work embraced his life-long passion of motorcycles. He raced dirt bikes in District 38 in San Diego county and continued to ride recreationally throughout his life. Motorcycles, and later, his brightly colored orange Manx, were the vehicles that carried him to the wide-open desert spaces in the US Southwest and Baja Mexico he so enjoyed. Every time he pulled up to a stunning viewpoint he would exclaim, “look where we are!” No motorcycle trip was complete without a craft beer and Pat was a true beer aficionado who loved both making it and enjoying it with friends. He was a certified beer judge at many county fairs and his “Hammer IPA” recipe can still be found on tap at select international breweries. He loved watching the explosion of craft brewing and attended many homebrew festivals with friends and family. It was common to see a smiling Pat at the local gun range or a blues concert. He was an avid gun collector and a long-time member of the Winchester Can-

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yon Gun Club. Music soothed Pat’s soul, especially oldies, rockn-roll and the blues. He was a member of the Santa Barbara Blues Society, attending many monthly concerts with his wife Debbie. He was, and she remains, an active member of Hope Community Church. Pat was a gentle, kind and humorous man with a huge heart who generously donated to several causes that were important to him, including charities for veterans. The many of us who loved him will miss him greatly. Pat was preceded in death by his parents Cavett Miller and Jean Combs of Bakersfield, CA . He is survived by Deborah Miller (wife); Chrystal Allen (daughter) and Elizabeth Allen (grand daughter); Mike Allen (son) and wife Stacy, and Riley and Emma Allen (grandchildren); Cavett “Mike” Miller (brother) and wife Terri; Wendy Mecum (niece) and husband Ron; Wyatt Miller (nephew); and Denise “Deni” Miller (sister) and partner Jason Cleveland.

Lilia Dolores Yanez 5/27/1933 - 1/31/2021

On Sunday January 31, 2021 Lilia Dolores Yanez went home to her Lord and Savior at the age of 87. Lilia, one of 4 siblings, was born on May 27th 1933 in El Paso, Texas and attended grammar school in the El Paso area. Lilia’s family relocated to Santa Barbra just in time for her to enroll at Santa Barbara Junior High from which she graduated in 1949. She then went on to graduate from Santa Barbara High school. Once out of high school, she went on to work in several local businesses including Infomag and Raytheon. Lilia was a devoted daughter, mother, sister, grandmother, great grandmother, aunt, and friend to many. She enjoyed spending time with friends and family and also enjoyed cooking for them. In her later years, she would spend her days doing puzzles, word searches and crocheting. Lilia is preceded in death by her mother, daughter, brother and grandson. She is survived by 2 sisters, nieces, nephews, grandchildren, great grandchildren and many friends. She will be missed and always loved. Continued on p.14

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Arturo Flores Rodriguez

OPINIONS JEFF KOTERBA

Letters

obituaries nine grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter. Family and friends are invited to Memorial Service will be held Saturday, February 27th, 2021 at the JOSEPH P. REARDON FUNERAL HOME & CREMATION SERVICE, 757 East Main Street Ventura, at 10:30 AM.

6/2/1952 - 2/14/2021

Rudolph “Rudy” Saragosa

4/14/1941 - 2/12/2021 On Sunday, February 14, 2021, Arturo Flores Rodriguez, loving husband, father and grandfather, passed away at age 68. Arturo was born on June 02, 1952 in Torreon, Coahuila, Mexico to Adela Flores and Candelario Rodriguez. His childhood years were spent in Durango, Durango, Mexico. He moved to Santa Barbara, CA in 1974. On November 9, 1990 he married Lupe Medina. He was a father to two sons Jorge and Jose, two daughters Kenya and Ari, and his stepchildren Claudia, Manuel, and Ricardo. Arturo worked for many successful restaurants in the Santa Barbara area, and later went on to own his own restaurant, Mai-Kai Restaurant, in Carpinteria, CA for several years. Arturo worked at Harding School preparing and serving meals to students. His dedication to students’ wellbeing drove his decision to work during the COVID-19 pandemic. Arturo had a passion for cooking, gardening, and his soccer team: Las Chivas de Guadalajara. He enjoyed taking daily walks in his neighborhood with his wife and three dogs. He also loved to watch wildlife documentaries, Spanish-language films, and to sing banda songs at the top of his lungs. He was known for his infectious smiles, patience, kindness, and fervor for life. His family is grateful to his nurses and doctors at Community Memorial Hospital who worked tirelessly to care for him. Arturo was preceded in death by his father Candelario, his mother Adela, and his brothers, Fernando and Jorge. He is survived by his wife, Lupe; his sons, Jose and Jorge; his daughters Kenya and her husband Ronnie; his daughter Ari; his stepchildren Claudia, Manuel and Ricardo; his brothers Esteban and Mario and sister Rosa; several nieces and nephews, 14

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Rudolph “Rudy” Saragosa, age 79, passed Friday, February 12th at Valle Verde Health Center after a long illness. Rudy was born April 14, 1941, to John Saragosa and Beatrice Escobar Saragosa (Gonzales) A lifelong resident of Santa Barbara, he was born the second of seven children. Rudy attended Santa Barbara High School and worked as a gardener at Hope Ranch, an assembler at Infared Carpinteria, 24 years at UCSB as a mail carrier, and ten at Scolari’s Food & Drug Store. In July 1971, Rudy’s boss asked him for a favor. A recent transplant from Stillwater, Oklahoma, Joy Fringer was requesting a job application. She was living with her brother Tim in the same apartment complex as Rudy’s then girlfriend. It would be quicker than the mail, if he could drop off the application instead. They had seen each other before but never interacted.  He asked her as she was new to town, if she would like to see some of Santa Barbara, so he took her on a drive all over Santa Barbara, Montecito,  Hope Ranch, and Goleta. After they went for coffee and talked for hours. They were married 11/6/71 and remained so until her passing in November 2016. Rudy is survived by his son John Paul of Santa Barbara, and sisters Gloria Dunn (Saragosa) of Bakersfield and Aurora Gonzales of Santa Barbara. Rudy was interred at Carpinteria Cemetery, where he reunited with his wife. Thanks to Coastal Cities Cremation of Ventura, Ca. There was no service due to Covid-19.

FEBRUARY 25, 2021

Yes, They Need Vaccine

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urely it is simply common sense to make vaccinating our primary and secondary school teachers a priority. The idea that people who provide such an essential service to our children and to our community need to plead for such protec—Andrew Norris, S.B. tion is mind-boggling.

Parking Discrimination

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s a chronically ill senior citizen, for many years I have walked in the dry sand at Leadbetter Beach for cardiovascular exercise, because walking in the dry sand is much easier on my arthritic joints than walking on hard surfaces. For many years, I have also purchased an annual waterfront parking permit so that I can park my VW van as close to the sand as possible. This year, the City of Santa Barbara will not allow me to purchase an annual waterfront parking permit because my van contains a bed, a sink, and a pop-top, all of which were built into the van when I obtained it in 1969. As I discovered when I moved into my current apartment, the City Parking Department requires verification of a residential address in order to receive an on-street parking permit. The city could use the same residential verification for a waterfront parking permit for vehicles like mine. As it now stands, I am very disappointed that the city is essentially discriminating against me, and other residents like me, because of the vehicles that we drive. —Bob Keats, S.B.

Ugly? What About Need!

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his letter is in response to the housing proposal at 711 North Milpas Street that was “slammed” by the Architectural Board of Review. Like many residents of the neighborhood around Milpas, I was delighted to read that the city rejected the current proposal, yet I was dismayed at the reasoning for the rejection. The Architectural Board of Review rejected the proposal because the building would be ugly. Ugly. In a part of town where the cost of living is rapidly exceeding the average pay; where families are forced to live in multi-generation households; where yet another luxury housing complex just popped up on Canon Perdido; in a place where the people are hurting, the city is worried about how the new building will look. This is an insult to the community.

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If Santa Barbara wants to get serious about its housing crisis, it must make drastic changes. The citizens of this city do not want more luxury, $3,500-a-month apartments. They want dense, affordable housing. The city regulations on height for dense housing units must be abolished. Let developers come and make Santa Barbara a place for everyone, and not just the rich. What will happen to local shops on Milpas Street as the community becomes more gentrified with luxury housing? It will start to look like State Street, where there are only two types of storefronts: high-end retailers and vacant rooms. The only possible future for Santa Barbara is an equitable one, and dense housing is the way to start.

—Alex LeBrun, S.B.

Design and Self-Expression

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rchitect Robert Ooley wrote in the American Institute of Architects column a piece titled “Standards Must Allow for Creative Expression.” In this article, published on February 4, he said, “Dictating to the design community how they are to design a building thereby narrows the architect’s innovative efforts in spite of their First Amendment right of self-expression.” I was reminded of a similar letter to the editor 16 years ago in which an architect complained about El Pueblo Viejo (Santa Barbara’s historic downtown, waterfront, and the area around the Mission). He said its restrictions stifle creativity. As evidence, he said that there were only two buildings of excellence in El Pueblo Viejo: the Arlington Theatre and the Santa Barbara County Courthouse. I wrote back pointing out that architects can and do design buildings in whatever style they choose outside El Pueblo Viejo. I asked where the buildings of excellence were outside El Pueblo Viejo. I waited and waited, but there was no response. There weren’t any buildings of excellence outside El Pueblo Viejo then; I know of none that have been built since. Creativity can be expressed even within guidelines and standards. Residents and visitors alike love Santa Barbara’s world-famous iconic architectural tradition. It can and must be maintained with the creativity already demonstrated. —Sheila Lodge, S.B.


