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PROJECT ON QUALITY OF WORK LIFE


CHAPTER-1 INTRODUCTION

INTRODUCTION: Quality of work life (QWL) is the favorableness or unfavorableness of he job environment. Its purpose is to develop jobs and working conditions that are excellent for both the employees and the organization. Work rules can help you create and maintain an orderly atmosphere that is pleasant to work in where employees can work effectively. Creating such an atmosphere is to your benefit as an employer because employees tend to be more creative and productive when they are content work rules can help improve quality of work life by:  Encouraging open communication between employer and employees.  Creating an atmosphere where employees are treated with dignity and respect.  Helping to ensure that employees conduct themselves in a professional and safe manner.  Ensuring that all employees are treated fairly & that they follow the same rules. The relationship between work rules and quality of work life is an important one. If work rules are unreasonable, inappropriate, or unenforced, the rules can actually damage employee morale. One of the way of accomplishing QWL is through job design. He discussion of job design has revolved mainly around job characteristics, job enrichment, job enlargement and social information processing. Job enlargement adds a more variety of tasks and duties to the job so that it is not a monotonous. This takes in the breath of the job. That is, the number of different tasks that an employee performs. This can also be accomplished by job rotation, job enrichment, on the other hand, adds additional motivators. It adds depth to the job more control,


responsibility and discretion to how the job is performed. This gives higher order needs to the employee, as opposed to job enlargement which simply gives more variety. The chart below illustrates the differences.

Job Enrichment & Job performance: Higher order

Job Enrichment

Job enrichment & Enlargement

Routine Job

Job enlargement

Lower order Accenton Few

Needs

Many

Variety of tasks The concern for quality of work life (QWL) and the accompanying Sociotechnoical approach to job desing take a more macro perspective. Unlike the job enrichment and social information processing approaches, QWL is not based on a particular theory, nor does it advocate a particular technique for application. Instead, QWL is more concerned with the overall climate of work. One analysis of QWL described it as “(1) a concern about the impact of work. on people as well as on organization effectiveness, and (2) the idea of participation In organizational problem solving and decision making.� Recent research evidence indicates that when employees have such a participation, problem-solving approach to QWL, they are more committed both to their organization and, if union members, to their union.


The overriding of QWL is to change the climate at work so that the Human-technological –organizational interface lead in a better quality of work life. Unlike the more general concept of QWL, the sociotechnical approach to job designing has a systems theoretical based. In particular, thesociotechnical approach to job desing is concerned with the interface and harmony among personal, social, and technological functioning. In application, this translates into the redesign of technological work process and the formation of autonomous, self-regulation work groups or teams.0 To some, QWL refers to industrial democracy, increased worker participation in corporate decision-making, or a culmination of the goals of the human relations movement of two decades ago. To others, especially those in management, the term suggests any of a variety of efforts to improve productivity through improvements in the human rather than the capital or technological input of production. Many view the quality of work life as closely related to, if not merely a broader and more up-to-date term for, such concepts as job satisfaction, humanizing work, or individualizing organizations. Thus, efforts to improve QWL are seen as closely akin to organizational development programs. The most comprehensive and widely - quoted definition of QWL was developed by Richard Walton (1974a), who proposed eight major conceptual categories as a framework for analyzing and assessing the phenomenon. 1. Adequate and fair compensation: Does pay received meet socially determined standards of sufficiency of the recipient’s subjective standard? Does pay received for certain work bear an appropriate relationship to pay received for other work? 2. Safety and healthy environment: The employees should not be exposed to physical conditions or work arrangements that are unduly hazardous or unhealthy is widely accepted.

In the future, when health will be less the issue than comfort, more

stringent standards that today’s will possible be imposed.

These may include

minimizing odors, noise, or visual annoyances. 3. Development of human capacities:

To varying degrees work has become

fractionated, deskilled, and tightly controlled; planning the work is often separated from implementing it. So jobs differ in how much they enable the worker to use and develop his skills and knowledge, which affects his involvement, self-esteem, and the challenge obtained from the work itself.


4. Growth and security: Attention needs to be given to (a) the extent to which the worker’s assignments contribute to maintaining and expanding his capabilities, rather than leading to his obsolescence; (b) the degree to which expanded or newly acquired knowledge & skills can be utilized in future work assignments; and (c) the availability of opportunities to advance in organizational or career terms which peers, family members, or associated recognize. 5. Social Integration : Whether the employee achieves personal identity and selfesteem is influenced by such attributes in the climate of his workplace as freedom from prejudice, a sense of community, interpersonal openness, the absence of stratification in then organization, and the existence of upward mobility. 6. Constitutionalism: What rights does the worker have and how can he (or she) protect these rights? Wide variations exist in the extent to which the organization culture respects personal privacy, tolerates dissent, adheres to high standards of equity in distributing rewards, and provided for due process in all work-related matters. 7. The total life space: A person’s work should have a balanced role in his life. This role encompasses schedules, career demands, and travel requirements that take a limited potion of the person’s leisure and family time, as well as advancement and promotion that do not require repeated geographical moves. 8. Social relevance : Organization acting in a socially irresponsible manner causes increasing numbers of these employees to depreciate the value of their work and careers. For example, does the worker perceive disposal, marketing techniques, employment practices, and participation in political campaigns? STRATEGIES FOR IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF WORK LIFE : The strategies for improvement in QWL include self managed work teams, job redesign and enrichment, effective leadership and supervisory behavior, career development alternative work schedules, job security, administrative or organisational justice and participating management.

1. Self –managed work teams: These are also called autonomous work groups or integrated work teams. These work teams are formed with 10 to 20 employees who


plan, co-ordinate and control the activities of the team, with the help of a team leader, who is one among team. Each team performs all activities including selecting their people. Each team perform all activities including selecting their people. Each team has authority to make decisions and regulate team performs all activities including selecting their people. Each team has authority to make decisions and regulate the activities. Group as a whole, is accountable for the success or failure. Salaries and fixed both on the basis of individual and group achievement. 2. Job redesign and enrichment: Narrow jobs can be combined into larger units of accomplishment. Jobs are redesigned with a view to enriching them to satisfy higher other human needs. 3. Effective leadership and supervisory behavior:

For effective leadership and

supervisory behavior 91 – 91 style of managerial gird is suitable. 4. Career development: Provision for career planning, communicating & counseling the employees about the career opportunities career path, education and development and for second careers should be made. 5. Alternative work schedules:

Provision for flexible working hours, partime

Employment’s, job sharing and reduced workweek should be made. 6. Job security: This is the employee’s list of the priority. It should be adequately taken care off. REWARD SYSTEM : If there is one message it is that there are reward system practices that can contribute to a high quality of work life. Admittedly, what is good and what is bad depends partially on organisational and environmental conditions, but these can be identified and dealt with. On the one hand it seems clear that improving the QWL is not simply a matter of providing more extrinsic rewards, as some would have us believe. On the other hand is also seems clear that reward systems cannot be ignored in efforts to produce a high QWL, as there would have a

believe. Any serious effort to improve

QWL must consider reward system and must deal with the complexities and conflicts inherent in them. TABLE 1.1 Reward Practice

External

Internal

Individua

Performance

Memb

Absent


Open promotion & Job posting Participation in promotion decisions Cafeteria fringe benefits Skill based evaluation plans All-Salary plans Performance pay plans Scanlon plan Variable ration plans Open pay Participation in decisions

Equity

Equity

lity

Motivation

ership

cism

1

3

0

2

2

1

1

4

0

2

2

1

2

0

4

0

2

1

0

2

3

2

2

2

2

0

1

0

1

0

2

2

3

3

1

1

2 0 1

0 0 2

0 0 0

2 0 2

2 0 0

1 0 1

1

2

0

2

1

1

The above table summarizes what has been said about the effect of new reward practices and processes. Each of the practices discussed is rated on six dimensions. The first three are dimensions that contribute to a high QWL, and the next three are dimensions that contribute to organisational effectiveness.

Because these are new

practices, the question that concerns us is whether they represent improvements over traditional practice. Thus, each practice is rated on a five – point scale running from 0 to 4. A rating of 0 indicates that the practical leads to a negligible increase over what is usually present in organizations. A rating 4 indicates that the practice produces a large increase over what is usually present. They should be viewed as averages across all situations. The rating suggest that improvements can be obtained by changing both the process and the mechanics of reward administration. PROMOTION: Promotions, and indeed virtually all movements of employees from one job to another in n organization, are handled in a similar manner by most organizations. Decisions about who will be moved where and when are made by managers who are at least one organization level above both the position that is to be filled and the individuals who are being considered to fill it. Promotion and job change decisions are typically


regarded as so important that only individuals higher up in the organization can be trusted to make them. It is usually reasoned that individuals at the same or lower levels do not have the knowledge to make good decisions, and that they cannot be counted on to put organisational effectiveness first in the decision process because their self-interest is so directly involved. The whole promotion process is kept secret in most organizations. Often, even the people who are being considered for a position are not aware of this fact. All planning is done by top management, usually with the aid of the personnel department, and the individuals are not asked their preferences or even informed of the results of the planning process. GOVERNAMET STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE OWL: Improving the QWL is a reasonable goal for our society.

However, many

individuals who recognize the value of a high quality work life would oppose government pressure on employers to improve it. Managers in the private sector might cite such government action as a misdirection of energy away from adding to the nation’s economic well being through the pursuit of profits. Others might see government action on this issue as an encroachment on the collective bargaining process. Only government pressure can stimulate some organizations, however, positive government programs would both hasten and extend of their voluntary activity in this area. The federal government might undertake any of a variety of possible strategies to improve the quality of work like.

1. The government can modify existing laws affecting the QWL. 2. New legislation can set and enforce QWL standards of employment. 3. New legislation can reward organizations with government incentives fro adopting QWL innovation. 4. New legislation to require all employers to begin a change process with each organization to improve the QWL it provides its employees. 5. Government funds can support programs to advance the state of the art in QWL practice and knowledge.


6. The government can serve directly as a model QWL employer or encourage its contractors to become such models. 7. Finally, the government can change the policies on education and the economy to improve the QWL.

METHODOLOGY: It is a case study. The QWL is categorized in a systematic way by taking their view into context. The categorization is done with the help of a flow chart taking the view of the employee. Survey method of research is adopted for collecting the necessary data from the sample respondents. Among the inputs that go into a business activity, i.e., B.M’s Men, Materials, Machines, Methods, Matter, Market, Money, Minutes etc., The human input in the only one which can give more than 100% and it is the input which an make other inputs to yield less or more than 100%. The most important thing is to maintain the QWL in the organization so that the employees and give better results. NEED FOR THE STUDY The basic need of the study is to know the quality of work life currently prevailing in the organization and to provide feedback information for the same to the organization. This information helps in analyzing the quality of work life existing in the organization and thereby suggesting changes whether necessary. OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY The specific objectives of the study are : 1. To study the pattern of QWL in B.H.E.L. 2. To analyze the view of the employees towards the changing QWL. 3. To offer the suggestions in the light of findings.


