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MINIATURE to MASSIVE

A CATALOGUE of MAPS Sanders of Oxford

Antique Prints & Maps


All items are guaranteed to be genuine. A full refund will be given for any item found not to be as described, provided it is returned undamaged within 14 days and any work returned must be sent by registered, prepaid, ďŹ rst class post (airmail overseas) and must be fully insured. All items are in good condition unless otherwise stated. Sizes are given in millimetres. Prices are nett and do not include postage. All orders will be sent by registered mail, by air to overseas customers unless instructed, at the customer’s expense. Any importation or customs charges will be the responsibility of the customer. Payment must be made in British Pounds Sterling, either in person or bank transfer (all banking administration and transaction fees to be paid by the customer). We also accept Visa, Mastercard, Switch, and American Express. The title of the goods does not pass to the purchaser until the amount has been paid in full. For full Terms & Conditions please visit: https://www.sandersofoxford.com/terms-conditions/


Minature to Massive A Catalogue of Maps From 30th August, 2017.

This catalogue brings together a collection of very small, and very large, recent cartographic acquisitions. The maps included range from miniature sixteenth century pocket atlas city plans, to impressive large-scale double hemisphere wall maps. These items are complimented by a collection of maps featuring all four continents, which were printed in unusual formats, such as Matthias Quad’s map of Africa from his Quarto Atlas and Vincenzo Coronelli’s two sheet map of England and Wales published in his epic Atlante Veneto. All works are available to purchase and will be on display in the gallery.

Sanders of Oxford. Antique Prints & Maps Salutation House 104 High Street Oxford OX1 4BW www.sandersofoxford.com - 01865 242590 - info@sandersofoxford.com Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm. Sundays 11am - 5pm.


Contents

Pg.

01-08: World & Celestial Maps

06

09-20: Africa & The Middle East

18

21-26: The Americas

30

27-36: Asia & Australasia

40

37-49: Europe

48

50-70: The British Isles

60

Biographies: Cartographers, Mapmakers, & Publishers

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WORLD & CELESTIAL


Miniature

01. Typus Orbis Terrarum Goos, Abraham Copper engraved [Jan Jansson, Amsterdam, c.1631] 146 x 202 mm A superb example of Abraham Goos’ miniature map of the world in two hemispheres, engraved for the 1631 German printing of Jan Jansson’s new edition of the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor. The plate was commissioned by Jansson in 1628 to replace the earlier example by his father in law, Jodocus Hondius. Although following the same layout, with the Old and New World divided neatly between the hemispheres, the Goos world map is engraved in far more detail, with more place names and territorial divisions, and differs most notably from the earlier example by having an insular rather than peninsular California. The American coast above California is left almost completely blank, though a pair of lightly engraved lines suggests the putative Straits of Anian.

Unlike the Hondius map, the coastline of Terra Australis is also much less defined, and now shown as unconnected to New Guinea. The spaces surrounding the hemispheres are, like the earlier example, elaborately decorated with ornate strap-work, though the Hebrew panel with the name of ‘Jehovah’ is here replaced with an armillary sphere, which is balanced below by a decorative compass. The plate is completed by the inclusion of the four elements in each corner, and a boxed inscription below, replacing the former passage from Psalm 23 about the abundance of the world. Shirley 325 iv/viii Condition: Strong clean impression. German gothic letterpress title and pagination notes above and below plate. German text on verso. [43603] £900

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02. Descrittione del Mappamondo Porro, Girolamo after Porcacchi, Tommaso Copper engraved [Appresso gli Heredi di Simon Galignani. In Venetia, MDLXXXX] 106 x 145 mm A map of the world, engraved by Girolamo Porro for Tommaso Porcacchi’s L’isole più famose del mondo. The current example comes from the 1590 printing published in Venice by Simon Galignani. The globe is depicted in the pseudo-cylindrical projection popularised by Ortelius in his 1564 Typus Orbis Terrarum and favoured by Italian cartographers during the second half of the sixteenth century. The prime meridian is set based on the Ptolemaic ‘Fortunate Isles,’ though Porro cleverly avoids making a decision on their identification by positioning the line alongside all three of the main contenders: the Azores, the Canaries, and the Cape Verde islands. North America is depicted as significantly less elongated than in the individual map of the continent from the same work, and South America retains the characteristic south-western bulge depicted by Ortelius. The easternmost parts of China and Russia, as well as the islands of Japan appear at the far west of the globe. The southernmost part of the projection is occupied by the huge landmass of Terra Incognita. The Antarctic circle is labelled, as is the ‘Terra de Luchac,’ erroneously located in the region of modern day northern Western Australia. Locach, first recorded by Marco Polo is generally thought to refer to one of the parts of the Khmer Empire, though at the time of the map’s publication, was often applied to the northern reaches of Terra Australis. Above the map, the title in Italian appears below a decorative section divider, and Italian text below provides a history of the globe, with particular reference to the four elements. Condition: Strong dark impression on full sheet. Italian text above and below plate, and on verso. [42873] £550

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Miniature

03. Discorso Intorno alla Carta da Navigare Porro, Girolamo after Porcacchi, Tommaso Copper engraved [Appresso gli Heredi di Simon Galignani. In Venetia, MDLXXXX] 104 x 140 mm A map of the world, with particular reference to navigation, engraved by Girolamo Porro for Tommaso Porcacchi’s L’isole più famose del mondo. The current example comes from the 1590 printing published in Venice by Simon Galignani. The map is effectively a Mercator projection with the prime meridian at the Straits of Gibraltar. The western coast of North America and Asia beyond the Indian subcontinent are not pictured, falling outside the scope of the map. South America is very squat, West Africa is significantly elongated, and the massive supercontinent of Terra Incognita takes up the entire southern edge of the map. The entire map is crisscrossed by numerous rhumb-lines. Above the map, the title in Italian appears below a decorative section divider, and Italian text below provides an account of navigation. Condition: Strong dark impression on full sheet. Italian text above and below plate, and on verso. [42876] £550

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04. [World and Four Continents] Arsenius, Ambrose and Ferdinand after Ortelius, Abraham Copper engraved with hand colour [Jan Baptist Vrients, Antwerp, 1609] Each map approx. 80 x 120 mm A beautiful set of five miniature maps, depicting the world and four continents, from a Latin edition of the third Epitome of Ortelius’ Theatrum. The third Epitome, based on the earlier two editions by Philip Galle, included a new set of miniature maps, all of which were engraved by the brothers Arsenius, with accompanying text by Michael Coignet.

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Numerous editions in Latin, German, French, Italian, and English were published by the leading printers of the day, including Jan Keerbergen, Jan Baptist Vrients, and Michael Coignet, all in Antwerp, as well as James Shawe in London, and Levinus Hulsius in Frankfurt. The current examples derive from the 1609 Vrients printing. Condition: Strong dark impressions with full margins. Latin text on verso. Framed in matching set of black and gilt antique style frames. [42662] £2,250


Miniature

Typus Orbis Terrarum: Unlike earlier Galle editions of the Epitome, which featured a reduced version of Ortelius’ elliptical world map, the Arsenius plate is the first miniature map on Mercator’s projection to be published in an atlas. The limits of each continent are outlined in hand colour, and key regions are charted. The large expanse of North America features a note attributing its discovery to Columbus in 1492. Five key cities, Mexico, Paria, Jerusalem, Calcutta, and Quinzai (Hangzhou) are picked out in red, as is the Great Wall of China, to the north and west of Quinzai. To the south, the massive, and largely hypothetical landmass of Terra Australis is divided into the regions of Nova Guinea, Tierra del Fuego, Psittacorum regio (Kingdom of Parrots), and Beach (Locach). The map is further embellished with a strapwork title cartouche, a large sailing ship in the Pacific, a sea monster in the Indian ocean, and a border showing degrees of longitude and latitude.

Africa: Africa, with neighbouring parts of the Arabian peninsula and the southern tip of Spain, the boundaries of each outlined in hand colour. Principal cities, including Morocco, Tripoli, Alexandria, Cairo, Mozambique, Mina, and Sierra Leone are picked out in red. The continent itself is effectively divided into three large islands by the hypothesised course of the Nile. East Africa, labelled Abyssinia, features a note about the mythical patriarch and king, Prester John. The atlas mountains are washed in hand colour, and two red bands running across the map indicate the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. Off the east coast, Madagascar is labelled as San Lorenzo, and off the west coast, the Canary islands, the Cape Verde islands, and the easternmost tip of South America can be seen. The map is further embellished with a strapwork title cartouche in the bottom right corner, three sailing vessels, in the Atlantic, India Ocean, and Cape of Good Hope, and a border showing degrees of longitude and latitude.

Europa: Europe, with adjoining parts of Asia and Africa, the boundaries of each continent outlined in hand colour. Principal cities are picked out in red. The map is further embellished with a strapwork title cartouche in the top left corner, three animals in the Eastern steppes of Moscovy, Prussia, and Hungaria, the hand coloured range of the Alps dividing Hispania and Gallia, and a border showing degrees of longitude and latitude.

America: North and South America, as well as the massive supercontinent of Terra Australis, based closely upon Ortelius’ celebrated map of the Pacific. The boundaries of the continents are outlined in hand colour, and principal cities and settlements, including Tigeux, Mexico City, Lima, Cusco, Chile, and Orellana are picked out in red. California is depicted correctly as a peninsula. To the south, parts of New Guinea, Australia, and Antartica, are combined to form ‘Terra Incognita,’ the Unknown Land. Like the original Ortelius map, a very large sailing ship is featured off the West coast of South America, representing the Victoria, the flagship of Magellan. The map is further embellished with a strapwork title cartouche at top centre, three sea monsters in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and three horizontal lines representing the Equator, and the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn. Unlike the other continent maps in the series, America is enclosed in an ornate elliptical border in place of the usual degrees of longitude and latitude.

Asia: The continent of Asia, with adjoining sections of Europe and Africa, the boundaries of each continent outlined in hand colour. Principal cities, including Jerusalem, Mecca, Aden, Samarkand, Ormus, Bengal, Goa, and Quinzai (Hangzhou) are picked out in red. Surrounding Hangzhou, the Great Wall of China is shown pictorially and also coloured in red. Korea is depicted correctly as a peninsula, though the mapping of Japan is very rudimentary. In the bottom right corner, a large landmass is labelled as New Guinea. The map is further embellished with a strapwork title cartouche at bottom centre, a pair of camels and an Indian elephant in the centre of the continent, and a border showing degrees of longitude and latitude.

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05. A New and Correct Map of the World from the Latest Observations Senex, John Copper engraved [Patrick Gordon. London, c.1730] 148 x 296 mm A finely detailed early eighteenth century map of the World in two hemispheres, engraved by Senex for Patrick Gordon’s Geography Anatomiz’d. The map shows the extent of British knowledge of the globe in the early eighteenth century. The western and northern coasts of Australia are mapped, as are parts of Tasmania, though the Eastern and Southern coasts are still missing, and the Cape York Peninsula is shown joined to New Guinea.

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A small section of New Zealand’s eastern coast is plotted in the southern pacific, and California is depicted as an island. The northern parts of the American west coast and Alaska are still missing, plotted putatively as the Straits of Anian, and with a sketchy line representing ‘Compagnies Land.’ Condition: Vertical and horizontal folds as issued. Strong, dark impression with full margins. Small tear to plate mark at bottom left corner, not affecting map. [43421] £300


Massive

06. Planisphaerium Coeleste Seutter, Georg Matthaus Copper engraved with original hand colour [Nuremberg, c. 1760] 490 x 560 mm A magnificent double hemisphere celestial chart showing the northern and southern sky with constellations in allegorical form derived from Hevelius. A diagram in the upper left corner represents day and night on the earth with quotations from Genesis. The diagram at upper right shows the monthly orbit and illumination of the moon. The five diagrams along the bottom represent the monthly orbit and illumination of the moon, and the planetary hypothesis of Tycho Brahe, Copernicus, Ptolemy, and the annual orbit of the sun and the seasons.

This map was produced by Matthaus Seutter and first published in Ausburg c. 1730 and then later re-issued from the same plate by Johann Michael Probst the Elder in 1760 in Nuremberg. Condition: Pressed vertical centre fold, as issued. Overall time toning and dirt build-up. Partially laid to another sheet of eighteenth century paper. Printers crease to bottom margin, into printed map. Repaired tear to bottom margin. [43141] £1,500

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Massive

07. A General Map of the World, or Terraqueous Globe, with all the New Discoveries and Marginal Delineations, containing the Most Interesting Particulars in the Solar, Starry, and Mundane System Dunn, Samuel Copper engraved with original hand colour By Saml. Dunn, Mathematician. London. Published by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, 12th May 1794 1040 x 1240 mm A magnificent and very large wall map of the world in two hemispheres, designed by the mathematician and geographer Samuel Dunn and printed over four sheets by Laurie & Whittle for Kitchin’s General Atlas, describing the Whole Universe: being a complete collection of the most approved maps extant; corrected with the greatest care, and augmented from the last edition of D’Anville and Robert with many improvements by other eminent geographers. The map is a colossal work of cartography, further ornamented by original outline colour. At centre, the world is shown in double hemisphere, updated with particular reference to the recent explorations of Cook in the Pacific. The fledgling ‘United States’ is marked along the Eastern side of the North American continent, though the interior is labelled simply as Louisiana, and the west coast is shown in only superficial detail, though California is correctly depicted as a peninsula rather than an island. Hawaii, here spelled phonetically as ‘Owhyhee’ contains a note about the death of Cook. To the extreme left of the map, New Zealand is shown in considerable detail, as are New Caledonia and the New Hebrides islands, while the numerous small islands of the Pacific are shown to reflect the circumnavigation of Anson.