In Memoriam

Barbara Tellefson 1936-2020

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Served People in Crisis

BY L I AT WA S S E R M A N AND T H E U N I T Y S H O P P E FA M I LY COURTESY PHOTOS

n the days after Barbara Tellefson died, we strive to improve the economic situation or sense of hopelessness experienced by our scores of well-wishers described her as neighbors, we mustn’t ever forget to show them “Saint Barbara,” an “unstoppable force for good,” “a walking heart of gold,” a respect and elevate their dignity at every turn,” woman who “inspired others to join her in she said in 2020. Thanks to Barbara, this sentimoving mountains.” She was the founder and ment has remained imbued in Unity Shoppe’s matriarch of the Unity Shoppe, which formed work core purpose to this day. in 1987 thanks in part to Kenny Loggins. In Barbara realized early on that temporary true Barbara Tellefson fashion, she convinced crises are inevitable and could occur at any him to help her get KEYT-TV to be a partner time. Whether during the 2017-2018 Thomas Fire and 1/9 Debris Flow, or today with the in what has become an annual Unity Shoppe Telethon fundraiser in support of low-income impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, Unity residents. Shoppe, under Barbara’s deft leadership, was able to undertake massive but focused proIn the last half century of her 84 years of life, Barbara was proudly a human rights grammatic overhauls to meet the specific needs of the community’s residents as they arose from champion with a strong work ethic. She each crisis. attributed her pragmatism and defense of basic human rights to fundamental values And her vision survives her passing not only instilled by her family. in Santa Barbara, where Unity Shoppe continIn the small Southern town of Dinwidues onward under new and similarly dedicated die, Virginia, Barbara absorbed important life leadership, but also in cities such as Nashville, lessons as she worked alongside her parents Tennessee, and Blacksburg, Virginia. as they learned the language and reinvented In 2012, country singer Brad Paisley and his themselves in a new world with few resources. family volunteered at Unity Shoppe while visitEmigres from Germany who managed to ing Santa Barbara. They were so taken by how escape before the full onset of World War II the mission was executed, they committed the and the atrocities of the Holocaust that would next few years to replicating the model in their hometown of Nashville, calling it The Store and ensue, her family arrived in the United States penniless. They eventually cobbled together launching it two years later. In 2019, an alumni enough money to buy a simple side-of-thecouple of Virginia Tech University put up the highway motel with adjoining dinette and gas seed money to open The Market, after learning station. Throughout her life, Barbara referred that many students attending their alma mater were struggling with food insecurity. Hema to those years in Dinwiddie as the place she and Mehul Sanghani said their desire to create developed a profound appreciation for “peoThe Market was inspired in large part by the ple of all kinds passing through on their lives’ mission and tactics employed at Unity Shoppe journeys.” under Barbara’s direction. Barbara’s father died in 1958, and her stepBarbara’s work and vision were recognized mother followed a few years later. With both time and again: She received letters of appreciaparents gone, Barbara was left to take care of her much younger brother, Stephen, a little tion from Presidents Reagan, Bush, and ClinHELP WITH DIGNITY: Barbara Tellefson regarded the Unity Shoppe staff and volunteers as an extended family, including (clockwise from left) Elvira Avina (left), who was like a daughter to her; the boy at the time. After several years of lowton; she was named Woman of the Year by the “Rein Teen” Christmas helpers; Kenny Loggins; and senior volunteers for Unity’s predecessor group, the paying jobs throughout the country in order Santa Barbara Foundation and the California Council of Christmas Cheer. Legislature; she was given Distinguished Serto find a way to make ends meet and survive vice Awards by the Anti-Defamation League, as a “single mother,” Barbara arrived in Santa Barbara in the mid-1960s — penniless and alone. She secured founded in 1917. Barbara served under Chase’s leadership for the University of Notre Dame, and the California State PTA. work as a travel agent and soon after met and married Clair more than 20 years. When asked about those early years, Bar- Her last award was perhaps the most fitting — in SeptemTellefson, an engineer, in 1969. It was then that Barbara bara explained: “I was immediately struck by how the council ber 2020, the Santa Barbara Chapter of the United Nations vowed never to forget her roots or life’s rough patches. She welcomed and aided all Santa Barbarans — the young, old, Association selected Barbara to receive the UN Award for began to actively focus on volunteer work to help struggling rich, and poor; people from all races, creeds, and colors.” As “Advancing Human Rights and Dignity.” Pearl Chase was getting ready to retire, Barbara promised In 2015, Barbara had begun penning her life story but, single mothers raise their children, much as she had. that she would “re-commit her life and resources” to unfortunately, was unable to complete the work before the helping the most vulnerable in the community as best onset of an aggressive illness and her untimely passing. as she could for as long as she could — and the Unity Above all else, Barbara dedicated herself to the people she ‘When we strive to improve helped; to her mother, father, brother, and husband, whom Shoppe sprang from that vow. the economic situation After several years of ups and downs, Barbara was she loved deeply; and to the staff of Unity Shoppe, whom she ultimately able to achieve the kind of organizational cherished and considered family. or sense of hopelessness stability and breadth of programming she felt were Barbara is survived by her niece Anita Graf Valoy of New experienced by our essential to keeping Unity Shoppe open year-round York and nephew Oren Tokatly of Israel, and also the many and relevant. In one of her last interviews, she said, she adopted into her heart and life: daughter-in-law Bernaneighbors, we mustn’t “All I’ve ever wanted was to find a way to build a ‘sus- dette Tellefson, grandson Tellef Tellefson, great-grandson ever forget to show them tainable community of support’ so that Unity Shoppe Lennon Tellefon; and her Unity Shoppe family: Sammy could be ‘just the right place’ local residents facing an Cook, Fernando Cuevas, Tricia Edwards, Donna Egeberg, respect and elevate their unforeseen crisis could go to avoid welfare dependence Gerardo Figueroa, Vanessa Gonzales, Jan Hawkins, Patricia dignity at every turn.’ or even homelessness — and, most of all, keep their Hitchcock, David Holden, Lila Leon, Gloria Meldonian, families intact.” Jeanette Moran, Christina Rodriguez, Beto Rodriguez, Vin–Barbara Tellefson But Barbara took it a step further, insisting that peo- cent Romero, Consuelo Sierra, Jose Sierra, Karina Vera, and ple in need should never be made to feel they had to especially Elvira Avina, loyal to Barbara and Unity Shoppe By 1973, Barbara began volunteering with Pearl Chase turn over their dignity, autonomy, or independent decision- for more than 29 years and whom Barbara considered a and her charity, the Council of Christmas Cheer, which was making in order to receive something in return. “When daughter.

Condolence donations honoring the enormity of Barbara’s legacy can be made to the Barbara E. Tellefson Building and Programs Fund at unityshoppe.org. INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 25, 2021

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COVER STORY

PURPLE URCHIN POSSIBILITIES FISHERMEN TEAM WITH SHELLFISH FARMER TO BUILD NEW INDUSTRY, HELP KELP FORESTS

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or a spiny creature that was quite alien

to most California seafood lovers just a few years ago, the orange-fleshed gonads of urchin were being slurped at superspeed outside of the Sea Stephanie Fish booth on a sunny Saturday morning in October 2019. As thousands meandered around the docks, tasting through the Santa Barbara Harbor Festival, we could barely keep up with the fierce carapace cracking and delicate extraction of the soft, slippery meat to satisfy the wide demographic of uni fanatics. Sea Stephanie Fish is the commercial fishing company by owned by Harry Liquornik MATT KETTMANN and Stephanie Mutz, the celebrated Santa photos by Barbara urchin diver and global uni ambassador. I’ve DANIEL DREIFUSS known Mutz for years, and she’d invited my then-9year-old son to shuck uni at that year’s fest, qualifying as his first paid gig ever. Given the apparent need for extra hands, I joined in as well, volunteering my amateur urchin-unleashing services to keep up with the constant demand. (It’s not difficult work, but prepare for a couple of days of red-stained hands.) As far as I knew, the only items on the menu were the red urchins that thrive on the rocky edges of the Santa Barbara Channel, considered the best source for uni on the planet. But every so often, someone would sneak up

toward the front of the line and inquire in hushed tones whether there were any purple urchins left. The “hotchis” had already sold out, Mutz would reply to their frowns, speaking in some secret seafood code. I’m pretty good about staying on top of culinary curiosities, especially in my own backyard, but I’d never heard of hotchis, and didn’t know that California’s purple urchins could be eaten like the reds. As Mutz quickly educated me in her matter-of-fact manner, this smaller urchin species — only about two inches wide compared to the reds’ fiveinch breadth — had only recently become an available uni option. And that was all due to a groundbreaking commercial-fishing-meets-aquaculture partnership that she and Liquornik launched with Doug Bush of The Cultured Abalone, an onshore shellfish farm on the Gaviota Coast.    Unlike most commercially caught seafood, which goes straight from the boat to the market, Mutz and Liquornik were harvesting purple urchins and delivering them to Bush to fatten in the same tanks—and on the same fresh seaweed — that he feeds his abalone. It wasn’t the first time someone thought about fattening purples or any of the other common urchin species around the world, whose smaller frames lack the consistently plump gonads as the reds. But as far as anyone can tell, this is the first time that the idea is actually creating a viable market — even through the pandemic, the supply can’t quite keep up with the demand. If the project continues to prosper, the benefits are bountiful. For uni lovers, the purples, once properly fattened, are considered even sweeter and creamier than the reds.  For the traditionally competitive commercial fishing and aquaculture industries—where creative partnerships could be fighting food insecurity and ecological imbalance in the face of overpopulation and climate change—it’s a strong symbol of hope. “This idea that fishing and aquaculture are KELP CRAVERS: Purple urchins are fed four different types of fresh kelp at The Cultured Abalone, similar to what the one million abalone eat at the same farm.

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somehow adversarial is absolute nonsense,” Bush explained to me during a phone call last week. “This project highlights that fishing and aquaculture should be a collaborative part of the local seafood economy.” And for those concerned about the health of oceans, eating purple urchins offers the opportunity to play a role—however miniscule—in culling the species’ currently problematic population densities and restoring kelp along the California coastline. As ocean waters warmed in recent years and urchin-grubbing sea stars were taken to near-extinction by disease, the purples have expanded their range and voracity, eating kelp forests clean and creating lifeless barrens like no one has ever seen. “People want to feel like their seafood is engaged with a larger context, and the hotchis represent that,” said Bush. “You’d have to eat a lot, a lot, a lot of purple urchins to create a positive impact on the impact that the urchin barrens are having on the kelp biomass. On the other hand, these are natural cycles that get out of balance, and harvesting these purple urchins and commodifying them is just another tool in the toolbox.”  For Mutz, the project goes beyond anything she’s done in an already illustrious career to popularize uni and uplift the Santa Barbara fishing community. “Let’s make this a win-win-win,” she said. “Economically, ecologically, and socially — a triple bottom line.”

SCARY SCIENCE The interconnectedness of nature is rarely laid so bare as it is in the ocean’s intertidal zone, a biologically dense arena where land meets sea in shallow waters. Today’s proliferating purple urchins are the direct result of failing relationships between predator and prey, with the warming waters of climate change powering the mess. “Southern California has always had alternating ecosystems,” explained Jenn Caselle, a research biologist at UCSB’s Marine Science Institute. “We have gone from a kelp-forested state to an urchin-barren state and then back again at some frequency. But now, especially since 2015, we’ve really been in a persistent state of warm water. It seems like that’s shocked the system into a persistent state of urchins. Barrens are now in places that they never used to be.” Mutz agrees. “They’ve always been here,” she explained. “They’re not invasive — they’re just causing a nuisance at the moment.” These warm waters likely contributed to sea star wasting disease, which has decimated populations of


CONSISTENT KEYS: Only about one in 20 purple urchins are viable in nature, but the aquaculture process makes about 19 in 20 of them ready for market.

TEAM HOTCHI: Urchin diver Stephanie Mutz (left) brings in the purple urchins to The Cultured Abalone, where employees such as Devin Spencer (center) and Becca Troske help to fatten them. sea stars from British Columbia to Baja California. “It’s actually the biggest marine mass die-off that’s ever been recorded,” said Caselle. When it comes to urchins, one of their top predators was the sunflower sea star, or Pycnopodia helianthoides, a massive, multi-armed, meter-wide beast that could usually be found prowling urchin barrens. “They just mowed them,” said Mutz. But the wasting disease made them “functionally extinct,” said Caselle, whose team hasn’t spotted one since 2014. “I have trained a whole new fleet of divers that have only seen them in pictures,” said Caselle. “That is scary stuff.” It’s not just the kelp that’s harmed by the purple proliferation. “They affect everything,” said Caselle. “It’s a low-diversity, lowproductivity system once you’ve got an urchin barren. Even the urchins don’t have anything to eat.” That’s a primary reason these seafloor-clearing purple urchins don’t usually have hearty gonads that humans want to eat — they’re starving on these barrens but can survive for literally years without eating.  Luckily for Southern California waters, Pycnopodia is not the only urchin predator. Both the Pacific spiny lobster and California sheepshead do a number on urchins. “The lobster and sheepshead, to some extent, are able to compensate for the loss of the sea star,” said Caselle, but she notes that both are also heavily fished by human predators. “Now you are putting pressure on your backups.” Northern California hasn’t been so fortunate — neither lobsters nor sheepshead venture much past the Monterey Bay. Purple urchins weren’t a problem in the past, due to the sea stars and historically large populations of sea otters, which were taken to near extinction by hunting a century ago. But with stars suddenly gone and otter numbers still a fraction of what they once were, the recent urchin impacts have been nothing short of disastrous, with kelp forests, red urchin, and abalone populations utterly decimated. “On the North Coast, they didn’t have any backup,” said Caselle. “It’s hundreds of miles of urchin barrens now and no kelp whatsoever.” What are they doing about it? “Cry-

ing,” said Caselle, and she wasn’t kidding. Urchin and abalone divers across the West Coast are partnering with ecology-minded organizations to smash and otherwise remove purples, but the human ability to counteract the issue is limited. “You’re never gonna smash all the urchins on the North Coast, but having people do something is important,” said Caselle. “They just need to be very clear on the expectations.” Caselle is also very clear that we’re never going to eat the purple urchins back into balance. “Once these purples take over, you aren’t really gonna bring in 50 million of them,” said Caselle. “It’s just not scalable.” The biggest hope right now is that nature itself fights back, whether in the form of cooler waters returning or perhaps something more drastic. “When urchins get that abundance,” said Caselle, “they’re known to have their own disease that comes through and wipes them out.”

