October 28, 2021

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OCTOBER 28-NOVEMBER 3, 2021 | VOLUME 16, ISSUE 43

L O C A L

N E W S

Y O U

C A N

U S E

INSIDE: Editor’s Pick: Casa Creepy Haunted House GETTING OUT/PAGE 7

Swegles: When Lifeguarding Began in San Clemente SC LIVING/PAGE 10

Passion for Food West Toast Café Revamps Snack Shack Concept with Healthy Eats E Y E O N S C / PAG E 3

Husband and wife Tulio Poller and Eli Stravinskaite recently took over the T-Street concession stand to open West Toast Café. Photo: Shawn Raymundo

sanclementetimes.com

School Board Asks Newsom to Rethink Vaccine Mandate

SC Board Riders Club Looks to Maintain Winning Tradition

SCHS Football Readies for MVHS, New Playoff System

EYE ON SC/PAGE 4

SURF/PAGE 18

SPORTS/PAGE 13


San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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EYE ON SC

What’s Up With... TOP NEWS SAN CLEMENTE SHOULD KNOW THIS WEEK

West Toast Café Revamps Concession Stand Concept with Healthy Eats BY SHAWN RAYMUNDO, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

“I love this train,” Eligija “Eli” Stravinskaite said as a locomotive passed by T-Street. Every time Stravinskaite and her daughter would hear a train travel through town, they’d make a wish. For Stravinskaite, who would often pass by the T-Street concession stand only to see it closed much of the time, her wish was to one day operate the beachside shack. “The first time I saw the concession stand, I fell in love with the idea of opening a restaurant here, serving healthy, organic food,” Stravinskaite recalled while seated at the snack bar tables. She later added,“My wish was to get a concession stand.” That wish would eventually come true, taking less than a year from the time she and her husband Tulio Poller had relocated their family from Florida to San Clemente. “After nine months of dreaming and consistently contacting the city to get the place, we got it by the end of June,” she gleefully explained. “This train is magical for me and made my dream come true.” With those dreams turning into a reality, the couple in September opened up West Toast Café at the T-Street stand, where they’ve been serving organic-based, nutritious foods for breakfast and lunch. “Thinking about the lifestyle here on the beach, the (Beach) Trail, a lot of people here take care of themselves and their bodies, their minds,” Poller said.“That’s why we created a menu based on organic ingredients.” West Toast’s menu is a stark departure from the previous treats offered at the T-Street stand since the 1990s. Up until this past summer, the Wilson family operated the snack shack, which featured traditional beach-going eats such as burgers, hot dogs and ice cream. The city ended its contract with the Wilson family just before the Fourth of July, the Orange County Register previously reported. The city’s decision was part of an effort to increase revenue at the T-Street stand, as well as snack bars at the Richard T. Steed Memorial Park, North Beach and the San Clemente Pier. This past May, the city council unanimously voted to have the city’s parks department take over food service operations at Steed Park, renegotiate the terms of a five-year contract with the operator of the Pier Bait & Tackle Shop, and solicit local restaurants to operate pop-up stands at T-Street and North Beach. With the contract for the stand up for grabs, Stravinskaite and Poller jumped on San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

the opportunity, securing a limited-term lease agreement through March 2022. “I contacted the city at that moment they told me the current operator had no more contract, and they were willing to do a bid to fill up the space,” said Stravinskaite. According to Jonathan Lightfoot, the city’s economic development officer, the city will formally solicit requests for proposals (RFP) to operate the T-Street and North Beach stands by the end of the year. “We hope that Eli still plans to be a participant of that process and have been very happy with the good work she has put in to clean up and modernize the T-street stand,” Lightfoot said in an email. The new concessionaires didn’t waste any time making the space their own, and quickly got the stand up and running after five weeks. All the while, Stravinskaite was also pregnant with their fourth child, who was born Sept. 21. “She’s a hard worker,” Poller said in admiration of his wife, who returned to work within a few weeks of giving birth. Since opening, the new coastal café has garnered quite a bit of attention from residents on social media who have raved about West Toast’s menu. Some of the more popular items, Stravinskaite noted, include the acai bowl, smoothies and Green Juice. But their biggest hit, she noted, is undoubtedly Poller’s avocado toast, which is topped with avocado, tomato, cucumber, chili flakes, micro cilantro greens, sesame seeds and salt. For a few extra dollars, patrons can also add salmon on top. “We’re very proud of our menu. People really like it,” Stravinskaite said.“The most famous item, I would say, is the avocado toast.” In Florida, the two had already operated their own businesses. The Lithuania-born Stravinskaite started a girls and women swimwear line, while Poller, a native of Venezuela, launched a software company with close friend Adrian Real—West Toast Café’s chef. For years, the couple would spend family vacations in San Clemente, where Poller would surf while Stravinskaite and the kids enjoyed playing on the beach. Having been attracted to the city for so long, the family relocated here from Miami about a year ago. When the couple moved to Southern California, they knew they wanted to start a restaurant business. It had also been something Poller and Real had spoken about at length while running their

San Clemente resident Kim Rosalino, 35, orders a drink from West Toast Café co-operator Eli Stravinskaite on Oct. 21. Photo: Shawn Raymundo

IT consulting firm in Miami. “Tulio and I always dreamed about having a restaurant; we always talked about it,” Real told San Clemente Times over the phone last week. “The opportunity came; I was very passionate about the food industry.” Real, who was also born in Venezuela, said that he comes from a family in which food is very important. He noted that some of his best friends are chefs, and that he’s helped them in marketing and collaborating on projects. Enjoying the culinary arts, Real said he likes to be creative when cooking for himself and friends. “Cooking at home was a way to create and disconnect, and I’ve always loved to cook. My friends always call me ‘Martha Stewart,’” he said, laughing, before also stating that he enjoys opportunities to “gather a good group of friends and cook for them.” Using that creativity and passion for food, Real—who prides himself on maintaining a healthy lifestyle—is working with his longtime business partner and Stravinskaite to bring their style of healthy cuisine to San Clemente, as well as the town’s surf and yoga communities. “Now, with this new journey, we have this opportunity to present to the community of San Clemente a healthy approach,” said Real, who will be moving to San Clemente with his wife and two kids in November. Poller echoed that sentiment, stating, “We don’t have anything premade; everything is fresh.” That includes one new and creative specialty item that’s not officially on the menu quite yet, but has been met with positive feedback: West Toast’s arepas—a South American dish found in Colombia and Venezuela. Traditionally, Poller explained, the Venezuelan arepas are white. But at West Toast, the team has put their own spin on things, incorporating a bit of color, as one is made with spinach, another with beets, and the third with carrots. Poller said he’s looking forward to Real’s move to San Clemente, as the two “have Page 3

a lot of plans to create different kinds of menus, like a super food for the surfers; going to be for the kids who come here every day to train on the beach.” According to Poller and Real, they are developing a sort of “surf box” breakfast program for surfers who regularly visit T-Street’s water for morning sessions. The box, Real said, will include nutritious foods to help surfers with performance, as well as provide educational materials on workout recovery and meditation. “Things they don’t teach at school but we want to share that information with the audience,” Real said. “We’re very focused on this new generation. San Clemente is a very family-oriented town—the kids, the surfers, the athletes—they understand what nutrients can do for the general health,” Real said. Stravinskaite further explained that they intend to set up a prepaid or account-based structure for the surf box program, wherein the young surfers can order their box the night before and have the food ready when they get out of the water the following morning. Other plans for the future include expanding the business to rent surfboards and bikes. For now, though, West Toast will continue gaining traction by hosting Sunday morning yoga classes on the sand led by a certified instructor. Following the classes, West Toast also treats customers to live entertainment from local musicians. “It was a big success; people really loved it, so we’re going to start doing (it) right now, every Sunday. Yoga in the morning and live music,” Stravinskaite said. “They can have breakfast and listen to music.” Over the coming weeks, the concessionaires intend to also host a weekly sunset event. Each week, they explained, will be themed, such as Greek, Spanish and Italian nights, and feature a guest chef to prepare the food. There will also be live music, and ideally, cocktails for guests to enjoy. West Toast Café is open Tuesdays through Sundays, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. sanclementetimes.com


EYE ON SC

Literary Group Honors Longtime Community Volunteer Bill Thomas

ation computers. He also taught writing classes for local residents before expanding it to students at Saddleback College. Capable of reading a book a day, Thomas in 2009 enlisted a handful of his tennis buddies to start the Literary Society. Members would pick a book to read and discuss it at a member’s home each month, socializing, too.

