Page 1

Architecture Portfolio

Selected Works

San Lae Lae Cho 2015~2018


SAN LAE LAE CHO 312.206.1636 · sanlaelaecho@gmail.com · Chicago, IL · www.linkedin.com/in/sanlaelaecho

EDUCATION Bachelor of Architecture, Double Specialization in Landscape and Digital Design Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL, USA 3.75/4.0

May 2018

The Why Factory by MVRDV Studio Abroad

Aug 2017-Dec 2017

Faculty-led IIT Architecture Study Abroad Program

June 2015

Delft University of Technology, Netherlands Rome, Italy and London, United Kingdom

SKILLS Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe Indesign Microsoft Suite

Rhinoceros 5 SketchUp Revit 3ds Max

AutoCAD QGIS Blender animation Video editing

Grasshopper Sefaira

Myanmar English Chinese

WORK EXPERIENCE Designer Intern at Perkins Eastman

July 2018 - Sep 2018

Architectural Intern at Johnson Lasky Kindelin Architects

Feb 2018 - May 2018 Feb 2017–Aug 2017

Scholar of Leadership Academy of Illinois Tech

Apr 2015-May 2018

Front Yard redesign of a Personal Client

May 2017

Speaker for TEDxIIT 2016 Talk http://bit.ly/TEDxSan

Apr 2016

·Edited design changes in Revit model ·Made changes to the design as per MEP requests ·Prepared construction documents ·Reviewed submittals ·Participated in meetings discussing design solutions ·Skype called with clients to hear their requests ·Prepared design proposal drawings ·Prepared construction documents ·Met with clients to hear their requests ·Met with zoning coordinator to discuss client requests and zoning issues ·Made realistic renderings ·Did site surveys and measurements ·Designed marketing materials to promote the firm ·Attended weekly meetings to overview work

·Facilitate and lead the sophomore leadership retreat experience for students of IIT ·Meet with President of IIT, Vice Provost and other professionals from different careers ·Brainstorm, market and participate in a series of leadership seminars and leadership training workshops ·Won International Collegiate Leadership Competition in April 2018 ·Met with client to take site measurements and showed precedents research to know their preferences ·Selected specific plants based on their desires and sent a design ·Selected from a group of approximately 40 speakers; 1 of the 2 student speakers among all the finalists ·Prepared and practiced together with other 20 speakers ·Gave live speech to approx. 30,000 global viewers and 100 audience

IPRO 397: Innovating Solutions to Urban Problems to Improve Livability

·Worked with 4 other members from different professions (MSE, CE, ME, AERO) ·Designed and prototyped a working, sustainable, portable, solar charger for daily devices’ charging ·Finalist for Innovative Showcase Award

ACHIEVEMENTS International Champion of Collegiate Leadership Competition, CLC, 2018 Dean’s List, College of Architecture, IIT 2013-2018 Third Year Faculty Award Finalist, College of Architecture, IIT Spring 2015 Awards Finalist, College of Architecture, IIT

Jan 2016–May 2016


Content

Resume

Manoeuvre Habitation 01

School, 2018

Montessori Elementary 02

School, 2016

Bailey Renovate! 03

School, 2016

Gravity Well 04

School, 2015

Other 05

School

Studio OnTheGO, The Why Factory by MVRDV

2017

Hand sketching

2015

Rendering

2014

QGIS

2015

Modeling

2014

06

Work

Johnson Lasky Kindelin Architects

2017

Perkins Eastman

2018

Work


01 Manoeuvre Habitation Professor Wiel Arets Adjunct Associate Professor John Manaves Zeeburgereiland, Amsterdam, Netherlands What will be the strategy for the contemporary city and who will challenge this development? We have to radically change our perception of what is a city; we have to find a new definition and even a new word for what we call ‘the city’ or the ‘Metropolis,’ a name that was coined in the early 20th century.


Provocation According to the Population Division of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the United Nations, most of the world population will live in densified urban areas by 2050. This densification of the metropolis will place further emphasis on the high-rise tower and its integration within the context of the city. A new evaluation of the high-rise tower and its relationship to the traditional horizontal organization of the city should create a new typology. This new vertical and horizontal environment will need to adapt to the demands of the metropolis and its user. Urbanization Even with the advancements of the tower, our cities are organized horizontally emphasizing streets, building blocks, plazas, and parks. The high-rise building is consistently disconnected from the fabric of the city. How can the urban quality of the city be organized into the vertical? Movement Our high-rise towers are limited to the movement of the elevator, a technology invented over 150 years ago. How can we rethink metropolis and vertical urbanisms based on a new development and mode of circulation? New technology offer vertical and horizontal movement by a patented magnetic elevator. Neighborhoods Can the high-rise tower start to develop and distinguish a range of qualities and environments? How can the high-rise integrate the culture and diversity of the city? Can it created horizontal zero-zero level conditions? The Site: Zeeburgereiland, Sluisbuurt, Amsterdam, Netherlands


Vibrant, diverse neighborhoods of Amsterdam


From the IJ river, looking north at EYE Museum and A’DAM Lookout

Albert Cuyp Markt, the most popular flea market in Amsterdam

Amsterdam, Netherlands is well known for its canals and artistic, slim houses. It is a city of vibrant lifestyle and freedom. The fun culture is seen throughout the city with bustling bars and cafes. However, the calming parks and refreshing nature is seen throughout different pockets within neighborhoods in Amsterdam as well. Neighborhoods in Amsterdam have their own unique characteristics and many are quite different from one another significantly. It is also famous for its fabulous nightlife, number of bikes and canals. Generally, the bars and shops are common throughout the neighborhoods with unique features of flea markets, housing styles, parks and museums distributed among each neighborhood.

