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Budding Musicians Praise Montreal’s Blast of Brass

How Churches Can Overcome Loneliness With Friendship

Taking the Temperature: COVID-19 and Kids’ Health

THE VOICE OF THE ARMY

November 2020

Salvationist.ca

Territory Releases New Vision Statement is the culmination of extensive consultation, collaboration and prayer


What Do All of These Officers Have In Common? Class of Booth UC, page 1 of many...

They All Graduated with a Degree from Booth University College

Preparing the Army to give hope today and tomorrow BOOTHUC.CA

ED UCA TI ON FOR A B ETT ER W O R L D


November 2020 • Volume 15, Number 11

20 DEPARTMENTS

CONNECT ONLINE

5 Frontlines

Visit Salvationist.ca to add your comments and read web-exclusive articles.

16 Ethically Speaking The Fourth Wave by Major Karen Puddicombe

@salvationistmagazine Follow us on Instagram for the latest and best Army photos. Tag your photos #salvationists.

17 Not Called? Nursing a Faith by Kimberly McIntyre

23 Taking the Lead All Systems Go by Paul Carew

/salvationistmagazine Like us on Facebook for photos and updates. Interact with our community of 38,000+ fans.

26 Cross Culture 28 People & Places 30 Salvation Stories The Creator’s Path by Sipili Molia

COLUMNS 4 Editorial Believe the Impossible by Geoff Moulton

5 Onward Positioned for Growth by Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd

10 Chief Priorities A Whole Vision by Colonel Edward Hill

24 Family Matters Taking the Temperature by Captain Bhreagh Rowe

25 Viewpoint The Blind Spot by Darryn Oldford

FEATURES 8 2020 Vision Salvationists reflect on the new territorial vision statement. by Brianne Zelinsky-Carew

12 Lost in Translation These five Hebrew words give us insight into poverty. by Dion Oxford

13 Something Wonderful Helping orphan and vulnerable children—together. by Lt-Colonel Brenda Murray

14 Let’s Talk A new resource will help Salvationists learn to engage difficult topics in ways that bring us together. by Aimee Patterson

15 The Invitation How the COVID-19 pandemic opened a door to community connections in Calgary. by James Watson

@Salvationist Follow us on Twitter for the Army’s breaking news. Use hashtag #SalvationArmy for your own updates and photos. issuu.com/salvationist Catch up on all the Salvation Army news and features on your tablet, desktop or smartphone. Cover illustration: merovingian/ DigitalVision Vectors via Getty Images

READ AND SHARE IT! Helping the Army

WONDER WOMEN P.12

Tackling Nazism

RESISTANCE P.10

Tackling COVID-19

CARING PORTRAITS P.21

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

NOVEMBER 2020

“One Day At a Time”

18 Come One, Come All Budding musicians praise Montreal Citadel’s Blast of Brass. by Leigha Vegh

20 Alone in a Crowd

30

Churches can be lonely places. We need to equip people in friendship-making. by Mike Frost

CONCENTRATION CAMP SURVIVOR JOE KNYPSTRA’S FAITH HELPS HIM MAINTAIN A POSITIVE OUTLOOK ON LIFE. P.16

Salvationist  November 2020  3


EDITORIAL

Believe the Impossible “

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here there is no vision, the people parish.” This ironic typo appeared in a Salvation Army bulletin a few years back. Of course, the original Proverbs 29:18 (KJV) says that where there is no vision, the people “perish.” But sometimes I wonder if “parish” isn’t also true. What is our vision for our Army? Do we have big dreams for what God can do in this territory? Too often, we apply a “hit and miss” strategy in our approach to ministry. We blunder ahead with our own plans, and then ask God to bless them. I am reminded of a passage in Lewis Carroll’s classic children’s tale, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, where Alice encounters the Cheshire Cat and its enigmatic smile. “Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?” asked Alice. “That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,” said the Cat. “I don’t much care where—,” said Alice.

“Oh, you’re sure to do that,” said the Cat, “if you only walk long enough.” Like Alice, we often are not as concerned about where we are going, provided we end up somewhere. Fortunately, God’s direction is not aimless. He has a very specific will and plan for our lives and for our Army. “ ‘For I know the plans I have for you,’ declares the Lord, ‘plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future’ ” (Jeremiah 29:11). In this issue of Salvationist, we unveil the new territorial vision statement as part of the Mobilize 2.0 transformation project (page 8). It is the product of much prayer, consultation and collaboration. We unpack it in our cover story and trust that it will be a guiding force in the coming years. Scripture tells us that God can do “immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine” (Ephesians 3:20). All that is required is for us to step out in faith. Which brings me back to Alice….

“Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,” said the Cat. “—so long as I get somewhere,” Alice added as an explanation.

Salvationist

is a monthly publication of The Salvation Army Canada and Bermuda Territory Brian Peddle General Commissioner Floyd Tidd Territorial Commander Lt-Colonel John P. Murray Secretary for Communications Geoff Moulton Editor-in-Chief and Literary Secretary Giselle Randall Features Editor (416-467-3185) Pamela Richardson News Editor, Copy Editor and Production Co-ordinator (416-422-6112) Leigha Vegh Associate Editor and Staff Writer 4  November 2020  Salvationist

“I daresay you haven’t had much practice,” said the Queen. “When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” What seemingly impossible task is God calling you to do? May he help us embrace this vision of all that can be accomplished for his kingdom. GEOFF MOULTON EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Alice laughed. “There’s no use trying,” she said to the Queen. “One can’t believe impossible things.”

Brandon Laird Senior Graphic Designer Hannah Saley Digital Media Specialist Ada Leung Circulation Co-ordinator Ken Ramstead Contributor Agreement No. 40064794, ISSN 1718-5769. Member, The Canadian Christian Communicators Association. All Scripture references from the Holy Bible, New International Version (NIV) © 2011. All articles are copyright The Salvation Army Canada and Bermuda Territory and can be reprinted only with written permission.

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Mission

The Salvation Army exists to share the love of Jesus Christ, meet human needs and be a transforming influence in the communities of our world. Salvationist informs readers about the mission and ministry of The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda. salvationist.ca facebook.com/salvationistmagazine twitter.com/salvationist youtube.com/salvationistmagazine instagram.com/salvationistmagazine


ONWARD

Positioned for Growth Keep looking forward. BY COMMISSIONERS FLOYD AND TRACEY TIDD

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olin Powell, former United States secretary of state, offered some good advice—not only to new drivers, but to all of us on the highway of life—when he said, “Always focus on the front windshield and not the rear-view mirror.” That’s not to say one should ignore the rear-view mirror; it’s there for a purpose. Perhaps the wise approach would be to keep its size in proportion to the windshield in mind and look forward, with an awareness of what lies behind. As we enter the next chapter of life and ministry for The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda, we are focusing on the front view. We keep a glancing eye on the rear-view mirror, recognizing what God has done in and through our movement to bring us to this point in time. As we embark together on the “Mobilize 2.0—Inspired for Mission, Positioned for Growth” journey, we will choose to look forward with anticipation of all that God is doing and will yet do in and through The Salvation Army.

Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard said that “life can only be understood looking backwards, but it must be lived looking forward.” God gave a word to his people through the prophet Isaiah: “Forget the things that happened in the past. Do not keep on thinking about them. I am about to do something new” (Isaiah 43:18-19 NIRV). Note that these verses immediately follow a list of all that God had done—setting his people free from bondage and leading them through the Red Sea into the promised land. His instruction, following that appropriate glance in the rearview mirror, was to keep looking through the windshield. Looking back, they could understand the faithfulness of God, but life was to be lived looking forward, seeing the new thing God was doing. As we capture the vision of where God is leading The Salvation Army Canada and Bermuda Territory, we are relying upon his Spirit to breathe a fresh wind into

INSPIRED FOR MISSION | POSITIONED FOR GROWTH

his Army. We are positioning for growth, setting our gaze forward to see the new thing God is doing. “It is beginning to happen even now. Don’t you see it coming?” (Isaiah 43:19 NIRV).

Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd

FRONTLINES

COVID-19 Mobile Testing Site Deploys in Toronto

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n partnership with the Toronto Central Local Health Integration Network, Toronto Grace Health Centre (TGHC) established an onsite COVID-19 testing unit as well as a mobile testing unit when local assessment centres became overloaded from an increase in positive cases in September. The mobile unit was deployed to a variety of settings, including longterm care homes, retirement homes, supportive housing and shelters.

Mjr Marie Hollett, director of spiritual and religious care, TGHC, picks up the mobile testing unit, a brand-new minivan, at territorial headquarters in Toronto

Salvationist  November 2020  5


FRONTLINES

Women’s Ministries Introduces New Grow Program

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he Canada and Bermuda Territory’s women’s ministries department introduced a new program in September called Grow, for girls ages 12 to 17 to cultivate their identity as beloved children of God. “We long to see girls understand their worth and potential to make a positive impact in the world around them as they grow in Jesus,” (see Colossians 2:7), says Captain Laura Van Schaick, divisional secretary for women’s ministries, Ontario Division. Grow incorporates themes of leadership, spiritual formation and social justice. It includes a variety of activities to help girls understand themselves and the world around them. Guided Bible studies invite girls to dive deep into Scripture to discover what God says about growing in him. The program offers practical life applications to help participants apply God’s truth to their lives, while life-skills sessions, such as sewing, car care and public speaking, aim to prepare girls practically as they transition into

independence. “Our children are growing up faster than ever before, and the world they are growing up in is much different than the world we knew even a decade ago,” says Captain Van Schaick. “Unfortunately, because of this rapidly shifting culture, we, as adults, have not always given children the tools to grow up healthy in our society.” As teens wrestle with complex issues, they need a safe space to talk about them. This is especially true for adolescent girls, notes Captain Van Schaick, speaking on the considerable cultural pressures placed upon the female gender in general. “By the time a young girl is six, she has already been socialized to believe that boys have the potential to be smarter than girls, and by age seven, she will likely believe she is valued more for her looks than her personality,” she says. “Talk About It,” which is one component of Grow, supports The Salvation Army’s Ethics Centre, which is located in Winnipeg, by providing a framework for girls to discuss topics such as sexual-

ity, media and race in a non-judgmental, faith-based setting. The goal of Grow? “We want to see girls raised up to be like mature trees planted by streams of water, able to withstand any drought or storm that comes their way, because their roots grow deep into Jesus,” says Captain Van Schaick. To learn more about Grow, visit salvationist.ca/women-s-ministries/grow/.

Ethics Centre Hosts Anti-Racism Webinar Series JOIN US FOR

Moving Salvationists beyond “I’m not Racist” A four-part webinar series Facilitated by Major Shari Russell and Captain Crystal Porter Hosted by Dr. Jim Read and Dr. Aimee Patterson, The Salvation Army Ethics Centre

SESSION 1 “I’m not racist” and

other damaging defenses SESSION 2 “All lives matter”?

White privilege and fragility SESSION 3 “Your color will not

matter there”: Songs and slogans of the church SESSION 4 “From Tonto to

right relations”: Moving from tokenism to anti-racism

Sept 15, 22, 29 & Oct 6, 2020 2:30 pm Newfoundland DT / 2 pm Atlantic DT / 1 pm Eastern DT / 12 pm Central DT / 11 am Central ST & Mountain DT / 10 am Pacific DT

REGISTER TODAY

salvationarmyethics.org

T

he Salvation Army Ethics Centre in Winnipeg hosted a four-part webinar series titled “Moving Salvationists Beyond ‘I’m Not Racist’ ” from September to October. The sessions were hosted by Dr. Jim Read and Dr. Aimee Patterson of the Ethics Centre. Major Shari Russell, 6  November 2020  Salvationist

territorial Indigenous ministries consultant, and Captain Crystal Porter, divisional Indigenous ministries consultant and divisional youth secretary, Prairie Division, facilitated the conversations around topics such as white privilege, tokenism and anti-racism. “Anti-racism is a way of living that aims to end racism in all its forms: individual, institutional and systemic,” says Dr. Patterson. The first session, titled “ ‘I’m Not Racist’ and Other Damaging Defenses” had 188 Salvationists join in the conversation. The webinars started with a presentation, followed by a question period, and ended with a chance for participants to break out into conversation groups to discuss what they had learned and share new ideas. The webinar series was conceptualized in early 2020 when the news became flooded with stories about Black and Indigenous people all over Canada and the United States being discriminated against. “We knew that to nurture ethical awareness, the Ethics Centre would

need to engage the voices and perspectives of the people on the receiving end of racism,” says Dr. Patterson. To broaden the scope of the webinars, several Salvationists of diverse ethnicities were invited to share their experiences. “We need to see racism through the eyes of the people who suffer,” says Major Russell. Participants expressed an interest in wanting to know what anti-racism looks like on a foundational level. They learned to favour the perspective of the offended person over their own good intentions, to listen and take to heart what the offended party has said before trying to mount an explanation. Questions were also raised about whether oppression can be found in the ways people serve and worship within The Salvation Army. “The Ethics Centre worked diligently to ensure that Salvationists were given a sacred space to learn about racism and to ensure that there was time and space for reflection,” says Captain Porter.


