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volume 35, # 788, Feb. 18-25, 2021

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Tyler Hayden and Matt Kettmann Associate News Editor Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Copy Editors Alexandra Mauceri, Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Esperanza Carmona, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Staff Photographer Daniel Dreifuss Web Content Managers Celina Garcia, Saehee Jong Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Betsy J. Green, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Leslie Dinaberg, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Carolina Starin, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown

COVER STORY

The Struggle Against Learning Loss Teaching Virtually Has Not Been Working for All Elementary Students by Delaney Smith

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman

Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Calendar Intern Sophie Lynd Editorial Interns Sunidhi Sridhar, Katherine Swartz

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill

Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com, sales@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . . 25

FEATURE WRITING AND ONLINE EDITING Just over a year after Delaney Smith started as a news reporter with the Santa Barbara Independent in May 2019, she was promoted to Associate News Editor last fall, and she now manages the daily news flow on Independent.com. “I still write nearly as much as ever, but I also am in charge of all online news stories,” said Smith, who is originally from San Diego. “I make sure that breaking news is edited and published on the website as soon as possible and ensure that news features get prominent play.” She’s also the author of this week’s cover story on learning loss for students stuck at home during the pandemic. “I think the most interesting part of this week’s cover story is the interconnectedness between children’s social-emotional learning needs and academic learning loss,” said Smith But our editor’s education continues during COVID-19. “Due to pandemic boredom,” she admitted, “I recently learned how to crochet.”

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A Conversation with Claudia Rankine SUNDAY | MARCH 7 | 2 – 3 PM

Acclaimed author Claudia Rankine joins SBMA in a conversation “on the path to understanding.” The talk begins with a screening of selections from Situations, a series of ten short videos collaboratively produced by documentary filmmaker John Lucas and Rankine, which exist in dialogue with Rankine’s 2014 hybrid prosepoetry book Citizen: An American Lyric and amplify the micro and macro racist aggressions that occur throughout the social and political fabric of the United States. Rankine and Lucas admit us into the liminal “in between” spaces where we might travel toward trust, and offer us a look at the disturbing ordinariness of what we have come to accept.

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FEB. 11-18, 2021

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, and INDEPENDENT STAFF DAN I EL DR EI FU SS

CORONAVIRUS

How to Get Vaccinated in S.B. County Ages 65+ Now Eligible, More Locations to Deliver COVID-19 Shots by Jean Yamamura he announcement by Santa Barbara County Public Health on Friday that 65- to 74-year-olds can join the vaccination line came with two big limitations: If there’s enough of the vaccine, and if you can get an appointment. “Even though we are moving to the 65-plus, we are still very limited in the number of vaccines that we get as a county,” Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso said on Friday. “I just want to ground us in reality…. We have a lot more people than we have vaccines for.” With only 6,000 doses arriving per week in the County of Santa Barbara and more than 40,000 people in the new tier, the bottlenecks are obvious—and now further complicated by ice and snow blanketing two-thirds of the nation and holding up vaccine deliveries. Public Health officials in both the county and the nation have held out hope that Pfizer and Moderna—and possibly Johnson & Johnson if its contender is approved—will be able to produce and provide more of the vaccine, but the answer to “when” could be May or June. As for the “how” of getting on a vaccination list, public vaccination sites are open and new ones are opening. Some health-care providers offer the vaccine. Sign-ups are mostly through each provider’s website, although the county’s 2-1-1 information system is available for residents without computer access. Unsurprisingly, it is choked with calls. With demand intense, Public Health posted a note asking that only residents who qualify for the vaccine attempt to get an appointment; the ineligible will be turned away.

T

Well-organized, socially distanced vaccination sites have been set up by the hospitals in the county. Webpages at the Cottage, Marian, and Lompoc hospital sites are the best way to make appointments. The small quantities of vaccine means they fill up fast, though the pharmacy at Marian in Santa Maria has received additional allocations from the federal government. The rest of the allocations in the county are coming from the State of California to County Public Health NEXT IN LINE: County residents ages 65 and up can now get the COVID-19 vaccine, for distribution. Some pharmacies are receiving doses, includ- though the supply is limited. ing Vons, Sav-on, and Ralphs in Montecito, Carpinteria, Santa Maria, Orcutt, and Lompoc. The CVS nia COVID plan, insurance giant Blue Shield will take over pharmacies in Buellton and Santa Maria are taking appoint- vaccine distribution in the coming weeks or months. What ments, too. County Public Health’s website (publichealthsbc. that means for the ongoing effort to vaccinate the county is org/covid-19-vaccine-appointment-registration) contains the unknown as the details are still being sorted out. details on which pharmacies will give the shot and a link to Also important to note is that the vaccination is free, Social schedule an appointment. Security numbers are not required, and insurance is also not Primary care providers are operating on a “don’t call us; we’ll required. Questions like these came up during a Town Hall call you” basis in offering the vaccine. For the most part, only meeting last week, more than 4,000 residents tuned in from the largest organizations are vaccinating existing patients, such the African-American, Latinx, and Mixteco communities. (See as Sansum Clinic or the Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics. online Town Hall story at independent.com/PHDTownHall.) Jackie Ruiz, a spokesperson for County Public Health, Public Health sends regular updates on vaccine availnoted that vaccine providers are starting on the second doses ability. To sign up to receive them, go to tinyurl.com/ for the first tier of patients as well as opening to the new tier. sbph-sign-up. Another route is California’s MyTurn This could eat up a good number of vaccination slots until the .ca.gov, which registers residents for eligibility updates for n second round is complete. And, in the ever-evolving Califor- Santa Barbara County.

HOUSING

$27 Million in Rental Assistance Coming Two Pandemic Relief Programs to Help Tenants, Landlords by Jean Yamamura ore than $27 million will soon be available for rent and utility payments to keep Santa Barbara County residents in their homes and their landlords paid. About half of that is in a new county program that started this week; $13 million will fund payments due and past due for people who have lost income or seen their wages reduced because of COVID-19. A second program administered through the state—and totaling $14 million from the U.S. Treasury—is on tap for the middle of March. The influx of money is part of $25 billion in the federal Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021. Tenants and landlords in Santa Barbara County got nearly $4.5 million in financial help since the beginning of the pandemic through monies, including federal CARES Act funding, from the county and the cities of Goleta and Santa Barbara, and also through funds raised through the nonprofit Joint Response Effort spearheaded by the Santa Barbara Foundation and Hutton Parker Foundation. More than 3,000 households were supported by those programs. The heavy lifting to coordinate applicants and funding has been accomplished by the Family Service Agency, which vets program applicants, and the United Way, which handles finances and administration. Both agencies have been called on for the new programs, as well. Rental assistance has far-reaching consequences, said

M

Laura Bode, who leads the Santa Barbara Rental Property Association. Rent payments to landlords and utility payments to the city water system, for instance, keep mortgages paid, utilities operating, people in jobs, and the whole system humming along. “Mortgages have not been forgiven, you have to remember,” she said of landlords. As well, property tax payments are due to the county in a couple of months. Rachel Sim of Santa Barbara’s newly formed Tenants Union said her organization was pleased to see rent relief was on its way but had hoped for more from the county. “Too many landlords have taken the opportunity to strong-arm tenants and ignore valid and legal tenant complaints,” she said. One reason the group had formed was because they knew tenants whose landlords had evicted or threatened to evict them, including working families and persons who were undocumented, elderly, or disabled. “We remain concerned about the long-term financial impact of the pandemic on tenants, the ongoing affordable housing crisis, and illegal and ‘soft’ evictions,” Sim said. Bode noted that her association offers classes to landlords, especially owners of small numbers of units, who might not keep up with rapidly changing rental laws. For instance, she said, landlords cannot discriminate against potential Section 8 tenants. In the new state and county programs, tenants must not only be affected financially by COVID but must also meet

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low-income requirements. The federal assistance funds are meant for tenants at or below 80 percent of the area median income, and people at the lowest tier receive preference. For example, single people making up to $66,750 annually would qualify, while for a family of four, the income level is up to $95,300. Navigating requirements and dealing with paperwork is one reason United Way is involved. The nonprofit has spent the months since April 2020 taking phone calls and emails and meeting people at their doors to answer questions and steer people into programs, said Steve Ortiz, CEO for United Way of Santa Barbara County. This will be especially important once the state program rolls out in March. “It has different guidelines and is more able to address arrears going back to April,” Ortiz explained, “but to eliminate debt, landlords have to agree.” His staff has spent the past month preparing for an expected onslaught of applicants. “It’s a lot of work and a lot of new systems,” he acknowledged. “At the end of the day, it’s a benefit for the community, and we’re excited to participate.”

4-1-1

Details on the rental assistance and the application are at unitedwaysb.org/rent. For assistance, United Way can be called at (805) 965-8591 or emailed at info@unitedwaysb.org. The S.B. Rental Property Association can also answer questions at (805) 687-7007 or laura@sbrpa.org.


Photo ID a Barrier to Vaccine?

CORONAVIRUS

by Tyler Hayden t was her first day on the job as a COVID-19 vaccination site volunteer when Elizabeth Wilbanks was told by Santa Barbara County Public Health Department supervisors to turn away a 92-yearold undocumented woman because she couldn’t produce a photo ID. The woman was advised to return with a library card or other form of identification to prove her eligibility as a county resident 75 or above. “It broke my heart,” said Wilbanks, a biology profes- POINT OF DISPENSING: A county official monitors operations at Santa Maria’s COVID-19 vaccination site. sor at UCSB. “We should have been able to do better. We know that voter photo ID laws discriminate burden of doing something more. Granted, against Black, Indigenous, Latinx, and Chi- many vaccines are now going to be routed canx communities with what courts have through hospitals—like Marian, Cottage, called ‘surgical precision.’ Why allow such Sansum—which may have different polipractices to go forward when it’s a matter of cies, but Public Health sets the tone.” The woman’s granddaughter was brave life and death?” The encounter took place February 3 in enough to make her case in person, WilSanta Maria, said Wilbanks, whose role was banks went on. What about all the other to greet residents and ask them a handful of undocumented residents who may read preliminary questions as they lined up for Public Health’s website and decide to not their shots. It was toward the end of a slow even try?  Wilbanks acknowledged the heroic work day, and there were plenty of extra vaccines performed daily at the public vaccination on hand, she said. The elderly woman remained in her car sites across the county. “Generally, everywhile her granddaughter spoke to the Public one is doing their damndest to get shots Health team, explaining her grandmother in arms,” she said. But she worries if the had only ever owned a Mexican ID, which county’s hard-and-fast photo ID rule may was stolen, along with her purse, shortly be putting vulnerable populations off from before the pandemic began. She’d lost family receiving their vaccines. “Even asking for and friends to the virus, the granddaughter ID is intimidating and discouraging,” she said, and was so afraid of falling ill that she said. “This is something as a community we should be talking about.”  hadn’t left the house since March.  After reading through Public Health’s Ruiz said she was unaware of other such website, she continued, the pair decided not incidents. “Our team works very carefully to to make an appointment so they wouldn’t ensure we can get persons eligible and with take one of the limited spots from someone appointments vaccinated,” she said. “We are with the proper documentation. They were open to being flexible and responsive to help hoping the county would still be willing to ensure our vulnerable community members are vaccinated.” help them. Jackie Ruiz, the Public Health DepartAt a virtual town hall meeting hosted by ment’s spokesperson, said the site team the Public Health Department last week, “worked with the individual to discuss if however, representatives of CAUSE (Centhere were utility bills, insurance medi- tral Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable cal cards, as well as library cards that list Economy) and MICOP (Mixteco Indigena a county address. Additionally, our team Community Organizing Project) expressed recommended a medical bill statement concern about similar types of roadblocks. that would have the individual’s name and Dalia Garcia passed along a story about a a county address.” As a general rule, Ruiz Mixteco resident of Santa Maria being asked said, “We are committed to making sure that at Albertsons for his Social Security numdocumentation is not a barrier to getting ber and proof of insurance. “These types vaccinated.” of questions scare our community,” Garcia But that’s unfortunately what happened said. “It doesn’t allow for any comfort or that day, Wilbanks said, as the request was trust in the vaccine.” Public Health Director Dr. Van Dosent up the ranks of Public Health and ultimately denied. “We didn’t do anything to Reynoso said she would “address that partremove the barrier,” she lamented. “What ner” and others to ensure that kind of thing concerns me is that we gave this woman the didn’t happen “moving forward.” n

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A SNAKE IN THE SPRING RAIN How Global Biodiversity is Responding to a Changing Climate AMANDA SPARKMAN, WESTMONT COLLEGE

Headlines nearly every day in newspapers across the world broadcast the pressing threat of climate change for humans and their affairs. What is less prominently publicized, however, is the effect of a rapidly changing climate on the multitude of other species with whom we share this planet. How exactly is global biodiversity responding to climate change now? And what are the prospects for the future?

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 18 5:30 P.M. Join via zoom at WESTMONT.EDU/LECTURES SPONSORED BY THE WESTMONT FOUNDATION INDEPENDENT.COM

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The existing stationhouse was built in 1958, is not seismically safe, and is so small that the department has been forced to locate four key departmental functions in separate buildings. The new building is budgeted to cost $80 million, though the exact costs—like the final design—are far from certain. The ABR vote, which found that the proposal conformed to city land-use policies, including compatibility with the neighborhood, now sends it to the city’s Planning Commission. That body will decide whether to approve its height. The building height is designed to be 53 feet, though the limit for that neighborhood is 45 feet. If approved, the project reverts back to the ABR for further deliberation. “I’m determined to see it through to where you appreciate it,” vowed Cearnal. —Nick Welsh


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOUSING

Project Roomkey Gets Expansion from Feds

S

anta Barbara County’s Project Roomkey — a quarantine housing program for homeless people vulnerable to COVID-19 — got an upgrade last month when President Biden signed an executive order directing the federal government to fully reimburse cities and counties for the cost of housing homeless people in hotels. The county currently operates Project Roomkey and other non-congregate shelter programs at four hotels. More than 20,000 shelter-bed nights have been provided through local Roomkey efforts during the pandemic so far. Up until Biden’s order, the federal government had been covering 75 percent of those costs. The Community Services Department, in partnership with PATH, operates the

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BACK TO DRAWING BOARD: The Architectural Board of Review has sent back the proposal for the four-story complex at 711 North Milpas Street for major revisions.

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Downtown Business

Milpas Housing Proposal Slammed

T

he largest housing project yet to be proposed for Milpas Street got slammed last week by the city’s Architectural Board of Review (ABR). Some members found the design details for the proposed four-story apartment complex — to be located at 711 North Milpas Street — so busy as to be almost “random,” in the words of one commissioner. Another suggested the architects tried to disguise the overwhelming mass of the proposal by “sprinkling” lots of little Madame Rosinka fortune-telling studios throughout. As to solutions, one member suggested the architects adopt a unified approach that embraced the expanse of its footprint; another suggested the architect make it look like three distinct structures; another suggested the architect might look to The Dakota, New York City’s famous apartment building, or perhaps the palace of King Philip II in Madrid. All agreed, however, that the developer—Ed St. George—could get the same number of apartments with the same square footage without encroaching upon the city’s height limit by building more of the units in space that’s currently under-utilized over the proposed project’s parking garage. They encouraged him to lose the towers and parapets and suggested that he push the large entrance stairway farther back from Milpas Street.

St. George took over the project when the previous developer failed to secure the necessary financing. He quickly jettisoned the contemporary industrial design—derided by one neighborhood critic as “Legoland” architecture—in favor of a more traditional Santa Barbara red-tile-roof and whitestucco-wall look. That won him some points with the commissioners, but not enough. He also proposed six additional units—bringing the total to 82—and designating 16 units for affordable- to moderate-income households. St. George was hoping that the affordable housing would earn concessions from the city, particularly to exceed the city’s height limits. The ABR rejected the previous design for this same project two years ago, and it’s not certain this model can win a majority of votes without significant reductions in the height. But their vote might not matter. St. George began negotiating a deal directly with the City Council half a year ago in order to bypass such interference—a highly unusual move. But that deal has not been finalized. If it is, the number of units and size of units St. George can build will be stipulated. The ABR is taking pains not to dispute those numbers, but to pressure St. George to construct the new building so it won’t tower over Milpas Street as much.