FUN ON THE FISH FARM I didn’t get to try any of the sold-out hotchis that day of the Harbor Fest, so in February 2020, I drove up to The Cultured Abalone fish farm to get my first taste and learn more from the whole team about their project firsthand. As the four of us stood on the edge of endless rows of what look like long, industrial-sized bathtubs — all gurgling away, with flashes of seaweed floating by—Mutz sorted through the purple urchins in the closest tank, pulled a few out, and began cutting them open. Inside were uniformly sized gonads that came out with ease, at least compared to the sloppy scooping I recall from the Harbor Fest. Mutz cracked a bottle of Whitcraft chardonnay, and I plopped the meat into my mouth. Just like red urchins, they taste of the sea — briny, fresh, a bit kelpy. But the purples seemed a tad sweeter, their flesh more resilient yet still creamy in texture, the overall eating experience more compact and refined.  Chefs think so too. “The purple urchin are definitely sweeter,” said Jeff Olsson of Industrial Eats in Buellton. “They look very delicate in the little shells.” But Olsson is most fired up on how eating the hotchis are helping decrease their numbers, and that’s why Daisy Ryan of Bell’s in Los Alamos is a fan. “By eating them, you are helping the ocean’s ecosystem,” she said. In nature, Liquornik explained as we stood under the shade cloth, finishing our wine, only about one in 20 purple urchins have enough meat for humans to eat, since they’re living on those barrens. But once they are fattened in these tanks over 10 to 12 weeks on four types of fresh

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seaweed—“it was important for us not to use synthetic food,” said Mutz — as many as 19 in 20 have marketable gonads. “We get great yield and extraordinarily consistent flavors,” confirmed Mutz. “We were genuinely surprised to find out how quickly they fatted up and how delicious they were,” said Bush. “The first couple batches, everyone had the same reaction. ‘Oh my god, we might really be onto something. These are incredible!’” As to calling the purple urchin a “hotchi,” the team researched a number of potentially marketable nicknames, learning that the Spanish word “erizo” meant both “urchin” and “hedgehog.” That led to the English Romani word “hotchi-witchi,” which means hedgehog but translates directly to “forest urchin.” “Hotchi” caught on quickly.  “Our biggest challenge right now is that we have marketed ourselves too well,” Mutz told me back in 2020, just before COVID-19 came to town. She’d been popularizing the new seafood with chefs in San Francisco, Los Angeles, Portland, and even New York, not to mention hosting hotchi-showcase dinners at places like Bibi Ji in Santa Barbara.  “We got a little ahead of ourselves,” admitted Bush around that same time. “People started ordering by the hundred, and we ran out real quick. Now we have a feel for it. The flow is moving together. We’ve got the basics down. Now we’re refining things.” The pandemic hasn’t really affected anything. “Purple urchin project is full speed ahead,” Mutz emailed me in August. “Demand is high.” Just this month, she sang that same tune. “Not much has changed on our end, except demand is up!” wrote Mutz, who shifted her target market from restaurant to retail but is starting to prioritize restaurants again. “We have succeeded in 2020 because we are diversified with our markets.”

ABS & URCHINS As is clear from the farm’s name, urchins aren’t the main game at The Cultured Abalone. Bush considers the hotchis a pilot project, in which the supplies are being maintained while they figure out logistics and economics. The urchins occupy just a handful of the farm’s 400 tanks, which are dominated by one million abalone in various stages of development. That alone makes The

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PHORUM 2021

PERSPECTIVES IN HEALTHCARE

See How Music Upstages Alzheimer’s in Glen Campbell’s Unforgettable Tour I’LL BE ME

Thursday, MARCH 4 at the west wind drive-in Gates open at 5:45 PM–Film begins at 6:15 PM

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12/11/20, 2'34 PM

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THE OG TRIO: The Cultured Abalone’s Doug Bush (left) shows off some hotchis with his friends and business partners Stephanie Mutz and Harry Liquornik of Sea Stephanie Fish. Cultured Abalone a rarity in California, one of only three remaining abalone farms in a state that’s had an accelerate/hit-the-brakes relationship with aquaculture for decades. “This was the golden age of the California Department of Fish and Game supporting aquaculture,” said Bush of when the state permitted more than 30 abalone farms in the 1980s, when the initial idea for what became The Cultured Abalone was envisioned by founders Dick Craig and Ben Beede. “But they got whittled away because abalone farming is hard.” The most recent closure was The Abalone Farm in Cayucos, once a very popular and seemingly successful operation. “I am not happy that they’re gone,” said Bush. “I’m getting a lot of calls, but I liked having more of us.” The other two are the Monterey Abalone Company, which grows the shellfish in cages beneath a harbor, and American Abalone Farm in Davenport north of Santa Cruz, which recently underwent ownership and management changes.  The Cultured Abalone was officially launched on Dos Pueblos Ranch in 1995. After learning about aquaculture during his Peace Corps assignment in Malawi, getting a master’s in animal science from UC Davis, and working on projects from San Diego to Bodega Bay, Bush was lured to the company in 2004. Eight years later, he took over The Cultured Abalone with the help of his late business partner, David Albaum, who died in 2018.   “We turned this place around and kept it going,” said Bush. “The abalone business is challenging. They’re three to four years old when we sell them. Anything that takes that long to get to market size, there is just a huge amount of risk. There is so much that can go wrong, so much that can happen between spawning them and selling them.”  The economics aren’t easy, either. “It’s not very easy to respond to market pressures,” said Bush. “If demand is really good? Let’s grow more. They’ll be ready in four years.” Yet abalone does pay the bills, and it’s even done okay during COVID-19, in part because The Cultured Abalone started selling directly to consumers when the restaurant business evaporated overnight. “That took a little of the edge off of the darkness,” he said of the direct-to-consumer shift, while hoping that restaurants really come back this summer. “Things are still highly fluid. We relied on consistency. That consistency is no longer there. Every week is different.” Pandemics aside, Bush always saw the farm as a “whiteboard of creativity,” a prime place for experimentation and collaboration. “The abalone is kind of set; it’s got traction,” explained Bush, who also sells some

culinary kelp as well. “But we’ve always felt that there was a huge value in this place just from the opportunity that it creates. California is such an embarrassment of riches with respect to marine resources, full of things that can be eaten or used for some type of market application. There is so much that can be done here.” It’s not the first time anyone’s considered farming wild-caught urchins, and this trio even tried fattening red urchins a few years back but were not successful. They’ve known each other for years, and Mutz and Liquornik often work on Bush’s intake valves, which suck in 2,000 gallons of water per minute. “We get on real well,” said Bush. “We’ve had plenty of opportunities over the years to stand around the commercial pier and jaw about things.” The idea to do purples came up from those dockside conversations, just as the urchin barrens became more of a problem around the Santa Barbara Channel. A much larger outfit called Urchinomics is working on a similar idea, but across the globe, pledging to pay fishermen to harvest urchins and develop a commercial market while funding kelp restoration. According to Denise MacDonald, who is in charge of global brand marketing for Urchinomics, the company’s successful pilot project in Japan is moving toward a full commercial buildout, and a facility in Newfoundland just finished a round of urchins to test the markets in Toronto and then New York.  In California, they’ve signed a lease for a commercial site in Bodega Bay, have worked on trials with UC San Diego and UC Davis, and have an ongoing partnership with the Bay Foundation in Santa Monica. “We are exploring other sites in California as well,” said MacDonald.  But at least for now, Santa Barbara is one of the only places on the planet where hotchis can be enjoyed regularly, whether by ordering them directly through Sea Stephanie Fish and The Cultured Abalone, or finding them prepared by restaurants such as Bibi Ji on State Street, Buellton’s Industrial Eats, and Bell’s in Los Alamos. “For the consumer who cares and wants to eat with a story, that story is there for them, and it’s a good one,” said Bush. Meanwhile, in reflecting on the damage that a warming ocean continues to wage on her fishing grounds, Mutz offered her own resolution: “I will never complain about cold water again in my life.” Order your own urchin, abalone, and other seafood directly via culturedabalone.com and seastephaniefish.com.

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The above list reflects significant gifts over the past year to UCSB Arts & Lectures through January 31, 2021. We would also like to acknowledge and thank all those not listed above who have helped bring A&L’s roster of premier artists and global thinkers to Santa Barbara. Every effort has been made to assure accuracy. Please notify our office of any errors or omissions. (*deceased)

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COURTESY

Sports

One Night in La Cañada

living p. 22

MARK HOOVER

Books

Remembering the Clay-Liston Fight and Some of the Era’s Greats

Art Sylvester in the Inyo Mountains, circa 1970 A BROADCAST FOR THE AGES: Indy sports writer John Zant listened to the historic Clay-Liston bout on a transistor radio in his high school auditorium.

T

he movie One Night in Miami commemorates the night Cassius Clay, soon to be known as Muhammad Ali, proclaimed himself “The Greatest” after defeating the fierce and formidable Sonny Liston in a legendary heavyweight fight. It imagines the conversations that might have taken place among Clay, Jim Brown, Sam Cooke, and Malcolm X, who met in a hotel room after the fight. It happened on February 25, 1964, and I remember that night well. I was seated in the auditorium at St. Francis High School in La Cañada, where William Pickering, an eminent rocket scientist at the nearby Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), was the featured speaker at a banquet for academically inclined students. Don’t ask me to recall anything he said. I can report that a cheer broke out during his talk. One of my classmates, an English whiz named Rich, brought a transistor radio into the room. He concealed it under a tablecloth and set the volume at the lowest setting. Periodically bending over, he was able to follow the progress of the Clay-Liston bout, while Pickering extolled the virtues of unmanned space exploration. At the start of the seventh round, Rich heard Howard Cosell announce, “Sonny Liston is not coming out!… The winner and the new heavyweight champion of the world is Cassius Clay!” Rich spread the word at our table, which prompted an outburst that might have made Pickering wonder what he’d said to impress us. In the 57 years since then, I became a sportswriter, Rich taught literature at a girls’ Catholic high school, and Muhammad Ali achieved fame as the greatest athlete of our generation. Pickering earned several honors in his field. He was inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame in 1980, three days after Ali went into the ring at age 38 and flamed out sadly against Larry Holmes. But when he ignited the Olympic flame at Atlanta in 1996, Ali had garnered worldwide admiration that transcended sports. The legacy of William Pickering, who died in 2004, came to life last week when JPL scientists — no longer an exclusively male congregation — brilliantly masterminded the landing of Perseverance on Mars. When the rover’s touchdown was confirmed, the brainiacs in the control room lustily applauded and cheered like the fans who would be watching games at UCSB or