FRONTLINES

Bermuda EDS Team Helps During Hurricane Paulette

W “We were just blown away,” says Mjr Brenda Hammond (right) on the unexpected donation

McCain Foundation Tops Generous Donation

hen hurricane Paulette made a rare landfall on the Bermuda coastline in September, The Salvation Army’s emergency disaster services (EDS) team was there to help. As soon as the Army heard about the hurricane, they immediately began stormproofing Salvation Army buildings, checking generators and preparing food to serve for the more than 85 people seeking refuge. The Category 2 storm caused damage to trees and power lines, but no one was injured. On the other hand, there was new life being celebrated as two children were born at the height of the storm, CTV News reported. Fewer than 10 hurricanes have made direct landfall on Bermuda since the National Hurricane Center began tracking disasters in the 1850s.

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he food bank at Portage la Prairie Corps, Man., received a donation of $50,000 from the McCain Foundation, at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Salvation Army was able to invest in new freezers to help store the large quantities of food that Winnipeg Harvest donates once a month. Before the end of summer, the McCain Foundation topped up their initial donation. “They called and said they were sending another $10,000 to help with our expenses,” says Major Brenda Hammond, corps officer. The additional funds helped with such things as the repair of a leaking roof, the painting of walls and the addition of more space for freezers. “We were also able to give gift cards to our clients so they could be confident that food will be there for them,” says Major Hammond. The McCain Foundation also delivers a selection of frozen foods for the food bank freezers throughout the year whenever it is needed.

Salvation Army EDS personnel serve food as hurricane Paulette nears Bermuda

Local MP Visits Belleville

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eil Ellis, member of Parliament for Bay of Quinte, Ont., and parliamentary secretary to the minister of agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, visited the Army’s community and family services and thrift store in Belleville, Ont., in September. He toured the ministries program space to re-announce a $20,000 grant from the Local Food Infrastructure Fund that had been administered in early February. Taking him on a tour to showcase the new equipment that was bought with the grant was Connie Goodsell, director of community and family services, Major Wil Brown-Ratcliffe, corps officer at Belleville Citadel, and other Salvation Army representatives. “We are grateful to Mr. Ellis for his interest and support of our ministry,” says Goodsell.

Mjr Wil Brown-Ratcliffe, Connie Goodsell and Neil Ellis tour the Army’s facilities in Belleville

Salvationist  November 2020  7


2020 Vision

Participants from the focus groups shared thoughts on how they relate to this vision, highlighting where they see their identity and ministry represented.

Salvationists reflect on the new territorial vision statement. BY BRIANNE ZELINSKY-CAREW

Lt-Colonel Susan van Duinen “We are an innovative partner” Lt-Colonel Susan van Duinen is a retired Salvation Army officer living in Winnipeg. She acted as a focus group facilitator in the vision development process.

Illustration: merovingian/DigitalVision Vectors via Getty Images

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ver the past 12 months, much work has been done to help discern God’s plan for The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda. This work commenced when the territorial leaders, Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd, embarked on a listening tour, visiting 18 cities in just a few weeks. The commissioners interacted with members of our Salvation Army community to get a sense of the feelings and concerns in the territory. They continued listening as they visited six officers’ retreats, held a discussion with the territorial executive council in May, and facilitated focus group discussions with area commanders and emerging leaders across the territory. Building on the themes that had been discerned from hearing many Godinspired voices, in August 2020, an online survey sought input from all ministry units, departments and teams that would inform the development of a territorial vision statement. The result? More than 3,000 people shared their thoughts about the future of our Army, laying the groundwork for the creation of a new vision. If ever there was a time to release 8  November 2020  Salvationist

a statement that echoes the collective hopes and dreams of our Army, it is now. In a world rocked by rapid change and gripped by fears of an uncertain future in a pandemic, it is a tremendous opportunity to pause and consider where God is leading us as we live out the mission he has given to The Salvation Army. Following the survey, five focus groups were formed to allow diverse voices across the territory an opportunity to speak to the themes of the survey results. These groups included stakeholders with corps, youth, soldier and employee, external and social service experiences, whose feedback, paired with results from the survey, culminated in a territorial vision statement. The territory is proud to release this vision, as it will provide direction for our movement in the coming years. The official vision statement for The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda is: We are an innovative partner, mobilized to share hope wherever there is hardship, building communities that are just and know the love of Jesus.

Vision statements are critical in any organization, business or church. Even in our own personal life, it is the vision statement that compels action and gets attention. It brings alignment so that everyone is pulling in the same direction. In kingdom work, it is imperative to have a vision, for the mission is our calling, and the vision tells us where we are heading. What excites me about this vision statement are the pictures of the future that are painted, which, after all, is what a vision statement does. I see a picture of partnership (both horizontal and vertical), a picture of rolling up sleeves and engaging in hard work, a picture of tenderness and compassion offering hope, and a picture of communities filled with human kindness. I see a picture filled with the love of Christ expressed in a myriad of ways. This excites me for two reasons. First, the vision statement will pull us forward and energize us to make those sacrifices for the greater good and create new ways of being disciples. Second, I believe (and it has been my experience) that a vision statement must balance inspiration with realism. Ours does just that. There is no doubt that, in our world, we face challenges. We can choose to concentrate on adversity or we can make a difference. The same can be said of our Army. We can choose to question where our children are going if they are not coming to Sunday school or other


youth programs, why Sunday attendance is on the decline, where our funding will come from for the next budget year, or what program we should be engaged in. There is much to be said about all of that. I prefer to be optimistic. Not naive optimism, but the relentless optimism that moves us forward. We have made some missteps along the way and this vision statement can help us find our way back to who we are and what we do best. I see a Salvation Army in this territory where every connected person, be it through corps, social programs or administrative hubs, is deeply engaged with, passionate about and clear on the mission. I see a Salvation Army that will filter decisions through our vision statement. I see a Salvation Army in which everyone knows our mission and vision and is excited to tell the story of God’s love. We are told that each new generation stands on the successes of the previous generation. Looking back can help us push forward. The Salvation Army is here today because of past innovation, which shows up in our history. We offer hope in times of hardship and continue building communities that shine the forever love of God throughout the territory. There comes a time in the life of every organization or movement when we step back and

of pride in our organization. We desire to partner with our communities, we desire to share hope, and we want just communities. The Salvation Army is all of those things to me.

Cameron Eggie (Social/Program Focus Group) “mobilized to share hope” Cameron Eggie is the executive director for The Salvation Army’s Northern Centre of Hope in Fort St. John, B.C.

This vision statement brings together all of The Salvation Army’s ministry expressions and sums up what we are all about; we want to partner, we are prepared to serve wherever there is need and we want to do that in a just way that honours Jesus. The Army has a long history of planning, preparing and being ready to serve, which benefits us well, especially now. This year, we have been mobilized to address a variety of concerns in response to a global pandemic. The Salvation Army is sharing hope and meeting human needs in ways that we didn’t expect but have always been ready for.

We are an innovative partner, mobilized to share hope wherever there is hardship, building communities that are just and know the love of Jesus. reclaim these strengths before moving forward with relentless optimism. The new vision statement aligns well with our mission. The mission statement is about what we do, whom we serve and how we serve. It is about today. The vision statement moves us into the future. It places focus on tomorrow, identifying the hopes, dreams and problems we are going to solve, and addresses how people are going to be inspired. I believe that our spiritual roots combined with our unique strengths, resilience, spirit of discovery, diversity, work ethic and commitment will ensure the picture of this vision becomes a reality.

We are often ready to serve because we value partnership. The use of the word partner in our vision implies that we come alongside others, rather than resolving or fixing situations. By definition, partnership is also reciprocity. For far too long, many have viewed our work as handouts, but we want to partner with people, recognizing that they contribute value. In my community, we are earning the trust of our neighbours. It is my desire to be truly welcomed by the community. My goal is not to merely point people in the “right” direction, it’s to journey alongside our neighbours. This vision makes me feel a sense

Elizabeth Borgela (Youth Focus Group) “wherever there is hardship” Elizabeth Borgela is a young Salvationist who attends Montreal Citadel.

This vision signifies determined action to me. It holds up to the standard that William Booth set for The Salvation Army as a whole: to share the truth of Christ with servant hands and servant hearts. To me, I see this as our commitment to innovate in ways that better serve others in our communities while still staying true to our mission of sharing the gospel. The emphasis in the vision on sharing hope “wherever there is hardship” resonates with me most. The hope of salvation is meant to be shared in all signs of hardship, whether that is spiritual, emotional or financial. I believe this reflects our duties as Christ-followers to reflect the life of Jesus, to go and make disciples of every nation. No matter where we are set or where God has called us, there are souls that need salvation. Each focus group was created to get the most rounded representation of the Canada and Bermuda Army in order to create a vision statement that could be applied to all peoples of all ages. It is encouraging to know that this vision was formed with Salvation Army voices from different creeds, status and perspectives. It was an honour to take part in the youth focus group. Including the voices of the younger generations communicates that we are one through the body of Christ. As a Christian and Salvationist, I believe it is my duty to build Christlike communities that show his love and grace, and to share this hope in my ministry. Salvationist  November 2020  9


Brent Hobden (Soldier Employee Focus Group) “building communities that are just” Brent Hobden is the community ministries director for The Salvation Army in Comox Valley, B.C.

I see this vision statement as an echo of the Great Commission; as Salvationists, we are called to journey with people who God places into our care and help others recognize the abundance of hope in Christ. The desire to “build communities that are just” speaks to the inequality that exists in every community, so I understand “just communities” as parts of a territory that regards every individual as valued and equal. This action is complemented by the word “mobilized,” which draws a vivid picture of an Army being sent out to distribute a vital message. It is a strong word of action with pending success. I like to think of myself as an out-ofthe-box-thinker, so I connect with this

vision and the notion that our Army is moving forward with new ideas. Within our growingly complex communities live diverse populations. To encourage partnership through our vision statement confirms that we will enlist the support of qualified individuals and agencies. Together, we are equipped to love the individuals that God places into our care. In the Gospel of John, Jesus tells us that, in life, struggles will always be a reality and then he says, “But take heart! I have overcome the world.” In a COVID-19 reality, a vision like this communicates that our Army anticipates the struggles of life and is well positioned in the community to serve, recognizing that service is an outward expression of love through an indwelling of the Holy Spirit.