I Amsterdam, Museumplein

The site of the project is on the Zeeburgereiland, specifically Sluisbuurt - northern end section of the island. This island is connected in loop with the rest of Amsterdam by two main highways. It is situated like a gateway to the inland on the eastern edge of Amsterdam.


Business trade and Industry Parks, Public Spaces and Water

Parks, Public Spaces and Water

Shops, Malls, Hotels and Sports Area

Shops, Malls, Woods and Sports Area

Sports area and sporting buildings

Parks, Public Spaces and Water

Shops, Malls, Hotels, Pubs and Restaurants Area

Public Utility and Army Barracks

Business

Business and industrial areas

Sports building and Water bodies with recreative function

Parks, Public Spaces and Water

Parks, Public Spaces and Water

Living Areas (incl. cultural, social, medical, educational facilities)

Living Areas (incl. cultural, social, medical, educational facilities)

Development Site Non-residential Area

Living Areas (incl. facilities)

Business and industrial areas

Living Areas (incl. facilities)

Living Areas (incl. cultural, social, medical, educational facilities)

Natural areas (agriculture, breeding)

5% 3% 5% 2%

90%

10%

25% 5%

40%

50%

5%

65%

60%

5% 15%

10% 5%

75%

10%

5% 15%

85%


types: Landscape Climate Water Governance Mobility Waste Commerce Health Leisure Work Education Housing Energy Production Extraction Food

Ratio Landscape 22.46% Climate4.84% Water12.78% Governance 0.55% Mobility 0.58% Waste 0.01% Commerce 0.16% Health0.08% Leisure1.57% Work 0.26% Education 0.25% Housing 4.92% Energy4.89% Production 4.85% Extraction 0.01% Food 41.77%

AreaRatio (m²) 22.46% 213.0 4.84% 45.9 12.78% 121.2 0.55% 5.2 0.58% 5.5 0.01% 0.1 0.16% 1.5 0.08% 0.7 1.57% 14.9 0.26% 2.4 0.25% 2.4 4.92% 46.7 4.89% 46.4 4.85% 46.0 0.01% 0.1 41.77% 396.1

Area (m²) 213.0 45.9 121.2 5.2 5.5 0.1 1.5 0.7 14.9 2.4 2.4 46.7 46.4 46.0 0.1 396.1

948.2

948.2

types:

volume

landscape landscape 213.0 climate climate 45.9 2% water water 121.2 Parks, Public Spaces and Water 3% Shops, Malls, Hotels, Pubs and Restaurants Area governance governance 5.2 5% mobility mobility 5.5 waste waste 0.1 Living Areas (incl. cultural, social, medical, educational facilities) commercecommerce40%1.5 health health 0.7 leisure leisure 14.9 work work 2.4 education education 2.4 housing housing 46.7 Natural open areas for light and air energy energy 50% 46.4 productionproduction 46.0 extraction extraction 0.1 food food 396.1

* Volumes areofgiven * Volumes are given a generic height 10m.a generic height of 10m.

vol. 1 person: 50,000 persons:

for 1948.2 person: neededvol. forneeded 1 person: sq 948.2 m 47,410,000 sq m

for 50k people: vol. neededvol. forneeded 50k people: 47.4 m 1,264,000 sq m *30% for air/light *30% for air/light =61.6 m 50,000 persons Zeeburgereiland: 37 mpeople: high vol. for 100k vol.onneeded forneeded 100k people: 94.8 m Zeeburgereiland:

Westpoort

Noord

with 50% light and air:

West Centrum

Zeeburgereiland

Nieuw West

Sluisbuurt: 50,000 persons on Sluisbuurt: with 50% light and air:

Oost Oud Zuid

Zuid Oost

74 m high

123

*30% forsqair/light *30% for air/light = 336,000 m 141 m high 282 m high


137 18 0 8 66 1 10 14 1

De Pijp Restaurants Schools Religious buildings Museums Shopping stores Flea Markets Theaters Hotels Squares

3.482 km sq 28,288 people 8,100 ppl/sq km

De Pijp’s programs with 10 mins and 5 mins walking radii


With the technology of 2050 in transportation, what if the neighborhoods could exist and maintain their qualities vertically? This would help blur the conditions of ground level on different levels. Hybrids within neighborhoods can be created in their overlapping borders. By playing with the scale of neighborhood and

applying it vertically into the Sluisbuurt, it is like the neighborhoods are the different, personalized units in a building, while the Sluisbuurt site is equilvalent as the building holding these units.