Westmont College if they were not banned by COVID precautions. Note: You can find livestreaming videos of the Gauchos, including their nationally ranked baseball team, and the Warriors at ucsbgauchos.com and athletics. westmont.edu. Back to that night in Miami, Jim Brown is the only surviving member of the featured foursome. I was 12 when I watched the Cleveland Browns star slash through the L.A. Rams defense for 171 yards in a 1958 game. He appeared to be bigger than linemen. I never saw a more powerful display of running the football. Which brings me to the already booming necrology of 2021. It starts with a pair of running backs. Floyd Little wore the same No. 44 at Syracuse as Brown and Ernie Davis, a Heisman Trophy winner whose life was cut short by leukemia, and the 44 he wore for the Denver Broncos was retired by the club. Little was a sweet guy who lived in Santa Barbara for a while when he owned a car dealership here. He died on January 1 at 78 in Nevada. Jaguar Jon Arnett, who once roamed the turf at the L.A. Coliseum, died on January 16 at 85. He was a shifty, elusive runner for the USC Trojans and the Rams. Baseball’s Hall of Fame took a big hit last month, losing Tommy Lasorda, Don Sutton, and Hank Aaron. Lasorda devoted his life to the Dodgers and baseball, spreading the good news all over the land, including Santa Barbara several times when he helped raise funds for UCSB’s program. Sutton got his start in professional baseball in 1965 with the erstwhile Santa Barbara Dodgers, a Single-A club, and he went on to a 23-year major league pitching career. Aaron picked up where Jackie Robinson left off, fighting prejudice with absolute dignity, and he became one of the greatest, if not the greatest, of all time. It would be remiss for me not to mention another running back, Tom Broadhead, a UCSB Hall of Famer. Known as the Camarillo Comet, he became the alltime leading Gaucho rusher in 1967 and ’68. Long after the school dropped football, he enjoyed reunions with his old teammates. Broadhead kept coming even when he was afflicted with cancer that left him, in his words, with “more bags, pouches, and organs attached to my outer body than there are within.” He died last April in Texas. That movie sent me quite far down memory lane. The road has been breaking up in obits and pieces. n

22

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by JOHN ZANT

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 25, 2021

ART SYLVESTER Brings Geology to You

D

uring 35 years of teaching geology at UCSB, Art Sylvester led more than 300 field trips, mostly across Southern California, providing the professor with repeat lessons on the region’s many ridges, canyons, and landforms of interest as seen from the major roads. While crossing the Mojave Desert on the way back from a Bryce Canyon family vacation in 2013, Sylvester realized yet again that he knew quite a bit about this and that mountain. “I know things that students these days will never know because they’re in their computers and not in the field,” he mused. “I ought to write a book about this.” About a quarter century earlier, he’d been asked to do just that by Mountain Press, which has published the popular Roadside Geology guides since 1972. But Sylvester was too busy at the time. When he called the publisher this time, they were still ready — indeed, they’d been hoping for a sequel to the Northern California guide since it came out in 1975.  Four decades later, Roadside Geology of Southern California, by Arthur Gibbs Sylvester and illustrator Elizabeth O’Black Gans, was published in 2016. “It’s what you see driving down the major highways at 65 miles an hour,” explained Sylvester.  Upon later meeting the Mountain Press publisher in person at a convention, Sylvester suggested updating Geology Underfoot in Southern California, first published in 1993 with lots of blackand-white photography. The publisher agreed, so Sylvester sought permission from the original co-author Allen Glazner (the other co-author, Robert Sharp, had died), and the project commenced. In addition to the fresh color photos, Sylvester delivered new chapters on the San Andreas Fault, Devil’s Punchbowl, and the St. Francis Dam. The update was published in 2020, and he’s now updating 1997’s Geology Underfoot in Death Valley, also written by Sharp and Glazner.  Compared to the geographically organized Roadside guides, the Underfoot chapters are vignettes that encourage visitors to “get out of your car, get out there, and walk about the geology,” said Sylvester. But the tone is similar. “We’ve set the books at the level of a first-year graduate student or, you might say, the informed and interested layman,” he explained. “We’re not trying to wow everybody with jargon, and we’re not trying to talk down to everybody.” —Matt Kettmann


living | Starshine

Fictional Friends:

COVID’s Perfect Companions

O

nce upon a time, I had friends. Actual flesh-and-blood buddies with whom I made plans. Went out. Shopped and danced. Ate and drank. Took walks. Met for coffee. Attended shows. We knew the intricacies of each other’s families, kept up on each other’s work, hobbies, and health. Their problems were mine; my struggles theirs. They felt like my Allies for All Eternity. And then the Pandemic hit. Sure, we Zoomed a few times. We tried online games. Masked and quick-footed like bandits, we dropped little treasures at each another’s doors: baked goods, lemons from the backyard tree. Then our confab dwindled to texts and comments on the occasional social post. The sad truth is that over the course of the year, my Forever Friends have become much like the perfume, wedge heels, and statement necklaces collecting dust in my bedroom: archaeological relics of The Time Before COVID. They’re all things I would miss terribly—things that would, in fact, inspire whiny-baby sobs of WHERE DID MY LIFE GO?!—if I indulged in that particular pity party. Instead, I’ve developed this almost-certainly unhealthy alternative: I’ve collecting a tribe of colorful new companions from the shows I binge on streaming services. I mean, who needs friends when you have Friends from College? The New York City dramedy follows six Harvard grads as they become adults … or don’t, as the case may be (damn it, Ethan, get your $#@% together!). Or Scott & Bailey, the British email: starshine@roshell.com show about two women detective constables—one careful, one impulsive (damn it, Rachel, get your $#@% together!). Or Rita, the Danish series about a hellraising teacher who leaves messes in her wake (for søren, Rita, get your lort together! … It seems I’m attracted to a certain kind of friend). From Netflix to Hulu to Amazon Prime, the characters on my screen these days are always there when I need them. Which is more than I can say about toilet paper. Whether I have 10 minutes while awaiting DoorDash, or an entire Saturday that should absolutely have been spent cleaning the house, my new friends are a relief to eyes tired of staring at the same real-life quarantined faces. When I watch Saul and Carrie on Homeland or Tig on One Mississippi or Lip and Fiona on Shameless before bed, I dream about them all night long. During the day, they haunt my thoughts: You know what Fiona would say in this situation? Haha, I sure do — and it would be rated TV-MA! Look, these folks must be my friends because I know the intricacies of their families; I keep up on their work, hobbies, and health. However — their problems are not mine, my struggles not theirs. And that’s by design. You see, whenever I begin to resent my new friends for being out there living their lives, roaming their make-believe worlds maskless, hugging people, sharing elevators, sharing drinks, making out with strangers (oh, Rita), and not getting COVID, I remember they’ve got other problems. And that’s what I love most about them! I duck into my shows to evade the overwhelming statistics and headlines and predictions of our current reality. To watch other people cope with other headaches. To forget, for a blissful, blue-lit spell, that we’re living — and dying — in a humanity-shifting moment that will be chronicled in history books (to say nothing of the dreadful action-movie plotlines it’s bound to engender). But while my scripted-character chums offer respite from the nonfiction nightmare that resumes when I hit pause, their friendship comes at its own cost: the dreaded series finale. I find the end of a beloved, long-running series is an emotional letdown on par with hearing your state’s going back into lockdown … again. You just think, “Honestly, I’m not sure how I’ll get through the next two weeks. Is there any chocolate??” At least I know that when quarantine finally ends, my real friends — my Allies for All Eternity—won’t be relegated to reruns. They’ll still be around to shop, dance, eat, drink, and carry on with me again in the flesh. And to call me out for ever trading them in. I can almost hear them now. Damn it, Starshine, get your $#@% together!

by Starshine

ROSHELL

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FOOD&DRINK SAMIN NOSRAT

p.25

TALIA HERMAN

lls house ca

on Fame, Food, and Writing

UCSB Arts & Lectures Hosts the Author and Cooking Show Star BY GEORGE YATCHISIN

FUN WITH FOOD: Samin Nosrat (above) is joining famous IsraeliEnglish chef and cookbook author Yotam Ottolenghi (below) for a ( friendly online conversation this Sunday, February 28.

when her preferred mentor, Thomas Lux, left the school, she deferred. “I wasn’t willing to give all of me to cooking,” said Nosrat, who is now 41 years old and has seen so many chefs of her generation, particularly women, beat up by the restaurant industry. “Cooking chews you up and spits you out.” Luckily, she audited a class with Michael Pollan, got the food-writing bug, and a scored gig on his doc Cooked, a precursor to her solo TV success. Since the instant and seemingly easy 2017 success of Salt Fat Acid Heat, Nosrat has struggled more with the follow-up. “I’m very familiar with the narrative around the second-book problem,” she said. “I’m a 99 percent procrastinator.” She’s letting this next book percolate. “I certainly used up a lot of my own personal stories in the first book, so I needed to listen,” she realized. “I needed to learn how people are eating so I can teach them how to cook. I had a plan of going out in the world and reporting, but then the pandemic happened. I started a podcast last year so people could bring their problems to me. How are people hitting walls? But COVID questions are different than regular questions.” Progress is happening, though. “Last week, I only watched TV, but I figured out all the structural problems of my book,” she said about her let-it-rest process. “I’m not a normal person — people assume I’m testing a bunch of recipes. But instead I’m creating many, many puzzles for myself. I don’t know of any other way than to make things difficult for myself. Ottolenghi has his lab, and they work on recipes — I’d implode doing that. I need to move Post-It notes around and go for a hike. At least now I have the training of being through this pain once.” Beyond the struggle to write, Nosrat still asserted that we need to “be as present with our senses as we can” in order to seriously enjoy our food. “The sensory experience of tasting can seem too monkish,” she admitted, and then her leavening sense of humor rushed in. “But don’t forget I’ve been known to eat a bag of gummy bears in one sitting, too.”

FOOD & DRINK

It’s our great fortune that she will be part of a UCSB Arts & Lectures virtual talk on Sunday, February 28, at 11 a.m. Moderated by Santa Barbara’s own restaurateur Sherry Villanueva, owner of The Lark, La Paloma, Loquita, and other hotspots, the chat also features IsraeliEnglish author/chef Yotam Ottolenghi — remember when his book Plenty would be set dressing on television shows as a symbol that characters had hip taste? “I have had the great privilege of learning from Yotam for several years now,” Nosrat said during a recent telephone call. “He’s introduced so many cooks to the part of the world we both come from. The way he uses ingredients is somewhat similar, but he says, ‘You’re really close, but you missed sweet.’ ” Ottolenghi, who lives with his family and runs several restaurants in London, has had a very different pandemic experience than Nosrat. She lives alone, and even fessed up that many of her meals during this time

have been peanut butter toast or fried eggs. Nosrat suggests viewers enjoy their talk as a peek into two friends having a conversation. She elaborated, “There’s so much stress from pandemic life, so it will be nice to have a little cozy bubble you can go to.” Despite growing up in San Diego and living much of her life in the Bay Area (including now), Nosrat hasn’t spent time in Santa Barbara and is disappointed she won’t get to come in person as originally scheduled. So much for her planned pilgrimage to Julia Child’s favorite, La Super-Rica Taqueria. But, of course, she’s most associated with Berkeley, thanks to a transformative meal at Chez Panisse. “What really moved me about Chez Panisse—I’m not sure any other restaurant would have done it for me — was that people were artists and cooks, professional musicians and bartenders. They had full lives and were good at everything they did,” she said, explaining why that dinner led her to apply as an intern. “These people were so capable and creative and could make something out of nothing. It was a portal to this other universe.” That portal was especially welcome, for she feared a corporate future. “I had no idea what to do with my life,” she said. “I did have a dreadful understanding that I would have to get a job and get a wardrobe and go to an office. I felt completely unequipped to do that. What’s Ann Taylor? I still don’t know.” Despite rising through the Chez Panisse ranks and then studying food in Italy even more seriously, her English-major roots beckoned. “I still wanted to write,” she admitted. “When I love something, I need to completely immerse myself.” She was accepted into the MFA poetry program at Sarah Lawrence, but

PEDEN MUNK

T

he James Beard Award–winning author and Netflix star Samin Nosrat needs no introduction. To call her thought- and taste-provoking Salt Fat Acid Heat a cookbook is like saying Hamlet is a ghost story—except Shakespeare didn’t have such nifty infographics.