The group expanded to non-tennis players, sharing diverse backgrounds and reading interests. They’ve gone through some 140 books over 12 years, so far. On Oct. 21, the group gathered at a member’s home to thank Thomas for a world of intellectual exchange he contributed to their lives. He was retiring from the club, his final meeting, at age 90.

“Our learning together and gaining more intelligence and knowledge, learning things, it’s like continuing your education (beyond) high school and college, providing us an interactive opportunity to know more,” Thomas told the group.“I appreciate all that you have given me, in my aging.” Those who know Thomas shared a few thoughts about him this past week. “Bill, thanks for all you do and have done in a life still being well-lived,” said Grant McPhail. “You brought together a great group of guys to enjoy sharing personal experiences, heated discussions and lots of laughs,” Jim Offineer said. “We didn’t know much about each other’s lives outside tennis. Bernd Ziesche discussed the experience of being bombed as a young child in Berlin, and the late John Libby acknowledged one of the bombers— until he was shot down,” said Jim Bingham. “I’ve read many, many, many books that I would never have read, and in many cases didn’t even know existed. It has been a pleasure and an honor to know Bill.” “You broadened our horizons,” Stan Gianzero said. “Without realizing it, you provided us a course in early civilization and life here and now.” “Bill’s love of literature, his love of students young and old, and his love of travel will always be a part of San Clemente.” said Lee Van Slyke.

ing a switch away from in-person instruction could impact social and emotional benefits for students. “We feel that whether you’re in favor of vaccines or not, the fact that children would be harmed by being removed from the district is something that needs to be brought to the state’s attention,” Jones said. Trustees debated the exact words and technical details of the resolution during the hours-long discussion, including whether to add data about COVID-19 case and death rates—particularly as they apply to children. District trustees and staff have repeatedly said they must adhere to state guidelines, a point reiterated by Bullockus. “We have said to you in many emails and on many platforms (that) we are following the (California Department of Public Health) and we are following the governor—not that we necessarily like it,” Bullockus said.“But, please understand these people are working around the clock. You all know what we did to get kids back into the classroom. These changes that are coming down legislatively from the governor are constantly changing.” Hanacek said that while she understood the intention of the resolution, it won’t effect change. “I feel like we are not addressing and representing a huge swab of the school district. This is really sad to me and, again, it’s not going to fulfill anything that you

want,” Hanacek said.“At the end of the day, a lawsuit—but, of course, with the walkout, that cost us about 500 grand. There went any money that we would have for legal.” Numerous parents and local community members spoke against the vaccine mandate on the grounds of individual freedom, skepticism over its safety and effectiveness, and dislike of government control. Health experts have generally said vaccines are safe and help prevent the spread of COVID-19. “I realize that no one on this board wants to force these vaccines on students, and you don’t want to force them on teachers. I also know that you face serious consequences if you decide to go against the governor,” Vista Del Mar Middle School math teacher Craig Adnams said. “But I say, fight for us. If you fight for us, we will fight for you.” Some audience members felt the resolution did not go far enough, calling for the district to defy the mandate and sue the state—the latter desire echoed by Trustee Davis. The meeting was, at times, tense as audience members variously cheered and jeered trustees—including Student Advisor Kanei Padhya. Trustees scolded the audience for their behavior and encouraged attendees to instead show approval by silently waving their hands. Some who spoke at the meeting, including Vanessa Santos, support the mandate.

“I believe that vaccines are a really invaluable tool to fight disease, especially during global health pandemics like the one we’re going through. It’s how we are no longer living with polio,” Santos said. “It’s how we are no longer living with smallpox. It’s how we manage measles. It’s how we manage so much disease.” A rally to protest the mandate was held outside the CUSD offices before the meeting. When trustees convened the meeting, participants remained outside, loudly chanting anti-mandate slogans while parents and others held anti-mandate signs. John, a parent in Laguna Niguel who declined to give his last name, said he is opposed to mandates for everyone, but especially for kids. “I don’t think COVID is really an issue for the children especially, and for myself, I wouldn’t get it, either,” said John, whose daughter attends a private school outside the district.“I had it. It wasn’t that big of a deal. I took some hydroxychloroquine, and I’m fine. I think now that I have the immunity in my system, I don’t think it’s really an issue for me to get vaccinated. There’s no way I’m going to put that in my kid.” Orange County resident Jennifer Sterling addressed rallygoers with a megaphone and said battles against mandatory masks were the beginning. “It is communism,” Sterling said. “It’s not far-fetched that this country could turn, and it’s right now.”

BY FRED SWEGLES, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

You’ve probably heard of Bill Thomas, an extraordinary community volunteer—a former San Clemente Citizen of the Year, Volunteer of the Year and Wall of Recognition honoree. It turns out, he also is the founder of a San Clemente Gentlemen’s Literary Society, enriching lives. A longtime member of the city’s parks commission, Thomas helped launch the Friends of San Clemente, a nonprofit foundation to support beach, park and recreation activities, and develop the city’s skatepark, Vista Hermosa Sports Park, Aquatics Center, a countywide acclaimed universal-access playground, the community’s yearly Carnival Colossal, free summer concerts on the beach, annual skateboard competitions, a golf tournament, a snow hill for children every December, and a Sports Wall of Fame, just to name a few. Thomas also had a career in television and theater in America and Europe, as well as in academics at a university in Los Angeles. He retired to live in San Clemente, where he started a city program to help seniors learn to use early gener-

Capo School Board Asks Newsom to Rethink Student Vaccine Mandate BY COLLIN BREAUX, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

In a largely symbolic gesture underscoring opposition from some in South Orange County toward state educational health policy, the Capistrano Unified School District Board of Trustees approved a resolution urging Gov. Gavin Newsom to reconsider and potentially do away with an eventual COVID-19 vaccine requirement for student in-person instruction. The board voted, 4-2, on the request co-authored by Trustees Gila Jones and Martha McNicholas during a meeting on Oct. 20. Jones, McNicholas, Trustee Lisa Davis, and Board President Judy Bullockus voted yes. Trustees Amy Hanacek and Krista Castellanos voted no. Trustee Pamela Braunstein was not at the meeting. The request came following concerns about how the mandate could affect educational experiences for students—particularly, due to parents potentially pulling their kids from school rather than allowing them to get the shot to stay on campus. Jones attempted to tailor language in the resolution toward state officials, saySan Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

Bill Thomas (center), is honored at his final meeting of the San Clemente Gentlemen’s Literary Society. Photo: Fred Swegles

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San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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SOAPBOX

Letters to The Editor PRIORITIZING PICKLEBALL RUTH MARTIN, San Clemente Is it legal for a city to give priority/favoritism for one group’s wants/desires over the safety and quality of life of its residences? I’m pretty sure it is morally inappropriate. Listening to pickleball players, it is abundantly obvious that they feel it’s the responsibility of the city of San Clemente to meet their needs, which include more courts, how these courts are designed and that they are lighted. Is it the position of our city council and Beaches Parks & Recreation that San Clemente be the premium pickleball destination for South Orange County? Is it fiscally judicious to allocate our funds to pickleball over the needs that encompass a broader spectrum of San Clemente residents? San Gorgonio Park is a great asset to our city but is located on a residential street, which has no infrastructure allowing its full potential. Furthermore, the pickleball players want more courts with lighting. Proper placement seems irrelevant. However, the environmental impact, safety of our residential streets impact, light pollution impact or noise pollution impact have not even been investigated or a requirement of the consultant our BP&R has spent over $15,000 thus far. How can we expect our park commissioners and city council to make appropriate decisions? RESPONSE TO ASSISTANCE LEAGUE GRANTS TO MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHERS ELYSE RIDEOUT, San Clemente When you walk into an elementary or middle school classroom, you likely expect to see it decorated according to the subject taught. The music room always had music notes up on the walls, and the science room had skeletons with clever names. If a room wasn’t decorated, I didn’t expect to enjoy the class. So why, if this is something we have come to expect, do teachers have to apply for grants to be able to afford these setups? These dedicated instructors pay for fun decorations and other classroom enrichment out of their own pockets. It is immensely thoughtful for the Assistance League to award grants to these deserving teachers, but unfortunately, this is only a short-term solution. A lack of funding for public school San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

teachers is a concern across the country that needs to be addressed at the roots, not just at the surface. No teacher should feel that they need to pour their income back into their classroom, but much of the time they may feel stuck between their seemingly only options: pay to decorate the classroom and provide enrichment activities or leave the classroom as it is, and appear less invested in and devoted to their students.

for the rest of the dilemma associated with Amazon’s “fulfillment center,” aka distribution center, aka truck terminal. It certainly does not fulfill any of our ideals. We will have issues with health, safety, pollution, frustration, and mainly, deteriorating our quality of life. The City of Industry, between the 60 and 10 Freeways, was developed for just such an enterprise as the Amazon distribution center, eloquently called “fulfillment center.” Ontario, California also was designed for distribution, with the added benefit of a Free Trade Zone. I would suggest they relocate this proposed facility to either the City of Industry or Ontario, which has all of the infrastructure for 24/7 trucking, which our village does not.