In the right hand hemisphere, Greenland carries a note saying that it was ‘found again in the preceeding century,’ while Iceland appears on both hemispheres. To the south, Australia is relatively well depicted, though the Cape York peninsula is truncated, and Tasmania, inexplicably, is shown joined to the Australian mainland. The whole of the east coast is labelled as New South Wales, and described as having been discovered in 1770. Surrounding the double hemisphere are numerous cosmographic and geographic notes, surveys, scales, and diagrams, including a boxed map of the world on Mercator’s Projection, a detailed map of the Moon, a description of the changing of the seasons and the position of the sun therein, a large diagrammatic description of the Analemma and its benefits and limitations as a geographic projection, a diagram of the solar system with tables of celestial distances and sizes, two celestial hemispheres with the constellations depicted pictorially, and another analemma showing astronomical lines of longitude and latitude. All remaining space is filled with textual commentary and copious notes about the world and the science of cartography. Condition: Printed over four sheets, joined and folded as issued. Original outline colour. Time-toning to sheets from previous mount. A few small tears, losses, and creases to the edges of the sheets, without loss to map. [43625] £5,500

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08. A New Map of the World in Two Hemispheres with the New Discoveries & Tracts of the Circum Navigators vizt. Dampier & Anson round it: Drawn from the latest Geographers and greatly Improved from the Sieurs D’Anville & Robert Sayer, Robert Copper engraved with early hand colour London, Printed for Robt. Sayer Map and Printseller at the Golden Buck in Fleet Street [c.1755] 550 x 970 mm Condition: Central vertical join and old vertical folds. Old tear repair to bottom of right hand fold with minor adhesive staining. Light time toning to sheet. Otherwise strong impression with early outline colour. [43592] £5,000

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Massive

A rare and impressive example of Robert Sayer’s 1755 separately published wall map of the world in two hemispheres, with early hand colour. Printed over two sheets, and joined at centre, this example appears to have been bound into an atlas or extra-illustrated volume. The title of the map advertises it as having been significantly improved from the early works of other publishers and cartographers. The northernmost reaches of the American west coast are still uncharted, listed here as ‘Parts Unknown,’ as is the east coast of Australia. The top end of Australia, here ‘New Holland’ is putatively joined to Papua New Guinea and referred to as a separate region under the title ‘Carpentaria.’ Tasmania’s northern coastline is as yet unexplored, and the island itself retains the Dutch name ‘Dimens Land.’ At the extreme left of the Western Hemisphere, New Zealand’s western coastline is partially charted. The Antarctic region, left entirely blank and at this point completely unknown, carries a message that the inhabitants, if such exist, spend their time in persistent Night when the Sun is in the Tropic of Cancer, and in persistent Day when it is in the Tropic of Capricorn. At the other pole, the opposite condition is listed for those who dwell in the Arctic. Russian exploration in the Bering Strait is marked, while Greenland’s treatment is confused. In the Western Hemisphere, it is depicted as a peninsula attached to the top of Canada, while in the Eastern, it is shown as two separate territories, an island marked ‘Greenland,’ and a stretch of coastline marked ‘Groenland.’

Coastlines and the divisions of different countries and regions are outlined in hand colour, and the voyages of Anson and Dampier are marked as dashed lines. Anson’s circumnavigation, completed only a decade before the issuing of this map, had a significant impact on British cartography in the era before Cook. His capture of the Spanish treasure ship Nuestra Señora de Covadonga not only earned Anson and the Crown over one million pieces of eight, but also copies of the Spanish admiralty’s charts of the Pacific, adding numerous islands including the Anson Archipelago to British maritime knowledge. Trade winds, tides, monsoons, the paths of hurricanes and tornadoes, and other navigational and meteorological points of interest are also marked and illustrated. Areas of dotted or crossed lines depict reefs, bays, and shoals, including Deep Bay off the western coast of Australia, where Dampier, in 1688, became the first Englishman to survey the new continent. His studies of Australian flora and fauna were to have a profound effect on later British expeditions to New Holland. In the four corners of the map, smaller circles show the North and South polar regions, as well as the Hemispheres as illuminated by the Sun during the Summer and Winter Solstices. The remaining spaces are filled with commentary and notes on cartography, geography, and history more generally, as well as comments about the Antipodes, the composition of the globe in square miles, and peculiarities of the Polar regions.

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AFRICA & the MIDDLE-EAST


Miniature

A rare and interesting map of Africa, showing the course of the Nile, from Ramusio’s Della descrittione dell’Africa et delle cose notabili che iui sono. The map is oriented with south to top, and shows almost the continent of Africa from the Tropic of Capricorn to the North African coast. The Cape of Good Hope and Guinea are not pictured, though the Arabian peninsula and Madagascar are both featured, the latter labelled here as San Lorenzo, an italicism of the island’s original Portuguese name, St Lawrence. The Nile is given the most prominence, from its putative sources in two great lakes in the interior marked as the ‘Fonti del Nilo’ to the Mediterranean Delta at Damietta. Principal cities, including Cairo, Memphis (with its pyramids), Alexandria, Suez, Mecca, and Aden, are depicted pictorially, and the continent is criss-crossed by a number of exaggerated mountain ranges. Below the map, an alphanumeric key, augmented by a number of zodiacal symbols on the map itself, shows the position of various star-signs relative to the Tropics and Equator.

09. [Sopra il Crescer del Fiume Nilo] Ramusio, Giovanni Battista Woodcut [In Venetia nella Stamperia de Giunti. L’Anno M D LXIII] 222 x 145 mm Condition: Creases to bottom left corner of sheet, not affecting map. Italian text on verso. [43062] £400

‘Della descrittione dell’Africa et delle cose notabili che iui sono’ was part of the large series of travellers’ accounts and pilgrim tales published by Giovanni Battista Ramusio under the title ‘Delle navigationi e Viaggi.’ The series was one of the most influential works of the sixteenth century, and was widely published, copied, and pirated across Europe, in numerous different languages. Ramusio’s work was largely an amalgam of existing travel narratives, including those of Marco Polo, Magellan, Tome Pires, and de Vaca. The section often referred to as the ‘Description of Africa’ was an Italian translation of a mostly firsthand account dictated in Arabic by the traveller, merchant, and Christian convert, Leo Africanus. Leo’s experiences as a slave under capture by the Barbary pirates represented one of the first accounts of the North African coast available to European readers at a time when the West was increasingly coming into contact and conflict with the Ottoman east. The English translation of the Description, published by John Pory in 1600, has been suggested as a potential source of inspiration for Shakespeare’s Othello.

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10. Aphrica Quad, Matthias and Bussemacher, Johann Copper engraved Johan Bussemecher excudit in Ubiorum Coloniae. Q. [Cologne, c.1600] 210 x 290 mm An attractive quarto map of the continent of Africa, engraved by Johann Bussemacher for Quad’s Geographisch Handtbuch. The continent is highly detailed, with numerous place names listed, and with rivers, mountains, and principal cities depicted pictorially. To the east, the Arabian peninsula is shown in full, as is Madagascar and the islands of the Indian Ocean. North, across the Mediterranean, the southernmost parts of Cyprus, Turkey, Greece, Sicily, Italy, Sardinia, and Spain can be seen, and off the west coast, the Atlantic islands, including the Canaries, the Cape Verde islands, and Tristan de Cunha are plotted. The map is further embellished by a large and decorative circular strapwork cartouche enclosing the title. On the left side of the plate, an extensive Latin description of the history and geography of the continent of Africa reads vertically. Condition: Strong impression with full margins. Central vertical fold as issued. Printers creases and general light creasing to sheet, particularly through text description at left and margin at right. Minor time toning and damp staining to edges of sheet, not affecting map. Small tears to edges of sheet, not affecting map. Blank on verso. [43068] £500

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11. Africa Porro, Girolamo after Magini, Giovanni Antonio Copper engraved [Arnhemii Excudebat Ioannes Ianssonius, Anno 1617] 135 x 170 mm A map of the continent of Africa, with parts of the Arabian peninsula, South America, and southern Europe, from the 1617 Latin printing of Giovanni Antonio Magini’s edition of Claudius Ptolemy’s Geographia, published by Jan Jansson. The northern sections of the continent retain, for the most part, their classical titles, including Aegyptus, Nubia, and Lybia. Areas of contemporary colonial interest, including Guinea and the Congo, Madagascar, and the Cape of Good Hope, are particularly well depicted. The interior, however, is largely speculative, following standard late sixteenth century conventions. Condition: Strong, dark impression. Minor time-toning to sheet. Latin text on verso. [42673] £350


Miniature

12. Aegyptus Honter, Johannes Woodcut [Ex Officina Henrici Petri. Basileae, c.1561] 125 x 152 mm A miniature woodcut Ptolemaic map of Egypt, North Africa, and the Arabian peninsula, cut by Honter for Henricus Petrus’ 1561 combined edition of Proclus’ De Sphaera and Cleomedes’ De mundo, siue Circularis inspectionis meteororum. The map depicts the ancient regions of Egypt, Marmarica, Cyrene, Aethiopia, and Nubia. Cities and towns are marked with their ancient names, and mountains and rivers are depicted pictorially.

To the east, the Arabian peninsula and Persia are marked, but contain almost no cartographic detail apart from Jerusalem, marked here simply as ‘Judea.’ The border of the map is divided into simple degrees, and below the map, an alphanumeric key provides the names of 8 key Egyptian cities, including Bubastis, Thebes, and Pelusium. Condition: Central vertical fold as issued. Some thinning to top right of sheet. Minor time-toning to edges of sheet. Otherwise a strong, dark impression. [43613] £300

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13. Turcicum Imperium Galle, Philips after Ortelius, Abraham Copper engraved with hand colour [Jan Baptist Vrients, Antwerp, 1601] 76 x 105 mm A miniature map of the Turkish Ottoman Empire, from the 1601 printing of the Epitome du Theatre du Monde, the second Galle edition of the Epitome of Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. The Epitome was the first miniature atlas ever published, and, like the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum on which it was based, was an immediate success. The first edition, published by Galle in 1577, was entitled Spieghel der Wereld. In 1588, Galle published a revised and improved second edition, under the title Epitome du Theatre du Monde, with a new series of much finer miniature maps. The third edition, inspired by Galle’s success, featured a new set of maps engraved by the brothers Arsenius, who, alongside Galle, had previously engraved plates for Ortelius’ original Theatrum. The current example comes from a French printing published by Jan Baptist Vrients. The borders of the Turkish Empire, covering modern day Greece, the Balkans, Turkey, the Levant, Egypt, and North Africa, are outlined in hand colour, as are adjoining sections of Italy, Persia, the Arabian peninsula, and Africa. Principal cities, including Thessalonica, Constantinople (Istanbul), Antioch, Aleppo, Damascus, Cairo, and Tripoli, are picked out in red, and mountain ranges and river systems are also hand coloured. A scrolled box cartouche in the bottom left corner contains the title. Condition: Strong dark impression with full margins. French text on verso. [42671] £200

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14. Costantinopoli Porro, Girolamo after Magini, Giovanni Antonio Copper engraved [Venice, c. 1620] 103 x 137 mm A decorative birds-eye view of the city Constantinople or Istanbul, from the second edition of Giovanni Antonio Magini’s publication Claudius Ptolemy’s Geographia. Above the map, the title in Italian appears below a decorative section divider, and Italian text below provides an account of navigation. Inscription above print: ‘Descrittione Di Costantinopoli’. Condition: Strong, dark impression with ink offset to plate mark. Slight water damage to bottom right corner, not affecting image. Sold together with three explanatory text sheets of same publication. [43097] £375


Miniature

15. Persia Ex Adamo Oleario Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved with hand colour [c. 1661] 118 x 123 mm A miniature map of Persia from Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. On the lower left, the title is enclosed in a decorative cartouche. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns, mountains and rivers. The majority of the plates for Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum libri septem were reduced versions of those published in the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor. The first edition, published by Cornelis Claes, was published in Amsterdam in 1600, using a suite of miniature maps first published in the CaertThresoor by Barent Langenes. Over the next fifty years, the Bertius atlas was issued numerous times in Latin, French, and German, its collection of maps continually increasing with new plates, the majority of which were engraved by Bertius’ brothers-in-law Jodocus Hondius and van den Keere. Hondius the Younger’s first issue of the Bertius atlas, published in 1616, was an immediate commercial success, and the second edition appeared later the same year.

16. Arabie Moderne Mallet, Allain Manesson Copper engraved with hand colour [Paris, c. 1683] 146 x 102 mm An attractive map of the Arabian Peninsula from Mallet’s Description de l’Universe, with French text on the verso. [43351] £150

Condition: Strong impression. Pressed vertical fold as issued. Trimmed within plate mark. [42343] £120

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Miniature

17. Alexandri Magni Expeditio Hondius, Jodocus Copper engraved with hand colour [Imprinted at London for Henry Fetherston at ye signe of the rose in Pauls Churchyard, 1625] 150 x 188 mm A decorative miniature map of the Middle East, depicting the conquests of Alexander the Great, King of Macedon, originally engraved by Jodocus Hondius for the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor, this particular example accompanied by English commentary and appearing in Samuel Purchas’ Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes. The map depicts the ancient kingdoms and regions of Greece, Asia Minor, Libya, Egypt, Arabia, Mesopotamia, Bactria and Sogdiana, Parthia, Arachosia, Gadrosia, and the Valley of the Indus River, ornamented in beautiful hand colour. Principal cities are picked out in red, and the map is heavily annotated with references from the classical source tradition for Alexander’s expeditions. The terminus of Alexander’s expedition, on the banks of the Indus, is marked by a pair of altars near the source of the Ganges. The map is further embellished by a pair of strap-work cartouches. One encloses the title, while the larger of the two in the bottom left corner shows an inset map of the Aegean Sea and the coast of Asia Minor. At bottom centre, an Alexandrian coin shows the Conqueror’s helmeted head on the recto and a winged Nike holding an orb and sceptre on the verso.