TOOLS FOR DATA COLLECTION A structured and disguised scheduled is used for collecting the necessary data. The schedule consists of multiple-choice questions. TOOLS FOR ANALTSIS OF DATA Percentages and Graphs (pie charts) are used for comparisons. SCOPE OF THE STUDY The study covers the following aspects under its purview. 1. The study is about the view of the employees towards QWL in the organization. 2. The study was confined to employees and non-employees.

CHAPTER-2 PROFILE OF THE COMPANY


PROFILE OF THE BHARAT HEAVY ELECTRICALS LIMITED B.H.E.L is the largest Engineering and Manufacturing Enterprise in INDIA in the energy related and infrastructure sector today. The company was established more than 40 years back in Bhopal and subsequently in Haridwar, Trichey and in Hyderabad. Today B.H.E.L has 14 manufacturing divisions, 4 regional centers and over 100 project sites, service centers etc B.H.E.L caters to fie major lines of Business i.e. power Industry Transmission, Transportation and Electronics. The company has the capabilities for executing power projects from concept to commissioning and is now posed to enter into the super critical power station business of 600 MW and above. The company has been rectified for the ISO 9000-2000 for Quality Management and ISO-14001 for Environment at Management. VISION MISSION

VALUES

A world-class Engineering enterprise committed to enhancing stake holder value. To be an Indian multinational Engineering Enterprise providing total business solutions through quality products, systems & services in the fields of energy, transportation, Industry, Infrastructure and other potential areas.  Zeal to excel and zest for change.  Integrity and fairness in all matters.  Rasped for dignity and potential of individuals.  Strict coherence to commitments.  Ensure speed of response.  Foster learning, creativity and teamwork.  Loyalty and pride in the company.

CORP. PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS (Rs. Crores) Sl. No. 1 2 3 4

Indicator TURNOVER VALUE ADDED PBT PAT

Flash 2004 – 05 10520 4324 1606 1002

Actual 2003 – 04 8662 3680 1015 658

Actual 2002 - 03 7482 3248 802 445


5 6 7 8 9

ORDERS INFLOW ORDER BOOK EARNINGS PER SHARE PHYSICAL EXPORTS MW COMMISSIONED

18016 31867 40.9 810 3548

16477 11227 23650 15800 26.9 18.2 1033 637 2126 1922 * Figures are subject to audit .

POWER SECTOR SCENARIO 9th 5 – YEARS PLAN (1997 – 2002) * Planned addition in MW * Actual addition in MW * BHEL’s contribution in addition * Total installed capacity in the country * BHEL’s Share in the country 10th 5 – YEAR PLAN (2002 – 2007) * Planned addition in 10th plan * Firm orders with BHEL * IPPS EXPECTED * NTPC addition projected up to 2012

MW 40245 19119 12463 104917 67232 46939 7442 10501 20470

B.H.E.L. HYDEABAD Hyderabad unit of B.H.E.L at Ramachandrapuram started in the early 60’s to cater to power plant requirement of 110 mw and 60 mw units and small sets of 12 mw in collaboration with SKODA Czechoslovakia. The unit has rapidly diversified its product portfolio into compressors, high speed turbines pulverizes oil field equipment, SF6 circuit breakers, gas turbines, feedwater heaters and pumps. It has entered into technology tie-up with world renowned companies (see box) over the years Hyderabad unit has emerged as a premium engineering CURRENT TECH TIE – UP organization with a strong system • G.E., USA – For Gasengineering Turbines. group and has the expertise to undertake • SIEMENS, GERMANAY – right Fofr theSteam Turbines turnkey services for thermo mechanical projects green field status. & Generators. • STEIN INDUSTRIES, FRANCE – For Bowl Mills • • • •

EARLIER TECH TIE - UP YUBA, USA – For Heaters WEIR PUMPS, UK – For Pums NUOVO PIGNONE, ITALY – For compressors SKODA, CZECH – for Steam Turbines & Generators


Total No. of equipment’s manufactured up to Mar’06 PRODUCT YEAR OF START TOTAL SETS STEAM TURBINE 1967 585 GAS TURBINES 1986 147 COMPRESSORS 1971 302 GENERATORS 1967 543 HEAT 1967 2835 PUMPS 1967 2716 OIL RIGS 1978 85 PULVERISERS 1975 1005 BREAKERS 1967 16988 STRATEGIC PLAN PROCESS IN B.H.E.L. Corporate planning is a continuous process of defining business, he corporate objectives action plans and allocates resources. B.H.E.L. made its beginning nearly 40 years ago as a manufacturer of power plant equipment. Over the years, it has grown into a vibrant engineering organization with capabilities to execute contracts from concept to commissioning.

It is now operating in five major lines of business that is Power,

Industrial, Transmission, Transportation and Electronics covering more than 200 different products, spread over 14 manufacturing units in the country. B.H.E.L. was the first organization both in public and private sector to Realize the value of a corporate plan considering that our product portfolio has been a Multi – Product and Multi – Discipline, the need for a corporate plan was felt which can integrate the different B.H.E.L units and give a common direction to its business. The first corporate plan was brought out in 1974 (called as “out line of a corporate plan”). This plan, which seeking to integrate the diverse operations of the company also sought to reorganize the company essentially along functional lines. It gave particular emphasis on


Engineering reorganization and synthesis of technologies.

The plan also envisaged

vertical integration by setting up manufacturing and service group. Since the B.H.E.L has come out with “The Growth Perspectives of the 80’s” in April 1982. “The corporate plan for the 90’s in January 1990 “The Perspectives for 2002” in October 1997.

The corporate planning process is regularly initiated by corporate planning and development (P & D) department who lay down the guidelines for the plan. The business sectors (Power, Industry, and International Operations) provided the overall growth scenario and projections for future dovetailing with the five year plan period of our country. The divisional plans at the unit level, emanates from various product groups of the unit, through interaction with the different departments like Engineering, Technology, Planning Production. Materials, Quality etc., Based on these inputs, P & D department of each unit of B.H.E.L. prepares a draft divisional plan and presents it to corporate P & D. suggestions are incorporated and plan is reworked and finalized. This plan from all B.H.E.L. units, become the basis for the corporate plan of B.H.E.L. From the above corporate plan document emanates the corporate vision & Mission, wherein the company indicates what is desires to be in the future and through what lines of business in 1997, B.H.E.L. articulated its VISION 2001 to transform B.H.E.L. into a world class innovative, competitive and profitable Engineering enterprise providing total business solutions. The proposed divisional plan for the period 2002 to 2012 of B.H.E.L. Hyderabad unit for incorporation in the corporate plan has been made taking into account the present economic scenario and the projections by the unit vis-à-vis the plan documents of the 1971’s, 80’s 90’s. PERSPECTIVE PLAN OF B.H.E.L 2007 Keeping the overall company objectives in consideration Hyderabad unit has made a reasonably ambitious growth plan even through the market continues to be


uncertain and worldwide fast changes taking place in technology and markets. The highlights of the plan are:

GROWTH

NEW AREAS OF BUSINESS

THRUST OF EXPORTS

ENGG

INVESTMENTS

 Increase in Turnover from Rs.1533 crs in 2001-02 to Rs.2700 Crs on 2006-07.  15% annual growth in turnover.  The growth can be subdued in international market and/or gas turbine technology transfer is restricted . (The turnover may stabilize at around Rs.2200 Crs.  9FA gas turbines and matching generators.  Pumps, heat exchangers an pulverizes for 660 MW super critical thermal plants.  Pumps and heat exchangers for LNG plants.  Gas turbine driven compressors for gas transporation projects.  Gas turbines and auxiliaries for IGCC plants.  Refurbishment of oilrigs and compressors.  From present level of Rs.300 Crs in 2001-02 to Rs.600 Crs in 2006-07  20% annual growth.  Product basket to include steam turbines generators,  Compressors and services.  Refurbishment potential to be exploited especially in gas turbines &steam turbines and generators.  Start service centers in select areas.  Start a new manufacturing plant especially in Dubai/Oman.  Break through in new markets like China, Africa , Iran, and Iraq& South East Asia.  Consolidated the engineering strength.  Revive unit level RPD activities with the help of corp, R&D  Achieve self reliance in select areas namely small STGs heat exchangers etc.  Timely investement for growth areas and modernization. Proposed investment in 10th plan is Rs.200Crs. as compared 9th plan actual of Rs.60 Crs.


MAN POWER

DIVES TMENT

E-INITIATIVE

QUALITY & ENVIRONMENT ORGN.

 Need to induct fresh engineering talent to an extent of around 250 engineers.  Overall man power to be pegged at 6000.  Select recruitment of experienced man power.  Switch gear light machining fabrication bulk of foundry operation, maintenance workshops and service plants.  Privatize township, hospital, canteen.  ERP for all products.  E-commerce for all spares.  Online transfer of technical information and training.  E-procurement including reverse auctioning.  TQM: score of 600 on CII/EFQM scale  4.5 sigma level in select areas.  ISO 9001 (2000) certification and EMS  Comprehensive plant wide HSE implementation.  Focus on customer commitments.  Incentives based on meeting customer commitmentment.

While opportunities do exist, unless organization consolidates and builds engineering strength and gears up to meet the customers expectations in ever shortening cycle lines, it will be an uphill struggle. HYDERABAD PERFORMANCE HIGHLIGHTS (2005-2006) (Rs.Crores) S.NO. 1 2 3 4 5 6

Indicator TURNOVER VALUE ADDED PROFIT BEFORE TAX ORDER BOOK O/S ORDER INFLOW PYSICAL EXPORTS

Flash

Actual

Actual

(2005-06) 1755 712 308 3666 2683 23

(2004-05) 1745 582 158 2518 2216 313

(2003-04) 1378 560 137 1974 1534 132


KEY PARAMETERS OF PERFORMANCE IN 2003-04 •

The highest value added per employee at Rs.9 Lakhs among all B.H.E.L. units.

Despite reduction in maintained the value addition of over Rs.500 Crores.

Profit before tax has increased from Rs.55 Crores in 2001-02 to Rs.124 Crores in 2003 – 04

Maintained a cash m-flow of over Rs.1500 Crores for the second successive year.

Received excellence award in suggestion scheme for the fifth time from INSSAN.