Concept image of Amsterdam’s neighborhoods overlapped on top of one another


137 18 0 8 66 1 10 14 1

De Pijp De Pijp 137 Restaurants Restaurants 18 Schools Schools 0 Religious Religious buildings buildings 8 Museums Museums 66 Shopping Shopping stores stores 1 Flea Flea Markets Markets 10 Theaters Theaters 14 Hotels Hotels 1 Squares Squares

3.482 km sq 3.482 km sq 28,288 people 28,288 people 8,1008,100 ppl/sq km km ppl/sq

Programs projected at 2 scales (350 m radii and 124 m radii) on Sluisbuurt, Zeeburgereiland


137 18 0 8 66 1 10 14 1

De Pijp De Pijp 137 Restaurants Restaurants 18 Schools Schools 0 Religious Religious buildings buildings 8 Museums Museums 66 Shopping Shopping stores stores 1 Flea Flea Markets Markets 10 Theaters Theaters 14 Hotels Hotels 1 Squares Squares

3.482 km sq 3.482 km sq 28,288 people 28,288 people 8,1008,100 ppl/sq km km ppl/sq

3 Dimensional projection of stacked programs on Sluisbuurt, Zeeburgereiland


Hotels

Restaurants

Squares

Museums


Religious Structures

Schools

Theatres

Flea Markets


137 18 0 8 66 1 10 14 1

De Pijp De Pijp 137 Restaurants Restaurants 18 Schools Schools 0 Religious buildings Religious buildings 8 Museums Museums 66 Shopping stores Shopping stores 1 Flea Markets Flea Markets 10 Theaters Theaters 14 Hotels Hotels 1 Squares Squares

3.482 km sq 3.482 km sq 28,288 people 28,288 people ppl/sq 8,1008,100 ppl/sq km km

Molecular

Too Rigid Isolation of communities Strong differentiation of interstitial and neighborhood spaces


Pixelate Too Rigid Overlapping of communities Potential hybrid programs Extremely dense No room for light and air


Voronoi Flexible Overlapping of communities Potential hybrid programs Dispersion Potential for light and air 2 systems: Volume and Parameter


Soap Bubbles Flexible Overlapping of communities Potential hybrid programs Strong network Porous Potential for light and air Single system


The new city in Sluisbuurt imagines the future and projects potential trends. The new future would have an enclosed, energy efficient loop system. Clean water will go into the Zeeburgereiland and clean water will come back out of Zeeburgereiland. The photovoltaic glass of the facade will change color according to the light received, to provide the right amount of shade to the interior. Food and waste would be processed at optimal efficiency. Meat would be 3D printed and laboratory produced. Industries and robots would monopolize the hazardous productions with humans quality controlling through VR. Artificial Photosynthesis would not only be implemented with real trees but also provide solar energy and high concentration of Oxygen to the city atmosphere. Self driving cars and drones transportation systems would provide a much more efficient method of traveling and communication. These new trajectory future systems would enforce both maintaining the identity of Amsterdam and implementing new technology into the architecture, on the planning of Zeeburgereiland.


During the second part of the 20th century, the rediscovery of the traditional city was the focus of attention. But just as the phone operates together with the computer and the e-mail to communicate, the new city, the city to come is more complex than the city as we know it so far, because our culture is simply much more complex as well. New infrastructural devices have to be developed. Perhaps the virtual realm will help the city to get a new identity, in which our constantly changing world is meeting instability. The way the World is dealing with Financial Issues and the role/position of the Bank, Property-ownership and the playground for developers and entrepreneurs are not anymore bound to one city; they relate by Stock-exchange and the International Property-development as a Global issue. We would like to speak in this respect about the city to come, the city we experience in a dreamlike condition; the un-sensational, the un-thought, the un-environment, the seemingly un-complex perception of a new reality.


02 Montessori Elementary Professor Jeffery Klymson Primary Education for free, independent children Chinatown, Chicago, IL “They [misbehaviors] are merely his reactions to an environment that has become inadequate... But we do not notice that. And since it is understood that the child must do what adults tell him, even though his environment no longer suits his needs, if he does not comply we say that he is “naughty” and correct him. Most of the time we are unaware of the cause of his “naughtiness”. Yet the child, by his condut, proves what we have just said. The closed environment is felt as a constraint...” (Maria Montessori, From Childhood to Adolescence) Rather than making a child learn to adapt to his environment, this design focuses on giving the children options in their surroundings. Whether in the classroom or in the hallway, the students are always given a choice on what they want to see, act, go and explore.