The map was likely inspired by a similar large scale example published by Ortelius for the Parergon, a collection of maps on classical and biblical subjects intended as a supplement to the famous Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. The map has been retitled in English above the plate as ‘Hondius his map of Alexanders Expedition.’ Above, and on the verso, a lengthy textual commentary in English recounts scenes from Alexander’s travels, described as his ‘Returne, Mariage, Feasts, Guard, mourning, rage, death,’ as well as part of a description of Nearchus’ voyages with Alexander’s fleet. Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes was a monumental four-volume collection of travellers reports and adventure stories, intended by the author, Samuel Purchas, as a continuation of the Principal Navigations of Richard Hakluyt, the British polymath and early supporter of British colonisation in the New World. At the time of publication in 1625, the Pilgrimes was the largest edition ever printed in England. In addition to the text, the book featured numerous maps, the majority of which had originally been engraved by Jodocus Hondius for inclusion in the Atlas Minor. The plates had been sold at auction by the Hondius publishing house in 1621 and purchased by an English publisher. For the Pilgrimes, Purchas simply reprinted the plates with English titles above. Condition: English text above plate, and on verso. Chip to top right corner of sheet, not affecting map. [42334] £300

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18. Africa with all its States, Kingdoms, Republics, Regions, Islands, &c. Improved and Enlarged from D’Anville’s Map to which have been added a Particular Chart of the Gold Coast wherein are Distinguished all the European Forts and Factories, and also A Summary Description relative to the Trade and Natural Produce, Manners and Customs of the African Continent and Islands Boulton, Samuel Copper engraved with original hand colour By S. Boulton. London. Published by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, as the Act directs, 12th May 1794 1040 x 1220 mm One of the most celebrated and important eighteenth century maps of Africa, based upon the d’Anville map and printed over four sheets by Laurie & Whittle for Kitchin’s General Atlas, describing the Whole Universe: being a complete collection of the most approved maps extant; corrected with the greatest care, and augmented from the last edition of D’Anville and Robert with many improvements by other eminent geographers. The map, an impressive and very large wall map of the entire continent, was originally printed by Robert Sayer in the previous decade, becoming a watershed for the mapping of Africa. This particular example is the Laurie & Whittle printing of 1794. Unlike almost all previous maps of Africa, Boulton follows the example of d’Anville in excluding spurious, sensational, or apocryphal information. The result is that much of the interior of Africa, unexplored by Europeans, is here largely blank. The map was a huge undertaking, attempting to collect together all previous scientific knowledge of the continent, from the classical period to Boulton’s present day. The map is covered with notes of cartographic, geological, exploratory, and ethnographic interest, and in the spaces on either side of the continent, commentaries discuss the different customs and habits of the various peoples of Africa.

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Although Boulton’s encyclopaedic approach is commendable, the map is not necessarily the most up to date in its information, placing the commentaries of Pliny and Ptolemy, by this point over 15 centuries out of date, on an equal footing with the accounts of various European exploratory missions from his own century. Regardless, the map is fascinating in its detail. Each kingdom, state, and tribal area carries descriptions of its religion, history, conflict, or customs. The city of Timbuktu is mapped out in the interior of modern day Mali, the various communities of Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Magreb are described, and the source of the Nile, as best known, is still shown as originating in a pair of lakes in the ‘Lunar mountains.’ In the south, a sailing ship rounds the Cape of Good Hope, and a lengthy discussion of Hottentot women segues into a table outlining the distribution of wealth from the region amongst the various officers of the Dutch Company. In the bottom left corner, a boxed inset map of the Gold Coast provides more information about the continent’s wealth and interest to the colonial powers, while at the top left, a tiny inset map shows details of the Azores, the traditional dividing line between the holdings of the Portuguese and Spanish trading empires. The map is outlined in original hand colour, and at the top right features a large baroque title cartouche. The figures in the scene, sitting before a fire on which roasts a human leg, are possible the Jagas, prominently described on the map as ‘Man Eaters.’ Condition: Printed over four sheets, folded and joined as issued. Original outline colour. Minor tears to folds. Minor time toning to edges of sheet, not affecting map. [43628] £2,000


Massive

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19. Africa Vetus Sanson d’Abbeville, Nicolas Copper engraved with hand colour Amstelodami Apud I. Covens et C. Mortier. cum Privilegio. [Amsterdam, c. 1700] 551 x 391 mm A large map of ancient Africa, the place names marked using their Greek, Latin, or Biblical equivalents. Parts of the Middle East and Europe are similarly marked using their ancient nomenclature, and the westernmost tip of Brazil, just visible at the extreme left edge of the map, is listed as ‘Terra Incognita.’ Borders and divisions of kingdoms and provinces are marked in hand colour. In the top right corner, the title is enclosed in a cartouche composed of garlands with the heads and wings of eagles.

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Nicholas Sanson’s map of Africa was first published individually in 1650 and later in Sanson’s ‘Cartes Generales’ in 1658. After Sanson’s death, several posthumous editions from a slightly reworked plate were published. Condition: Central vertical fold as issued. Minor tears to margins, not affecting map. [43074] £500


Massive

20. Imperium Turcicum in Europa, Asia et Africa : regiones, proprias, tributarias, clientelares sicut et omnes ejusdem Beglirbegatus seu prĂŚfecturas generales exhibens Homann, Johann Baptist Copper engraved with hand colour Nuremberg [c. 1737] 485 x 565 mm

A decorative and detailed map of the Arabian peninsular, depicting Turkish rule in the area from Northern Africa and Southern Europe to Arabia, including Greece, Turkey, the Holy Land and Persia. Title at bottom left inside stone slab and surrounded by ďŹ gures of the eastern and western worlds. Condition: Pressed vertical centre fold, as issued. Water stain centre top and toning along centre fold. [43142] ÂŁ575

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The AMERICAS


Miniature

21. Mondo Nuovo Porro, Girolamo after Porcacchi, Tommaso Copper engraved [Venice, c.1572] 102 x 140 mm An excellent impression of one of the earliest published maps of North America, engraved by Girolamo Porro for Tommaso Porcacchi’s L’isole più famose del mondo. Cartographically, the map is essentially a small-scale version of the seminal map of the continent by Paolo Forlani. The landmass of North America, while not as thin or stretched as the ‘Baccalearum Regio’ that appears in earlier sixteenth century maps, is still significantly elongated, with the eastern seaboard particularly exaggerated. California is depicted correctly as an island, though features an erroneous promontory on the northwest coast. Similarly exaggerated promontories are depicted on the north coast of South America, though Mexico and the Caribbean are shown relatively correctly. Japan, labelled here as ‘Giapan’, is located equidistant from the coasts of California and China, directly below the Straits of Anian, which are depicted in detail here for the first time. The map is further embellished by a baroque title cartouche, a compass rose, and a pair of sea-monsters with elephantine heads. Above the map, the title in Italian appears below a decorative section divider, and Italian text below provides a history of the New World. Condition: Strong dark impression on full sheet. Italian text above and below plate, and on verso. Binding holes to left margin, not affecting plate. [42872] £950

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22. Temistitan Porro, Girolamo after Porcacchi, Tommaso Copper engraved [Venice, c.1576] 104 x 140 mm A rare and historically significant map of the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan, now Mexico City, in the centre of Lake Texcoco, engraved by Girolamo Porro for Tommaso Porcacchi’s L’isole più famose del mondo. Tenochtitlan was founded on an island in the middle of the lake in 1325, rising through conquest and commercial enterprise to become the capital of a vast Mexican empire during the 15th century. In 1521, the city fell to the Spanish, who refounded the old capital as Mexico City. At the time of the Spanish conquest, Tenochtitlan was estimated to hold a population of over 200,000. By contrast, the city of Seville, the most populous Spanish city at the time, was less than half the size. With its aqueducts, terraced palaces, and gardens, the conquistadors considered the city a wonder, praising it as the ‘Venice of the New World.’

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The first woodcut plans of the city began appearing in Europe during the 1520s, and by the end of the sixteenth century was an essential inclusion in any illustrated book relating to the New World. Porro’s copper engraved map of the city was first included as part of a suite of 15 New World maps in the 1576 second edition of Porcacchi’s L’isole. This particular impression of Porro’s map of Tenochtitlan was possibly separately printed, owing to the fact that it lacks the usual Porcacchi text above and below the plate, and on the verso. In addition, the old binder’s fold to the centre left of the sheet is consistent with it having been bound into a composite atlas or extra illustrated book. A number of composite atlases of Porro’s plates with blank backs are known, likely issued by the Galignani brothers in Venice during the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Condition: Vertical binder’s fold to centre left of plate, as issued. Clean impression with full margins. Vertical crease and binding holes to right margin not affecting plate or map. [42935] £300


Miniature

A decorative miniature map of the western coast of Mexico, originally engraved by Jodocus Hondius for the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor, this particular example accompanied by English commentary and appearing in the fourth volume of Samuel Purchas’ Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes. The map shows the central and western parts of ‘New Spain,’ following the Spanish conquest. The former Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan has been replaced by the eponymous capital Mexico, which is plotted on the shores of Lake Texcoco. Principal pre-Columbian and Spanish settlements are picked out in red, and the seas, coasts, mountain ranges, and river systems are all highlighted in hand colour. The map is further embellished by a pair of strapwork cartouches enclosing the title and a scale in German miles. The map has been retitled in English above the plate as ‘Hondius his map of New Spaine.’ Below, and on the verso, a lengthy textual commentary in English discusses the bureaucratic structure of the Mexican council, the Catholic Church in the New World, and various places of political, military, and mercantile importance.

23. Hispania Nova Mercator, Gerard and Hondius, Jodocus Copper engraved with hand colour [Imprinted at London for Henry Fetherston at ye signe of the rose in Pauls Churchyard, 1625] 412 x 186 mm Condition: English text above and below plate, and on verso. Minor time toning and ink spotting to edges of sheet, not affecting map. [42949] £200

Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes was a monumental four-volume collection of travellers reports and adventure stories, intended by the author, Samuel Purchas, as a continuation of the Principal Navigations of Richard Hakluyt, the British polymath and early supporter of British colonisation in the New World. At the time of publication in 1625, the Pilgrimes was the largest edition ever printed in England. In addition to the text, the book featured numerous maps, the majority of which had originally been engraved by Jodocus Hondius for inclusion in the Atlas Minor. The plates had been sold at auction by the Hondius publishing house in 1621 and purchased by an English publisher. For the Pilgrimes, Purchas simply reprinted the plates with English titles above.

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24. America Septentrionalis Hondius, Henricus Copper engraved with original hand colour [Amsterdam, 1636] 466 x 552 mm A rare first state example of Henricus Hondius’ soughtafter map of North America, from the 1636 Latin edition of the Atlas Novus. The map is one of a number of new plates that were prepared by Hondius in the early 1630s, in an attempt to remain competitive against his main business rivals, the Blaeu family, who had succeeded in purchasing many of the plates from the estate of Henricus’ recently deceased brother, Jodocus Hondius. This map in particular was a commercial triumph, as at the time of publication the Blaeu family still did not have a separate map of North America, continuing instead to publish their earlier and now badly outdated map of the whole of the Americas. Cartographically, the Hondius map of northern America is significant, being the main inspiration for the erroneous popular belief in an insular California. Although not the first to depict California as an island, the Hondius map was certainly the most wide-spread and popular. The map itself is incredibly detailed, and an excellent exemplar of the extent of current knowledge of America up to the time of publication, drawing upon Brigg’s ‘North Part of America,’ Hessel Gerritsz’s chart of Florida and the Gulf of Mexico, Thomas James’ 1633 survey of the west coast of Hudson Bay, and John Smith’s map of Virginia. The interior of the continent, as well as most of the north-west coastline are left blank, and New Amsterdam is notably absent, though Fort Orange is plotted with a small square icon. The island of California takes up much of the west coast, and the Great Lakes are represented by just a single example, here labelled Lac des Iroquois.

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The south-east, Mexico, the Caribbean, and the northern coasts of South America are, by contrast, very well mapped, though a small note above the Parime Lake in Brazil still includes the popular belief in El Dorado. The sea coasts and territorial borders of the various European interests in the region are all outlined in original hand colour, and the map is further embellished by numerous sailing ships, sea monsters, and animals, including bears, deer, wild horses, pigs, bulls, a beaver in Nova Francia, and a fox on the edges of Button’s Bay. This latter is suggested by Burden to be a neat cartographic homage to Luke Foxe, whose survey of Hudson Bay was likely consulted by Hondius when preparing the plate. The map is further embellished by a pair of cartouches. In the top left corner, the title is enclosed in a baroque oval, flanked by a cadre of First Nations warriors. In the bottom left, a blank imprint cartouche features a pair of mermaids on either side of a globe, one of whom holds a surveyors rule. Why the first state of this map was left uninscribed is unknown, though Burden’s suggestion for an earlier unpublished plate prepared by Jodocus Hondius is plausible. The current example is evidently a very early printing, as the guide lining for the map’s inscriptions can still be seen. Condition: Excellent strong impression with original colour. Central vertical fold as issued. Minor time toning to edges of sheet, not affecting map. Latin text on verso [42865] £3,500


Massive

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25. A New Map of the Whole Continent of America, Divided into North and South and West Indies, wherein are exactly Described the United States of North America as well as the Several European Possessions according to the Preliminaries of Peace signed at Versailles Jan 20.1783. Compiled from Mr. d’Anville’s Maps of that Continent, with the addition of the Spanish Discoveries in 1775 to the North of California & Corrected in the several Parts belonging to Great Britain, from the Original Materials of Governor Pownall, MP. d’Anville, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon Copper engraved with original hand colour London. Publish’d by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, as the Act directs, 12th May 1794 1040 x 1200 mm An impressive and very large wall map of the Americas, North and South, following d’Anville and printed over four sheets by Laurie & Whittle for Kitchin’s General Atlas, describing the Whole Universe: being a complete collection of the most approved maps extant; corrected with the greatest care, and augmented from the last edition of D’Anville and Robert with many improvements by other eminent geographers. The map shows the extent of the New World, updated to reflect the divisions settled at the Treaty of Versailles. Along the eastern coast of North America, the United States, newly formed after the conclusion of the Revolutionary War in 1783, are outlined in green. The remainder of North America is divided up into the Spanish territories of New Mexico, New Navarra, New Biscay, California, and the former French territory of Louisiana.