Spotlight a virtual interview series Join Matt Kettmann in conversation with John Nasser (Night Lizard Brewing Company), Aron Ashland (The Cruisery / Wine Therapy), and Katie Grassini y Todam 3p ! (Grassini Family Vineyards) in this week’s Downtown Business Spotlight.

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

So Long, Congo-Bob

RIP: I don’t remember exactly where the name Congo-Bob came from. I assume I stole

it. But somehow, I managed to make it stick, at least enough to get under the skin of the person I stuck it to, Congressmember Robert Lagomarsino. He made it a precondition for any interview I ever got with him that “Congo-Bob” not appear in the text of any ensuing article. For nearly 40 years — 1961 to 1992—Congo-Bob just was. He represented Ventura and Santa Barbara in Congress, and before that, he was elected to the Sacramento Statehouse as a state senator. And from 1958 to 1961, Lagomarsino—son of a successful wine and beer distributor—served as Ojai mayor and city councilmember. But as of a couple of weeks ago, Robert J. Lagomarsino was no more, having died at his family home at age 94. In the moment, I had tended to dismiss Lagomarsino as just another right-wing, moss-backed Republican. And I wasn’t wrong. He was forever railing against government spending while pushing tax breaks for the rich. He was all law and order when it came to the death penalty. But when his buddy, President Ronald Reagan, broke the law by selling missiles to the Iranian government —designated as state terrorists—to illegally fund a covert war to topple a socialist government in Nicaragua —thus violating a bill passed by Congress to prevent just that—Lagomarsino evidenced precious little

perturbation. That Lagomarsino appeared to talk out of the side of his mouth—courtesy of a facial tic—made him that much easier to lampoon. But with a few notable exceptions, there was good reason no one but Death-Wish Democrats and No-Chance progressives could be mustered to run against Lagomarsino. When it came to constituent services — delivering the actual goods — Lagomarsino was the man. A friend’s mother—a transplanted New Yorker, knee-jerk liberal, and Yellow Dog Democrat—all but giggled when his name was mentioned, so quick on the trigger was Lagomarsino’s staff when her Social Security check did not appear on time. Legend has it that his predecessor, Charles Teague, told Lagomarsino the secret to eternal life —at least politically—was returning every phone call and answering every letter. Clearly, he took it to heart. When Teague

died on the job in 1974, Lagomarsino ran in a special election to fill his shoes. With Watergate in the air, 1974 was not a propitious time for Republican candidates. Of the seven who sought office in special elections that year, only one would win: Congo-Bob. Back in the day, Democrats tended to dismiss Lagomarsino as just another getalong-go-along kind of guy. Where was his signature legislation, they demanded? Lago, I am told, got 103 bills passed his first year in Sacramento, still — I am also told—a land-speed record. One increased

penalties for dog-napping, then allegedly an epidemic. In Sacramento, Lagomarsino was then Governor Ronald Reagan’s senator. When Reagan occupied the White House, he was the president’s Congressmember. Reagan, after all, owned a ranch in Santa Barbara. Still, his abiding legislative achievement—the creation of the Channel Islands National Park —came about only because

Lagomarsino was willing to play political footsies with Democrat Phil Burton, a firebreathing liberal from the Bay Area who was smart enough to know he needed Republican friends, and Lagomarsino was smart enough to be Burton’s friend. It was, as they say, a different time. Really, the Channel Islands Park would be legacy enough, but Lagomarsino did more. Over the years, he laid the necessary spade work for what would eventually become the Cal State Channel Islands campus. And then, of course, there’s the Dick Smith Wilderness, which without Lagomarsino would never have been designated. A major national park. A Cal State campus. A new federal wilderness named after a local reporter. All in all, pretty impressive footprints to leave behind. I mention this because Lagomarsino is best remembered by his ignominious departure. In 1990, district boundaries were redrawn, and Lagomarsino found himself in the awkward spot of sharing a district with fellow Republican Elton Gallegly. Lagomarsino, obliging to a fault, “moved” to Shell Beach so he could run in the new district that

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encompassed San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties in 1992. About that time, Arianna and Texas multimillionaire Michael Huffington —then on the prowl for a district from which to run — happened to move to Montecito, where they quickly began passing out $10,000 checks to every nonprofit that asked. A gay man then locked in the closet, Huffington was a cipher unto himself and figment of his wife’s sprawling rococo ambition. But he was willing to spend $5.4 million of his Texas tycoon cash to knock off Lagomarsino.  By that time, Congo-Bob’s 100 percent pro-life voting record did not sit well with many women in his own party. When Huffington allowed himself to be persuaded into taking a pro-choice stance, many defected. Many pro-choice Democrats did too. Once elected, Huffington found the actual work of office beneath contempt and constituent service tainted by corruption. Pathologically secretive, Huffington refused to tell his own staff where he was and ordered copies of his voting record destroyed. Naturally, one such as this would feel the call of even higher office, the U.S. Senate. To get there, Huffington spent $28 million — another record — and bankrolled the three strikes initiative then on the ballot. Huffington narrowly lost to incumbent Dianne Feinstein, but three strikes would pass and become the driving engine for mass incarceration in California. That one we’re still paying for. So long, Congo-Bob. You deserved better. —Nick Welsh


Opinions

voices

CONT’D

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Independent stands behind the news article referred to in the following piece, but also stands committed to publishing dissenting voices.

MEXICO

HAWAII

CARIBBEAN

Correcting the

Covid Record

I

BY A.L. BARDACH

can’t say for sure when the Independent’s executive editor felt the siren call to be Boosterin-Chief for Santa Barbara officialdom. Many of his fans, myself included, were sad to see official malfeasance and misconduct, the

inevitable byproduct of money and politics, mostly drop from his portfolio.

Sadder still—speaking for myself—is watching his cranky ire alight upon other media and reporters who continue to pound his old beat. Last week, he devoted a half page of print to lambasting The Montecito Journal for two cover pieces about the County’s woeful response to the Covid epidemic, invoking a disingenuous premise. I wrote one of them—a first person account of being denied a vaccine after waiting weeks for my confirmed appointment. But County Health officials, having learned that pharmacies were following state, federal and CDC guidance and vaccinating those 65 plus, ordered them to immediately cease or lose their licenses. How did the County do this? They invoked their “discretionary power” to overrule state and federal mandates, insisting that vaccines be given only to those age 75 and over. They also refused to provide future notice to those who had been registered and demanded instant compliance. Scores of seniors (many with co-morbidities) were turned away at Dignity Health Center and pharmacies throughout the County. There were plenty of gut-wrenching scenes, including a wheelchair-bound man on oxygen being turned away at Ralph’s pharmacy for being only 74. Yet, the same Health officials he described as a “Dream Team” declined to use their “discretionary power” to remove cannabis industry workers—an estimated 6,000 people according to the County’s 2019 figures, from being at the head of the line. Nor did the Board of Supervisors intervene. Yup, Pot store employees (average age perhaps 25) and farm and greenhouse workers (average age 28) got to jump the vaccine queue into the First Tiers with doctors and surgeons, using the canard of medical marijuana. Vaccinating the cannabis industry ahead of the elderly, teachers, police and those with co-morbidities was not a problem. Other counties, however, yanked them from the queue. (Recently pressed on the matter, Public Health Director Van Do-Reynoso cited state guidance on medical marijuana then added she was “not aware”

of cannabis workers getting shots, then qualified, “which doesn’t mean some have.”) In fact, many have. Just to confirm, I walked over to some of the pot farms in my neighborhood and chatted with departing employees, who confirmed they were given the okay for Covid vaccines “awhile ago.” As noted in my piece, some seniors denied vaccines, later contracted Covid and are now in Cottage Hospital ICU. One has died. One might reasonably ask, what qualifies as a bad judgment call or even negligence? The SB immunologists and oncologists I spoke with said they had been advocating ranking by co-morbidities—rather solely by age—but were unable to sway health officials. That said, I never wrote that SB Health officials be replaced by the estimable Thomas Tighe or Dr. Charity Dean. Their names were proffered by an array of distressed SB medical doctors as good candidates for a Covid or Pandemic Czar. Nor did I speak with either. If asked, my advice to both—who happen to live and work in health care in this County—would be not to make waves with the Supervisors. The current crop are hardly shy about retaliation. Just ask the vintners in Santa Ynez whose complaints to the County were rewarded by endless acres of open cannabis fields threatening their very existence; or the residents of Carpinteria (and all five districts) who filed thousands of odor complaints, resulting in the BOS ramping up even more cannabis permits, blanketing said communities with more skunk stench. Moreover, the argument for a Covid Czar would seem to be a no-brainer as we find ourselves in the Age of Pandemics with virus mutations already happening and variants projected for years to come. SB’s Director of Public Health is responsible for all county Health Care Centers, community health from tobacco to drug prevention, routine vaccinations, Environmental Health, water quality, animal control issues, and a wide panoply of regulatory programs. Likewise, for the Health Care Officer. The department employs over 500 people. In other words, it’s a huge portfolio—without COVID. Battling COVD and future pandemics is a full time job. We need our own Dr. Fauci.

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A.L. Bardach is a PEN-Award winning journalist and author/ editor of four books.

For the Record

¶ In last week’s news story “Following the Money” regarding the race for mayor of Santa Barbara, we mistakenly omitted the fact that Deborah Schwartz has filed her papers of intent to run. As well, in “COVID Team ‘Doing a Fantastic Job,’ ” the Montecito Journal editorial referenced did not suggest that a COVID czar should replace Public Health officials. Also in last week’s paper, the Wedding Guide gave the

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wrong email address for Folio Press & Paperie; the correct one is marlene@foliopressand paperie.com. ¶ In the February 4 issue, an editor’s note to the letter “In Defense Of ” erroneously stated Matef Harmachis pleaded no contest to sexual battery. It was to a charge of battery that he pleaded no contest. We apologize for the error.

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

obituaries Berk, Harriet Fern 5/6/1916 - 2/7/2021

Berk, Harriet Fern was born May 6, 1916 in Rockford, Illinois and passed away Feb 7, 2021 in Santa Barbara, CA. She was the only child of Grace Irene Thomas and James Robert Hall. The family moved from Illinois to California when Harriet was 13. They ran an auto court in Duarte where she worked pumping gas. Harriet’s father got her, her very own car to drive to school. She was very proud of her car and enjoyed driving. Later the family moved to Santa Monica where she attended and graduated from Santa Monica High School. She met her husband Richard Marshall Berk and they were married in 1938. They lived in Santa Monica and worked at Douglas Aircraft Company during the war. Later she was a bookkeeper at the high school. They had two daughters. She loved to sew; making adorable pinafore dresses for her two girls. The family enjoyed camping in their trailer; taking many trips. They camped every Thanksgiving for 52 years with extended family. Harriet loved driving and her husband “let her” drive while he study the maps and navigated their trips. Harriet enjoyed entertaining and often had family and friends at the house for picnics and dinners. She was very active in the Baptist church in Santa Monica and supported their church bazaar with many hand made items. In 1983, after many years of retirement in Santa Monica, Harriet and Richard moved to Valle Verde Retirement Community in Santa Barbara. They could often be seen riding their bikes around the campus. She continued to entertain and made many new friends. She also continued to pursue her love of quilting; making hundreds of quilts for family, friends, babies and charitable causes. She helped to start the La Tienda thrift store, which raised money for many campus projects. She continued to attend church and called bingo for the other residents. Harriet was resilient. At 100, she fell and broke her neck eventually recovering and moving to The Grove. 12

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Here she died of old age at age 104. While not the oldest, she is the resident who has lived at Valle Verde the longest. She was preceded in death by her husband, Richard, of 69 years and her parents. She is survived by her two daughters, Sandra Lynn Berk and Carol Lee Boyce, and one granddaughter Bonnie Lee Boyce (John Malinzak) and their three grown children Matthew, Jared and Kelsey. Harriet was an inspiration to all that knew her. She had a wonderful sense of humor. She was loving, generous, creative and motivating. She will be dearly missed by her loving family and friends.

Nancy C. Potter 1926 - 2021

Nancy C. Potter sadly passed away on February 6th, 2021, at Cottage Hospital. She was born Nancy Bettridge, in Chicago, Illinois, in 1926, and spent her young childhood in Hinsdale, Illinois, while her father John Bettridge commuted to an insurance company in Chicago. Nancy grew up in the town of Hinsdale, with her brother Bob and her mother, Jeannette. After the death of her father, her mother remarried Frank Crum, when Nancy was 12 years old, and he adopted Nancy and her brother. She later attended the private boarding schools, Dana Hall, in Wellesley, Massachusetts, and Kingswood, near Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. She went on to art school at Finch, in New York, after which she married Camille M. Shaar, a Lt. Commander in the Navy, at the end of W.W. II. They had two daughters and moved to South Bend, Indiana, until the late 1950’s , where her husband worked as an engineer for Bendix. When he was hired by GM, they moved the family to Ann Arbor, Michigan, and finally in 1960, the family arrived in Santa Barbara, where he worked at Delco. While in South Bend, Nancy and a friend enjoyed creating a small business called Naneen Crafts, which sold many items to major department stores in Chicago. Nancy also joined a local community theater. In each town, she returned to take college classes, while her daughters

FEBRUARY 18, 2021

were in school. In Santa Barbara, she also became involved with the Assistance League and Transition House charities. She enjoyed volunteering and playing bridge and continuing her artistic pursuits. In 1979, she later remarried David S. Potter, a VP at General Motors, and moved to Bloomfield Hills, Michigan for a few years, eventually returning to Santa Barbara, where Nancy and Dave retired to their home in Montecito. They often treated his grown children and grandchildren, as well as hers, to big family reunions in interesting places. They both loved to play bridge, golf, read, work on their crossword puzzles, and make unique wooden hand painted toys and gifts for their children and grandchildren. They traveled the world together and had wonderful stories to tell. After Dave passed away, Nancy continued to paint her lovely oil paintings at The Portico Gallery in Montecito, and gift many of them to her family. She still loved her bridge games with friends and her puzzles, as well as books, and visits from her grandchildren and great grandchildren, who called her “Gigi.” She is lovingly remembered as a warm and caring mother, a very special and generous grandmother, an elegant great grandmother, a tireless community contributor and friend, as well as a wonderful artist, with a curious mind. Her creativity and loving spirit will be missed and yet always with us. She is survived by her daughters, Jeannette DeConde and Camille Segna and Cami’s husband Dan Segna, her grandsons, David DeConde and Benita Tsao, Rob DeConde and Anna Kirby, their two daughters, Alexandra and Quinlan, Adam and Jenny DeConde and their son Owen and daughter Violet, Ken Segna and his wife Laura and daughter Rowan, and Brian Segna. She will be remembered by Dave’s four children: Bill, Tom, Diana, and Janice and their families, as well as her good friend Don Bowles. All of us will miss her and fondly recall our many family trips together and our happy years enjoying dinner and games at her home. Those sweet memories and her kind and loving nature are forever in our hearts. There will be a deferred Celebration of Life for family and friends, when it is safe to gather once again. In lieu of flowers, any donations will be gratefully accepted by the Assistance League of Santa Barbara, and Transition House.