See artsandlectures.ucsb.edu and saltfatacidheat.com.

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FEBRUARY 25, 2021

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HEATHER DAENITZ | CRAFT & CLUSTER

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STEAKS FOR SOLVANG: Demetri and Karen Loizides (below) are opening Sear Steakhouse in Solvang and will serve such dishes as seared tenderloin with ginger garlic ponzu and microgreens.

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March 10, bringing proprietary farm-sourced dining to the center of downtown Solvang. The new full-service restaurant and bar, transformed from the existing K’Syrah Catering and Events space, represents the third Santa Ynez Valley hospitality business for owners Demetri and Karen Loizides, who also own the fabled Maverick Saloon. Sear is also the second business for partner and GM Alberto Battaglini, the S.Y. Kitchen alum who also co-owns and operates Santa Ynez coffee shop Pony Espresso. Sear will source ingredients from the restaurant team’s organically farmed properties, Sear Farm and Roblar Farm, both minutes away from the restaurant’s location. With 100-plus varieties of vegetables, fruits, and herbs farmed by hand for their restaurant and catering businesses, Sear Farm sits on the Loizides’ Santa Ynez Valley land, where the family has resided since 2011. Protein will come from a Colorado farm as well as from neighboring ranches, with fresh seafood from nearby waters. Helming the kitchen is Vancouver, Washington, native Executive Chef Erik Dandee, whose two decades of restaurant experience began as a dishwasher at a family-owned steakhouse. He attended culinary school at Vancouver’s International Air and Hospitality Academy and Scottsdale Culinary Institute, which led to restaurant careers in Portland and Palm Springs at hospitality greats like the Wolfgang Puck Kitchen + Bar and Birba in the Alcazar Hotel. In early 2019, Dandee competed on Food Network Canada’s Fire Masters, a grilling competition show. Sear Steakhouse will accommodate approximately 150 diners once indoor dining rejoins the current outdoor dining, which occupies two areas. A private, hidden dining room will accommodate up to 14 guests and feature a specific tasting menu. Once events are able to resume, the restaurant and bar will be available for private parties and catering, in part or in whole, with dedicated event and tasting menus. Sear Steakhouse is located at 478 4th Place at the corner of Copenhagen Drive, Solvang. Call (805) 245-9564 or visit searsteakhouse.com.

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showing off eats and drinks during the annual event hosted by the Lompoc Valley Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau. “This year, more than ever, we are looking forward to Restaurant Week and supporting our local restaurants and wineries,” sad the chamber’s CEO, Amber Wilson. “We are hopeful the community will come out in full force and get a taste of what Lompoc has to offer.” Dining patrons can enjoy a prix-fixe meal, a two-for-one dining option, or a pairing at participating restaurants and tasting rooms for only $20.21 (plus tax and tip). Gift certificates collected from participating restaurants and wineries will be raffled off to diners who ordered a Restaurant Week special! To enter, diners can save their receipt from each Restaurant Week menu item and email, mail, or drop a copy through the mail slot at the Chamber office by March 5, 2021. To see participating businesses and view menus, visit bit.ly/3i9pp8i or call (805) 736-4567. HIBACHI CLOSING? Reader Richard let me know that employees with Hibachi Steak House & Sushi Bar at 502 State Street have said that the restaurant will be closing its doors next week. I called the eatery, and a representative tells me it is not 100 percent certain, but it is likely that operations will cease shortly. The family-owned restaurant served Santa Barbara for decades as Something’s Fishy and changed the name to Hibachi Steak House & Sushi Bar in February 2017. Before it moved to State Street, the business was located inside Santa Barbara’s Piccadilly Square, which was replaced by Paseo Nuevo in 1990.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. 26

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FEBRUARY 25, 2021

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Ridley-Tree Cancer Center

DANIEL DREIFUSS

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Community Lectures In partnership with the Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara Barbara, our Community Lectures program presents free lectures open to the community to discuss relevant topics in cancer care and cancer prevention. To adhere to social distancing guidelines, we are offering pre-recorded Community Lectures which can be viewed on our website at any time. New lectures are recorded and released regularly.

HOLLISTER BEANS: Jennifer Shively took her experience in catering and opened Dean: a coffee shop, serving both the expected coffee drinks as well as creative toasts on Hollister Avenue across from the Santa Barbara Airport.

Warm Drinks and Creative Toasts at

J

DEAN:

A COFFEE SHOP

sauces, spices, pastas, beans, and the walks into the clean, airy, and bright crowd favorite, Girl Scout cookies. Dean: a coffee shop. “I just never Victrola Roasters in Seattle supplies thought I would have the coffee beans. The rich, deep, robust flavor peeks my own place,” gushes through the foam on a Shively, who’s been Lunchbox Founder creamy cappuccino keeping Santa Barlike a smooth hit of barans delightfully sated for the past 20 espresso sunshine. Opens Up in Goleta years with her cater“They’re good to their ing company, Lunchfarmers, and they have BY REBECCA HORRIGAN long-term relationships,” box. When a friend let her know about the building explained Shively. Another for lease near the Santa Barbara Airport, unique beverage treat is their iced oat she couldn’t pass up the opportunity to milk matcha — with just three ingredients open her dream coffee shop and café. (oat milk, matcha, and simple syrup), it’s “I just said, ‘I’m gonna make this hap- the perfect refresher after a long bike ride. pen!’” explained Shively. With the help of Shively’s industry relationships are a contractor and architect, she converted carefully considered and nurtured as she the space into a modern and peace- lovingly refers to her “LTR” (long-term ful shop over the course of 10 months. relationship) with D’Angelo Bakery. The They opened in August, filling the walls beloved spot has supplied the bread for with gourmet coffee as well as delectable Lunchbox since its opening in 2000 and breakfast, lunch, and retail options. They now provides all the toast and pastry also boast a spacious patio perfect for goodness for Dean. socially distanced lounging. Located on the corner of Hollister and Anyone who’s tried Lunchbox’s fresh Frederick Lopez, this breezy spot is an and flavorful fare knows they’re in good ideal hangout for college students and hands if Shively’s behind the bar — the busy business professionals alike. While toast bar, that is. Their inventive creations many coffee shops don’t even have outlets include, as expected, a lovely avocado for lingering laptops, Dean encourages toast, but the real standout is their Date guests to hang, providing a portable batwith a Goat Toast, where creamy and tery pack for those looking to get some mild Laura Chenel goat cheese, toasted work done out of the house. walnuts, dates, arugula, and a drizzle of The shop is named after Shively’s honey dance across D’Angelo bread with beloved grandpa, Dean. Her father and brother proudly wear Dean as their mida kick of Aleppo pepper. The salami and Gruyère on toasted dle name, and there’s a school named French Seigle rye topped with a splash of after him as well. grain Dijon mayo makes for an extremely “He’s the kind of guy you would name satisfying bite. The smash bean toast with things after, since he’s so great,” Shively white beans, lemon, olive oil, wild baby explained of the former school principal. arugula, salt, and za’atar on toasted sour- “He had this warm hospitality.” dough is certain to perk up any palate. Entering this classy yet relaxed coffee If time’s tight, the grab-and-go fridge shop, where you are greeted with a smile, features pre-packaged salads, sandwiches, a brew of choice, a thoughtfully created snacks, and beverages. A quick favorite is snack, and a seat out in the patio sun, it’s the chicken salad filled with the flavors clear that Dean’s welcoming spirit infuses and textures of Fuji apples, almonds, this sweet new space as well. and dried cranberries. “The sky’s the limit with the grab and go!” said Shively, 6100-1 Hollister Ave., Ste. B, Goleta; (805) who further stocks her retail shelves with 350-4110; deancoffeeshop.com

UPCOMING TOPICS:

ennifer Shively is still in awe when she

JENNIFER SHIVELY

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Meditation in Cancer Recovery: An Integrative Approach

Breast Radiology and Pathology: Behind the Scenes of Breast Cancer Care

Sex, Intimacy & Cancer

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MOZART FOR THIS MOMENT alumnus in the late ’90s, Bayrakdarian has also graced local stages, starring in Opera Santa Barbara’s production of Janáček’s The Cunning Little Vixen in 2017, recitals at MAW’s Hahn Hall, and appearing with the St. Lawrence String Quartet at the Lobero Theatre in 2018. (Like the St. Lawrence, she has Toronto roots, as a Lebanese-born Canadian singer of Armenian lineage). Armenian heritage blends with her operatic life in the impressive 2020 album project The Other Cleopatra: Queen of Armenia (Delos Records), which began as a UCSB research project exploring baroque operas about the Armenian King Tigranes II (140-55 BCE). Bayrakdarian sees the album as “a unique chance to bridge my Armenian identity with my operatic identity. I’ve always been attracted to projects that move my spirit — which probably explains my eclectic discography. Our spirits are timeless, with many stories to tell. The more you let the spirit express itself, the more you realize what your mission is in this life.” More generally, Bayrakdarian asserts “I’m an optimist. Always have been. I believe in the power of hope and faith. I actively look for the silver lining in everything to lift me up and to bring light into my life. Even though most of my 2020 and 2021 live performances and planned tours have been canceled, many other opportunities have had a chance to bloom, and these have enriched my life in different and unexpected ways.” —Josef Woodard

4·1·1

UCSB Opera Theater’s Don Giovanni premieres on Friday, February 26, at 6 p.m. on the UCSB Department of Music YouTube channel, tinyurl.com/ucsbmusicyoutube. See music.ucsb.edu/news/event/2171.