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To the north, eastern Canada is labelled as New Britain, Labrador, and the Province of Quebec. The north western regions of the continent are almost completely blank, apart from ‘New Albion’ north of California, which carries a note about the anchorage of Sir Francis Drake, and the cryptic Fou Sang, a purported colony of the Chinese on the coast north of George’s Sound. By contrast, the West Indies, and Central and South America are very well mapped. Off the coast of South America, the Galapagos are given the whimsical title of the ‘Inchanted Isles.’ On the other side of the Atlantic, parts of Europe and Africa are shown, though the Pacific is mostly devoid of detail. The blank spaces of the map are instead occupied by a boxed inset map of Hudson Bay and Baffin Bay, with Greenland and Iceland also featured. Above this, a large table allots various territories to the European powers, and also lists the constituent colonies that now make up the United States. The map is outlined in original hand colour, and is further embellished in the bottom right corner by a large decorative cartouche, featuring various botanical and faunal emblems of the Americas, including a beaver and a crocodile, as well as a feathered head-dress and a quiver of arrows. Condition: Printed over four sheets, folded and joined as issued. Original outline colour. Minor tears to folds. Minor time toning to edges of sheet, not affecting map. [43627] £2,500


Massive

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Massive

26. A Map of South America Containing TierraFirma, Guyana, New Granada, Amazonia, Brasil, Peru, Paraguay, Chaco, Tucuman, Chili and Patagonia, from Mr. D’Anville, with Several Improvements and Additions, and The Newest Discoveries Kitchin, Thomas Copper engraved with hand colour London. Printed for Robert Sayer, No 53, Fleet Street, as the Act Directs, 20 September 1775 1000 x 1185 mm A stunning wall map based on d’Anville’s map of South America, including new discoveries by explorers along the coast, printed over two sheets and published by Robert Sayer in 1775. This particular example has been laid to archival linen, but, like other examples published by Sayer and his successors Laurie & Whittle, was likely originally bound into a large scale world atlas, the most common of which were the various printings of Kitchin’s General Atlas. The continent is shown in its entirety, from the Caribbean in the North, labelled here as the ‘North Sea of the Spaniards,’ to the southernmost tip of the Tierra del Fuego and the Falklands. The Galapagos, off the western coast off the continent, are also given the whimsical title of the ‘Inchanted Isles,’ a direct English translation of their former Spanish name, Las Encantadas.

Akin to other wall maps published by Sayer, the map follows d’Anville’s convention, only including cartographic information that is verified by trusted geographic sources. The map features numerous notes of geographic, ethnographic, and historic interest, and to the left, in the Pacific Ocean, a large boxed text features a description of the ‘Division of South America with a Summary Account of its Trade’. At the top right corner, an inset boxed chart shows the Falkland Islands, ‘named by the French Malouine Islands, and discovered by Hawkins in the year 1595’. The map is outlined in hand colour, and features a large baroque title cartouche assembled from floral and faunal emblems of the continent in the bottom right corner. Condition: Printed on two sheets and laid to archival linen. Vertical folds as issued. Small repaired puncture and crease to bottom left of sheet. Minor creasing to surface of map. Otherwise an excellent clean impression. [30187] £1,200

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ASIA & AUSTRALASIA


Miniature

28. L’Asie Suivant Mr. De Lisle de L’Academie Royale des Sciences after de Lisle, Guillaume Copper engraved with hand colour [Paris, c. 1730] 125 x 170 mm

27. Asia Porro, Girolamo after Magini, Giovanni Antonio Copper engraved [Venice, c. 1598] 125 x 170 mm A map of Asia, from Giovanni Antonio Magini’s edition of Claudius Ptolemy’s Geographia, published c. 1598. The entire map is criss-crossed by numerous rhumblines. Above the map, the title in Italian appears below a decorative section divider, and Italian text below provides an account of navigation. Inscription above print: ‘Vniversal Descrittione Dell’Asia’.

A small French map of Asia, with the various states and regions outlined in hand colour, from La Science des Personnes de la Cour, de l’Epe’e et de la Robe. The entire map is criss-crossed by numerous lines of longitude and latitude. La Science des Personnes de la Cour, de l’Epe’e et de la Robe was a French encyclopaedia, which appeared in numerous editions from 1707 to 1757. Edited predominantly by Monsieur De Chevigny and Henri Philippe de Limiers, the work was dedicated to the Prince of Orange and Nassau. Condition: Strong, clear impression. Two vertical folds as issued. Trimmed within plate except on left margin, not affecting map. [43131] £100

Condition: Strong, dark impression. Small rust mark to lower centre. [43096] £400

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29. Baly Wright, Benjamin Copper engraved Beniamin Wright caelator. [Tot Amsterdam, Ghedruckt by Iudocum Hondium, woonende inde Calver-Straet, inden Wackeren Hont. Anno 1614. Met Privilegie.] 88 x 122 mm A scarce miniature map of the Indonesian island of Bali, engraved by Benjamin Wright for the ‘Historische beschrijvinghe der seer wijt beroemde coopstadt Amsterdam’ by Pontanus. Like many of Wright’s contributions to Pontanus’ history, the map is closely based on earlier maps of the East Indies by de Bry and Langenes. In this case, the map is an almost exact copy of the de Bry original, including the inset views of two Balinese temples, though the orientation of the map has been flipped so that North is now to top. Parts of Java and Lombok, here titled ‘Cambaba’ are also featured, to the left and right margins of the map respectively. The islands’ jungles, mountains, and temples are depicted pictorially, and a number of Dutch sailing vessels are depicted off the coasts of Bali. Dutch interests in Bali had been established in 1597 with the arrival of the Dutch explorer Cornelis de Houtman, and in 1602, with the creation of the Dutch East Indies Company, the island became one of a number of important trading ports for the spice trade.

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‘Historische beschrijvinghe der seer wijt beroemde coop-stadt Amsterdam’ (Historical description of the famous trading city Amsterdam) by Johannes Isaac Pontanus was first published in Latin (‘Rerum et urbis Amstelodamensium historia’) by Jodocus Hondius in Amsterdam in 1611. Three years later, in 1614, Jodocus Hondius had the book translated by Petrus Montanus into Middle-Dutch and published it again. The book was put on the Index because of its hostility towards Roman Catholics. The book was essentially a cumulative history of all Dutch knowledge of the world, through the efforts of the Dutch East Indies Company (VOC) and their various commercial and exploratory enterprises. This print is from a rare Dutch edition of the publication. Condition: Strong, dark impression on full sheet. Dutch text above and below plate, and on verso. [42956] £300


Miniature

30. Iauva Insula, Samatra Insula, Borneo Ins. Hondius, Jodocus Copper engraved [Tot Amsterdam, Ghedruckt by Iudocum Hondium, woonende inde Calver-Straet, inden Wackeren Hont. Anno 1614. Met Privilegie.] 86 x 122 mm A rdecorative miniature map of the Dutch East Indies, depicting the Indonesian islands of Sumatra, Java, Bali, Lombok, and the southern parts of Borneo, engraved for the ‘Historische beschrijvinghe der seer wijt beroemde coopstadt Amsterdam’ by Pontanus. Like many of the maps in Pontanus’ history, this example is closely based on earlier maps of the East Indies by de Bry and Langenes. The islands are mapped relatively well, though the southern coast of Java is still unchartered, and thus marked by a simple dotted line.

labelled, and the towns of Bantam and Sura are marked by small temple icons. Reefs are indicated with dotted and crossed sections, and the map features a large compass rose in the top right corner. In the bottom right corner, a strapwork cartouche encloses a scale in German miles. Condition: Strong, dark impression on full sheet. Dutch text below plate, and on verso. [42976] £200

Principal settlements and Dutch trading ports are

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31. India Orientalis Porro, Girolamo after Magini, Giovanni Antonio Copper engraved [Arnhemii Excudebat Ioannes Ianssonius, Anno 1617] 125 x 170 mm A map of south east Asia, covering modern day India, Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Vietnam, Cambodia, Malaysia, Japan, and parts of the Persian empire, China, Indonesia, and New Guinea, from the 1617 Latin printing of Giovanni Antonio Magini’s edition of Claudius Ptolemy’s Geographia, published by Jan Jansson. Persia is labelled as the ‘Imperium Sophorum,’ a westernised title for the Sufic Safavid dynasty, which ruled the empire between 1501 and 1736. In the bottom right corner of the map, a note on New Guinea describes it as being either an island, or a part of the unknown southern continent of Terra Australis. In the top right corner of the map, the westernmost reaches of North America can be seen. Condition: Strong, dark impression. Minor time-toning to sheet. Latin text on verso [42674] £350

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32. Inde Ancienne a L’Occident Du Grange Mallet, Allain Manesson Copper engraved with hand colour [Paris, c. 1683] 148 x 102 mm An attractive map of ancient India from Mallet’s ‘Description de l’Universe’, with French text on verso. [43350] £100


Miniature

34. New Holland Arrowsmith, Aaron Copper engraved [c. 1804] 200 x 245 mm

33. La Chine Mallet, Allain Manesson Copper engraved with hand colour Paris, c. 1683 146 x 102 mm An attractive map of China from Mallet’s ‘Description de l’Universe. This map depicts China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, and the Philippines’, with a ship next to the Philippines and French text on the verso.

An early map of Australia. This map was first published in 1802 in London, by Cadell and Davies. This however is a rare example of the 1804 edition with extended blank space going from the southern coastline to bottom of the print. The simplicity of the print indicates perfectly how little of Australia was discovered and inhabited at the time. Condition: Good impression from a worn plate. Binding holes to top of sheet. Trimmed within plate mark to the right. [43108] £250

[43349] £200

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35. Asia and Its Islands according to D’Anville: Divided into Empires, Kingdoms, States, Regions, &c. with the European Possessions and Settlements in the East Indies and an Exact Delineation of All the Discoveries made in the Eastern Parts by the English under Captn. Cook d’Anville, Jean Baptiste Bourguignon Copper engraved with original hand colour London. Published by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street. 12th May 1794 1030 x 1200 mm An impressive and very large wall map of the continent of Asia, following d’Anville and printed over four sheets by Laurie & Whittle for Kitchin’s General Atlas, describing the Whole Universe: being a complete collection of the most approved maps extant; corrected with the greatest care, and augmented from the last edition of D’Anville and Robert with many improvements by other eminent geographers. The map spans the entirety of the Asian continent, from Turkey and the Arabian Peninsula in the West to Japan, New Guinea, and the islands of the Pacific in the East. At the far left, the eastern coast of Africa can be seen, while at the extreme top right, parts of Alaska and Canada are depicted.

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In the bottom right corner, the coastline of Papua New Guinea is mapped completely, though erroneously. The northernmost reaches of Australia are labelled as ‘part of New Holland.’ The map is covered in notes of geographic interest. In the Arabian Peninsula, a note warns about the ‘very dry deserts’ encountered between Mecca and the Persian Gulf. The site at which Admiral Anson captured the Manilla Galleon is marked, and a site at the northern tip of Borneo is labelled cryptically as ‘Pyrates Point.’ Above the tip of Cape York, ‘Endeavour’s passage’ marks the journey of Cook. The map is outlined in original hand colour, and further ornamented by a large oriental cartouche in the top left corner, which features a Turk with a long pipe under a large palm tree and a camel resting beside a smoking incense burner. Condition: Printed over four sheets, folded and joined as issued. Original outline colour. Minor tears to folds. Minor time toning to edges of sheet, not affecting map. [43626] £2,500


Massive

36. Musashi no Kuni zenzu / Kikuchi Bushin jicho. Hashimoto Gyokuran gazu. Kikuchi Shuzo and Utagawa Sadahide Woodblock Konosu : Nagashima Giichiro. 1856 1280 x 1120 A large-scale Japanese woodblock map of the environs of Tokyo (Kanagawa-ken, Saitama-ken). The map is oriented with north to the lower right and includes extensive explanations and history of temples and shrines alongside a printed legend.

UC Berkeley, East Asian Library, D74. Condition: Printed on nine sheets and joined. Pressed folds as issued. Colours faded. Laid to board. Old wormholes from when folded to top of sheet, stain to bottom right. [42713] ÂŁ900

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EUROPE

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Miniature

37. L’Europe, Suivant Mr. De Lisle de L’Academie Royale des Sciences after de Lisle, Guillaume Copper engraved with hand colour [Paris, c. 1730] 128 x 168 mm A French map of Europe, with the various states and regions of Europe outlined in hand colour, from La Science des Personnes de la Cour, de l’Epe’e et de la Robe. Principal cities are plotted in red, the Mediterranean and Atlantic are washed in full hand colour, and the borders of Asia and Africa are outlined in pink and green respectively.