GAS-POWERED LANDSCAPING EQUIPMENT BAN HARRY TOUART, San Clemente It’s long overdue that these environmental terrorists be eliminated from our lives. I’ve been pointing out for years to the city council and the city manager how bad these things pollute our air, damage our health, and create a public nuisance altogether. Here’s what the state of California finally admits: “Now, state officials say running a gas-powered leaf blower for one hour emits the same amount of pollution as driving a 2017 Toyota Camry from Los Angeles to Denver, a distance of about 1,100 miles (1,770 kilometers).”

JAKE’S PERSPECTIVE CHRISTIE MACLEAN, San Clemente Without Jake Howard, we would get one side of the story. Don’t we deserve and you want balance in the news you publish? Jake brings a perspective that challenges many peoples’ thinking on the environment. We must open our minds by looking at various viewpoints before we come to our opinions. Taking into consideration ethics, and not just profit, wouldn’t hurt, either.

AMAZON TRUCK TERMINAL-PORT OF SAN CLEMENTE GARY HEIN, San Clemente

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR POLICY

As many residents before us, we moved from LA County and have thoroughly enjoyed the ocean influence and clear skies associated with our village of San Clemente. Current information reveals a facility proposed in the Rancho San Clemente Master Association. It is a 104,000+ square-foot facility that would distribute products daily, 24/7, via semi-trailer trucks/delivery vans. Our HOA is a sub-association of the RSSCA Master Association, with our location on Calle Del Cerro. Our board has accepted the fiduciary responsibility for our association’s financial well-being, and to uphold/improve the standards for our association homeowners. I would expect our city council also to accept its sworn duty to maintain the village standards as set forth in the city’s Mission Statement. All city councilmembers were voted in, “of the people, by the people, and for the people.” It is time for all of them to represent all of the people of our village and defeat any proposition for this “industrial facility,” with the ensuing congestion of semi-trucks daily. Residents of San Clemente, take advantage of the internet—look up truck traffic congestion in Rialto, California (Linden St.) and also Milford, Massachusetts, both negatively affected by their approved Amazon facility. It is too late after the fact; we need to all vocalize our displeasure with any kind of Planning Commission/city council approval. The congestion is the precursor

San Clemente Times reserves the right to edit reader-submitted letters for length and is not responsible for the claims made or information written by the writers. Have something you’d like to say? Email your letter to sraymundo@picketfencemedia.com no later than 8 a.m. on Monday morning. Limit your letters to 350 words or less. Please send with your valid email, phone number and address for verification by staff. Your address and phone number will not be published.

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HOW TO REACH US CITY EDITOR Shawn Raymundo • 949.388.7700, x108 sraymundo@picketfencemedia.com SPORTS Zach Cavanagh • 949.388.7700, x110 zcavanagh@picketfencemedia.com ADVERTISING Laura Gaffney • 949.388.7700, x103 lgaffney@picketfencemedia.com DISTRIBUTION Racks, Driveways, Subscriptions Inna Cazares • 949.388.7700, x111 icazares@picketfencemedia.com GENERAL MANAGER Alyssa Garrett • 949.388.7700, x100 agarrett@picketfencemedia.com

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EDITORIAL City Editor, SC Times Shawn Raymundo

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Sports Editor Zach Cavanagh Columnists Fred Swegles Tom Blake Special Projects Editor Andrea Papagianis-Camacho Copy Editor Randy Youngman

Join SC Times for Beachside Chat on Friday, Oct. 29 at 8 a.m. at Dorothy Visser Senior Center Join SC Times for Beachside Chat at the local senior center. Beachside Chat is a spirited, town hall forum on community issues hosted City Editor Shawn Raymundo. The chat will be held at Dorothy Visser Senior Center, 117 Avenida Victoria. All are welcome.

CORRECTION: In the San Clemente

Times’ Oct. 21 edition, a Business Beat profile on Three Dog Bakery and its 15th anniversary misstated the date of the shop’s celebration. Three Dog Bakery celebrated its anniversary on Oct. 16.

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OPERATIONS General Manager Alyssa Garrett Group Operations & Production Coordinator Inna Cazares FINANCE Accounting & Finance Manager Tricia Zines CONTRIBUTORS Megan Bianco, Jake Howard

San Clemente Times, Vol. 16, Issue 43. The SC Times (sanclementetimes.com ) is published weekly by Picket Fence Media, publishers of the Dana Point Times (danapointtimes.com) and The Capistrano Dispatch (thecapistranodispatch.com). Copyright: No articles, illustrations, photographs or other editorial matter or advertisements herein may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for return of unsolicited manuscripts, art, photos or negatives. Copyright 2021. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. San Clemente Times is published weekly by Picket Fence Media, 34932 Calle Del Sol, Suite B, Capistrano Beach, CA 92624. Application to Mail at Periodicals Postage Prices is Pending at San Clemente, CA. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: San Clemente Times, 34932 Calle Del Sol, Suite B, Capistrano Beach, CA 92624.

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GETTING OUT

Editor’s Pick

The List What’s going on in and around town this week SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

Get a curated list of the weekend’s best events sent straight to your inbox every Friday! Sign up for The Weekender at sanclementetimes.com/weekender

FRIDAY | 29 HAUNTED HOUSE FOOD DRIVE 6-10 p.m. This family-run Haunted House will be open to visitors Friday through Sunday. During this “no touch” event, the homeowners will collect, as admission, canned goods to be distributed to Family Assistance Ministries. It is family-friendly fun for all ages, as the family does all the decorations, animatronics and lighting themselves, so it is not a professional haunted house. The homeowners will also hand out candy and glow sticks for the children.1601 Via Ameno, San Clemente. 618.975.3910. 2goodhearted@gmail.com.

SATURDAY | 30 TRUNK OR TREAT AT SOUTH OC CARS AND COFFEE 9-11 a.m. Join South OC Cars and Coffee for a Trunk or Treat to kick off Halloween weekend. The weekly event, dubbed the world’s biggest weekly car meet, is encouraging participants and motorists to bring candy to share, decorate their cars and come in costume. There will be prizes for the best decorated vehicle and also for the best costume. No cars in before 8:30 a.m. Cars should enter and leave slowly and quietly—no revving, speeding or burnouts. The Outlets at San Clemente, 101 West Avenida Vista Hermosa, San Clemente. southoccarsandcoffee.com. San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

Photo: Courtesy of Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens

THURSDAY | 28 CASA CREEPY HAUNTED HOUSE 7-9 p.m. Casa Creepy Haunted House is among South Orange County’s largest family-friendly Halloween attractions, with a 1920s-themed haunted house and gardens. Walk through 2.5 acres of the most haunted mansion on the block Thursday through Saturday. Werewolves, vampires and ghosts are waiting behind every corner of the historic home, and you can bet on plenty of creepy-crawlies in the gardens. The haunted house is suitable for most families with children ages 10 and up; please use discretion. Costumes are encouraged; costume masks not allowed. Medical masks will be required indoors. Last entry is slated for 8:45 p.m. each night. Admission is $12 for those 13 and older, and $8 for those 12 and younger. More info about the haunted house and where to buy tickets can be found at casaromantica.org. 415 Avenida Granada, San Clemente. 949.498.2139. of fruits, vegetables and artisanal goods from organic growers at the Community Center/San Clemente Public Library parking lot. 100 North Calle Seville. 949.361.8200. san-clemente.org.