BEACHSIDE DRIVE-INS FOR SBIFF 2021 CEL INA GAR CIA

That’s one of the pandemic pivots for the Santa Barbara International Film Festival’s 2021 edition, which runs from March 31 to April 10. SBIFF, as it’s commonly abbreviated, will also host a full slate of virtual screenings, selected from the most submissions in festival history. And there’s the regular lineup of celebrity tributes as well, including Bill Murray, Sacha Baron Cohen, Amanda Seyfried, Riz Ahmed, Maria Bakalova, Kingsley Ben-Adir, Andra Day, Sidney Flanigan, Vanessa Kirby, Tahar Rahim, Zendaya, and Delroy Lindo. They’ll be broadcast live via SBIFF’s platform. “It’s imperative we bring a sense of hopefulness to 2021, but in the safest way possible,” said SBIFF executive director Roger Durling in an email to festival attendees this week. “A virtual component was a given, but experiencing movies in socially distanced cars and being by the ocean felt oh-so-perfectly Santa Barbara, California.” The full lineup will be announced in early March. See sbiff.org. —Indy Staff

INDEPENDENT.COM

L I F E PAGE 29

COURTESY

he pandemic’s devastating effect on live, real-time culture has taken a particular toll on opera, that grand, four-century-old tradition reliant on closely intertwined and interactive parts, close quarters, and the multifaceted art of “being there”—for audiences and artists alike. Even so, opera may be down, but it is hardly out. In December, Opera Santa Barbara went to the drive-in model, with Carmen, A Live Drive-in Opera, at the Ventura County Fairgrounds. On Friday, February 26, local opera strikes again, when UCSB’s Opera Theatre presents an ambitious virtual production of Mozart’s Don Giovanni. The production, which will be permanently available on the program’s YouTube channel following its online premiere, is directed by renowned soprano Isabel Bayrakdarian and features a cast of music students recorded remotely from UCSB professor Isabel Bayrakdarian various locations. “In an ideal world,” Bayrakdarian com- excellent choice for young singers as it promented, “we would’ve come together, motes healthy singing and beautiful expresrehearsed in person with an accompanist, sion. But you can’t program Don Giovanni and then staged it for a live performance if you don’t have a great singer who can with an orchestra. However, as Carl Sagan make this larger-than-life character come says, ‘We live in an extraordinary age.’ to life, vocally and dramatically.” Enter “No one could’ve ever imagined this Valdis Jansons, a second-year Doctor in worldwide scenario where established Musical Arts voice student, who has freopera companies have been closed for quently sung the role in various European more than a year, professional opera sing- opera houses. She also double-cast Jansons ers are without jobs or singing opportuni- as Leporello, Don Givoanni’s servant, “to ties, with no end in sight,” she continued. allude to the notion that the servant and his “I wanted to give our UCSB voice students master are alter-egos, opposite sides of the a glimmer of hope as well as an enviable same person. Of course, this kind of casting opportunity to prepare a role vocally and wouldn’t have been possible if it were a live dramatically, collaborate with other musi- performance, but then again, we aren’t livcians—even if it’s remotely—and continue ing in ordinary times.” to hone their vocal technique, and of course Bayrakdarian’s rich résumé includes have the chance to perform it for a wide having sung in Mozart’s classic at the Metaudience, via a YouTube broadcast.” ropolitan Opera and the Salzburg Festival. She added that “Mozart is always an A Music Academy of the West (MAW)

ZACH MENDEZ

T

UCSB OPERA THEATRE PRESENTS DON GIOVANNI ONLINE

Roz Cornejo as Sonny Carson

FIRES IN THE MIRROR

SHEDS LIGHT ON PRESENT

It’s been 30 years since the Crown Heights riots — three days of violent conflict between Lubavitcher Jews and their Black neighbors in Brooklyn — yet the issues they raised about racial bias in policing and discrimination in health care remain as pressing today as they were in 1991. Thanks to Anna Deavere Smith’s Fires in the Mirror: Crown Heights, Brooklyn and Other Identities, a documentary play which comes to Zoom this weekend in an exciting new production by the UCSB Department of Theater, the voices, gestures, and perspectives of those involved remain available to us as tiles in a theatrical mosaic full of wisdom and pain, knowledge and suffering. Adapting what began as an in-person solo performance into something suitable for seven actors on Zoom gave director Risa Brainin a chance to guide each of her cast members toward the cascading impact first embodied by the show’s originator. For Harry Davis (UCSB BFA 2021), the task of playing more than one role reminded him of a metaphor in the script. In the same way that “a good telescope uses a large lens to take in a lot of light,” Fires in the Mirror gathers 26 points of view into a single sharp focus. Fellow cast member Rosslyn Cornejo (UCSB BFA 2019) portrays five characters, including Ntozake Shange and the Reverend Al Sharpton. She credits Smith’s visits to the show’s Zoom rehearsals with inspiring her to dig deep into the physicality of her various roles, adding that Smith insisted to everyone involved that the show should move audiences from understanding to action. Cornejo told me that the question she would like to see people asking themselves after seeing Fires in the Mirror is “not so much ‘what did that mean?’ as it is ‘what can I do?’” Fires in the Mirror will be live on Zoom February 26-27 at 7 p.m., and February 27-28 at 1 p.m. For more information, visit theaterdance.ucsb.edu. To watch the Zoom, go to bit.ly/3mDmxSk. —Charles Donelan

FEBRUARY 25, 2021

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES

CANCER

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): I invite you to think about one or

(June 21-July 22): “The only way to live is by accepting

two types of physical discomforts and symptoms that your body seems most susceptible to. Meditate on the possibility that there are specific moods or feelings associated with those discomforts and symptoms — perhaps either caused by them or the cause of them. The next step is to formulate an intention to monitor any interactions that might transpire between the bodily states and emotional states. Then make a plan for how you will address them both with your own healing power whenever they visit you in the future.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Poet Billy Collins describes “standing on the edge of a lake on a moonlit night and the light of the moon is always pointing straight at you.” I have high hopes that your entire life will be like that in the coming weeks: that you’ll feel as if the world is alive with special messages just for you; that every situation you’re in will feel like you belong there; that every intuition welling up from your subconscious mind into your conscious awareness will be specifically what you need at the moment it arrives.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’re entering a potentially heroic phase of your astrological cycle. The coming weeks will be a time when I hope you will be motivated to raise your integrity and impeccability to record levels. To inspire you, I’ve grabbed a few affirmations from a moral code reputed to be written by a 14th-century samurai warrior. Try saying them, and see if they rouse you to make your good character even better. (1) “I have no divine power; I make honesty my divine power.” (2) “I have no miracles; I make right action my miracle.” (3) “I have no enemy; I make carelessness my enemy.” (4) “I have no designs; I make ‘seizing opportunity’ my design.” (5) “I have no magic secrets; I make character my magic secret.” (6) “I have no armor; I make benevolence and righteousness my armor.”

each minute as an unrepeatable miracle,” writes Cancerian author and Buddhist teacher Jack Kornfield. I disagree with him. There are many other modes of awareness that can be useful as we navigate our labyrinthine path through this crazy world. Regarding each minute as an opportunity to learn something new, for instance: That’s an excellent way to live. Or, for another example, treating each minute as another chance to creatively express our love. But I do acknowledge that Kornfield’s approach is sublime and appealing. And I think it will be especially apropos for you during the coming weeks.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The coming weeks will be a poignant

and healing time for you to remember the people in your life who have died — as well as ancestors whom you never met or didn’t know well. They have clues to offer you, rich feelings to nourish you with, course corrections to suggest. Get in touch with them through your dreams, meditations, and reminiscences. Now read this inspiration from poet Rainer Maria Rilke: “They, who passed away long ago, still exist in us, as predisposition, as burden upon our fate, as murmuring blood, and as gesture that rises up from the depths of time.” (Translation from the German by Stephen Mitchell.)

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 25

with trees. In accordance with the astrological omens, I propose that we make him your patron saint for now. I hope you’ll be inspired to tap into your inner MauriceQuentin de la Tour.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I’m not saying there’s anything wrong

with your overall health, Libra. In fact, I expect it’s probably quite adequate. But from an astrological point of view, now is the right time to schedule an appointment for a consultation with your favorite healer, even if just by Zoom. In addition, I urge you to consult a soul doctor for a complete metaphysical check-up. Chances are that your mental health is in fair shape, too. But right now it’s not enough for your body and soul to be merely adequate; they need to receive intense doses of well-wrought love and nurturing. So I urge you to ask for omens and signs and dreams about what precisely you can do to treat yourself with exquisite care.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Love commands a vast army of

VIRGO

moods,” writes author Diane Ackerman. “Frantic and serene, vigilant and calm, wrung-out and fortified, explosive and sedate.” This fact of life will be prominently featured in your life during the coming weeks. Now is a fertile time to expand your understanding of how eros and romance work when they’re at their best — and to expand your repertoire of responses to love’s rich challenges. Don’t think of it as a tough test; imagine it as an interesting research project.

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’m fond of 18th-century Virgo

SAGITTARIUS

painter Maurice-Quentin de La Tour. Why? (1) He specialized in creating portraits that brought out his subjects’ charm and intelligence. (2) As he grew wealthier, he became a philanthropist who specialized in helping poor women and artists with disabilities. (3) While most painters of his era did self-portraits that were solemn, even ponderous, de La Tour’s selfportraits showed him smiling and good-humored. (4) Later in his life, when being entirely reasonable was no longer a top priority, de La Tour enjoyed conversing

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian poet and visual artist Wil-

liam Blake (1757-1827) cultivated a close relationship with lofty thoughts and mystical visions. He lived with his wife, Catherine, for the last 45 years of his life, but there were times when he was so preoccupied with his amazing creations that he neglected his bond with her. Catherine once said, “I have very little of Mr. Blake’s company. He is always in Paradise.” I hope that you won’t be like that in the coming weeks. Practical matters and intimate alliances need more of your attention

than usual. Consider the possibility, at least for now, of spending less time in paradise and more on earth.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Poet Robert Graves regarded the

ambiguity of poetry as a virtue, not a problem. In his view, poetry’s inscrutability reflects life’s true nature. As we read its enigmatic ideas and feelings, we may be inspired to understand that experience is too complex to be reduced to simplistic descriptions and overgeneralized beliefs. In fact, it’s quite possible that if we invite poetry to retrain our perceptions, we will develop a more tolerant and inclusive perspective toward everything. I’m telling you this, Capricorn, because whether or not you read a lot of poetry in the coming weeks, it will be wise and healthy for you to celebrate, not just tolerate, how paradoxical and mysterious the world is.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The coming weeks will be a favorable

time to shed old habits that waste your energy and create constructive new habits that will serve you well for months and years to come. To inspire and guide your efforts, I offer these thoughts from author and naturalist Henry David Thoreau: “As a single footstep will not make a path on the earth, so a single thought will not make a pathway in the mind. To make a deep physical path, we walk again and again. To make a deep mental path, we must think over and over the kind of thoughts we wish to dominate our lives.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Piscean author Anaïs Nin was a mae-

stro of metamorphosis, a virtuoso of variation, an adept at alteration. She regarded her ceaseless evolution as a privilege and luxury, not an oppressive inconvenience. “I take pleasure in my transformations,” she wrote. “I look quiet and consistent, but few know how many women there are in me.” Her approach is a healthy model for most of you Pisceans — and will be especially worth adopting in the coming weeks. I invite you to be a Change Specialist whose nickname is Flux Mojo.