Received best performance award from A.P. Productivity council for organizational excellence in promoting and nurturing Quality circles

BUSINESS SCENARIO During the last couple of years, the country has been witnessing a depressed market situation. The industrial recession which has, in particular affected the industries, have resulted in delay/deferment of orders. Lack of resources with the utilities as well as investment from private sector for setting up power plants, entry of the global players in the Indian market, need for the Government to fulfill its commitment to the World Trade Organization for reducing duly barriers have resulted in the Capital goods manufacturers including B.H.E.L. to stand at the cross road of survival. Post APM (Administered Price Mechanism) the viability of setting up grass root refineries is under question mark and with the trend shifting towards LSTK (lump sum turnkey) for refineries, BHEL Hyderabad had to come up with successful strategies to counter the slow down in its business.

STRATEGIES ADOPTED Small is beautiful One of the first step of Hyderabad unit is to target the cost effective sugar market for Captive Power Plant (CPP). This has resulted in value engineering of our products enabling us to counter the stiff competition. This strategy of cost effective designs has been extended to TG sets up to 25 MW and the unit is now having a major share of medium range, Sugar and CPP market.


Conquer the Alien land Exports have been given a major thrust through a two pronged attack (1) to increase the basket of product being exported and identifying new countries for exports. For the traditional exports of only GTG plants of medium range, Hyderabad unit is now exporting large and advanced class Gas Turbines, Compressors and its drives, STG sets for captive applications, CCPs etc. New countries have been added in our export map like China, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Srilanka. The exports figure which was Rs.8 Crores in 1998-99 has gone up to nearly Rs.300 Crores in 2001-02 and in 2002-03 the unit maintained its export level above Rs.175 Crores mark despite nearly Rs.100 Crores worth of items lying undispatched at various ports due to Iraq war. Focus on service sector In the area of spares and services, B.H.E.L. Hyderabad set a new focus into the lucrative refurbishment business. The company has completed supplies of the refurbishment job for updating of 110 MW Turbo generator sets at APGENCO, Kothagudem, Booked the major order from ONGC for refurbishment of 12 Nos of land rigs (Rs.113 Crs.) Another 30 rings have been identified for refurbishment and will be taken up in the next 3 to 5 years. With this the spares and services business for 2002-03 has crossed Rs.300 Crores

mark which represents nearly; the quarter of the total

Hyderabad unit’s Turnover. In the area of services, we have overhauled 77 Turbines, Generators and conducted life extension study on 3 sets of Turbines and 9 sets of Generators of aging power plant. Planning for Success Another strategy, the company has adopted is implementing the enterprise wide resource planning (ERF). As a first step implemented the pilot project for Gas Turbines and planned to extend to other product more competitive in line with the global market requirements. Slim & Trim In the present competitive world, an organization has to be slim & trim. From a level of more then 9,000 employees three years back, the company has trimmed its flab and is now fighting fit at less than 6,000 Nos manpower, through implementation of the


VRS scheme. Simultaneously the company has implemented a novel incentive scheme linked to productivity, resulting in the highest ever critical facilities utilization of 90% in 2002-03, the company has executed more than 9501/1W of power equipment’s, which is the highest in a year so far. E-enables Operation B.H.E.L. Hyderabad has demonstrated its abilities in encompassing e-enabled services for quicker customer response and greater transparency in purchase order placement, through implementation of e-commerce for ordering of spares by customer and procurement of material through reverse auction. HUMAN FACE OF HYDERABAD UNIT B.H.E.L. was selected as the 7th best employer out of 25 in a survey conducted by He will Associates This survey included Private companies also. The company has a system of workers participation in Management through shop council, Plant council and Joint committees at shop floor level, unit level and company level respectively. Hyderabad unit runs an institute to take care of the mentally challenged Children and make them self-dependent through Vocational Training. Physically Challenged person are provided employment in the company. A 169 bed Hospital with modern facilities in which not only our employees but also Postal and other PSU employees residing in township are allowed to use the facilities. Vocational training for destitute women has been imparted through Ladies Welfare Center. Special Olympics were conducted for the physically & mentally challenged children throughout Indiawide in B.H.E.L. The company is also deeply committed to the up-lifting of its surroundings are; its environment, like for example:

• • •

Adopted five villages and provides base amenities. Afforestation (in 233 Hectares), Rain water harvesting (3,600 cu.m) have been implemented. Dry low Nox combustion system have been successfully implemented and commissioned at two gas based power plants in India, thereby reducing toxic amissions from these plants. This is the frist ever such system in the country.


Latest technology, state of the Art machines, skilled and dedicated manpower are the hallmark of the unit and it has prepared a road map to almst double its turnover by 2006-07. STD. HRS. OVER YEARS (in lakhs) HYDERABAD B.H.E.L. PRODUCT TC&GT ELEC M/C HE & FAB PUMPS RIGS MILLS SP CENT OTHERS TOTAL

2001-02 ACTUAL 8.13 3.14 3.21 0.99 0.09 2.19 0.36 0.08 18.19

2002-03 ACTUAL 9.28 3.65 3.09 1.11 0.28 2.17 0.47 0.07 20.12

2003-04 ACTUAL 9.06 3.7 3.34 1.09 0.25 2.13 0.47 0.03 20.07

2004-05 FLASH 8.86 3.62 3.75 1.06 0.22 2.22 0.43 0.04 20.20

2005-06 B-E 11.16 4.55 4.48 2.97 0.2 5.3 0.4 0.04 29.10

DIVISION – WISE HIGHLIGHTS 2004 – 05 TC & GT 1. First in-house manufactured advanced clss Gas Turbine (Fr-6FA) was successfully tested and dispatched to Dhuvaran. This assembly and testing was earned out without seeking the experts from our collaborator M/s. General Electric. This GT was also fitted with MNQC combustion system which is done for the first time in the world. 2. Shroud segment for stage#2 of Fr-6FA Gas Turbine successfully indigenised and will be used in TNEB Kuttalam project. 3. The shop has delivered Turbine equipment’s totaling to 950 MW, which is the highest so far. EM 1. Highest number of 22 Generators tested in a financial year. The shop also has delivered the highest output at 950 MW. 2. Overhand Exciters were successfully established in-house through reverse engineering and utilized for a number of projects. 3. Modular design for 4-pole cost effective generators in 8 MW to 12.5 MW range developed. The first such order dispatched to 12.5 MW BSES Grasim.


4. Lowest cycle lime of 2 ½ month’s for Fr-9E 120 MW Generator was achieved (from receipt of rotor forging) on single line priority basis as against the normal cycle time of 5 ½ to 6 months. The Generator was dispatched to Iraq-IV. 5. Static Frequency converter to Fr-6FA Dhuvaran was supplied for the first time Tins is used for starting of the Gas Turbine. SWITCHGEAR 1. All time high number of 400 KV SF6 Breakers completed (48 Nos). 2. 74 Nos. of mud agitators manufactured and handed over to OFE division in a record time of 45 days. 3. In-house vacuum brazing of Honeycomb for shroud segment of Fr-9E & Fr-6FA successfully established. 4. Fr-6 combustion liner successfully established in house. HEAT EXCHANGERS 1.

Fr-6FA Gas Turbine Exhaust Frame and diffuser supplied

to 01 shop for the In-house manufactured Gas Turbine, avoiding costly imports. 2.

Fr-9E Cooling Water Module and Air Blast Oil cooler

hitherto imported was Manufactured for the first time in-house and supplied to Iraq. 3.

Improved

condenser

tube

layout

was

developed,

manufactured and supplied for Shakti Sugars with the help of Corporate R&D, resulting in 20% higher heat transfer coefficient. This resulted in 25% reduction in size and weight of the condenser.

PUMPS 1. Sulzer design cartridge for refurbishment of 200 KHI pumps, successfully established at Kothagudem TPS resulting in energy savings of 9168 KWH per day. Based on this performance. APGENCO has ordered 7 more pumps, of which one number was supplied in March 2003. 2. A fixture for fabrication of pipes for kicker stage outlet on the discharge cover of 500 MW BFP is developed to ensure with changeability of cartridges. 3. All pumps repairs were completed within 3 months of receipt from customer.


OSP 1.

Based on an emergency call from OMGC Ankleshwar due to an accident O&P engineers carried out repair of E1400 Rig on war fooling and restored the rig within 4 days.

2.

E140C Rig at OMGC Karaikal was refurbished and restored to the best condition

matching international standards.

3.

Crossed Rs.60 Crores mark in Oil Rig refurbish-ment.

4.

E-Commerce for Pulverize spares goes live-cycle time for spare orders by Customers reduced from 3 months to 30 minutes.

5.

Highest number of XRP 1003 mills manufactured (25 Nos).

PED 1. Fuel conversion of 3 x Fr-5 Gas Turbines at Maruti Udyog was successfully carried out, within a short span of time. F&P 1. The quality of in-house manufactured Ni-haed rolls is improved by controlling the alloying elements resulting in improved wear life.

SPARES MANAGEMENT 1. Crossed Rs.300 Crores mark in spares turnover for the first time. This also represents (313/1042) a level of 30% of the corporation turnover of spares. 2. All spares due up to March 2001 have been liquidated. 3. Crossed Rs.90 Crores in refurbishment business for the first time. EXTERNAL SERVICES 1. Residual life extension studies (RLA) carried for 3 turnover and 9 generators. 2. Helped commissioning of SNPS China Fr-9E GTG set in a record time of 35 days.


3. Successfully commissioned 6 industrial TG sets (Supreme-2 sets. ACC Tikana, ACC Madhukarai Sree Paper. Balarampur Chini Mills). 4. Carried out a number of retrofit jobs. MAS 1. Designed, manufactured and supplied a chasis with Hyderbad Brake System for Tirumala Maha Ratham within a short time of 2 months. After fitting the chassis, the Ratham was used in the Brahmotsvam festival in November,2002. 2. Savings in power consumption to the tune of Rs.30 Lakshs achieved throught reduction in maximum demand. 3. Erected and commissioned (a) CMC Flame cutting machine (b) CNC horizontal machining center (c) CMC HMT center lathe. 4. Two conventional machines in 51 shop retrofitted with CNC. QUALITY 1. Second Fr-9E test bed was commissioned and one Fr-9E GT was tested in this bed and dispatched to Iraq. 2. The earlier Fr-9E test bed was modified for testing of Fr-6FA and successfully carried out the test on the first in-house manufactured Fr-6FA GT for Dhuvaran. 3. DH70 pedestal for vaccum balancing tunnel commissioned to accommodate Steam Turbines Rotors between 20 & 30 MW. 4. The unit was certified for ISO 9000-2000 version in May 2002. 5. TQM assessment done covering all the products. 6. External customer satisfaction survey was conducted covering 17 Head Quarters and 22 Sites. 7. API 8C certification for Oil Rig product obtained. 8. Received for best award from APPC for promoting and maintaing Quality Circles. 9. Received OHSAS 18001 certification. CMM 1. On – line enquiry system for Vendors called PRADAN (Purchase Related Activities Data Access through Network) was launched as e-initiative to increase


transparency the MM function and enabling vendors to access various procurement related information. 2. Reverse Auction for Rate Contract conducted for selected items. 3. MM software developed for on-line conversion of indents to inquire through e-mail reducing the procurement cycle time. 4. Established C-Class common item stores for which automatic procurement actions are taken based on MIN stock level. 5. Rs.125 Crores worth of Site returned items salvaged. QUALITY What is New in the Revised ISO 9001 (2000) Standard The key standards within the ISO 9000 family of standards (ISO 9001 1994, ISO 9002 1994, ISO 9003 1994) have been merged into a single ISO standard. ISO 9001 2000. NEW FORMAT The text has been rewarded for easier adaptation to a wider range of organization some definitions have been changed. •

“Subcontractor” has been changed to “Supplier”

“Customer” remains uncharged.