La Science des Personnes de la Cour, de l’Epe’e et de la Robe was a French encyclopaedia, which appeared in numerous editions from 1707 to 1757. Edited predominantly by Monsieur De Chevigny and Henri Philippe de Limiers, the work was dedicated to the Prince of Orange and Nassau. Condition: Strong, clear impression. Two vertical folds as issued. Re-margined to right hand side. [43134] £85

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38. [Delos] Bordone, Benedetto Woodcut [Venice, 1528] 82 x 144 mm A woodcut map of the Greek islands of Delos and Mykonos, from Bordone’s famous Isolario (’Book of Islands’). Like all of Bordone’s maps, the coasts and topography of the islands are highly stylised and simplified. Mykonos’s interior features a crenellated tower and a collection of houses. Delos features three labelled points of interest, mostly relating to its classical heritage. To the north of the island, the ruins of the Temple and Sanctuary of Apollo are depicted pictorially. Mount Cynthus, upon which the titaness Leto gave birth to Apollo and Artemis, is also labelled. Behind the map is a simple eight-pointed line-compass. Condition: Minor foxing to sheet. Italian text above and below map, and on verso. [43058] £275

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39. Gallia Marchetti, Pietro Maria after Ortelius Abraham Copper engraved with hand colour [Venice, c.1598] 78 x 104 mm From Il Teatro del Mondo, a pirate edition of Philips Galle’s 1593 Italian edition of the Epitome of Ortelius. Although not as finely engraved, the Marchetti map is an almost perfect copy of Galle’s miniature map. The Epitome was the first miniature atlas ever published, and, like the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum on which it was based, was an immediate success. The first edition, published by Galle in 1577, was entitled Spieghel der Wereld. In 1588, Galle published a revised and improved second edition, under the title Epitome du Theatre du Monde, with a new series of much finer miniature maps. The third edition, inspired by Galle’s success, featured a new set of maps engraved by the brothers Arsenius, who, alongside Galle, had previously engraved plates for Ortelius’ original Theatrum. Condition: Italian text above and below plate, and on verso. Time toning and foxing to edges of sheet, not affecting plate or map. [42337] £120


Miniature

40. Patavinum van den Keere, Pieter Copper engraved P. Kaerius sc. [Claes Janszoon Visscher, Amsterdam, c.1649] 86 x 121 mm A finely engraved miniature map of the ‘Patavinum Territorium,’ now the modern province of Padua in the Veneto, Italy, engraved by van den Keere for the 1649 printing of Claes Jansz. Visscher’s Tabulae Geographicae Contractae. The Venetian Lagoon can be seen at the right edge of the map, with the city of Venice itself depicted pictorially in the centre of the lagoon. The island of Murano, famous for its glass, is also plotted nearby. The city of Padua is also depicted pictorially, and the other towns and villages of the region are plotted. The marshy territory inland of the Venetian Lagoon is identified by hatchured lines, and rivers and lakes are also named. The title of the map is enclosed in a simple box cartouche at top left, along with a scale in Italian miles. Condition: Excellent clean impression with full margins. Blank on verso. [43610] £150

41. Bohemia van den Keere, Pieter Copper engraved with hand colour [London, c. 1662] 86 x 124 mm A miniature map of Bohemia, part of the modern-day Czech Republic, originally produced for Speed’s A Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World, printed by Miles Fletcher for William Humble, in 1646. The maps in the publication are generally referred to as ‘miniature Speed maps’, and were the last miniature maps created by van den Keere before his death. Several further editions were produced after van den Keere’s death, with Roger Rea reprinting the maps in 1662, 1665, 1666, and 1668. In 1676, Thomas Basset and Richard Chiswell also reprinted the maps. Towards the end of the 17th century, Charles Brome acquired the plates and used them for editions of Bohun’s Geographical Dictionary. It is likely that Brome used the plates for other publications as well. English text on verso describing the areas shown on the maps. Shirley, 368. Condition: Repair to top right margin, not affecting map. [42341] £120

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Miniatures from Bertius’ Tabularum Geographicarum Contractarum The majority of the plates for Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum libri septem were reduced versions of those published in the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor. The first edition, published by Cornelis Claes, was published in Amsterdam in 1600, using a suite of miniature maps first published in the Caert-Thresoor by Barent Langenes. Over the next fifty years, the Bertius atlas was issued numerous times in Latin, French, and German, its collection of maps continually increasing with new plates, the majority of which were engraved by Bertius’ brothers-in-law Jodocus Hondius and van den Keere. Hondius the Younger’s first issue of the Bertius atlas, published in 1616, was an immediate commercial success, and the second edition appeared later the same year.

42. Islandia Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 92 x 130 mm A miniature map of Iceland or Islandia from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. In the bottom left, the title is enclosed in a decorative strap-work cartouche. A scale in miles is included in the bottom right corner. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns, mountains and Iceland’s famous Hekla volcano. Condition: Clean, dark impression. Latin text on verso. [43107] £275


Miniature

43. Sicilia Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 95 x 135 mm

44. Corsica Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 95 x 135 mm

A miniature map of the Island of Sicily from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. On the bottom left, the title is enclosed in a decorative strap-work cartouche. A scale in miles is included in the top left corner. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns, mountains as well as the volcano Mount Etna.

A miniature map of the Island of Corsica from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. On the bottom left, the title is enclosed in a decorative strap-work cartouche, which features a depiction of a face. A scale in miles is included in the bottom right corner. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns and mountains.

Condition: Latin text on verso. [43119] £275

Condition: Slight creasing to lower right margin, not affecting image. Latin text on verso. [43120] £250

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45. Canariae I. Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 95 x 132 mm A miniature map of the Canary Islands from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. On the top left, the title is enclosed in a decorative, face-like strap-work cartouche. A scale in miles is included on the bottom right corner.

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Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns, as well as two sea monsters, one on the lower edge off the coast of Gran Canaria and another off the coast of La Palma. A depiction of a ship also features, adrift off the coast of Forteventura. Condition: Clean impression. Dots of foxing to upper left margin, not affecting image. Latin text on verso. [43123] £275


Miniature

46. Portugallia Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 91 x 129 mm A miniature map of Portugal from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. On the top left, the title is enclosed in a decorative cartouche. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns, mountains and rivers. Condition: Excellent impression. Slight time toning. Latin text on verso. [43152] £200

47. Russia Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 93 x 133 mm A miniature map of Russia from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. On the top right the title is enclosed in a decorative cartouche. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of rivers and the notable town. Condition: Excellent impression. Minor time toning. Slight staining to the left, not affecting image. Latin text on verso. [43144] £250

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Miniature

48. Taurica Chersonesus Hondius, Jodocus Copper engraved with hand colour [Imprinted at London for Henry Fetherston at ye signe of the rose in Pauls Churchyard, 1625] 130 x 165 mm A decorative miniature map of the Tauric Chersonese, the modern day Crimean peninsula, with the adjoining parts of Russia, the Ukraine, and Moldova, originally engraved by Jodocus Hondius for the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor, this particular example accompanied by English commentary and appearing in Samuel Purchas’ Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes. The map depicts the region with a combination of classical and modern place names, the most prominent example being that Sevastopol is here given the name of the Classical Greek city of Chersonesus. The Black Sea is given its classical title of Euxine, and the Sea of Azov is labelled as Lake Maeotis. The boundaries of adjoining countries and kingdoms are outlined in hand colour, and forests bodies of water are also washed in hand colour. Principal cities are picked out in red. A decorative strapwork cartouche in the top right corner of the map encloses the title, and the map has been retitled in English above the plate as ‘Hondius his Map of Taurica Chersonesus.’

Hakluytus Posthumus or Purchas his Pilgrimes was a monumental four-volume collection of travellers reports and adventure stories, intended by the author, Samuel Purchas, as a continuation of the Principal Navigations of Richard Hakluyt, the British polymath and early supporter of British colonisation in the New World. At the time of publication in 1625, the Pilgrimes was the largest edition ever printed in England. In addition to the text, the book featured numerous maps, the majority of which had originally been engraved by Jodocus Hondius for inclusion in the Atlas Minor. The plates had been sold at auction by the Hondius publishing house in 1621 and purchased by an English publisher. For the Pilgrimes, Purchas simply reprinted the plates with English titles above. Condition: Ink staining to left and bottom margins, not affecting map. English text above plate, and on verso. [42335] £220

Above the plate a lengthy textual commentary in English describes the history and habits of Tartars and Cossacks, drawing upon the accounts of Martin Broniovius, ambassador of King Stephen of Poland, and his journeys to the Crimea.

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49. Europe divided into Its Empires, Kingdoms, States, Republics, &c. by Thos. Kitchin, Hydrographer to the King, with many Additions and Improvements from the latest Surveys and Observations of Mr. D’Anville Kitchin, Thomas Copper engraved with original hand colour By Thos. Kitchin, Hydrographer to the King. London. Published by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, 12th May 1794 1010 x 1230 mm A monumental wall map of Europe, compiled by Thomas Kitchen from the surveys of d’Anville, and printed over four sheets by Laurie & Whittle for Kitchin’s General Atlas, describing the Whole Universe: being a complete collection of the most approved maps extant; corrected with the greatest care, and augmented from the last edition of D’Anville and Robert with many improvements by other eminent geographers. The map, impressive in its scale, covers the entire European continent, from Ireland in the West to the Asian steppes in the East, and from North Africa in the South to the Arctic Circle in the North. Borders and sea coasts are outlined in hand colour, and each country is thoroughly and meticulously detailed, with cities, towns, and villages individually plotted and labelled. To either side of the map, panels of explanatory text and cartographic notes discuss the size and composition of each European nation. Britain naturally finds favourable treatment, described by Kitchin as ‘this happy Island, manned with the Sons of Liberty.’

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Along the bottom border of the map, across the top of North Africa, the flags and ensigns of the World’s nations are depicted, featuring the various banners of the British Empire, as well as those of Barbary Pirates, the Emperor of China, the Papacy, and the newly established flag of the United States, showing here 13 stars representing the original 13 States of the Union. The map is further embellished by a simple oval cartouche in the bottom right corner containing various mile scales, as well as a large baroque title cartouche at top left, featuring emblems of the Arts and Sciences. Condition: Printed over four sheets, folded and joined as issued. Original outline colour. Minor tears to folds. Minor time toning to edges of sheet, and to joins from previous mount. [43629] £1,700


Massive

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The BRITISH ISLES


Miniature

50. Magna Britannia Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 96 x 135 mm A miniature map of the British Isles from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. Britain is oriented with the West to the top. On the bottom right, the title is enclosed in a decorative strap-work cartouche. A scale in miles is included in the top right corner. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns and mountains. The majority of the plates for Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum libri septem were reduced versions of those published in the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor. The first edition, published by Cornelis Claes, was published in Amsterdam in 1600, using a suite of miniature maps first published in the CaertThresoor by Barent Langenes.

Over the next fifty years, the Bertius atlas was issued numerous times in Latin, French, and German, its collection of maps continually increasing with new plates, the majority of which were engraved by Bertius’ brothers-in-law Jodocus Hondius and van den Keere. Hondius the Younger’s first issue of the Bertius atlas, published in 1616, was an immediate commercial success, and the second edition appeared later the same year. Condition: Good clean impression, very faint water stains to the top and left margins, not affecting image. Latin text on verso. [43115] £285

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51. Inghilterra Porro, Girolamo after Porcacchi, Tommaso Copper engraved [Venice, c. 1575] 105 x 143 mm A map of the British Isles engraved by Girolamo Porro for Tommaso Porcacchi’s L’isole più famose del mondo. The map is decorated with a cartouche and several sea monsters. Above the map, the title in Italian appears below a decorative section divider, and Italian text below provides an account of navigation. Inscription above print: ‘Descrittione Dell’Isola D’Inghilterra’. Condition: Slightly light impression. [43095] £350

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Miniature

52. Ingiltera Marchetti, Pietro Maria after Ortelius, Abraham Copper engraved with hand colour [Venice, c.1598] 78 x 108 A miniature map of ‘Anglia,’ England and Wales, with west to top, from Marchetti’s Il Teatro del Mondo, a pirate edition of Philips Galle’s 1593 Italian edition of the Epitome of Ortelius. Although not as finely engraved, the Marchetti map is an almost perfect copy of Galle’s miniature map. Place names are identical and retain Galle’s spelling, the scale in English miles is the same, and even the two sailing vessels are of the same type and position as in the Galle original. The Epitome was the first miniature atlas ever published, and, like the Theatrum Orbis Terrarum on which it was based, was an immediate success. The first edition, published by Galle in 1577, was entitled Spieghel der Wereld. In 1588, Galle published a revised and improved second edition, under the title Epitome du Theatre du Monde, with a new series of much finer miniature maps. The third edition, inspired by Galle’s success, featured a new set of maps engraved by the brothers Arsenius, who, alongside Galle, had previously engraved plates for Ortelius’ original Theatrum. Condition: Italian text above and below plate, and on verso. Time toning and foxing to edges of sheet, not affecting plate or map. [42955] £200

53. Scotia Bertius, Petrus Copper engraved [Amsterdam, c.1616] 95 x 133 mm A miniature map of Scotland from a Latin edition of Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum. In the top right, the title is enclosed in a decorative strap-work cartouche. A scale in miles is included in the bottom right corner. Beautiful detailing with the inclusion of notable towns and mountains. The majority of the plates for Petrus Bertius’ Tabularum geographicarum contractarum libri septem were reduced versions of those published in the Mercator-Hondius Atlas Minor. The first edition, published by Cornelis Claes, was published in Amsterdam in 1600, using a suite of miniature maps first published in the CaertThresoor by Barent Langenes. Over the next fifty years, the Bertius atlas was issued numerous times in Latin, French, and German, its collection of maps continually increasing with new plates, the majority of which were engraved by Bertius’ brothers-in-law Jodocus Hondius and van den Keere. Hondius the Younger’s first issue of the Bertius atlas, published in 1616, was an immediate commercial success, and the second edition appeared later the same year. Condition: Clean, dark impression. Latin text on verso. [43110] £250

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Thomas Jenner’s Civil-War edition of Van Langeren’s A Direction for the English Traviller Thomas Jenner’s printing of Jacob Van Langeren’s ’A Direction for the English Traviller’ was one of the few county atlases to be published in England during the Civil War. Jenner, a Puritan parliamentarian, reissued Van Langeren’s maps with improvements in 1643, believing the maps and distance charts would be of assistance to the Parliamentarian army in the field. The earlier thumbnail county maps of the first edition were erased, to be replaced by new maps on a larger scale, which now gave town names in full together with the location of many towns in neighbouring counties. The most recognisable feature of Van Langeren’s maps are the large triangular distance charts in the top left corners, providing measurements in English miles between the towns and cities of each county.