PUMPKIN SPLASH 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m. This Pumpkin Splash event, hosted by the city of San Clemente, will take place over two sessions, one beginning at 11:30 a.m., and the second starting at 2 p.m., at the San Clemente Aquatics Center. Attendees of all ages can swim in the activity pool and play structure, float around with pumpkins, listen to spooky music, play on the inflatable obstacle course, and enjoy Halloween-themed activities in and out of the pool. Each participant will enjoy one pumpkin for decorating while supplies last. Entry fee is $7 per person (pre-registered space is limited). 987 Avenida Vista Hermosa, San Clemente. san-clemente.org.

TUESDAY | 02 SUCCULENT GARDEN CLASSES 10 a.m. Learn about gardening succulents at Casa Romantica’s gardens in this recurring class led by horticulturist Stephanie Knight. Cost to join is $80 for Casa members and $100 for non-members. Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens, 415 Avenida Granada, San Clemente. 949.498.2139. casaromantica.org.

HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARTY 9 p.m. Join Goody’s Tavern for its annual Halloween costume party, with $50 cash prizes for those with the most creative, funniest and sexiest costumes. DJ Larry will be on hand to get the party started for those 21 and over, only with valid ID. Goody’s Tavern, 206 S. El Camino Real, San Clemente. 949.492.3400.

WEDNESDAY | 03 PICKLEBALL DRILLS & SKILLS 11 a.m.-4 p.m. In partnership with the city of San Clemente and the Southern California Pickleball Association, coach Bill Miller hosts this weekly pickleball class at San Gorgonio Park, where participants have fun while learning the fundamentals of the sport and improving their game. Participants can practice basic shots, including the structure of an accurate serve, return of serve, how to dink

SUNDAY | 31 FARMERS MARKET 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Shop for a wide selection Page 7

and volley at the kitchen line, as well as work on paddle grip, footwork positioning on the court, and scoring. This class combines coaching and instruction with the fun of doubles play. Bring plenty of water. Court tennis shoes recommended. Paddles will be provided. Reservations are required. San Gorgonio Park, 2916 San Gorgonio, San Clemente. 818.535.5130. miller.william22@gmail.com. southerncaliforniapickleballassociation.com. BINGO AT THE SENIOR CENTER 1:30 p.m. Every Wednesday, the Dorothy Visser Senior Center will host Bingo. The center will begin selling cards at 1 p.m., with the game starting promptly at 1:30. The buy-in is $12 for 10 games with four cards and a special pick-your-number game. For more information, contact the center at 949.498.3322. Dorothy Visser Senior Center, 117 Avenida Victoria, San Clemente. MANDALA ROCK PAINTING 4 p.m. Led by Kelly Gallaher, this recurring class held at Casa Romantica allows participants to get Zen by using this Indian painting technique. Cost to join is $100 for Casa members and $120 for non-members. Casa Romantica Cultural Center and Gardens, 415 Avenida Granada, San Clemente. 949.498.2139. casaromantica.org. BIKING CLUB FOR MIDDLE SCHOOLERS AND HIGH SCHOOLERS 5-6:30 p.m. Anyone have middle school- to high school-aged kids who love to bike? Community Outreach Alliance’s biking club meets every Wednesday afternoon at different trails, with professional biker and mentor Mike Russell from Freakshow Aloha. San Clemente High’s COA club, which hosts this free activity thanks to Hardman Classic, has bikes and helmets for participants to borrow. To participate, fill out a registration form online at form.myjotform.com/91392099886576. For questions, call or text 949.795.4721. communityoutreachalliance.com. TRIVIA NIGHT AT THE BREWHOUSE 6:30-8:30 p.m. The BrewHouse hosts a trivia night every Wednesday. Test your knowledge with friends, or show up solo and join a team. The BrewHouse, 31896 Plaza Drive, Suite D3, San Juan Capistrano. 949.481.6181. brewhousesjc.com. BACKYARD OPEN MIC NIGHT AT KNUCKLEHEADS 8-10 p.m. Knuckleheads’ backyard is open for food, drinks and live music. Performers of all skill levels are welcome. If you are a musician, do stand-up comedy or the spoken word, this is the place to be on Wednesday nights. So, come down, grab a drink and go for it. Knuckleheads Sports Bar, 1717 North El Camino Real, San Clemente. 949.492.2410. knuckleheadsmusic.com. sanclementetimes.com


SC LIVING

GUEST OPINION | Historical Happenings by Tom Marshall

Mystery of President Nixon’s Will: SOLVED

A

ttached to a wall outside the Andalusia Restaurant in San Clemente’s Old Town Plaza is an ornate list of accomplishments of former San Clemente resident and President Richard M. Nixon. Toward the bottom, it states, “Gave land in his will to city of San Clemente.” A reader contacted the San Clemente Historical Society to find out if that is true, and if so, where is this land? The answer is, like the man himself, a little ambiguous. We found the Nixon will. The lengthy Feb. 25, 1994 document makes no mention of an outright grant of land to the city. Over a million dollars in cash (presumably much of it from the sale of his San Clemente estate at Cotton’s Point) and personal property was willed to the Nixon Presidential Library in Yorba Linda. The rest of his assets were divided up among his family members.

We don’t know who painted the scroll or when it was painted. But, it has sparked questions. The Nixon Library has no record of any property Nixon willed to San Clemente. Current and former city officials have no record of HISTORICAL Nixon giving land HAPPENINGS to the city, either, BY TOM MARSHALL but they point to a couple of transactions the author of the scroll might be referencing. Economic Development Officer Jonathan Lightfoot and Councilmember Chris Duncan note that Nixon, along with then-California Gov. Ronald Reagan, did help negotiate the 50-year lease with the Navy for the Trestles State Beach areas near the Western White House. That lease expired earlier this year, and a

three-year extension has been agreed upon while a long-term lease is being negotiated. Nixon liked to walk that stretch of beach when he was in town. That resulted in it being off-limits to others, including surfers who considered it the prime surfing spot in this area. The mystery scroll also mentions Nixon’s love of surfers. When made aware of the surfers’ unhappiness, he then cut the deal with the Navy so surfers and others could return to Trestles. Meanwhile, Nixon made a lonely beach, named Red Beach, on Camp Pendleton his place for private and secure beach time. That required a 13-mile helicopter ride from his residence. After resigning the presidency, Nixon was driven to the spot by Secret Service agents. Wayne Eggleston, a former San Clemente mayor, pointed to a second transaction the painter might be referencing. “The land someone may be referring

Chip

PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

Sudoku

SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

ADOPTABLE PET OF THE WEEK

to is the adjacent Navy land where (Nixon) had a helicopter pad, now Marine housing, but it was never San Clemente land,” explained Eggleston. When the former President moved from San Clemente to New York City in 1980, he probably wasn’t particularly happy with our town’s government at the time. He had wanted his presidential library located here, but city officials dithered due to traffic concerns, among others. Ironically, they built the Outlets at San Clemente there instead, and are bending over backward to attract people to shop there. Tom Marshall is a member of the San Clemente Historical Society and a retired journalist. SC

This little cutie is Chip, a sweet kitten now available for adoption. Only 3 months old, he is a bundle of energy and loves to run around and explore. Chip gets along with the other cats that he has met, and he will likely grow up to be a lovable kitty companion. Could Chip be the one for you? If you are interested in adopting Chip, please visit petprojectfoundation.org to download an adoption application form. Completed forms can be emailed to animalservices@scdpanimalshelter.org, and you will be contacted about making an interaction appointment.

BY MYLES MELLOR

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult. Level: Medium

See the solution in next week’s issue.

Local Real Estate By Local Experts Jeremy Conrad Broker, DRE# 01279209 949.542.8348 Jconrad@conradrealestate.com Bill Conrad Broker, DRE# 01461548 949.542.8349 Billc@conradrealestate.com Steve Conrad Property Manager, DRE# 01297404 949.542.8347 Stevec@conradrealestate.com

San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

Did you know that...

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•S an Clemente still has historically low inventory with just 59 homes on the market •9 44 homes have sold in San Clemente so far in 2021, with an average sales price of $1,463,609 and taking just 20 days to sell •C omparing the neighboring cities of Dana Point, with population of 33,000, and San Juan Capistrano at 34,000, San Clemente is almost double the size, at over 64,000 residents

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It’s time to expect more… Established 1963

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San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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SC LIVING

When Lifeguarding Began in San Clemente COASTLINES BY FRED SWEGLES

An early 1960s photo of the pier, from the lifeguard foundation’s collection, shows a small observation tower labeled Tower 0 atop the pier, at left. It evolved, around 1965, into San Clemente’s much larger Tower Zero, a well-recognized landmark today.