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Ventura Morales López 12/24/1923 - 2/3/2021

Our family mourns with tremendous sadness the passing of Ventura Morales López known affectionately to most as Benny Lopez. Husband, father, grandfather, and great grandfather, Benny passed away peacefully at his home in Santa Barbara on the morning of February 3rd, 2021 into the arms of our Lord and Savior. Benny was born on December 24, 1923 in Longmont, Colorado. He was the 6th child of 8 children born to Ventura López Solorio and Angela Fernanda Morales. Benny was the last surviving sibling of his family and lived an abundant life of 97 years. Benny is survived by his wife, Carmen Victoria López. They were married for 70 years. He is also survived by 3 children, 8 grandchildren, 6 great grandchildren, and his half-siblings, Raul López, Elizabeth López, Francisco López, Elisa López, and Arturo López of Mexico City, Mexico. Benny and Carmen’s 3 children and immediate offspring include: ~ Son Oswaldo D. López and wife Angela Carroll of Honolulu, HI. ~ Daughter Cynthia Marie Castañeda and husband Richard Castañeda of Santa Barbara, CA and their 3 children Christina Castañeda Cañon and husband Andrés Cañon, Selina Castañeda Wimmel and husband Nicholas Wimmel, and Stephen Castañeda and Sydney Casler. ~ Son Dr. Paul López and spouse Tracy Flores of Novato, CA and Paul’s 3 children James López and their 3 children, Saundra López and husband Carlos Herñandez Sr. and their 5 children, and AnnaAlicia Chief and husband Wakinyan “Luke” Chief. At the age of 10, Benny moved from Longmont, CO to Mexico with his father, mother and siblings due to conditions related to the Repatriation Act of 1938 and the Great Depression. At 17 years of age, Benny was recruited into Mexican military service because of his ability to speak fluently in English and Spanish. Benny was also accepted to the Universidad

Nacional Autónoma de México, but the notification of his acceptance came one day after his induction into military service. After exceling at the West Point equivalent of military training in Mexico, Benny rose to become a special assistant to 3 military generals. In 1948, at the end of World War II, at the age of 22, Benny chose family pursuits over a military career, and returned to Santa Barbara, California to be with his mother, sister, and brother who had re-settled in Santa Barbara, CA during the war. In 1951, he married Carmen Victoria Moreno and moved to Dos Pueblos Ranch in the Santa Barbara region where he worked for 10 years. During his time on the ranch, he suffered a serious back injury while fighting a large fire on the ranch property. Benny and Carmen moved to Santa Barbara to recuperate and after his recovery, Benny was hired by the City of Santa Barbara in the Streets/ Public Works Department. He then rose to a position in the Facilities Maintenance Department where he became a fixture at City Hall. Benny befriended many of Santa Barbara’s mayors, city council members, and civic leaders. Benny was ultimately promoted to the head position at the Santa Barbara Airport, where he met numerous celebrities such as John Travolta and political figures such as President Ronald Reagan. Benny retired in 1986. Benny relished mentoring and entertaining his grandchildren who he loved with all his heart. Benny’s devotion to his grandchildren was summed up by his often-repeated quote: “My grandchildren will always be heaven on earth to me”. During his free time, Benny was a passionate gardener, often seen working in his yard. He was honored by the Rose Society of America for discovering a species of rose native to Santa Barbara, which was aptly named after him, the “Benny Rose.” This rose continues Benny’s legacy and is often exchanged as a gift among those special and fortunate people who came to enjoy his magnetic personality. At his passing, he was surrounded by his wife, children, and grandchildren who will forever remember their grandfather with love and devotion. He will be dearly missed for his devotion to his family, sense of humor, and strong work ethic. May his life be remembered by all who knew him, and may he rest in peace for all eternity.


obituaries Dr. Mortimer “Morty” Glasgal 1932 - 2021

“That was perfect” Dr. Mortimer “Morty” Glasgal always lived and loved life, including those he shared it with, from conception to his death, to the fullest. He passed away peacefully on Sunday, February 7th 2021 in Santa Barbara, California at the ripe old age of 88 and a half. A cultured artist and an intellectual with a love of theater, classical music, literature, politics, gardening and world travel, Morty was a positively charming and enthusiastically positive presence wherever he went. He shall be missed dearly by his friends and family. He is survived by his son, niece, grand nieces and Kanta, his loyal friend whom he called “the love of his life” and who was his stalwart companion in his final years.. Ever the optimist, his common summary of his busy day’s events was, “That was perfect.” Morty liked to live in the moment, stop to smell the flowers and always took the scenic route. He approached life with ease, applying positive new age philosophies to each day and processed the family tragedies he experienced as what was “meant to be.” About his inevitable end, he wrote “My life was full of all experiences and for that reason, I have no regrets, except that it could be a better world for everyone.” A zoom memorial service will be held in the near future. Please email MortyMemorial@ gmail.com for details on how to join. If you wish to make a donation in his memory, consider The Pacifica Foundation, which funds the community radio stations that were always on in his home. Born to loving parents in the early summer of 1932, Morty grew up with New York City as his playground. Raised along with his beloved older brother Robert in a selfless and caring family, Morty learned the values of self-sacrifice, loyalty, higher education and the arts. Morty worked at his father’s pharmacy, collected stamps

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com and spent quality time with his cherished extended family that included Matthew, Joyce, Edie, Buzzy, Martin and Betty. At the prestigious High School of Music & Art, Morty established life-long friendships with a crew that would come to be known as “BTOs” (Big Time Operators). After his graduation in 1950, Morty followed in his older brother’s footsteps enrolling in the University of Buffalo’s accelerated undergrad + graduate Doctor of Dental Surgery program. Upon earning his degrees, he joined the merchant marines and took a job as a doctor’s mate aboard a luxury cruise liner, spending a season sailing the South Pacific where he explored many islands and cultures. Morty again followed Robert by enlisting into the US Air Force where he served as a captain. When stationed as a pediatric dentist in England, he spent his time off-duty sampling Europe’s diverse artistic, cultural, and leisure offerings. Following his time in the military, Morty served as an assistant professor of dentistry at New York University before settling into private practice in Smithtown, Long Island. On his first date with Judith, Morty said, “you’re the one I’m going to marry.” A year and a half of globetrotting courtship later, his premonition came true and they tied the knot. In 1976, the couple welcomed twin boys. Morty grew a pediatric dental practice with his partner and friend, orthodontist Jerry Levy. Even though the practice thrived year after year, Morty valued his time and committed to only working six months a year, spending time with his family and traveling the other six. As a fellow of the American Academy of Pedodontics, he contributed to dental science research, and he was an active supporter of public radio, public television and the local arts council. Despite claiming not to like the family cat, Morty was caught several times, caton-lap, petting away. Morty was devoted to his parents, and as they aged he provided them with loving care and support. Morty retired from dentistry after 44 years of practice and moved to California to be closer to family where his adventures and travels continued in grand style. He loved driving his convertible, navigating by the seat of his pants, through thousands of miles of back roads up and down the

west coast. Until the pandemic, he kept an extremely busy schedule and was a true man-abouttown. He loved and cherished time spent with his partners, each serendipitous, unique and very constructive to his life. He was known for his quick wit, plentiful puns and off the cuff poetic recitations. Morty was a regular in the lecture halls of the local colleges, yoga and exercise classes, theaters, gardens and farmers markets. He was a true friend to all and always made new ones along the way. We like to think that his perfect journey is continuing now in the great beyond, alongside family members and friends who passed before him.

Robert Thomas Flowers 2/1/1942 - 2/6/2021

Bob Flowers was born in 1942 in Long Beach, California. He was the first born of two expatriates from Ohio’s farm country, seeking relief from the cold winters and hot humid summers in Ohio by moving to golden California. After Bob gained a sister and a brother, the family relocated to the beautiful forests of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to such small towns as Johnsondale, Bass Lake and Oakhurst, all having to do with the logging industry.  Here Bob began his education in a 1-room schoolhouse. Also here, Bob acquired his love of the great ou doors; exploring through the woods, climbing trees and rock outcroppings, catching snapping turtles in the creeks, fishing in the ponds and lakes. After a few years of what for Bob must have been an idyllic lifestyle, his parents decided that the kids should have better educational opportunities than those available locally

and moved to San Bernardino and later to Rialto, California, where Bob grew up and two additional sisters arrived. Like a lot of other Southern California boys of driving age, he enjoyed working on and drag racing cars. His first, a 1940 Ford coupe, he kept and more recently rebuilt.  It will remain in the family, hopefully, long past it’s century mark, by Bob’s son Michael (Mick). After graduation from San Bernardino High School in 1959, Bob commuted to what is now known as California State Polytechnic University at Pomona, working nearly full-time but still graduating in four years with a B.S. Degree in Civil Engineering.  He spent the next decade working for a civil engineering firm and later, a soil (now geotechnical) engineering firm, serving San Bernardino County. Bob had always had a love for the Central Coast area of California.  So, in 1972 he relocated to Santa Barbara having gained employment with the firm of Schmandt and Lenvik.  At the time, in addition to much local work, the firm was responsible for the architecture and engineering for all restaurant sites nationwide for the exploding Sambo’s Restaurant chain. He later went to work for Les Grant at U.S. Grant & Son, a firm that already employed Bob’s younger brother Steve, also a civil engineer.  In 1978 Bob and Steve established Flowers & Associates, Inc., a consulting civil engineering firm. Bob was capable of addressing any engineering challenge and did so throughout his career, both in the public works arena and, more often, in the planning and design of private infrastructure and land development.  Of note is Bob’s design of the Mission Canyon Sewerage Project which extended public sewers into the rugged Mission Canyon area, allowing abandonment of septic tanks and mitigating the perennial groundwater and creek contamination issues. It was in Santa Barbara that Bob began and continued training in martial arts, earning his black belt in Koei Kan Karate.  Throughout his life, Bob maintained his connection with the great outdoors.  He was frequently hiking the local trails and into the Sierra Nevada Mountains.  When time permitted, Bob went on

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extended and much more rigorous and challenging trekking and mountaineering forays to many parts of the world including Europe, Asia and South America. Bob was most proud of his trek through the Annapurna Circuit in central Nepal, of climbing Mount Aconcaqua in Argentina, and his climbs on the Alps in Europe. Bob’s involvement in engineering, development and community issues went beyond just his business interests.  He was always willing to participate on public/ private sector committees or otherwise provide his insight on matters affecting local planning and development or redevelopment, when solicited by government agencies.  He was a board member with the California Council of Civil Engineers and Land Surveyors for many years.  He sat on the Elings Park Board of Directors, providing input to the planning for development of this valuable community resource. It was at Flowers & Associates’ 40th anniversary celebration in 2018 that Bob announced his decision to retire.  Sadly, he was unable to enjoy a lengthy retirement, being stricken by a stroke in December 2019.  He battled to recover from the effects of this stroke for over a year, but finally succumbed to them this last week at his home in Orcutt, California. Bob is survived by his wife of 33 years, Cindy; his sons Thomas (Heidi) and Michael (Mick) and daughter Stephanie Nelson (Tim); his sisters Jean Anderson (Ken), Mary Pebworth (Mike) and Carol Lorenz (Alan); his brother Steve (Ellen); his nephews Mark Anderson (Alicia), Robert Gamage, Steve Gamage (Monique), Brian Gamage (Rose), Joel Allen (Kim), Craig Flowers, Jason Flowers (Kaylin); his nieces Denise Housatchenko (Walt), Erin Flowers, Kristin Flowers, Kerry Lorenz and Kelly Lorenz; and his grandchildren Marcus Flowers and Mae Flowers. Bob was a good, fun loving, gregarious man.  He made innumerable friends and colleagues throughout his life, and not just in Santa Barbara.  He will be greatly missed! After the COVID19 Virus risks have been resolved, the family plans to hold a celebration of Bob’s life at Elings Park.

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In Memoriam

obituaries

John M. Daniel 1941-2020

10/2/1938 - 1/30/2021

Writer, Publisher, Editor, Teacher

BY B E N D A N I E L n mid-December, John M. Daniel

COURTESY

I

Judith (Judy) Forshey

passed away at his home in McKinleyville, California, after a prolonged struggle with Parkinson’s disease. The world lost a warmhearted, brilliant, witty, and generous man who, as a writer, chronicled life in Santa Barbara and who, as a publisher, editor, and writing teacher, had a profound impact on Santa Barbara’s literary community. John wrote several critically acclaimed novels, including The Poets’ Funeral (Poisoned Pen Press, 2005) and Vanity Fire (Poisoned Pen Press, 2006), both of which were set in a fictionalized version of Santa Barbara’s literary and publishing communities. His book Hooperman: a Bookstore Mystery (Dark Oak Mysteries, 2013) was inspired by John’s experience as a bookstore clerk in the San Francisco Bay Area during the 1970s. His short stories—many of which were set in Santa Barbara—were published in literary journals such as Tin House, ZYZZYVA, Fish Stories, and Santa Barbara Review, and in the collections Santa Barbara Stories (John Daniel and Company, 2015) and Generous Helpings (Shoreline Press, 2001). In collaboration AN ORIGINAL: John Daniel is lovingly remembered as a publisher and editor for the Santa Barbara literary community in the ’80s and with Steve Moss, John was the editor of The ’90s. World’s Shortest Stories, a series of books that collected and published 55-word stories. His nonfiction works included books about writthe company became Daniel & Daniel Publishers, ing and publishing, and memoirs that told the story of Inc. Over the years, they would publish books by a his remarkable life and the unconventional household variety of well-known authors, including Artie Shaw, and family in which he grew up. Al Capp, and Charles Champlin. From among Santa John was born in 1941 in Minneapolis, the young- Barbara’s authors, they published Dennis Lynds, Max est of four siblings. When John’s father, Lewis Daniel, Schott, Perie Longo, Julia Bates, Brooks Firestone, and passed away in 1945, his mother, Hannah Mallon Dan- Glenna Luschei. iel, moved her family to Cleveland, Ohio, to live with While living and working in Santa Barbara, John her brother, Neil Mallon, who was a bachelor and the also taught aspiring authors in the craft of writing CEO of Dresser Industries, which built parts for oil —at the UCLA Extension and Santa Barbara Adult wells. In 1954, the Mallon/Daniel household moved to Education programs, and at the Santa Barbara Writers Farmers Branch, Texas, where the family played host Conference, where for 20 years he led a Pirate Workto a long list of influential and consequential visitors, shop that lasted deep into the night. John listened including the Dulles brothers and the Bush family. to every writer who showed up with work to share. John had the rare distinction of pulling a drowning As a savvy observer of the writing process, he had a child out of the family’s backyard swimming pool; child-like excitement over excellent writing. He was that kid grew up to be the second American president a fair instructor whose praise, encouragement, and named George Bush. suggested improvements all were as honest as they John attended high school at Phillips Academy, were empowering to aspirational writers. in Andover, Massachusetts, and he earned a BA in As a teacher, John was quick to laugh and to cry American Literature from Stanford in 1964. After when appropriate. Linda Stewart-Oaten, who pargraduation, John spent a summer in Summersville, ticipated in John’s Pirate Workshops, remembers him Massachusetts, attending the Radcliffe College Pub- arriving one night, dressed in a bow tie and looking lishing Procedures Course, and in 1967 he returned to dapper. He sat down at a piano and sang a song he’d Stanford as a Wallace Stegner Fellow, studying creative written that made mention of, and offered praise for, writing under the tutelage of Wallace Stegner and of each of the participants’ work. Nancy Packer, whose work he later published. In 2004, John and Susan moved to McKinleyville John began his career in books by working for in Humboldt County, but the impact of John’s life in Stanford University Press. He later worked at Kepler’s Santa Barbara is still felt. Eric Larson, who worked Books in Menlo Park and, while living on the mid- at Daniel & Daniel and learned the publishing trade peninsula, John worked as a freelance editor and from the Daniels, remembers John’s wisdom: “John started No Deadlines, his first foray into the world of learned how to graciously accept things that didn’t go small-press publishing. his way, and he kept his sense of humor.” His Santa Barbara years began in 1982 when he John Daniel is survived by his wife, Susan; by his took a job with Capra Press, where he met and fell sons, Morgan Daniel of Mendocino and Ben Daniel in love with his boss and officemate, Susan Winton. of Oakland; by stepsons Cory Graham of Las Vegas, Before long, their lives were joined at home and at and Stewart Graham of Santa Barbara; by his brother, work. They were inseparable for more than 35 years. Thomas Daniel of Shaker Heights, Ohio; by seven In 1987, John started John Daniel and Company. grandchildren and two great-grandchildren; and by Susan soon followed John to the new venture, and a world more beautiful for his having lived in it. n

friends. One of her grandchildren had this to say about Gram-Gram and Papa, ‘they will always be influential in the way we raise our children.’ Due to Covid, a Celebration of Life will be held at a later date.