The standard has a new process oriented structure. It included a process model based on the Plant-Do-Check-Act cycle, which outlines the product and / or services cycle and the management control cycle. The 20-point formal has been replaced. The text of the standard is now organized into four major processes. Section 5

Management Responsibility.

Section 6

Resource Management

Section 7

Product Realisation

Section 8

Measurement analysis, and improvement.

Documentation requirements are less – prescriptive, and allow greater flexibility. NEW REQUIREMENTS •

Higher focus on the Customer.

Measurable objective must be established.


Product Realisation.

Measurement analysis, and improvement.

Resource Management.

Product Realisation.

Measurement, analysis and improvement.

TQM Total Quality Management is a management philosophy & a methodology that work together to produce an organization focused on customer satisfaction, continuous process improvement, employee participation, teamwork, leadership and recognition. TQM aims at “Constancy of Process” through •

Continuously maximizing customer satisfaction.

Continuously identifying and eliminating non-value adding activities.

Continuously harnessing human, material and other resources of an organization in most effective way to achieve company objectives.

Embedding a culture of continuous improvement in all areas of operation with customer focus. In this year internal customer perception study (ICPS) was carried out followed

by internal customer satisfaction. Measurement with the help of M/s GN Consulting 12 critical customer pairs were identified that participated in workshops to identify perception gaps. Thereafter, internal customer satisfaction measurement was also earned out. The scores now showed below. The score reflects the extent of satisfaction of other functions with the function shown in chart below. HSE IMPLEMENTATION IN B.H.E.L – HYDERABAD •

Health, safety and environment (HSE) systems in B.H.E.L Hyderabad are in line with ISO 14001 standard for environmental management and OHSAS 18001 for Occupational Health & Safety Management.

Unit is certified by DNV (Del Norske Veritas) to ISO 14001 in October 2000 and to Occupational Health & Safety Assessment Series (OHSAS) 18001 in October 2002. Both systems are defined in ‘HSE Manual’ for he unit.


B.H.E.L has gained in implementation of HSE both in tangible benefits as well as in improving working conditions. Some of the major event/achievements of 2002 – 2003 include.

a) OHSAS 18001 certification by DVN in October 2002. b) Work environmental Study of all critical areas in earned out and areas / activities exceeding permissible work environment limits are identified. c) Medical check up of identified people is cabled out (400 are covered out of 600 identified people) 2. Overview of the EPQM Excellence Model The EPQM Excellence Model is a non-prescriptive framework based on criterion. Five of these are ‘Enablers’ and four are ‘Results’. The Enabler criteria cover what an organization does. The results criteria cover what an organization achieves. ‘Results’ by ‘Enablers’ and feedback from. Results help to improve ‘Enablers’ The model which recognizes there are many approaches to achieving sustainable excellence in all aspects of performance, is based on the premise that excellent results with respect to performance, customers, people and achieved through leadership driving policy and strategy, that is delivered through people partnership and resources, and processes. The EFQM model is presented in diagrammatic from below (PRIVATE). The arrows emphasize the learning helping to improve enablers that in turn lead to improved results. Highlights of TQM: 2001 – 02 for the first time all the products areas were covered in the assessment. Till 2000 – 01 only 3 product areas were covered additionally O & P pumps and SG also. TAM was renamed as Business excellence Management at Hyderabad unit to reflect the focus of TQM in the name itself. 2002 – 03 for the first time General Hospital has also been included in the scope of TQM besides the 6 product areas. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (EMS)


1. EMS is a system through which an organization sets and achieves environmental performance levels like conservation of natural resources control of pollution, reduction of waste, etc. 2. ISO 14001 is an international standard on Environmental Management System Organisations following 150:14001 define their environmental policy, objectives and set targets for achievement. 3. B.H.E.L is certified to ISO 14001 since October 2000. After initial environmental review of activities various departments in B.H.E.L identified significant aspects in their activities, which have impact on environment.

Based on these

environmental management programs (EMPS) are identified in each area to mitigate or eliminate the impact of significant aspect. Operation of a steam jet air elector is a significant environment aspect, which has environmental impact (nose pollution). An EMP is undertaken to install a silence: to reduce the impact (noise level) 4. B.H.E.L’s environmental policy stipulates. •

Compliance to environment regulation / legislation’s (Air Act, Water Act, Hazardous Waste Rules). Environment Protection Act and Manufacturing, Storage and Handling of Hazardous chemical rules;

Control of pollution and reduction of waste.

Conservation of natural resources with focus on water, oil, energy, chemicals and paints.

Creating environmental awareness.

Increasing green cover.

5. With the implementation of EMS BHEL has gained significantly in areas like •

Compliance to legislation / regulations.

Reduction in power, water and oil consumption.

Reducing pollution (leakage of oil, coolant in storm water drain is avoided).

Awareness on environmental protection is given to all employees.


6. The achievements for 2001 – 02 are encouraging and recorded a saving of 9% in energy consumption, 31% saving in water consumption 31% saving in oil consumption. 7. To improve our environmental performance, we have taken up several measures like Mechanized Disposal of solid waste in canteen, established fume extraction system in welding areas, installed of moisture eliminator for improving the performance of service compressors, revamped of shaker to reduce noise in foundry areas, landscaping done to reduce dust, introduced HT-capacitors to improve efficiency of power transmission and construction of raised platforms to store segregated waste. 8. Achievements in engineering field include introduction environmental friendly filters, on line water wash and dry low nox combustion systems ( DLN ) to control pollution in gas turbine, development of steam turbines for biomass based power plants, introduction of high efficiency pumps and reduction of material content in generators and steam turbines. STATUS OF ERP IMPLEMENTATION PROJECT “PROGRESS” 1. The GT pilot project ERP implementation was released for use from 31 st Dec. 2002. The implementation covered the areas of Materials Management, Engineering Quality Control, Manufacturing, Production Planning, Project Management, Costing and Finance functions of gas turbines. All the systems have been in live use from 1st January 2003 encompassing above functional groups. There has been heavy use of many of these systems during the last three months because of relatively higher magnitude of operations in the last quarter of the just concluded fiscal year. 2. The general feedback with respect to last three months usage is as given below. 3. Sub-contract activities which were earlier partially computerized have been fully computerized now and integrated with overall material management system. The material issued to vendors and material lying with vendors related data are available on-line. The processing time for material movement to vendors has been reduced by about one month. 4. Purchase order release and identification of supply sources have been integrated. Better PO authorization and control has been realized.


5. Valuation of material release has been made on-line and current thus avoiding Manual processing of the same. 6. Quality inspection clearance of incoming materials has been made on-line. This has reduced the delays in QC clearance because of lack of documentation from vendors etc. The material accountable status and its movements are available online for monitoring. 7. Engineering project templates have been used for monitoring of project status at PGMA level.


CHAPTER-3 HRM Practices In B.H.E.L


HRM Practices In B.H.E.L In Introduction HUMAN RESOURCE With the changing business scenario, B.H.E.L. is alive to the challenge before it in terms of new approaches to Human Resources Management Developing and sustaining a dynamic work culture which enables joint optimization of organizational goals and individual potential, taking care if the changing aspirations of the people are the key focus areas for the organization at this juncture. HUMAN RESOURCE PROFILE B.H.E.L. derives its strength from its strong and dedicated workforce of 62500 employee (as on March 1998 ) of which over 11,000 are highly qualified professionals. The manpower strength of the organization is distributed across major employee categories and units. Promotion Policy and Rules Objectives:  To provide all employees with board equality of opportunity in growth and career prospects.  To ensure fairness, equitability, consistency and uniformity in the matter of promotion of employees in all the units/divisions of the company.  To recognize and reward employee for their contribution to the growth of the organization. Guidelines and principles  Promotion from one group to another group:


It is done on the basis of merit as assessed through a selection process which through a selection process which may include an eligible for consideration for promotion to the promotion to the higher group.  Promotion with in a group: Employees are eligible for consideration for promotion from a lower grade to the next higher grade with in the same group on completion of the number of years of service prescribed in the lower grade. The “qualifying period” for promotion with in a group will be noticed by management by time to time. 

Fast track promotion: In order to motivate to them for further improvement, the number of employees

promoted is generally limited to 10% of the total number of employees. 

Preference for SC/ST: The government of India orders issued from time to time relating to reservations

for SC/ST candidates.  Seniority: Seniority as between personnel selected in the same selection shall determined in accordance with the order of merit drawn up by the selection promotion by the competent authority. TRANSFER POLICY AND BENEFITS Every employee of the company is liable to transfer from one unit or company to other unit or company. 

It may be horizontal transfer: Unless selected for a higher position the transfer of an employee is made in the

same grade and pay as held at the time of transfer ( here in after reffered to as horizaontal transfer.) Such employees who are horizontally. 

Transfer on selection to higher post against open advertisement: The employee is selected from one unit/ division for appointment to higher posts

in another unit/division against open advertisement are entitled to all the benefits as on horizontal transfer except the grant of distriburbance allowance and payment of bonus. Their pay in the higher post is fixed as on promotion. STUDY LEAVE Study leave is admissible to regular employee of the company who has rendered a minimum of 3 years services inclusive of training/apprenticeship period in the company.


In the case of deputation’s who are subsequently absorbed in the company the period of deputation will count for this purpose. The chairman, may, in exceptional cases, approve reduction of the eligibility period of 3 years service 2 years for grant of study leave under the rules.

