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Who Needs the Old Testament?

Unique Commissioning for Messengers of the Kingdom

Hope for Forgiveness in a “Cancel Culture”

THE VOICE OF THE ARMY

July 2020

Salvationist.ca

More Than a Memory Keeping Youth Ministry Alive in a Summer Without Camp


July 2020 • Volume 15, Number 7

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Amazing Gracie

Hi kids!

Did you know that a newborn can’t see very far away? She can only see blurs of light and shapes. It takes a whole month for a baby’s eyes to develop enough to see her mother’s face, just a few inches away. In this week’s Bible story, we see Abram’s faith in the way he trusts God with his whole life, even when God doesn’t show him the full picture. Abram new and his wife, Sarai, move to a strange Abram and land when God calls them to. Next, give them a Sarai ask God to do the impossible—to to have one! child, even though they are too old when he Abram trusts God with his future, even to trust Him can’t see what’s ahead. Can we learn like Abram?

ISSUE

23

Your friend, Kristin

CLARENVILLE, N.L.—When Gracie Marsh, a junior soldier at Clarenville Corps, celebrated her birthday earlier this year, she decided to use the occasion as a fundraiser. She asked her friends to give her money instead of gifts because she wanted to support The Salvation Army’s Partners in Mission campaign. Together, Gracie and her friends raised $157. Here’s Gracie with her corps officers, Majors Bill and Velma Preston.

10 Differences

Word Search

Find

T P F E I M E K DA NE X E NA NE F A

Y O A T Q R Y Y V I

H S NO I U M L D N D E P W A M M R T H

N T I R A S G T K P

U H A B L S A R A I

C Q F R B E U I V A

C Z D V S L T L B V

J D E Y E B O U F W

BLESSED CHILDREN FAITH HOME LAND NATION OBEYED PRAYED SARAI STARS

JUST FOR KIDS Just for Kids is an exciting weekly activity page published by The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda for children ages five to 12, packed with Bible stories, games, puzzles, colouring, jokes and more. We’ve now partnered with Canada Bermuda Youth to incorporate elements of the ORANGE curriculum.

DEPARTMENTS 6 Frontlines 21 Cross Culture 23 Ethically Speaking #Cancelled by Alex Stoney

24 People & Places 26 Family Matters Kids and COVID-19 by Captain Bhreagh Rowe

COLUMNS 4 Editorial Hairy Situations by Geoff Moulton

5 Onward The Main Thing by Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd

20 Grace Notes Beyond COVID-19 by Captain Laura Van Schaick

22 Viewpoint Oh, Canada by Darryn Oldford

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FEATURES 9 Inheriting Crisis From Greece to Canada, Major Rachele Lamont continues to combat human trafficking with new appointment. Interview by Leigha Vegh

10 Messengers of the Kingdom Commissioned Canada and Bermuda Territory welcomes 14 officers in a unique livestreamed event. by Pamela Richardson

12 Campfires, Canoes and COVID-19 Camps are not able to operate this season, but there are things we can do to keep the foundational benefits of camping ministries alive. by Major Terence Hale and Chris Noel, with Captains Juan Chirinos and Indira Albert, Rachel Lee, Misha Pavey, Caitlin West, Majors Carson and Teresa Decker, and Cody Russell

Due to the pandemic shutdown, Just for Kids, along with our other publications (Salvationist, Faith & Friends and Foi & Vie), has temporarily gone to a digitalonly format. Visit Issuu.com/ Salvationist to download and print this month’s issues of Just for Kids. Cover illustrations: LiaRey/stock.Adobe.com

READ AND SHARE IT! “Thanks for Helping Me”

SALVATION SUPPORT P.8

Warrior Woman

MULAN MOVIE P.18

Caring During COVID-19

A HELPING ARMY P.5

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

SUMMER 2020

17 Monday Morning Meditation A retired Salvation Army officer finds a surprising new ministry. by Major Gary Venables

18 All of a Piece Is the Old Testament irrelevant? by Donald E. Burke

The Kick Off

TOM SCOTT IS GOING FOR GOLD AT THE 2021 OLYMPICS IN TOKYO. P.16

Salvationist  July 2020  3


EDITORIAL

Hairy Situations

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any of us have found new skills in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown. When my 13-year-old son came to me and asked, “Dad, can you cut my hair?” I couldn’t hide my shock. Getting James to go to the regular barber had always been a fight. Now he wanted me to wield the clippers? Before he could change his mind, I put down some towels and gathered the required equipment. I did not want to mess it up, so I went slowly, evening out one side and then the other. “Dad, why is it taking so long?” he lamented. “I want it to be a work of art,” I replied. “Well, don’t make it abstract art!” I think Captain Bhreagh Rowe knows how I’m feeling. Check out some of her suggestions for life with kids and COVID-19 (page 26). Her reminder to value “grace, not perfection” certainly resonated with me. And her encouragement to “try something new,” including helping kids to love their neighbours, is a great thing to add to our to-do lists. The pandemic has also taken things from us. One loss we are mourning is our summer camping season. But as Major Terence Hale and Chris Noel note, we don’t have to stop discipling our young people (page 12). In our cover story, we

Salvationist

is a monthly publication of The Salvation Army Canada and Bermuda Territory Brian Peddle General Commissioner Floyd Tidd Territorial Commander Lt-Colonel John P. Murray Secretary for Communications Geoff Moulton Editor-in-Chief and Literary Secretary Giselle Randall Features Editor (416-467-3185) Pamela Richardson News Editor, Copy Editor and Production Co-ordinator (416-422-6112) Leigha Vegh Associate Editor and Staff Writer 4  July 2020  Salvationist

hear from campers and staff across the territory about what a difference camp has made in their lives.

It’s a chance to not just go to church, but to be the church

the church in our communities. For the time being, we must embrace every opportunity to connect, whether it’s over the phone, watching a Sunday service online or participating in a Zoom call. When we finally get together again in person for worship, it will be a joyous reunion—even if we still have to physically distance. And I’m guessing some of us will have some pretty wacky haircuts!

Another change is that the Messengers of the Kingdom were commissioned in a unique livestreamed event and not in a large public celebration (page 10). Yes, they have been commissioned and ordained and have received their appointments, but it will be a while before we can physically gather together to honour them. In the meantime, they go into a world that needs them more than ever. When it comes to the pandemic, we are all fumbling our way toward a “new normal” as Captain Laura Van Schaick notes (page 20). What that will be, we do not know. But it’s an opportunity for us, as Christians, to re-evaluate the things that truly matter to us. It’s a chance to not just go to church, but to be

Brandon Laird Senior Graphic Designer Hannah Saley Digital Media Specialist Ada Leung Circulation Co-ordinator Ken Ramstead Contributor Agreement No. 40064794, ISSN 1718-5769. Member, The Canadian Christian Communicators Association. All Scripture references from the Holy Bible, New International Version (NIV) © 2011. All articles are copyright The Salvation Army Canada and Bermuda Territory and can be reprinted only with written permission.

GEOFF MOULTON EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

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Mission

The Salvation Army exists to share the love of Jesus Christ, meet human needs and be a transforming influence in the communities of our world. Salvationist informs readers about the mission and ministry of The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda. salvationist.ca facebook.com/salvationistmagazine twitter.com/salvationist youtube.com/salvationistmagazine instagram.com/salvationistmagazine


ONWARD

The Main Thing Reflecting on 100 Days of Unceasing Prayer and Shared Scripture. BY COMMISSIONERS FLOYD AND TRACEY TIDD

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ife is filled with so many experiences. Experiences that shape us. John Dewey, an American philosopher, psychologist and educational reformer in the first half of the 20th century, once said, “We do not learn from experience ... we learn from reflecting on experience.” As a territory, we recently shared the experience of 100 Days of Unceasing Prayer and Shared Scripture, with more than a thousand people taking part from January 1 to April 9. During the final weeks of the 100 Days journey, we extended an invitation to reflect on the experience. What was God saying through his Word as we read selected passages from Genesis to Revelation? What was God saying through his people as we read prayers from 100 different ministry expressions across the territory? We are grateful to the more than 100 people who took the time to share their reflections on this experience. Together, we are learning from these reflections. In addition to the specific learning shared with us, we are sensing that these 100 Days prepared us for this uncharted time in our world. The Salvation Army in Canada and

Bermuda, through its diverse ministry expressions, is responding to the new reality of a COVID-19 world. Through the 100 Days experience, we have become more informed about how to pray for one another as together we share the love of Jesus, meet human needs and, through the power of God, serve as agents of transforming influence in our communities. There is much we are all experiencing these days. We encourage you to find quiet moments to reflect on what are we learning about our world, our neighbours, ourselves and our God. Allow us to share some of the recurring themes from the reflections submitted by those who shared the 100 Days journey. God is speaking, his people are listening and we are all learning. What are you hearing? What are you learning? One prominent theme was a strong sense of celebration of all that God is doing through The Salvation Army in so many different expressions across the territory. God is at work, as evidenced by lives being transformed. The reflections repeatedly noted an awareness of God’s work wherever we are engaged in the community. One participant observed, “We are a missional movement. God is still sending men

and women, youth and young people for the purpose of redeeming a lost world. God is still using The Salvation Army on the front lines to serve the most vulnerable and poverty stricken in our communities, but also to engage individuals and families whose need for him is manifested in other ways.” The reflections captured a message of hope and challenge: “The future is bright.” Spiritual hunger and renewal were evident: “God appears to be guiding The Salvation Army to consider change to better serve.” The message of coming change was deeper than programs and structures; there was an awareness of God calling us to a change of heart, a pursuit of holiness. “Through Scripture, I believe God is calling us to have pure hearts (undivided hearts), so that we can be ready and useful vessels for him. He is calling us to pursue faith, love and peace, and to be patient with one another.” Reflections on the prayer points offered for the communities in which we live and serve included the recurring image of “salt and light.” The current COVID-19 pandemic and the restrictions it has placed on all our lives has made an impact on how we do life and ministry. Yet The Salvation Army has found ways to continue connecting, build community and offer Christfollower service to others. As one person noted, “The Army must always continue to be flexible, missional and faithful in living, serving and proclaiming.” As territorial leaders, we express our great appreciation to all who participated in the 100 Days journey and shared their reflections on the experience. What we have learned continues to shape the understanding of the leadership team in this territory. This final thought is an encouragement and a challenge for us all: “As I reflect on the intercessory prayer requests and the Scripture readings, the heart cry of the Army of God is hope for the broken, and for souls to be won for Jesus. This is incredibly encouraging. It says we’re keeping the main thing, the main thing.”

Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd Salvationist  July 2020  5


FRONTLINES

Congradulations! Booth UC Convocation Goes Virtual

Lt Courtney Kelly is the recipient of the 2020 General’s Medal in recognition of her high academic standing

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ach April, Booth University College students, family, faculty and staff gather in Winnipeg for convocation ceremonies. This year, however, graduation looked a little different due to COVID19. Large gatherings were prohibited, but nevertheless, the show had to go on, and Booth UC did a great job to honour its graduating students. Students were invited to watch a special celebration video created by Booth UC graduate Camillia Layne, who earned her bachelor of social work. The video featured encouraging messages from the graduating students, alumni, faculty and staff of the University College. Using #BoothUCGrad2020, graduates

were also encouraged to share images, words of reassurance and prayers to build a virtual graduation experience. The graduates were also sent a gift package in the mail, which included their degree or certificate, and a few other items to commemorate their accomplishments. “This is not the way I hoped to celebrate your convocation weekend,” noted Dr. Marjory Kerr, president, Booth University College, in a video message. “I was so looking forward to welcoming you back to campus, to shaking your hands as you walked across the stage. You will forever be remembered as the COVID-19 class of 2020 … but the resilience, flexibility and grace under pressure that you have demonstrated in recent weeks will hold you in good standing for whatever may come in your personal and professional lives.” The 2020 Chancellor’s Medal was still awarded on what would have been “Convocation Day,” to Zachary Marshall, a Salvationist from Newfoundland and Labrador, who graduated with a bachelor of administration degree. The Chancellor’s Medal is presented to a student with a high academic standing who has demonstrated significant spiritual development and contributed to the life of the college and greater community. “Zach, we’re proud of you,” said Dr. Kerr. “Congratulations and God bless you.” Lieutenant Courtney Kelly, who graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in biblical and theological studies, received the

General’s Medal, awarded by the General to an extended learning graduating degree student who has achieved high academic standing. That person must have shown potential for leadership in The Salvation Army and have a clear grasp of the mission and theology of the Army, including the doctrine of holiness. “General Brian Peddle joins us in extending his congratulations and best wishes to you,” said Dr. Kerr. In the celebratory video, student Katerine Torres, who earned her bachelor of arts degree in psychology, summed up the mixed feelings of joy and disappointment: “Congratulations to everybody that I was supposed to be graduating with in April. I was really looking forward to this moment, but it’s OK because later we’re going to be able to celebrate.”

