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Winter Gardens: Step by step guide to Place Making Winter Gardens: Step by step guide to Place Making is based on the research of two communities that were found prominant in the coastal town of Margate. By applying the purpose of cross-programming to the inactive zones of Winter Gardens, the building behaves as a hub for multiple programmes. The permanent communities; four of Margate’s main discussion groups, provide an opportunity to gather public and create public realm and interaction. With the transient community, bus passengers arriving into Winter Gardens offers an opportunity to manipulate dwell and waiting time at the bus stop. However, in accordance to Marc Augé’s theory, bus stops could be considered as ‘non-place’. The focus is on the attention of the destination and not the bus stop. They are relied on memory to exist in, despite the contradiction of these spaces being the focus of regeneration to enhance culture and society. Therefore, challenging the concept of ‘non-place’ versus ‘place’ was heavily explored in this project. The design was inspired by seaside ride, dodgems, to adapt and capture the humour that exists in fairgrounds. The cross-programming is based on eight micro architecture devices that form their own network within Winter Gardens and contribute to existing networks in Margate to enhance interaction, involvement and regeneration. Within the interiors of Winter Gardens, the intention is for the users to question the transitition from the public and private in terms of the use of materiality, and whether they are in an urban condition set within the interiors.

01.

Exterior View


02.

02.

Urban Interior concept

03.

Analysis + sketch

04.

Overall model

04.

03.


a

1 x Stainless steel grid

b

1 x Galvanised steel mesh

c

1 x Steel conductive floor

d

1 x Facade structure

e

7 x LED Linear light panels

f

8 x Large movable woven glass facade panels

g

1 x Concrete ramp

h

18 x Circular light panels

i

9 x Small fixed woven glass facade panels

j

10 x LED diagonal light panels

k

8 x Micro architecture

a

b

c

e

f

h

i

j

k

d 05.

Kit of parts

06.

Axonometric of whole scheme 1:1250

g 05.

06.


B

A

07.

08.

07.

Mid-level plan 1:2000

08.

Rear Elevation 1:200

09.

Sectional Elevation A - A 1:200

09.

A

B


a b

c

d

e

f

10.

11.

10.

Sectional Elevation B - B 1:200

a

Canopy cladding with services

11.

Movable facade detail 1:20

b

Steel box section 150 x 200mm

c

Steel CHS facade frame

d

Existing facade

e

Triple glazing in aluminium-wood frame

f

Glass-fibre fabric, silicone coated


8

4

1

12.

13.

2

3

14.

1 5

2x

15.

2

9

6

1x

2x 16 x

4x

1

1x

3

Illluminated shelter Pop-up shop

14.

Garden space

15.

Discussion + meeting space

16.

Reading room

17.

Café

18.

DIY Café micro architecture

2x

1x

7

1x

13.

4x

1x

2x

2x

4x

2x

2x

1x

2x

1x 2x

16.

17.

2x

2 1x

12.

4x

18.

4x

1x


19.

CafĂŠ micro architecture prototype

20.

Internal view


The Activist Interior The Activist Interior deals with the design of an artist-in-residence studio and exhibition at the Crescent House, Golden Lane Estate, Goswell Road, London. The project creates a complex spatial proposition which recognises and negotiates a series of thresholds between: private and public, inside and outside, open and close. The design creates a customisable and transformable space which contains: a working studio area, an area to exhibit work and basic facilities for eating and sleeping. The design proposal accommodates changeable patterns of use where various kinds of art practices need specific requirements in space, light conditions and equipment. Therefore the project focuses on art practices of painting, sculpture, video, performance and graphic design. The Activist Interior intends to establish a controlled connection with interior and architecture for the artist-in-residence and the general public, allowing the site to integrate and become “a bit of city” (Penoyre, 2012). The project questions, ‘What is Public Space?’, therefore explores usual interior programmes and activities that artists tend to associate within an interior, such as a studio space, and questions what would happen when these programmes are placed outside due to the design of a series of devices. The design of the artist-in-residence gives the possibility to subdivide the differences of interior and architecture when necessary. Objects are fragmented and taken apart to create form and functionality within and outside of the site. This will in effect create appropriate uses and influences in context, which are dependant on the user’s activities.

01.

Golden Lane Estate City Analysis

Around Golden Lane Estate Houses in Golden Lane Estate Public Spaces Public Spaces joining to Goswell Road


a 02.

Main design moves

b

c

d a

Existing site

b

Interior walls, front, rear and basement facades removed

c

Implement tracks and new facade

d

Objects placed into facade

e

Facade and objects in use

e


a

A

A b

03.

c

d

e

f

g

A

A

h

04.

05.

03.

Ground Floor Plan 1:200

a

Hardwood framing for facade

04.

Basement Floor Plan 1:200

b

Metal rail support

05.

Facade transformable element

c

Screw

detail 1:5

d

50mm caster wheel

e

LR55 Rail: 165mm wide, 35mm curve

f

Elastometric bonding grout

g

LR55 Trough: 380mm wide

h

Ground road base


06.

Facade + components diagram

07.

Front elevation 1:100

06.

07.


08.

Sectional Elevation A - A 1:50


09.

10.

09.

Exterior view

10.

Interior view


The Barbican Centre Roundabout By observing and recording human activity in multi-arts and conference venue The Barbican Centre, it was evident that a congestion of people after finishing an event would allocate and gather themselves under the circular orange suspended light. The Barbican Centre Roundabout derived from analysing the existing entry and exit routes in accordance to this meeting point. The proposed intervention is situated on the Ground Floor level, therefore this created an opportunity to conceptually think about the way facilities are connected on different levels to this centre point. The mass and congestion of people produced a moment to manipulate the space through a conceptual intervention of glass routes that provided a direct route from one facility to another, whilst still maintaining the central point as a pivot and a hub as a meeting and social space. By creating routes and the concept of a motorway, urbanising the interior, just like a motorway, it would alter and force the way people would walk and hence control the congestion and build up of people under the suspended lighting.

01.

The Barbican Centre Roundabout Diagram


BAR/CAFE TO INFORMATION

THEATRE LEFT TO THEATRE

BAR/CAFE TO ENTRANCE

RECEPTION TO HALL THEATRE

CAR PARK TO CAR PARK

BAR TO TOILETS

LOUNGE BAR TO FOUNTAIN ROOM

02. THEATRE RIGHT TO CAR PARK

SHOP TO LOUNGE BAR

HALL CIRCLE TO BARBICAN FOOD HALL

02.

Interior view

03.

Movement analysis

04.

Axonometric and materiality of routes

PROPOSED MATERIALS

OAK

03.

04.

PVC

GLASS

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