G

enerations of San Clemente ocean lifeguards this year are celebrating a 90-year heritage of protecting beach visitors and locals from the sea. Now, just imagine yourself, back in the year 1931, when the town of San Clemente—then a five-year-old beach attraction—was known as the “Spanish Village by the Sea.” San Clemente’s present-day Lifeguard and Junior Guard Foundation, led by historians Greg Hulsizer and Larry Moore, have documented the city council’s launching of a lifeguarding history at scljgfoundation.com, loaded with information and historical photos. On Jan. 2, 1931, Santa Fe Railroad launched construction of San Clemente’s first train station, promoted as “the first station on the ocean of the Santa Fe system … built on the sands of the beach” between Los Angeles and San Diego. “The beach was a big deal,” Moore said. The pier, ocean, surf and soft sand beaches were there in 1931, with amenities set up to entice beach families.” “You set up your gear on the south side of the pier and head to the water in your new beach ‘costume,’” Moore said. “Jumping over a few little waves, you have no idea a south swell set is coming. Moments later, the whitewater sucks you into the inSan Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

shore hole and the current is pulling you into the pilings. It’s terrifying ... and a daily occurrence on our beaches. That is why ocean lifeguarding goes back to the city’s early roots.”

COASTLINES

TRAIN STATION OPENS

The train station opened in April, eager to shuttle visitors for summer days or week trips. San Clemente would be offering comfort stations, beach safety and downtown hotels built since 1926, the year when San Clemente’s first collection of buildings went up. Town founder Ole Hanson dreamed of building a spectacular 100-room resort hotel on a hill overlooking what is now known as T-Street Beach. So, on July 16, 1931, San Clemente’s city fathers hired the Spanish Village’s first public lifeguard—paid $100 per month— to protect local residents and visitors on the beach through Labor Day of each summer season. We can’t be sure how many original lifeguards the city might have had. The lifeguard foundation was able to document the original hiring on July 16, 1931, from city council proceedings. Could there have been BY FRED SWEGLES

more lifeguards, either paid or as volunteers like volunteer fire departments had? Moore said, “We needed a lifeguard. Would it be bad business to have people getting frightened, or the beach looking a mess?” On Aug. 5, city fathers discussed the idea to install an at-grade railroad crossing and the coming establishment of San Clemente State Beach. Another idea was to string a long rope between pier pilings at sea level, so bathers could grab it if swept into the pilings. “That is so dangerous,” Moore said. Lifeguards also were asked to rake seaweed from the beach daily and remove litter. There were also mentions of lifeguards assisting barefoot visitors suffering from splinters while walking on the wooden pier.

AT LAST, CITY LIFEGUARDS San Clemente was touted as among Southern California’s fastest-growing towns from 1926 through 1930, featuring Spanish-designed homes and businesses, a golf course, a stylish clubhouse, an enticing beach club, the fishing pier, 3,000 feet of public beach, parks, a Spanish plaza, a Spanish schoolhouse and a network of equestrian trails. From 1926-28, the population went from zero to more than 1,000, according to the book The Heritage of Clemente. What Ole and his financier, Hamilton

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Cotton, said was that “this land appears to be available at a reasonable price, and we just need to sell people on the fact that they can build their slice in paradise,” Moore said. “This isn’t necessarily a place you’re going to move to and make your home full-time. You’re an hour and a half by dirt roads.” San Clemente was said to have the highest per capita income in the entire country, he said. “It’s a surreally piece of history,” Moore said. “To incorporate, city maintained all infrastructure, given to the city.” The newspaper El Heraldo de San Clemente insisted in 1931 that San Clemente could continue to grow, despite a national 1929 stock market collapse across America. “A piece of land is a solid thing that no stock market crash, no failure, can erase,” the local paper said, suggesting buyers invest in real estate at San Clemente. Hanson’s town, having built its infrastructure at no cost to property purchasers, donated the public facilities to the city for $1 after San Clemente incorporated as a city in 1928.

LIFEGUARDING THROUGH TOUGH TIMES The town, owning its water system and other infrastructures—all built by the Ole Hanson Organization to enable residents to not have to bear the costs— (Cont. on page 12) sanclementetimes.com


San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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SC LIVING

(Cont. from page 10) gave San Clemente a better chance to withstand Depression hardships and stay solvent, even as homeowners were in danger of losing their homes. The hotel for T-Street never got started. The population dropped, as many residents no longer could afford their homes. All the while, San Clemente’s beaches remained popular. Council meeting minutes from 1933 have a report about Lifeguard Russell E. Schneeberger rescuing three lives. Cliff Russell, a San Clemente lifeguard from 1937-40, mentioned how one of town founder Hanson’s sons—Bunny Hanson— was a lifeguard before Russell was. Teenager Hanson, described as a lively personality, “was very short and a bodybuilder and very proud of it,” his niece, Julia Watters, recalled. She had no knowledge of him being a San Clemente lifeguard back then. She said Ole Hanson named him Eugene Field Bunny Hanson, after a famed children’s poet, author of Wynken, Blynken, and Nod.

CLIFF RUSSELL’S MEMORIES

Three distinctive views show what is believed to have been San Clemente’s landmark lifeguard observation tower, built in the 1930s south of the pier. It was believed to be the first lifeguard tower. One photo shows a San Clemente teen, Don Divel, in the foreground with his towel and rescue personnel sitting nearby, plus a Santa Fe train at the pier. Another photo shows the tower by itself. A third photo shows a sunbather in the foreground. That photo appeared in the opening night’s dedication program for the San Clemente Theatre in 1938, promoting San Clemente.

San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

In a 2006 interview with lifeguards, Russell recalled that lifeguarding started out under management of the police department. “Organized lifeguard training was held in Long Beach, and only five to six lifeguards worked during peak summer months,” Lynn Hughes, the city’s lifeguard captain in 1980, was quoted as saying. “Guards did not use fins. They had no telephones and ran to all rescues, because they didn’t have vehicles,” Hughes said. “The majority of swimmers congregated on the south side of the pier.” Russell said in 2006 that he had arrived in San Clemente in 1935, when the town was down to a population of about 250 people. He was 16 or 17 when hired as a lifeguard, from 1937-40. “They had only one lifeguard, and that was me, in 1937,” he said. “Then on weekends, sometimes they’d hire one more. When we got big holidays on the Fourth of July, sometimes we’d get 5,000 people or more on the beach, and they’d hire one or two more lifeguards. We’d keep real busy.” Hughes said Russell worked out of San Clemente’s first lifeguard observation tower—built south of the pier. It had a 20-foot-tall ladder up to the observation deck and a pole to slide back down to the beach to sprint to an ocean rescue. Russell told how he had to grasp victims by the shoulders, and panicked swimmers were apt to fight for their lives. Lifeguards had learned how to reverse the resistance, stay under control with one arm. Eventually, lifeguards used a “torpedo” floatable assist, attached to their shoulder, to haul the victim. Visit the lifeguard association website

A photo of Cliff Russell describes a bit about his lifeguard times in San Clemente, 1937-40, with more from him viewable on the San Clemente lifeguard foundation’s website at scljgfoundation.com.

to hear Russell’s recollections.

A MEMORABLE RESCUE One of the earliest pictures of the beach tower shows a smiling San Clemente boy, Don Divel, with a Santa Fe train in the background. Divel would become a San Clemente lifeguard in 1939 at age 17. He recalled how part of his job was raking up seaweed, digging a hole to bury it, also helping beach visitors set up their orange and black umbrellas. One year, one of his ocean rescues involved a San Clemente girl six years younger than he. “I didn’t think I needed to be rescued, anyway!” Lois Driscoll said recently about that day. “But he thought I was struggling.” “He just said, ‘I think you’re in trouble out here. Just take my hand, and I’ll take you back into more shallow water,’” she said. “I thought it was pretty cute, pretty neat. There weren’t many people on the beach anyway, so he was doing his duty.” In 1946, as Driscoll was a senior in high school, she learned that her rescuer, Don Divel, was coming home from the Navy. He took her to the senior prom, and Don and Lois Divel were married that October. They became co-founders of the San Clemente Historical Society in 1973, ded-

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icated to preserving San Clemente’s heritage, historic buildings and showcasing the Spanish Village’s original resources.