New Chinatown, Chicago IL


Montessori Elementary looking South West


ဃEvolution of classrooms into a school


Chinatown Montessori School Section


Lower Level Plan Scale: 1/8” = 1’

Lower Level Plan


First Floor Plan Scale: 1/8” = 1’

First Floor Plan


Second Floor Plan Scale: 1/8” = 1’ Second Floor Plan


Juxtaposition of play and learn

Outdoor auditorium landscape

A Classroom

Nooks for self development and reflection


Music Practical Language Arts

Corridor Mathematics

Entrance Culture

Geography

Biology

Sensorial

Culture Sensorial Entrance

Geography Biology

Kitchen Practical

Language

Reading

Personal

Biology

Kitchen

Sensorial

Practical Geography

Entrance

Language

Culture

Restrooms

Reading

Personal

Sensorial

Biology Entrance

Culture

Language Geography

Kitchen

Practical

Reading

Personal

Flexible Programs and Zones inside a classroom


1'

2'

10'


One resident occupancy

Two residents occupancy (Optimal operation)

Couples occupancy

Foldable and expandable furnishing to reduce space occupied

Approx. 6’ x 9’ bathroom

Spacious and generous furnishing

Storage underneath couple bed to reduce space occupied

Approx. 4’ x 9’ bathroom

Approx. 4’ x 9’ bathroom

300 sq ft

10‘ x 20’ Unit

10‘ x 20’ Unit

Single Unit

Single Unit

Different types of units for student residents

Double Unit


Three residents occupancy (Optimal operation)

Two residents occupancy

Approx. 6’ x 9’ bathroom

Approx. 6’ x 9’ bathroom

Storage underneath bed to reduce space occupied Typical dorm room style Storage underneath bed to reduce space occupied Foldable and expandable furnishing to reduce space occupied Tight minimalist living style

03 Bailey Renovate!

300 sq ft

300 sq ft

Professor Eva Kultermann Sustainable student housing Douglas, Chicago, IL with Carolina Almeida This project aims to compete in AIA Cote Top Ten Students Competition, which focuses on different measures of innovative sustainability. The site, Bailey Hall is an unoccupied student housing in Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, IL. With the current trends and available housings on campus in mind, Bailey Hall was retrofitted into a sustainable housing.

Double Unit

Double Unit

Instead of fully retrofitting sustainability innovations into the old building, we decided to create a new “brother” building which will be a makers’ space that also generates green energy for its older “brother” Bailey Hall. The “brother” building not only houses grocery store, labs, event spaces, energy gym, open studio and roof top restaurant, but also has rainwater harvesting tank, greywater recycling tanks, water filtering fish tanks and living machines. These innovative technology will allow the students in the lab to learn directly as a hands-on experience. Many under-used, surrounding sites have been improved to drain stormwater, engage community or generate even more green energy!


up

elevator

Laundry

down

kitchen elevator

up

up

Gallery bridge

open studio

up down

elevator

5th Floor 1’ = 3/32� 16 Units @ 27 - 43 +1-2

?

1st and 5th Floor Plan


storage

up

elevator

laundry bean bags

down

kitchen

elevator

down

down

fish tanks for water treatement

up down

stage

ballroom

6th Floor elevator

fish tanks for water treatement

1’ = 3/32� 14 Units @ 20 - 34 +1-2

2nd and 6th Floor Plan

?


up

elevator

Laundry

down

Storage

elevator

Kitchen

up

Gallery bridge

energy running machines

constructed wetland

electricity or energy production gym

up down

energy bikes elevator

7th Floor 1’ = 3/32� 16 Units @ 26 - 42 +1-2

?

3rd and 7th Floor Plan


elevator

down Laundry

up

kitchen

down

bean bags

elevator

storage

restaurant up down kitchen 8th Floor elevator

1’ = 3/32� 14 Units @ 24 - 38 +1-2

4th and 8th Floor Plan

?


Water fea

rapeutic Gard The en

e as aco tur

E 31st street

nt me

Keating Sports Center

orting ele mf

Gl

nt me

t the base gh

New Bailey Hall

Paths curv

Grocery

Cunningham Hall

re Sto

de insi

inwards to ed Incubator Space

ures uct

Farm

ated landscape ctiv

S Michigan Avenue

permeable pavement

rain drainage, s a w

s water, Filter slo

inwards

unte mm rs

c Attra t co

act traffic attr

parking lot

had lar s ing str so

Solar energy

e nerat d from ge

or t n flo o li

blocks o ass

retention pond

sloped to drain into the pond

Gunsaulus tennis court

Carman Hall McCormick Tribune Campus Center academic buildings

5'

20'

50'

100'

200'

parking lot

Site Plan


average use of electricity byBailey

2.6 million gallons used by residents

2.1 million gallons harvested rainwater

100%

80%

rainwater harvest 9,600 sq ft

25% distributed .5 million gallons

kWh per year

spring + summer winds

growing beds fish tanks

energy immediately used

energy supplied to the electricity

processed water distributed to site

community farm

summer + spring breeze

radiant steam heating

compost collector

therapeutic garden

cooling energy saved

windows placed high on NE side to exhale warm air out

energy gym

living machines

excess energy can be supplied back into the school system

10%~60%

15%

out of total energy consumed

solar heating

blackwater and greywater storage

vertical wind turbines

harvesting rainwater from site, waiting to be purified

35%

efficiency for conventional generation

into electricity

into other uses

resultant energy used to pump water

photovoltaic triple-glazed glass

sprouts hydroponics

85% reused 2.9 million gallons

rooftop garden for growing

wind turbines

filtered water storage rainwater harvest 66,000 sq ft

32,000

kWh per year

distribution tank

engagement to the community through means of growing

wind energy

780,000

heat recovery steam from Illinois Tech

70% efficiency for pressure steam system

photovoltaic glass

250,000

kWh per year

cool air being inhaled into the double glass windows placed low on the SW side facade to inhale the cool breeze

mechanical room in the basement

60% efficiency for solar heating system

Sustainable Technology integrated in the Energy Plus New Building that supports the Existing Student Housing