Period of study leave: Study leave is normally admissible for a maximum period of 2 years for masters program and 3 years in the case of doctoral program once during the entire service of the employee subject to exigencies of work. The period of study leave may be extended by maximum of one year in case of P.G. programmers and 2 years in case of doctoral program on merits of each case. Each case of study leave abroad will require specific approval of the corporate office. Study leave will not be debited to the regular leave account of the employee. The employee choose to contribute to his provident fund account during the period of study leave, the company will make a matching contribution as per rules in force from time to time. The contribution will however, be based on the qualifying emoluments drawn by the employee before proceeding on study leave. Successful completion of the higher studies and acquisition of the related qualification is a pre-requisite for extending these benefits. The employees will be considered for promoting only after they have joined duty in B.H.E.L. on the expiry of study leave and in the event of selection they will be given notional seniority in the promoted grade. Financial benefits on account for promotion will accrue earliest from the date the employee has joined his duty on the study leave. The study leave will not be considered for the purpose of earning any kind of leave.

FAMILY PLANING INCENTIVE 

Female Employees – Tubectomy: Employees with two children or less, amount of incentives is rest. 400 applies to

puerperal and non-puerperal cases.


For other cases

All other cases of female employees/male employees or their wives under going Tubectomy / vasectomy irrespective of the number of children, amount of incentives they get 200 Rs.

Growth of special increment The employees who themselves or whose spouses undergo sterilization may be granted.  “One special increment” subject to the following conditions. The employees must be with in the reproductive age group. In case of male employee must be with in the reproductive age group. In case of male employee, this would mean that he should not over 50 years of age and his wife should be between 20 to 45 years of age, in the case of a female employee, she must not be above 45 years of age an her husband must not be over 50 years of age.  The employee should have 2 or 3 living children only. LEAVE AND HOLIDAYS Casual leave Employees with service up to 10 years 10 days in a calendar year. Employees with service above 10 years  12 days in a calendar year. Sunday and holidays falling with in the spell of casual leave will not be debited to the casual leave account. Extra Ordinary Leave Extra ordinary leave without any pay and allowance may be granted.  Up to 3 months and any occasion other than on grounds of illness.  Up to 6 months on any occasion on medical certificate for disease other than TB and leprosy.  Up to 8 months in case of treatment for TB and leprosy.


 The period spent on extraordinary leave will not count for purpose of earning earned leave HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT The most prized assets of B.H.E.L. are their employees. The HRD center of the company help in up gradation of skills, continuous training and retraining, a positive work culture and participate style of management have led to the development of a committed and motivated workforce, enhanced productivity and quality levels. OBJECTIVES OF HRD CENTER B.H.E.L. HRD help employees to enhance his skills and capabilities so that it leads to “job satisfaction” 

Managerial Effectiveness: To help corporate cadre executives to improve their effectiveness in the current

jobs and also preparing and taking up new responsibilities and challenges in future through development programs. 

Developing managerial skills in trust area: To identify constraints in achieving objectives of the organization and identify

trust areas for action. To develop relevant managerial skills amongst executives in the thrusts areas.  Nourishing a value system for B.H.E.L.: To identify ingredients of the requisite value system for the organization and to strive through various strategies for strengthening and nourishing it. Periodically to access the prevalent value system and to bridge gaps. 

Research and Publication: To take up research projects within the organization and also in collaboration with

other organization. To understand managerial process and dynamics and contribute to knowledge and Indian management practices research which help in shaping future organization. 

Consultancy services: To provide management consultant services to the units division B.H.E.L. on

specific problem areas, which are also extended to other organization.


TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR EMPLOYEES General management program •

GMP-XIII

GMP-XIV

GMP-XV

GMP-XVI

MAP based programs for executives •

Cost consciousness.

The strategist.

Working together.

The winner.

Synergy.

The first step.

Customer focus.

Problem solving.

Decision-making.

Art of negotiation.

Communication skills.

Analytical ability.

Commitment to quality.

Creativity and innovation.

Organization planning & system.

BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE •

Building managers programme.

Executive development programme (promoters).

SDP module-0.

SDP module-1.

SDP module-11.

SDO module-111.


Technician development programme.

Artisan development.

Managing emotion.

Employee productivity through NLP.

7 habits for highly effective people.

Counseling.

Advance counseling.

Managing stress & tension.

Interpersonal skills.

Supporting staff development programme (SSDP)

HEALTH SAFETY, ENVIRONMENT & QUALITY •

Safety programmes.

Department based HSE programmes.

Health care.

Workshop on OHSAS 18001.

HSE refresher course.

TQM for top management.

Quality circle program for executive guides and area coordinators.

COMPUTERS. •

Compressors.

Steam turbine generators & pumps.

Gas turbin & generators.

Circuit breaker.

OTHER PROGRAMMERS •

Engineer trainees.

Graduate apprentices.

ICWAI finance trainees.

Post diploma trainees.

Sandwich apprentices.

Technician apprentices.


Trade apprentices.

Vocational apprentices.

Crane operators.

Trade conversion.

MATERNITY LEAVE All female employees are entitled to the grant of maternity leave as under. On full pay for period of 90 days from the date of its commencement subject to production of medical certificate from the “authorized medical attendant”. 90 days of maternity leave is also permissible in the event of delivery of a still born child on full term by a female employee. Maternity leave may be combined leave of any other kind, but only if a medical certificate from the authorized medical attendant supports the request for such leave.

SPECIAL CASUAL LEAVE 30 days leave is granted to the employee is selected to represent the company in tournaments recognized by the state association. Retired employees contribution health scheme: This scheme will apply to the following categories of retired B.H.E.L. employees. In case the B.H.E.L. retired employees who is availing the benefits under this scheme dies, his spouse with continues to avail the benefits under this scheme subject to his continuing to meet the criteria of eligibility mentioned in the scheme. The spouse of an employee who dies while in service after putting in minimum of 10 years in the company may be allowed medical facilities (both OPD and indoor treatment) to the extent allowed to the retired employees under the B.H.E.L retired employees contribution health scheme on payment of contribution and subject to the terms and conditions prescribed under the said scheme. The medical card will be issued to the retired employees. This card is valued for prescribed period. The retired employee and spouse will be entitled to medical attendance and treatment as indoor patients in the company’s hospitals, the expenditure incurred on


availed of in any of the company’s hospitals, the expenditure incurred on hospitalization is reimbursable in full on submission of bills, except as otherwise provided, only if the treatment is taken in AIMS/GOVERNMENT/PSU RAILWAY/DEFENCE HOSPITALS.

REIMBURSEMENT Expenses incurred by the beneficiary on medical attendance and treatment in government/company approved hospitals, on purchase of materials from open market or payment for diagnostic tests etc., will be reimbursed to him by the division where he is registered. For this purpose, the beneficiary should submit his claim for reimbursement in the prescribed form. LTC (LEAVE TRAVEL CONCESSION) LTC once in a calendar year (split facility): Admissible to employee and family in lieu of LTC on a in a block of tow years as per entitlements and condition specified under the rules. The LTC block year will be the same as under the facility of availing once in two years. If split facility is availed once, the same facility will be available for the second time for that block of two years. If an employee/ member of family a\- ails split block facility for a two years, the employee/ member of the family will be entitled to the same facility only for block of two years. When an employee hires a company car on payment, it should be ensured that he is not allowed LTC claim for the same journey at a rate higher than the rate charged by the company. In such cases a certificate should be obtained from the employee that the amount claimed is not more than the actual expenditure incurred by him. An employee may avail LTC during leave of any duration and of any kind including casual leave, this will include special leave granted for sports meets as also leave without pay but not unauthorized absence. The employee can be permitted to avail LTC during holidays and weekly off days also with prior permission of the competent authority to leave head quarters.


An employee and member of family who are unable to avail LTC in a block of two years may carry forward the entitlement to the end of next block of two years where the journey falls in the succeeding calendar year of the next block; the concession will be counted against the year in which the outward journey is commenced. REIMBURSEMENT OF LTC EXPENSES OF CERTIFICATION The employee may claim reimbursement of LTC expenses under the certification scheme for traveling to any place in India. The employees retiring between January and March of a new LTC block may be allowed reimbursement of LTC expenses on certification basis for journey performed. TRAVEL CONCESSION FOR EMPLOYEES CHILDRENS Travel concession for employee’s children studying away from the place of posting of the employee who are studying in recognized educational institution. This concession can be availed of only once in a calendar year during approved vacation from the educational/professional institutions to the place of posting of the employees to join their parents and back. The reimbursement of the fare will be limited to actual expense incurred on travel in each directional rates from the railway station. Nearest to the place where the children are studying to the railway station nearest to the place of posting of the employee/ place where the employee has been permitted to retain the family by the shortest route. LOANS AND ADVANCES Festival advance Interest free advance for listed festivals is admissible an employees once in a calendar year. The amount of such advance admissible will be as laid down in the rules depending on the employee category. Cycle advance Admissible once in five years up to Rs.800/- or the anticipated cost of the cycle which ever is less. Interest charged will be at rates notified by the company from time to time to the advance is payable in twenty monthly installments. Vehicle advance Admissible only to employees who are members of B.H.E.L.’s provident fund for at least one year for purchase of motorcar, motorcycle / scooter as per eligibility criteria laid down. The advance for purchase of motorcar is admissible only to executives in E3 level and above.


Vehicle 1.Motorcar 2.Motor cycle 3.Moped

Maximum no of installment for recovery 35 months basic pay or Rs.120000 or 200 anticipated cost of car, whichever is less. Rs.15000/- or anticipated cost of vehicle 90 Whichever is less. Rs.9000/- or anticipated cost of vehicle 80 Whichever is less. Amount of advance

INTEREST SUBSIDY ON HOUSING LOAN Employees with continuous regular service of 5 years in the company are eligible qualifying amount for subsidy is limited to a maximum of Rs.3.5 lakhs loans should be from housing agencies approved by B.H.E.L. interest difference to the extent of rate of interest charged by the government and HFA rate of interest whichever is less is subsidized. SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS Insurance schemes a)

GLSI Offers life coverage in the event of death while in service and also promotes savings by employee to provide for retirement. Caegory of employee AI/BI to AVI/BVI & equivalent grades. AVII/BVII to AXI/BXI/BXI/SI to SIII, J.E. E1 to E4 and equivalent grades. E5 and above

Sum assured (Rs.)