THE EARLY LIFEGUARD RECORDS? Through the 1970s and ’80s, Moore was a San Clemente lifeguard. In the late ’80s, he transitioned from lifeguard lieutenant to establish a technology office at city hall. Part of it was uploading historic city paper records digitally into computers. City officials could then look up information, searching by name or topic. Years later, Lifeguard Chief Bill Humphreys researched to try to track down the word lifeguard or beach lifeguard for some history in digital city records. Nothing showed up. He tried the word Life Guard, and it clicked, turned up city council meeting actions or brief mentions—some lifeguard history from the 1930s. Fred Swegles grew up in San Clemente before the freeway. He has 50 years’ reporting experience in the city and can be reached at fswegles@picketfencemedia.com. SC PLEASE NOTE: In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the SC Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the SC Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@sanclementetimes.com

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SPORTS & OUTDOORS

Old Foes, Same Stakes San Clemente, Mission Viejo meet for league title, seeding in new playoff format BY ZACH CAVANAGH, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

A

s it has every season since the San Clemente football team returned to the South Coast League in 2016, the South Coast League championship race comes down to the final game of the regular season. And just as it has been every season since that 2016 return, the final game of the regular season is between the South Coast League’s top two title contenders: the San Clemente Tritons and the Mission Viejo Diablos. Mission Viejo (8-1, 2-0) hosts San Clemente (7-2, 2-0) on Friday, Oct. 29, at 7 p.m. For nearly two decades, Mission Viejo’s trips through the South Coast League were simple marches toward another league title coronation, with games such as the Tritons’ 7-6 loss on a missed extra point in 2005 or the Diablos’ last-second field goal to secure a 31-31 tie in 2007 mere speed bumps on that road to glory. However, over the previous three seasons, the Tritons have injected some energy and spice into what had previously been a one-sided rivalry. San Clemente had the audacity to actually beat Mission Viejo. In fact, the Tritons have now won two of their past three games against Mission Viejo—San Clemente’s first wins against the Diablos since 1999—and both have come in dramatic fashion. In 2018, San Clemente beat the Diablos with a 21-20 win fueled by a backup quarterback and a final-minute, two-point conversion stop. Mission Viejo exacted some revenge in a 38-6 win in 2019, but in the spring last season, the Tritons won again as the clock ran out with a last-play field goal for the 10-7 win. Make no mistake, those losses have stuck in the craw of Mission Viejo and Diablos head coach Chad Johnson. Mission Viejo has been on a warpath most of this season, and the Diablos will once again bring a vaunted offense to this matchup. Mission Viejo has scored fewer than 30 points only twice this season: a 44-7 loss to nationally ranked Servite and a 27-10 win over highly CIF-SS-ranked Sierra

San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

San Clemente and Mission Viejo meet once more for the South Coast League championship on Friday, Oct. 29, at Mission Viejo, as the teams fight for a league title and playoff seeding. Photo: Alan Gibby/Zone57

Canyon of Chatsworth. The Diablos are potent thanks to the return of all of their offensive stars. Junior quarterback Kadin Semonza has completed 69% of his passes for 1,982 yards and 21 touchdowns. Junior receiver Mikey Matthews has caught 49 passes for 659 yards and eight touchdowns. Senior running back Kenny Manassero has rushed 97 times for 602 yards and nine touchdowns. However, San Clemente would be quick to point out that Mission Viejo was similarly explosive on offense last season, but the Tritons held that group to 10 points in the spring. San Clemente enters Friday’s game with an offense that came fully back to life against Tesoro last Friday, Oct. 22. The Tritons beat the Titans, 49-35, as senior quarterback Lachlan Van Rosmalen ran for four touchdowns and 94 yards on just six carries. Van Rosmalen also completed 15 of 25 passes for 172 yards and a touchdown. Junior Thomas Hartanov stepped up at running back for an injured Blake Allen with 19 carries for 137 yards and a touchdown. Junior Reid Kotiranta caught six passes for 87 yards, and senior Easton Cattich caught the lone touchdown pass. In South Coast League play, San Clemente beat San Juan Hills, 16-10, and Tesoro, 49-35; Mission Viejo beat Tesoro, 45-3, and San Juan Hills, 42-22.

New CIF-SS Playoff Format Friday’s game will also represent the

last data point for San Clemente and Mission Viejo, as the two attempt to solidify their digital resumes in the calpreps.com computer power rankings. The calpreps. com rankings are the major component for CIF-SS’ new playoff system, in which the playoff divisions won’t be revealed until brackets are released on Sunday, Oct. 31. This season, in a further attempt for competitive equity in its playoff brackets, CIF-SS is basing its playoff divisions completely on the results of this current season with the help of the calpreps.com algorithm. In previous seasons, teams were placed in divisions ahead of the season based on results from the previous two seasons. However, many felt these divisions weren’t fair, as the system didn’t take into account graduation losses or transfer additions, meaning teams could be ranked too high or too low based on their current situation. Now, everything is based on these current-season results. A peek at the current calpreps.com rankings reveals the stakes some teams are playing for on Friday, and what role these power rankings and CIF-SS have in some teams’ playoff fate. As it stands, Mission Viejo is ranked No. 5 in the Southern Section with a 66.7 rating, and San Clemente is ranked No. 21 with a 48.5 rating. This means, as of now, Mission Viejo is slated to make the CIF-SS playoffs in Division 1, and San Clemente would be in Division 2. Division 1 will be at least an eight-team bracket, with the possibility of a nineor 10-team bracket. Once Division 1 is

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selected, the rest of the divisions will be separated based on the number of total automatic playoff qualifiers, with eligible at-large teams selected within certain groupings to complete 16-team brackets. Going into the final week, these are the top eight teams in descending order: Mater Dei (108.8 rating), Servite (91.3), St. John Bosco (86.5), Centennial of Corona (80.7), Mission Viejo (66.7), Santa Margarita (64.8), Los Alamitos (63.0) and Norco (62.4). The CIF-SS rules state that the next division down will start with an automatic qualifier as its No. 1 seed. As of now, the No. 9 team in the rankings is Orange Lutheran (60.5), which will be an at-large team. No. 10 is Sierra Canyon (60.0) and No. 11 is Edison (58.6), which are both automatic qualifiers. It will be CIF-SS’ decision to either cap Division 1 at eight teams, which would eliminate Orange Lutheran and put Sierra Canyon in Division 2, or include Orange Lutheran and/or Sierra Canyon in Division 1, which would make Edison the top team in Division 2. For San Clemente and Mission Viejo, things stay quite simple. A win for Mission Viejo keeps the Diablos in Division 1, but it’s also possible a loss wouldn’t knock them out of the top group, either. San Clemente is also unlikely to move from Division 2, win or lose, but the Tritons could improve seeding to possibly get a first-round home game. Either way, the rest of it is out of their hands, as the season comes down once again to the Tritons and the Diablos. SC sanclementetimes.com


PUBLIC NOTICES TO ADVERTISE: 949.388.7700, EXT. 111 • LEGALS@PICKETFENCEMEDIA.COM PUBLIC NOTICE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 30-2021-01227354-CU-PT-CJC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1) Petitioner: Shahrooz Brown filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name a. Shahrooz Brown Proposed Name a. Shawn Shahrooz Brown THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court of the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objective is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: 01/05/2022 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept. D100 Room: Remote Appearance. The address of the court is Central Justice Center, Superior Court of California, County of Orange, 700 Civic Center Drive West, Santa Ana, CA 92701 . For remote hearing instructions, go to the Court’s website at www.occourts.org; click on the “COVID-19” button; click on the “Civil” button; click on the “Remote Hearing Instructions” button. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Clemente Times, Oct 28, Nov 4, 11, 18, 2021 Date: 10/21/2021, Judge Layne H. Melzer, Judge of the Superior Court PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1719 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of San Clemente, at its meeting of October 19, 2021, introduced the following ordinance: Ordinance No. 1719 entitled AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN CLEMENTE, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTER 10.40 PARKING METERS. A full copy of the aforementioned Ordinance is available for review in the City Clerk’s Office, located at 910 Calle Negocio, San Clemente, California. Persons interested in receiving a copy of the Ordinance are invited to contact the Deputy City Clerk at (949) 361-8301 or by email at campagnolol@ san-clemente.org. NOTICE IS HEREBY FURTHER GIVEN that the City Council of the City of San Clemente will consider adopting the aforementioned Ordinance at its meeting of November 2, 2021 at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Community Center Auditorium, located at 100 N. Calle Seville, San Clemente, commencing at 6:00 p.m. JOANNE BAADE City Clerk and Ex-Officio Clerk of the Council

San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

ton; click on the “Civil” button; click on the “Remote Hearing Instructions” button.