HOMEWORK: Complete this sentence: “Sooner or later the pandemic will lose its power to limit us. When it does, I will _____________.” FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION T O A D M I N I S T E R E S TAT E OF: ALOYSIUS WILLIAM KOLEGRAFF Case No.: 21PR00050 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ALOYSIUS WILLIAM K O L E G R A F F, A I W . K O L E G R A F F, A I KOLEGRAFF and A W KOLEGRAFF A PETITION FOR P R O B AT E has been filed by: DAVID W. KOLEGRAFF in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: D AV I D W. K O L E G R A F F be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the d e c e d e n t ’s will a n d c o d i c i l s , i f a n y, b e admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, h o w e v e r, t h e p e r s o n a l representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the

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court should not grant t h e a u t h o r i t y. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 3 / 1 1 / 2 0 2 1 AT 9 : 0 0 a . m . Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Yo u r appearance may be in person or by your a t t o r n e y. I F Y O U A R E A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a c r e d i t o r. Yo u may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Califor nia law. Y O U M AY E X A M I N E t h e file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for P e t i t i o n e r : B a r r e t t P. O’Gorman 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215 Published Feb 11, 18, 25. 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER E S TAT E O F : J A N E S . D Y R U F F, a l s o k n o w n as MARGARET JANE STIVERS DYRUFF Case No.: 21PR00063 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JANE S. D Y R U F F, a l s o k n o w n as MARGARET JANE STIVERS DYRUFF A PETITION FOR P R O B AT E h a s b e e n f i l e d by: BRADLEY S. DYRUFF in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: BRADLEY S. DYRUFF be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the d e c e d e n t ’s will and codicils, if a n y, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the

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file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, h o w e v e r, t h e p e r s o n a l representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant t h e a u t h o r i t y. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 03/18/2021 AT 9 : 0 0 a . m . D e p t : 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF S A N TA B A R B A R A , 1100 A n a c a p a S t r e e t , P. O B o x 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Yo u r appearance may be in person or by your a t t o r n e y. I F Y O U A R E A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a c r e d i t o r. Yo u may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Califor nia law. Y O U M AY E X A M I N E t h e file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg;1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published Feb 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION T O A D M I N I S T E R E S TAT E O F : G AY L E N J . N O R T O N Case No.: 21PR00058 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may

otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of G AY L E N N O R T O N , G AY L E N J O N NORTON A PETITION FOR P R O B AT E h a s b e e n f i l e d by: SHARON ZAMORA in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: SHARON ZAMORA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the d e c e d e n t ’s will a n d c o d i c i l s , i f a n y, b e admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, h o w e v e r, t h e p e r s o n a l representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant t h e a u t h o r i t y. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 3 / 1 8 / 2 0 2 1 AT 9 : 0 0 a . m . Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Yo u r appearance may be in person or by your a t t o r n e y. I F Y O U A R E A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a c r e d i t o r. Yo u may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Califor nia law. Y O U M AY E X A M I N E t h e file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing

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of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215 Published Feb 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: C A L I F O R N I A PROPERTY GROUP at 351 Hitchcock Wa y, S u i t e 1 1 0 S a n t a Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 3/18/2016 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2016‑0000860. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: American Dream Acquisition Group Inc. (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: ASHLEY FARRELL LANDSCAPE DESIGN INC, AFLD, ASHLEY FARRELL LANDSCAPE DESIGN at 2200 White Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Ashley Farrell Landscape Design, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000123 Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: JEREMY KYLE PHOTO, JEREMY KYLE REAL E S TAT E P H O T O G R A P H Y at 811 Bath Street Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jeremy K Gruner (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Jeremy Kyle Gruner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 13, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2 0 2 1 ‑ 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 . Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BESHDA at 1600 Sycamore Canyon Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Bonnie E Sangster‑Holland (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Bonnie Sangster‑Holland Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000104. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: 2 HAWKS DOG LEASHES at 1810 Pampas Ave Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Lori G Lynch (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000150. Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BEAUTY HAIR CLUBS at 309 W Haley St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Beauty Hair Clubs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Evelia Garcia Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000205. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: S A N TA B A R B A R A A R T A N D F R A M E C O M PA N Y, SHADES PICTURE HANGING SYSTEMS at 19 West Gutierrez Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Shades International Inc. 912 Echo Lane Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000120 Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: CHRYSALIS POLE & BODY at 2600 De La Vina Street, Ste B Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Kelsey B Bodine 401 Chapala Street Unit 209 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kelsey Bodine Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000198. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: THE FENG SHUI COLLECTIVE at 145 Gerard Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Pamela Abbott‑Mouchou (same address) Lauren Nicole Bragg 3554 La Entrada Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Pamela Abbott‑Mouchou Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000191. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SANTA BARBARA GELATO, MESA G E L AT O , 8 0 5 G E L AT O , G O L E TA G E L AT O at 624 W Canon Perdido St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; James S Haskins (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: James Haskins Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000237. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FISHER‑COLODNY MEDIA, FCMEDIA at 1417 Las Positas Pl. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Kenneth Convoy (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000117 Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: F E M M E FATA L E B E A U T Y at 7098 Scripps Crescent St Goleta, CA 93117; Bahar Roxanna Bina (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000330. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CRUISE IT at 7388 Calle Real, Unit 10 Goleta, CA 93117; Dylan J Tighe (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000259. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.


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LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CALIFORNIA PROPERTY GROUP at 351 Hitchcock Way Suite 110 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; California Property Group, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000273. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOLDEN ARROW GOODS at 755 Firenze Pl Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lindsay M. Gould (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000085 Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOON CANDLE CO at 4860 Calle Real Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Brooke Thuna 1884 Ave Soltura Camarillo, CA 93010 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000280. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person‑ (s) is/are doing b u s i n e s s a s : LOACOM at 508 East Haley Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; L o a c o m , S o c i a l Purpose Corporation ( s a m e a d d r e s s ) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000225. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. F I C T I T I O U S B U S I N E S S N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business a s : B U S I N E S S C O N S U L T I N G , MARKETING, AND CONTENT SERVICES, INC., HOME AND G A R D E N D I Y PROJECTS. INC., MANIFESTING YOUR DREAMS, INC. at 1524 Dutton Avenue Apt 8 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Your Real E s t a t e S o l u t i o n , Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000336. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOODLAND GARDENS at 2246 Lilly Ave Summerland CA 93067; Peter Berkey 931 Castillo Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000325. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: C O A S TA L R O S E E V E N T S at 6548 Covington Way Goleta, CA 93117; Emily RS Greig (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000210. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIVINE HAIR STUDIO at 1810 Cliff Drive B Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Sarah L Jonas 535 East Arrellaga 18 Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000275. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LEE & NEAL SEPTIC SERVICE at 136 North Quarantina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Marborg Industries (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000083. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE WRITE C O N T E S T, THE WRITE CONTEST AND COMMUNITY at 1520 San Miguel Ave Santa Barbara, C A 9 3 1 0 9 ; Ta w n y a B r a g g (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000096. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Sunrise 6:28 Sunset 5:54

High

Thu 25

1:37 am 1.9

7:51 am 5.7

2:53 pm -1.0

9:29 pm 3.7

Fri 26

2:17 am 1.6

8:31 am 5.8

3:25 pm -1.0

9:55 pm 3.9

Sat 27

3:00 am 1.3

9:13 am 5.8

3:58 pm -0.9

10:23 pm 4.2

Sun 28

3:46 am 1.0

9:56 am 5.5

4:31 pm -0.6

10:54 pm 4.5

Mon 1

4:37 am 0.8

10:43 am 5.0

5:04 pm -0.1

11:28 pm 4.7

Tue 2

5:33 am 0.6

11:36 am 4.3

5:39 pm 0.5

Wed 3

12:07 am 4.9

6:38 am 0.5

12:41 pm 3.6

6:15 pm 1.2

Thu 4

12:53 am 5.0

7:56 am 0.4

2:12 pm 3.0

6:57 pm 1.8

19 H

27 D

5

13 D source: tides.net

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“I’m Gonna Have Some Words” -- themeless time again!

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THREAD AND GLUE at 227 West Valerio Street Apt 3 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ian M. Wilson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000367. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021.

50 Search engine input 51 Slacker’s sin 54 Edge 1 Underscores? 6 Belt holders near belts? 55 Store-hours word 56 Restoration site of 2019 15 Establish by law 16 Subject of a constitutional 58 Stops on ___ 59 Kind of phenomenon that clause explains why Ouija board 17 Culminated in planchettes move 18 Porcelain, when around 60 1996 presidential electricity candidate Alexander 19 “Must have been ___ 61 Edge news day” 62 Powers portrayer 20 Fall apart 21 Expand 22 Semiconductor 1 College founder Stanford classification whose 2 It’s the least you can rate first letter stands for 3 Phrase said with a “negative” downcast look 23 “Remove plastic,” e.g. 4 “Ghostbusters” stuff 25 Wagering venue, for short 5 Author Harriet Beecher ___ 26 ___ Webster (Twain’s 6 Beneficiaries of some “celebrated jumping frog”) trust funds 27 BBC’s Italian counterpart 7 “___ telling anyone” 29 Like some hours 8 Medium that was often 30 Salty snack from an air psychedelic in the 1960s fryer, maybe 9 Reason for a winter shot 36 Popeye, as the theme 10 Former Brazilian president song goes ___ da Silva 37 Passive-aggressive 11 “Diary of ___ Black message header implying Woman” (2005 film) you should’ve read 12 Put in writing 42 Projectile at some bars 13 Tangled 43 Formula One racer Vettel, 14 Rave flashers to fans 24 ___ d’Or (prize at Cannes) 44 Aberdeen resident 28 Mosque leader 46 Spinning stat 31 “The cow ___ [mooooo]” 47 Spoil, with “on” (pull-string toy output)

Across

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32 Like some bathrooms 33 Full of detail 34 “øPor quÈ no los ___?” 35 When Easter falls 37 It’s “like a carrot doused in perfume,” according to cookscountry.com 38 Go boom 39 More out-of-the-way 40 Hockey player’s concern 41 Producers of “Dallas,” “Falcon Crest,” and “Knots Landing” 45 1840s First Family 48 East ___ (nation since 2002) 49 Nail file material 50 Feeling of uneasiness 52 Enterprise counselor Deanna 53 Natural rope fiber 57 Exclamation often prompted by Bart Simpson ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1020

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HERB at 25 East Anapamu Street Third Floor Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Flora Media, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . FBN Number: 2021‑0000362. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUNTAIN VIEW PRODUCTIONS at 1156 N. Fairview Goleta, CA 93117; Dana B Driskel (same address) Patricia A Devlin‑Driskel (same a d d re s s ) T h i s b u s i n e s s i s conducted by a Married Couple County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000212. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: DANCE UNLIMITED at 5370 Hollister Ave. Suite One Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Lisa Walsh 4534 Auhay Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s f ro m t h e date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000110. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROSE AND SKYLER PRESS at 7297 Padova Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Theodore S Kisner (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000246. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021.

NOTICE INVITING SEALED BIDS FOR THE CROSSWALK PEDESTRIAN HYBRID BEACON ON CALLE REAL NEAR ENCINA LANE PROJECT NO. 9087 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, City of Goleta, CA PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta (“CITY”), invites sealed bids for the above stated project and will receive such bids via electronic transmission on the City of Goleta PlanetBids portal site until 3:00 P.M., March 11, 2021, and will be publicly opened and posted promptly thereafter. Copies of the Contract Documents and Specifications are available from the CITY, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 upon payment of a $50.00 non-refundable fee if picked up, or payment of a $60.00 non-refundable fee, if mailed or no payment to CITY if obtained from the CITY website at http://www.cityofgoleta.org/i-want-to/ view/city-bid-opportunities. The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plant and equipment necessary to construct and deliver a finished Crosswalk Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon on Calle Real near Encina Lane Project No. 9087. Work includes construction of a new Pedestrian Hybrid Beacon (PHB) signal-controlled crosswalk with mast arms, developing a power supply, installing pedestrian push buttons, constructing ADA accessible ramps, new crosswalk striping, pavement markings and installing applicable PHB warning and control signage. The contract period is Thirty (30) Working Days. A Pre-Bid Meeting is not scheduled for this project. Bidders must be registered on the City of Goleta’s PlanetBids portal in order to receive addendum notifications and to submit a bid. Go to PlanetBids for bid results and awards. It is the responsibility of the bidder to submit the bid with sufficient time to be received by PlanetBids prior to the bid opening date and time. Allow time for technical difficulties, uploading, and unexpected delays. Late or incomplete bids will not be accepted. The bid must be accompanied by a bid security in the form of a money order, a certified cashier’s check, or bidder’s bond executed by an admitted surety, made payable to CITY. The bid security shall be an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the total annual bid amount included with their proposals as required by California law. Note: All bids must be accompanied by a scanned copy of the bid security uploaded to PlanetBids. The original security of the three (3) lowest bidders must be mailed or submitted to the office of the City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117, in a sealed envelope and be received or postmarked within three (3) City business days after the bid due date and time for the bid to be considered. The sealed envelope should be plainly marked on the outside, “SEALED BID SECURITY FOR CROSSWALK PEDESTRIAN HYBRID BEACON ON CALLE REAL NEAR ENCINA LANE PROJECT NO. 9087.” The Project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations (DIR) per California Labor Code Section 1771.4, including prevailing wage rates and apprenticeship employment standards. Affirmative action to ensure against discrimination in employment practices on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion will also be required. The CITY hereby affirmatively ensures that all business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this notice and will not be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, or religion in any consideration leading to the award of contract. A contract may only be awarded to the lowest responsive and responsible bidder that holds a valid Class “A” Contractor’s license, Class “C” Electrical specialty, or specialty licensing in accordance with the provisions of the California Business and Professions Code. The successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond and a Payment Bond each in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract Price. Each bond shall be in the forms set forth herein, shall be secured from a surety company that meets all State of California bonding requirements, as defined in Code of Civil Procedure Section 995.120, and that is a California admitted surety insurer. Pursuant to Labor Code sections 1725.5 and 1771.1, all contractors and subcontractors that wish to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, or enter into a contract to perform public work must be registered with the DIR. No Bid will be accepted nor any contract entered into without proof of the contractor’s and subcontractors’ current registration with the DIR to perform public work. If awarded a contract, the Bidder and its subcontractors, of any tier, shall maintain active registration with the DIR for the duration of the Project. Failure to provide proof of the contractor’s current registration pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 may result in rejection of the bid as non-responsive. Pursuant to Public Contract Code section 22300, the successful bidder may substitute certain securities for funds withheld by CITY to ensure performance under the Contract or, in the alternative, request the CITY to make payment of retention to an escrow agent. Any protest to an intended award of this contract shall be made in writing addressed to the City Clerk prior to the award. Any protest may be considered and acted on by the City Council at the time noticed for award of the contract. To request a copy of the notice of agenda for award, please contact the City Clerk (805) 9617505 or register on the CITY’s website (www.cityofgoleta.org). For information relating to the details of this Project and bidding requirements contact Debbie Talarico in writing at dtalarico@cityofgoleta.org. CITY OF GOLETA _____________________________ Deborah S. Lopez, City Clerk Published: Santa Barbara Independent: February 11, 2021 and February 25, 2021 34