Risk portion (Rs. P.m.*)

Savings portion (Rs. P.m.*)

10,000

5.00

8.50

20,000

10.00

17.00

40,000

20.00

34.00

80,000

40.00

68.00

* Paid by the company. * * Paid by the employee. Note: The sum assured in the event of death while in service is payable to the nominee. b) Group insurance


Offers only life coverage and the premium is entirely born by the company. The sum assured is as below to the nominee: CATEGORY OF EMPLOYEE AI/BI to AVI/BVI and equivalent grades. AVII/BVII to AXI/BXI SI to SIII & JE E1 to E4 & equivalent grades E5 and above

SUM ASSURED (Rs.) 10,000 20,000 35,000 50,000

c) EDLI Policy taken with LIC with no premium liability on employee in lieu of the statutory employee’s deposit linked insurance scheme under the PF act uniform life coverage of Rs. 37,000/- payable to the nominee. d) Housing loan group insurance Offers life coverage only to an employee who has availed house Building advance/interest subsidy from the company risk coverage is the housing loan and interest outstanding as on the date of death subject to a maximum of Rs.3.5 lakhs payable by LIC to B.H.E.L. to be adjusted against the outstanding principle and interest amounts the premium will be born by the employee @ Rs.51/-per thousand p.a. of the outstanding loan amount plus interest subject to a maximum of Rs.3.5 lakhs. e) Other insurance schemes (i) Group personal accident insurance Applicable only to executives in grades E4 and above providing maximum coverage of Rs.1 lakh for injury/diablement/death arising out of accident while traveling by air/rail in India or abroad entire premium is borne by the company. (ii) Overseas medical insurance scheme Operational on individual basis to officers visiting foreign countries on Official duty for the duration of visit policy is purchased by the company from Indian insurance companies Indian currency. (iii) Individual personal accident insurance policy Operative for all the categories of employees posted/visiting / passing through areas affected by terrorism covering states of Punjab, Assam and Jammu And Kashmir.


COMPENSATION

TO

EMPLOYEE’S

COVERED

UNDER

WORKERS-

COMPENSATION ACT. For personal injury caused by an accident arising out of in the course of employment resulting in death or permanent to total/ partial disablement, subject of other conditions, compensation will be admissible as given under the act. In addition, leave salary will be paid during the period of disability leave after deducting the compensation amount payable under the act. EX-GRATIA PAYMENT TO THOSE KILLED IN TERRORIST ATTACKS. Will be made equivalent to 50 months pay + DA last drawn by the employee in lieu of employment provided to spouse / dependent. GRATUITY Payable to an employee as per the payment as per the payment of gratuity act on termination of employment due to superannuation / resignation / death or diablement due to accident or disease after rendering continuous service of not less than five years except in case of death or disablement. The ceiling of gratuity to an employee is Rs.3.5 lakshs. DEATH RELIEF FUND Gives monetary assistance to family of member employee who dies while is service the schemes voluntary Rs.1.00 per member collected as contribution on death of con. 1. The following areas / actions require proof information and sanction of the competent authority:a)

Employment of the near relation of the employee in any establishment enjoying patronage of the company.

b)

Recording of the relationship/interest in any matter concerning any establishing whose dealing come before an employee.

c)

Participation in any radio broadcast, contribution of an article to a newspaper of periodical.

d)

Giving evidence in connection with any enquiry conducted by any person committee or authority.


CHAPTER - 4 DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION


4.1.1. Opinion regarding the salary and perks receive. EXECUTIVES: 1 Highly Satisfied

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total

1 4 3 8 (19%)

Diagram:

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

3 8 16 7 34 (77%)

1 1 (2%)

1 1 (2%)

Total 5 (12%) 9 (20%) 20 (45%) 10 (23%) 44 (100%)


2% 2% 18%

78% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

18% of them are highly satisfied, 78% of them are satisfied, 2% of them are undecided, 2% of them are dissatisfied about the salaries and perks they receive.

NON-EXECUTIVES: 4.1.2 AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 10 4 17 (26%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

3 29 12 44 (67%)

-

1 3 1 5 (7%)

Total 7 (11%) 42 (63%) 17 (26%) 66 (100%)


8% 26%

66%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatified

26% of them are highly satisfied, 66% of them are satisfied, 8% of them are dissatisfied about the salaries and perks they receive.

2. Feel the safety and welfare measures are satisfactory? EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total

1 Highly Satisfied 3 3 6 12 (15%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

9 16 7 36 68 (79%)

1 2 3 (3%)

3 3 (3%)

Total 9 (10%) 20 (23%) 13 (15%) 44 (52%) 86 (100%)


DIAGRAM 5%

14%

14% of them are

highly

satisfied, 81% of them are satisfied, 5% of them are undecided the

safety

welfare 81%

about and

measures

they follow.

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total DIAGRAM

1 Highly Satisfied 3 4 7 (12%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 31 12 47 (82%)

1 1 (2%)

1 1 2 (4%)

Total 7 (12%) 33 (58%) 17 (30%) 57 (100%)


2% 3% 24%

71%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

24% of them are highly satisfied, 71% of them are satisfied, 2% of them are undecided, 3% of them are dissatisfied about the safety and welfare measures they allow.

3. The work environment? EXECUTIVES: 1 Highly Satisfied 25-34 35-44 1 45-54 1 Above 54 1 Total 3 (7%) AGE GROUP

Diagram:

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

1 6 13 7 27 (61%)

2 3 2 7 (16%)

2 1 3 6 (14%)

5 Total Highly Dissatisfied 5 (12%) 1 9 (20%) 20(45%) 10(23%) 1 (2%) 44(100%)


2%

7%

14%

16%

61%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

7% of them are highly satisfied, 61% of them are satisfied, 16% of them are undecided, 14% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the environment of their surroundings.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 6 3 10 (15%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 30 13 47 (71)

1 2 3 (5%)

1 4 1 6 (9%)

Total 7 (11%) 42 (64%) 17 (25%) 66 (100%)


9%

15%

5%

71% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

15% of them are highly satisfied, 71% of them are satisfied, 5% of them are undecided, 9% of them are dissatisfied about the environment of their surroundings.

4. Regarding the nature of the work ? EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total

1 Highly Satisfied 1 2 3 6 (14%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 6 15 5 28 (64%)

1 2 3 (7%)

1 1 3 5 (11%)

5 Highly Dissatisfied 2 2 (4%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (21%) 20(45%) 10(23%) 44(100%)


Diagram:

5%

14%

11%

7%

63% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

14% of them are highly satisfied, 63% of them are satisfied, 7% of them are undecided, 11% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the nature of work they are presently working.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 8 3 14 (22%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 29 12 45 (70%)

1 1 (1%)

4 4 (7%)

Total 7 (11%) 42 (66%) 15 (23%) 64 (100%)


2%

6% 24%

68%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

24% of them are highly satisfied, 68% of them are satisfied, 2% of them are undecided, 6% of them are dissatisfied about the nature of work they are presently working.

5. Psychological feeling regarding interest in the work? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP

1

2

3

4

5

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

3 7 12

1

1 2

Highly Dissatisfied 2 -

25-34 35-44 45-54

Highly Satisfied 1 5

Above 54

3

6

1

-

-

Total

9 (20%)

28 (64%)

2 (5%)

3 (7%)

2 (4%)

Total 5(11%) 9(21%) 20(45%) 10(23%) 44(100%)


Diagram: 5% 7%

20%

5%

63% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

20% of them are highly satisfied, 63% of them are satisfied, 5% of them are undecided, 7% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the psychological feelings and interest in their work. NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 12 5 18 (27%)

2

3

Satisfied Undecided 5 27 11 43(65%)

1 1 1 3 (4%)

4 Dissatisfied 1 1 (2%)

5 Highly Dissatisfied 1 1 (2%)

Total 7 (11%) 42 (64%) 17 (25%) 66 (100%)


5%

1%2% 27%

65% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

27% of them are highly satisfied, 65% of them are satisfied, 5% of them are undecided, 1% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the psychological feelings and interest in their work.

6. Acquiring new skills and knowledge to enhance performance? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 3 1 6 (13%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

3 5 14 7 29 (64%)

1 1 2 2 6 (13%)

1 1 2 (5%)

5 Highly Dissatisfied 2 2 (5%)

Total 6 (13%) 9 (21%) 20 (44%) 10 (22%) 45(100%)


5%

5%

13%

14%

63% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

14% of them are highly satisfied, 63% of them are satisfied, 13% of them are undecided, 5% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the acquiring new skills and knowledge to enhance their performance.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 9 3 13 (20%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 28 14 46 (70%)

2 2 (3%)

2 3 5 (7%)

Total 7 (11%) 42 (64%) 17 (25) 66 (100%)


8%

0%

3%

20%

69% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

20% of them are highly satisfied, 69% of them are satisfied, 3% of them are undecided, 8% of them are dissatisfied about the acquiring new skills and knowledge to enhance their performance.

7. Contribution of work assignments to maintain and expand capabilities? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 5 1 9(20%)

2

3

Satisfied

Undecided

1 4 12 9 26(59%)

1 1 2 4(9%)

4

5 Highly Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 2 1 1 3(7%) 2(5%)

Total 5(11%) 9(21%) 20(45%) 10(23%) 44(100%)


5% 7%

20%

9%

59% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

20% of them are highly satisfied, 59% of them are satisfied, 9% of them are undecided, 7% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the Contribution of work assignments to maintain and expand their capabilities.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1

2

3

4

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecide d

Dissatisfie d

2 7 2 11 (17%)

3 28 13 44 (66%)

1 4 2 7 (10%)

1 2 3 (5%)

5 Highly Dissatisfie d 1 1 (2%)

Total 7(11%) 42(64%) 17(25%) 66(100%)


5%

2% 16%

11%

66% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

16% of them are highly satisfied, 66% of them are satisfied, 11% of them are undecided, 5% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the Contribution of work assignments to maintain and expand their capabilities.

8. Opportunities to increase marketability? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 4 2 7 (16%)

2 Satisfied 3 4 11 2 20 (45%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2 5 (11%) 3 1 9 (20%) 3 2 20 (45%) 5 1 10 (24%) 11 (25%) 3 (7%) 3(7%) 44(100%)


7%

16%

7%

25%

45% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

16% of them are highly satisfied, 45% of them are satisfied, 25% of them are undecided, 7% of them are dissatisfied, 7% of them are highly dissatisfied about the opportunities to increase their marketability.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 4 3 7 (11%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

5 26 13 44 (68%)

2 10 12(18%)

2 2 (3%)

Total 7 (10%) 42 (65%) 16 (25%) 65 (100%)


5%

0%

11%

18%

66% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

11% of them are highly satisfied, 66% of them are satisfied, 18% of them are undecided, 5% of them are dissatisfied, about the opportunities to increase their marketability.

9. Organizing employee seminars on new developments? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 1 (2%)

2 Satisfied 1 3 10 3 17 (39%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2 2 5 (12%) 2 4 9 (20%) 3 6 20 (45%) 3 4 10 (23%) 8 (19%) 16 (36%) 2 (4%) 44(100%)


2%

5%

39%

36%

18% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

2% of them are highly satisfied, 39% of them are satisfied, 18% of them are undecided, 36% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the organizing employee seminars on new developments.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 8 3 13 (19%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 22 10 34 (51%)

1 3 1 5 (9%)

2 7 3 12 (18%)

5 Highly Dissatisfied 2 2 (3%)

Total 7(12%) 42(63%) 17(25%) 66(100%)


3% 20%

18%

8%

51% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

20% of them are highly satisfied, 51% of them are satisfied, 8% of them are undecided, 18% of them are dissatisfied, 3% of them are highly dissatisfied about the organizing employee seminars on new developments.