CHIEF PRIORITIES

A Whole Vision Are we willing to disrupt the present to achieve a brighter future? BY COLONEL EDWARD HILL

10  November 2020  Salvationist

Illustration: Eoneren/E+ via Getty Images

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n John 5:6, Jesus asked a paralyzed man at the pool of Bethesda, “Do you want to get well?” It is interesting to me that Jesus didn’t ask the man if he had enough faith to be healed. He only asked if he wanted to be healed. It seems an unnecessary question. Scripture records that the man had been paralyzed for 38 years. Wasn’t it obvious to everyone that the man wanted to be healed? Of course it was! And yet, it’s fair to say that people do not always act as if they want to get well. Some are comfortable languishing in brokenness or self-pity and others prefer the status quo to the disruption that comes with change. Let’s be honest. Getting well—physically, relationally, emotionally, spiritually—comes at a price. What is true in our personal experience applies to congregational life, too. For example, think about the current context of your worshipping community. If it is anything less than you think it ought to be, do you truly want it to be better? Are you willing to make the changes needed for it to get well? Are you willing to disrupt the present to achieve a brighter future? These are fair questions

to ask of Salvationists. It is no secret that The Salvation Army must address several fundamental challenges facing the movement. That’s why our territory has launched “Mobilize 2.0—Inspired for Mission, Positioned for Growth.” We recognize that the Army is still thriving in many places throughout Canada and Bermuda. Indeed, one could argue that the Army’s societal impact is

greater now than ever before. And yet, there are reasons for grave concern. A decades-long downward trajectory in the number of corps, soldiers, people accepting Christ and weekly worship attendance is troublesome to those who highly value the spiritual ministry of the Army. While there is still time to reverse the tide of decline in much of our spiritual work, it seems to me that


Captain Graciela Arkell (Corps Focus Group) “and know the love of Jesus” Captain Graciela Arkell is community ministries officer and corps officer at Ottawa Citadel.

The phrase that stands out for me in our new vision statement is “building com-

munities that ... know the love of Jesus.” It compels us to show Jesus’ love in all we do, and to take every opportunity to unashamedly tell others about who Jesus is, sharing his message of salvation. As The Salvation Army ministers in places of hardship—financial, physical, mental, emotional, spiritual—it is my hope that people would know that, regardless of our circumstances, God is present. God is the only one that can bring hope where there is none. I pray that people will experience the love of Jesus and know that there is absolutely nothing that can separate us from his love. The year 2020 is quite different from what we expected. So far, it has been a difficult one, which can make us feel a sense of hopelessness, but Christ gives me hope

because I know that he is in control. This new vision statement gives me a sense of excitement and anticipation of the “new thing” that God is and will be doing in our territory over the next decade. I will live out this vision in my ministry by being attentive to God’s voice, allowing his Spirit to lead and being obedient to his call to share the gospel in the communities where he has placed me. May God continue to work in and through us, for his glory. I am excited to see all that God is going to do through The Salvation Army over the next decade. He will continue to bring transformation as we reach out to folks in our communities. Brianne Zelinsky-Carew is a communications specialist for the Mobilize 2.0 team.

CHIEF PRIORITIES

Salvationists must first positively answer the questions already referenced above: Do we want to be well? Are we willing to effect change? Will we be open to a new and different journey in our own context that, though personally uncomfortable, may lead to a growing, more missional and vibrant Salvation Army? Saying “yes” to these questions and taking action does not come as easily as one might expect. Incompatible Wishes In the book Necessary Endings, Dr. Henry Cloud lists a series of internal obstacles that will be encountered and must be overcome by those seeking positive and necessary change. One such obstacle is the tendency many of us have to hold incompatible wishes. Incompatible wishes are most easily defined as the seeking of divergent goals that cannot all be achieved. For example, one can’t expect to lose weight while at the same time snacking on cookies and ice cream! The wish to lose weight and to continue consuming goodies are incompatible. Incompatible wishes are a common challenge to decision-making in The Salvation Army. Consider the congregation that intellectually agrees moving to a new location will be more conducive to mission and ministry, but chooses not to do so because of personal convenience or a sense of nostalgia associated with the present location. Sometimes we can’t have it all! To win, grow and

change requires the sacrifice of some things for others. An Open Mind Another obstacle to becoming well is leaders having an attachment to a certain outcome. Too often, leaders at all levels hold tightly to pre-determined personal preferences, rather than having a commitment to embrace the course of action that will be most beneficial for the mission. In other words, we must enter difficult discussions with an open, rather than a closed, mind. Such an approach requires the full knowledge and acceptance that not everyone will be happy with the final decision. It takes courage for a group of leaders to understand that some may leave and there will be pain in the process, but still commit to making the right decision—and allowing “the chips to fall where they may.” Medicating Thoughts A third obstacle to change is leaders who defer decisions by defaulting to medicating thoughts. Medicating thoughts are employed to relieve leaders from the sense of urgency to take a potentially agonizing action. Medicating thoughts allow us to “kick the can down the road.” We declare to others and ourselves, “I’ll address my addiction … later.” “I’ll end this unhealthy relationship … later.” “I’ll lose weight … later.” Unfortunately, “later” never arrives. We continue for-

ward in the same path as before. Besides putting hard things off, leaders are also often guilty of selective memory. This happens a lot in dysfunctional relationships. We remember the good, but forget the bad. In an Army context, leaders sorting out big decisions can be guilty of cherrypicking the positive highlights in our collective memories, but overlooking the gaps in ministry and relevance that may have contributed to a weakened Salvationist influence. The solution to selective memory is a whole vision that acknowledges the positive, but clearly sees deficits that must be addressed. Jesus met a man who had been suffering for 38 years at a pool called Bethesda. Did the man have a clear idea of what he wanted? Did he want to move on? Did he truly want to be made well? The Lord must have thought so. Jesus transformed the trajectory of the man’s life. God wants to do a new work in the spiritual life of worshipping congregations throughout our vast territory. Will we consent to his transforming work? Will we choose, with God’s help, to get well? If so, let’s put aside the obstacles that may cause us to think small and instead strive to seek a whole vision. Only then will we truly be “Inspired for Mission, Positioned for Growth.” That’s what Mobilize 2.0 is all about. Colonel Edward Hill is the chief secretary in the Canada and Bermuda Territory. Salvationist  November 2020  11


Photo: Watercolor_Concept/stock.Adobe.com

do everything right, but if it rains too much or doesn’t rain at all, their efforts do not yield any fruit. Then they end up seeking government “welfare” to feed their families. In North America we have a famine of work. Many people are rā’eb. This is why it’s so important that we create work and take employment seriously.

Lost in Translation These five Hebrew words give us insight into poverty. BY DION OXFORD

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t has been said that if you ripped out all the pages in the Bible that have to do with poverty, you’d be left with a book hanging in shreds. About 2,000 passages deal with people who are poor. In the Old Testament, poverty is the second-most prominent theme. In the New Testament, one in every 17 verses is about the poor and, in the Gospels, it’s one in 10. Since the Bible is the Word of God, then it’s obvious that God cares deeply about issues of poverty and injustice. But this emphasis loses something in the translation from the original biblical languages to English. In Hebrew, several words are used to describe people who are poor and how they ended up that way. In English, we just have the word “poor,” which is somehow supposed to describe every person experiencing poverty. It doesn’t. Here are five Hebrew words that demonstrate what I mean. 1. ’āni. This is the most frequently used word for poverty in the Old Testament. It is used 80 times and refers to people whose poverty is 12  November 2020  Salvationist

caused by affliction and oppression. People who have experienced violence, been violated, sexually exploited or have PTSD for one reason or another fit this description. These are people who have been victims of oppression, making them unable to function, leading to their poverty. 2. dal/dalal. These are people who are frail and weak. This word is used 62 times in the Old Testament. Those who are sick, infirm or have mentalhealth concerns fit this description. Some of the poorest of the poor are the dal, yet they are the neediest people and we often leave them on the streets. (I hope you can already see major differences between ‘āni and dal and why it’s so important to respond to them differently.) 3. rā’eb. This is a word meaning hungry or famished. It is used 38 times in the Old Testament. It is an agricultural word meaning land that doesn’t yield anything—famine. People can

4. rûsh. This word describes those who are impoverished through dispossession. It is used 31 times in the Old Testament. People become rûsh when the government comes and takes their land. We can see the outcome of that all around us in Canada right now when we think of Indigenous people. The process of becoming rûsh is that you lose your stakeholding, becoming a non-person, and then you lose your voice. A Christian response, a biblical response to rûsh, therefore, is to speak on behalf of people until they get their voices back. 5. ‘ebyôn. This is a word used 61 times in the Old Testament, and it describes someone who is needy and dependent—a beggar. In many ways, welfare has created a dependency. We’ve invented the system that created this. We get angry when we see dependent people and try to create new rules. This is not a new problem, of course. The people of Israel became dependent on Pharaoh and wanted to run back to Egypt at the first sign of trouble in the desert, because they didn’t know how to be free. These are the people that we get most mad at, yet we are the ones who created dependence in the first place. These words show us why we need to treat people as individuals. Each person or family struggling with poverty that we encounter is dealing with different issues. So, a one-size-fits-all approach doesn’t—and can’t—work. I hope this brief overview about the different causes of poverty can help us start to make a dent in this massive issue. Dion Oxford has spent more than 25 years working among people experiencing homelessness in Toronto, most recently as the director of mission integration for Toronto Housing and Homeless Supports. He was the founding director of the Salvation Army Gateway, a shelter for men.


Something Wonderful Helping orphan and vulnerable children—together. BY LT-COLONEL BRENDA MURRAY Lt-Col Brenda Murray shares a moment with Army personnel in Mozambique. From left, Cpt Aida Simango, Davide Raura and Cpt Francisco Novela, COAL project; Lt-Col Murray; and Mjr Jose Nharugue, training principal

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ogether we can! This has been my motto for the past number of years. I am always amazed at what we can accomplish when we work together toward a common goal. Mother Teresa once said, “None of us, including me, ever do great things. But we can all do small things, with great love, and together we can do something wonderful.” When I think of doing something wonderful together, I think of The Salvation Army’s COAL (community orphans, vulnerable children and livestock banking) project in Mozambique. This project was developed as members of the community, target beneficiaries and Salvation Army personnel in Panda, Xai-Xai and Zobue came together to help orphans and vulnerable children thrive. In partnership with the local community, the Army identified several ways to provide support: increasing access to education; distributing livestock (chickens, pigs and goats) to generate income; reducing food insecurity and malnutri-

tion by promoting communal gardens and conservation agriculture; and developing community response teams (CRTs). The total cost of this three-year project is US$192,000, with our territory contributing US$175,000. These funds primarily come from women Salvationists across Canada and Bermuda through the women’s ministries territorial project, however, some of the funds also come from our Gifts of Hope ethical giving program. A year ago, I was in Mozambique for the celebration kick-off of the project in Chicumbani, a community just outside Xai-Xai, one of the three communities identified to the project. The excitement was electric as many gathered: families, Salvation Army leaders, project officers, government officials and community representatives. The launch provided an opportunity to communicate the objectives and timelines of the project; to hear from potential beneficiaries about the issues facing

orphans and vulnerable children in their community; and for the project staff to discuss things in more detail. And, of course, every event like this has to include singing, dancing and, most importantly, a time of Scripture reading, prayer and dedication. It was moving to participate and hear the stories from children who were going to benefit because people came together and worked toward a common goal. We also heard from grandparents who were raising their grandchildren because they had been left orphaned, and they expressed gratitude to The Salvation Army for supporting them in this way. The number of people and hours of dedication that go into a project such as this are astounding, and what’s great is that we here in Canada are part of it. From the donor to the beneficiary—in this case, a child—you are making a difference and helping to break the cycle of poverty. Your donation through the women’s ministries department, or your purchase of one of the 17 gift items through Gifts of Hope, makes a difference. It’s the gift that keeps on giving. Goats, pigs and chickens provide a source of income and food for families who have taken in orphan and vulnerable children. Tuition fees, school uniforms and textbooks mean a child can attend school, breaking down social barriers and enabling future success. Kids’ clubs and after-school programs give children psycho-social support and expose them to the gospel message through games and activities. How I wish I could take every one of you with me to see the wonderful work that The Salvation Army does in more than 131 countries. Stories of transformation, hope and dignity are the result of partnership. It’s exciting to be part of something bigger than ourselves. Let’s continue to work together, mobilize and “do something wonderful.” Lt-Colonel Brenda Murray is the director of international development. Salvationist  November 2020  13


Let’s Talk A new resource will help Salvationists learn to engage difficult topics in ways that bring us together. BY AIMEE PATTERSON