Zachary Marshall is the recipient of the 2020 Chancellor’s Medal for his high academic performance and contribution to the community

Bermuda Division Receives Donation from Law Firm

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n the Bermuda Division, local law firm Conyers, Dill and Pearman made a generous donation of $15,000 to The Salvation Army during the coronavirus pandemic. “This crisis will have a long-term impact on the fabric of our community,” says Christian Luthi, Conyers’ chairman. “We were proud to support The Salvation Army. They mobilized quickly to offer shelter for an increased number of displaced persons and were providing essential humanitarian relief in the most vulnerable parts of our community.” The Army in Bermuda experienced an increased demand for food, shelter, cleaning supplies and staffing in order to serve the community during the pandemic. More than 716 families received help with almost half being first-time clients of the food banks. In response to the COVID-19 crisis, the Army also quickly took measures to extend the shelter’s operational hours to 24-7. “We are grateful for the generosity of Conyers, Dill and 6  July 2020  Salvationist

Pearman in support of our social and community ministries here in Bermuda,” says Major Sandra Stokes, divisional commander. “They are helping make a genuine difference in the lives of people in need.”

“We are proud to support The Salvation Army,” says Christian Luthi, Conyers’ chairman


FRONTLINES

Calgary Food Hamper Pop-up Sees Overwhelming Demand

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he Salvation Army Community Services in Calgary served more than 2,000 people, half of them children, in the first week of their pop-up food hamper events around the city in response to COVID-19 in May. In just two events, the Army served 465 boxed hampers, 730 hot meals and 150 children’s lunch bags, which included fun activities. When the first event saw an overwhelming demand for food, organizers turned it into an ongoing series of pop-up food hamper distribution sites throughout the city in May and June. “It was the craziest two hours of my life; we were not prepared for so many people needing help,” says Jane Ellen

Forbes, community services ministries manager at The Salvation Army in Calgary, recalling the first pop-up event. The initiative started as a response to a gap in services when the hot meals programs for children were suddenly no longer available after school closures. That’s when The Salvation Army stepped in and collaborated with “Brown Bagging for Calgary’s Kids” to bridge that gap. “We’re hoping to be able to continue this support in various locations throughout the next two months,” says Karen Livick, executive director for The Salvation Army Community Services. “Through this simple act of support for the families, our desire is that we’re giving them hope in this time of uncertainty.”

These events were made possible by funding from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada as well as community donations.

A food hamper pop-up site in Calgary

McCain Foods Donates 150,000 Pounds of Potatoes

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Two Army staff stand next to bags of potatoes donated by McCain Foods

illing food bank orders throughout the Maritime Division was a little easier thanks to a generous donation of 150,000 pounds of potatoes from McCain Foods in May. “We couldn’t believe our eyes,” says Captain Jamie Locke, divisional secretary for public relations and development. “We are so grateful for their generosity.” The potatoes were delivered to locations in Halifax, Sydney, N.S., and Fredericton, where they were organized by volunteers and distributed to Salvation Army food banks in the regions. “Everyone is coming together to help those who need it the most. We are so fortunate to have community partners like McCain Foods who are stepping up during this difficult time,” says Captain Locke.

Orillia Army Offers Spiritual Care

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Lt Lynnette Trottier (left) helps to prepare a food hamper for a family in need in Orillia, Ont.

he Salvation Army’s food bank ministry in Orillia, Ont., offered the chance to pray with a staff member when calling in to place a request for a food hamper during the coronavirus pandemic. The operation transitioned to a hamper model, allowing clients to call in to request special items, while ensuring physical distancing guidelines were kept. On average, the ministry received 15 calls a week that started with a request and ended in a prayer. “We are so grateful that we could share the love of Jesus Christ with those who were looking for hope in the midst of this chaos,” says Lieutenant Lynnette Trottier, corps officer and community

ministries officer. “It was our privilege to walk alongside people and pray with them, so they knew that there was someone who cared on the other end of the phone.” With growing demands from the pandemic, the ministry served food hampers to more than 450 individuals per month, which was a significant increase from before. “We were blessed to serve our community and they were so thankful to know that we were there for them,” says Lieutenant Trottier. The team running the food bank are determined to ensure the people of Orillia are taken care of both physically and spiritually, she notes. Salvationist  July 2020  7


FRONTLINES

Raptors “Superfan” Donates Meals to Mississauga Temple

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he NBA season may have been put on hold because of COVID-19, but that didn’t stop the one and only Toronto Raptors Superfan Nav Bhatia from showing up. On May 6, he left staff speechless at Mississauga Temple Community Church in Ont., when he delivered 100 readymade meals with a food truck from his self-titled charity, the Superfan Nav Bhatia Foundation. Joel Binner, director of community and family services at the church, says the whole process of how they scored a visit from Bhatia was comical. A contact at the Peel Regional Police called one morning and asked if they would be ready by noon to accept 100 meals. Ann Pugh, who also works at the temple, ran into Binner’s

Nav Bhatia delivers 100 ready-made meals to Mississauga Temple CC

office and emphatically said, “We need some families to come in at noon!” Just before noon, the Superfan truck rolled up to a parking lot full of families patiently waiting in their cars to catch a glimpse of Mississauga’s local celebrity. Bhatia also took time to share joy

with the local community by taking pictures and signing autographs—all while respecting physical distancing guidelines. “It was quite the thing to see the faces of our clients light up,” Binner reminisces. The impromptu event turned out to be a slam dunk.

Lieutenants Serve at Goderich Food Bank

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ieutenants Derek and Angela Kerr, corps officers at Suncoast Citadel in Goderich, Ont., came full circle when they served at a food bank in the community. In 2009, Derek fell sick and, being unable to work, had to muster up the courage to visit a Salvation Army food bank. “It took me a few attempts to go to The Salvation Army’s food bank,” says Lieutenant Derek Kerr. “But when I got through the door, the love and support I received on the other side made it worthwhile.” Now, Lieutenants Kerr are spearheading a group of volunteers to serve

food to those experiencing homelessness, who are hit especially hard during the COVID-19 pandemic. “The effects of community closures are extreme for people who call the streets home,” says Lieutenant Angela Kerr. The weekly hampers included an assortment of healthy food. Every Saturday, the Army cooked up hot meals as well. “In the coming days, we anticipate the demand on our community and family services will be great,” says Lieutenant Derek Kerr. “The small business owners who were once our supporters may now be the ones needing our help. Meanwhile,

we remain on the front lines assisting where we can.”

Lts Derek and Angela Kerr support the community of Goderich, Ont., during the pandemic

Former Addict Donates 4,000 Fish Fillets

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From left, Glenn van Gulik and Jay Barnard share a moment together

8  July 2020  Salvationist

ay Barnard, a chef who was once assisted by The Salvation Army, donated 4,000 fish fillets from his own freshwater fish company, Freshwater Cuisine, to The Salvation Army in Toronto for distribution to its food banks in April. “Owning a food processing company, I wanted to do something positive in the midst of a negative time,” says Barnard. Now a Red Seal chef and business owner, Barnard struggled with addiction and attempted suicide twice before finding the strength to ask for help. “The Salvation Army helped me gather

the tools that I needed to have this recovery and this life that I’ve always wanted but didn’t know how to get,” says Barnard. When he heard of the increase in demand at Salvation Army food banks, he reached out to help. One thousand people benefited from Barnard’s donation. “At a discounted price to The Salvation Army, families and individuals will eat fresh fish that ultimately came as a result of Jay’s journey to recovery, which started at The Salvation Army,” says Glenn van Gulik, divisional secretary for public relations, Ontario Division.


Inheriting Crisis From Greece to Canada, Major Rachele Lamont continues to combat human trafficking with new appointment. “Canada is considered a transit, destination and source country for human trafficking,” says Mjr Rachele Lamont

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ajor Rachele Lamont has been newly appointed as the territorial co-ordinator for antihuman trafficking for the Canada and Bermuda Territory. Associate editor Leigha Vegh spoke with her to discuss her new appointment. What led to your new appointment as the territorial co-ordinator for anti-human trafficking and national contact person for the Canada and Bermuda Territory?

I’ve just transitioned out of Greece where my husband and I had been for the last four years. I was the coordinator for anti-human trafficking for the whole region. When I started, I had inherited the emergency disaster response to the refugee crisis and the anti-human trafficking response that was ongoing for about eight months already. So, I developed and ran a community services refugee day centre, which offered case management, advocacy and different programs to help families integrate. One of our top concerns was sex and labour trafficking and exploitation of high-risk persons such as refugees, migrants and undocumented persons who were coming into the country. How did your experience in Greece prepare you for the work you’ll be doing in Canada and Bermuda?

What I did in Greece is similar to what I’m doing now. It’s part of a global response from International Headquarters. Every territory, command and region need a co-ordinator for modern slavery and human trafficking. We also require a national contact person so that we can network with each other and work proactively in situations of human trafficking, exploitation and slavery. In a sense, I had already

been doing this in Greece, so now I get to continue my efforts, but in another territory. We’ve had a team going now for about a year, so I get to use my experience from Greece to help the team here while we’re still in the grassroots. Is there human trafficking going on within the territory that people should be aware of?

Yes, absolutely. There is sex trafficking, labour trafficking and commercial sexual exploitation of children going on. For example, in Ontario and British Columbia, there are seasonal agricultural programs that have undertones of exploitation. There are also temporary migrant worker and caregiver programs where people can be taken advantage of. Canada is considered a transit, destination and source country for human trafficking, so people from Europe, Asia, the Caribbean and Mexico are either coming to our country or passing through our country to the United States and further south. What do you hope to achieve?

A lot of things. The Salvation Army has a deep history of fighting social injustices, and one of them is human trafficking. My hope is that we go back to those roots and become passionate again about this social injustice. It’s a part of who we are in Christ because he has

such a heart for justice as well. Another hope I have is that we learn about human trafficking as it pertains to every level of our structure, such as women’s ministry, social services, children and youth ministry, and refugee work to name a few. Not only do we need to become aware of it, but then we must stand and fight it. As it becomes a natural part of our structure, we will start seeing the fruit of our prevention, protection and partnership initiatives. We will see people being freed and healed; we will see people realizing who they have been created to be in Christ. I would love to see more shelters specifically for human trafficking and after-care programs happening throughout our territory, so that it becomes our norm. What is it like starting a new appointment during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Coming from Greece, where we were in the midst of an economic crisis, a homelessness crisis and a food crisis, I found the transition to Canada easier in the sense that in Greece we inherited one crisis after another, so transitioning to COVID-19 in Canada seems natural to me. I’m stepping into a great team that is already in place. I appreciate all their efforts before I even got here—all the sweat and tears, all the hearts that I now get to join with. The team has been here faithfully, so I’m just going to continue building on that. Major Rachele Lamont spent four years as the co-ordinator for anti-human trafficking in Greece. Now, she’s bringing her expertise to the Canada and Bermuda Territory, hoping to incorporate a response to human trafficking at every level of The Salvation Army. Salvationist  July 2020  9


Messengers of the Kingdom Commissioned Canada and Bermuda Territory welcomes 14 officers in a unique livestreamed event. BY PAMELA RICHARDSON

Photos: Winnipeg—Cdt Amy Patrick; Toronto—Alexandria Gerard

Messengers of the Kingdom and training college staff share a moment together

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e rejoice that God has called you, equipped you and gifted you for sacred service,” declared Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd, territorial commander and territorial president of women’s ministries, as they ordained and commissioned the Messengers of the Kingdom Session on June 20. With travel and social-gathering restrictions in place due to COVID-19, the livestreamed event took place across two time zones and two provinces. As the cadets and training college staff gathered at the College for Officer Training (CFOT) in Winnipeg, Commissioners Tidd and Colonels Edward and Shelley Hill, chief secretary and territorial secretary for women’s ministries, joined them online from territorial headquarters in Toronto. The sacred service began with Colonel 10  July 2020  Salvationist

Edward Hill expressing words of welcome to those gathered in Winnipeg as well as the many people watching the proceedings from across the territory and around the world. “In spite of our physical separation, we are brought together by our shared commitment to God’s mission,” he said. Following the call to worship by Major Darlene Morgan, director of spiritual formation at CFOT, and the reading of Luke 9:1-6 by Colonel Shelley Hill, Major Andrew Morgan, principal, commended the cadets to the territorial commander. “I ask Salvationists to join me in praying that [they] will be used mightily so that the kingdom of God will be fully realized on earth as it is in heaven,” he said. Cadets Susan Roffel, Andrew Sweet and Danielle Feltham recited the Officer’s Covenant that had been signed by each

cadet in anticipation of their commissioning. The Messengers of the Kingdom then presented the doctrines of The Salvation Army in their Affirmation of Faith. Focusing on Ephesians 3, Commissioner Floyd Tidd shared his prayers of expectation for the cadets, that they would embrace the dimensions of God’s kingdom, experience its full power and live to the glory of God. “Invite the Spirit to do a continuing work in your life, to conform you into the likeness of Christ and to give you a fresh power to live in a way that glorifies him,” he urged. Commissioners Tidd stood together to ordain each cadet as a minister of the gospel of Jesus Christ and commission them as an officer with the rank of lieutenant. Later in the service, the first appointments of the new officers were recognized.


Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd with Colonels Shelley and Edward Hill

As a video presentation featuring the children of the Messengers of the Kingdom entertained those gathered in person and online, the new officers left the room to return moments later in uniforms bearing the red epaulettes with one star that identify them as lieutenants in The Salvation Army. Speaking on behalf of her sessionmates, Lieutenant April Keeping highlighted their outstanding character and commitment to mission and ministry, especially in light of the pandemic. “We are facing unprecedented and quickly developing realities which are difficult to predict and manage,” she said. “We have seen that in our own commissioning, but I know it is not a coincidence that we are commissioned today as Messengers of the Kingdom. We carry with us the message of the presence of God’s kingdom here on earth during these uncertain times.” Following recognition of the parents and spiritual mentors of the new officers who were admitted to the Fellowship of the Silver Star, Commissioners Tidd acknowledged the summer assignments of the Messengers of Grace Session as well as five cadets who will enter fieldbased training appointments in their second year of study. Major Elizabeth Nelson, assistant principal, brought the service to a close and prayed God’s blessing on the new officers as they embark on a life of ministry. View the entire ordination and commissioning service online at youtube.com/ watch?v=KcznBC_7fis.

A glimpse behind the cameras at CFOT

Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd salute cadets during the commissioning service

Lts Kyron and Emily Newbury are commissioned in Winnipeg via livestream

Lts Brandon and April Keeping, with their three sons, receive their first appointment

Lt Danielle Feltham recites the Officer’s Covenant

Mjr Andrew Morgan commends the cadets to the territorial commander

Salvationist  July 2020  11


Campfires , Canoes and COVID-19 Camps are not able to operate this season, but there are things we can do to keep the foundational benefits of camping ministries alive. BY MAJOR TERENCE HALE AND CHRIS NOEL

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t’s undeniable that camp changes the lives of campers and staff alike. Camp is a place to stretch yourself. Camp is a place to make lifelong friendships. Camp is a safe place to be yourself. Camp is a place that makes leaders. Camp is a place to live in Christian community. Camp is a place to feel included, maybe for the first time. Camp is a place to have a transformative encounter with Jesus. The benefit and impact of Salvation Army summer camping ministries are not easily measured, but there are five foundational things we believe camp offers. A safe environment for children and youth. Camping ministry creates a

Illustrations: LiaRey/stock.Adobe.com

place of safety and refuge for many children who do not experience security at home or in their community. At camp, young people can enter a safe place and feel the freedom to simply be kids and enjoy the fellowship of God’s creation. A sense of community. In a society that is nearly infinitely connected yet desperately lonely, camp is an opportunity to connect with others on a foundational level. Camp is the birthplace of life-changing, lifelong relationships—just ask any former camp staff member who is regretting not being able to be at camp this summer. A medium for connecting with God.

Camp offers our most fruitful ground for evangelism and introducing others to a transforming relationship with Jesus Christ. We’ve seen first-hand how God transforms lives at camp. 12  July 2020  Salvationist

Leadership development. Being a camper, and more directly working on camp staff, transforms your life mentally, emotionally and spiritually. At camp young people grow into the men and women God has designed them to be. Ask around, and you will find more people than you may expect whose lives and leadership were impacted by a camp experience. A practical and direct means through which we serve and are a transforming influence in the communities of our territory. We provide

a summer experience to children and youth that would not be possible for many. In doing so we are being the compassionate hands of Jesus at work in our neighbourhoods, towns and cities. Due to COVID-19, camps are not able to operate this season. We invite you not to despair the loss of a camping season,

but to dream. How can you carry on these five elements of camp—safety, community, evangelism, leadership development and service? Can you think about just one way you can help fulfil one of these elements of camp, and then ask the Spirit to help you follow through? Pray for our camps. Please join us in praying for the campers who would have come through our camps this summer— that they would still have that safe space, still stretch and grow, and still meet Jesus. Join us in praying for the staff who would have been at camp—that they would find other ways to join in ministry, continue to develop their leadership skills and still grow as Christ followers. And join us in a prayer of submission to the Holy Spirit, asking, “God, how do you want to carry on the spirit and impact of camp through me this summer?” What follows are reflections from representative camp staff members and divisional youth secretaries on their camp experiences and how they are keeping the spirit of camp alive this summer. Because this is God’s work and not ours, and God’s time and not ours, we are believing for even greater things, and are trusting that this summer will be more impactful than those before it, even though we cannot do things the way we have done them in the past. Major Terence Hale, territorial youth secretary, and Chris Noel, administrative assistant/camping standards specialist, are part of the Canada Bermuda Youth team at territorial headquarters.


A New Perspective by Captains Juan Chirinos and Indira Albert, divisional youth secretaries, Quebec Division

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hen we reflect on the ministry that takes place at Camp Lac L’Achigan in the Quebec Division, we clearly remember our arrival in the summer of 2017. The beauty of nature was all around us, but what we couldn’t see then was the impact this place would make on our lives. As divisional youth secretaries, camp ministry gives us a great opportunity to not only speak into the lives of campers, but the staff as well. As we have shared in daily devotionals, coached, mentored and built meaningful relationships with young people, we have seen consistent spiritual growth every summer. Some have shared that this is where their real journey with God began. Thursday night chapel is always the most meaningful time of the week, when children are invited to accept Christ. And when the service ends, staff gather to pray for every decision made. God’s overwhelming love and the movement of the Holy Spirit are so real! While COVID-19 has brought about the closure of camps this summer, we are excited about the new possibilities the Lord is bringing to us. We are adapting with new perspectives and strategies in ministry, because ultimately, who or what can stop the mission? Online Bible studies, devotional videos tailored for young people, spiritual training and coaching are making an impact, not only on those who would attend camp, but on all who access the resources. God is opening broader avenues of ministry and he is allowing us to reach new audiences. We praise God for the team of young leaders who are part of the divisional youth committee here in Quebec. Together, we are reimagining and innovating how to spread the gospel in ways that are relevant and effective.

Cpts Juan Chirinos and Indira Albert (front, left) with staff from Camp Lac L’Achigan

“I want to carry on the spirit of camp right where I am,” says Rachel Lee (second from left)

Out of the Comfort Zone by Rachel Lee, St. John’s Temple, Newfoundland and Labrador Division

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usic camp has always been my favourite week of the year. As soon as the final program ended, I counted down the days until I could go back. When I became older and found out that I could live at camp for the whole summer as a staff member, I jumped at the chance. For the past five summers, I’ve had the privilege of working at Camp Starrigan and at Twin Ponds Camp in the Newfoundland and Labrador Division, first as a cabin counsellor, then as head counsellor, and last year, as the program director. I have so many funny memories from my years at camp. No where else would I get proposed to by a six-year-old camper, perform my Olympic figure skating routine and voluntarily smash a raw egg over my head all on the same night! Camp is truly my favourite place on earth, and it has helped make me who I am. It was at camp that I first understood God’s love for me and asked him into my heart, first led someone to him in prayer and regularly saw campers give their burdens to him. It was at camp that God showed me his unlimited provision and faithfulness, and that I saw first-hand his unconditional love and ability to bring light to even the darkest situations. Camp has taught me the importance of being joyful and having a positive attitude and has given me the courage to share God’s love with confidence. I’ve learned that having an authentic faith and a personal relationship with Jesus is more important than having your faith look as others think it should. Although camp is not going ahead this year the way it normally would, I want to carry on the spirit of camp right where I am. I will reach out to people for those deep, friendship-building chats that seem to always happen while staring at the stars or the top bunk above you. I will continue to break out of my comfort zone and do things that scare me. I will intentionally and passionately share how God’s love and grace is extended to everyone, no matter what. I will dance often, belly laugh loudly, eat a second dessert whenever possible, and keep on smiling, rain or shine, knowing I am abundantly blessed. Salvationist  July 2020  13


My Mission Field by Misha Pavey, Richmond Hill Community Church, Ontario Division

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rowing up attending divisional camps as a faculty kid and camper, I never imagined that I would spend years working at camp. I’ve been on the summer staff of Ontario Camping Ministries since 2013, when I was a part of the Timothy 2 leaders-in-training program at Jackson’s Point Camp. That summer changed my life and ignited the love and passion I have for camp. I’ve served in a variety of roles at Jackson’s Point and Newport Adventure camps, including as a cabin leader, Timothy 2 leader, Bible co-ordinator, assistant program co-ordinator and co-ordinator of the Timothy program. I’ve been challenged, encouraged and strengthened as I cared for the kids in my cabin, led a group of teenagers into Algonquin Park for an out-trip and learned the life-changing power of sharing the gospel message. Camp has been the place where I found and became me. One of my best memories is from the first summer I would spend at Newport, as the Bible co-ordinator. Although I was ecstatic and believed it was my calling to lead Bible, I was terrified of the unknown. During our final staff orientation worship time, I sat at the back of the auditorium filled with fear and some regret for having accepted the position. As a friend prayed with me, I sensed the Holy Spirit whispering to my heart, “Newport is your mission field, and you aren’t always sent where you want to go.” God, knowing my fear, did not give me an out but rather affirmed me in what I was called to do. That message whispered to me then is my encouragement this summer to all who feel the loss of camp. Right where you are—whatever corps, town, city, division—is your mission field, and you aren’t always sent (or allowed to be sent) where you want to go. What opportunities can you create to replace the regular rhythm of going away to camp? Who can you teach cornet lessons to even though it won’t be followed by canteen? What parents around you might need you to entertain their kids for an hour or two? And most importantly, who needs to hear the gospel? The Holy Spirit has reminded me lately that he just needs our hearts and willingness to serve. It is my hope that we will all find the opportunities God is prompting and leading us to this summer.

“Camp has been the place where I found and became me,” says Misha Pavey

14  July 2020  Salvationist

“My memories of Camp Sunrise are as clear as a picture,” says Caitlin West (front, second from right)

A Second Home by Caitlin West, The Willows, Langley, British Columbia Division

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can’t easily recall things from my childhood, such as birthday parties, favourite TV shows or big vacations, but my memories of Camp Sunrise in the British Columbia Division are as clear as a picture. My connection to the camp goes back to when it was founded in 1925, when my great-grandfather was the divisional youth secretary. When my family moved back to Canada from England and settled in Surrey, B.C., in 1997, my parents became instantly involved at Sunrise. I remember watching the “big kids” march around camp, led by the bass drum, for morning flag raising when my parents helped lead junior music camp, and listening for the bell to ring out throughout the day to announce when the next activity or meal was to start. I looked forward to music camp, my favourite week of the summer, and I don’t ever remember feeling homesick while at camp because it was a second home to me. Before I was even old enough to realize it, it became the place where I felt the love of God stronger than at any other place in the world. My dream to work at Camp Sunrise was planted when the energy, life and love of my camp leaders combined with their love for Christ to make a lasting impact on me. The staff who pushed me on the swings, sang songs with me and led me to Jesus are the ones I try to reflect in my life. From talking to campers as their cabin leader about the love of Jesus, to spending my summer up in the trees as the ropes course co-ordinator, to planning wacky campfires as the recreation director, to my current role as program director working out of divisional headquarters, I’ve been living my dream for the past eight years. Not being able to physically attend camp for the first time in my life will be a very strange and sad experience, but I am filled with the knowledge and hope that the God we serve is so much more than a physical place. I believe he will continue to move and work in the hearts of the children and adults who would have come through our campground this summer. I am confident that God will use this time away to ignite a passion for him in ways that we can’t even imagine.


a break from the rrigan staff take (below) Camp Sta life busyness of camp ian Glen Camp er has fun at Scot mp (right) A young ca

Camp Sunrise is a great place to

connect with nature


Paying it Forward by Cody Russell, Fredericton Community Church, Maritime Division “Silly shenanigans” are part of the fun at Scotian Glen Camp, says Mjr Carson Decker (left), shown here with Cody Russell

Heaven on Earth by Majors Carson and Teresa Decker, divisional youth secretaries, Maritime Division

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ampfires, Bible time, swimming, field games, fireworks, the buzz around the meal table, staff worship nights and latenight conversations are just a few of our favourite camp things. This summer marks seven years for us as divisional youth leaders, first in the British Columbia Division and now in the Maritime Division. While this appointment provides numerous blessings, camping ministry is the highlight. Seeing a camper have a “wow” moment from trying the climbing tower or canoeing for the first time, watching campers and staff form friendships, witnessing a camper say “yes” to Jesus, and observing staff grow and mature in their faith and leadership are moments forever etched in our memories. Camp is a place of acceptance, understanding, laughter and transformation. We are privileged and blessed to share in this amazing ministry. Sure, days are long, and sleep is often in short supply, but it’s worth it to see the impact it has on the lives of others. We have experienced the value of teamwork, the power of influence and the strength of community. It has been a pleasure to mentor and encourage our staff, to offer support and guidance, to help them develop to their full potential for the kingdom and empower them to lead. Our lives are richer, and our own leadership strengthened as a result of this unique ministry. Like all camps across the territory, Scotian Glen Camp will remain closed this year, but we have not given up on camping! We are exploring virtual options, camp in a box and DIY ideas to offer our camp family. Maintaining a connection with our campers and staff is important for us. That doesn’t change. Salvation Army camping is an ideal setting for life-changing, fun-filled adventure and a wise investment in both camper and staff lives. It truly is a little piece of heaven on earth.