10. Clear and well-defined tasks? EXECUTIVES:

25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54

1 Highly Satisfied 1 1 8

Total

10 (23%)

AGE GROUP

Diagram:

2

3 1 1 3 -

1 1 1 1

5 Highly Dissatisfied 1

5 (11%)

4 (9%)

1 (2%)

Satisfied Undecided 3 6 15 24(55% )

4 Dissatisfied

Total 5 (11%) 9 (21%) 20 (45%) 10(23%) 44(100%)


2%

9%

23% 11%

55% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly dissatisfied

23% of them are highly satisfied, 55% of them are satisfied, 11% of them are undecided, 9% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the clear and well-defined tasks.

NON-EXECUTIVES: 1 Highly Satisfied 25-34 35-44 2 45-54 10 Above 54 5 17(26% Total ) AGE GROUP

Diagram:

2 Satisfied 5 24 11 40(61%)

3

5 Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 4 3 1 1 5(7%)

4

3(4%)

1(2%)

Total 7 (11%) 42(64%) 17(25%) 66(100%)


2%

5% 8%

25%

60% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

25% of them are highly satisfied, 60% of them are satisfied, 8% of them are undecided, 5% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the clear and well-defined tasks.

11. The resources to perform delegated task ? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 4 5 (11%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 5 11 6 24 (54%)

1 1 3 5 (11%)

3 2 4 1 10 (24%)

Total 5(11%) 9(20%) 20(45%) 10(24%) 44(100%)


0%

11%

23%

11%

55%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

11% them are highly satisfied, 55% of them are satisfied, 11% of them are undecided, 23% of them are dissatisfied about the provision of the resources to perform delegated task.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 3 3 8 (12%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 12 31 47 (71%)

1 3 4 (6%)

1 1 5 7(11%)

Total 7(20%) 17 (45%) 42 (24%) 66(100%)


0%

11%

12%

6%

71% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

12% of them are highly satisfied, 71% of them are satisfied, 6% of them are undecided, 11% of them are dissatisfied about the provision of the resources to perform delegated task.

12. Opportunities for independent thoughts and action in job ? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 3 4 10 (23%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 4 13 3 22(50%)

1 2 1 4 (9%)

3 1 2 2 8(18%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (20%) 20(45%) 10(24%) 44(100%)


0% 18%

23%

9%

50% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

23% them are highly satisfied, 50% of them are satisfied, 9% of them are undecided, 18% of them are dissatisfied about the opportunities for independent thoughts and action in their job.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 5 7 13 (20%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

5 11 29 45 (68%)

1 1 2 (3%)

1 5 6 (9%)

Total 7 (11%) 17 (26%) 42 (63%) 66 (100%)


0%

9%

20%

3%

68% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

20% of them are highly satisfied, 68% of them are satisfied, 3% of them are undecided, 9% of them are dissatisfied about the opportunities for independent thoughts and action in their job.

13. Encouragement to try out new ways of dealing with problems, even if they may not always succeed? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 2 2 5 (11%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 7 12 3 24 (55%)

1 4 3 8 (18%)

2 1 2 2 7 (16%)

Total 5(11%) 9(20%) 20(45%) 10(24%) 44(100%)


0% 16%

11%

18%

55%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

11% them are highly satisfied, 55% of them are satisfied, 18% of them are undecided, 16% of them are dissatisfied about the encouragement to try out new ways of dealing with problems, even if they may not always succeed.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 5 3 9 (14%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 11 31 46 (70%)

1 1 (1%)

1 1 8 10 (15%)

Total 7 (11%) 17 (26%) 42 (64%) 66(100%)


0% 15%

14%

2%

69% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

14% of them are highly satisfied, 69% of them are satisfied, 2% of them are undecided, 15% of them are dissatisfied about the encouragement to try out new ways of dealing with problems, even if they may not always succeed.

14. Rewards to the successful new approaches in problem solving? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 4 2 7 (16%)

2

3

Satisfied Undecided 2 3 6 3 14(32%)

1 2 5 2 10 (23%)

4 Dissatisfied 2 3 5 2 12 (27%)

5 Highly Dissatisfied 1 1 (2%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (21%) 20 (45%) 10 (23%) 44(100%)


3% 20%

34%

3%

40%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

20% them are highly satisfied, 40% of them are satisfied, 3% of them are undecided, 34% of them are dissatisfied, 3% of them are highly dissatisfied about the rewards to the successful new approaches in problem solving.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 4 3 10 (15%)

2 Satisfied 2 12 28 42 (64%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2 7 (11%) 1 17(26%) 5 5 1 42(63%) 5 (8%) 7 (10%) 2 (3%) 66(100%)


3%

15%

11%

8%

63% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

15% of them are highly satisfied, 63% of them are satisfied, 8% of them are undecided, 11% of them are dissatisfied, 3% of them are highly dissatisfied about the rewards to the successful new approaches in problem solving. . 15. Communication with the group members to solve the problem? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 3 6 (15%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 7 16 4 29 (66%)

3 1 1 5 (12%)

2 2 4 (7%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (20%) 20 (45%) 10 (23%) 44 (100%)


0%

9%

14%

11%

66% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

14% them are highly satisfied, 66% of them are satisfied, 11% of them are undecided, 9% of them are dissatisfied about the communication with the group members to solve the problem.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 2 5 8 (12%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 14 29 47 (71%)

2 1 1 4 (6%)

7 7 (11%)

Total 7 (11%) 17 (26%) 42 (63%) 66(100%)


11%

0%

12%

6%

71% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

12% of them are highly satisfied, 71% of them are satisfied, 6% of them are undecided, 11% of them are dissatisfied about the communication with the group members to solve the problem.

16. Achieving the personal identity and self-esteem at your work place. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 1 2 5 (11%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

3 4 16 3 26 (59%)

1 1 3 5 (11%)

1 2 2 1 6 (14%)

5 Highly Dissatisfied 1 1 2 (5%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (20%) 20(45%) 10 (24%) 44(100%)


5%

11%

14%

11%

59% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

11% them are highly satisfied, 59% of them are satisfied, 11% of them are undecided, 14% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about achieving personal identity and self-esteem at work place.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 7 9 (14%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

6 13 30 49 (74%)

1 1 2 4 (6%)

1 3 4 (6%)

Total 7 (11%) 17 (26%) 42 (63%) 66 (100%)


6%

0%

14%

6%

74% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

14% of them are highly satisfied, 74% of them are satisfied, 6% of them are undecided, 6% of them are dissatisfied about achieving personal identity and self-esteem at work place.

17. Relations with superiors and subordinates. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 3 4 9 (21%)

2 Satisfied 4 6 16 3 29 (66%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 5 (12%) 1 9 (20%) 1 20(45%) 2 1 10(23%) 4 (9%) 1 (2%) 1 (2%) 44(100%)


2% 2% 9%

20%

67% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

20% them are highly satisfied, 67% of them are satisfied, 9% of them are undecided, 2% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the relation between superiors and subordinates.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 4 4 10 18 (27%)

2 Satisfied 3 13 25 41 (62%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 7 (11%) 17(26%) 4 2 1 42(63%) 4 (6%) 2 (3%) 1 (2%) 66(100%)


3%

6%

0% 28%

63% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

28% of them are highly satisfied, 63% of them are satisfied, 6% of them are undecided, 3% of them are dissatisfied, about the relation between superiors and subordinates.

18. Measures undertaken to increase motivation. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 2 3 (7%)

2 Satisfied 1 4 10 6 21 (48%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 3 1 5(11%) 1 2 1 9(20%) 7 1 20(45%) 2 2 10(24%) 13 (29%) 5 (12%) 2 (4%) 44(100%)


5%

7%

11%

47%

30%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

7% them are highly satisfied, 47% of them are satisfied, 30% of them are undecided, 11% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the measures undertaken to increase motivation.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 1 1 4 (6%)

2 Satisfied 3 15 28 46 (70%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2 7 (11%) 1 17(26%) 3 8 2 42(63%) 6 (9%) 8 (12%) 2 (3%) 66(100%)


3%

6%

12%

9%

70% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

6% of them are highly satisfied, 70% of them are satisfied, 9% of them are undecided, 12% of them are dissatisfied, 3% of them are highly dissatisfied about the relation between superiors and subordinates.

19. Leadership style follows. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 2 2 5 (11%)

2 Satisfied 3 4 15 5 27 (60%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 1 5 (11%) 2 1 1 9 (20%) 2 2 21(47%) 3 10(22%) 8 (18%) 3 (7%) 2 (4%) 45(100%)


7%

7% 7%

18%

61% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

7% them are highly satisfied, 61% of them are satisfied, 18% of them are undecided, 7% of them are dissatisfied, 7% of them are highly dissatisfied about the leadership style of their boss.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 3 5 (8%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 14 29 47 (71%)

1 2 3 6 (9%)

1 7 8 (12%)

Total 7 (10%) 17(26%) 42(64%) 66(100%)


0%

12%

8%

9%

71% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

8% of them are highly satisfied, 71% of them are satisfied, 9% of them are undecided, 12% of them are dissatisfied, about the leadership style of their boss.

20. Reward system and promotion, are they directly related to the potential of the employee. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 1 3 (7%)

2 Satisfied 1 3 8 2 14 (32%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 2 1 5 (11%) 3 1 9 (20%) 3 6 3 20(45%) 2 2 3 10(24%) 6 (14%) 13 (29%) 8 (18%) 44(100%)


7% 18%

31%

30%

Highly Satisfied

14% Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

7% them are highly satisfied, 31% of them are satisfied, 14% of them are undecided, 30% of them are dissatisfied, 18% of them are highly dissatisfied about the reward system and promotions.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 5 6 11 (17%)

2 Satisfied 5 6 18 29 (44%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 1 7 (10%) 4 1 1 17(26%) 5 9 4 42(64%) 10 (15%) 11 (17%) 5 (7%) 66(100%)


8% 17% 17%

15%

43% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

17% of them are highly satisfied, 43% of them are satisfied, 15% of them are undecided, 17% of them are dissatisfied, 8% of them are highly dissatisfied about the reward system and promotions.