11

11

12

12 10

1

10

9

8 7

large car parking lot the only use for parking cars

7

terrazzo paving on ground floor no light into the basement

5

3

4 7

6

2

5

3

1

8

1

6

2

9

4

1

large car parking lot solar panels roofing generate green energy while shading cars

7

glass blocks in the terrazzo on the edge of the building allow light to the basement

large lawn, high solar in summer bordered with native plants, grown with reused greywater community farm for organic growing natural landscape slopes down to retain stormwater

8

innovative glass-and-dark-brick-screen trombe wall on south and west sides for solar heating simple brick pattern facade for east and north sides

2

large lawn, high solar in summer occasionally used for frisbee

8

uninsulated facade, exposed floor slabs, uninsulated windows, poor ventilation

2

3

abandoned playground

9

an isolated building

3

retention pond for storing excess stormwater before transferring to living machines to be purified for reuse

9

sustainable energy generated from “battery” building fed into renovated student housing

4

permeable paving with natural pattern taken from usual routes

10

varying corridor with large social space for gathering and small, quiet nooks for private studying four varying floor plans with communal kitchen for choice movable furnishing for students’ personalization of rooms high sound proofing for high quality privacy in the units

4

thinly paved, concrete walkways (mostly unused)

10

dark, narrow corridor with no social space for gathering large, strict, repetitive floor plans for very high privacy low sound proofing

5

grass and trees around entrance

11

beautiful views on rooftop (unaccessible)

5

public plaza for gathering with native, wild plantings

11

beautiful views on rooftop accessible through the rooftop or rooftop cafe in incubator building solar panels roof generate solar energy while also harvesting rainwater for reuse

6

area with trees

12

no sustainability integrated

6

therapeutic garden to destress students and community members connection to the community with inviting flowers

12

“battery” building (incubator building) uses high, innovative technology to generate green energy while requiring low energy itself provides flexible, multi-purpose spaces for social events, hang-out, formal, informal occasions

Before and After


rate solar energy while also harvesting rainwater for reuse

or building) nology to generate green energy while requiring low energy itself pose spaces for social events, hang-out, formal, informal occasions

Ulmus Patriot

Quercus Imbricaria

Sassafras Albidum

Iris

Sassafras Albidum

Ulmus Patriot

Lonicera

Eutrochium Maculatum

Dalea Purpurea

Juncus

Lobelia Siphilitica

Schizachyrium Scoparium

Lobelia Siphilitica

Liatris Spicata

Activated Landscape

Site Section and Landscape

Filters Waters

Vegetation Slope Drain to Pound

Path

Vegetation

Path

Vegetation Slope Drain to Pound

Path

Vegetation


PV Solar Installation Butterfly Roof

Restaurant Kitchen

Swiss Chard

Peas

Energy Production Gym

Fish Tanks Ballroom

Lettuce

Open Studios Leek Greywater and Blackwater Storage Laboratory

Kale

Living Machine Showcase Event Spaces Brussels Sprouts

Small Group Meeting

Rainwater Storage Tank Workshop

Grocery Store

Farm

Filters Waters

Activated Landscape

Incubator Building

Connection Path Energy Connector

Bailey Hall


ၤေခေိနFacade Option 1

ၤေခေိနFacade Option 2

ၤေခေိနFacade Option 3

East Elevation

East Elevation

South El

South Elevation


1 Awning Window

2 Window Framing

3 Single Pane Laminated,

3

1

Low-E Glazing

2

4 Flashing

4

5 Pre-Manufactured

Window Box Frame Anchored to Masonry Wall, Light Weight Metal

5

6

6 Window Framing 7 Double Glazed Glass 8 Awning

7

9 Wood Window Box

10 Double Wythe Open

Weave Mansory Wall

8 9

10

1 Single Pane Laminated,

2

Low-E Glazing

2 Double Wythe Open

Weave Mansory Wall

3 Triple Pane Laminated,

3 4

1

5

Low-E Glazing

4 Window Framing

5 Awning Window 6 Kawneer 1600

Curtain Wall Sys.