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o say that I love camp would be the understatement of a lifetime! Being able to serve God and minister to so many kids over my eight years on the staff of Scotian Glen Camp in the Maritime Division, where I’ve been a kitchen support worker, counsellor, head male counsellor, Bible director, activities co-ordinator and climbing tower co-ordinator, has been the greatest blessing of my life. From music camp to youth retreats, camp has been my home away from home since I was seven years old, thanks to the efforts of my leaders, counsellors and faculty members. They took the time to encourage me and to make sure I was having fun and felt included in what was going on. Those moments defined me and planted seeds in my heart that would eventually grow into something God could use to serve his people. A highlight of my time at camp is the opportunity to have one-on-one conversations with campers to talk about how amazing Jesus is and answer any questions they might have. As I watched one camper pray and pour out his heart to God, I was filled with so much joy and happiness that I could not explain it in words. It was in that moment I realized leading someone to Christ is the most awe-inspiring thing I can do. That’s why I choose to work at camp—to follow the example set for me by my camp leaders all those years ago, to encourage young people and to show them the way to Christ. And maybe, one day, they will be able to do the same for the next generation. The thought of not having camp this year was hard for me. My heart goes out to the kids who look forward to camp, especially those who see it as a safe place to get away from difficult home situations. I may not be able to minister directly to campers this summer, but I can still reach out to staff members. If I can put a smile on one of their faces with an encouraging message or share the joy and spirit of camp with them, it would be amazing!

“Leading someone to Christ is the most awe-inspiring thing I can do,” says Cody Russell (left)

16  July 2020  Salvationist


Photo: Mjr Marion Venables

Mjr Gary Venables posts a short musical piece on Facebook every Monday morning as a time of worship

Monday Morning Meditation A retired Salvation Army officer finds a surprising new ministry. BY MAJOR GARY VENABLES

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t all started with a Christmas gift of a pocket cornet five years ago. While I was giving it a try, playing an old prayer chorus, my son-in-law shot a short video. I posted it on Facebook to show my older brother, who lived in Ottawa at the time, although he has since passed away. I knew others would be able to see it, but I didn’t think anyone else would be interested. To my surprise, there were several comments from Salvationist friends, expressing how nice it was to hear one of the old songs. One even suggested I post a video every Monday morning, “to get the week off to a good start.” While I suspected he wasn’t totally serious, I thought I would comply with the suggestion by posting one or two. I called it “Monday Morning Meditation.” The response was overwhelming. Within weeks, views, likes and comments

increased in large numbers. I received requests to lengthen the meditation from playing once through a chorus to something more substantial, and to make the posts available for sharing. Friend requests, shares and comments from the United States, the United Kingdom, Europe, Australia and even Africa were, at the same time, gratifying and humbling. It seemed evident that a door had opened to a ministry I never would have anticipated. From the first, I thought it was important to include the precious words to these old songs and choruses. In many cases, contemporary worship songs don’t contain the depth of theology of the older songs. This theological richness makes them a strong teaching tool, second only to the Bible. The way music marries lyrics and harmonies helps the words sink in. I can

hear a melody and not only am I tantalized by the sound, but it brings me into deeper understanding and communication with God. It’s a form of meditation. I try to sing the songs with my cornet, and people feel they can sing along with me. Sometimes a song will just pop into my mind, and other times I look through the Salvation Army song book. I try to choose songs that are meaningful, without repeating any. I record five or six meditations at a time and add the lyrics before making the weekly posts on Monday morning. This has enabled me to post regularly, having missed only two postings in five years. The views can be anywhere from 500 to 2,000. After more than 40 years of service as a Salvation Army officer, this ministry has been an unexpected blessing in retirement. Surprise and delight have accompanied this opportunity to serve, as friends and strangers alike approach me, acknowledging and expressing gratitude for the new ministry God has given me. I play in the London Citadel Band and I’m the principal cornet player for the divisional seniors’ band. A few years ago, the London Citadel Band went on a trip to the U.S.A. Southern Territory, and every place we stopped, somebody said, “You’re the guy who plays on Monday mornings!” That happens quite regularly whenever we leave the corps and go out. The number of people who look forward to Monday Morning Meditation as a devotional time continues to surprise and humble me. I think it’s not so much my playing as the fact that I’m reintroducing some of the old music that people don’t hear regularly. This is God’s ministry and I’m grateful he’s using me for it. Opportunities for ministry are more plentiful and available than one can dream of. All it takes is an open mind, a willing heart and a response to the Holy Spirit’s urging. Major Gary Venables is a retired Salvation Army officer who attends London Citadel, Ont. You can view Monday Morning Meditation on his Facebook page. Salvationist  July 2020  17


Photo: Kevin Carden/stock.Adobe.com

All of a Piece Is the Old Testament irrelevant? BY DONALD E. BURKE

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hat are Christians to do with the Old Testament? Frequently, we struggle to answer this question. The Old Testament, after all, is often difficult to understand. For many, God in the Old Testament seems unpredictable, filled with wrath and prone to judgment and destruction. In addition, a commonly stated view is that the Old Testament is dominated by “law” and the New Testament is dominated by “grace”—and who wouldn’t prefer grace over law? For some, the only redeeming value to be found in the Old Testament is that it points forward to Jesus Christ; and since we have the New Testament from which to learn about Jesus, surely we can dispense with the Old Testament. Finally, the simple designation of the first part of the Christian Bible as the Old Testament suggests that it has been superseded by the new and improved New Testament. Perhaps it is time to “unhitch” Christianity from the Old Testament. 18  July 2020  Salvationist

Before we rip the Old Testament out of the Bible, it is important to observe that none of these concerns about the place of the Old Testament in the Christian Scriptures is new. They have a long history that stretches back to the second-century Christian thinker Marcion, who argued in favour of the abandonment of the Old Testament (and several of the writings of the New Testament as well). Many of Marcion’s arguments against the Old Testament were the same as those advanced today— he asserted that the Old Testament is dominated by law and that the New Testament is characterized by grace. Basically, Marcion argued that the New Testament has made the Old Testament irrelevant. The church did not follow Marcion’s lead. Eventually, his views were judged heretical and he was excommunicated. But far from having been put to rest, Marcion’s views continue to find new life as they resurface in each generation. While some Christians might in effect remove the Old Testament from

their Bibles by ignoring it, others want to exclude it entirely from the Scriptures. However, it is my conviction that to do so would be a devastating error. So, what is it that keeps Christians tied to the Old Testament? Why does it really matter? In this article, I will respond to two broad assertions that are commonly made about the Old Testament to support removing it from the Bible. In a second article, I will discuss some of the positive contributions that the Old Testament makes to Christian faith. Claim #1: The Old Testament has been made irrelevant by the New Testament.

As Christians, we believe that in Jesus Christ, God has been revealed definitively. It is in Jesus that we learn most clearly the character of God. In Jesus’ devotion to his neighbours and his selfsacrificing love, we also receive the fullest revelation of God’s love for all of creation. Yet while this is all true, it should not lead us to think that the Old Testament


is unnecessary. The Old Testament is indispensable as a witness to the one God who showed divine love and concern for the Hebrew slaves in Egypt; for the weak and powerless in Israel at the time of the prophets; for the refugees and displaced persons in Israel who could be subject to abuse and harm; and who was revealed in Jesus Christ. The Old Testament reminds us that the God who is revealed in Jesus Christ did not suddenly wake up to the plight of humanity and decide to intervene on our behalf. Rather, the Old Testament teaches us that God’s sending of his Son was the climax of a long history of God’s selfgiving love that has continually sought to draw rebellious humanity home to God. Without the Old Testament, our understanding of God’s mission in the world and even of God’s character would be incomplete. For Christians, neither testament can stand on its own. Neither testament, on its own, represents the full counsel of God for the church. It is only when they are heard together that we receive “the divine rule of Christian faith and practice,” as it says in The Salvation Army’s first doctrine. Claim #2: The Old Testament is dominated by “law” and the New Testament is filled with “grace.”

This is a common caricature that results from a selective reading of both testaments. Yes, law has a prominent place in the Old Testament. But we need to broaden our understanding of “law” to realize that law is more than a set of arbitrary rules that must be obeyed. The Hebrew term torah, most often translated into English as “law,” should more properly be translated as “instruction.” Torah is a means of guidance for the people of God that helps to shape our values, our behaviour and our character in ways that will facilitate the creation of a faithful human community. For Israel, this instruction was necessary since they were called out of slavery in Egypt to become a community of contrast—a community with different values, that operates on different principles—when set alongside its neighbours. They needed to learn a new way of life. In this situa-

tion, torah has a positive, instructive and community-shaping function. This broadened understanding of law as instruction can also be applied to the New Testament. There we find Jesus giving instruction to his disciples in the Sermon on the Mount (see Matthew 5-7) and Paul giving instructions to his churches in many of his letters. Are these “laws” in the sense that they are clear commands? Sometimes they are; at other times, they are more akin to guidance. They provide signposts that guide us

19:4; 20:2). It was divine grace that spared David’s life after he had sinned by taking Bathsheba in an adulterous affair and arranging for the death of her husband (see 2 Samuel 12:13). It was God’s grace that welled up in the Book of Hosea where, in spite of having built a compelling case for the destruction of Israel for its sinful abandonment of the Lord, we read about the pain that stirred God’s compassion and led God to recoil from striking a fatal blow (see Hosea 11:1-9). In the Book of Jeremiah, in the face of a

When we neglect the Old Testament, we are left with a fragmentary witness to God’s work in the world. toward lives that are consistent with our new life in Christ. In this sense, there is continuity between the two testaments: both provide instruction about how to live in harmony with God’s intentions for the world. Of course, there is the flipside of this claim, which suggests that the Old Testament knows nothing of the grace of God. Nothing could be further from the truth. The Old Testament speaks again and again of God’s relentless grace extended to people in a variety of circumstances. From the very beginning of the biblical story, we find that God provided disobedient Adam and Eve with clothes (see Genesis 3:21), that God put a mark on murderous Cain to protect him from violence (see Genesis 4:15) and that God saved Noah and his family from the flood (see Genesis 6-8). And after the flood story, it is God who makes an unconditional commitment to work with a fallen world rather than destroy it again (see Genesis 8:21-22). These all are acts of divine grace. But the list goes on. It was out of divine grace that God heard the cries of the Hebrew slaves in Egypt and delivered them from their genocidal, oppressive rulers (see Exodus 2:23-25). It was grace that motivated God to make a covenant with Israel at Mount Sinai (see Exodus

brutal and divinely sanctioned destruction of the tiny kingdom of Judah by the massive Babylonian military machine— caused by Judah’s continued breaking of the covenant—Jeremiah pronounced God’s intention to reach out again with a new covenant, to heal and restore them once again (see Jeremiah 31:31-34). God’s compassion and grace fill the pages of the Old Testament. Only a selective and distorted reading could say otherwise. Each of the objections raised against the Old Testament—both in the early church and in our time—can be countered by embracing the full witness of the Old Testament rather than by cherry-picking passages we find troubling. When we read Scripture in its complete form—with both the Old and the New Testament received as the Word of God—we open ourselves up to the full counsel of God for Christian faith and practice. When we neglect or excise the Old Testament, we are left with a fragmentary witness to God’s work in the world. That would not only be unfortunate, it would be fatal to the church’s mission and witness in the world. Dr. Donald E. Burke is the interim president of The Salvation Army’s Booth University College in Winnipeg. Salvationist  July 2020  19


Illustration: Nuthawut Somsuk/iStock via Getty Images Plus

GRACE NOTES

Beyond COVID-19 Reflecting on what matters most. BY CAPTAIN LAURA VAN SCHAICK

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y now everyone is asking the same question—how long will it be until things return to normal? I think it’s natural to long for a sense of normalcy during a time of dramatic change that doesn’t have a set end date. We long for the kids to be back in school, to be able to eat out, to worship in the presence of our church family. But if I’m being honest, I don’t really want things to go back to the way they were. Not entirely. Looking back, there are many things I don’t like about the way things were. It was busy. Every minute of every day 20  July 2020  Salvationist

was filled with a task, an obligation or somewhere to be. Meals were rushed, human interactions were shortened by the next commitment in our calendar, and success was defined by how full our inbox was and how many meetings we had scheduled. Busyness became something that defined us, something we wore as a badge of honour. I am not alone in this sentiment. In April, a poll in the United Kingdom indicated that less than one in 10 Britons wanted to return to “normal” after the lockdown is lifted. That’s right. Less than

10 percent want things to go back to the way they were. If that isn’t an indication that our western way of existing is broken, I don’t know what is. As the world locked down, some welcome new forms of normal began to emerge. We began to breathe cleaner air and notice more wildlife in our neighbourhoods. We began to cook more and eat out less. We began to cultivate and create, rather than simply check tasks off a to-do list. Homes were filled with the smell of fresh bread, the click-clack of sewing machines and the tinkering of kids creating with LEGO. We began to feel a stronger sense of community. Checking in on our neighbours, supporting local businesses, sharing shopping duties, and even gifting rolls of toilet paper became common occurrences. Many even distributed notes in their neighbours’ mailboxes letting them know they could be contacted for help with running errands or picking up groceries. We learned the names of those who live across the street. We were reminded that we are stronger together. Outside our neighbourhoods, we began to connect more with our family and friends. We picked up the phone and called our parents—the ones we perhaps hadn’t visited in months. We drove by friends’ houses, with balloons billowing out our car windows and honking the horn to wish them a happy birthday. We played board games around the kitchen table. Faced with the reality of mortality as COVID-19 death tolls were reported daily like sports scores, we remembered that our days are numbered, and human connections are what truly matter. And the church—well, it revealed itself to be the people, not the building we meet in. What if, rather than going back to normal, we used all these quarantine experiences to create a new normal? What if everyone who could work from home did? Would our freeways be less congested and our cities more liveable? What if we continued to embrace the arts and our God-given creativity? Would our hearts be lighter and our souls be healthier? What if we carved out time to savour both our meals and the company of our family and friends? Would


GRACE NOTES

CROSS CULTURE

Displaced, But Not Forgotten our relationship with food improve along with our human bonds? What if we bought only what we needed and shared with those who could not? Would our communities be strengthened and our priorities be well-ordered? And what if the church continued to be the people—people who truly engaged with one another, people who were equipped to interact with the Bible themselves rather than simply consume a Sunday sermon, people who lifted one another up in prayer?