21. Timing and training given to the people prior to the promotion. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 1 1 3 (7%)

2 Satisfied 1 3 6 1 11 (25%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2 1 1 5 (11%) 3 2 9 (20%) 7 6 20(45%) 4 2 2 10(24%) 16 (36%) 11 (25%) 3 (7%) 44(100%)


7%

7%

25%

25%

Highly Satisfied36% Satisfied Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

7% them are highly satisfied, 25% of them are satisfied, 36% of them are undecided, 25% of them are dissatisfied, 7% of them are highly dissatisfied about the timing and training given prior to the promotion.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 20(45%) 10(24%) 44(100%) Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 5 6 13 (20%)

2 Satisfied 2 6 18 26 (39%)

3

4

5 Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 3 4 1 1 7 10 1 11 (17%) 14 (21%) 2 (3%)

Total 7 (11%) 17(26) 42(63%) 66(100%)


3% 20% 21%

17%

39% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

20% of them are highly satisfied, 39% of them are satisfied, 17% of them are undecided, 21% of them are dissatisfied, 3% of them are highly dissatisfied about the timing and training given prior to the promotion.

22. Appraisal system to assess the performance of an employee. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 2 (4%)

2 Satisfied 2 3 7 4 16 (38%)

3

4

5 Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 3 2 2 8 4 1 3 3 13 (29%) 9 (20%) 4 (9%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (20%) 20(45%) 10(24%) 44(100%)


4%

9%

20% 37%

30%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

4% them are highly satisfied, 37% of them are satisfied, 30% of them are undecided, 20% of them are dissatisfied, 9% of them are highly dissatisfied about the appraisal system to assess the performance of an employee.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 5 7 13 (18%)

2 Satisfied 4 10 25 39 (54%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 1 7 (8%) 1 1 17(24%) 7 7 2 48(68%) 8 (11%) 9 (12%) 3 (5%) 72(100%)


5%

11%

14%

12%

58% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

11% of them are highly satisfied, 58% of them are satisfied, 12% of them are undecided, 14% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the appraisal system to assess the performance of an employee.

23. Formalized and clear organizational structure. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 6 1 8 (18%)

2 Satisfied 4 5 9 3 21 (48%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 5 (11%) 2 1 9 (20%) 2 2 1 20(45%) 3 3 10(24%) 7 (16%) 6 (14%) 2 (4%) 44(100%)


5% 18%

14%

16%

47% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

18% them are highly satisfied, 47% of them are satisfied, 16% of them are undecided, 14% of them are dissatisfied, 5% of them are highly dissatisfied about the formalized and clear organizational structure.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 3 5 (7%)

2 Satisfied 4 16 28 48 (74%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 7(11%) 1 17(26%) 8 3 42(63%) 9 (14%) 3 (4%) 1 (1%) 66(100%)


2%

5%

8%

13%

72% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

8% of them are highly satisfied, 72% of them are satisfied, 13% of them are undecided, 5% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the formalized and clear organizational structure.

24. Sharing of the organizations values. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 1 2 4 (9%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 6 19 3 30 (68%)

3 2 3 8 (18%)

2 2 (5%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (20%) 20 (45%) 10 (24%) 44(100%)


4% 0%

9%

18%

69% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

9% them are highly satisfied, 69% of them are satisfied, 18% of them are undecided, 4% of them are dissatisfied about the sharing of organization values.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 5 8 (12%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

7 14 29 50 (76%)

5 5 (8%)

3 3 (4%)

Total 7(11%) 17 (26%) 42 (63%) 66(100%)


5% 0% 8%

12%

75% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

12% of them are highly satisfied, 75% of them are satisfied, 8% of them are undecided, 5% of them are dissatisfied about the sharing of organization.

25. Rules and regulations of the company. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 4 5 (11%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

2 6 15 8 31 (70%)

1 1 1 3 (7%)

3 1 1 5 (12%)

Total 5 (11%) 9 (20%) 20 (45%) 10 (24%) 44(100%)


0%

11%

11%

7%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

71%

Undecided

11% them are highly satisfied, 71% of them are satisfied, 7% of them are undecided, 11% of them are dissatisfied about the rules and regulations of the company.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 6 9 16 (24%)

2 Satisfied 5 11 22 38 (58%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 7 (11%) 17(26%) 3 7 1 42(63%) 3 (4%) 8 (12%) 1 (2%) 66(100%)


2%

12%

24% 5%

57% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

24% of them are highly satisfied, 57% of them are satisfied, 5% of them are undecided, 12% of them are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the rules and regulations of the company.

26. Contribution to the organization. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 5 4 11 (25%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

4 7 15 6 32 (73%)

1 1 (2%)

-

Total 5 (11%) 9 (20%) 20(45%) 10(24%) 44(100%)


2% 0% 25%

73%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Slice 4

Slice 5

25% them are highly satisfied, 73% of them are satisfied, 2% of them are undecided about the contribution to the organization.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 3 7 22 32 (48%)

2

3

4

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

3 10 19 32 (48%)

1 1 (2%)

1 1 (2%)

Total 7 (11%) 17 (26%) 42 (63%) 66(100%)


2%2%

0%

48% 48%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Dissatisfied

Slice 5

Undecided

48% of them are highly satisfied, 48% of them are satisfied, 2% of them are undecided, 2% of them are dissatisfied about the contribution to the organization.

27. Strategies undertaken to improve quality of life at work. EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 1 1 3 (7%)

2 Satisfied 1 6 15 8 30 (68%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2 1 1 5 (11%) 2 9 (20%) 2 2 20(45%) 1 10(24) 7 (16%) 3 (7%) 1 (2%) 44(100%)


7%

2%

7%

16%

68% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

7% them are highly satisfied, 68 of them are satisfied, 16% of them are undecided, 7% of the are dissatisfied, 2% of them are highly dissatisfied about the strategies undertaken to improve quality of life at work.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 2 6 8 (12%)

2 Satisfied 6 12 27 45(68%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 7 (11%) 2 1 17(26%) 4 4 1 42(63%) 5 (8%) 6 (9%) 2 (3%) 66(100%)


3%

9%

12%

8%

68% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

12% of them are highly satisfied, 68% of them are satisfied, 8% of them are undecided, 9% of them are dissatisfied, 3% of them are highly dissatisfied about the strategies undertaken to improve quality of life at work.

28. “The grievances of the employees are handled properly�, to what extent do you agree? EXECUTIVES: AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 3 1 5 (11%)

2 Satisfied 2 2 11 4 19 (43%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 2 1 5 (11%) 3 1 2 9 (20%) 5 1 20(45%) 2 2 1 10(24%) 10 (23%) 6 (14%) 4 (9%) 44(100%)


9%

11%

14%

43%

23%

Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

11% them are highly satisfied, 43% of them are satisfied, 23% of them are undecided, 14% of are the dissatisfied, 9% of them are highly dissatisfied about the grievances of the employees are handled properly.

NON-EXECUTIVES:

AGE GROUP 25-34 35-44 45-54 Above 54 Total Diagram:

1 Highly Satisfied 1 5 6 12 (18%)

2 Satisfied 5 6 16 27 (41%)

3

4

5 Total Highly Undecided Dissatisfied Dissatisfied 1 7 (11%) 5 1 17(26%) 10 8 2 42(63%) 15 (23%) 10 (15%) 2 (3%) 66(100%)


3% 18%

15%

23%

41% Highly Satisfied

Satisfied

Undecided

Dissatisfied

Highly Dissatisfied

18% of them are highly satisfied, 41% of them are satisfied, 23% of them are undecided, 15% of them are dissatisfied, 3% of them are highly dissatisfied about the grievances of the employees are handled properly.


CHAPTER-5 FINDINGS & SUGGESTIONS

FINDINGS 1. Almost all the employees of the organization are enthusiastic. 2. They have team spirit and like to work with their colleagues.


3. Many feel that their capabilities are not fully utilized and find no innovation in their work. 4. Promotion systems are influenced by Trade Unions and Superiors personal bias. 5. In very few cases employees are not receiving right information by Superiors. Employees feel that their superiors do not invite them to informal talks. 6. On the whole most of the employees, both Executives and Non Executives like the QWL existing in the organization. Whereas very few of them feel that their should be a little bit change in the QWL.

SUGGESTIONS 1. Superiors should treat all their subordinates with same view, without any personal bias. 2. Work should be allotted according to their capabilities. 3. Employees should be sportive. 4. Employees should be present in their work spots during their working hours. 5. Promotion system should not be influenced by the trade unions or superiors.They should be given according to abilities. 6. Employees should work not only for their salaries but also for their organizational goals.


CHAPTER-6 ANNEXURE

ANNEXURE . QUESTIONIER

YOUR DETAILS


Designation:

Dept:

Age:

Experience: All the questions in the questionnaire are rated on a 5 point scale and scores are to be given as: 1.

Highly satisfied.

2.

Satisfied.

3.

Undecided.

4.

Dissatisfied.

5.

Highly dissatisfied.

1. Your opinion regarding the salary and perks you receive.

(

)

2. Do you feel the safety and welfare measures are satisfactory?

(

)

3. What do you say if you are asked about the work environment?

(

)

4. How do you feel regarding the nature of the work?

(

)

5. Your psychological feelings regarding interest in the work?

(

)

6. Acquiring new skills and knowledge to enhance your performance

(

)

7. Contribution of work assignments to maintain and expand your capabilities. (

)

8. Opportunities to increase your marketability.

(

)

9. Organizing employee seminars on new developments.

(

)

10. Do you have clear and well-defined tasks.

(

)

11. Provision of the resources to perform delegated task.

(

)

12. Opportunities for independent thoughts and action in your job.

(

)

13. Encouragement to try out new ways of dealing with problems, even if they May not always succeed.

(

)

14. Rewards to the successful new approaches in problem solving.

(

)

15. Communication with the group members to solve the problem.

(

)

16. Achieving the personal identity and self esteem at your work place.

(

)

17. Relations with superiors and subordinates (if any)

(

)

18. Measures undertaken to increase motivation.

(

)

19. Leadership style your boss follows.

(

)


20. Reward system and promotion, are they directly related to the potential of the employees.

(

)

21. Timing and training given to the people prior to the promotion.

(

)

22. Appraisal system to assess the performance of an employee.

(

)

23. Do you have a formalized and clear organizational structure?

(

)

24. Sharing of the organizations values.

(

)

25. Rules and regulations of the organization.

(

)

26. Your contribution to the organization.

(

)

27. Strategies undertaken to improve quality of life at work.

(

)

28. “The grievances of the employees are handled properly�, to what extent do you agree?

(

)


BIBLOGRAPHY

Organizational Development – Wendell L. French – Cecil H. Bell, Jr. Organizational Behavior – McGraw-Hill, Fred Luthans. Improving life at work – J. Richard Hackman, J.Lloyd


Profile for Sanjay Gupta

QUALITY OF WORK LIFE  

QUALITY OF WORK LIFE

QUALITY OF WORK LIFE  

QUALITY OF WORK LIFE

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