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FEBRUARY 25, 2020 2021

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F I C T I T I O U S BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CORRIGAN AND COMPANY at 32 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Protective Financial & Insurance Services (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 17, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000440. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: TEMPEST at 136 W. Canon Perdido Street Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Te m p e s t Te l e c o m S o l u t i o n s , L L C (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000404. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business a s : H U N N Y F LY Y O G A STUDIOS at 103 West Walnut Ave. Lompoc, CA 93436; Vihal S Ya d a v 127 N J St. Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000220. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business a s : D I E R B E R G V I N E YA R D S , STAR LANE V I N E YA R D S , THREE SAINTS at 2121 Alisos Rd Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Star Lane & Dierberg Vineyards (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000468. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LARNER V I N E YA R D & W I N E R Y, LARNER V I N E YA R D , LARNER W I N E RY, LARNER WINE C O M PA N Y, EARTHFLUENCE at 955 Ballard Canyon Road Solvang, CA 93463; Stevan L a r n e r, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 22, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000484. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: H U N N Y F LY WELLNESS at 103 West Walnut Ave. Lompoc, CA 93436; Martena Rachel Wilson 127 N J St. Lompoc, CA 93436 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000218. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ASK COACHING, ANGIE S WA N S O N ‑ K Y R I A C O COACHING, ASK LIFE COACHING at 47 Dearborn Place, #19 Goleta, CA 93117; Angela B Swanson‑Kyriaco (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000189. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: S A N TA BARBARA CLEAN, SB CLEANING C O M PA N Y at 2939 De La Vina St, Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Santa Barbara Cleaning Company (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000338. Feb 25. Mar 4, 11, 19 2021.

NAME CHANGE AMENDED IN THE M AT T E R OF THE APPLICATION OF KAIA JOYE MOYER WESOLOWSKI and GRAHAM JAMES WESOLOWSKI ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER:

20CV04017 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: GLORIA BERET JUNA WESOLOWSKI TO: JUNA BERET WESOLOWSKI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4 , C o u r t h o u s e , S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 04, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF THE APPLICATION OF CONNIE AGUIRRE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04337 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CONNIE AGUIRRE TO: CONNIE SPEAR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 16, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3 , C o u r t h o u s e , S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to


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LEGALS Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 3, 2021. by T h o m a s P. A n d e r l e . o f the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F C H R I S NICOLE KULIGOWSKI ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00223 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CHRIS NICOLE KULIGOWSKI T O : C H R I S N I C O L E L O YA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 15, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5 , C o u r t h o u s e , S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 4, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F J O H N AT H O N MICHAEL G E D S TA D ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00222 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: J O H N AT H O N M I C H A E L G E D S TA D TO: JOHNATHON M I C H A E L L O YA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described

above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4 , C o u r t h o u s e , S A N TA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 3, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. AMENDED IN THE M AT T E R OF THE A P P L I C AT I O N O F M A R I A CRISELDA VA L E N C I A CRUZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04059 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MARIA CRISELDA VA L E N C I A C R U Z T O : M A R I C E L VA L E N C I A CRUZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 8, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 29, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF THE S TAT E OF CALIFORNIA IN AND

FOR THE COUNTY OF S A N TA BARBARA A N A C A PA D I V I S I O N In re the Sanders Family CASE NO. 21 PR00036 S u r v i v o r ’s “A” Tr u s t , created by Louis C. Sanders and Josephine C. Sanders, dated NOTICE TO CREDITORS January 22, 1992 (PROB C §§19040 (b), 19052 Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Josephine C. Sanders (Decedent) that all persons having claims against Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver a copy to Ann H. Sanders, as trustee of the Sanders Family S u r v i v o r ’s “A” Tr u s t , of which Decedent was the s e t t l o r, c/o the Law Offices of James F, Cote, P. O . Box 20146, Santa Barbara, California 93120‑0146, as provided in Probate Code §1215 within the later of 4 months after February 4, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to c r e d i t o r s ) o r, i f n o t i c e is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: 1/21/2021. Law Offices of James F. C o t e . Published Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. SUPERIOR COURT OF THE S TAT E OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF S A N TA BARBARA A N A C A PA D I V I S I O N In re the Sanders Family Credit CASE NO. 21PR00037 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (PROB C §519040 (b), 19052) Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent Shelter “B” Tr u s t , created by Louis C. Sanders and Josephine C. Sanders, dated January 22,1992 creditors of Josephine C. Sanders (Decedent) that all persons having claims against Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver a copy to Ann H. Sanders, as trustee of the Sanders Family Credit S h e l t e r “ B ” Tr u s t , o f which Decedent was the s e t t l o r, c/o the Law Offices of James F. Cote, P. O . Box 20146, Santa Barbara, California 93120‑0146, as provided in Probate Code §1215 within the later of 4 months after February 4, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to c r e d i t o r s ) o r, i f n o t i c e is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. For your protection, you

are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: 1/21/2021 Law Offices of James F. C o t e Published Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL MEETING (Electronically and Telephonically) March 16, 2021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct an Electronic public hearing on the following matter: Measure A Five-Year Program of Projects for Fiscal Years 2021-2026

PUBLIC NOTICES W O R K E R S ’ C O M P E N S A T I O N A P P E A L S B O A R D S TAT E OF CALIFORNIA W C A B N o . : ADJ11488066 To : D E F E N D A N T, D A V I D JESUS ROSALES dba C O N C R E T E & PAV E R S S P E C I A L I S T, A P P L I C A N T, JUAN BARRETO NOTICES GOOD CAUSE having been shown, it is hereby ordered that service of the special notice of lawsuit in this case can be made upon the defendant by publication in a newspaper of general circulation published at Santa Barbara, California. Said publication shall be made at least once a week for four successive weeks in the manner prescribed in Gov. Code 6064. Name and address of a p p l i c a n t ’s attorney: Ghitterman, G h i t t e r m a n & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Esq. Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, (805) 965‑4540. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

The City Council will consider adoption of the City’s five-year program of projects to be funded by Measure A sales tax funds pursuant to Local Transportation Authority Ordinance No. 5, the Road Repair, Traffic Relief and Transportation Safety Measure (“Measure A”.)

NOTICE OF SALE OF A B A N D O N E D PERSONAL PROPERTY NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that under and pursuant to Sections 1993 et seq. of the California Civil Code, the property listed below, which has been abandoned by David Budlong whose last known address was 4745 Calle Camarada Santa Barbara, CA 93110 The undersigned will sell at public auction and will sell for cash in lawful money of the United States t h e f o l l o w i n g described personal property at the hour of 10:00a.m. on the 12th day of March, 2021 on the premises where said property has been stored and which is located at 2328 De La Vina St. #2 REAR Santa Barbara, CA 93105 To o l s , l a d d e r s , p a i n t , shelves and other misc. items sold in lots. Auction conducted by Barry Sweet Auctioneer, Bond #70489167 C A S H O N LY, S a m e D a y Removal. Dated Feb. 19 th , 2021. Wolfe & Associates by: Kathy Palacio, 173 Chapel St. Santa Barbara, CA 9 3 1 1 1 . ( 8 0 5 ) 6 1 8 ‑ 3 2 2 6 . Feb.25, M a r. 4 , 2021. FACE MASKS MUST BE WORN!

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information may be obtained by contacting James Campero, Deputy Public Works Director, via email at jcampero@cityofgoleta.org.

MEETING DATE/TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 5:30 P.M.

Goleta City Hall, Council Chambers (Virtual Meeting – Electronically and Telephonically)

ATTENTION: Pursuant to the Governor’s Executive Order N-29-20 dated March 17, 2020 authorizing local jurisdictions subject to the Brown Act to hold public meetings telephonically and electronically in order to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, the regular City Council meeting for March 16, 2021 will be conducted telephonically and electronically. It will be broadcast live on the City’s website and on Cable Goleta Channel 19. The Council Chambers will not be open to the public during the meeting. City Council Members will be participating telephonically/ electronically and will not be physically present in the Council Chambers. IN LIGHT OF THE CITY’S NEED TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETINGS ELECTRONICALLY AND TELEPHONICALLY DURING THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC, written comments may also be submitted as instructed herein or via email to the City Clerk at cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by electronic means during the Public Hearing (date and time noted above), provided they are received prior to conclusion of the public comment portion of the Public Hearing. Instructions on how to submit written comments during the hearing will be available on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to participate in the public hearing electronically or telephonically as described above. All letters or emails should be submitted via email to the City Clerk at cityclerkgroup@ cityofgoleta.org. Email/letters must be received on or before the date of the City Council meeting. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The staff report may be obtained and will be posted on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org.

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent – February 25, 2021

ORDINANCE NO. 21-02 U AN URGENCY ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, CLARIFYING THE TEMPORARY MORATORIUM ON RESIDENTIAL EVICTIONS TO COMPORT WITH RECENT CHANGES IN STATE LAW AND SETTING FORTH THE FACTS CONSTITUTING SUCH URGENCY On February 16, 2021 at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta adopted an urgency ordinance that will conform the City’s repayment period of deferred rent under its COVID-19 eviction moratorium to August 1, 2021 and August 31, 2021, in compliance with Senate Bill 91. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 21-02 at a regular meeting held on the 16th day of February, 2021, by the following roll call vote: AYES:

MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO TEMPORE KYRIACO, COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND RICHARDS

NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

This Ordinance will be effective immediately. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or via email at cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org or by calling City Hall at (805) 9617505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent February 25, 2021

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 25, 25, 2021 2021 FEBRUARY

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

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Santa Barbara Independent 2/25/21  

February 25, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 789

Santa Barbara Independent 2/25/21  

February 25, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 789