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’ve often heard it said that we live in a society that talks about sex a lot— perhaps too much—and that the church doesn’t talk about sex enough. The Salvation Army has taken this statement seriously. You may recall the words of General André Cox (Rtd), then the international leader of The Salvation Army, in a Salvationist interview: “We need a greater ability to simply listen to people’s experience, to walk in their shoes and understand their realities before we’re swift to condemn. I think our understanding on the whole subject of sexuality is growing. We realize that it’s a very complex topic, and we shouldn’t just weigh in with absolutes, but be willing to listen and dialogue.” A Bit of Background on “Let’s Talk” So, in 2015, General Cox called on the International Moral and Social Issues Council, the International Theological Council and the International Social Justice Commission to provide resources for Salvationists around the world to address issues of sexuality and sexual relationships. Their first task was to develop topical materials for conversations on sexuality. The result is a series called “Let’s Talk.” This effort has since been boosted by the appointing of Lt-Colonel Julie Forrest as the international liaison officer for dialogue on human sexuality. “Let’s Talk” resources adapt a conver14  November 2020  Salvationist

sation method called faith-based facilitation (FBF) that The Salvation Army has used internationally in versatile ways, such as in community development, social work, evangelism and administrative decisions. The aim of FBF conversations is to engage people in exploring and responding to issues together in the light of Christian faith. As the title of the 2010 FBF guidebook says, it can help “build deeper relationships.” After endorsing the use of the “Let’s Talk” series in the Canada and Bermuda Territory, territorial leadership called on the members of the social issues committee to become trained facilitators, and to promote conversations at all levels and settings. To date, there are about 30 people in the territory trained to facilitate conversations on divorce and remarriage, married life, partner abuse, pornography, same-sex relationships, sex outside of marriage and singleness. What Happens at a “Let’s Talk” Conversation? Ideally, the five-step conversation is held by a group small enough that each participant may contribute and large enough that several different experiences and perspectives are represented. First, to get everyone on the same page, we identify the topic under discussion. For instance, if the topic is sex outside of marriage, are we talking about cohabitation? Marital infidelity?

Casual sex? The second step calls us to describe and analyze the topic. Here we move beneath the surface to develop a comprehensive account of the topic based on the information we bring to the table. In the third step of reflection and evaluation, the conversation gets more personal, perhaps even more sensitive. We may be wrestling with difficult questions. Perhaps differences of perspective have been voiced. Together, we engage in prayer and reading Scripture, listening for what God’s Spirit might be saying to us. We may have a “kairos experience,” a sense that this is a special moment, “God’s time,” when we gain insight on what it means to live as Jesus would have us live. While the third step is often seen as a moment ripe for kairos, the diagram places kairos in the centre, reminding us of God’s continuous presence and the importance of integrating belief and action at all times. Next, we decide and plan. It’s a dynamic step, and outcomes depend both on the topic and the group engaged. The final step, act, takes place following the conversation in response to our decision(s). An action may be to change a practice or behaviour. It may be to set up another conversation on a different topic or to address the same topic at a deeper level. Will this Lead to Official Changes for The Salvation Army? There’s no avoiding the fact that sexuality and sexual relationships have become polarizing. “Let’s Talk” conversations do not signal official changes. Rather, they are designed, in part, to address division and help Salvationists build capacity to engage each other in ways that bring us together. When I am part of a “Let’s Talk” conversation, I am reminded of how Jesus responded to those who approached him. Jesus listened. Listening helped him understand who they were and where they had come from. Walking a mile in their shoes didn’t separate Jesus from people; it deepened relationships. It’s my hope that, instead of walking away from each other, we learn to live together in gracious love, accepting that it’s possible for faithful Christians to come to different conclusions. Interested in a “Let’s Talk” conversation? The Ethics Centre can provide more information. Dr. Aimee Patterson is a Christian ethics consultant at The Salvation Army Ethics Centre in Winnipeg.


Lt Connie Cristall and her husband, Cameron

The Invitation How the COVID-19 pandemic opened a door to community connections in Calgary. BY JAMES WATSON

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n a warm evening this past summer, Lieutenant Connie Cristall was walking her dog in her Calgary neighbourhood when someone stopped to say hello. An ordinary moment on the surface, but one with deeper significance, because it marked a turning point in her relationship with the community. Lieutenant Cristall moved to Calgary three years ago, appointed as a corps planter in response to the creative and thriving ministry at The Salvation Army’s Barbara Mitchell Family Resource Centre, located in the diverse Shaganappi area. The centre has nurtured a friendly atmosphere where spiritual conversations are welcome. When she moved into the neighbourhood, Lieutenant Cristall began trying to establish community connections— shopping, frequenting local coffee shops, visiting people. She partnered with the existing Messy Church and Bible studies at the centre and worked with the staff to develop a leadership team, composed of a chaplain, program staff, neighbours and people who have been participants

in the centre’s programs. As the team explored opportunities for sharing faith and building community, their diversity of spiritual journeys helped establish a vision and direction for the new corps. In 2018, Lieutenant Cristall and the leadership team piloted a “cafechurch” model (see cafechurchnetwork.wordpress.com). The multi-purpose space at the centre is bright and comfortable, an ideal space for table group discussions. As life issues, such as internet safety or parenting, started conversation around the tables, someone would share a personal story and then biblical wisdom was explored. This environment encouraged people to come out of their shells. Newcomers moved from being shy visitors to asking to share their story with the group. When the COVID-19 pandemic began and physical distancing came into effect, it was a challenge to find opportunities to develop relationships while adapting to new public health realities. They were able to use videoconference “room” func-

tions to continue their table discussions. “Even though we’re not meeting in person, we still have that connection,” says Noshelle Armogan, a senior soldier who started attending through the cafechurch. “That beautiful warmth through the Zoom calls … who would have thought?” A few people have visited the new corps on Zoom without turning on their camera, but if something connects for them, they enter the discussion. Another way Lieutenant Cristall is involved in the neighbourhood is through the Shaganappi Community Association, where she’s part of a committee studying housing issues. Her connections with the association gave her insight into new local developments and prompted conversations with people who also care deeply about the neighbourhood. When pandemic health concerns emerged in the spring, the community association asked her to share her perspective on the mental-health issues affecting the community, alongside an expert in the field. Lieutenant Cristall was introduced at the start of the webinar as the pastor of the new Salvation Army church in the Barbara Mitchell Family Resource Centre. This invitation from the community association was a divine moment. The webinar raised awareness of her care for the neighbourhood and opened conversations with neighbours—including a friendly chat while walking her dog, with someone who attended the webinar. This was a welcome development, and COVID-19 is partly responsible. Reflecting on her experience over the past three years, Lieutenant Cristall shares, “I had a hard time becoming known in the Shaganappi community. The pandemic opened a door for me. Really, God opened the door, and I was given an invitation to walk in.” James Watson is the corps health and planting consultant for the Canada and Bermuda Territory.

Lt Cristall leads a virtual service during the pandemic

Salvationist  November 2020  15


ETHICALLY SPEAKING

The Fourth Wave How is COVID-19 affecting those who are already marginalized?

Photo: courtneyk/iStock via Getty Images Plus

BY MAJOR KAREN PUDDICOMBE

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his year, as COVID-19 burst through the gates of our comfortable Canadian context, life drastically changed for all of us. Public health officials and the government strongly advised isolation, and we heeded the call to stay home and stay safe. The next few months weren’t easy for anyone. We were separated from family, friends and church; expected to work and teach our children at the same time; faced unemployment and economic instability; and experienced housing and food insecurity. The complexity of living in a changed world filled us with questions and anxiety. The frenzy on social media often consumed us, enhancing the tendency to worry and panic over things we couldn’t change. All of this affected our mental well-being. Think about how challenging the changes were for your little bubble. Think about how you coped, how you navigated your needs versus your wants. Think about how you chose to simplify life and care for your family in a time of crisis. Now let’s pause and think about the marginalized in our society. As a Salvation 16  November 2020  Salvationist

Army officer who oversees community and family services, I was on the front line responding to the needs of our community, including those experiencing homelessness. There were many changes to protocols and safety measures, but my incredible staff and I did our best to serve and share the love of God. In the early weeks of our provincial lockdown, many of the people experiencing homelessness who came to us were unaware of the severity of the pandemic and did not have the right information to guide their daily choices. COVID-19 made life even harder for these individuals in many ways. Social agencies closed, shelters minimized the number of beds available for an ever-growing population, and people who once let others crash on their couches worried about getting sick and shut their doors. Restaurants were only open for drive through. This was a problem for those who did not have a phone to preorder food or a vehicle. Without access to the internet, the ability to get help for mental-health challenges became even more complex.

In an article for The Conversation, an independent media website, researchers described the mental-health consequences of COVID-19 as the “fourth wave” of the pandemic, citing an Angus Reid study from April, which found that “50 percent of Canadians felt their mental health had worsened during the pandemic, indicating high levels of worry and anxiety.” God created us to be in relationship with one another, to be in community with one another, and months of isolation and physical distancing have taken a toll. But as the researchers point out, this impact on mental health is even greater for those groups marginalized by social circumstances and stigma. They lack financial resources and the tools to stay connected on social media, and their social supports remain closed to the public. Marginalized groups are more likely to experience poor mental health and, in some cases, mental-health conditions. In addition, marginalized groups also have decreased access to the social and economic factors that are essential to recovery and positive mental health. So, what can we do as an Army to enhance the mental well-being of those we accompany? 1. Meet in person. We need to create

safe opportunities to meet face to face (with proper health and safety protocols in place). People need to know that we are still here for them.

2. Ask the right questions. “How are

you holding up? How are you coping emotionally? How can we help you on this journey?”

3. Have mental-health professionals connected to your ministry unit.

Partner with local mental-health resources in your area or employ a professional counsellor to provide help and guidance to those in need.

4. Be the church. People don’t care

how much you know until they know how much you care. Walk with Jesus as he walks with those you meet from day to day. Live the truth of your faith and be the friend who seeks equality of service for all people.

Major Karen Puddicombe is the corps officer at Burlington Community Church, Ont., and executive director of community and family services.


NOT CALLED? “One of the things about The Salvation Army that resonates with me is that it’s faith in action,” says Cdt Jenelle Durdle

Nursing a Faith For Cadet Jenelle Durdle, officership, like nursing and teaching, is as much a calling as it is a career. BY KIMBERLY McINTYRE

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adet Jenelle Durdle has always had a helping spirit. Her career as a nurse and teaching in health care prepared her for acceptance at the College for Officer Training in September 2019. Getting Her Start “I grew up attending church with my grandmother,” recalls Durdle. “I always had a faith, but it wasn’t until later that my faith became solid.” Durdle found The Salvation Army when she was 19. “I started attending Westville Corps, and then Halifax Citadel Community Church with my boyfriend, Dion, who is now my husband, and that’s when my faith started to develop and mature,” she says. “I experienced being embraced by a church family, and people took me under their wing. I grew as a Christian, and I wanted to align my life with who Jesus was.” Durdle was enrolled at Halifax Citadel Community Church and started studying to become a nurse. “I had a desire to care for people and I felt that’s where God was calling me,” she says. As a nurse, Durdle taught at the College of the North Atlantic and Nova Scotia Community College in the practical nursing program. “I loved teaching in the lab but my true passion was in the clinical setting—nursing homes, surgical units and such. It was

a wonderful privilege to be a part of the student nurses’ development,” she says. But by her second year of nursing, the newly married woman started to question, “Is God calling me to be an officer?” “Having people encouraging me to share my testimony affirmed to me that God could use me in this way,” she says.

It’s not about who I think I am; it’s being who God wants me to be. –Cadet Jenelle Durdle

“It’s not about who I think I am; it’s being who God wants me to be. God breathed his Spirit into me, and that’s when I really started to dream about officership.” Coming Together “Part of my story is my husband’s journey to officership, too,” says Durdle. “There was definitely push and pull! When I talked to Dion about it the first time, he said, ‘Huh?’ ” she smiles. “By the time I graduated from nursing, we had two children, and my husband felt a call to ministry, but not necessarily officership.”