7 Existing Concrete Slab

8 Steel Angle

9 Aluminum Ventilation

6

Louvers

7

10 Steel Shelf Angle

11 Separating Plate for

Louvered Ventilation for Inlet at the Top Outlet at Base

10

9 8

Wall Section Technology Detail


Night Perspective


N M e

N Leavitt Ave

ke au ilw e Av

A CT

Bloomingdale’s Trail

ue

Bl ne

Li Art

Starbucks

Art

Bar

Basketball Art Art

Stairs

Art

Pool Table

Volleyball Stairs

Sk Cafe’

Site Plan 21’-0” Scale Site Plan, Wicker Park

1/64” - 1’

N Leavitt Ave

Canopy


04၃ ြမေလငအပGravity Well Professor Michael Glynn

kate and Bike Park

Cultural Center for diverse communities Park 567, Chicago, IL How can architecture influence the balance, speed and flow of economic, social, and political aspects? Located on the border of Bucktown and Wicker Park, Park 567 is overlooked by Ward 2 of Damen station and Ward 1 of Western station. Unlike the busy, lively communities around the Damen station of blue line, it exists merely as a bypass where mostly only the Bloomingdale’s users past. Since it is an entry point to the infamous Bloomingdale’s trail, the segregated site which is currently divided into mainly 3 sectors by Milwaukee, Leavitt, Bloomingdale’s, and CTA train, can be brought together by readjusting and allocating the existing flows.

N M e ke

au ilw e Av


One of the ways looked into was an attraction like gravity where nearby users would be attracted and drawn to the proposed hub. They would be either slowed down due to the attention to the hub which includes cafes’, art, miniature sports and so on, or be completely engaged in the activity in which case they would stop and stay. There are also ramps through the hub which provide multiple access to the Gravity Well. Not only will the design bridge the segregated site, but also reorganize or even encourage the flow of political, recreational information and people in a certain direction while gravitating towards the central proposed gathering center. This will in turn recreate a close, socialized community, bringing art and culture back to the Wicker Park.


Political Boundaries

Ward 32

Logan Square

Ward 2 Humboldt Park Political boundaries amongst wards and neighborhoods

Ward 1

West Town


1’

1’

1’

N Leavitt Ave

Bloomingdale’s Trail

2’

N M e

ke

au ilw

2’ e Av

2’

Art 2’

Starbucks

3’

2’

Art

Bar

Basketball Art Art

Stairs

Art

Pool Table

Volleyball Stairs

N M k au ilw

3’

ee

N Leavitt Ave

Cafe’

Scale

1/16” - 1’

e Av

Bloomingdale’s Level 21’-0” 2’

2’

Elevated Main Plan


N

N Leavitt Ave

Bloomingdale’s Trail

M e

ke

au ilw e Av Picnic Area

Green roof

Stage

Green roof

Stairs

N e

ke e Av

Roof Plan

1/16” - 1’

au ilw

Scale

N Leavitt Ave

M

CTA train’s height 32’-0”


Opportunities

Highest Opportunities

Lowest Opportunities

Highest Opportunities

Lowest Opportunities

Programs’ Relationships


East Elevation

South Elevation

North Elevation

Scale

1/16” = 1’ 0”


Section Scale

1/16” = 1’ 0”

East Elevation


Wall Section Scale

1’-1”

Wall Elevation Scale 1

3


1.1.1 Activity Catalog

The Why Factory, MVRDV, Netherlands


04 Other Winy Maas MVRDV, Professor John Manaves

Adaptable Architecture with Newly Designed Current Technology Delft, Netherlands with Caleb Vick, Jacob Wall, Joshua MacWilliams, Kathleen Birk, Landon Vowels, Ludin Castillo, Samantha Sheppard, San Lae Lae Cho, Stephen Yoshida

Prof. Leslie Johnson, Lukasz Kowalczyk

Radial Cartographies London, England & Rome, Italy

Professor Joel Putnam

Design Communications III

Professor Kindon Mills

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

Lafayette Park by Mies van der Rohe Detroit, MA

Professor Lukasz Kowalczyk

Design Communications II

with Jaehyuk Chang, Arlene Hayes, Jacob Wall


Let’s take a look at the average current city....

Urban Housing LEC

t?f

t?f

The Why Factory

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

OnTheGo Urban Housing Limited-Equity Cooperative The city is not being utilized to its full potential

it is actually a compilation of semi- latent spaces

t?f

The City at 7:00

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

We consume and demand more space, but leave those spaces inactive

The Why Factory

t?f

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

The City at 14:00

t?f

The City at 17:00

The Why Factory

College of Architecture

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

Transience and Motive So OnTheGo

1

[ the refugees ] [ the individualists ] [ the divorcees ]

[ the homeless ] [ the re-enterers ]

gym 2

entertainment

What if we focus on the activation of that one activity in that one space instead?

[ the emancipators ] [ the ex-pats ]

[ the new normal ]

restaurant transience ability to get up and go

3

coffee shops grocery stores

At any moment only one activity is activating only one space

[ the nomads ]

[ the pensioners ]

bars

[ the free spirit ] So-So OnTheGo

[ the frat house ]

[ the work-placements ]

[ the brady bunch ]

[ the squatters ]

4

[ the students ]

shopping school

[ the grandparents ]

work

[ the hermits ]

home

[ the stoopers ]

5

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The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

Our amount of places and spaces needed for daily life are dispersed and inconsistently used

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The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

[ the superstars ] [ the hoarders ] Not So OnTheGo motivation for change general disatisfaction, geographic pressure, economic perks, lack of access to Architecture, etc.