What if, rather than going back to normal, we used all these quarantine experiences to create a new normal? No, I do not want things to go back to normal. What was normal was broken anyway. Our pre-COVID existence was often one of greed, exhaustion, disconnection and backwards priorities. Our days of self-isolation gave us the gift of hindsight and an opportunity to examine what we were asked to give up. And a lot of it I don’t want back. It is time for radical environmental, social, political and economic change. We can’t let this opportunity slip away. So, when this virus has been beaten and restrictions are lifted, what aspects of this new way of living will you embrace? How will you define your priorities? What will you fill your days with? Let’s take this crisis as a divine gift to reflect upon what matters most and to order our lives accordingly. I, for one, am only adding back those things that affirm my identity as a child of God, a disciple of Jesus, a steward of creation, a member of my family and a friend. These are the things that matter most. Captain Laura Van Schaick is the women’s ministries program and resource officer.

Salvation Army documentary spotlights work with migrants in South America.

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BY LEIGHA VEGH

isplaced is a new Salvation Army documentary that captures the experiences of migrants who have left their countries due to economic and political unrest in hopes for a better life. Co-produced by The Salvation Army’s Brazil Territory, it was filmed on location by International Headquarters’ emergency services and communications teams. Early on, the film takes us along a poorly maintained road that winds through the Amazonian rainforest in Venezuela, a route often travelled by migrants. For many who can’t afford the fare for the three-hour bus ride to Boa Vista, Brazil, it is an arduous 200-kilometre journey on foot. Some try to hitch a ride, a dangerous practice that makes them susceptible to human trafficking. About 25 kilometres into the journey, we meet Pedro and Stefani, who are travelling with their four small children, one of whom has a disability. They have no money, few possessions and are extremely fatigued. The family is fleeing Venezuela, hoping to claim refugee status in Boa Vista. At the Venezuela-Brazil border is a military-led, multi-agency reception centre for refugees called “Project Welcome.” There we meet several people, from all walks of life, including professionals who have left behind their livelihoods: a nurse, a caregiver in need of a prosthetic leg, an out-of-work filmmaker. One heartwrenching interview reveals how a group of young people is faced with two choices of employment: hairdressing or sex work. The Salvation Army had no pre-existing presence in the region (the nearest Salvation Army location is a four-hour plane ride away) and Displaced emphasizes the need for co-operation between non-governmental organizations to support the large arrivals of migrants. With exclusive rights to film inside UnitedNations-managed refugee camps and shelters, the film crew gives us a glimpse at the grim reality for many migrants. But there is joy, too, as The Salvation Army helps Venezuelan families integrate into Brazilian society by marking Dia das Crianças, Brazil’s National Children’s Day.

Pedro, Stefani and their four children celebrate Brazil’s National Children’s Day

We discover that the family we met on the side of the road earlier has now been transported by The Salvation Army to Boa Vista where they received emergency assistance and, eventually, permanent accommodation, with specialist care for their disabled child. Elsewhere in the film, we meet Haitian refugees in the south of Brazil, who are integrating into their new community 10 years after the devastating earthquake that forced them to leave their country. Everyone has their own unique story to be told. For some, it’s the hope of a life better than the one left behind; for others, it’s the hope that one day it will be safe enough to return home. “This is a film for anybody interested in the multitude of issues affecting refugees, asylum seekers and migrants anywhere in the world,” concludes Major Alison Thompson, international emergency services co-ordinator. Displaced was filmed in October 2019, but The Salvation Army’s work in Brazil continues during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Salvation Army team is providing 125 meals to Venezuelan migrants every day, identifying people for emergency income and assisting with public health efforts.

Watch and download Displaced here: sar.my/displaced. Salvationist  July 2020  21


VIEWPOINT

Oh, Canada Can we celebrate our country without whitewashing its problems? BY DARRYN OLDFORD

Illustration: cbies/iStock via Getty Images Plus

A

s Canada Day approaches, I am thinking about two challenging questions. The first is, what is a Canadian? The second is, how should national pride be celebrated? My best friend and I share a lot of things in common. We went to the same high school, we both love superhero movies, we are both writers and we were both born in Canada. But despite both of us bleeding red and white, she is regularly asked, “Where are you from?” As a white man born and raised in Canada, with no discernible accent, my Canadian-ness is seemingly apparent. The fact that her ancestors are from India and she has brown skin has made many people call her Canadian identity into question. Part of the problem is that we often define what it means to be Canadian with whiteness. Ever since the colonization of Canada, primarily by English and French people, Canada has been viewed either explicitly or implicitly as a country built by white men, for white men, while ignoring Indigenous history. European values, traits and cultures were imported, and everything else was foreign. In the early 1970s, there was a push to define Canada as a mosaic, not a melting pot, of cultures. A mosaic, as I understand, recognizes that different people from different places bring their own food, clothes, language, art and culture, adding to the richness of Canadian society. A melting pot, on the other hand, means that you are expected to toss your culture into a cauldron, where it is mixed with everyone else’s culture, 22  July 2020  Salvationist

and only the aspects that prove popular are kept. “Some foods can stay, but nothing too spicy or ‘weird.’ ” “I love this pattern, but the rest of the outfit looks silly.” “I know you were taught English in your country, but you need to speak it like we speak it.” In 1971, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau introduced a policy of multiculturalism, acknowledging that Canadians come from a variety of cultural backgrounds, and that every culture has intrinsic value. In his book, Memoirs, he wrote, Canadian society is “where all people are equal and where they share some fundamental values based on freedom.” There are those who oppose this vision of multiculturalism and think things should remain as they were. As both a patriot and a Christian, I refuse to engage in a debate with those who would call the identity and worth of other human beings into question. You are not Canadian because of, or in spite of, your British, Indian or Chinese heritage; you are Canadian because you believe in the freedom your national identity gives you. It’s not “either/or,” it’s “both/and.” Celebrate your Canadianness and any other identities you hold. Just because someone is Indian-Canadian or Jamaican-Canadian does not make them any less Canadian. My second question, about national pride, is even harder to answer. From residential schools, to the treatment of Chinese workers building the Canadian Pacific Railway, to the internment of Japanese Canadians during the Second

World War, Canada has not always been on the right side of history. If we celebrate Canada, are we whitewashing past or current problems? In my view, it comes down to making people fans of Canada without becoming a fanatic. A fan enjoys something, while aware of its flaws; a fanatic refuses to recognize there are any flaws. A fan of Canada can enjoy it on its own merit, while a fanatic insists on putting every other country down. A fan has multiple identities, some overlapping and some not, while a fanatic only has one identity. I can acknowledge our problematic past and current issues and still celebrate Canada Day and my Canadian identity. If you can’t, that’s OK. We don’t all have to be Canadian in the same way to show we are patriots. I am a proud Canadian, but I also believe that my “citizenship is in heaven” (Philippians 3:20). Some of the best qualities ascribed to being Canadian—freedom, compassion, generosity—are, in fact, what God calls all Christians to practise and preach. This does not mean we look for other Christian virtues to set us apart from the world, but rather, we go beyond what an average Canadian would be willing to do. I have no doubt that if Christ witnesses us fighting for justice, being exceedingly generous and helping a broken world with a compassionate heart, he will be overjoyed that we are representing his kingdom. Darryn Oldford is a senior soldier in Toronto.


ETHICALLY SPEAKING

#Cancelled Is it standing up to injustice or a mob mentality? BY ALEX STONEY

I

Illustration: alashi/DigitalVision Vectors via Getty Images

n May, Canadian singer-songwriter Bryan Adams posted an expletivefilled rant on Instagram, blaming “bat eating, wet market animal selling, virus making” people in China for the coronavirus outbreak—comments that many considered offensive and racist. Although Adams apologized the next day, saying he was referring to the cruelty of such markets and promoting veganism, #BryanAdamsIsCancelled was already trending on Twitter. If you are unfamiliar with the term, to be “cancelled” refers to the practice of boycotting or withdrawing support for public figures or organizations after they have said or done something objectionable. It could also be described as group shaming. For some, it’s a way to stand up against injustice. For others, it’s a mob mentality that causes fear and inhibits free speech. Chances are high that we have all been involved in “cancel culture” to some degree. Even if you’ve never participated in online shaming, you’ve probably seen someone else display outrage at another person’s misbehaviour, and may even have thought, “They deserve to be called out.” But as Christians, how

do we acknowledge wrongdoing and still demonstrate God’s love and grace? Here are a few things to remember as we navigate cancel culture: We don’t know the whole story. It’s an elementary school lesson—you can’t form an accurate opinion of someone you don’t know very well. I’ve taught this to kindergarten classes. And yet it’s a major factor in cancel culture. Do we really know enough about somebody to form an opinion? Unless we have lived another person’s life, lived through their experiences, we can’t judge them for the choices they make. And is the offender even informed enough to understand what they are putting out there for everyone to see? Once you post something online, it’s there forever. You can try to delete it, but chances are that it can still be found online, somewhere. There are many things I said in my youth, and even within the last few years, that I wish I could take back because of my ignorance and lack of understanding. No one has the moral high ground.

We are all in need of forgiveness and grace. God created and knows all of

us, inside and out, and still chooses to love us, all the same. Even with all our shortcomings, God extends grace to us through the words, actions and sacrifice of his Son, Jesus Christ. Because we know what it is to be forgiven, we should forgive others. “Freely you have received; freely give” (Matthew 10:8). We need to model the love of Jesus and befriend the cancelled as well as those who cancel others, to show all parties involved that they are valued. This will take courage—if we break away from the group to believe the best in someone and show grace, we risk being cancelled ourselves. But Christians are called to live out forgiveness culture, not cancel culture. Cancel culture closes the door to reconciliation. There is nothing wrong

with holding people or organizations accountable for their words or actions, but cancel culture doesn’t do this. Instead, it condemns, equating the offender with their offence, without acknowledging their ability to change. It ends a narrative that has the potential to see growth in the offender and reconciliation with the injured party.

Adams’ comments were insulting and ignorant, but he should have the chance to reflect on his words without being “cancelled.” Otherwise, we could miss a significant part of the story. Conflict can only result in reconciliation if we stay open to talking. We need to leave the door open to redemption. As we navigate cancel culture, let’s be open and prepared to listen and live life with people who have views different from our own, remembering this: “Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry, because human anger does not produce the righteousness that God desires” (James 1:19-20). Let’s be prepared to love God’s people as he commanded us to do (see 1 John 4:7). Let’s do what we can to see God’s people as he sees them, as people who are worthy of love. It’s never OK to write someone off. Alex Stoney is the children and youth ministry co-ordinator, Upper Skeena Circuit with Gitsegukla, Hazelton and Sik-E-Dakh (Glen Vowell), B.C., and a member of The Salvation Army’s social issues committee. Salvationist  July 2020  23


PEOPLE & PLACES

OSHAWA, ONT.—For the past seven years, members of the knitting club at Oshawa’s community and family services office have handcrafted and given away countless items. Hats, scarves and mittens are given to people experiencing homelessness; Twiddle Muffs, double-thickness muffs with bits and bobs attached inside and out, provide stimulation activity for restless hands for children on the autism spectrum and seniors battling dementia; scarves are placed in Christmas hampers, and afghans are delivered to the sick and shut in. The group is looking forward to resuming its important ministry when the COVID-19 pandemic has ended.

SYDNEY, N.S.—With social distancing and safety as a top priority, Salvation Army personnel in Sydney have found a creative way to keep the food bank open during the pandemic. A drive-up window makes it possible for clients to safely tell Nicole Maclean, family services co-ordinator, what their needs are. Dedicated volunteers then prepare a box of food and other necessities and place it outside the door to be picked up. From left, volunteers Francis and Ken Manning do their part to support the work of The Salvation Army in their community.