Harvey Jessum 1927 - 2021

Beloved wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, Judy passed away on January 30, 2021 at the age of 82, due to complications from Covid. Judy was born October 2, 1938 in North Hollywood to Norman and Elsie Baird. In 1943 the family moved to Santa Barbara, where she attended school. In 1955 she married the love of her life, Reid Forshey. They remained married until he passed away in 2007. She was a devoted wife and mother to their 4 children. Any neighbors would recall the familiar call to her children, ‘Leslie, Lisa, Loren and Lee’. There are many happy memories of lake trips, the beach, fishing, water skiing, dirt bike riding, all with close family and friends. She loved to dance, especially to country music, many times with her children. After the children were grown, Judy and Reid travelled cross country several times in their motor home, and they were devoted to spending time with their grandkids. They loved having beach days, attending BMX races, or watching the grandkids dirt bike ride. They were always strong influences in their lives. Judy loved people and was quite social, yet always content with a good book. She had a strong faith, cherishing good memories that made her feel happy. She always looked for the good in others, and in her life. She is survived by her loving children, Leslie & Brian Kolich, Lisa & Bill Volmar, Loren Forshey and Julie, Lee & Pam Forshey. She adored her 9 grandchildren, Genessa, Justin, Nick, Brandon (preceeded her in death in 2010), Jarrett, Jake, Kristin, Tyler, and Ashley. She was blessed with 11 great grandchildren as well as nieces and nephews, and good

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Harvey William Jessum was born in Jamaica, New York on November 16th, 1927. A child born into the Great Depression, Harvey was the middle of three, preceded in death by his older sister Ruth Helgeson and his younger brother Richard Jessum. Raising a family in Glen Cove, NY, Harvey worked as a middle school teacher in the public school system. He is survived by his three children, Maria Melkonoff, Denise Barth and John Jessum and by six grandchildren, Natalie, Dylan, Molly, Dustin, Emily and Sophia. Harvey lost his mother at the age of 8 and was raised by his sister Ruth and Aunts. He went on to serve in WWII as part of the occupation force in Germany and after his service, returned to complete his High School education, where he met and eventually married his first wife, Marilyn. Harvey was a master at marshalling neighborhood kids to help work around his house and left a wide path of friendship wherever he traveled. He biked extensively, remained active for most his life and could strike up a conversation with anyone, anywhere. He settled in Santa Barbara, California, 20 years ago declaring it the best place on Earth to settle. He loved spending time with his children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews. He was an avid lawn bowler, and volunteered at the local food bank, and Santa Barbara Hospice. He also worked as a volunteer at the A. C. Postel Rose Garden, where he was able to indulge his passion of gardening. Donations in lieu of flowers may be sent to: Food From the Heart PO Box 3908 Santa Barbara, CA 93130 Hospice of Santa Barbara 2050 Alameda Padre Serra, Ste. 100 Santa Barbara, California 93103 American Heart Association

FEBRUARY 18, 2021

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DANIEL DREIFUSS PHOTOS

The Struggle Against

Learning Loss Teaching Virtually Has Not Been Working Well for All Elementary Students

W

by Delaney Smith

hen they finally returned to school,

some of the students couldn’t even write their own names. Others struggled to use scissors or hold pencils. For Carpinteria’s Canalino kindergarten teacher Andrea Edmondson, this was the reality when her students returned to the classroom in October. The COVID-19 pandemic devastated, destroyed, and took lives. But the impact of the virus on schoolchildren may be the most insidious impact of all. A generation of students, those who were already struggling to keep pace, have fallen further behind, and it will likely take years before the true impact of distance learning is fully known. For educators, trying to minimize what’s now known widely as “learning loss” has proved to be the educational challenge of their lifetime. For students, it’s a new way of life. The Independent spent weeks interviewing teachers, students, and education activists to better understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has shaken the state of education. The experiences vary, but one thing is clear: Children will never be the same. When her students returned to class this fall, after months of virtual teaching in 2020, Edmondson saw the effects of learning loss firsthand. She estimated that half the class was struggling and behind, while those who were English learners struggled the most. Not surprisingly, students who had resources and support at home tended to succeed better than those who didn’t have space to do schoolwork or whose parents had to work and couldn’t be home to help. As a result, learning loss has wid16

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FEBRUARY 18, 2021

ened the achievement gap between the haves and have-nots even more dramatically than it was before. According to a December 2020 study released by McKinsey & Company, U.S. students are likely to have suffered up to nine months of learning loss in math, on average, by the end of the academic year because of pandemic distance learning. Students of color could be as many as 12 months behind. The study concluded: “While all students are suffering, those who came into the pandemic with the fewest academic opportunities are on track to exit with the greatest learning loss.” Educators, parents, students, and the whole community

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has taken the challenge head-on. Local school districts are working to mitigate learning loss in a variety of unique ways — from changing the grading system to opening a summer school program to relying on professional learning communities, creating learning centers, and more.

Carpinteria Unified School District Carpinteria Unified was one of the few in the district to be allowed to reopen its elementary schools this fall. They

Figure 1


grades when it went remote, but it could provide middle school and high school grades to demonstrate learning loss. Please see Figure 1. Jaime Persoon, principal of Canalino School, said, “On a typical year, there’s multiple interruptions throughout the day like band, art, therapy, PE.” But on the hybrid model, there are no interruptions. “Those kids are with their certificated teacher the entire day, and there’s no interruptions.” Teachers use the days students are learning remotely to teach art and other enrichment subjects. Structuring the day this way, Peterson said, allows for the most impactful learning because instructional days are shorter and teachers from all grade levels are able to meet together to discuss a student’s progress across grade levels. This has really helped students get back up to speed. “We’re seeing huge strides,” she said. “The kids are absolutely thrilled to be back.”

Goleta Union School District

LEARNING CENTERS: Student Victoria Arias gets help from a tutor at the Eastside Boys & Girls Club learning center. Students with working parents can come to the learning center during the day to complete their schoolwork with the help of supervising adults.

received permission from the State Board of Education to begin a hybrid model of in-person instruction, meaning the students in each class were split into cohorts and brought back into the classroom two days a week and worked online at home three days a week. This has made for a massive turnaround in student performance. Kindergarten teacher Edmondson even saw the change in her new-to-school kindergarteners. The first few months of the school year, she only knew her students through a computer screen. When the district switched to a hybrid format last October, she was with her class face-to-face. Now she was able to understand how to motivate each child. When one middle-income, English-speaking student entered class only knowing how to write his name, she had to find a way to engage him. “I discovered he was really into trucks. I used that to motivate him, and now he’s totally on track to where he should be.” Kristina Garcia, who teaches a 4th grade and 5th grade combination class at Canalino, has seen the effects full circle. (In combination classes, students from two grade levels are placed in one classroom under the same teacher.) Last year, Garcia had to teach her 4th grade students remotely. Now those same students are in her 5th grade class, where she can teach them in person. Carpinteria Unified is nearly 75 percent Latino, and many of the parents work in the marijuana and flower industry and are unable to be home with their children. Garcia said that computers and Wi-Fi were a huge barrier, as well, despite the district handing out devices and hotspots. The biggest issue, though, came down to a lack of accountability and motivation. Even though she brought in counselors and did home visits, some students would not do much of anything online. “It was like pulling teeth to get them to interact,” she said. But things have really turned around since Garcia began teaching her students face-to-face twice a week. One of her 4th graders last year was really struggling, so much so that Garcia had trouble reading his writing. Now, in her 5th grade class, the student can write a solid paragraph. “He’s up two grade levels from where he was,” she said. Garcia has learned through assessments that students were “all over the place” and that she couldn’t give them the same assignments. Approaching each child’s needs individually has been her biggest tool against learning loss. Assignments are focused on specific students’ level of learning. The classroom aide has been a great help working with each student. “I’ve been teaching for 23 years, and this has been the most challenging year because of how hard it is to differentiate instruction,” said 2nd-grade dual-language teacher Sonia Aguila-Gonzalez. “I have students reading five words per minute and others 100 per minute,” she said, but because students must sit six feet apart, it’s not possible to have them working closely with each other.

Aguila-Gonzalez said that although some of her students are behind, distance learning wasn’t all bad. “They can join Zoom, they can use Flipgrid, PowerPoint, Google Classroom. All of that is useful when they grow up. They have learned a lot about gratitude and being resilient.” But this isn’t always true, especially for young learners. Jessica Clark, a mother of two children in Canalino, said though her oldest child was doing well with distance teaching, her younger, 5-year-old son, Dax, was experiencing Zoom fatigue. His mother had to sit next to him through the whole Zoom class because it was so difficult to make him pay attention. “He hated school even though he had always loved prekindergarten. He would cry and cry and cry every time it was time for Zoom. Once we were given the green light for hybrid, it was like a night-and-day difference.” Carpinteria Unified counselors Bert Dannenberg and Shanna Hargett said that the emotional toll caused by distance learning is to be expected. When kids were stuck on Zoom, they felt the strain not just of academic loss, but also of being separated from their friends and teachers. Even the hybrid classes are not perfect. “They can’t really play together,” Dannenberg said. “They can’t use the same balls on the playground or touch the same equipment. A lot of the social-emotional impacts we’re not going to fully see right away, but we will see over the next three to four years. Some of these kids have already missed a ton of school between the fires, debris flow, and now pandemic. The effects will be felt down the road.” Grades are one way to illustrate the impacts of learning loss in Carpinteria Unified. The district did not give elementary

Goleta Union tends to be an outlier among other school districts because, despite its distance-only learning model, it has shown the least amount of learning loss among its elementary students. Although its Latino students have suffered the most, they have had less leaning loss than students of color in any other district. Goleta Union students in 1st grade actally performed better on their STAR 360 assessments in 2020 than in 2019. That can be attributed to more parents being at home and having more time to help their young children with schoolwork. Higher grades have seen a slight dip in reading and math skills overall, though the dip was greater for Latinos. Please see Figure 2. Overall, Superintendent Donna Lewis said, the majority of Goleta Union kids are performing at or above grade level. What has helped make them an outlier in this way? She believes it is professional learning communities. Professional learning communities (PLCs) are an ongoing process in which teachers work collaboratively across grade levels to plan lessons and to implement new strategies. Ned Schoenwetter, principal of Ellwood Elementary, explained the district’s PLC strategy. “Teacher teams identify those five to seven key learning standards,” he said. “Then they are talking to the grade-level teachers above them and below them so student learning is continuous…. We are teaching the key most important standards in depth rather than a lot of standards not in depth. The question is not if they will get it; it’s when will they get it.” Craig Abshere, a 4th grade teacher at Ellwood who is in his 26th year of teaching, is convinced PLC methods work. “With remote teaching, we have a much smaller window of time to learn, so we really need to stay focused on what those skills are.” Three years ago, Abshere was part of a group of teachers who put PLC structures they learned at conferences in place at Ellwood. He believes this gave the school an advantage during the pandemic.

Figure 2

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Calling all bookworms!

in partnership with the Santa Barbara Public Library

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2021

READING CHALLENGE February’s Theme:

Books Written by Black Women

Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

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C O V E R S T O R Y cont’d Teachers at each grade level meet weekly to look at STAR 360 data. This helps identify different techniques to help those students who are not making progress. “PLCs have invigorated my last years as a teacher,” Abshere said. With PLC methods, teachers will be able to pick up the pieces of learning loss when classes start back in person. “When we say all children can learn and all children can get these standards, we mean it.”

Santa Barbara Unified School District Like Goleta Union, Santa Barbara Unified is still teaching in a distance-only learning model, and its students are experiencing the same widening achievement gap seen throughout the county. Roughly a third of elementary students in Santa Barbara Unified have earned a 1 or 2 (out of 4) score in reading, writing, and/ or math on their most recent report cards — a 10 percent increase in the number of students earning these lower numbers than pre-pandemic. Please see Figure 3. In the elementary schools, 85 percent of the students who are getting three or more 1s on their first trimester report card are Latinos. One school in Santa Barbara Unified, however, was instrumental tackling that discrepancy head-on. “I had teachers and staff ready to take the kids back on campus back when we were first in the purple tier,” said Gabriel Sandoval, principal of Cleveland Elementary. “We also had identified struggling students even before cohorts. We had the data that showed who were not logging on and weren’t progressing. We used that to identify which students to invite back for small cohorts.” The students invited back included special education students, English-language learners, students with bad connectivity or no study space at home, and others with needs. Cleveland is also the only elementary school in the district that has all kindergarteners back in classrooms because they were able to get the staff together before COVID cases spiked. “Kindergarten is the foundation for reading, so we knew those kids had to learn in person.” A program designed for students on the autism spectrum is taught in small

cohorts, and this approach, according to special education teacher Eben Robinson, has allowed students to learn in leaps and bounds. A 3rd-grade girl with receptive language delays in Robinson’s class lived in a crowded home and had great difficulty with distance learning. “She needed to be able to touch things and talk to learn —Zoom just wasn’t doing it. Since we’ve invited her to the cohorts, she’s on the same grade level she should be now.” Other elementary schools in the district are gearing up for the longer-term solution to learning loss. Over at Franklin Elementary, Principal Casie Killgore devised a four-tiered system for determining what level of intervention a student needs to make up for learning loss — including summer school. Students with less than 20 percent learning loss are placed in Tier One. They work in small groups in their classrooms, and their families are offered night programs to help them create home structures so that their children can perform better academically.  Tier Two students have 20 to 40 percent learning loss. They will go to summer school, have an extended school day, and enroll in small group intervention services. Students in Tiers Three and Four have increased programming support, including summer school and either night school or Saturday school.  Not all schools in the Santa Barbara district are working like Cleveland or Franklin is— each school is building its own plan to combat learning loss. Teachers, regardless of their district, praise parents, who have had to step in and help teach their children when many were unprepared to do so. Patricia Garcia, with children in the 4th and 8th grades at Franklin, said, “It is hard to help them with the technology piece, and I am not as good with it as they are.” Garcia spoke in Spanish, translated by 4th-grade teacher Marlen Limon. “My husband and I both work full-time, so the kids stay home alone during the day. Luckily, my 4th-grader is doing better, and she is responsible with turning in her work.” Limon said disengagement is the hardest battle for her students. She tries to get creative and asks herself every day: What

Figure 3


DANIEL DREIFUSS

recruits, trains, and supports community volunteers to advocate for children who have experienced abuse and/or neglect.

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Coura

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& Ch

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“There were 26 different people involved in my case. Lawyers, social workers, therapists, foster families, group homes, etc.” “My CASA volunteer was the only person who was there for me the entire time I was in foster care.”

We are

Rachel, Age 17

Change a Child’s Story

Media Grants

FRIDAY FUN DAY: Every Friday, students at Franklin Elementary line up in cars to pick up their new weekly schoolwork packets and to drop off their completed assignments. Students are usually overjoyed on Fridays because they get to see their teachers outside of Zoom, if only for a few minutes to pick up their packets.

SBCASA.ORG

And this is

what we do!

On May 19th, DUCKS are coming to Santa Barbara County! Continue reading for details

for Santa Barbara County Nonprofit Organizations April2019-CASAInsert.indd 1

excites a 9- or 10-year-old? “The socialemotional piece really matters,” Limon said, “so I check in with them daily and try to make that connection.”