PUBLIC NOTICE ORDINANCE NO. 1717

A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: San Clemente Times, Oct 14, 21, 28, Nov 4, 2021

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of San Clemente, at its Regular Meeting of October 19, 2021, adopted the following ordinance: Ordinance No. 1717 entitled AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF SAN CLEMENTE, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING SAN CLEMENTE MUNICIPAL CODE CHAPTERS 8.72 AND 12.34 RELATING TO SPECIAL EVENT PERMITS, AND SECTIONS 8.48.080 AND 8.48.090(C) RELATING TO AMPLIFIED SOUND AND EXCESSIVE NOISE IN PUBLIC PLACES; RENUMBERING THE MUNICIPAL CODE ACCORDINGLY; AND FINDING THE ORDINANCE EXEMPT FROM THE CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT.

Date: 10/06/2021, Judge Layne H. Melzer, Judge of the Superior Court PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20216616102 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1.CAPISTRANO MAZDA 32852 VALLE ROAD SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA 92675 ADD’L FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): 1B. CAPO MAZDA Full Name of Registrant(s): MISSION VOLKSWAGEN, INC. 32922 VALLE ROAD SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA 92675 This business is conducted by a CA Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: 10/01/2015 /s/MISSION VOLKSWAGEN, INC./ MILES D BRANDON/PRESIDENT This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 09/21/2021. Published: San Clemente Times, Oct 14, 21, 28, Nov 4, 2021

A full copy of the aforementioned Ordinance is available for review in the City Clerk’s Office, located at 910 Calle Negocio, San Clemente, California. Persons interested in receiving a copy of the Ordinance are invited to contact the Deputy City Clerk at (949) 361-8301 or by email at campagnolol@ san-clemente.org. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the above-referenced Ordinance was introduced at the City Council meeting of October 5, 2021 and was adopted at the Regular City Council meeting of October 19, 2021 by the following vote: AYES:

DUNCAN, JAMES, MAYOR WARD

NOES:

FERGUSON, KNOBLOCK

PUBLIC NOTICE

ABSENT: NONE

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20216616105 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: 1.CAPISTRANO VOLKSWAGEN 32922 VALLE ROAD SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA 92675 ADD’L FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): 1B. CAPO VW Full Name of Registrant(s): MISSION VOLKSWAGEN, INC. 32922 VALLE ROAD SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA 92675 This business is conducted by a CA Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: 06/01/1997 /s/MISSION VOLKSWAGEN, INC./ MILES D BRANDON/PRESIDENT This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 09/21/2021. Published: San Clemente Times, Oct 14, 21, 28, Nov 4, 2021

JOANNE BAADE City Clerk and Ex-Officio Clerk of the Council PUBLIC NOTICE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 30-2021-01225103-CU-PT-CJC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: 1) Petitioner: Vincent Jay Miller filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name a. Vincent Jay Miller Proposed Name a. Vincent Jay Dallas Miller THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court of the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objective is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20216616722 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: GRAF 777 AVENIDA SALVADOR SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92672-2369 Full Name of Registrant(s): ADNAN GHANTOUS 777 AVENIDA SALVADOR SAN CLEMENTE, CA 92672-2369 This business is conducted by an individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed

NOTICE OF HEARING Date: 12/14/2021 Time: 8:30 a.m. Dept. D100 Room: Remote Appearance. The address of the court is Central Justice Center, Superior Court of California, County of Orange, 700 Civic Center Drive West, Santa Ana, CA 92701 . For remote hearing instructions, go to the Court’s website at www.occourts.org; click on the “COVID-19” but-

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above on: n/a /s/ADNAN GHANTOUS This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 09/28/2021. Published in: San Clemente Times Oct 14, 21, 28, Nov 4, 2021 PUBLIC NOTICE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Case No. 21FL000662 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner Elizabeth Ellyn Gregory filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: Present Name A. Elizabeth Ellyn Gregory Proposed Name A. Elizabeth Ellyn Dallas Miller THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court of the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objective is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING a. Date: 11/05/2021 Time: 01:30 p.m. Dept.: L62 b. The address of the court is: Lamoreaux Justice Center, 341 The City Drive S. Orange, CA 92868, Other: REMOTE (1) If you plan to appear, you must attend the hearing by video remote using the court’s designated video platform; (2) Go to the courts website at: http://www.occourts.org/ media-relations/probate-mental -health.html to appear for probate hearings and for remote hearing instructions; (3) If you have difficulty connecting to your remote hearing, call (657)622-8278 for assistance. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: Date: September 13, 2021 JUDGE JULIE A PALAFOX, Supervising Judge, Family Law Published: San Clemente Times October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2021 PUBLIC NOTICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 20216616149 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: UTC TERMITE CONTROL 1740 N WILLOW WOODS DR UNIT C ANAHEIM, CA 92807 Full Name of Registrant(s): VEO INC 1740 N WILLOW WOODS DR UNIT C ANAHEIM, CA 92807 This business is conducted by a CA Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on: N/A VEO INC/S/MONIQUE LUNA/MONIQUE LUNA, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Orange County on 09/21/2021. Published in: San Clemente Times October 7, 14, 21, 28, 2021

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PUBLIC NOTICES TO ADVERTISE: 949.388.7700, EXT. 111 • LEGALS@PICKETFENCEMEDIA.COM

PUBLIC NOTICE

In accordance with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 U.S.C. § 2714(c)), the P00547 Pipeline, owned and/or operated by the San Pedro Bay Company, a wholly owned subsidiary of Beta Operating Company, LLC, which in turn is a wholly owned subsidiary of Amplify Energy Corporation (collectively “Amplify”) has been identified as the source of a discharge of oil into the Pacific Ocean off the California Coast on or about October 2, 2021. As noted by the Unified Command, as of October 8, 2021, preliminary findings estimate the discharge involved a minimum of 24,696 gallons, or 588 barrels of oil and a maximum of 131,000 gallons, or 3,134 barrels of oil. As noted by the United States Coast Guard, this discharge impacted the California Coastline from Long Beach down to about San Clemente. As the owner/operator of the facility and/or the lessee or permittee of the area in which the facility was located, Amplify may be liable for removal costs and damages and is therefore required to advertise the procedures by which persons who have claims for removal costs and damages may submit their claims. Removal costs and damages which may be compensated include removal costs performed in accordance with the National Contingency Plan; damage to natural resources; damage to or loss of real or personal property; loss of subsistence use of natural resources; loss of government revenues; loss of profits and earnings capacity; and increased cost of public services. Claims should be in writing, signed by the claimant, for a specified amount; and should include all evidence to support the claim. Claims presented may include claims for interim short-term damages representing less than the full amount to which the claimant ultimately may be entitled. It should be noted that payment of such a claim shall not preclude recovery for damages not reflected in the paid or settled partial claims. Claims should be mailed to the following address: Name: Chris Moore Company: McClaren’s Inc. Address: 500 W. Colorado St., Unit C PMB 144 Glendale, CA 91204 Office hours are from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM PT, Monday through Friday, except holidays. Claimants may call 1-866-985-8366 for information. Any claims which are denied or which are not settled within 90 days after the date of submission to our claims representative may be submitted to: Director National Pollution Funds Center (Ca) US COAST GUARD STOP 7605 2703 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR AVE SE WASHINGTON, DC 20593-7605 San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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ATTORNEY

Aaron Lloyd Bankruptcy Attorney 2377 S. El Camino Real, San Clemente, 949.544.9355, lloydlegal.com

BODY MIND SPIRIT ARE YOU HAPPY? Let us assist you in creating a life plan for the life & relationships you want & deserve. Body Mind Spirit, 949.248.7377, bodymindspirit.com DENTISTS

Benjamin Stevens, D.D.S. 3553 Camino Mira Costa, Suite B, San Clemente, 949.493.2391, benstevensdds.com

Eric Johnson, D.D.S. 647 Camino de los Mares, Ste. 209, San Clemente, 949.493.9311, drericjohnson.com

ELECTRICAL

Arcadia Electric 949.361.1045, arcadiaelectric.com

LOCALS ONLY BUSINESS DIRECTORY

ENVIRONMENTAL INSPECTIONS 3West Environmental, Inc. www.3westenviro.com Residential & commercial inspections for mold, asbestos and lead paint. 310.400.0195

LIST LOCALS ONLY. USE LOCALS ONLY.