It was a long process, but their dream finally became reality when the couple made their decision to attend training. “We went to the Officership Information Weekend a total of four times between the two of us over the years!” Durdle laughs now, remembering their attendance at the events held at the College for Officer Training in Winnipeg, which allowed them to explore their call to officership “But in 2017, we both felt it was time.” The Durdles arrived at the training college in September 2019. CFOT and COVID-19 Durdle’s year, like so many others, was changed by the reality of COVID-19. Durdle found herself with an opportunity to practise confidence and sharing. “I started to share some information that was evidence-based,” she says. “It was very stretching. As a nurse, I had the skills needed to find good information, but it was intimidating to share with folks who had greater influence than me.” Durdle and her fellow students were put to action right away. “Everybody was very helpful,” she says. “We cared for members of our community who had been travelling. “I can’t say that I felt isolated from my peers, because within days our faculty had figured out how to do class online. It was weird to engage with a computer screen at first, but now I’m used to it,” she says proudly. “For us as a family, our contribution to ministry has been doing an online service, and we’ve been able to help with online worship at Heritage Park Temple. All of us now are involved in helping with online ministry across the territory. The cadet body as a whole has been quite active.” After a career in nursing and teaching, then moving across the country to train to become a Salvation Army officer, Durdle ties the three together in this sentiment. “One of the things about The Salvation Army that resonates with me is that it’s faith in action,” she concludes. “Like nursing and teaching, becoming an officer is as much a calling as it is a career. The desire to care about people and participate in transforming their lives is similar to journeying with people through their faith.” Salvationist  November 2020  17


Come One, Come All Budding musicians praise Montreal Citadel’s Blast of Brass BY LEIGHA VEGH Edward Herba and his wife, Dara Murphy

At the retirement homes BOB visited before the pandemic, the response was overwhelmingly positive. The residents enjoyed the music, including those with conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease. “They say music is the last thing to go, so seeing them respond to it was gratifying,” says Purcell.

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ith deep roots in the history of The Salvation Army, the Montreal Citadel Blast of Brass (BOB) band is a wide-ranging group of all ages with a purpose extending beyond bringing the joy of music to Salvationists and the community. The bandmaster is Salvationist Gary Purcell, who has dedicated his life to both teaching music and serving in The Salvation Army. Before becoming the band’s leader 12 years ago, he was a Sunday school teacher and the corps caretaker at Montreal Citadel. The band’s self-proclaimed “eclectic” group consists of 18 members, ranging from high school students to retirees. It serves to bridge the gap between the junior and senior bands, giving members more time to cultivate their musical talent. It’s also a place where people can come to play an instrument if they’re experiencing loneliness, which particularly affects seniors. The band is not just exclusive to Salvationists, but it is open for members of the community to join as well. “It’s a door of opportunity for our corps,” says Purcell. “A number of participants have become part of the corps.” Although practice is temporarily on hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, 18  November 2020  Salvationist

BOB typically plays a number during

Montreal Citadel’s Sunday worship service and does special performances in the community throughout the year. While the majority of those take place at retirement homes, the band has ventured inside the walls of a prison to play to inmates back when the citadel had a correctional and justice services program. “It was a wonderful opportunity to talk to the inmates and see how they were doing,” says Purcell. “Many of them were grateful for the band’s performance.”

The Right Notes Edward Herba, an engineer in the aircraft industry, began playing the trumpet when he was 11. When he got busy with schoolwork and didn’t realize the value of practising, he gave it up. It was a decision he came to regret. Years later, however, he sought out private lessons and after about a year playing solo, he felt the urge to join a group. His only hesitation was that he didn’t feel prepared enough. “It’s hard to join a band until you’re quite good,” Herba says. That’s when his music teacher suggested he contact The Salvation Army. He did just that, and soon thereafter joined BOB. Having never played in a band before, Herba had to overcome some challenges at first. He had to follow the movements of the conductor, work to fit in with everyone else’s playing, and figure out how to read music, which proved to be the most

Gary Purcell conducts a performance at The Salvation Army's Montclair Residence in Montreal


Everyone Is Welcome Louise Fernandez is the immigrant and refugee services program co-ordinator for The Salvation Army in Montreal. Having fled the Yugoslav Wars to Canada, she is compassionate toward the newcomers she works with and shares in their burdens. “When I say to my clients, ‘I know how you feel,’ I really know, with a capital K,” she says. Going to BOB practice has been a creative outlet to help her decompress. Fernandez was introduced to the band through her son, Andre, who was asked by the bandmaster to join BOB when they first started attending Montreal Citadel. Andre was shy and only spoke French, so he was apprehensive to join the practice, which is run in English. Purcell suggested the whole family sit with him during practice for moral support, and to interpret.

Blast of Brass

Very quickly, they discovered Andre’s natural musical talent, as he picked up the cornet within just a few weeks of joining the band. Inspired by her son’s success, Fernandez told Purcell that she had always dreamed of learning to play and read music but thought it might be too late to pick up an instrument. Purcell thought otherwise. He immediately gave Fernandez a baritone to play. A year and a half later, after she learned to play from scratch, the band had enough members to have its first performance. Fernandez will never forget the riveting first time they played at Easter. “There were screams of joy in the sanctuary because it had been years since there was a new group of beginners,” she remembers. Fernandez began to pay her success forward by inviting other budding musicians to observe the Tuesday evening practice. “What I enjoyed so much was the fact that Gary used the Blast of Brass to welcome whosoever,” Fernandez says.

If you have a desire to play and the will to try, you’re welcome to join—regardless of your age, language or religious affiliation, she notes. Andre eventually traded his cornet for a guitar and left BOB, but his passion for music has remained. “He still remembers Montreal Citadel and enjoys listening to brass band music,” says Fernandez. Despite her son’s departure, Fernandez stayed with BOB and was eventually invited to join the senior band. “It was a dream come true,” she says. “I thought I would only achieve that when I retired.” Beyond having a chance to grow musically, Fernandez says the real enjoyment comes from the meaning behind the playing. “More than just playing music, it’s worshipping God with the little talent that he gave me,” she says. As for the bandmaster who encouraged her to join despite her reservations, Fernandez holds him in high regard. “Gary is an extraordinary leader and a pillar of Montreal Citadel,” she says.

The First Brass Band The first Salvation Army brass band goes back to well over a century ago when a Methodist preacher named Charles Fry, along with his three sons, played brass instruments to support the Army’s open-air meetings in Salisbury, England, in 1878. They soon began to travel with William and Catherine Booth as they toured England, leading to the brass band becoming a distinct feature of The Salvation Army’s ministry style. Today, brass bands such as BOB are still an important way of attracting people from the community to share the good news of Jesus.

Charles Fry and his family, who formed the first Salvation Army brass group in 1878

Salvationist  November 2020  19

Photo: story.salvationarmy.org

trying of all. “At the beginning it was a little frustrating, but Gary has so much patience—he’s really the best man for the job,” he says. Herba’s wife, Dara Murphy, saw how much fun BOB was having and was invited to join, despite playing the clarinet, which isn’t a brass instrument. “Gary was accepting of it,” Herba recalls. Herba and his wife have played in the band together ever since. “When we started, everyone was patient and we enjoyed it,” he reminisces. After getting enough experience in the BOB, the two have garnered the skills to join the senior band as well. BOB might be comprised of a wideranging group of people, but they share one common goal. And according to Herba, that’s to do their best for God. Even if the band didn’t hit all the right notes while performing, the essence of the music was not lost for the residents at The Salvation Army’s Montclair Residence, where the band performed pre-COVID-19. “It’s quite touching to see that even though we made mistakes and we didn’t sound like a professional band, they appreciated and were touched by the music,” he says. For some residents, it was a trip down memory lane since they grew up with Salvation Army songs in their youth. “I sense that we’re providing some happiness and nice memories for them,” says Herba. While practice is suspended, Herba continues to refine his skills on his own in anticipation of returning. “I still practise every day, using the songs from the Blast of Brass books,” he says. “I keep going because I know we’ll get together eventually again.”


Illustration: Good Studio/stock.Adobe.com

Alone in a Crowd Churches can be lonely places. We need to equip people in friendship-making. BY MIKE FROST

I

’ve lost count of the number of Christians who’ve told me they either stopped attending church or left their church to join another one because they couldn’t make any friends there. They report that the church people were friendly enough. They were hospitable and welcoming. As one person told me: “They’re nice to you, but no one becomes your friend.” And it hurts when all that friendliness leads only to friendlessness. In the 1950s, sociologist David Riesman coined the term “the lonely crowd,” in part to describe collectives of people who live according to common traditions and conforming values, but who barely know or like each other. I fear the church is in danger of becoming just such a lonely crowd. I know pastors think long and hard about how to be better preachers and leaders, how to calibrate the church’s ministries to meet needs and serve others, how to be more missional, more adaptive, more innovative. These are all good things. But is it possible that all that leadership development, visioning and ministry planning might be wasted if people can’t find 20  November 2020  Salvationist

friends and just drift away? Before hosting any more conferences or seminars on vision-casting, living your best life or finding your spiritual gift, how about we start equipping people in friendship-making? Becoming and being a friend isn’t easy. It takes intentionality and training. It might be your church’s next major challenge. It’s Not Just the Church Before we start beating ourselves up about how friendless churches can be, we should note that this is a society-wide problem. In his book, Social, Matthew Lieberman reports on a survey of people’s social connections that was done in 1985 and again in 2004. People were asked to list their friends in response to the question, “Over the last six months, who are the people with whom you discussed matters important to you?” In 1985, the most common number of friends listed was three; 59 percent of respondents listed three or more friends fitting this description. But by 2004, the most common number of friends with whom you would discuss important matters was zero. And

only 37 percent of respondents listed three or more friends. Back in 1985, only 10 percent indicated that they had zero confidants. In 2004, this number had skyrocketed to 25 percent. As Lieberman says, “One out of every four of us is walking around with no one to share our lives with.” Church People Aren’t Good Listeners Like my first point, it might be fairer to say most people aren’t good listeners. The inability or disinterest in asking meaningful questions that indicate an interest in another person is a huge impediment to making friends. Listening is key. When someone is a good listener, they are able to seek similarity with someone else. It’s impossible to show empathy or celebrate the positive in a person without first hearing from them. And without an awareness of similarity, empathy and celebration, friendships just don’t get started. Listening is not the same as hearing or waiting. Therapists refer to active listening to distinguish between giving someone your full concentration and


just passively “hearing” them. Frankly, I think church people can be so bad at it they need training. Churches should run regular workshops in active listening. Good listeners know how to harness all the non-verbal cues that show they are listening, such as making non-threatening eye contact, smiling, maintaining an open posture, mirroring (reflecting facial expressions), and eliminating distractions. They also need to know how to utilize verbal skills such as remembering things that were said, gently questioning someone for greater clarification and using reflection techniques (closely repeating or paraphrasing what the speaker has said in order to show comprehension). These things don’t come naturally for most people. Train your congregation to be active listeners. Church People Struggle to be Vulnerable Friendship is more than just listening, although that’s an essential start. Getting close to people, becoming their friends, involves something more. It involves vulnerability. Face it, people don’t become besties by only discussing the weather. Allowing yourself to be vulnerable helps the other person to trust you, precisely because you are putting yourself at emotional, psychological or physical risk. Other people tend to react by being more open and vulnerable themselves. The fact that both of you are letting down your guard helps to lay the groundwork for a faster, closer personal connection. The great enemy here is shame. Nothing silences us more effectively than shame. Sadly, church people are often the most shamed people. This could have come from old church patterns about needing to appear clean and tidy and always winning. Our church might have taught us to never show the parts of our lives that are messy, dirty or embarrassing. I think that might be because a lot of churches unwittingly promote perfectionism, which is a condition in which people constantly ask, “What will they think?” But as research professor and author Brené Brown says, “The irony is that we attempt to disown our difficult stories to appear more whole or more acceptable, but our wholeness—even our whole-

heartedness—actually depends on the integration of all of our experiences, including the falls.” Brown also writes, “If we can share our story with someone who responds with empathy and understanding, shame can’t survive.” It’s in the courage of vulnerability we find connection with another and then, potentially, friendship with them. Church People Need to be Less Busy Friendships take time. It’s the thing spouses and friends fight about the most—unavailability. In his book on friendship (helpfully titled Friendship), Daniel Hruschka reviewed studies on the causes of con-

ing” together. Hanging out, attending parties, camping, hiking, picnicking, goofing off—these are the occasions where people let their guards down and share more deeply. If a person’s church schedule is crammed with attending stuff, no matter how good that stuff might be, there might be a problem. Validating the importance of play and encouraging people to share in good, fun, non-religious experiences is really important. The Onus Shouldn’t be on the Newcomer A lot of people have shared with me how tough it is to break into a new church. It’s the newcomer who has to break into conversations. The newcomer has to find