4/12/19 9:46 AM

“Being a part of Girls Inc. has helped me climb out of my shell, talk to new people, and take on new opportunities. It has become my second home and a place where I feel comfortable expressing myself. And because of Girls Inc., I have the perseverance to always get up and try again.” — Monica D., 15

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique INSPIRINGopportunity ALL GIRLS TO BE nonprofits the ability to spread provides STRONG, SMART, AND BOLD their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. ere! H n is o s a Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is y Se b a healthy, is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent B educated & independent. design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation.

Girls Inc. of Carpinteria delivers life-changing programs and experiences that equip girls to overcome serious barriers to grow up

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

5315 Foothill Road, Carpinteria www.girlsinc-carp.org | 805-684-6364

Casa del Herrero

SB Wildlife Insert.indd 1

2/22/19 3:20 PM

Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience.

‘I’ve been teaching for 23 years, and this has been the most challenging year because of how hard it is to differentiate instruction. I have students reading five words per minute and others 100 per minute.’

Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

Good Work Lives On ARCHITECTURAL FOUNDATION OF SANTA BARBARA

A public nonprofit charitable organization, with the goal of enhancing our community’s awareness and appreciation of architecture and the built environment. A public nonprofit charitable organization

kids is better than being alone at home.” Jamie Collins, the executive director of Girls Inc. Carpinteria, described a typical day for a 1st-grade girl. She arrives at 8 a.m. and then checks in with her Zoom at 8:15, when Girls Inc. facilitators The Community Steps In class are there to help her. Following that is In the greater Santa Barbara area, where an enrichment program, and thanks to a there are struggling kids and families, there grant, they have hired a physical educais a community working to back them. tion teacher for the afternoons. Throughout the pandemic, numerous non“The unrealized stress of pandemic profits have tried to be there for any student isolation on the kids is really being seen who seemed to fall through the cracks— in their behaviors and how they relate who, for whatever reason, stopped showing peer to peer or to their Zoom calls,” Colup to distance learning altogether. lins said. “The kids feel like they are just a The United Way of Santa Barbara little box on the screen, so our facilitators County, for example, launched the Learn- work to mentor and fill in that gap.” ing & Enrichment Center Collaborative, Many local church groups have also which serves 501 students across Santa Bar- pitched in to help mitigate learning loss. bara County. The program provides a place Bob Niehaus, who attends Calvary for students to do their distance learning Chapel, is leading the Santa Barbara during the day with adult supervision. Learning Center movement. He recogIt serves students who don’t have Wi-Fi nized that not only were most younger access, someone at home to supervise them, children not learning to read using the online format, but it was even worse for kids without Wi-Fi or parents who couldn’t be home. Calvary Chapel, which can provide space for 20 students, was the first church to open its doors as a learning center. Though the learning center is not a religious program, Niehaus said if a child —Sonia Aguila-Gonzalez, pointed to a picture of 2nd-grade dual-language teacher Jesus in the church and or a learning area in their home because of asked who he was, they would definitely overcrowding. “have a conversation.” The United Way funds go to sites that Shoreline Community Church is also partner with districts all over the county, offering a learning center but can only such as the YMCA, Girls Inc. of Greater accommodate seven children. Overall, Santa Barbara, the Isla Vista Youth Projects, there are around 10 churches that are voland the United Boys & Girls Clubs of Santa unteering to be a learning center. Barbara County. Though the effects of learning loss on “The staff walk up and down and make young Santa Barbara students won’t be sure kids are on their Zoom and assisting felt immediately, some will be able to get them,” said Michael Baker, the CEO of the back to grade level sooner than others. United Boys & Girls Club of Santa Barbara And the social-emotional toll of being County, one of the sites that gets funding isolated from peers and teachers is diffifrom United Way. “That happens from 8 cult to predict. But while the children are a.m. to 2:30 p.m. They eat lunch at their desk. living through this pandemic, parents, Academic instruction is done at 3 p.m. teachers, and community members are “These kids really need the social inter- all making every effort they have at their n action, too. Being in a room with 13 other disposal to bridge the gap.

Since 1989, changing the world for one cat at a time.

Belief in the significance of architecture is premised on the notion that we are, for better or for worse, different people in different places — and on the conviction that it is architecture’s task to render vivid to us who we might ideally be. — Alain de Botton

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The world has changed, and yet the Lobero remains ready and available for the Santa Barbara community when the time is right. The Lobero has been a staple in our town during the good and the bad. Through two global pandemics, a historic earthquake and other natural disasters, the Lobero still stands.

148 years of the Lobero and counting! If you love the Lobero, can’t wait to return for live shows and care about its continued role in our vibrant local arts community, now more than ever, support our historic stage by making a gift today.

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Support the Lobero Today Text LOBERO to 41444 to make a direct donation on your phone Give online at lobero.org/give-day Share your favorite @loberotheatre memories on social media by adding #LoberoGiveDay to your posts Follow our #LoberoGiveDay videos from Lobero Family and Friends

Visit Lobero.org to see what’s on.


I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

FEB.

18-24

T HE

by TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have virtual events coming up, submit them at independent.com/eventsubmit.

2/24:

2/18:

Artist Talk: Introducing Cosmovisión Indígena: The Intersection of Indigenous Knowledge and Contemporary Art SBCC’s

Sharon Green: Exposed: A Virtual Multimedia Experience with Ultimate Sailing Photographer Sharon Green

will transport you out on the water at this multimedia presentation that will highlight the sport of ultimate sailing. 7-8:30pm. Free; donations are welcome. Call (805) 962-8404 or email info@sbmm.org.

Atkinson Gallery invites everyone to this group discussion about Cosmovisión Indígena and how it will trace the history, science, and contemporary uses of Mesoamerican dyeing and weaving while exploring the mythology, ritual, and storytelling used to preserve and pass on this traditional knowledge. An art lab and learning garden will be established in S.B., and a research space in Oxnard will serve members of the Mixtec, Zapotec, and other communities from Oaxaca, Mexico, who have settled throughout Ventura County. Register to receive the webinar information. 4pm. Free.

sbmm.org/santa-barbara-events

Please join on the eve of the 79th anniversary of Executive Order 9066, when President Roosevelt authorized clearing the way for incarceration of Japanese Americans in U.S. concentration camps. Bradford Pearson, author of The Eagles of Heart Mountain: A True Story of Football, Incarceration and Resistance in World War II America, and journalist Nancy Ukai of 50objects.com, a history project that explores the human impact of this incarceration, will share their insights. 5pm. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email events@chaucersbooks.com.

tinyurl.com/BradfordPearson 2/18: Virtual Author Discussion: Dwight Reynolds Join online for a dialogue with Dwight Reynolds (Religious Studies, UCSB) about his new book, Humanities Decanted: The Musical Heritage of Al-Andalus, a critical account of the history of Andalusian music in Iberia from the Islamic conquest of 711 to the early 17th century. An audience Q&A will follow. Register to receive Zoom link.

2/19:

2/21: Online Class: Handmade Ceramic Butter Dish All levels and ages

tinyurl.com/DwightReynolds 2/19-2/21: Gem Faire Get your jewelry repaired and cleaned while you shop for jewelry, gems, and stones at manufacturers’ prices. Safety protocols will be practiced, and masks are required. Fri.: noon-6pm; Sat.: 10am-5pm; Sun.: 10am-5pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free-$7/weekend pass. Call (805) 252-8300 or email info@ gemfaire.com. tinyurl.com/

SBGemFaire

SATURDAY 2/20 2/20-2/21, 2/24: S.B. Museum Outdoor Exhibits Open Reserve online and in advance to visit the outdoor exhibits, including Prehistoric Forest, Dinorama, and the Museum Backyard. Changes to cleaning and guest protocols have been made to keep everyone as safe as possible. Masks are required. 10am4pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$15.

tinyurl.com/OutdoorExhibitsOpen

Virtual Q&A: George

Takei View the documentary

tinyurl.com/GeorgeTakai tinyurl.com/WatchFilmOnline Fundraiser

claystudiosb.org/events/butter-dish

Black History Month SATURDAY 2/20

MONDAY 2/22 2/22: Flow Outdoors Downtown with Sierra Noland All levels are invited to a creative and energizing breath-to-movement practice that builds heat, endurance, flexibility, strength, mental focus, and self-awareness. Bring your own mat and blanket for added comfort. Masks are required, and safety guidelines will be observed. 5:30-6:30pm. El Paseo Restaurant, 813 Anacapa St. $24.

Chocolate Baby Story Time Bring your baby for books written for them with Black voices, read by Black leaders, and written by Black authors in this virtual series. There will be a future story time on February 27. 10-11am. Donation based.

tinyurl.com/BHMSB2021

Virtual Interview: Harold Brown Listen to stories from Harold Brown, founding member of the group War and co-writer of songs such as “Lowrider,” “Spill the Wine,”“Cisco Kid,” and more. 2-5pm. Free; donations accepted.

tinyurl.com/BHMSB2021

divinitreesantabarbara.com/outdoor

SUNDAY 2/21

TUESDAY 2/23 2/23: Memoirs and Biography Virtual Book Club Join the virtual discussion about this month’s selection, Dear America: Notes of an Undocumented Citizen by Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas, which spans 25 years of his life as an immigrant from the Philippines trying to pass as an American. 4:30-6pm. Free. Call (805) 963-3727 or email amerza@santabarbaraca.gov.

tinyurl.com/JoseAntonioVargas

Celebrating St. Paul AME Church Learn about this S.B. city landmark on Haley and Olive streets that was a spiritual haven for Black Santa Barbarans and helped strengthen the Black community for decades. 2-5pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/BHMSB2021

MONDAY 2/22 Cooking with Shalhoob and Gipsy Hill Bakery Online with Healing Justice S.B. Time: TBA. Free; donations accepted. tinyurl.com/BHMSB2021

WEDNESDAY 2/24 2/24: 2021 Downtown S.B.’s Digital Annual Awards Ceremony This event will

COURTESY

And Then They Came for Us before you join host and film producer Abby Ginzberg in a Q&A with author, actor, and social justice advocate George Takei, who is featured in the film with others who were incarcerated during the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. 4-5pm. Free. Call (805) 564-5621 or email JLemberger@SantaBarbaraCA.gov.

are invited to join Instructor Dini Dixon, who will guide you in hand-building techniques to create a unique butter dish used to keep your butter at room temperature. Pick up your clay before the workshop and drop off your work afterward to be glazed and fired. 2-4pm. $60.

tinyurl.com/AtkinsonGallery

SANTA BARBARA TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION

2/18: Virtual Author Discussion Commemorating Executive Order 9066: Bradford Pearson

4-4:45pm. Free. Call (805) 893-2004 or email events@ihc.ucsb.edu.

COURTESY

THURSDAY 2/18

COURTESY

SHARON GREEN

SUNDAY 2/21

honor people, organizations, and downtown S.B. with announcements of the 2020 Volunteer of the Year, Citizen of the Year, Business Champion of the Year, Entrepreneur of the Year, and the 2021 Harriet Miller Youth Leadership Award recipient. 9-10am. $10.

TUESDAY 2/23 Conscious Conversations: The Movement for Black Lives, Fighting for Black Futures The UCSB MultiCultural Center (MCC) will host a BLM panel facilitated by MCC Scholar-in-Residence Dr. Terrance Wooten in a dynamic discussion about the radical possibilities of a future where all Black lives matter and the role of community in the fight for Black lives. 6-8pm. Free.

tinyurl.com/BlackLivesBlackFutures

tinyurl.com/DowntownAwards

Events may have been canceled or postponed. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 18, 2021

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living Arroyo Hondo

Nature

p. 22

SALLY ISAACSON PHOTOS

The Magical World of

Lorquin’s admiral

A Little-Known Nature Preserve with an Amazing Abundance of Wildlife Text and photos by Sally Isaacson

F

or the last 10 years, I have spent many hours at this lovely nature preserve and every time I visit, I see something new and interesting. Water is always running in the Arroyo Hondo Creek. In summer, the stream is reduced to pools that provide refuges for many special aquatic species and supply life-giving water for land animals that travel from all around. Since the big February rain, water is again rushing all the way down from the mountains to the Pacific. Lining the stream are huge western sycamore trees that change with the seasons — with bright green leaves in spring, providing shade in summer, glowing gold in the autumn light, and, when leafless in winter, showing off their exquisite branching patterns and jigsaw-puzzle bark. When it rains, it is possible to see rare newts start to move around, and later in spring, the pools are filled with them. Masses of males compete for each single female. Egg masses are attached to submerged sticks, and later, tiny gillbreathing newt larvae emerge. In a big pool, far up the stream, you may watch for a while, and then suddenly, a full-grown newt, now breathing with lungs, paddles to the surface, gulps air, and swims back down to the bottom. Newts have few predators as they have toxic skin, and their Northern flicker orange-brown color 22

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FEBRUARY 18, 2021

The next time I saw one, I picked it up to show to some kids. It bit me and would not let go … the children were in awe, not of the snake, but of my blood! Rattlesnakes are exquisite too: distinctly patterned young ones and big black old ones. It is said that for every rattler you see, there may be nine more in animal burrows underground! Arroyo Hondo is a great birdwatching place. Last spring, a pair of kestrels hatched chicks in a nest near the barn, and wrens built their nest in a sycamore cavity nearby. Noisy clown-faced acorn woodpeckers, as well as Nuttall’s woodpeckers with distinctive striped backs, are common. We see flickers, gorgeous birds, especially when they fly and expose their flame-colored feathers. Sapsuckers come here too, as we know from the rows of wells they have drilled in certain trees. Red-tailed hawks build big stick nests up in the rocks, and peregrine falcons are thought to nest much higher, farther back in the canyon. Hundreds of interesting plants grow here. There are huge old bay, sycamore, and coast live oak trees with scars that prove they have withstood wildfires, as well as alders, willows, cottonwoods, and big-leaf maples along the stream. In the chaparral and coastal sage scrub, a wide variety of tough, drought-adapted shrubs grow. Instead of showy carpets of wildflowers, you can see different species blooming in all the months. A variety of red, tubular-shaped flowers that attract hummingbirds supply

warns that they are not good to eat. In the same pool, there are small trout that may be rainbows or steelhead. With enough water, they swim to the ocean, where they feed for a few years. Later, they return Twin mule deer fawns to fresh water and are much larger and more silvery in color. These big fish lay eggs in the gravel of the streambed. Some of the next generation will live their whole life in the stream while others will travel to the ocean. Pacific pond turtles, like California newts and southern steelhead, are quite rare, and they also are found along Arroyo Hondo Creek. Pond turtles nest on land, and in April, the young turtles make their first visits to the creek. The canyon is home to many shy mammals, including bears, bobcats, foxes, and mountain lions. We see their scat and paw prints on the trails, but these creatures are rarely seen in daylight. Mule deer are often seen, however, and last spring, three does each had twins. It was a joy to watch them as they silently followed their mothers … and to see a big buck with huge, branching antlers, who might have been the father. One early morning, I saw a skunk busily rooting in the meadow. I thought this animal quite beautiful as it moved nectar for the tiny birds for much of the year. Different plants among the grasses with its bold black and white stripes and in the sunflower family provide good landing places for deliits feathery tail held high. cate winged visitors, especially butterflies. Another time, I had a close encounter with a young bear. Butterflies are plentiful, too. Monarchs have warning colChocolate brown, with perfect fur, not sun-bleached like an ors of orange and black, and birds avoid them as they contain older bear might be. It was frightened; it stood up on its hind toxins from the milkweed plants they ate as caterpillars. legs and dived quickly into the bushes. I did not have time for Buckeye butterflies with lovely eye spots accented with bright fear, just time to wish I had my camera. colors land in the meadow. Beautiful Lorquin’s admirals are This canyon is home to many snakes. Ring-necked often seen near the creek, and yellow and black swallowsnakes are little gray snakes with faint orange neck bands tails float gracefully through the air, sometimes settling to … uninteresting until they coil up and display their bright “puddle” near water as they collect nutrients from the mud. orange undersides in fright. They have some venom, but only Come to Arroyo Hondo Preserve — it is a wonderful place enough to affect small prey. to wander and wonder in nature.  Kingsnakes have bold stripes, but they easily get lost in patches of sun and shade. The first time I saw a mountain Sally Isaacson, a lifelong educator and naturalist, is the education kingsnake with red, black, and cream stripes, I was in awe. coordinator at Arroyo Hondo Preserve.