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54. Cambridgeshire with some confining Townes Van Langeren, Jacob Copper engraved c.1643 100 x 102 mm A scarce map of Cambridgeshire, with a distance chart, from Thomas Jenner’s printing of ’A Direction for the English Traviller’. Condition: Excellent impression on the full sheet with title above and town names engraved below. [42778] £120


55. Kent Van Langeren, Jacob Copper engraved c.1643 100 x 102 mm

Miniature

A scarce map of Kent, with a distance chart, from Thomas Jenner’s printing of ’A Direction for the English Traviller’. Condition: Excellent impression on the full sheet with title above and town names engraved below. [42775] £120

56. Somerset Van Langeren, Jacob Copper engraved c.1643 100 x 102 mm A scarce map of Somerset, with a distance chart, from Thomas Jenner’s printing of ’A Direction for the English Traviller’. Condition: Excellent impression on the full sheet with title above and town names engraved below. [42765] £130

57. Surrey Van Langeren, Jacob Copper engraved c.1643 100 x 102 mm A scarce map of Surrey, with a distance chart, from Thomas Jenner’s printing of ’A Direction for the English Traviller’. Condition: Excellent impression on the full sheet with title above and town names engraved below. [42763] £130

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59. An Improved Map of Middlesex Cowley, John Copper engraved with hand colour [London c. 1745] 131 x 182 mm A scarce, small decorative map of Middlesex including roads, the river Theems, hills and forests, as well as a key to cities, boroughs, market towns and villages in the county. From John Cowley’s The Geography of England and later A New Sett of Pocket Mapps of all the Counties. 58. An Improved Map of Oxford-shire Cowley, John Copper engraved with hand colour [London c. 1745] 183 x 133 mm A scarce, small decorative map of Oxford including roads, rivers, Whichwood forest, as well as boroughs and market towns. From John Cowley’s The Geography of England and later A New Sett of Pocket Mapps of all the Counties. Condition: Excellent, crisp impression. Trimmed within plate mark. Pressed vertical fold as issued. Small tearing to top and bottom of pressed fold. [43304] £120

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Condition: Excellent, crisp impression. Trimmed within plate mark to the right. Pressed horizontal fold as issued. [43303] £100


Miniature

60. An Improved Map of Cornwall Cowley, John Copper engraved with hand colour [London c. 1745] 130 x 180 mm A scarce, small decorative map of Cornwall including roads, rivers, hills and forests, as well as a key to boroughs, market towns, forts & garrisons in the county. From John Cowley’s The Geography of England and later A New Sett of Pocket Mapps of all the Counties. Condition: Excellent, crisp impression. Trimmed close to plate mark. Pressed horizontal fold as issued. Small tearing to left and right margin of pressed fold. [43305] £120

61. [Map of Cornwall] [Anonymous] Watercolour [c. 1834] 110 x 140 mm A rare, miniature, manuscript map of Cornwall, from E. Homann’s ‘Manuscript Atlas of England and Wales’ c. 1834. [43372] £85

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62. Hartford Sh: Morden, Robert Copper engraved with early hand colour 1676 - c. 1773 92 x 57 mm A very rare playing card map of the county on a scale of five-eighths of an inch to 10 miles. A compass rose to the top right and mile scale below the map. An engraved legend of the length, breadth and circumference of the county alongside the distance from London to Hertford and the latitude position of the city is listed below. Robert Morden’s set of playing cards first appeared in 1676 in a set entitled ‘The 52 Counties of England and / Wales, Geographically described / in a pack of Cards, / Whereunto is / added ye Length. Breadth. & Circuit. / of each County the latitude the Scitu- / ation and distance from London of ye / principal Cities, Towns. and Rivers. / with other Remarks as plaine and / ready for the playing of our Eng- / lsh Games as any of ye Common / Cards.’; the second set of English playing cards to show maps and the first series of county maps to include roads (which were taken from Ogilby’s Britannia of 1675). There was a further edition in 1676 published with the addition of the names of adjoining counties added outside the county boundary. A third edition by Morden and Pask in 1680 included additional place names and roads on some of the maps. The plates reappeared around one hundred years later in the hands of London publisher, Homan Turpin, who printed the cards without suit marks, but with a page of accompanying text giving county history, in the form of a small atlas.

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This impression of the playing card map is from Turpin’s atlas ‘A Brief Description Of England and Wales; Containing A particular Account of each County; With its Antiquities, Curiosities, Situation, Figure, Extent, Climate, Rivers, Lakes, Soils, Agriculture, Civil and Ecclesiastical Divisions, Cities, Towns, Palaces, Corporations, Markets, Fairs, Manufactories, noted Places, Bays, Harbours, Products, &c. and the Number of its Inhabitants. As Also, The Distance of each Market Town from London, by the latest Survey, with the Latitude and Longitude of each County, Town or City, and on what Point of the Compass from London. Embellished with Maps of each County. Very useful for Travellers and others, and very proper for Schools, to give Youth an Idea of Geography, and the Nature of his own Country, and each County. London: Printed for H. Turpin, No.104, St. John’s Street, West Smithfield.’ Homan Turpin was in business at this address 1764-87; the publication is not listed in his catalogues of 1770 and 1772. Condition: Excellent clean impression with good hand colour. [43365] £220


Miniature

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Massive

63. Parte Settentrionale del Regno D’Inghilterra Descritto,e Dedicato Dal P. Coronelli, Cosmografo della Serenissima Republica di Venetia All’Illustrissimo, et Eccellentissimo Signore Angelo Morosini, Cavaliere, e Procuratore di S. Marco, etc. / Parte Meridionale del Regno D’Inghilterra, Descritto,e Dedicato dal P. Cosmografo Coronelli, All’Illustrissimo, et Eccellentissimo Signore Cavaliere Angelo Morosini, Procuratore di S. Marco, etc. [Northern Part of the Kingdom of England / Southern Part of the Kingdom of England] Coronelli, Vincenzo Copper engraved with hand colour Venice c.1691 448 x 603 mm each A decorative large scale map of the British Isles, printed over 2 sheets and with cartographic notations in Italian. The map is beautifully ornamented in full hand colour, and a detailed cartouche in the top right corner of the upper sheet encloses the title and scales of distances. From Vincenzo Coronelli’s Atlante Veneto (Venice, 1690 - 1701). Atlante Veneto was a comprehensive atlas intended by Coronelli as a continuation of the Blaeu Atlas Maior. The work was published in thirteen folios and covered ancient and modern cartographers and geographers, together with astronomical and historical data. The most important maps were spread over two sheets, allowing for great detail. [30230] £1,600

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64. The South Part of Great Britain, called England and Wales. Containing all ye Cities, Market Towns, Boroughs: And whatever Places have ye Election of Members of Parliament with ye Names of ye Rivers, Seaports, Sands, Hills, Moors, Forests &c. All ye Great or Port Roads, and principal Cross Roads, &c. With ye Computed Miles from Town to Town, and all ye Post Towns, as they are at present regulated by the Postmasters Gen.l of the General Post House. Moll, Herman Copper engraved with original hand colour Printed for H. Moll over against Devereux Court without Temple Bar. I. Bowles at ye sign of ye Screen over against Stocks Market and Tho. Bowles Print and Mapseller next to the Chapter House in St. Pauls Churchyard… Sold by Philip Overton Map and Printseller near St. Dunstans Church Fleet Street. And by John King at the Globe in the Poultry. c.1730 605 x 967 mm A large-scale and incredibly detailed two sheet map of England and Wales flanked by two exhaustive tables listing “all ye Cities, Market Towns, Boroughs and whatever Places in South Britain have ye Election of Members of Parliament.” An elaborate allegorical title cartouche to the top right, surrounded by sailing ships in the “British Ocean”. An “Advertisement” in the bottom right corner outlines Moll’s appreciation for John Ogilby’s road maps published in 1675 and commenting on mistakes made by other mapmakers that have failed to take on board the latest and most correct observations.

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The map is further ornamented with a dedication to “Right Honourable FRANCIS, Lord Viscount Rialton Son and Heir apparent of the Right Hon.ble Sidney Earl of Godolphin & c. Lord High Treasurer of Great Britain. This Map of South Britain is most Humbly Dedicated by your Lordship’s most Humble Servant Herman Moll Geographer.” and a clear explanation key set below a compass rose. The title ‘South Britain’ stems from the Act of Union between England and Scotland in 1707, with Scotland being labelled ‘North Britain’. R.W. Shirley. Printed Maps of the British Isles 1650 1750. Moll 6. state 5. Condition: Excellent clean impression. Printed on two sheets and joined, as issued. Small professionally repaired hole to north riding of Yorkshire. Pressed vertical and horizontal folds [42269] £750


Massive

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65. The Colleges of Cambridge Fred Taylor Lithograph in colours Published by British Railways. Printed in Great Britain; Baynard Press. Published by the Railway Executive (Eastern Region) (AR 1043) c. 1950. Image 958 x 1215 mm, Sheet 1070 x 1328 mm A large and graphically impressive birds-eye perspective poster of Cambridge, designed by Fred Taylor and published by the British Railway Executive to encourage tourism to the University City following the conclusion of World War II.

Although the map was originally printed as advertising, intended to hang in the various ticket and tourist oďŹƒces of railway stations across the United Kingdom, it is likely that this particular example was never used, as it is in superb condition with vibrant original colour.

The map, in beautiful mid-century colour and style, shows the city centre with a particular focus on the historic colleges. The crest of each college appears alongside its physical representation on the map, as well as in a line above the title in the bottom border.

Condition: Excellent, crisp printing in full colour. [30459] ÂŁ1,500

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Massive

66. Oxford Fred Taylor Lithograph Printed by Jordison & Co. Ltd. c.1950 Image 920 x 1160 mm A rare and pristine proof impression of Fred Taylor’s large-scale birds-eye-perspective poster of Oxford, published by the British Railway Executive to encourage tourism to the University City following the conclusion of World War II. This particular example is an unfinished proof in black and white of a full colour view of the City, one of a pair designed by Taylor showcasing Oxford and Cambridge. The city is shown from an unusual South-West orientation, which shows off the Great Quad of Christ Church and Tom Tower to full effect. The High runs diagonally across the map, and the Radcliffe Camera is seen prominently at centre left.

Below the map, the Arms of the University are flanked by the crests of the constituent colleges, including many newer additions frequently missing from maps of the city. Campion Hall, St Benet’s Hall, LMH, Somerville, Hugh’s, and Hilda’s all received crests, though the most recent institutions, St Catherine’s, St Anne’s, Nuffield, and St Antony’s, are simply listed together on a single shield. Condition: Excellent, clean proof impression. Likely an ex-archive or printer’s copy. [31845] £1,100

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67. Bird’s-Eye View of Cambridge, 1894 Henry William Brewer Lithograph [1894] Image 325 x 990 mm A large scale aerial view of Cambridge, from an 1894 issue of The Graphic. The text below describes it as the companion to a similar view of Oxford by Brewer, published by the Graphic the previous week. This wonderful panorama of Cambridge views the city from the north, with the Chapels of St John’s and King’s College at centre. The Cam winds its way through the scene, and the Bridge of Sighs is particularly prominent at the centre right. Beneath the panorama, a key block image with a lettered and numbered key lists colleges, halls, and public buildings of the University, as well as schools, churches, and other notable landmarks.

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The Graphic, founded by William Luson Thomas, was a weekly illustrated newspaper in London that ran from 1869 until 1932. Believing that the Illustrated London News was unsympathetic towards artists, Thomas published The Graphic to compete with the popular Illustrated London News. Condition: Vertical folds as issued. Creasing to sheet, particularly to folds and edges of sheet. [41647] £700


Massive

68. London from the South Side of the Thames Robert Loudan after Thomas Sulman Woodcut Tho Sulman del. Robt Loudan Sc. Supplement to the London Illustrated News. February 9, 1861 Image 425 x 1320 mm, Sheet 590 x 1470 mm A very large birds-eye panorama of London, from the London Illustrated News. The Thames runs horizontally across the centre of the scene, with the view sweeping across the city, from Westminster Abbey at left. All major monuments, spires, bridges, and industrial structures are depicted, with St Paul’s particularly prominent at centre, providing a fascinating snapshot of the city at the height of the Second Industrial Revolution.

The scene, one of a number of large-scale panoramas of British and international cities produced by the London Illustrated News, was originally surveyed from a hot-air balloon, a technique mastered by the artist and draughtsman Thomas Sulman. Condition: Pressed vertical folds as issued. Minor timetoning to folds. Otherwise, a strong clean impression with full margins. [43055] ÂŁ1,375

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69. [A Plan of the University and City of Oxford] Davis, Richard Copper engraved Published by R.Davis, Lewknor, August 1, 1797 930 x 662 mm A scarce town plan from Richard Davis’ large scale map of Oxfordshire engraved by John Cary on sixteen sheets and published, with a key map, in 1797. Though the city plan owes much to Isaac Taylor’s map of 1751, it is, however, a delicately engraved work by one of the most competent engravers of the time. It was also the only large-scale contemporary plan of the city. Condition: Professionally restored small tears to top margin and top right sheet. Manuscript repair to centre. [34885] £1,700

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Massive

70. A survey of the city and suburbs of Bristol survey’d by John Rocque Land Surveyor. Plan de la ville et faubourgs de Bristol leve é par Jean Rocque. Rocque, John Copper engraved at Charing Cross 1750. Publish’d According to Act of Parlaiment 480 x 700 mm A fine and detailed, separately published, map of the city and suburbs of Bristol. This detailed city plan is a single-sheet reduction of Rocque’s 1743 four sheet map of Bristol. It plots the all the major roads, buildings, and landmarks from Redclift (Redcliff) to King’s Down (Kingsdown) with the Rivers Avon and Froom (Frome) snaking through the city and littered with sailing and merchant vessels. Brandon Hill occupies the top left corner of the map with relief shown by hachures. The map is plainly titled in English and French and has three measurement scales below, a compass rose to the top left indicates the unusual orientation of north to the top right.