VISIT: Salvationist.ca 100th Anniversary Celebrations Hazelton Corps Upper Skeena Circuit, British Columbia Division

October 10-11, 2020 With Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd Territorial Commander & Territorial President of Women’s Ministries

For further information or to send greetings: Janet_Hougesen@can.salvationarmy.org

24  July 2020  Salvationist

BURLINGTON, ONT.—When Charlie McDougall recently celebrated his 90th birthday, he wanted to do something special to mark the milestone. He loves to walk and so he decided to walk 90 laps around his entire retirement community, where he resides with his wife, to raise money in support of the Army’s community and family services in Burlington during the COVID-19 pandemic. With his wife cheering him on, McDougall is hoping to raise $2,500, which will be matched by the Burlington Foundation. Mjr Doug Binner, family services director, joined McDougall for a lap, staying a good seven feet apart at all times.


PEOPLE & PLACES

A Sweet Way to Say Thanks

MISSISSAUGA, ONT.—Salvationist Ron Smith of Mississauga Temple CC delivers portable vapour shields he handcrafted to protect staff and clients at community and family services offices during the COVID-19 pandemic. Tammi Ritson, community and family services specialist for the Ont. Div and Smith’s daughter, reached out to her father for assistance when she learned how expensive the shields would be to purchase. The tabletop shields are just one of the modifications implemented in community and family services locations across the territory to maintain social distancing while continuing to provide support to those in need.* MOUNT PEARL, N.L.—Georgia Hollett, who attends Mount Pearl Corps, loves to bake for others. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, she has spent days baking and decorating cookies for health-care workers, including her father, Danny Hollett, an ER nurse at the Health Sciences Centre in St. John’s, N.L., to thank them for their service. Hollett has also delivered baked goods to the front steps of more than 150 senior citizens within her community and corps family. Above, Danny and Georgia Hollett share a moment together. Below, Georgia Hollett delivers treats to medical personnel at the Health Sciences Centre.

GAZETTE INTERNATIONAL Appointments: Aug 1—Lt-Col Ireen Hachamba, CS, Zambia Tty; Lt-Cols Luka/Rasoa Khayumbi, CS/TSWM, Kenya West Tty; Lt-Cols Morris/Wanda Vincent, CS/TSWM, Caribbean Tty; Cpt Gerald Walker, CS, New Zealand, Fiji, Tonga and Samoa Tty, with rank of col; Sep 1—Cols Wayne/Deborah Bungay, TC/TPWM, Zimbabwe and Botswana Tty, with rank of comr; Lt-Cols Seth/Janet Appeateng, TC/TPWM, Tanzania Tty, with rank of col; Mjrs Jean Laurore/Elianise Clenat, OC/CPWM, Rwanda and Burundi Cmd, with rank of lt-col TERRITORIAL Appointments: Apr 3—Mjr Wanda Loveless, divisional integrated mission secretary and divisional retired officers secretary, N.L. Div (additional responsibility); Lt-Col Genevera Vincent, divisional director of spiritual life development, N.L. Div (additional responsibility); Jun 1—Mjr Raelene Russell, DHQ resource officer, Alta. & N.T. Div; Jul 1—Mjr Mona Moore, assistant officer personnel secretary (interim), THQ; Lt Gina Haggett, divisional public relations officer, London, Ont. Div (designation change); Aug 1—Lt-Cols David/Marsha-Jean Bowles, COs, Berlin South-West, Berlin, Germany, Lithuania and Poland Tty; Sep 1—Mjr Douglas Binner, officer personnel secretary (interim), THQ Retirements: Jul 1—Mjrs Everett/Violet Barrow, Mjr Miguel Borgela, Mjrs Phillip/Wavey Birt, Mjrs George/Karen Crocker, Mjrs Rick/Drucella Pollard Promoted to glory: Mjr Pauline Budgell, May 5; Mjr Eileen Peat, May 20; Mjr Hilda Harvey, May 30; Mjr James Hagglund, Jun 4 Salvationist  July 2020  25


FAMILY MATTERS

Illustration: Worayuth Kamonsuwan/iStock via Getty Images Plus

ation ceremonies. They are going to be mad, sad and frustrated. Let them grieve. Give them a journal to write in and get everything out. There’s nothing we can do to fix the situation, but we can help them develop healthy emotional practices. • Grace, not perfection! You’re going

to get frustrated, your house will be messy, your kids are going to fight, and you’re going to want to quit. Refer back to point one and then remind yourself that God doesn’t expect perfection, so why do we?

• Keep it simple. Less is more,

Kids and COVID-19 Supporting children during the coronavirus crisis.

C

BY CAPTAIN BHREAGH ROWE

OVID-19 has changed everything.

It’s difficult enough to cope with fear and uncertainty as an adult— how are we helping our kids through these unprecedented times? How can we help them come out the other side better, stronger and more deeply rooted in their faith? One of the most important things we can do for our kids right now is to take care of ourselves as parents and caregivers. Self-care can look different for all of us; however, it needs to start by getting into God’s Word. We need deep soul care that connects us with the One who loves us and is always with us. Our children will benefit from this more than anything else. What else can we do? There are so many resources out there on how to keep kids entertained or how to be a good homeschooler, it’s overwhelming! For our family, this wasn’t a time for brand-new routines or high expectations. This was a time for three things: to grow closer to God, to grow closer to each other and “get through it.” So, instead of a list of activities to help get your kids through this pandemic, here are some essential reminders: • This is not normal. Don’t make per26  July 2020  Salvationist

manent decisions during uncertain times. Fix your eyes on Jesus, and what is unseen (see 2 Corinthians 4:8). • Ditch the schedules. Having a flex-

ible plan is key—pick two or three things to do each day and learn to roll with it.

• Let your kids set the pace. I’m not

saying let your kids do whatever they want (although there will be days). If they are tired and cranky, no activity is going to end well. Know your kids and move on to something else if needed.

• Do some fun projects. Leave baked

goods on your neighbour’s steps. Paint your front-facing windows to bring some joy and colour to your street. Clean out the pantry and donate items to a food bank. Pray together. Make cards to mail to loved ones and seniors. Leave a special note for the garbage truck or delivery person. The ideas are endless! Use this time to teach your kids the importance of loving our neighbours.

• Grieve what needs to be grieved.

Older kids have lost a lot during this time—friends, events, school, gradu-

especially when it comes to sharing information about the pandemic with your kids. Younger kids do not need to know what’s going on, and older kids only need to know the necessities from credible sources. Ultimately, kids need to know they are loved, that you will be there, and that God is in control even when it feels scary.

• Slow down. Make messes. Eat junk

food. Camp out in the living room. Watch four episodes of a favourite show. Listen to your children. Hug longer. Enjoy this crazy time, because when things get back to “normal,” we are going to wish we were still stuck at home with our families.

Getting our kids through this time is our top priority as parents, but don’t overthink it. They will be just fine. You will be just fine. God is still on the throne, and “we know that in all things God works for the good of those who love him” (Romans 8:28). When all this is over, don’t rush back to normal. Keep the family meals and games. Keep being slow and intentional. Centre everything around God and his perfect plans, while relying abundantly on him. Keep hope and love going. Keep caring for your kids in this unique way. Make this moment in history a gamechanger for you and your family, as you grow closer to the Father and grow closer to each other. Captain Bhreagh Rowe is the corps officer and community ministries officer at The Salvation Army’s Cornerstone Community Church in Mississauga, Ont. She will take up a new appointment as community ministries officer at St. Albert Church and Community Centre, Alta., as of August 17, 2020.


IF IT DOESN'T SIT RIGHT, STAND UP.

BOOTHUC.CA

EDUCATION FOR A BETTER W ORLD


The Salvation Army Group Members enjoy great rates through our Group Car & Home Insurance Program. To receive a FREE no obligation quote on your CAR and HOME or TENANT Insurance through our partnership, please get in touch with one of our friendly customer service advisors.

Find the right insurance for you:

CAR HOME SMALL BUSINESS COMMERICAL 1-800-240-5283 www.deeksinsurance.ca

Servicing the Evangelical Community in Canada since 1981.

D.L. Deeks Insurance Services Inc. (“Deeks Insurance”) is a licensed insurance intermediary. Home and car insurance policies are primarily underwritten, and claims handled, by Unifund Assurance Company (“UAC”). Deeks Insurance and UAC share common ownership. Eligibility requirements, limitations, exclusions or additional costs may apply, and/or may vary by province. D.L Deeks Insurance Services Inc. and logo is a registered trademark of Deeks Insurance. Car insurance not available in BC or SK. Home and car insurance not available in MB, QC, NWT, NU, or YK.

For address changes or subscription information contact (416) 422-6119 or circulation@can.salvationarmy.org. Allow 4-6 weeks for changes. PM 40064794


“Thanks for Helping Me”

SALVATION SUPPORT P.8

Warrior Woman

MULAN MOVIE P.18

Caring During COVID-19

A HELPING ARMY P.5

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

SUMMER 2020

The Kick Off

TOM SCOTT IS GOING FOR GOLD AT THE 2021 OLYMPICS IN TOKYO. P.16


The Way Home

AN INUKSHUK

is a stone beacon used by the Inuit as a directional marker in the Canadian Arctic. While they vary in shape and size, they’re all symbols that signify friendship, safety and hope. Even in the worst blizzard, an Inukshuk can help the most desperately lost find their way home. For Christians, Jesus is our Inukshuk, our shining beacon in a world where it is all too easy to lose one’s way. In the Gospels, we find friendship and love in a world of enemies and hate; in Jesus’ arms, we find safety from the temptations of the world; and in His Word, we find hope when all seems hopeless. No matter how emotionally and spiritually lost we are, Jesus is there to help us find our way home. To learn more about Jesus and His message of hope, visit our website at www.faithandfriends.ca or contact us at: The Salvation Army Editorial Department, 2 Overlea Blvd., Toronto ON M4H 1P4


July 2020

VOLUME 23 NUMBER 7

SOMEONE CARES 5 Committed to Caring

During this pandemic, The Salvation Army remains on the front lines of critical service. COMMON GROUND 8 “Thanks for Helping Me”

For people living on the street, the pandemic has made their lives worse. That is where The Salvation Army comes in.

5

COMIC RELIEF 10 Wedge Issue

Discouragement is nothing new, but that doesn’t mean you have to give in.

FEATURES “Thanks for Helping Me”

SALVATION SUPPORT P.8

Warrior Woman

MULAN MOVIE P.18

Caring During COVID-19

A HELPING ARMY P.5

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

SUMMER 2020

The Kick Off

TOM SCOTT IS GOING FOR GOLD AT THE 2021 OLYMPICS IN TOKYO. P.16

COVER STORY

12

15

The Kick Off

Tom Scott is going for gold at the 2021 Olympics in Tokyo.

The Challenge of COVID-19

What Andrea Petkau’s transplant taught her about living in uncertain times.

FAITH BUILDERS

Cover photo: Courtesy of Tom Scott

18 The Courage to Fight

In Disney’s Mulan, a young girl finds hidden strength to take her father’s place in battle. LITE STUFF 20 Eating Healthy With Erin

Sudoku, Quick Quiz, Word Search.

15

NIFTY THRIFTY 23 Quarantining in Style

Or, how to wear loungewear. faithandfriends.ca  I  JULY 2020

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Faith&Friends

FROM THE EDITOR

Stepping Up

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hen I started the July issue, which seems like decades ago but was only in February, I had never heard of terms such as “physical distancing” and “flattening the curve.” I had no idea what “PPE” stood for and I hadn’t the faintest idea what an N95 particulate respirator was. I had heard of COVID-19 but that was something happening far, far away. Now I know. In what feels like the blink of an eye, COVID-19 has enveloped the world, and we are all, to some degree, reeling from its effects. Millions of people worldwide have been infected, and hundreds of thousands have died. Here in Canada and Bermuda, we have not been immune to COVID-19. But I have been heartened by how this has brought out the best in us, from verandah serenades and drive-by birthday greetings to church groups assembling and distributing lunches to the homeless. And, as always in times of hardship, we find The Salvation Army on the front lines, offering a hand up and a listening ear. In this issue of Faith & Friends, you’ll find articles on how Army churches, food banks and other ministries have responded to the challenge of COVID-19. When our thrift stores and churches temporarily closed to help combat the spread of COVID-19, it was decided to go online with our publications, starting with the May Salvationist and Faith & Friends. We plan to resume print once our facilities reopen but, until then, you can access this issue, as well as back issues, online at Issuu.com/Salvationist. Happy reading! Ken Ramstead

4 • JULY 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

Mission Statement To show Christ at work in the lives of real people, and to provide spiritual resources for those who are new to the Christian faith.