411

Owned and managed by the Land Trust for Santa Barbara County, Arroyo Hondo Preserve is open for hiking, by reservation only, on Mondays, Wednesdays, and two weekends each month. Visitor numbers are limited to allow social distancing. For more information and reservations, visit sblandtrust.org.

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COURTESY

Cannabis Corner

Khalid Al Naser

T

One of Largest Companies Statewide Grows in Wine Country by Matt Kettmann terroir, or how a farmed product’s characteristics reflect where it was grown; they find direct tourism parallels between visiting estates to enjoy the fruits, or buds, of those properties on-site; and they see the wine industry as a model for how to talk about cannabis in cultured ways, a potential roadmap for establishing an accepted vocabulary describing aromas, flavors, and farm-totable techniques. Considering this convergence daily is Khalid Al Naser, the product director for Raw Garden, one of the largest cannabis companies in California. With two farms along Santa Rosa Road in the Sta. Rita Hills and one outside of Los Alamos, Raw Garden — whose cultivation operations are better known as Central Coast Agriculture, run by CEO John De Friel — is already on the cutting edge of cannabis breeding and product development. So far, they’ve introduced more than 800 new strains and sell hundreds of different products and flavors in more than 750 dispensaries across the state. But Al Naser is putting the company on the front lines of social acceptance as well — perhaps an even greater challenge for a product that remains federally illegal and culturally combative, even in liberal-leaning places such as Santa Barbara. “I take ownership in the way we talk about cannabis and am really trying to drive normalization, to get people to adopt an elevated understanding of the experience,” said Al Naser, who was raised outside of Seattle and came to California about 15 years ago. “Wine, in a lot

Hope on Horizon for

High School Sports F

Cultivates Raw Garden’s Kingdom

here’s been a lot of choking in the nascent days of commercial cannabis growing in Santa Barbara County, especially as whitetented, periodically pungent farms expanded into the heart of wine country. As repeatedly covered in both this newspaper and much larger publications, this 21st-century cultivation conflict triggered lawsuits, contentious county hearings, and no shortage of seemingly endless squabbling, much of it between grape and cannabis growers themselves. It’s curious, then, that the very same things that drew winemakers to Santa Barbara County — the unique, maritime-chilled microclimatic conditions afforded by our east-to-west lying Transverse Ranges — are also what make growing cannabis here so ideal. Much like in wine grapes, the diurnal temperature shifts between warm, sunny days and cool, sea-breezed nights allow strong cannabis growth during the day and ample resting at night. But the similarities between the two industries go much deeper, say cannabis proponents. They believe that marijuana also exhibits the wine country notion of

Sports

of regards, is very simple, but we’ve been able to pull out the nuances that elevate the experience. There is something that’s intangible about wine that cannabis shares.” Navigating uncharted waters such as these are comfortable for Al Naser, whose original aspirations in cooking and photography didn’t satisfy his adventurous spirit. “I would have hopped on a boat to go to a new land,” said Al Naser, had he been born in a different era. “Having come from culinary arts and photography — two things that have been done to the umpteenth time by other people — cannabis felt like a new space.” Righteousness was also involved, as he entered the industry a dozen years ago when only medical marijuana was legal. “If I was gonna go on a new adventure, I wanted to make sure it was happening for the right reasons, to be able to stand by what we were doing and be proud of it,” he said. “I realized it was vulnerable people like older ladies and sick kids who were really the crux of why this had happened. For me personally, there was a need to be on a soapbox about it.” That mentality is baked into Raw Garden, which started as a medical marijuana company in 2011 and went recreational after the 2016 legalization vote. “Our time under medical really drove our ethos,” said Al Naser. “There was a need to create good medicine for people who were patients. As we transitioned into the regulated market, that dynamic really benefited the customer. We still hang our hat on that idea of good quality consistently at an accessible price.” Having worked in so many facets of the industry now, Al Naser proves insightful on a wide range of cannabis topics: from the efficacy of hoop houses (dappled sunlight and wind protection help protect terpenes) to consumer trends during COVID (smaller ticket purchases after initial surge, with flower coming back a bit) to flavor preferences shifting from today’s super-sweet fruity strains toward “those traditional skunky, funky, dank, hard-to-describe weed smells that almost became secondary in the market” in years to come. In a modern world that prefers boutique over big, perhaps it should not be surprising that very few Santa Barbara residents realize they are neighbors with one of the state’s largest cannabis operations. “We are the number-one cannabis brand in vape, and one of the largest, if not the largest, brands by dollar in the state,” explained Al Naser. But he’s clear that Raw Garden isn’t trying to hide anything. In fact, it’s more of the opposite motivation. “If you’re making medicine, you don’t want to be boastful or bragging about how cool your stuff is,” he explained. “We really try not to pound our chests too hard about anything. I think that detracts from the product, which should be the main focus.”

See rawgarden.farm.

or high school athletes in Santa Barbara Unified School District, the first steps toward normalcy are on the horizon as sports cleared for competition in the most restrictive purple tier — cross-country, track and field, golf, and tennis — prepare to get underway in the coming weeks. California youth sports are still operating based upon the updated guidelines that were given in mid-December, despite lobbying by various groups and individuals for Governor Newsom and public health officials to relax guidelines. Among the first competitions to take place locally is a cross-country dual meet between host Dos Pueblos and Santa Barbara High School on Saturday, February 27. On the following Saturday, Santa Barbara and San Marcos will compete on the Dos Pueblos course. “They’re really excited, but a little guarded at the same time,” said Santa Barbara High cross-country and track and field coach Olivia Perdices of her student athletes. “These are all the same kids that got [track and field] pulled out from under them in the spring, then they were supposed to start [cross-country] in the fall, and then they by Victor Bryant pushed it to January. They are excited to get out there and run for sure, but at the same time, until it really happens, they don’t want to get too deep.” All competition will be Santa Barbara County only in the immediate future. The cross-country season will be abbreviated and lead right into the track and field season, serving somewhat as a preseason, especially from a training perspective. Santa Barbara athletes are currently authorized to work out in small pods within one sport, but the California Interscholastic Federation sent out a press release on February 10 that clarified the guidelines. According to the release, the language regarding multi-team participation is not a mandate but a recommendation. This removes one hurdle for athletes who hope to compete in multiple sports at their high school as well as those who wish to take part in club sports while still maintaining high school eligibility. The reality is much bleaker for athletes in sports that cannot compete in the purple tier, although coaches and administrators are eager to make the most of an adverse situation.  “I will say that the local athletic directors and even our colleagues up with Lompoc, Cabrillo, and Santa Ynez — we are ready to go if anything should change,” said Santa Barbara athletic director Todd Heil. “We are ready to plan away and have backup plans if anything should change with the tiers.” For administrators, athletes, and coaches who are trying to implement and follow strict guidelines and procedures, making things work from one day to the next is a daunting task in itself without even looking at the big picture of who will be able to compete and when. “A couple weeks ago, we were allowed to share balls again, and so that was really helpful,” said San Marcos High Athletic Director Abe Jahadhmy. “We’re just working on protocol and stuff like approval and just making sure that we’re doing everything safely, and then we’re planning on doing the best we can to have it happen.” For several sports such as volleyball and water polo, the dropdead date for competition is March 13, so the reality that those sports will be unable to compete at all this school year is setting in. The final date for any football games to be played is April 17. n

Cross-Country, Track and Field, Golf, and Tennis Competition Set to Begin

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DANIEL DREIFUSS

COURTESY PHOTOS

ives

alternat

FOOD &DRINK

p.25

No-Bake Almond Butter Bars

FAMILY BUSINESS: Kate and Bryan Flynn started Sun & Swell in 2017 and changed the entire business model during the pandemic. Now, they sell staples like cashew flour, date syrup, and nutritional yeast, all in compostable bags.

L

ess than three years after launching Sun & Swell

Foods, Kate and Bryan Flynn’s original idea to produce healthy, sustainably sourced grab ’n’ go snacks — full of energy-rich dates, cashews, and other farm-grown ingredients — was running full-steam in early 2020. This was the couple’s entrepreneurial escape from living “crazy lives” in San Francisco, and the Santa Barbara–based company was managing numerous wholesale accounts at coffee shops, fitness studios, and grocery stores while also stocking break-room shelves at UCSB and corporations such as LinkedIn and Procore in Carpinteria, as well as some Bay Area clients.

Sustainable Food Company Changes Course During Pandemic BY MATT KETTMANN

“Then COVID happened, and 75 percent of our wholesale business went away,” explained Kate Flynn, whose corporate accounts tanked too. “Nobody is working in the office anymore.” But by April, Sun & Swell was already moving to a new model. “We’ve basically transitioned to an online, sustainably packaged grocery,” said Flynn, a UCSB grad who now offers more than 60 staples through SunandSwellFoods.com, from dried fruits, nuts, seeds, and grains to nut butters, cashew flour, date syrup, lentils, and more. “We want people to stock their pantry with super healthy, organic, planet-friendly foods.” The direct-to-consumer format also allowed the Flynns to strengthen a muscle they’d had trouble flex-

ing in the competitive retail world: compostable packaging. As Sun & Swell sales quickly increased after launching in 2017, they realized that they were contributing to the proliferation of single-use plastic bags and identified compostable packaging as the next responsible step toward sustainability. “We have the potential to use our business to make a really positive change, not just for the health of people but also for the health of the planet,” said Flynn, who introduced their plant-based packaging to retail in 2019. “There were a lot of companies working on it and nobody doing it.”  Challenges quickly mounted with the compostable bags. “It just doesn’t look as beautiful as plastic, and that’s a problem,” said Flynn. “For consumers, if one package looks beautiful and the other looks wrinkly, you’re not gonna pick that product. We learned that lesson the hard way.” So Sun & Swell bifurcated their sales: corporate accounts, many of which requested compostable packaging, got the eco-friendly bags, but the retail snacks went back to the shiny plastic. With the shift to direct online sales, however, Sun & Swell’s compostable program became dominant overnight, as all of the staples come in bags made from wood pulp, except for those that come in glass jars. The company will also take the bags back and process them for customers who don’t have access to industrial composting. (Sun & Swell partners with the White Buffalo Land Trust in Summerland for that.)  Their next goal is to open some small “plastic-free, zero-waste” retail stores for Sun & Swell products. The pilot shop will be in front of their manufacturing warehouse in Ventura, but they hope

See sunandswellfoods.com.

FOOD & DRINK

SUN & SWELL Evolves from Snacks to Staples

to open one in Santa Barbara as soon as this summer. The Flynns see the grocery model as very much in line with their original goal of “making it easier for people to live healthy while living really busy, on-the-go lifestyles.” Sun & Swell’s virtual shelves are constantly expanding, and many of the products serve as alternative ingredients to traditional dairy, wheat, and sugar, today the cause of so many allergies. They still source directly from organic farmers, mostly in California, as much as possible.  “If you buy a bag of almonds from the grocery store, you might not know where they came from or when they left the farm,” said Flynn. “With us, it goes from the farm to the warehouse to you. We’re trying to connect people to their food sources a little bit more.”

SUN & SWELL Recipes Not sure what to do with cashew flour, date syrup, or nutritional yeast? Sun & Swell’s website features dozens of recipes that make using their pantry staples easy, especially as alternatives to traditional dairy, wheat, and sugar ingredients. One-Ingredient Lentil Tortilla Wraps: Simply soak lentils in water overnight, toss them in the blender, and fry up these savory tortillas like pancakes. Then wrap them while still warm around whatever stew, beans, or curry you’d like.  No-Bake Almond Butter Bars: Making cookies without the

baking part? What can go wrong? Not much when it comes to these decadent yet simple treats, which rely on almond butter, cashew flour, and date syrup for their sticky sweetness. Cheese-y Broccoli and Rice: It’s almost

magical how close the combination of nutritional yeast and cashew flour comes to tasting like real melted cheese. This takes that nondairy duo and applies it to a mix of broccoli and rice, making for a full meal.

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Cheese-y Broccoli and Rice

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wrote that Copenhagen Sausage Garden of Solvang is opening a business location in the Funk Zone. The Copenhagen Sausage Garden is an outdoor beer garden located in the heart of Solvang and offers the famous Danish Rød Pølse along with 11 family-made sausages from around the world. They also offer veggie sausages and 12 beers on tap. More than three years later, I am happy to tell you that the new business is finally showing signs of life and will be called “S.B. Biergarten.” It will be located on a new rooftop patio being built at 11 Anacapa Street.

DUNKED DONUTS: There has been a mystery surrounding Dunkin’ Donuts on upper State Street that has finally been solved. The four-year-old business announced a temporary closure around the time “COVID-19” became a household word yet never reopened when similar businesses did. Dunkin’ Donuts’ corporate website had continued to list the closure as temporary. This changed last week when our local outlet finally disappeared from the Dunkin’ database and a for-lease sign was posted on the property.

post from commercial real estate agent Caitlin McCahill Hensel that says: “Not so fun fact: 1 in 6 retail storefronts are available on State Street. Even Starbucks is giving up its space on De la Guerra St.” The business is located at 800 State Street, which was once the long-time home of Weston’s Camera.

COFFEE CLOSING? A commercial real estate agent reports that the Starbucks at State and De la Guerra streets may be closing.

sbimplants.com FEBRUARY 18, 2021

BIERGARTEN FOR FUNK ZONE: In October 2017, I

Arab Emirates. Reader Cris let me know that a sign for the fast-growing eatery has appeared in La Cumbre Plaza between See’s Candies and Chipotle. “Our proprietary recipes, outstanding food, and superior customer service created a demand that could only be satisfied by more locations,” says a message on the company’s website. “We’re not in the wing business. We’re in the flavor business. Wingstop is the destination when you crave fresh, never-faked wings, hand-cut seasoned fries and any of our famous sides. For people who demand flavor in everything they do, there’s only Wingstop—because it’s more than a meal, it’s a flavor experience.”

SAYONARA TO STATE STREET STARBUCKS? Reader Annie read a

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HOPE FOR CORNER: Can Chris Chiarappa make a restaurant work at 700 State Street? The busy corner has been home to Left at Albuquerque, Ma Dolce Vita, and Panera Bread before going vacant in 2015.

WINGSTOP TAKES FLIGHT: Reader Steve H. let me know that Wingstop has opened in La Cumbre Plaza at 3849 State Street, next to next to Chipotle. Wingstop began as a small buffalo-style chicken-wing restaurant in Garland, Texas, in 1994, and expanded to more than 1,500 restaurants open across the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Panama, Singapore, Indonesia, Malaysia, the United Kingdom, and the United

February 16 - April 29

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anera Bread, Left at

Albuquerque, and Ma Dolce Vita were all once located at 700 State Street. The property has been vacant since July 2015, and now reader Richard tells me that serial restaurateur Chris Chiarappa has applied for a liquor license and eating place permit for that address. In recent years, Chiarappa has opened Corner Tap, Lighthouse Coffee, Mesa Burger, and M. Kitchen. A shared commercial kitchen on State Street and possibly an ice cream spot on the Mesa are also part of Chiarappa’s future plans.

Andersen’s Danish Restaurant & Bakery. Menu available for curbside or walk-up pickup. For dining in, order inside and we’ll bring you everything you need at an outside table. Open Daily 10am-6pm, closed Tuesday. Breakfast served until 2pm, Lunch & Dinner 12- Close. We also deliver through restaurant connection. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM

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PRESIDENT’S BREAKFAST Bestselling Author and Harvard Historian

NANCY KOEHN

PASTRY FOR PURIM: The author shows off a plate of Hamantaschen she prepared for Purim, which starts on February 25 this year.