Is it possible that all that leadership development, visioning and ministry planning might be wasted if people can’t find friends and just drift away? flict in friendship and found that the most common arguments boil down to time commitments. Spending time with someone is a sure indicator that you value them and feeling undervalued is a surefire friendship killer. A New York Times report concluded, “the leading cause of persistent relationships is reciprocity—returning a friend’s call.” The report cited research that said enduring friendships require friends to touch base at least once every 15 days. If we want our churches to be more friendly places, we need to encourage people to create time for friends. Churches are good at running programs and promoting faith. As a result, a lot of church conversations are either about serious matters of faith (Bible studies, workshops, etc.) or focused on the practicalities of volunteering for a ministry or committee. But many of us know that our really good friendships emerged not by being on a committee with someone, or even attending a Bible study group with them. Friendships are often forged in the conversations that occur when we’re “play-

common interests and angle for invitations. It’s often the newcomer who does all the hosting of people for a meal. I can relate to this. Since leaving the church we planted, my wife and I have attended two great churches, but in both cases, we had to work so hard to make relational connections. It really shouldn’t be the newcomer’s responsibility. Churches should be learning to embody the grace and hospitality of the gospel and striving to be more like Christ, the friend of sinners. Teresa of Ávila wrote: “If Christ Jesus dwells in a person as his friend that person can endure all things, for Christ helps and strengthens us and never abandons us. He is a true friend.” We can’t sing, “What a friend we have in Jesus,” without his friendship affecting how we befriend others. Mike Frost is the director of mission studies at Morling College in Australia.

Reprinted from others magazine (Australia Territory). Salvationist  November 2020  21



TAKING THE LEAD

Leaders must be creative and innovative. BY PAUL CAREW

T

he COVID-19 pandemic has shaken our world. So much of what we took for granted has been altered. While our greatest concern is to love our neighbours and prevent the spread of this virus, we are also endeavouring to create some sense of “normal” in our day-to-day lives. The ability to shop for groceries, send our children to school and worship as a church community are among the activities that have required creative and innovative thinking. For leaders, these skills are an oftenoverlooked capability. In fact, in the past, they could be a detriment to those aspiring to leadership. However, in today’s everchanging world—sometimes described by the phrase VUCA: volatile, uncertain, complex, ambiguous—we clearly need to be creative and innovative. Over the past year, we have been exploring the LEADS Leadership Capability Framework as a strategic approach to leadership development (visit salvationist.ca/leads). The final domain is SYSTEMS TRANSFORMATION. This domain looks at leadership from a much higher level and moves beyond the ability to manage oneself and others. Leaders need to be able to address concerns at a level beyond their own locus of control and see the view from the “balcony.” They need to consider how their decisions and actions might impact the entire organization. This domain states that leaders should be able to: demonstrate systems and critical thinking; encourage and support innovation; orient themselves strategically to the future; and champion and orchestrate change. When leaders demonstrate critical thinking skills, they question and challenge the status quo. They identify issues and challenges, and respond by implementing solutions that will work at the system level. Their solutions are process-oriented and are usually innovative in nature. With respect to innovation, leaders who excel in this domain are not only creative themselves, but also foster an environment where others are encouraged to be creative and innova-

tive, with many of their ideas resulting in system changes. Leaders who are oriented to the future are extremely good at scanning the environment and searching for ideas and solutions. They can anticipate not only the future needs of the organization, but also solutions that already exist that might meet those needs. They are aware of emerging trends and the impact of those trends on the organization. Finally, excellent leaders champion and orchestrate change. They actively contribute to the change process and help improve the functioning of the organization. While they may initially question why changes are taking place, they are able to understand the needs of the organization at a higher level and, as a result, move forward with a supportive position for the changes that are being implemented. Often change is precipitated by outside agencies and circumstances, although rarely at the level of a global pandemic. At other times, the need for change is created from within an organization. Perhaps the changes are driven by the need for an organization to move away from previous practices and make a significant move forward. Mobilize 2.0—Inspired for Mission,

Positioned for Growth offers an indication of significant change that is to come to The Salvation Army in Canada and Bermuda. Commissioner Floyd Tidd speaks of a season of transformation and the need for the territory to respond to a fresh wind of God. I suggest that this is a season of change and transformation. When coupled with the response of our communities to the global pandemic, clearly there appears to be a time of change in the near future. How are our leaders positioned for the change that is coming? Do we, as leaders, demonstrate systems and critical thinking, and encourage and support innovation? Do we, as an organization, orient ourselves strategically to the future, as well as champion and orchestrate change? In previous articles, Salvation Army officers and employees shared how implementing what they learned from the LEADS learning series, which were offered across the territory, expanded their leadership capabilities. These capabilities are now being woven into not only our performance excellence and coaching (PEAC) review process for leaders, but also job descriptions and “briefs of appointment.” While the pandemic has had an impact on recent learning opportunities, we continue to develop our leaders by sharing the LEADS Leadership Capability Framework. Paul Carew is the leadership development secretary in the Canada and Bermuda Territory.

Illustration: Irina Griskova/iStock via Getty Images Plus

All Systems Go

Salvationist  November 2020  23


Photo: Juanmonino/E+ via Getty Images

FAMILY MATTERS

Taking the Temperature The impact of COVID-19 on children’s mental health. BY CAPTAIN BHREAGH ROWE

M

averick was about three years old when I noticed something. Every time we came to a red light while in the car, he reminded the driver to stop. For a while, we didn’t think anything of it. But he kept doing it, no matter how often we reassured him that we would keep him safe. It was the first time I observed my sweet kids worry about something they shouldn’t have to think about. Kids grow up way too quickly these days. They hear more, see more and experience more, at a younger age, than ever before. According to Anxiety Canada, anxiety is one of the most common mental-health concerns, affecting more than 20 percent of children and adolescents. Let’s stop and let that sink in for a second. And this was before a global pandemic hit and turned all of our lives upside down. I’ve heard it put this way—if seniors are the ones most infected by COVID-19, children are the ones most affected by 24  November 2020  Salvationist

response measures. We talk a lot about the long-term health and economic consequences of the lockdown, but there has been little conversation about the effects on children. As a parent, I’ve heard many dismissive comments, such as, “It’s an extended summer vacation” or “Kids are resilient— they’ll be fine.” Although kids are resilient and they will be OK, it seems as if we have focused a lot on the infected and not a lot on the affected. Here are some of the consequences of the lockdown: reduced access to our health-care system; widespread delays in routine checkups; heightened stress and conflict in the household; increased risk of family violence; food insecurity due to school closures or parental job loss; missed milestones; loss of structured routines; less social interaction; increased screen time; reduction in physical activity.... Should I continue? Take a deep breath with me. Parenting

is hard. I feel like I fail my kids under normal circumstances, let alone during a worldwide pandemic. I’m sure the last thing you need as a mom or dad is more guilt, or a list of ways we have messed up our kids. But we need to acknowledge just how difficult this has been for our littles, even if they can’t put words to their feelings. We need to start thinking about them, I mean really thinking about them. We’re all fighting over mask or no mask, school or no school, when what we should really be fighting for is proper care and safety for all, including our littlest people. We don’t need to expose them to everything. They don’t need to know the fights that are happening. They definitely don’t need to watch the news. But they do need us, as adults, to show them how to act, how to advocate for others and ourselves, and how to fiercely trust God in all circumstances. Or else we are missing out on teaching them an important lesson. I believe we need to teach our kids to process the world and our anxieties through the lens of faith and God’s Word. In Romans 12: 2, Paul tells us, “Do not be shaped by this world; instead be changed within by a new way of thinking” (NCV). We can’t be shaped by the world, even during a pandemic. We must be deeply rooted in Christ. Now, I’m not saying we should have a mask-burning ceremony, open our doors and completely ignore all health measures. Please don’t do that. I am saying that we have an amazing opportunity to teach our kids what to do when things get hard and anxiety rises. No, not an opportunity—a responsibility. We have been given this sacred responsibility to show our children the comfort Christ can bring in the midst of so much uncertainty. And that lesson will go well beyond COVID-19. Maverick is not perfect. He knows very little about accidents and tragedies and COVID-19, but he does know Jesus. He knows that Jesus loves him and cares for him and brings beauty from chaos, and that we can give Jesus all our anxieties because he cares for us. Do your kids know this? More importantly, do you know this? Captain Bhreagh Rowe is the community ministries officer at St. Albert Church and Community Centre in Edmonton.


VIEWPOINT

The Blind Spot Welcoming the dissenting voice.

Photo: SIphotography/iStock via Getty Images Plus

BY DARRYN OLDFORD

I

’ve noticed a familiar pattern when it comes to advertising. A company, whether a large multinational firm or a small store, puts out a blatantly problematic ad—racist, sexist or just completely tone-deaf to real-world issues—and is shocked when people have a problem with it. I like to give people the benefit of the doubt and believe that, in most cases, the shock is genuine and not itself a marketing stunt. I think workplace culture is to blame for most of these missteps in two key ways. While advertising is a multi-billiondollar industry, it has real people at the centre, like all businesses. The first problem is having the same kinds of people, with similar beliefs, making decisions without outside input. The second is having a top-down approach to decisionmaking that makes it impossible to collaborate or point out problems, since “the boss has the final say.” While having a team with diverse backgrounds who are empowered to voice their ideas is important for television advertisements, it is even more essential for churches. I have a rather controversial opinion regarding church leadership, so prepare yourself.

In my view, whether it’s a local church, a national denomination or an international organization, there should be at least one non-Christian from the community on the board to offer their opinion and vote on issues. This person could be an atheist or someone from another faith.

Having someone at the table who sees the world from a different perspective is a useful tool.

Here’s my reasoning. If church leadership is solely comprised of Christians, who share the same beliefs and language, it can create an echo chamber where everyone agrees on how things should run, and we arrive at the same conclusions. This is especially true when everyone making the decisions are ordained members of the clergy.