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The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

The Commercial Users sharing preference noise preference light preference materialism

Junior type: age: stay length/frequency: occupation/hobbies: reason for OnTheGO:

“school/no DJ-ing”

“day off/no DJ-ing”

“friday/no DJ-ing”

day 1

day 2

day 3

the emancipator 16 ~year/continuous student/DJ living on friends couch

“Sponsored by a friendly neighbor, Junior is able to move out of his friends living room and finally be able to pursue his one true passion -disc jockeying”

day 2

day 3

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The Why Factory

“school+DJ-ing”

“day off+DJ-ing”

ILLINOIS TECH

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

TU Delft, the Why Factory by MVRDV in Netherlands


ဥညႊ့နOnTheGo Winy Maas MVRDV, Professor John Manaves

Adaptable Architecture with Newly Designed Current Technology Delft, Netherlands

Think of a city at a given moment. Traffic jams mean most people are on the move towards work or returning home while both workspaces and living ones remain unused. During the day, suburbs and average neighborhoods stand almost empty. If one made a scan of the city, it would not be surprising to find that a big chunk of it (even a dense city) is empty, or more precisely latent, waiting for the users to activate it. The great living room in your apartment remains unused perhaps 80 or 90% of the time. The bathroom gets used for 15 min and then spends 23 hours and 45 minutes waiting to be used again, not to mention the bedroom or the storage spaces. The story can go on to most functions of the housing block or the city. This reading would be irrelevant if space would be endless and the environment would be in perfect shape. But it is not. Humans consume and demand more and more space, so the answer given since time immemorial has been to compress the living quarters of those at the bottom of society to maximum levels and give to those at the top the sensation of power by space abundance. Density indeed has come with great advantages; it has brought affordable dwelling to millions and with it transport access, infrastructure, schools and so on. But the price tag of this has meant that families have to live in fixed environments of 35m2 even in rich Europe.. Can we challenge this? Now as new technology emerges we are suddenly able to locate our position, and crucially for architecture, we are now able to manipulate our space from a distance. Software and architecture seem to be merging into one. At last, it seems plausible to rethink what density means and introduce a key factor to the equation that has been largely ignored: time.


commercial opportunity

6000

Finding our test day = most intense time

4800 voxel minimum

amount of residents present

amount of residents present

5000

4000

3000

2000

0 Finding our test day = most intense time

1000

weeks

Finding our test day = most intense time

Test Day 0

52

weeks

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resident attendance

The Why Factory

0

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

52

weeks

m 0

su 52 41 week

weeks Test Day Test Day residentresident attendance attendance

amount amount of of residentsresidents present present

0

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The Why Factory

m

su week 41

m

ILLINOIS TECH

College The Whyof Factory Architecture

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ILLINOIS TECH


1.1.0 Methodology A unit of volume: small enough to capture articulation, but large enough for heavy computation.

30 cm

30 cm

30 cm

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The Voxel

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

35 voxels

Activity

Quantified

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The Why Factory

Some people simply need more space.

Add room for comfort.

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

transitions to best fit spaces

22:15

conclusion: moves users quickly across the envelope. could be fun but requires a lot of circulation movement

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Multiply by Character Materialism Factor.

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

transitions to adjacent spaces

Bunky, Yoga, Victor, Nuri, Aaminah, and Samir all change activities

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transitions in place

The Why Factory

t?f

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

The Why Factory

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

conclusion: demands less of the circulation and leaves more space available for local movement and expansion

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The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

Do ego spaces still accommodate the spatial imprints of the activities within?

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The Why Factory

Yolk as User Preferenced Activities

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

Do ego spaces still perform as well, or better than normal activity spaces in regards to density?

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

TU Delft, the Why Factory by MVRDV in Netherlands


multiple system method

People and stuff movers slides along one face of the envelope

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The Why Factory

The movers can move up

ILLINOIS TECH

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

t?f

The people mover lines up with her ideal space... she gets in

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

its internal arrangement is revealed

The Why Factory

t?f

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

The Why Factory

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

...and slides up to her newly formed sleeping space.

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The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

Katie arrives and gets into a space just tall and wide enough for her

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The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

the space transforms from her elevator into her sleeping quarters right in front of her eyes

t?f College of Architecture

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

she lifts through empty space until arriving at her ideal space

... and sideways

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

conclusion: provides circulation quickly without disturbing neighbors, but adds structural complexity and is a bit too vending machine-esque

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

Scene: Katie just got home and needs to bed after an exhausting day of knitting

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conclusion: this method requires greater overall movement to manage circulation, but is structurally and technologically more simple and keeps a smaller envelope

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

TU Delft, the Why Factory by MVRDV in Netherlands


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The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

t?f

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

The Why Factory

College of Architecture

College of Architecture

Specifications: Kitchen

Specifications: Dry and Cold Storage

The Wet Planks

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The Why Factory

The Why Factory

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

Specifications: Bathroom Plank

Specifications: Kitchen

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The Why Factory

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

t?f

ILLINOIS TECH

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

The Why Factory

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture

t?f

The Why Factory

ILLINOIS TECH

College of Architecture


TU Delft, the Why Factory by MVRDV in Netherlands


OnTheGo, Clients Addition


TU Delft, the Why Factory by MVRDV in Netherlands


OnTheGo, Clients Sharing


TU Delft, the Why Factory by MVRDV in Netherlands


OnTheGo, Commercial and Residential Sharing


OnTheGo challenged us to reflect on the problematic of maximum desires and pressing needs. What sort of organizing principle is needed to accomplish a 100%adaptability in real time to ever changing demands of temporary users? How can time be taken into account to use the maximum potential of space resources? Can we think of game software that can accommodate different temporary modes of accommodation?