Why We Make

Hamantaschen P

Courageous Leadership In Turbulent Times

for Purim

urim is upon us, and like Chanukah, the holiday celebrates

Sweet Treats and Costumes Are Key to This Jewish Holiday

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historical events that are best summed up by the Jewish adage: They tried to kill us, we won, let’s eat. And eat we do. Commemorating Queen Esther’s victory over Haman’s plot to kill every Jew in Persia, Purim is a jolly and boisterous affair. In addition to an interactive reading of the Book of Esther, the 24-hour holiday, which begins on the night of February 25, is full of festive feasts, sweet treats, and the giving of Mishloach Manot—goodie bags filled with cookies, chocolates, and other dainty delights — to friends, family, and those in need. Somewhere between a Jewish Mardi Gras and Halloween, on Purim you are encouraged to dress up in costume, often as one of the characters in the legendary tale or as your alter ego. Purim, which translates as “dice” or “casting lots,” got its name from BY SAMANTHA SILVERMAN Haman throwing dice to choose the day he would carry out his unsavory plans. For this reason, we eat sweets on Purim in a symbolic effort to sweeten our lots. There’s no shortage of traditional Purim dishes from around the world, but one dish takes center stage, even since its first mention in an 11th-century French prayer book: Hamantaschen, which means “Haman’s pocket” in Yiddish. These filled triangular cookies are said to allude to the bribes that Haman took during his time as Prime Minister of Persia, while others believe the cookie resembles his three-pointed hat. In The World of Jewish Cooking, writer Gil Marks explains, “Many Purim dishes involve a filling, alluding to the many intrigues, secrets, and surprises unfolding in the Purim story.” Traditionally, Hamantaschen were filled with a poppyseed paste known as mohn, or with prune jam, but today’s recipes feature fruit jams, nuts, chocolate, candies, and even savory fillings. Originally made with a yeast dough, sugar-cookie dough is now more common.  Whatever style you choose, these foods should remind us of the deeper message that comes with Purim: Even in the darkest of times, there is hope, so long as we are brave and willing to stand up against evil.

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Learn to make Hamantaschen during the Jewish Federation’s Purim-themed segment of Get Baked with Chef Doug, on Thursday, February 18, at 5 p.m. See jewishsantabarbara.org. For the younger crowd, Edjudaica’s Purim Sock Puppet Party is Sunday, February 21, 2 p.m., when Purim characters will come to life and kids can brainstorm ideas for Purim Spiels, which are humorous skits about Queen Esther’s victory. Register at edjudaica.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

ANGIE THOMAS: YA NOVELIST RULES THE BEST-SELLER LIST AND NOW THE CLASSROOM

A

s we enter 2021, there’s no hotter author anywhere than Angie Thomas. She currently rules the New York Times Hardcover Young Adult list with two revolutionary and relatable novels about Black lives in America in the top five. Her newest, Concrete Rose, occupies the top spot, while The Hate U Give (THUG), which has been on the list for more than 200 weeks, comes in at number four. With THUG in particular, and in part due to the success of the 2018 film adaptation, Thomas is fast approaching a level of popularity more commonly associated with franchises like the Harry Potter series and The Hunger Games. What makes her books stand apart from these other hugely successful stories are her themes of racial inequality and police brutality—topics that are unfortunately all too familiar from the news. What Thomas has done with THUG in particular is make these topics accessible to young adult readers through her appealing protagonist, Starr, a teenage girl torn between the two worlds of her Black neighborhood and the white private school she attends. And it’s not just teens who are taking notice.  All over the country, from Connecticut to the Central Coast, high school and even middle school teachers are reconsidering the readings they require in light of the Black Lives Matter movement and other initiatives toward social justice. Move over, F. Scott Fitzgerald and John Steinbeck! In today’s English classes, an unprecedented number of new books are being recognized as teachable modern masterpieces, and books like THUG and Concrete Rose featuring characters such as Starr and her gang-member-turned-militant father, Maverick, are leading the change. At Laguna Blanca School, 9th grade English teacher Ashley Tidey has been requiring that students read The Hate U Give since 2018. She describes it as a “game changer,” and adds that while she still includes canonical works such as The Great Gatsby and Of Mice and Men on her 9th grade English syllabus, her drive to explore Thomas’s work with her students has “revolutionized” her teaching of literature. Because the students engage with the text so passionately thanks to its approachable language and engaging storyline, Tidey says that “the days of assigning a one-size-fits-all essay prompt” are gone. Now students are coming up with original essay topics that she has never thought about. What impresses her most is the way that “they, and the book, are charting the journey. Not me.” Their topics include readings of the book that

IMANI KHAYYAM

AN AUTHOR FOR OUR TIME

involve examinations of the criminal justice system, code-switching, and fostering change through powerful, Black-led social and political movements. On the national level, a group organized around the hashtag #DisruptTexts is acting to shift the culture in secondary schools through a “crowdsourced, grassroots effort by teachers for teachers to challenge the traditional canon” and to “create a more inclusive, representative, and equitable language arts curriculum that our students deserve.” As led by such teachers as Tricia Ebarvia and Dr. Kimberly N. Parker, these educator/activists are seizing this moment to make what’s happening in a classroom like Tidey’s into a nationwide phenomenon. #Disrupt Texts uses social media so effectively that every day more teachers all over the country are tuning in to their message.  Thomas’s new book, Concrete Rose, takes readers back in time to Los Angeles in the 1990s, when Starr’s dad, Maverick, was struggling with teen fatherhood, gang violence, and finding his place on the street. Maverick’s story enlightens those familiar with Starr’s encounters with gun violence and police brutality by putting her experiences in a larger historical context. Through Maverick’s eyes, we see gang violence up close and personal. Although Concrete Rose may not achieve the same impact on the high school curriculum as THUG due to the way it declines to sugar coat the harshest realities of street life and its extensive use of curse words, this takes nothing away from Maverick’s incredibly compelling

MARTIN GORE’S

THE THIRD CHIMPANZEE As if it were not enough to be still active and commercially viable with Depeche Mode, a band that’s been around for 40 years and was recently admitted to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, longtime Santa Barbara resident Martin Gore continues to release powerful, innovative electronic music under his own name. His latest EP, a collection of five tracks titled The Third Chimpanzee, was recorded at Electric Ladyboy, Gore’s home studio, and takes as its conceptual point of departure the close genetic relationship between humans and primates. Each track is named after a species — “Howler,” “Mandrill,” “Capuchin,” and “Vervet,” plus “Howler’s End,” a reprise of the opener to close out the set. Gore was playing around with resynthesized wordless vocal tracks when he heard something that

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reminded him of the cry of the howler monkeys he had witnessed on a pre-pandemic trip to Costa Rica. This is music for people who love synthesizers and drum machines and what they can do to your ears and body when amplified through a superior sound system. Audiophiles will appreciate the density of textural detail, particularly as it arises out of the grooves of the vinyl release. Speaking of which, this version ought to appeal to collectors for a couple of reasons. First off, the A side is set to play at 45 RPM, while the B side is recorded for playback at 33 and a third. And if that’s not enough to get you excited, consider the cover, which is a reproduction of a painting by Pocket Warhol, a capuchin artist based at a Sanctuary in Ontario. Monkey do! —Charles Donelan

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story, which unquestionably deserves to have a turn in the author’s spotlight. Angie Thomas represents the latest chapter in a literary movement that proudly tells the stories of Black individuals in America and that doesn’t shy away from difficult topics. Her voice is one that millions of young people of all races clearly crave, and she is using it to tell inspiring stories that need to be heard, especially in 2021. By incorporating her novels into their lists of required readings, teachers are rising to the challenge of fostering change for the better in our society through impactful young adult literature. —Daisy Finefrock


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Atheists like to confront religious

people with accusations like this: “If God is so good, why does he allow suffering in the world?” Their simplistic, childish idea of God as some sort of Moral Policeman is ignorant of the lush range of ruminations about the Divine as offered down through the ages by poets, novelists, philosophers, and theologians. For example, poet Stéphane Mallarmé wrote, “Spirit cares for nothing except universal musicality.” He suggested that the Supreme Intelligence is an artist making music and telling stories. And as you know, music and stories include all human adventures, not just the happy stuff. I bring these thoughts to your attention, Aries, because the coming weeks will be a favorable time to honor and celebrate the marvelously rich stories of your own life — and to feel gratitude for the full range of experience with which they have blessed you. P.S.: Now is also a favorable phase to rethink and reconfigure your answers to the Big Questions.

sake of your inspiration, for the sweet turmoil in your lovely head. But also read against yourselves, read for questioning and impotence, for despair and erudition, read the dry, sardonic remarks of cynical philosophers. Read those whose darkness or malice or madness or greatness you can’t yet understand, because only in this way will you grow, outlive yourself, and become what you are.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’re on the verge of breakthroughs.

TAURUS

You’re ready to explore frontiers, at least in your imagination. You’re brave enough to go further and try harder than you’ve been able to before. With that in mind, here’s a highly apropos idea from Cancerian novelist Tom Robbins. He writes, “If you take any activity, any art, any discipline, any skill, take it and push it as far as it will go, push it beyond where it has ever been before, push it to the wildest edge of edges, then you force it into the realm of magic.” (I might use the word “coax” or “nudge” instead of “force” in Robbins’s statement.)

(Apr. 20-May 20): Blogger Rachel C. Lewis confides,

LEO

“I love being horribly straightforward. I love sending reckless text messages and telling people I love them and telling people they are absolutely magical humans and I cannot believe they really exist. I love saying, ‘Kiss me harder,’ and ‘You’re a good person,’ and, ‘You brighten my day.’ ” What would your unique version of Lewis’s forthrightness be like, Taurus? What brazen praise would you offer? What declarations of affection and care would you unleash? What naked confessions might you reveal? The coming days will be a favorable time to explore these possibilities.

(July 23-Aug. 22): In her story “Homelanding,” Margaret

Atwood writes, “Take me to your trees. Take me to your breakfasts, your sunsets, your bad dreams, your shoes. Take me to your fingers.” I’d love you to express requests like that. It’s a favorable time for you to delve deeper into the mysteries of people you care about. You will generate healing and blessings by cultivating reverent curiosity and smart empathy and crafty intimacy. Find out more about your best allies!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’re about to reach the end of

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s a good time to become more of

who you are by engaging with more of what you are not. Get in the mood for this heroic exercise by studying the following rant by Gemini poet Adam Zagajewski (who writes in Polish), translated by Gemini poet Clare Cavanagh: “Read for yourselves, read for the

your phase of correction and adjustment. To mark this momentous transition, and to honor your everincreasing ability to negotiate with your demons, I offer you the following inspirational proclamation by poet Jeannette Napolitano: “I don’t want to look back in five years’ time and think, ‘We could have been magnificent, but I was afraid.’ In five years, I want to tell of

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 18

how fear tried to cheat me out of the best thing in life, and I didn’t let it.”

CAPRICORN

LIBRA

to learn things but to unlearn things,” wrote author G. K. Chesterton. He was exaggerating for dramatic effect when he said that, as he often did. The more nuanced truth is that one of the central aims of education is to learn things, and another very worthy aim is to unlearn things. I believe you are currently in a phase when you should put an emphasis on unlearning things that are irrelevant and meaningless and obstructive. This will be excellent preparation for your next phase, which will be learning a lot of useful and vitalizing new things.

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): It’s not a good time for you to be

obsessed with vague abstractions, fear-based fantasies, and imaginary possibilities. But it is a favorable phase to rise up in behalf of intimate, practical changes. At least for now, I also want to advise you not to be angry and militant about big, complicated issues that you have little power to affect. On the other hand, I encourage you to get inspired and aggressive about injustices you can truly help fix and erroneous approaches you can correct and close-at-hand dilemmas for which you can summon constructive solutions.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “The most beautiful things are those

that madness prompts and reason writes,” declared author André Gide. As a writer myself, I will testify to the truth of that formulation. But what about those of you who aren’t poets and novelists and essayists? Here’s how I would alter Gide’s statement to fit you: “The most beautiful things are those that rapture prompts and reason refines.” Or maybe this: “The most beautiful things are those that experimentation finds and reason uses.” Or how about this one: “The most beautiful things are those that wildness generates and reason enhances.” Any and all of those dynamics will be treasures for you in the coming weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The poet Nayyirah Waheed has some

advice I want you to hear. She writes, “Be easy. Take your time. You are coming home to yourself.” I will add that from my astrological perspective, the coming weeks will indeed be a time for you to relax more deeply into yourself — to welcome yourself fully into your unique destiny; to forgive yourself for what you imagine are your flaws; to not wish you were someone else pursuing a different path; to be at peace and in harmony with the exact life you have.

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The chief object of education is not

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Sergei Rachmaninoff (1873-1943)

ultimately became one of the 20th century’s most renowned composers. But his career had a rough start. Symphony No. 1, his first major work, was panned by critics, sending him into a four-year depression. Eventually he recovered. His next major composition, Piano Concerto No. 2, was well-received. I don’t anticipate that your rookie offerings or new work will get the kind of terrible reviews that Rachmaninoff ’s did. But at least initially, there may be no great reviews, and possibly even indifference. Keep the faith, my dear. Don’t falter in carrying out your vision of the future. The rewards will come in due time.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Ancient Greek playwright Euripides was popular and influential — and remains so to this day, 2,400 years later. But there’s a curiously boring aspect in five of his plays, Andromache, Alcestis, Helen, Medea, and The Bacchae. They all have the same exact ending: six lines, spoken by a chorus, that basically say the gods are unpredictable. Was Euripides lazy? Trying too hard to drive home the point? Or were the endings added later by an editor? Scholars disagree. The main reason I’m bringing this to your attention is to encourage you to avoid similar behavior. I think it’s very important that the stories you’re living right now have different endings than all the stories of your past.

HOMEWORK: Listen to and download my music for free: soundcloud.com/sacreduproar. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, h o w e v e r, t h e p e r s o n a l representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the a u t h o r i t y. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 3 / 1 1 / 2 0 2 1 AT 9 : 0 0 a . m . Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the h e a r i n g . Yo u r a p p e a r a n c e may be in person or b y y o u r a t t o r n e y. I F YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights a s a c r e d i t o r. Yo u m a y

want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Califor nia law. Y O U M AY E X A M I N E t h e file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215 Published Feb 11, 18, 25. 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION TO A D M I N I S T E R E S TAT E O F : J A N E S . D Y R U F F, a l s o known as MARGARET JANE STIVERS DYRUFF Case No.: 21PR00063 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JANE S. D Y R U F F, also known as MARGARET JANE STIVERS DYRUFF A PETITION FOR P R O B AT E h a s b e e n f i l e d by: BRADLEY S. DYRUFF in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: BRADLEY S. DYRUFF be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION The petition requests the d e c e d e n t ’s will and codicils, if a n y, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate

under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, h o w e v e r, t h e p e r s o n a l representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the a u t h o r i t y. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 03/18/2021 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa S t r e e t , P. O B o x 2 1 1 0 7 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the h e a r i n g . Yo u r a p p e a r a n c e may be in person or b y y o u r a t t o r n e y. I F YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section

9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights a s a c r e d i t o r. Yo u m a y want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Califor nia law. Y O U M AY E X A M I N E t h e file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg;1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660. Published Feb 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. NOTICE OF PETITION T O A D M I N I S T E R E S TAT E O F : G AY L E N J . N O R T O N Case No.: 21PR00058 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of G AY L E N N O R T O N , G AY L E N J O N NORTON A PETITION FOR P R O B AT E h a s b e e n f i l e d by: SHARON ZAMORA in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: SHARON ZAMORA be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the d e c e d e n t ’s will a n d c o d i c i l s , i f a n y, b e admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

Tide Guide Day Thu 18

High

Low

High

Low

1:43 am 4.0

9:07 am 1.5

3:07 pm 2.4

7:02 pm 2.1

Sunrise 6:35 Sunset 5:48

High

Fri 19

2:38 am 4.1

10:52 am 1.1

Sat 20

3:46 am 4.2

11:59 am 0.7

7:47 pm 2.8

10:01 pm 2.7

Sun 21

4:51 am 4.4

12:43 pm 0.2

8:03 pm 3.0

11:25 pm 2.7

Mon 22

5:44 am 4.8

1:19 pm -0.2

8:21 pm 3.2

Tue 23

12:17 am 2.5

6:30 am 5.1

1:51 pm -0.6

8:42 pm 3.4

Wed 24

12:58 am 2.2

7:11 am 5.5

2:22 pm -0.9

9:05 pm 3.5

Thu 25

1:37 am 1.9

7:51 am 5.7

2:53 pm -1.0

9:29 pm 3.7

19 H

27 D

5

13 D source: tides.net

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“J’Accuse!” -- they’re in there.