Call Lauralyn for pricing at 949.388.7700, ext. 102 or lloynes@picketfencemedia.com

HOME IMPROVEMENT/ REMODELING

Hoover Construction License B-774675 949.292.6778

PROSTHODONTICS Hamilton Le, D.M.D., F.A.C.P. 1001 Avenida Pico, Ste. K, San Clemente, 949.361.4867 (GUMS), moranperio.com

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT

Buy • Consign • Sell

949.395.5681 (24 hours)

classicautosalesoc.com

We also offer professional appraisals, auction services, restoration and shipping.

2485 S. El Camino Real San Clemente

REALTORS MUSIC LESSONS

FIREWOOD FOR SALE Jack McKay, Owner 949.449.0445 mckayja29@gmail.com Call for prices. Earning money to purchase my first car. Perfect for campfires, beach fires, home fires.

Bill Metzger Plumbing 1001 Calle Recodo, San Clemente, 949.492.3558, billmetzerplumbing.com

Rock Club Music School 73 Via Pico Plaza, San Clemente, 949.463.1968, beachcitiesrockclub.com

PERIODONTICS & DENTAL IMPLANTS Dr. Alice P. Moran, DMD 1001 Avenida Pico, Ste. K, San Clemente, 949.361.4867 (GUMS), moranperio.com

Dr. Raymond L. Wright Jr., DDS 1001 Avenida Pico, Ste. K, San Clemente, (949)361-GUMS (4867), sanclementeperiodontics.com

SALONS “Sandy & Rich” RE/MAX Coastal Homes 949.293.3236, sandyandrich.com

PLUMBING

A to Z Leak Detection 1001 Calle Recodo, San Clemente, 949.481.7013, atozleakdetection.com

Scott Kidd, Berkshire Hathaway Home Services 949.498.0487, skidd@bhhscal.com

Salon Bleu 207 S. El Camino Real, San Clemente, 949.366.2060, scsalonbleu.com

VETERINARY HOUSE CALLS Dr. Damon Goldstein, DVM 626.485.9355, damongoldstein@outlook.com “Personalized Care for your Fur Babies at your Home”

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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BUSINESS DIRECTORY

San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

PLACE YOUR BUSINESS CARD HERE

PLACE YOUR BUSINESS CARD HERE

Call Lauralyn Loynes at 949.388.7700, ext. 102 or lloynes@picketfencemedia.com

Call Lauralyn Loynes at 949.388.7700, ext. 102 or lloynes@picketfencemedia.com

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SC SURF

Surf Club Season Is Here Powerhouse San Clemente Looks to Maintain Winning Tradition BY JAKE HOWARD, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

S

an Clemente is the de facto hotbed of American surf talent. That’s not an understatement or hyperbole. From the old guard to the up-and-coming next generation, nowhere else in the United States boasts the accomplishments and depth that this little Spanish Village by the Sea does. Consider that right now, with Kolohe Andino and Caroline Marks, half of the U.S. Olympic surf team lives in town. In Griffin Colapinto, we have the U.S. Open winner. Then there are world champs Kelly Slater and Mick Fanning, who’ve both been posted up here as of late. And we haven’t even touched on all the former Groms of the Week who are taking their act out on the international stage at the moment. But it’s not just the surf stars who make this place magical. It’s everyone else who’s dared to chase their dreams and dedicate themselves to the pursuit of wave-riding. And that’s where the San Clemente Board Riders Club (SCBC) comes in.

San Clemente standout Sawyer Lindblad has been hammering away this season on the WSL Challenger Series and is one of the most valuable members of the San Clemente Board Riders Club. Photo: Courtesy of Shawn Parkin

SCBC is a chapter of the West Coast Board Riders (WCBR), a consortium of clubs from surf towns up and down the California coast (and now expanding to the East Coast for the first time this year). The concept has been modeled after the widely successful Australian surf clubs. An opportunity to bring different groups of surfers from town together, the clubs are focused on building community. As the tagline reads, “The future is local.” On Nov. 6, San Clemente will host the first event of its 2021 WCBR season at San Onofre’s Church Beach. The San Clemente chapter will compete in a team format against clubs from Dana Point, Laguna Beach and Newport Beach. “We’ve been doing a lot of behind-thescenes work over the last few months

GROM OF THE WEEK

MOSES HENNINGS BY JAKE HOWARD, SAN CLEMENTE TIMES

B Moses Hennings. Photo: Courtesy of NSSA

San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

ig ups to San Clemente’s Moses Hennings, who took out the Boys’ Under-10 division at the NSSA competition in Oceanside earlier this month. It’s never boring when you’re scoring, and thanks to some epic 3- to 4-foot surf with classic autumn conditions, Hennings and his fellow competitors made the most of the crossed-up northwest and southwest peaks. For those who haven’t seen Moses

and are really excited about where we’re at,” says club co-founder Benji Severson. “One of the big foundational moves we’ve made is to transition the club to a nonprofit status. And to be honest, I’ve been pretty blown away by the level of support we’ve enjoyed.” The San Clemente Board Riders Club has recently locked in a partnership with surf company Rip Curl, as well as solidified their relationships with Stance, Jack’s Surfboard and Nomadix. “Rip Curl has roots here, and what’s more roots than supporting the local surf community in a real transformative, grassroots level?” says Frankie D’Andrea, the San Clemente Board Riders Club vice president. “To have that kind of commitment and

down at the San Clemente Pier, T-Street or Lowers shredding with his buddies, the young man has been ripping as of late. In fourth grade at the duel immersion Las Palmas Elementary School, his Spanish is on point, and he’s ready for some deep Baja missions. A stylish regular-footer, Hennings enjoys the support of surfwear brand Hurley and does his ripping on Rumaner Surfboards. He lists Olympian Kolohe Andino and world champ Carissa Moore as his favorite surfers—both of whom also represent Hurley. With so much talent in the water around San Clemente these days, Hennings and his fellow groms have no shortage of inspirations. Quite literally, the sky is the limit. SC Page 18

support from a company like Rip Curl, it’s going to make a difference,” D’Andrea further explains. “We couldn’t do what we do without the support of our sponsors; they’re part of the family, and that’s what this whole thing is all about.” For the first time, the San Clemente Board Riders Club is also awarding a scholarship to one of its members. Partnering with Left Coast Brewing Co. on the initiative, this year’s recipient is Sawyer Lindblad, who’s on the verge of qualifying for the WSL Championship Tour. After big results at the U.S. Open and in Europe, she’s one event away from graduating to the biggest stage in surfing. These funds will go toward helping her turn her dreams into a reality. “The Lindblads are such an awesome local family and so representative of what we’re all about,” Severson says. “In one of the club contests, we had Sawyer, her brother Taj, and their father, Marc, all competing.” “Hopefully, this scholarship helps Sawyer keep pushing forward,” Severson says. “Whether she makes the Tour this year or not, we’re so proud of her, and it means the world to be able to support her journey.” The WCBR season will culminate with the national championships coming to Lower Trestles later this year. And, hopefully, if things go according to Severson and D’Andrea’s plan, they’ll have a lot to celebrate in front of the hometown crowd. Jake Howard is local surfer and freelance writer who lives in San Clemente. A former editor at Surfer Magazine, The Surfer’s Journal and ESPN, today he writes for a number of publications, including Picket Fence Media, Surfline and the World Surf League. He also works with philanthropic organizations such as the Surfing Heritage and Culture Center and the Positive Vibe Warriors Foundation. SC

SURF FORECAST Water Temperature: 62-64 Degrees F Water Visibility and Conditions: 2-4 Thursday: Easing mix of West/northwest and South/southwest swell shows strongest in the morning, with waist to head high waves, (35’). Light/variable winds in the morning, shift to a light+ west sea breeze in the afternoon. Outlook: Friday’s surf levels off at waist to shoulder high, (3-4’). Mainly light southerly winds on Friday. Fresh South/southwest swell maintains waist-stomach-chest high waves, (2-3-4’) through the weekend. Light+ to moderate southerly winds for Saturday. Light/ variable winds early Sunday are followed by a moderate west sea breeze the rest of the day.

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San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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San Clemente Times October 28-November 3, 2021

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