Faith & Friends is published monthly by: The Salvation Army 2 Overlea Blvd, Toronto Ontario, M4H 1P4 International Headquarters 101 Queen Victoria Street, London, EC4P 4EP, England William and Catherine Booth FOUNDERS

Brian Peddle, GENERAL Commissioner Floyd Tidd TERRITORIAL COMMANDER

Lt-Colonel John P. Murray SECRETARY FOR COMMUNICATIONS Geoff Moulton, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ken Ramstead, EDITOR

Brandon Laird SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Hannah Saley DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST Pamela Richardson, COPY EDITOR, PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR

Ada Leung CIRCULATION CO-ORDINATOR

Leigha Vegh STAFF WRITER, PROOFREADER

Giselle Randall STAFF WRITER Scripture Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture references are taken from New International Version Contact Us P. (416) 467-3188, F. (416) 422-6217 Websites faithandfriends.ca, salvationist.ca, salvationarmy.ca Email faithandfriends@can.salvationarmy.org Subscription for one year: Canada $17 (includes GST/HST); U.S. $22; foreign $24 P. (416) 422-6119 circulation@can.salvationarmy.org All articles are copyright The Salvation Army Canada & Bermuda and cannot be reproduced without permission. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064794 ISSN 1702-0131


Faith&Friends

SOMEONE CARES

Committed to Caring During this pandemic, The Salvation Army remains on the front lines of critical service. by Linda Leigh

Slice of Heaven  The Salvation Army’s emergency disaster mobile feeding unit in Regina is delivering lunches every day to three different schools for community pickup

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he upheaval caused by the COVID-19 pandemic is having a ripple effect across the country and, as an organization that is uniquely positioned to assist the vulnerable, the work of The Salvation Army matters more now than ever. “Beyond the health hazard that

the virus itself poses, it has also created an increased demand for emergency assistance among people who have suddenly lost their jobs and income,” says Lt-Colonel John P. Murray, spokesperson for The Salvation Army. “On top of fearing for their families’ health, these people are now struggling to put food on

faithandfriends.ca  I  JULY 2020

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Faith&Friends

SOMEONE CARES

Bedside Manner The Salvation Army in Ottawa provides alternative methods for residents to connect with their loved ones

the table. That’s where we come in.” Giving Hope Since the start of the pandemic, many of The Salvation Army’s more than 225 community and family services offices across Canada have seen an increase in families and children using its food banks. In many cases, supplies are running low. While The Salvation Army continues to meet extraordinary challenges posed by the COVID19 pandemic, they are grateful to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Government of Canada for $5 million in funding as part of the $100-million investment to help local organizations such as The Salvation Army, who are serving people in communities experiencing food insecurity. “As more businesses are forced to close and people are impacted

6 • JULY 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

financially, the generosity of the Government of Canada will enable us to further provide our services, sustain communities and give hope to those who need it most,” says Lt-Colonel John. Helping Hand As an organization that has people at the core of its mission, The Salvation Army has taken unprecedented measures—altered its programs and service delivery— to ensure that those who rely on them for food and basic necessities, shelter, and emotional and spiritual support, stay healthy and safe. Here are just a few examples: • In Regina, many children attending school relied on the Army for a hot lunch. With schools closed, those meals are gone. Filling in the gap, and at the request of school principals, The Salvation Army expanded


“Everyone needs an Army—that’s us.” LT-COLONEL JOHN P. MURRAY

the program, and its community response unit now delivers lunch directly to those same children and families in need. • Last year, the Army in Fredericton launched Operation Senior Food Box Delivery, a program to bring groceries to seniors and help combat their loneliness with a visit. Little did the organization know the program would quickly enlarge to help those impacted by COVID-19. When someone is in need, volunteers drop food boxes at doorsteps and curbs so everyone stays safe. • With strict visitation protocols in place, The Salvation Army’s Ottawa Grace Manor long-term care home is bringing residents together with their families and loved ones through video conferencing. The video calls give a boost to those who feel isolated, and families are grateful for a way

to keep connected. “Everyone needs an Army—that’s us,” says Lt-Colonel John. “Last year, we helped 1.6 million Canadians with a helping hand. As the world continues to change, we expect those numbers to rise. Meanwhile, we remain on the front lines of critical service until that last person who needs us is helped.” Guided by Mission The Salvation Army began its work in Canada in 1882, serving the vulnerable. At work in more than 400 communities across the country, it has grown to become one of Canada’s largest non-governmental providers of social services. As they navigate these challenging times, The Salvation Army is guided by their mission, values and evidencebased information published by local health authorities and the Public Health Agency of Canada.

(left) Linda Leigh is manager of communications at The Salvation Army’s territorial headquarters in Toronto.

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Faith&Friends

COMMON GROUND

Photo: pixelfit/gettyimages.ca

“Thanks For Helping Me” For people living on the street, the COVID-19 pandemic has made their lives worse. That’s where The Salvation Army comes in.

S

by Linda Dixon

he enters our offices making not a sound, but the steady flow of tears coursing down her face utters more than words could say. The telltale signs of life on the street are evident. Five-foot-five, perhaps, with green eyes, sandy brown hair. Pretty … except, it’s difficult to look past the dark blue bruising on her face. Daniella, the administrative assistant at The Salvation Army’s North Toronto Community Church, sums up the situation in a glance and bustles her into the community and family services office. Chrissy The woman is incredibly fragile. Life on the street at the best of times is stressful. Vigilance is essential. The potential for violence is always present and this woman knows something about that violence. For people living on the street, in this

8 • JULY 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

COVID-19 pandemic, even the few

small stress relievers upon which they rely are robbed—a spot indoors to sit, just for a bit; a compassionate stranger offering change; a hot coffee; a place to wash their hands. “Hi.” I invite her to sit. “My name is Linda. What can I help you with today?” I smile at her before I ask my standard line of opening questions, not wanting for a moment to presume that I know what this suffering person needs. To ask the question is, to my thinking, a sign of respect— even when, to me, “What could I not help you with?” seems the far more appropriate question. “I’m hungry and need ... ” words trail off. A pause. “Yes. I can help you,” I say. Now the tears tumble out with a jumble of words impossible to decipher amid gulps of air. “First, let me get you something to eat.” Wordlessly, Chrissy—for that


There is so much more we want to do to help. There is so much more we can do to help.  LINDA DIXON is her name—scarfs down four breakfast cereal bars and seven— seven—fruit and pudding cups! I simply wait as Chrissy eats. Finished, she sits back into the chair and stretches. It is one of those long, lazy motions my pet cat used to make after a delicious nap. It speaks of contentment.

moves toward the door. “Please, come back and see me again,” I invite Chrissy. “Thanks for helping me,” she calls out over her shoulder. Then, Chrissy intentionally stops to utter a heartfelt “thank you” to Daniella. And she is gone. Neither Daniella nor I want to see Chrissy go. There is so much more we want to do to help. There is so much more we can do to help. But we know that by the grace of God, having received the help she wanted, Chrissy may one day take us up on our invitation and return.

Open Invitation Everything about Chrissy surprises me. She crams her bag with easy-toeat foods: granola bars, fruit cups, a grocery gift card, the contact number for housing and an offer of the use of a phone. I assure Chrissy that when she calls the number, she will get a room that very night—a place to sleep where she is safe. I stress the word “safe.” She takes the number. Stuffs it into a pocket, not once looking at it. Chrissy asks me for one of the bright lime green gift bags, known as SunTwo Hearts  Daniella Garcia (left) is the administrative shine Bags, in my office. assistant and Linda Dixon is the community and She stands up, gathfamily services co-ordinator at The Salvation Army’s North Toronto Community Church ers her belongings and

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COMIC RELIEF

Photo: Stuart Miles/stock.Adobe.com

Faith&Friends

Wedge Issue Discouragement is nothing new, but that doesn’t mean you need to give in. by Phil Callaway

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abloids do their best to start rumours. Here are a few headlines I’m not making up: “Farmer shoots 23-pound grasshopper.” “Man’s 174 m.p.h. Sneeze Blows Wife’s Hair Off.” “Satan’s Skull Found. Bible experts call it the find of the century.” Expensive Tool Speaking of the devil, I heard a rumour that he was going out of

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business. He had a blowout sale at his store there on 666th Avenue, offering to sell his tools to the highest bidder. Tools were marked down and showcased: pride, hate, greed, lust, anger, deceit and the rights to some TV shows he’s been writing for Netflix. In the middle of it all was an antique. A well-worn, wedge-shaped object. The price tag was enormous. Someone asked why it was so


expensive. “Aha,” snickered the devil. “It is my most useful tool. I love to wedge it into someone’s mind.” “What is it?” “Discouragement,” he snorted. “People get discouraged; they lose hope. Then I’ve got ’em. I’ve used it since the dawn of time. I’ll give you 10 percent off, today and today only.” But the customer couldn’t afford the price. So Satan is still using that wedge today. Mocking and Taunting Like the tale of the skull and the typhoon sneezer, this rumour isn’t true, of course, but there’s truth in it. Discouragement is as ugly as a 23-pound grasshopper. Of all the wicked tools in his toolbox, it’s one the devil uses effectively on me. And sometimes we use it on each other. The words of a boss, a parent or a spouse can haunt us, causing chronic discouragement to swirl around us, sapping our strength, sucking our joy, keeping us focused on past failures and present difficulties. Discouragement is courage running a deficit. And it’s nothing new. Goliath used it on David in 1 Samuel 17, mocking his God and his pitiful sling and five smooth stones. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali used it on his opponents, taunting them, “That don’t hurt. I thought you were supposed to be bad.”

On the Right Path Satan taunts us, too. His mission is to DIS-courage us with crippling fear that gets us off track. But God’s plan is to EN-courage us with confident faith that whatever happens, He will keep His word. So often, we are DIS-couraged when we listen to what others say. We are EN-couraged when we listen to what God says. We’re DIS-couraged when we focus on our failures. We’re EN-couraged when we focus on God’s faithfulness. When derailed by discouragement, gratitude helps us to get back on track. The Bible is filled with prescriptions from the Great Physician who loves us and has the remedy for whatever troubles us. Hang on to His promises. He is faithful. He says: • “Never will I forsake you” (Hebrews 13:5). • “God will meet all your needs” (Philippians 4:19). • “I will give you rest” (Matthew 11:28). In the face of all you face, stand on His promises and give thanks for His faithfulness. The devil will be out of business one day. Until then, this is the pathway to bidding that 23-pound grasshopper of discouragement goodbye.

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Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

Photos: Courtesy of Tom Scott

Fast and Furious Tom Scott (left) in competition

The Kick Off TOM SCOTT IS GOING FOR GOLD AT THE 2021 OLYMPICS IN TOKYO. by Jayne Thurber-Smith

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soccer match can last 90 minutes or more, a tennis match can stretch for hours, but a competitive karate match is a quick three minutes. Win or go home. It’s possible to fly to Europe for one match, make just one mistake and have to fly back. “On a great day, you’ve put in six or seven fights for a medal match,” Tom Scott says. “If you do go home early, 12 • JULY 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

you need to make quick corrections for the next month and not repeat mistakes. Every trip is valuable, regardless of winning or losing.” Tom fell in love with karate at the age of eight and entered the competitive arena at 18. The winner of North American and Pan American championships as well as two Pan Am gold medals, he hopes to add an Olympic medal to his collection


next year. “I’ve been dreaming about karate in the Olympics before it was ever even possible,” he says. “I’m excited about it! It’s a big challenge, but that’s what I’m here for.” Teachable Moments Tom has been training with sensei Brody Burns at the Academy of Classical Karate in Plano, Texas, for more than 20 years. There, he

to share his love of the sport with others. “It’s great helping kids gain confidence by learning new skills,” he says. “I also teach kids self-discipline. I love when they realize that they actually enjoy being rewarded for behaving the way they should.” More in Store Besides sharing his love for karate, Tom is also open to sharing his love

“I’ve been dreaming about karate in the Olympics before it was ever even possible.” TOM SCOTT has the perfect set-up, where he can train, work and travel. “Thankfully, I am in a unique spot,” he says. “So many athletes have to carefully manage their work schedule and be careful about time off because they have to pay bills. I get to use what I learned while earning my master’s degree in innovation and entrepreneurship, working with marketing and other ongoing projects at the academy.” When he’s not travelling to competitions or managing the school, Tom also teaches many of the school’s students. It’s rewarding

for God. “I was raised Catholic,” he says. “Then in college, I really got into exploring my beliefs to a deeper level. At university, if something’s important to you, you study it, write about it, read about it, watch videos. That’s how I approached my faith, finding answers to things I didn’t quite understand. I had a great group of Christian friends in a good fraternity. We held Bible study groups together and really learned how to push each other and be accountable. That was 10 years ago, and I’m still doing that.” faithandfriends.ca  I  JULY 2020

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Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

Olympic Bound Despite the postponement, Tom’s sights are still set on Tokyo

As Tom trusts in God, he looks forward to experiencing what He has in store for him, Olympics and otherwise. “Jesus Christ has become my backbone and safety net,” he proclaims on his website. “I can stand tall and fear not the trials of daily life, the shortcomings of humanity and the world, and especially what happens in the ring.” Rolling With the Punches The trials of daily life were on full display this past spring, when Tom lost his spot on the U.S. Olympic team and then the Olympic Games themselves were postponed to 2021 in the wake of COVID-19. “The qualification process for these games was very rough for me 14 • JULY 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

the last three months,” says Tom. “I qualified and then lost my spot to another athlete. Then the virus shut down my last opportunities for points. “There are still ways for me to qualify for the games, and my sights are set,” he continues. “But the qualifications have really been my own Olympics. I really do not care when the games happen because my second biggest focus is getting in. My first focus, of course, is not losing my way in the storm. It is difficult to cry ‘poor me’ through Lent and Easter when I learn how rich we are through Christ’s sacrifice on the cross. “I was devastated when I lost my spot but by contemplating Jesus’ Easter journey, I have found peace and hope in my own.”