59 “Me shooting 40% at the foul line is just God’s way to say nobody’s perfect,” for 1 Sluggish instance? 5 Arm gesture done by kids 63 Playwright Beckett graduating elementary school 64 Suffix for Gator or Power 8 Hosts in one’s apartment 65 Idaho neighbor (remember that?) 68 Midway through a migraine, e.g. 13 The A in A.D. 69 “In the Heights” Tony winner 14 Public radio host Glass ___-Manuel Miranda 15 Early online newsgroup 70 Adult ___ (Cartoon Network system offshoot) 17 “The Caine Mutiny” novelist 71 Leg bone (connected to the 18 ___ squared (circle formula) arm bone?) 19 Act as a go-between 72 China’s Sun ___-sen 20 Bygone laptop company’s 73 Male cats fiscal year division? 23 “Bleh!” 25 “As Seen on TV” knife brand 1 Ocelot foot 26 Dinnerware collections 2 See 4-Down 27 “Batman Forever” actor 3 Sonic the Hedgehog’s Kilmer echidna friend 28 “Messenger” material 4 With 2-Down, interviewee for 29 Talent for detail, maybe John Lennon retrospectives 5 ___ Dots (cryogenic ice 32 “Call Me Maybe” singer cream brand) Carly ___ Jepsen 6 “thank u, next” singer Grande 33 General ballpark 7 Hires competitor 35 It may be educated 8 Platform for the 37 “How does a company “Animaniacs” reboot reserve a symbol to trade?” and “How does it differ from 9 Bhutan’s continent 10 Retailer that filed for NYSE?” bankruptcy in 2018 44 Photographer Diane 11 No divider, they 45 Button alternative 12 Spanish currency pre-euro 46 Greek M’s 49 Long-running forensic drama 16 Briefly stated 21 Ball club VIP with an upcoming reboot 22 Leicester lineup 50 Mineral spring 23 “Kindergarten Cop” director 53 Airport posting Reitman 54 Catchall abbrs. 24 Model/actor Delevingne 56 Largest moon of Saturn 30 “For real?” response 58 Particle accelerator particle 31 ME zone, in winter

Across

Down

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34 Holly Hunter, in “The Piano” 35 Astronaut Grissom 36 “Pretty sneaky, ___” (Connect Four ad line) 38 Storyline progression 39 Many Super Bowl MVPs 40 Capital at over 9,000 feet 41 Like 50/50 odds 42 Alphabet where X is “X-ray” 43 Bridge section 46 Argentine soccer superstar Lionel 47 1960s United Nations secretary general 48 Dish prepared with garlic butter and white wine 50 Google gaming service as of 2019 51 Inventor’s concern 52 “Allergic to Water” singer DiFranco 55 Fledgling pigeon 57 Rome home 60 Royally named liner, briefly 61 Arm bone (connected to the leg bone?) 62 Force to leave 66 Objective 67 Letters on British battleships ©2021 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1019

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

31 31


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LEGALS

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, h o w e v e r, t h e p e r s o n a l representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the a u t h o r i t y. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 3 / 1 8 / 2 0 2 1 AT 9 : 0 0 a . m . Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF S A N TA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Yo u r appearance may be in person or by your a t t o r n e y. I F Y O U A R E A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights a s a c r e d i t o r. Yo u m a y want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Califor nia law. Y O U M AY E X A M I N E t h e file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney f o r P e t i t i o n e r : B a r r e t t P. O’Gorman 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215 Published Feb 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CALIFORNIA PROPERTY GROUP at 351 H i t c h c o c k W a y, S u i t e 1 1 0

32

Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 3/18/2016 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2016‑0000860. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: American Dream Acquisition Group Inc. (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: UNITED BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF G R E AT E R S A N TA B A R B A R A C O U N T Y, B O Y S & G I R L S C L U B O F S A N TA B A R B A R A , G O L E TA B O Y S & GIRLS CLUB, WESTSIDE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, LOMPOC BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, CARPINTERIA BOYS & GIRLS CLUB at 1528 Chapala Street Suite 300 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; United Boys & Girls Club of Greater Santa Barbara(same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Louise Cruz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 15, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000140. Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: T H R E AT GRIFFITH at 5006 Carbo Cir Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Brett Griffith (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Brett Griffith Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000199. Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: CARTEL & CO USA at 718 Union Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Pacific Pickle Works Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Bradley Bennett Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000196. Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: THE ELECTRIC GUYS at 3755 S a n R e m o D r, A p t 2 1 9 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Electrical By Professionals Inc (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Nolan Swain Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 30, 2020. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2020‑0003080. Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: F I G U R E AT E a t 1 5 8 0 Ramona Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93108; White Buffalo Land Tr u s t ( s a m e a d d r e s s ) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Ana Smith Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2 0 2 1 ‑ 0 0 0 0 0 8 9 . Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: FULL SPIRAL SALON at 633 Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Lunabella Makeup And Hair LL 1 1 0 W. M i s s i o n S t # 2 A Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Ashley Kelly Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2 0 2 1 ‑ 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 . Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: 3 SUN YOGA at 5504 Cathedral Oaks Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Karalea Richards (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Karalea Richards Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 21, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2 0 2 1 ‑ 0 0 0 0 1 7 1 . Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business a s : S A N TA B A R B A R A D E N TA L S PA a t 2 0 1 7 A Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; B K Rai, A Dental Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: BK Rai Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 8, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2 0 2 1 ‑ 0 0 0 0 0 5 6 . Published: Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: JEREMY KYLE PHOTO, JEREMY KYLE REAL E S TAT E P H O T O G R A P H Y at 811 Bath Street Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jeremy K Gruner (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Jeremy Kyle Gruner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 13, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2 0 2 1 ‑ 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 . Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: THE FENG SHUI COLLECTIVE at 145 Gerard Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Pamela Abbott‑Mouchou (same address) Lauren Nicole Bragg 3554 La Entrada Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Pamela Abbott‑Mouchou Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000191. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: CHRYSALIS POLE & BODY at 2600 De La Vina Street, Ste B Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Kelsey B Bodine 401 Chapala Street Unit 209 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kelsey Bodine Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000198. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: SANTA BARBARA GELATO, MESA G E L AT O , 8 0 5 G E L AT O , G O L E TA G E L AT O at 624 W Canon Perdido St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; James S Haskins (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: James Haskins Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000237. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person is doing business as: BEAUTY HAIR CLUBS at 309 W Haley St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Beauty Hair Clubs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Evelia Garcia Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000205. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: 2 HAWKS DOG LEASHES at 1810 Pampas Ave Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Lori G Lynch (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 20, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000150. Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: S A N TA B A R B A R A A R T A N D F R A M E C O M PA N Y, SHADES PICTURE HANGING SYSTEMS at 19 West Gutierrez Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Shades International Inc. 912 Echo Lane Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000120 Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ASHLEY FARRELL LANDSCAPE DESIGN INC, AFLD, ASHLEY FARRELL LANDSCAPE DESIGN at 2200 White Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Ashley Farrell Landscape Design, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000123 Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FISHER‑COLODNY MEDIA, FCMEDIA at 1417 Las Positas Pl. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Kenneth Convoy (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000117 Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person is doing business as: BESHDA at 1600 Sycamore Canyon Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Bonnie E Sangster‑Holland (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Bonnie Sangster‑Holland Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000104. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: F E M M E F ATA L E B E A U T Y at 7098 Scripps Crescent St Goleta, CA 93117; Bahar Roxanna Bina (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000330. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOLDEN ARROW GOODS at 755 Firenze Pl Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lindsay M. Gould (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000085 Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CRUISE IT at 7388 Calle Real, Unit 10 Goleta, CA 93117; Dylan J Tighe (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000259. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CALIFORNIA PROPERTY GROUP at 351 Hitchcock Way Suite 110 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; California Property Group, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000273. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SOON CANDLE CO at 4860 Calle Real Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Brooke Thuna 1884 Ave Soltura Camarillo, CA 93010 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000280. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LOACOM at 508 East Haley Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Loacom, Social Purpose Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 27, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000225. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LEE & NEAL SEPTIC SERVICE at 136 North Quarantina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Marborg Industries (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000083. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: C O A S TA L R O S E E V E N T S at 6548 Covington Way Goleta, CA 93117; Emily RS Greig (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000210. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: T H E W R I T E C O N T E S T, THE WRITE CONTEST AND COMMUNITY at 1520 San Miguel Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Ta w n y a Bragg (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 13, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000096. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: DIVINE HAIR STUDIO at 1810 Cliff Drive B Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Sarah L Jonas 535 East Arrellaga 18 Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000275. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOODLAND GARDENS at 2246 Lilly Ave Summerland CA 93067; Peter Berkey 931 Castillo Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000325. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.


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LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BUSINESS C O N S U LT I N G , MARKETING, AND CONTENT SERVICES, INC., HOME AND GARDEN DIY PROJECTS. INC., MANIFESTING YOUR DREAMS, INC. at 1524 Dutton Avenue Apt 8 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Yo u r R e a l E s t a t e S o l u t i o n , Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000336. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person‑ (s) is/are doing business as: M O U N TA I N VIEW PRODUCTIONS at 1156 N. Fairview Goleta, CA 93117; Dana B Driskel (same address) Patricia A Devlin‑Driskel (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 26, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000212. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: THREAD AND GLUE at 227 West Va l e r i o S t re e t A p t 3 S a n t a Barbara, CA 93101; Ian M. Wilson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000367. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROSE AND SKYLER PRESS at 7297 Padova Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Theodore S Kisner (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000246. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/are doing business as: HERB at 25 East Anapamu Street Third Floor Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Flora Media, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk ( S E A L ) b y. J o h n B e c k . F B N Number: 2021‑0000362. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: TEMPEST at 136 W. Canon Perdido Street Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Te m p e s t Te l e c o m S o l u t i o n s , L L C (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 10, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000404. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: DANCE UNLIMITED at 5370 Hollister Ave. Suite One Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Lisa Walsh 4534 Auhay Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y. John Beck. FBN Number: 2021‑0000110. Feb 18, 25. Mar 4, 11 2021. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS N A M E S TAT E M E N T T h e following person(s) is/ are doing business as: REGIONAL RESILIENCE NETWORK at 670 Northview Road, Unit B, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Conception Coast Project (same address) conducted by a Corporation. Signed: Rachel Couch Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 14, 2021. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2021‑0000103. Published: January 28. February 4, 11, 18.

NAME CHANGE IN THE M AT T E R OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F BRITTANY BEAVERS & MICHAEL BARDONI ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00151 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MASON LEE BEAVERS TO: JAVAN JAMES BARDONI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days

before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 8, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 22, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Jan 28. Feb 4, 11, 18 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF THE APPLICATION OF CONNIE AGUIRRE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04337 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CONNIE AGUIRRE TO: CONNIE SPEAR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 16, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 3, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 3, 2021. by T h o m a s P. A n d e r l e . o f the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. I N T H E M AT T E R O F T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F C H R I S NICOLE KULIGOWSKI ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00223 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by

the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CHRIS NICOLE KULIGOWSKI TO: CHRIS NICOLE L O YA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 15, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 4, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KAIA JOYE MOYER WESOLOWSKI and GRAHAM JAMES WESOLOWSKI ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04017 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: GLORIA BERET JUNA WESOLOWSKI TO: JUNA BERET WESOLOWSKI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 19, 2021 10:00 am,

Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 04, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. IN THE M AT T E R OF T H E A P P L I C AT I O N O F J O H N AT H O N M I C H A E L G E D S TA D ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 21CV00222 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: J O H N AT H O N M I C H A E L G E D S TA D TO: JOHNATHON M I C H A E L L O YA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 19, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 4, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 3, 2021. by Donna D. Geck. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MARIA CRISELDA VA L E N C I A C R U Z O R D E R TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV04059 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MARIA CRISELDA VALENCIA CRUZ

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T O : M A R I C E L VA L E N C I A CRUZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below t o s h o w c a u s e , i f a n y, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. Notice of Hearing Mar 8, 2021 10:00 am, Dept 5, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in t h i s c o u n t y, a t l e a s t once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 29, 2021. by Colleen K. Sterne. of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 11, 18, 25. Mar 4 2021.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS SUPERIOR COURT OF THE S TAT E OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF S A N TA BARBARA A N A C A PA D I V I S I O N In re the Sanders Family CASE NO. 21 PR00036 S u r v i v o r ’s “ A ” Tr u s t , created by Louis C. Sanders and Josephine C. Sanders, dated NOTICE TO CREDITORS January 22, 1992 (PROB C §§19040 (b), 19052 Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of Josephine C. Sanders (Decedent) that all persons having claims against Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver a copy to Ann H. Sanders, as trustee of the Sanders Family S u r v i v o r ’s “ A ” Tr u s t , of which Decedent w a s t h e s e t t l o r, c / o the Law Offices of J a m e s F, C o t e , P. O . B o x 20146, Santa Barbara, California 93120‑0146, as provided in Probate Code §1215 within the later of 4 months after February 4, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) o r, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: 1/21/2021.

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Law Offices of James F. C o t e . Published Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021. SUPERIOR COURT OF THE S TAT E OF CALIFORNIA IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF S A N TA BARBARA A N A C A PA D I V I S I O N In re the Sanders Family Credit CASE NO. 21PR00037 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (PROB C §519040 (b), 19052) Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent Shelter “B” Tr u s t , created by Louis C. Sanders and Josephine C. Sanders, dated January 22,1992 creditors of Josephine C. Sanders (Decedent) that all persons having claims against Decedent are required to file them with the Superior Court, at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California, and deliver a copy to Ann H. Sanders, as trustee of the Sanders Family Credit S h e l t e r “ B ” Tr u s t , o f which Decedent was the s e t t l o r, c/o the Law Offices of James F. Cote, P. O . Box 20146, Santa Barbara, California 93120‑0146, as provided in Probate Code §1215 within the later of 4 months after February 4, 2021 (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) o r, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code §19103. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. DATED: 1/21/2021 Law Offices of James F. C o t e Published Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

PUBLIC NOTICES W O R K E R S ’ C O M P E N S A T I O N A P P E A L S B O A R D S TAT E OF CALIFORNIA W C A B N o . : ADJ11488066 To : D E F E N D A N T, D A V I D JESUS ROSALES dba C O N C R E T E & PAV E R S S P E C I A L I S T, A P P L I C A N T, JUAN BARRETO NOTICES GOOD CAUSE having been shown, it is hereby ordered that service of the special notice of lawsuit in this case can be made upon the defendant by publication in a newspaper of general circulation published at Santa Barbara, California. Said publication shall be made at least once a week for four successive weeks in the manner prescribed in G o v. C o d e 6 0 6 4 . Name and address of a p p l i c a n t ’s attorney: Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, 418 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Esq. Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld, (805) 965‑4540. Published: Feb 4, 11, 18, 25 2021.

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Santa Barbara Independent 2/18/21  

February 18, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 788

Santa Barbara Independent 2/18/21  

February 18, 2021, Vol. 35, No. 788