While not all Christians are the same, and we can have passionate differences, those who attend church regularly enough to be invited into decision-making can easily fall into similar categories. During my time as a teacher, one thing that became clear is that if you don’t have the ability to explain a concept to someone who knows nothing about the subject, then you don’t fully grasp it yourself. Having someone at the table who sees the world from a different perspective is a useful tool to make sure you’re making the right decisions for the right reasons. While I believe that having a variety of opinions is important to make the right decision, I loathe the idea of a devil’s advocate. The devil has no need for an advocate. There are people in this world who take joy in being obstinate; if the sky is blue, they will argue it is purple with beige polka dots. In a meeting, this type of person is good for nothing more than raising everyone’s blood pressure. It’s important, then, to have people in leadership who have differing opinions, but share the goal of building something great, rather than tearing everything down. While expertise can and should be elevated in these conversations—for example, the person running the food bank should have the most say about food bank-related issues—it’s up to everyone else to listen and weigh in to expose blind spots and strengthen ministry. One of my favourite passages of Scripture compares the church to the human body, and the importance of respecting each and every one of us as part of the church body: “Now you are the body of Christ, and each one of you is a part of it” (1 Corinthians 12:27). True Christian leadership lifts up the voices of those on the margins of making decisions, recognizing that everyone has something to contribute. People who are naturally quiet and reserved may still have something important to say that the church needs to hear. It’s only by welcoming voices that are often overlooked that we can make our churches, and lives, better. Darryn Oldford is a senior soldier in Toronto. Salvationist  November 2020  25


CROSS CULTURE

Darkness to Hope Our society still faces many of the social injustices in Booth's Darkest England scheme. BY MAJOR RON MILLAR

O

n the 130th anniversary of In Darkest England, and the Way Out, we recall the penetrating words William Booth, the founder and first General of The Salvation Army, penned in 1890 in the preface of his visionary book: “When but a mere child the degradation and helpless misery of the poor Stockingers of my native town, wandering gaunt and hunger-stricken through the streets droning out their melancholy ditties, crowding the Union or toiling like galley slaves on relief works for a bare subsistence kindled in my heart yearnings to help the poor which have continued to this day and which have had a powerful influence on my whole life.” In Darkest England, and the Way Out was crafted by Booth as a graphic response to the appalling social conditions in Victorian England and based on the theological foundation that shaped his life. Having trained as a Methodist preacher, Booth’s heart was gripped by the theology of John Wesley who stated, “The gospel of Christ knows no religion but social; no holiness but social holiness.” For Booth, doctrine could never be perceived in isolation from the reality of human life and theology could never be divorced from 26  November 2020  Salvationist

the human condition. Authentic faith for him meant to feed the hungry, clothe the naked, house the homeless, liberate those enslaved by addiction and prostitution, bring comfort to the lonely, care for the sick, minister to the imprisoned and provide a better life in the here and now, as well as in the hereafter. By the time the book was published in 1890, The Salvation Army, established in 1865, had expanded its operations to 26 countries on six continents around the globe. This influential book sold 115,000 copies within the first three months, and more than 300,000 copies within its first year of publication. Booth estimated that 10 percent of the population of Great Britain at that time, about three million people, were living in abject poverty. In the Cab-Horse Charter, he contended that any cab horse in London (the Uber of the day) was blessed with a better life than human beings who fell within this “submerged tenth.” The two points that defined the life of a cab horse were that when he was down, he was helped up, and while he lived, he had food, shelter and work. “That, although a humble standard, is at present unattainable by millions— literally millions—of our fellow men and

women in this country,” he wrote. Booth articulated a three-phase scheme to provide “hope for all” suffering from homelessness, poverty and unemployment. First, the “City Colony” phase established “Harbours of Refuge,” which were designed to bring relief to the crippling overcrowding in the urban centres. Second, the “Farm Colony” was established to provide employment and agricultural training. Third, the “Overseas Colony” involved securing “millions of acres of useful land to be obtained almost for the asking, capable of supporting our surplus population in health and comfort.” Though the third scheme was never fully realized, it had a profound impact on the development of the Army in Canada and helped shape the nation. In 1905, the SS Vancouver, the first migrant ship chartered by the Army, departed the shores of Liverpool, England, with 1,000 passengers bound for Canada. Over the next four decades, 250,000 immigrants, including men, women, boys, girls, families and widows with children from the United Kingdom, travelled in liners supervised by Army personnel and were helped to settle into a new land, with a new home and often a new family. Pioneer communities such as Coombs, B.C. (named after the territorial commander of Canada at the time), were established and still exist today. Thousands of Canadians can trace their roots to the massive immigration program that found its birth in the Darkest England plan to alleviate the lot of Britain’s poor in the late 19th century. One hundred and thirty years later, we can still thoughtfully reflect on the book’s contemporary message. According to the most recent report from Statistics Canada, 3.2 million Canadians (8.7 percent), including more than 560,000 children, live in poverty, and depending on the formula used to define it, that number could rise to four million. We have our own “submerged tenth” right here in our own nation. Many of the core issues addressed in the Darkest England scheme remain at the heart of our social reality in Canada—poverty, addiction, social injustice, human trafficking and homelessness, to name just a few. Though methods and language change, this century-old book still has a profound message for the Army in this time. May it be a continued call to action as we exercise the mission—Giving Hope Today! Major Ron Millar is the director of archives for the Canada and Bermuda Territory.


CANADA AND BERMUDA TERRITORY

PRESENTS

AT ROY THOMSON HALL SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12 AT

7:00 PM EST

STREAMING LIVE AT S A LVAT I O N I S T.C A AC H R I S T M A S A VIRTUAL CELEBRATION OF THE SEASON

CANADIAN STAFF BAND

FEATURING

BANDMASTER JOHN LAM

CANADIAN STAFF SONGSTERS

SONGSTER LEADER MAJOR LEN BALLANTINE Salvationist  November 2020  27


PEOPLE & PLACES

ANCASTER, ONT.—The world missions department is again partnering with Seeds of Life, a Canadian charitable organization that grows and sells crops to raise funds to fight world hunger, in its 2020 growing project. Proceeds from the sale of this year’s crop of soybeans will go to the Canadian Foodgrains Bank. This money, together with matching funds from the Government of Canada, will be used to support food aid and development programs overseas. Funds representing The Salvation Army’s contribution will be used in the Malawi Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security (SAFS) Project. Lt-Col Brenda Murray, director of world missions, stopped by to check on the soybean crop during the growing season.

TORONTO—Brennan McAlister is enrolled as a junior soldier of North Toronto CC by his grandfather, Mjr David Ivany, in a special ceremony held in his grandparents’ backyard. Supporting him are, from left, Mjr Beverley Smith, CO, and his grandmother, Mjr Beverly Ivany, holding the flag.

TORONTO—In a ceremony held in their home, James and Bimbo Menone are enrolled as senior soldiers of North Toronto CC by Mjr Beverley Smith, CO.

TO R O N TO — N o r t h Toronto CC enrols three junior soldiers during an outdoor physically distanced ceremony on the grounds of Meighen Manor. Front, from left, Aaron and Cohen Goetzman, and Daniel Smith. Back, from left, Mjr Mark Wagner, holding the flag, and Robyn Goodyear, who was commissioned as the junior soldier sergeant during the service. 28  November 2020  Salvationist

Photo: Courtesy of MPP Daisy Wai's office

TORONTO—Four senior soldiers join the ranks of North Toronto CC during an outdoor service held outside Meighen Manor. From left, Marci Sharp, who was commissioned as the recruiting sergeant; Diana Choi, senior soldier; Mjr Mark Wagner, holding the flag; Janet Toth, senior soldier, supported by her son, Scott Toth; Leonard Morgan and Madison Cameron, senior soldiers.

RICHMOND HILL, ONT.—Community and family services in Richmond Hill receives 5,000 children’s masks for use in its back-to-school program thanks to the generosity of local business owner Alvin Yau. From left, Stephen Lecce, Ontario minister of education, and Daisy Wai, Richmond Hill MPP, who delivered the masks; Alvin Yau; and Cpt Jon Savage, CO, Richmond Hill CC.


PEOPLE & PLACES

GAZETTE TERRITORIAL Birth: Cpts Daniel/Bhreagh Rowe, son, Ezra Jericho, Sep 7 Appointments: Mjr Andy Albert, community services officer, Quebec City, Que. Div; Mjr Sonia Albert, community and family services worker, Quebec City, Que. Div; Mjr Colin Bain, assistant executive director, Toronto Housing and Homeless Supports, Ont. Div (designation change); Mjr Barbara Carey, director of family services, Montreal, and divisional family services consultant, Que. Div; Mjr Lynn Cummings, divisional volunteer services secretary, Toronto, Ont. Div; Mjr Linda Daley, director of business, Hamilton, Halton, Brantford Housing Support Services, Ont. Div; Mjr Stephen Daley, projects manager, Hamilton, Halton, Brantford Housing Support Services, Ont. Div; Mjr Roxzena Hayden, divisional retired officers’ secretary and divisional adult ministries secretary, London, Ont. Div; Mjr William Kean, Musgrave Harbour – Carmanville Circuit, N.L. Div; Mjr Shirley King, divisional secretary for women’s ministries, Toronto, Ont. Div; Mjrs Wayne/Betty Ann Pike, Liverpool, N.S., Maritime Div; Mjr Jean-Curtis Plante, assistant divisional secretary for business administration, B.C. Div; Mjr Mélisa Tardif, AC, Que. Div; Lt Gina Haggett, Mobilize 2.0 transformation project officer, executive department, THQ; Aux-Cpt Robert Donaldson, community and spiritual care co-ordinator, New Liskeard—Kirkland Lake and Timmins Community Ministries, Ont. Div; Jan 2—Mjr Sandra Stokes, assistant program secretary, THQ; Mjr Robert Kerr, DC, Bermuda Div; Mjr Shelley Kerr, divisional corps ministries secretary, including DDWM, community care ministries and adult ministries, Bermuda Div Retirement: Nov 1—Mjr Nancy Virtue Promoted to glory: Mjr Doris Reid, Sep 1; Lt-Col Marjorie Ham, Sep 14; Mjr Ruth Watkin, Sep 19; Mjr Elizabeth Lewis, Sep 23; Cpt Charles Will, Sep 29; Mjr Ralph Hewlett, Oct 4

CALENDAR Commissioners Floyd and Tracey Tidd: Nov 14 “Rising Up!” women’s event (virtual)*; Nov 16-17, 19 Territorial Executive Conference (virtual); Nov 18-20 personnel consultations (virtual)*; Nov 18-25 territorial review (virtual); Nov 28-29 CFOT Colonels Edward and Shelley Hill: Nov 14 “Rising Up!” women’s event (virtual)**; Nov 16-17 Territorial Executive Conference (virtual); Nov 18-20 personnel consultations (virtual)**; Nov 23-25 territorial review (virtual) (*Commissioner Tracey Tidd only; **Colonel Shelley Hill only)

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS Do you know the difference between the CCM and the CSM? Who’s your CO? And what exactly is a DDWM? See below for a list of some common acronyms and abbreviations that appear in the pages of Salvationist. BM/SL—bandmaster/songster leader CC—community church CCM/CCMS—community care ministries/community care ministries secretary CO—corps officer CS—chief secretary CSM/YPSM—corps sergeant-major/ young people’s sergeant-major IHQ/THQ/DHQ—International Headquarters/territorial

headquarters/divisional headquarters JSS—junior soldier sergeant RS—recruiting sergeant TC/DC/AC—territorial commander/ divisional commander/area commander TPWM/TSWM/DDWM/DSWM— territorial president of women’s ministries/territorial secretary for women’s ministries/divisional director of women’s ministries/ divisional secretary for women’s ministries Tty/Cmd/Rgn/Div—territory/ command/region/division TYS/DYS—territorial youth secretary/ divisional youth secretary

Salvationist  November 2020  29


SALVATION STORIES

“God had been calling my whole life, but that day, I heard him call my name,” says Sipili Molia, here with his wife, Krista, and children

The Creator’s Path How God met me on my walkabout.