ၽြနRadial Cartographies of London and Rome


ၽြနRadial Cartographies of London and Rome


Thickness depends on the weight and number of cars

Radius depends on the volume of water ow

Outlets depend on the location and capacity

Depth depends on the location of the manhole

Rendering


3d Modeling


QGIS


Threads in the Fabric

Norrebro District, Copenhagen, Denmark 1:100

The interior circulation of the Norrebro's megablocks is mainly interpreted as vertical. Each two or three units share a core stair. Therefore, the stairs allow the vertical neighbors to interact and meet each other more often than those living on the same floor a couple units far. All the units have multiple stairs which open up to the inner courtyard and the outter streets with the facades equally treated on both sides.

Modeling


Existing Trees and Shrubs

FOUNTAIN

S W

MONUMENT

PLAZA LEVEL S.F.: 2,950 SF EXTERIOR SEATING: 150 - 200 UPPER LEVEL SITE PLAN 31-33 EAST RIVERWALK JUNE 30, 2017

N


Livi ng Wa ll

05 Johnson Lasky Kindelin Architects

Service Window

BEER TASTING ROOM 190 SF

LEGEND DECORATIVE SCREEN WITH GRAPHICS / BRANDING RESPECTED MONUMENT/MEMORIAL AREA FUTURE DROP OFF / PICK UP FOR CHICAGO BREWERIES TOUR


Partial replanting with Hops and Barley

lic b

Hig

h ta

ble

enc

bar

h

Existing Trees and Shrubs

sea

ting

Wa ll

Pub

Livi ng

Future Awning

Bar

SUSTAINABLE FEATURE HIGHLIGHTS ● ● ● ● ●

HIGH QUALITY FURNITURE RECLAIMED WOOD INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR EXTERIOR PLANTINGS & LIVING WALL PLANTING OF HOPS & BARLEY MAIN INGREDIENT OF BEER IS WATER; FOCAL POINT: LAKE MICHIGAN WATER IS WHAT MAKES CHICAGO BEER EXCEPTIONAL ● DISPLAY OF 4 COMPONENTS OF BEER ◦ WATER ◦ HOPS ◦ GRAIN (BARLEY / MALTS) ◦ YEAST

RESTAURANT / EXHIBITS

Beer Tanks Exhibition Area

Beer Tanks Exhibition Area

Beer Tanks Exhibition Storage for rent

Elevator RESTROOMS

Dumbwaiter

RECLAIMED WOOD DIVIDER

INTERIOR S.F.: 5,000 SF EXTERIOR S.F.: 1,700 SF EXTERIOR SEATING: 90 - 100 LOWER LEVEL SITE PLAN 31-33 EAST RIVERWALK JUNE 30, 2017

LEGEND

WALK IN COOLER AND DRY STORAGE

N

KITCHEN

LANDSCAPING / PLANTERS IN RECLAIMED WOOD/METAL HOW BEER IS BREWED AND BREWING EXHIBITS (ROTATE INVITATIONS TO LOCAL BREWERIES) EXHIBITS ON HISTORY OF CHICAGO BREWING BREWING EQUIPMENT OF ALL SIZES (FIRST FOR EXHIBITS, EVENTUALLY OPERATIONAL FOR WINTER USE / CORPORATE EVENTS / ATTRACTIONS)


Gaillardias Blanket Flower ARIZONA SUN

Personal Client’s Front Yard Chicago Suburbs, IL The front yard is in need of repaving the soil and the grass. Weeds and dying evergreen trees needed to be removed.

Echinacea purpurea ‘White Swan’ ConeFlower

Measurements for the yard was made. Meetings inperson as well as online were made to show precedents and discuss design ideas. Professor Bulcheri from Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects supervised and mentored the process. Meticulous research was made on the available local plants, suitable for the client’s soil. Careful selection was made among the different local species, based on the client’s request to choose hardy plants. Additional research was made on the spacing between each of the plants.

Sporobolus Heterolepis Prairie Dropseed


Cornus alba ‘Bailhalo’ IVORY HALO

Thuja Occidentalis Arborvitae EVERGREEN

Buxus Boxwood EVERGREEN


“Good Architecture lets Nature in” Mario Pei


Architecture Portfolio'18 | San Lae Lae Cho  
Architecture Portfolio'18 | San Lae Lae Cho  
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