The map was surveyed, drawn and published by John Rocque and is flanked by 10 views of public buildings and local topography: A view of Redcliff Church on the south side with part of church yard - A view of the Great Crain and Slip at the lower end of Princess Street - The elevation of the Exchange of Bristol as it fronts north to the Peristyle... - The elevation of the Exchange of Bristol as it fronts to the General Market ... - Cathedral or the view of the college and rope walk from the opposite south side of the River Avon - A view of Clifton and Brandon Hills from the south side of the River Avon - A view of the High Cross and Cathedral Church from the north side of College Green - The elevation of the Exchange of Bristol as it fronts north to Corn Street - The elevation of the Exchange of Bristol as it fronts south to the Peristyle - A view of St. Vincents Rocks with the Hot Well’s from Mr Warrens House. Map Forum Issue 5, The Works of John Rocque 50. Condition: Good clean impression, well pressed light centre fold. Two very small worm holes to centre of map and one to view of the Exchange. [42271] £2,500

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Cartographers, Mapmakers, & Publishers

BIOGRAPHIES

Aaron Arrowsmith (1750-1823) was an English mapmaker, who was born in the county Durham. In 1810 his nephew John Arrowsmith joined his mapmaking business in London. In 1821, they published a map of North America based on maps obtained from the Hudson’s Bay Company and Aaron’s own previous work. After Aaron’s death in 1823, the business was carried on by his sons Aaron and Samuel Arrowsmith until 1839 when John took over. Ambrose and Ferdinand Arsenius (fl. 1598-1615) were Flemish engravers and makers of astronomic and geographic instruments. The brothers were born into the Aertssens family of engravers and scientific-instrument makers, based in Antwerp and Leuven. They are chiefly remembered for their work engraving map plates for Christopher Plantin, many of which were used by Abraham Ortelius in later editions of his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. In 1601, they produced a set of miniature maps after Ortelius, for inclusion in the third edition of the Epitome of Ortelius’ atlas. Petrus Bertius (14th November 1565 – 13th October 1629) was a Flemish theologian, historian, geographer and cartographer and was related to Jodocus Hondius Sr. and Pieter van den Keere by marriage. Bertius studied at the University of Leiden and later traveled in Germany and Russia. In 1620 he immigrated to France where he was appointed as a cosmographer to the court Louis XIII. Bertius published a number of folio maps, but never published an atlas of his own. His maps were either separately published or included in atlases and books by other publishers. Benedetto Bordone (1460-1531) was an Italian cartographer, author, and miniaturist. Born in the university town of Padua, and active as a publisher in Venice, Bordone is chiefly remembered for his Isolario of 1528, a work detailing the history, geography, mythology, climate, and position of the islands of the world. The book, featuring woodcut illustrations of most of the islands mentioned in the text, was intended as a guide for sailors, and was one of the first works to provide widely accessible details of the lands of the New World.

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Among the most important of Bordone’s contributions to cartography are his pre-Columbian plan of the Aztec Capital Tenochtitlan, the first western printed map of Japan as an island, and the use of an oval-from world map. Samuel Boulton (fl.1780-1800) was a British cartographer and geographer, known principally for his wall map of Africa, based upon d’Anville and originally published by Robert Sayer, and revised and reprinted a number of times by Sayer’s successors Laurie & Whittle. Henry William Brewer (1836 - 1903) was a London based architectural illustrator active in the late 19th century. Specialising in bird’s-eye views of cities, Brewer produced a number of views for British magazines such as The Graphic and The Builder. Johann Bussemacher (fl.1580-1613) was a German publisher, printer, art dealer, and engraver, active in Cologne at the turn of the sixteenth and seventeenth century. His is best remembered for a series of engravings of the Labours of Hercules after Aldegrever, and for preparing many of the map plates for three atlases he co-published with Matthias Quad. John Cary (1755-1835) was an English cartographer, engraver, globe maker and publisher, often working with his brothers George and Francis. In 1770, he was apprenticed to William Palmer, and became surveyor of roads to the general post office around 1794. He is best known for his English county atlases, particularly Cary’s New and Correct English Atlas, published in 17871789, and the miniature Traveller’s Companion. He also engraved the plates for Robert Gough’s edition of Camden’s Britannia, which was published in 1806. Cleomedes was a Greek cosmographer, geographer, and philosopher, principally known for his work on the nature of the heavenly bodies. Very few details of his life are known, and his life dates have been suggested variously from anywhere in the first century BC to the fourth century AD.


Biographies

Although Cleomedes contributed some useful remarks about lunar eclipses, his primary importance to the history of cosmography comes from his preservation of many of Posidonius astronomical theories, and for his recounting of Eratosthenes’ calculation of the circumference of the Earth.

His most important, and only known, contribution to English cartography was a survey of the county of Oxfordshire published by John Cary in 1797 on a scale of two inches to the mile. Davis continued as an Oxford-based land surveyor until his death in 1814, often working for the University.

Vincenzo Coronelli (1650 - 1718) was a Venetian Franciscan monk, cosmographer, cartographer, publisher, and encyclopedist. In 1663 Coronelli was accepted into the Conventual Franciscans, and by 1674 had been awarded a doctorate in theology. In 1678, Coronelli was commissioned to make a set of terrestrial and celestial globes for Ranuccio II Farnese, Duke of Parma. Shortly afterwards the Duke made Coronelli his theologian. In 1681, Coronelli also constructed a pair of globes for Louis XIV. In 1684 he founded the very first geographical society Accademia Cosmografica degli Argonauti, and in 1685 became Cosmographer of the Republic of Venice. Between 1690 and 1701 Coronelli published the Atlante Veneto series of maps and charts. He later published Biblioteca Universale Sacro-Profana one of the first encyclopedias.

Guillaume de Lisle (1625 - 1726) was one of the finest cartographers of the eighteenth-century. He is widely regarded as the father of scientific mapmaking, and was the first to utilise the practices of triangulation and mensuration in the production of his works.

John Lodge Cowley (1719-1768) was an English cartographer, mathematician and geologist. He was cartographer to King George II and specialised in maps of English counties. He often worked together with the engraver Emanuel Bowen and publisher Robert Dodsley to realise his maps. Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville (11th July 1697 - 28th January 1782) was a French cartographer, geographer, and antiquarian, whose rigourous standards of geographic reference revolutionised map making during the latter half of the eighteenth century. Rather than rely on the authority of earlier cartographers in the creation of his maps, d’Anville insisted on verifiable evidence. The resulting maps looked vastly different from the work of his predecessors. Ornamentation was stripped back, and dubious locations were simply left blank. In 1754 he became a member of the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles Lettres, and in 1775 was appointed first geographer to King Louis XVI. Richard Davis (fl.1792-1814) was an English land surveyor. Born in Lewknor, Oxfordshire, Davis first appeared as an estate and land surveyor in the Oxford Journal of 1792.

Samuel Dunn (d.1794) was a British mathematician and astronomer. Dunn was believed to have been born in Crediton, Dorset, though the year is not known. He rose to fame in the 1750’s when he began to prolifically author books, maps, and charts. Many of these works were reproduced in contemporary atlases and encyclopedias. Dunn ran an astronomical academy in Ormond House, which is where he observed the famous transit of Venus in 1761. He was a member of the American Philosophical Society, and was also employed by the East India Company. His best known works were a series of wall maps of the World and Continents, published by Sayer and Laurie & Whittle, as well as his ‘New Atlas of the Mundane System.’ Philips Galle (1537 - 1612) was a Dutch engraver, printmaker, and publisher, particularly celebrated for his reproductive engravings of original works by Hieronymus Cock, Maarten van Heemskerck, Johannes Stradanus, and other Dutch and Flemish masters. Galle’s success as an engraver and published put him in close contact with many of the late sixteenth century’s most important figures, including Ortelius, for whom he produced numerous plates, Christopher Plantin and the Familia Caritatis, and his students Hendrick Goltzius, Adriaen and Jan Collaert, and Karel van Mallery. Following his work on Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, Galle produced a series of miniature maps after Ortelius’ originals, which he published, potentially without the permission of Ortelius, as the Spieghel der Wereld, the first miniature atlas.

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Abraham Goos (c.1590-1643) was a Flemish mapmaker, engraver, and publisher. Although born in Antwerp, much of his career was spent in Amsterdam, where he worked as a map engraver for his uncle Pieter van den Keere, his cousin Jodocus Hondius, and his second-cousin Jan Jansson. He is best remembered for his work on Jansson’s continuations of the MercatorHondius Atlas Minor and for his many terrestrial and celestial globes. His son, Pieter, followed in the family business and is celebrated for his Atlas ofte WaterWeereld, the greatest maritime atlas since Lucas Janszoon Waghenaer’s Thresoor der Zeevaert. Johann Baptist Homann (20th March 1664 - 1st July 1724) was a German engraver and cartographer, and the Imperial Geographer to the Holy Roman Emperor Charles VI. In 1702 he opened a publishing house in Nuremberg, and his maps often make reference to his membership of the Prussian Royal Academy of Sciences and his imperial patronage. Upon his death, his maps passed to the Homann Heirs company and reprinted many times before the company closed in 1848. Jodocus Hondius (14th October 1563 - 12th February 1612) was a Dutch Flemish cartographer, engraver, and publisher. Hondius is most famous for reviving the primacy of the work of Gerard Mercator, through the publication of his Atlas, and the smaller Atlas Minor, in the early seventeenth century, at a time when cartography was largely dominated by Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. The Mercator-Hondius Atlas was composed of maps pulled from plates Hondius had purchased from Mercator’s grandson, as well as thirty-six new plates Hondius commissioned, and in many cases engraved, himself. He is also believed to have been the chief engraver of the plates for John Speed’s Theatre of the Empire of Great Britaine. Following his death, he was succeeded by his sons, Jodocus the Younger and Henricus, as well as his son in law Jan Jansson. Henricus Hondius (1597 - 16th August 1651), often called Hendrik Hondius the Younger to differentiate him from the earlier, and unrelated portrait engraver Hendrik Hondius the Elder, was the son of the famous cartographer Jodocus Hondius. Like his father, Henricus was an engraver, cartographer, and publisher.

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He first came to prominence through his publication in 1606 of a new version of Mercator’s 1569 World Map, the plates for which he had obtained from Mercator’s grandson Rumold. Following his father’s death, Henricus co-ran the family business, eventually partnering with his brother-in-law, Jan Jansson. Johannes Honter (1498-1549), also known as Janos Hynter or Johann Honterus, was a Transylvanian Saxon humanist, geographer, theologian, map and print maker, and leading figure in the Transylvanian Protestant Reformation. After a period studying in Vienna and Krakow, Honter went to Basel, where he worked as a map-maker for the publishing house of Henricus Petrus, producing a number of Ptolemaic woodcut maps to illustrate Petrus’ commentaries of classical texts. During this time he also produced a new map of Transylvania, which became the basis for the copper engraved map of the region published by Abraham Ortelius. In 1533, he returned permanently to Transylvania, setting up a printing house and issuing a number of theological works, as well as his most celebrated publication, the Rudimenta Cosmographica, a poetic cosmographic manual featuring 13 maps. The Rudimenta was so successful that it was reprinted in over 30 different editions. Johannes Janssonius (1588 - 1664) was a famed cartographer and print publisher. More commonly known as Jan Jansson, he was born in Arnhem where his father, Jan Janszoon the Elder, was a bookseller and publisher. In 1612 he married the daughter of the cartographer and publisher Jodocus Hondius, and then set up in business in Amsterdam as a book publisher. In 1616 he published his first maps of France and Italy and from then onwards, produced a very large number of maps which went some way to rival those of the Blaeu family, who held a virtual monopoly over the industry. From about 1630 to 1638 he was in partnership with his brother-in-law, Henricus Hondius, issuing further editions of the Mercator/Hondius atlases to which his name was added. On the death of Hondius he took over the business, expanding the atlas still further, until eventually he published an eleven volume Atlas Major on a scale similar to Johannes Blaeu’s magnum opus. After Jansson’s death, his heirs published a number of maps in the Atlas Contractus of 1666, and, later still, many of the plates of his British maps were acquired by Pieter Schenk and Gerard Valck, who published them again in 1683 as separate maps.


Biographies

Thomas Kitchin (1718-1784) was one of the best and most prolific engravers of the eighteenth-century. Born in Southwark, he was an apprentice of Emanuel Bowen in 1732. Based in Clerkenwell and later Holborn Hill, Kitchin worked as royal hydrographer to the king from 1773. He married Sarah Bowen, daughter of Emanuel, in 1739, and then Jane, daughter of Joseph Burroughs, in 1762. He is best known for The World From the Best Authorities published in Guthrie’s New Geographical Grammar (1777), The Small English Atlas (1749) with Thomas Jefferys, and The Large English Atlas (1749 - 60) with Emanuel Bowen. Robert Laurie (c.1755-1836) was a British engraver, mezzotint artist, and publisher. In 1776, he was awarded a prize by the Society of Arts for the invention of a method of producing colour-printed mezzotints. Laurie succeeded the publisher Robert Sayer after the latter’s death in 1794, and, in partnership with James Whittle, continued Sayer’s prolific and well-established business on the Fleet Street, issuing prints, maps, illustrated books, charts, and nautical works. Following Laurie’s retirement in 1812, Whittle continued in business with his former partner’s son, Richard Holmes Laurie, who gained sole ownership of the business in 1818 with the death of Whittle. Robert Loudan (fl. 1855-1895) was a British wood engraver, best known for his work for the London Illustrated News and The Graphic. Giovanni Antonio Magini (1555-1615) was an Italian scientist, cartographer, and chair of mathematics at the University of Bologna. A prominent geocentrist, he was a correspondent of many notable contemporaries, including Tycho Brahe, Kepler, and Ortelius. His commentary on Ptolemy’s Geographia, with accompanying copper-plate maps by Porro, appeared in Latin in its first edition in 1596, with the first Italian translation by Leonardo Cernoti printed in 1598. Alain Manesson Mallet (1630–1706) was a French cartographer and engineer. He started his career as a soldier in the army of Louis XIV, became a SergeantMajor in the artillery and an Inspector of Fortifications. He also served under the King of Portugal, before returning to France, and his appointment to the court of Louis XIV. His military engineering and mathematical background led to his position teaching mathematics at court. Mallet’s major publications were Description de L’Univers (1683) in five volumes and Les Travaux de Mars ou l’Art de la Guerre (1684) in three volumes.