Faith&Friends

FEATURE

Photo: Kat Grabowski, Art and Aerialist Photography

Three for the Road Andrea Petkau with her husband, Ty, and their son, Felix

The Challenge of COVID-19

WHAT MY KIDNEY TRANSPLANT TAUGHT ME ABOUT LIVING IN UNCERTAIN TIMES. by Andrea Petkau

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e are living in a very uncertain time. COVID-19 has become a reality for our country and our world. The sense that we have no control, that the future feels dim, that we are being told to self-isolate, brings about a sense of anxiety and fear for many. I can relate. Not so long ago, there was an overwhelming sense of “what if” in my own life, and now that feeling is magnified worldwide.

Starting Over When I was 12, I was diagnosed with polycystic kidney disease, a genetic disorder that can often lead to chronic kidney failure. At first, I did all the things that “normal” teens and young adults got to do: I went to school, graduated, worked at summer camp, went to college and eventually got married. But then I became pregnant with my son, Felix. Heading into the faithandfriends.ca  I  JULY 2020

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FEATURE

pregnancy, I was warned that it posed risks—my kidney function was at 40 percent, and a pregnancy could lead to a baby with low birth weight and developmental challenges. One doctor even thought he had the right to tell me we were making a mistake. That was not OK. But at the time I questioned—what if he was right? My husband and I had struggled with infertility for six years, and the last thing I wanted to hear was that I was making a mistake. But this was the first time my disease had become a reality—and I had to start putting my faith and trust in the medical system. Felix was born healthy nine months later. However, at a doctor’s appointment, I was told that my kidney function was now 20 percent. It could have been due to the unplanned emergency C-section I’d received, but no one could confirm that. At my age, it was normal for polycystic kidneys to digress or reach a level of dormancy. But that day and those results were the beginning of a downward trajectory in the health of my kidneys and my quality of life. My doctor told me it was time to move forward with dialysis. I was a 33-year-old new mother, but I couldn’t just enjoy this stage of my life. I had to start planning for a future with doctors at the reins. As the year went on, I ended up with a gallbladder removal and another drop in my kidney function, to 10 percent. 16 • JULY 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

Photo: Courtesy of Andrea Petkau

Faith&Friends

Happy Reunion Ty and Felix visit Andrea in the hospital after the operation

I started dialysis in January 2019, but in October, I was gifted with a kidney transplant from my extremely loving and generous father-in-law. It was the greatest gift I ever could have received: a new beginning and the ability to start living fully again. True Focus During my time on dialysis, I did everything I could to remain as positive and active as possible, but it was challenging. Some nights, I would be in tears with frustration: Why did God give me this struggle? Why do I have to journey with this disease—the unknowns, the lack


One doctor even thought he had the right to tell me we were making a mistake—what if he was right?  ANDREA PETKAU of control, the feeling that no one understood? Why do I feel so alone, so forgotten? The doctors told me what I needed to do, how to do it and when to do it. If I listened to their advice, I could live better, achieve more. But it felt as if I was being controlled by a medical system concerned only with maintaining my physical level of survival. As a Christian, I found I needed to focus my thoughts on God, trusting in His grace and healing. Ultimately, the miracle of my transplant, the success of the surgery, the fact that I am writing this now had as much to do with God as it did with the doctors who operated and cared for me. Challenges and Promises Now, we are putting our hope and trust in our government and public

health officials, just as I put my trust in the medical profession. We pray daily that the decision-making processes create a sense of peace. In a time when we need to put our trust in those we can see and hear, we also need to put our faith in He who is unseen, to remember that God is in complete control, that in seeking Him we can find peace and hope. This is a time of creativity, where we need to embrace isolation but reach out however we can. Remember to call a friend, a colleague or an elderly shut-in. Check on single moms or families whose jobs have been put on hold. Take care of yourselves and the ones around you. The challenge to trust and live out our lives is ours; the challenge to provide what is needed in our world is His. Let’s rest in that promise.

(left) Andrea Petkau is a member of The Salvation Army’s Willows Community Church in Langley, B.C. faithandfriends.ca  I  JULY 2020

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FAITH BUILDERS

Photo: Courtesy of Walt Disney Pictures

Faith&Friends

The Courage to Fight In Disney’s Mulan, a young girl finds hidden strength to take her father’s place in battle.

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by Jeanette Levellie

ans of Disney Studio’s liveaction fairy tales will thrill at Mulan, slated to be released on July 24. As with Disney’s 1998 animated feature, Mulan depicts the legend of a young Chinese girl, Hua Mulan. Groomed for the traditional role as a wife and mother, Mulan defies tradition and the law at the peril of her life. When the ruthless Huns—aided by an evil witch—attack China,

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the emperor demands that every family provide one male member to fight in the Imperial Army. Mulan’s aged father, an honoured former warrior, volunteers to serve, but he is ailing and weak. His wife and two daughters know that if he enlists, they will never see him again. Mulan, the eldest daughter, resolves to disguise herself as a man—Hua Jun— and fight in her father’s place. The battles that follow are the ultimate


test of her courage and devotion. Fight Like a Woman When Mulan decides to unveil her true identity, instead of cowering in the face of danger, she embraces her inner courage and fights as only a woman can—with fierceness born of love and loyalty. A fellow soldier who had mocked her for her small stature during their training later tells the others, “She’s the best warrior among us.” But is Mulan’s determination to bring honour to her family enough? Will her grit alone provide the strength she needs to help China overcome its enemies? Or will she die trying? One in a Thousand The popular Chinese actress Liu Yifei (Outcast, The Chinese Widow), beat out nearly a thousand other women for the title role. Yifei, known to Chinese audiences as “Fairy Sister” for her delicate looks, came to the role with experience in modelling, acting, singing and martial arts. Nevertheless, Yifei was still unprepared for the rigours of six- and seven-hour days of intense training in military marching, stunt fighting, sword training, horseback riding and archery. In a behind-the scenes video produced by Disney, Yifei stated, “I wanted to see my abilities as an actor. I wanted to discover more, more,

more. Mulan is discovering herself. Not on the surface, but deep inside.” Director Niki Caro (Whale Rider, The Zookeeper’s Wife) said, “Mulan has something for all of us and is as relevant and resonant as it was when it was first written more than 1,500 years ago.” The legend of Mulan, written as a ballad between AD 420 and AD 589, has become part of Chinese culture and is one of the first poems in Chinese history to introduce the notion of gender equality. “Liu is everything an action movie hero should be,” added Caro. Saving Our World We all enjoy hearing legends about heroes who inspire us to accomplish more than we thought humanly possible. Mulan is a sterling example of one such legend: full of selfsacrifice, courage and family loyalty that led to heroism. The story of Jesus is no legend. He didn’t simply dress up as a man. He became a man. Philippians 2:7 tells us that Jesus “emptied himself” (English Standard Version). The only way God could save mankind from sin and make us His children was to take on flesh and blood and die in our place. Jesus is a true hero. He didn’t simply save one nation from enemy invaders. He saved the entire world from a life of hopelessness. Jesus’ self-sacrifice, courage and family loyalty changed our lives forever.

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Faith&Friends

LITE STUFF

Eating Healthy With Erin COCONUT LIME BASIL SHRIMP

Recipe photos: Erin Stanley

TIME 2 hr 36 min  MAKES 8 servings  SERVE WITH salad or rice

1 kg (2 lbs) large shrimp, shell in 400 ml (12/3 cup) coconut milk 125 ml (½ cup) fresh basil 30 ml (2 tbsp) lime juice 5 ml (1 tsp) red pepper flakes 5 ml (1 tsp) onion powder 5 ml (1 tsp) garlic powder 5 ml (1 tsp) paprika 2 ml (½ tsp) cayenne pepper 15 ml (1 tbsp) soy or tamari sauce pinch of salt pinch of pepper

1. If using frozen shrimp, defrost in cold water for 20 minutes. 2. Blend all remaining ingredients and marinate shrimp for 2 hours in fridge. 3. Soak wooden skewers in water for at least 10 minutes. 4. Skewer shrimp and place on medium-high grill. 5. Grill 3 minutes per side or until shrimp are completely red.

GRILLED ROMAINE AND LEMON TIME 10 min  MAKES 2 servings  SERVE WITH hamburgers or hot dogs

2 romaine hearts 60 ml (¼ cup) olive oil 15 ml (1 tbsp) fresh lemon juice 2 ml (½ tsp) salt 1 ml (¼ tsp) pepper 60 ml (¼ cup) Parmesan cheese balsamic glaze (optional)

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1. Cut romaine hearts vertically and brush with 30 ml (2 tbsp) of olive oil. 2. Heat grill to medium-high and place Romaine hearts. Press down with tongs for 3 minutes per side or until grill marks are formed. 3. Remove from grill and place on large plate to drizzle remaining oil. 4. Squeeze lemon and add salt and pepper. Add Parmesan cheese and balsamic glaze (optional) to taste.


One Man Against Hitler

A HIDDEN LIFE P.26

Message From God

“FEAR NOT” P.5

Continuing to Serve

THE ARMY HELPS P.10

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

JUNE 2020

Tackling Faith

IN AND OUT OF CHURCH, HARD WORK PAYS OFF FOR THE CFL’S DRAKE NEVIS P.16

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Sudoku Puzzle

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 × 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9.

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1. What is the most expensive property in the game Monopoly? 2. What is the official flower of Manitoba? 3. The novel Anne of Green Gables is set in what province?

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© www.kevinfrank.net

HEAVEN’S LOVE THRIFT SHOP by Kevin Frank

Answers on next page.

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QUICK QUIZ

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Faith&Friends

LITE STUFF

Word Search Anime H F M E S N D Y S E K I R E I C D F A M A T N I G Q R B X R B J N B U M I H S I H S U M N A J T P N P L O A K P F B R C N I F C I D O H L O A G Y V N A G Y A A S C R D B M O O R I U X F R U I T S B A S K E T X D A O U O A Q S E I A G N I T B R B E R Y N J Y K Z X T O I O A L Y E U A A I M W D E I L N E F L E M O V T T R C E F R E E B O N A G A L B R Y H U P T O H C A R K L M V A R W N M N D F Y O E L B E C L U O H G O Y K O T Z S D L A L H A K J K S R C D L T O E A W L Y E T T O L R A H C J A E D N R A S M A O T V B G Y K R E S R E B A R I O C N A N A K U O Y H I K O I P S N R H A B M D A N N A L C X E T T E G E I A I E C E I P E N O J H E ANOTHER ATTACK ON TITAN BACCANO BERSERK BLEACH BLOOD BTOOOM CHARLOTTE CLANNAD CLAYMORE COWBOY BEBOP DEATH NOTE

DRAGON BALL DURARARA ELFEN LIED FAIRY TAIL FATE ZERO FOOD WARS FRUITS BASKET FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST FUTURE DIARY GIN TAMA HAIKYUU

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HELLSING HYOUKA INUYASHA MAGI MUSHISHI NORAGAMI ONE PIECE PARASYTE SAILOR MOON SEKIREI TOKYO GHOUL TORADORA

Quiz Answers: 1. Boardwalk; 2. the prairie crocus; 3. Prince Edward Island. 1

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Faith&Friends

NIFTY THRIFTY

Quarantining in Style Or, how to wear loungewear.

While spending more time at home, it can be tempting to stay in pajamas all day, but what you wear connects to how you feel—even if no one else can see you. Studies have shown value in putting effort into dressing presentably, including increased productivity and self-esteem. Here are four tips to make loungewear work for you. 1. Start with a soft shirt  Whether loose or tight, the most important factor to consider in choosing a loungewear top is the softness of the material. Cotton, linen and wool are staples of the trend.

2. Add comfortable pants  Sweatpants and trackpants are having a moment. Make sure that they are structured, tapered and fit properly for a polished look. 3. Finish with a great cardigan  Cardigans are a musthave. They are one of those staples that enable you to dress up or down without ever looking out of place. Throw it over a casual T-shirt and instantly look presentable. 4. Make it you  When trying a fashion trend, it is important to incorporate your own sense of style, whether you’re into neutral knits or colourful silks. With loungewear, you can look great around the house without sacrificing comfort. The best part? These pieces are easy to find at your local Salvation Army thrift store.

(left) May Strutt is an avid thrifter with more than a decade of shopping experience in thrift stores across Canada. She is also a communications and engagement specialist with The Salvation Army’s thrift stores. Find a thrift store near you at thriftstore.ca. The Salvation Army continues to provide its essential services to the vulnerable, but to ensure the safety of clients and staff, some thrift stores remain temporarily closed due to COVID-19.

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Profile for The Salvation Army

Salvationist + Faith & Friends July 2020  

The Salvation Army exists to share the love of Jesus Christ, meet human needs and be a transforming influence in the communities of our worl...

Salvationist + Faith & Friends July 2020  

The Salvation Army exists to share the love of Jesus Christ, meet human needs and be a transforming influence in the communities of our worl...

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