Pietro Maria Marchetti (1565-1614) was an Italian engraver, author, editor, and publisher, active in Brescia and Venice. He is chiefly remembered in cartographic circles for his publication in 1598 of a pirated edition of the Ortelius Epitome, based very closely on the Italian edition produced by Philips Galle. Gerard Mercator (1512 - 1594) originally a student of philosophy was one of the most renowned cosmographers and geographers of the 16th century, as well as an accomplished scientific instrument maker. He is most famous for introducing Mercators Projection, a system which allowed navigators to plot the same constant compass bearing on a flat map. His first maps were published in 1537 (Palestine), and 1538 (a map of the world), although his main occupation at this time was globe-making. He later moved to Duisburg, in Germany, where he produced his outstanding wall maps of Europe and of Britain. In 1569 he published his masterpiece, the twentyone-sheet map of the world, constructed on Mercator’s projection. His Atlas, sive Cosmographicae Meditationes de Fabrica Mundi, was completed by his son Rumold and published in 1595. After Rumold’s death in 1599, the plates for the atlas were published by Gerard Jr. Following his death in 1604, the printing stock was bought at auction by Jodocus Hondius, and re-issued well into the seventeenth century. Herman Moll (c.1654-1732) was born in Germany and came to England in the 1670s. He worked as an independent cartographer and geographer, and traded as a map publisher and seller for two years, and then worked for other publishers. Moll established his own business and eventually dominated the early eighteenth century map trade. He produced many maps and atlases of England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland. His county maps were all boldly engraved in a heavy style. Moll was also an active member in academic and intellectual circles, being a close associate of Daniel Defoe, Robert Boyle, Robert Hooke, and, most importantly for his cartographic career, the pre-eminent English explorer of the era, William Dampier.

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Robert Morden (c. 1650-1703) was an English bookseller and publisher, as well as an accomplished geographer and cartographer. He is best known for a series of maps issued in 1695 in Gibson’s revised edition of Camden’s Brittannia,’ engraved by Sutton Nicholls. Abraham Ortelius (1527 -1598) was a Flemish cartographer, cosmographer, geographer and publisher and a contemporary of Gerard Mercator, with whom he travelled through Italy and France. Although it is Mercator who first used the word “Atlas” as a name for a collection of maps, it is Ortelius who is remembered as the creator of the first modern atlas. Theatrum Orbis Terrarum was the first systematically collated set of maps by different map makers in a uniform format. Three Latin editions as well as a Dutch, French and German edition of Theatrum Orbis Terrarum were published by 1572 and a further 25 editions printed before Ortelius’ death in 1598. Several more were subsequently printed until around 1612. Ortelius is said to have been the first person to pose the question of the continents once being a single land mass before separating into their current positions. Henricus Petrus (1508-1579) was a German printer and published, whose print-works in Basel produced some of the most influential works of the German Renaissance, including Copernicus’ De revolutionibus orbium coelestium and Munster’s Cosmographia. Johannes Isacius Pontanus (1571–1639) was born when his parents had fled Haarlem to go to Denmark. He later adopted his academic name Pontanus (“of the sea”) because he would have been born at sea, when his parents were still on their way to Denmark. Shortly after his birth, his father Isaach Pietersz. was appointed by the Danish King Frederik II to return to the Netherlands and work as an agent. The family settled in Amsterdam, were Pontanus would spent most of his childhood. He would go on to study in Utrecht and Leiden and was promoted to doctor of medicine in Basel in 1601. He traveled often to Denmark and also visited Germany, Italy and France. He became a professor at the Gymnasium Illustre in Gelderland in 1604 and was appointed as the Royal Danish historian by King Christian IV. He wrote a history of Amsterdam in 1611, of Denmark from 1618 to 1631 and of the States of Gelderland in 1639 as well as several shorter works of history. He was married to Anneken van Heede with whom he had nine children.

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Tommaso Porcacchi (1530-1585) was an Italian humanist, geographer, translator, and author, chiefly remembered for his atlas, L’isole più famose del mondo descritte da Thomaso Porcacchi da Castiglione arretino e intagliate da Girolamo Porro padouano con l’aggiunta di molte isole. As a young man, he studied in Florence under the patronage of Duke Cosimo I. In 1559, he moved to Venice, translating works from Latin and Greek into Italian, on behalf of publishers including Ludovico Domenichi and Giolito de Ferrari. His treatise on the islands of the world included some of the very earliest maps and plans of the new world, including North America, Mexico, and Temistitan, the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan. Girolamo Porro (c. 1520-1604) was an Italian engraver active in Venice and his native Padua, working predominantly as a map engraver for Tommaso Porcacchi, and Girolamo Ruscelli. Johann Michael Probst the Elder (c. 1727-1776) was a German printmaker who came from a family of printmakers who ran a publishing house in Augsberg. Proclus (AD 412-485) was a Greek philosopher, widely considered to have been the last great Neoplatonist of the Classical Era. Born in Constantinople into a wealthy Lycian family, Proclus initially studied law in Alexandria and returned to Constantinople to practice. Deciding that his path lay in philosophy, he returned to Alexandria before moving to Athens and studying at the famous Academy. His later life was spent in Athens, where, as the head of the Academy and in resistance to the city’s Christian leaders, he taught a theurgic branch of Neoplatonism inspired by various Mystery Cults. Matthias Quad (1557-1613) was a Dutch-German cartographer, geographer, author, engraver, and publisher. Born in the Netherlands, Quad was one of a number of leading lights in the mapmaking community of Cologne at the turn of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Aside from working as an engraver for Braun and Hogenberg’s Civitates Orbis Terrarum, Quad also partnered with Johann Bussemacher in the production of a number of smaller scale atlases, inspired by the success of Ortelius’ Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. The first, an atlas of Europe, was published in 1594. This was later expanded into the Geographisch Handtbuch of 1600, and finally the Fasciculus Geographicus in 1608.


Biographies

Giovanni Battista Ramusio (1485-1557) was an Italian geographer, translator, author, and publisher. He is best known for the large series of traveller’s accounts that he compiled, translated, and published as the Delle navigationi e Viaggi. The first volumes appeared during the 1550s, and were republished, added to, and translated into other languages throughout the second half of the sixteenth century. John Rocque (1709-1762) was a Hugenot refugee who came to England as a baby in 1709 with his parents, fleeing persecution in France. In addition to his work as surveyor and mapmaker, Rocque was an engraver and map-seller. He was also involved in gardening as a young man, living with his brother Bartholomew, who was a landscape gardener, and producing plans for parterres, perhaps recording pre-existing designs, but few details of this work are known. Rocque produced engraved plans of the gardens at Wrest Park (1735), Claremont (1738), Charles Hamilton’s naturalistic landscape garden at Painshill Park, Surrey (1744), Wanstead House (1745) and Wilton House (1746). Rocque is now mainly remembered for his Map of London, published in twenty four sheets in 1746. It was by far the most detailed map of London published up to that time, and remains the most detailed map of eighteenth century London today. Rocque also published another smaller-scale map of London in sixteen sheets at the same time. His success as a cartographer brought him the appointment as cartographer to Frederick, Prince of Wales in 1751. A fire in 1750 destroyed his premises and stock, but by 1753 he was employing ten draughtsmen, and published The Small British Atlas: Being a New set of Maps of all the Counties of England and Wales. Rocque’s 1756 map of Dublin featured on an Irish ten pound bank note. He married twice. His widow continued the business after his death. Utagawa Sadahide (1807-c.1878) was born as Hashimoto Kenjiro in the Shimosa Province near Edo (modern day Tokyo). He was one of the finest students of Utagawa Kunisada I (1786–1865), also known as Tokokuni III, and usually signed himself Gountei Sadahide. He is also known as Hashimoto and Gyokuransai Sadahide. The artist was very well valued in his own time. His woodblock prints were shown at the Japanese Pavilion in the 1866 World Exhibition in Paris, together with renowned artists such as Zeshin Shibata.

Sadahide is best known for his yokohama-e (prints from the Western enclave of Yokohama depicting scenes with Westerners). With the opening of the country in 1859, the Japanese printmakers could suddenly see western prints and paintings without risking punishment. They started to experiment with western technique. Sadahide was keenly interested in this, alongside foreign affairs. He has been credited with compiling the drawings for Kaigai shinwa (Overseas News), a book published around 1850 about the Opium Wars (1839-1842) in China. This gave him an opportunity to portray English soldiers and battleships. Sadahide managed to incorporate western stylistic elements into his work in an utterly convincing manner. His deft use of western perspective in his panoramic birds eye view landscapes are combined with such typical ukiyo-e elements as the abrupt cutting off of the representation by the border of the picture plane, and the shading to indicate modelling of the figures is juxtaposed with flat planes. Sadahide’s work certainly influenced the later artists of the Utagawa School, who specialised in prints reporting actual events of the Meiji period, but most of these artists lacked his power of expression and depicted the much-changed Meiji world in the manner of their Tokugawa forebears. Nicholas Sanson d’Abbeville (1600 - 1667) was a French engraver and cartographer, and Geographer to Louis XIII and Louis XIV. As well as world maps, he also issued a series of historic maps to accompany popular classical texts like Caesar’s Gallic Wars. After his death, he was succeeded by his sons Adrien and Guillaume, who frequently sign their work ‘Sanson fils’. Robert Sayer (1725-1794) was a prolific English print and map seller, publisher, and engraver. Through his brother’s wife, he became the manager of the printing house of John Overton, gradually taking over the business, with a concentration on atlases, maritime charts, cartography, and accounts of travel, exploration, and navigation. Sayer is also remembered for his engravings after paintings by Johan Zoffany, and the pair grew to be lifelong friends. Sayer was succeeded on his death by Laurie and Whittle.

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John Senex (fl.1690-1740) was a British engraver, publisher, surveyor, and geographer to Queen Anne. Working with James Maxwell and Charles Price early in the 18th century, he produced some admirable maps of the world and continents including loose maps of many countries. In 1719 he issued a miniature, updated edition of Ogilby’s ‘Britannia’. This publication went through many editions and was inspired by the great interest he seemed to show in road maps. Matthaus Seutter (1678-1757) was a German cartographer. He was born in Ausburg and studied engraving with Johann Homann in Nuremberg. He later went back to his hometown to work at Jeremias Wolff’s publishing house. In 1707 Seutter started his own cartographic printing business. He would publish the ‘Atlas Geographicus Accurate’, ‘Atlas Minor’ and ‘Atlas Major’ and even become the imperial geographer under Charles VI. After Seutter’s death, his sons-in-law George Balthazar Probst and Conrad Lotter took over the publishing house and re-issued many of his plates. Thomas Sulman (1834-1900) was a British architect, draughtsman, and engraver, most celebrated for his large scale birds-eye views of London, Oxford, and New York, all of which were drawn from hot-air balloons. In addition to his work for the London Illustrated News, Sulman was also one of a number of engravers working for the artist Dante Gabriel Rossetti, one of the founding members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. Fred Taylor (1875-1693) was one of the foremost British poster artists of the twentieth century. A student of the Academie Julian and Goldsmiths, he came to prominence in the 1910s as an artist for London Transport and the Underground. Over the next three decades, he designed posters for shipping companies, travel agents, the Empire Marketing Board, and, most famously, British Railways. In addition to his graphic works, he was also a decorative painter, completing murals for Lloyds of London and Austin Reed, as well as exhibiting in a number of Royal Academy shows. Pieter van den Keere, also known frequently as Petrus Kaerius, came to England in 1584, as a Protestant refugee from his home town of Ghent with his sister Colette, who married Jodocus Hondius, in 1587. It was probably from Hondius that Keere learned to engrave. Both engravers left London in 1593 to settle in Amsterdam.

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Keere began to engrave a series of miniature maps in 1599 in preparation for a small atlas of the British Isles. The maps were first published in 1617 by William Blaeu with plate numbers and Latin text. They then passed to George Humble, who published them in 1619 and then again in 1627, by which time they had become known colloquially as ‘Miniature Speeds.’ Jacob Van Langeren’s ‘A Direction for the English Traviller’ was first published in 1635, and was the first pocket-sized road atlas. The left hand upper diagonal half of each map plate is occupied by a triangular table of distances copied from John Norden’s ‘England and Intended Guide, for English Travellers’ published in 1625. The signature of Jacob van Langeren appears on the title page of the work and he is credited with the engraving of the maps. Van Langeren is not recorded as having visited England - the plates for the English Traviller therefore were presumably engraved by him in his home town of Brussels. It is likely that Van Langeren’s original thumbnail county maps were influenced by William Bowes’ series of playing card maps that were published in 1590. The Visscher Family produced maps and atlases in Amsterdam throughout the seventeenth and early eighteenth century. Established by Claez Janszoon Visscher (1587-1652), they mainly published atlases from plates purchased from Pieter van den Keere. The business was then continued by Nicholas Visscher, I (1618-1679) and his grandson, Nicholas II. The Visschers published many revised editions of their ‘Atlas Contractus’ and ‘Atlas Minor’. Upon the death of Nicholas II, his wife, Elizabeth, continued the business before selling it to Peter Schenk. Benjamin Wright (fl. 1596-1613) was an English cartographer and engraver, who spent much of his working life in Venice and Amsterdam. He is best known for his work engraving maps for Magini’s atlas of Italy, Barent Langenes Caert Thresor, and Pontanus’ history of Amsterdam. A number of letters written by Magini suggest Wright was not the easiest of colleagues, being prone to bouts of alcoholism, and on a number of occasions, was apparently responsible for pawning Magini’s plates to other publishers in order to fund his libertine pursuits.


Biographies

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Sanders of Oxford

Antique Prints & Maps 104 High Street, Oxford. OX1 4BW info@sandersofoxford.com - 01865 242590 - www.sandersofoxford.com

Miniature to Massive. A Catalogue of Maps  

This catalogue brings together a collection of very small, and very large, recent cartographic acquisitions. The maps included range from mi...

Miniature to Massive. A Catalogue of Maps  

This catalogue brings together a collection of very small, and very large, recent cartographic acquisitions. The maps included range from mi...

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