M

BY SIPILI MOLIA

y parents met in Suva, Fiji, while

my mother was travelling after her first year of university. She stayed and became part of the community, and that’s where I was born. My heritage is Samoan, Rotuman and Kiribati on my father’s side, and my South Pacific roots are a big part of who I am. Although my parents were both brought up with Christian values, everything changed when they started attending The Salvation Army in Fiji and made a commitment to follow Jesus. I was dedicated at Raiwai Corps and the Army has always been part of my life. We lived in Fiji until I was almost four, then moved to Canada and settled in Victoria, where my mom is from. I grew up at Victoria Citadel and knew the gospel, but as I got older, I turned my back on Christ’s way and took my own path. The word that stands out during this time is empty. My life revolved around sports, friends and partying, but even when I was having a “fun” time, I still felt alone and unfulfilled, like something important was missing. I was searching for something more, for a sense of purpose. When I look back on my walkabout, I

can see that God was always there, putting people in my life at key points and reminding me of his plan. Major Robert McMeechan, now my mentor, would call out of the blue to have a “wee prayer” 30  November 2020  Salvationist

when I felt lost. Or I’d bump into rugby players who knew my dad, and we’d have heart-to-heart conversations about faith. Or people from our congregation would reach out and just be so sincere in their interest in me. Then I started a relationship with a beautiful, godly woman named Krista. I knew she was the one I was meant to spend the rest of my life with, and I knew I needed to pursue Christ’s way for myself. Deep down inside, I knew he was there, waiting for me to return. But I kept putting it off, thinking, I will quit drinking and be a better person first or I will start going to church and pray more, then I will be all in. I was afraid of the unknown, of failing, of not being able to live up to my idea of God’s expectation of me.

but that day, I heard him call my name. I ran up to the mercy seat in my bare feet, where I asked for forgiveness and committed my life to the way of Christ. It was the best decision I have ever made. My godfather put it well. He said, “Sipili, you never left Christ’s way. You just got a little lost.” Even if you have lost faith in God, he remains faithful. If you have turned your back on him, he is still facing you, arms open. If you are blinded, he is still watching over you. How is life different now? In one word—

full. I’ve always had a deep feeling that I would work with The Salvation Army, after watching my dad help so many people in 35 years with community and family services. In God’s perfect timing, I’m now the community relations co-ordinator at the Army’s Stan Hagen Centre for Families in Victoria. Once I stepped out in faith and said, “Lord, you have all of me and I choose to try my best to walk in your way,” everything changed. I’m far from perfect, but I’m striving to follow my Creator’s path for me. I’m content with however the journey unfolds, because my perspective has shifted from me to Christ and others. Every situation, good or bad, is an opportunity to grow in character and faith. I can now find true purpose in almost anything that happens in this crazy life of mine.

During the time I was wrestling with

my faith and scared to commit, God met me at a congress in Vancouver. I was listening intently as the speaker, Commissioner Christine MacMillan, talked about her ministry in Papua New Guinea. She shared that before people came to the mercy seat, they would slide their shoes under their chairs. I looked down. Without realizing it, I had already put my shoes under my chair. I started to cry, and they began to sing The Power of Your Love. God had been calling my whole life,

Molia is the community relations co-ordinator at the Army’s Stan Hagen Centre for Families in Victoria


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Helping the Army

WONDER WOMEN P.12

Tackling Nazism

RESISTANCE P.10

Confronting COVID-19

CARING PORTRAITS P.21

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

NOVEMBER 2020

“One Day At a Time”

CONCENTRATION CAMP SURVIVOR JOE KNYPSTRA’S FAITH HELPS HIM MAINTAIN A POSITIVE OUTLOOK ON LIFE. P.16


Out of Focus? Anyone who wears glasses or contact lenses can attest to how easy it is to lose your eyesight. Over time, your vision can deteriorate so gradually you don’t even notice. It takes regular examinations to keep your sight perfectly attuned. So it is with faith. Faith by itself can become stagnant. Only by opening yourself to others, practising acts of charity and kindness, attending church and studying the Bible can your faith stay focused in the way God intended.

“For this very reason, make every effort to add to your faith goodness; and to goodness, knowledge; and to knowledge, self-control; and to self-control, perseverance; and to perseverance, godliness; and to godliness, mutual affection; and to mutual affection, love.”—2 Peter 1:5-7 Need help in keeping your spiritual eyesight 20/20 in 2020? Visit our website (www.faithandfriends.ca), contact us at The Salvation Army Editorial Department, 2 Overlea Blvd., Toronto ON M4H 1P4 or visit your nearest Salvation Army church.


November 2020

VOLUME 23 NUMBER 11

COMMON GROUND 5 Serving From Both Sides

of the Counter The people at Sally’s Kitchen are a blessing to Paula Geister. SOMEONE CARES 8 Eating Humble Pies

Jill Boville decided to help people affected by COVID-19. FAITH BUILDERS

8

10 Resistance Is Not Futile

Movie tells the story of Marcel Marceau’s fight against the Nazis. FEATURES

Helping the Army

WONDER WOMEN P.12

Tackling Nazism

RESISTANCE P.10

Tackling COVID-19

CARING PORTRAITS P.21

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

NOVEMBER 2020

12

“One Day At a Time”

CONCENTRATION CAMP SURVIVOR JOE KNYPSTRA’S FAITH HELPS HIM MAINTAIN A POSITIVE OUTLOOK ON LIFE. P.16

16

COVER STORY 21

Wonder Women

Four young women were worth their weight in gold to The Salvation Army.

“One Day at a Time”

Concentration camp survivor’s faith helps him maintain a positive outlook on life.

Rising to the Challenge

Canada’s health-care workers have tackled COVID-19 head-on. FAMILY TIME 25 The Apology

When Jeanette Levellie offended her teenage grandson, God gave her the courage to ask for forgiveness. LITE STUFF 28 Eating Healthy With Erin

Sudoku, Quick Quiz, Word Search.

21

NIFTY THRIFTY 31 Winter Is Coming …

… so here are three tips to thrift the coat you need. faithandfriends.ca  I  NOVEMBER 2020

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Faith&Friends

FROM THE EDITOR

Caring Connections

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hile interviewing health-care professionals on the front lines of COVID-19 for this month’s Faith & Friends, writer Kimberly McIntyre was deeply touched by their dedication. “All health-care areas have been affected,” she says. “And learning how different professions and fields have coped in the face of COVID-19 was eyeopening and at times heart-wrenching.” During an interview, one health-care worker remarked to Kimberly, “We want the best for our patients. I hope every one of your readers knows that. Even through these hard times, we still care.” Read Kimberly’s story on page 21. Caring of a different type was displayed by four summer placement students who were assigned to The Salvation Army’s North Toronto Community Church. Not content with their assignments, the four eagerly completed some projects on their own initiative that benefited not only the North Toronto congregation but the wider community as well. “Folashade Oguntuga, Kyuhee Lee, Jodi Bosley and Phylicia Earl: you’re going to want to take note of those names,” says writer Linda Dixon. “They are the names of future leaders in years to come. Watch for them.” As well, in this issue of Faith & Friends, you’ll also see how a concentration camp survivor has kept a positive outlook on life through war and peace. Ken Ramstead

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Mission Statement To show Christ at work in the lives of real people, and to provide spiritual resources for those who are new to the Christian faith.

Faith & Friends is published monthly by: The Salvation Army 2 Overlea Blvd, Toronto Ontario, M4H 1P4 International Headquarters 101 Queen Victoria Street, London, EC4P 4EP, England William and Catherine Booth FOUNDERS

Brian Peddle, GENERAL Commissioner Floyd Tidd TERRITORIAL COMMANDER

Lt-Colonel John P. Murray SECRETARY FOR COMMUNICATIONS Geoff Moulton, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Ken Ramstead, EDITOR

Brandon Laird SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Hannah Saley DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST Pamela Richardson, COPY EDITOR, PRODUCTION CO-ORDINATOR

Ada Leung CIRCULATION CO-ORDINATOR

Leigha Vegh STAFF WRITER, PROOFREADER

Giselle Randall STAFF WRITER Scripture Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture references are taken from New International Version Contact Us P. (416) 467-3188, F. (416) 422-6217 Websites faithandfriends.ca, salvationist.ca, salvationarmy.ca Email faithandfriends@salvationarmy.ca Subscription for one year: Canada $17 (includes GST/HST); U.S. $22; foreign $24 P. (416) 422-6119 circulation@salvationarmy.ca All articles are copyright The Salvation Army Canada & Bermuda and cannot be reproduced without permission. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40064794 ISSN 1702-0131


Faith&Friends

COMMON GROUND

Serving From Both Sides of the Counter The people I’ve met at Sally’s Kitchen are more of a blessing to me than I could ever be to them. by Paula Geister

The Kitchen Help Paula Geister (right) with one of seven “Love Thy Neighbor Food Pantry” teams that serve at Sally’s Kitchen

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ometime during the spring of 2003, I volunteered to join a team that came in once a month to prep and serve food at Sally’s Kitchen, The Salvation Army’s soup kitchen in Battle Creek, Michigan. The Salvation Army has a reputation for helping people through activities I believe in. People I know personally have benefited from children’s afterschool programs, emergency disaster services, and food baskets at Christmas and Thanksgiving.

The people who come to Sally’s work, don’t work, live alone, have families, eat a lot or eat just a little. Being able to get one hot meal in 24 hours has been the case for some. Others come in because they’re trying to stretch their grocery money. I saw right away from behind the counter that the kitchen has its “regulars.” They’re all different, and I’ve enjoyed getting to know many of them over the years. But that started by simply asking someone his or her name.

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COMMON GROUND

Special Apron Paula’s teammate created a made-to-order apron that not only helps her stay clean while prepping and serving food, but showcases the Autism Awareness official artwork

Alan Not everyone who comes to Sally’s wants conversation. But there was Alan. I sat across from him one day during my break and we engaged in some small talk. “Sure was nice to get all that rain,” I said. “The farmers needed it.” “I don’t like the rain,” Alan countered. “We have to find shelter inside and sometimes we get kicked out, even if it’s a vacant building.” Alan went on to tell me other difficulties he and some friends had finding a home when they had none. He got choked up telling me about a friend who’d died alone in one of those vacant buildings. Up until then, I’d been sympathetic to the problem of homelessness, but Alan made it real to me.

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Val Not everyone has a sad story about why they come to eat. Sometimes they sit with friends to gab and catch up on each other’s lives. People like Val are fun to be with. She works as a home health aide and likes cookies. Whenever we serve cookies, Val asks, without fail, for two. I tell her, without fail, “Everyone gets one cookie.” She grumbles, albeit with a smile, then I see her in the dining room with a stack of cookies on her tray. Her friends come through. That’s something else I love about the kitchen—the fellowship. But people come and go. We lose track of some. Others we know will be there again tomorrow. I can talk about them like this


I think the best thing God did for me as I’ve served over the years is teach me how to better love my neighbour.  PAULA GEISTER because I’m now a regular! Circumstances kept me away from the dining room for about a week and when the dishwasher asked about my absence, he said, “We haven’t seen you in a while. I wondered if you’re OK.” I can’t tell you how much I felt cared for in that moment. Loving Her Neighbour Folks at Sally’s are like family. When we haven’t seen a Sally’s regular for a while, we try to find out if they’re OK. Usually, they’re fine, but it’s always nice to know. Some ask, “How are you?” and really mean it. We take care of one another. We’re a special community. God led me to serve at the kitchen

and now I have a passion for it. I’m grateful for opportunities to learn to be more flexible, to chill out, to learn teamwork, to realize that my way isn’t the only way. However, I think the best thing God did for me as I’ve served over the years is teach me how to better love my neighbour. That’s one of the best lessons anyone can learn. I’ve learned to love them no matter their situation and regardless of their skin colour, age, level of education or anything else by which I might have judged them before I started volunteering at The Salvation Army. God is still teaching me and I’m grateful for that. Whichever side of the counter I’m on, I want to keep learning. And loving.

(left) Paula Geister serves her church by writing small group studies based on the weekly sermons. She’s also a grandmother and “mom” to two pets, Scout the rabbit and Rennie the gecko.

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Faith&Friends

SOMEONE CARES

Eating Humble Pies When Jill Boville decided to help people affected by COVID-19, the baker never expected her actions to ripple out into the community. by Ken Ramstead

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ike so many, Jill Boville, owner of Jill’s Humble Pies in Oshawa, Ont., found her life grinding to a halt earlier this year because of COVID-19. But rather than lament over the state of the world, the baker and piano teacher decided to do something to make the world—or at least her little part of it—a better place. Fair Is Fair “I started hearing from people who were struggling,” she says. “I couldn’t sit back and do nothing. That’s not

No Pie in the Sky Baker extraordinaire Jill Boville is serious about making a difference during COVID-19

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how God created us to be. We’re supposed to treat others with compassion. We’re not here to judge; we’re here to love.” So in March, Jill starting asking people through her Jill’s Humble Pies Facebook page—as well as family, friends and acquaintances— if they could donate food items. The response surprised even her. “The outpouring was incredible,” she says. “More than 1,800 items of food were donated.” Now, the question was how to dis-


tribute the food—much of it baked goods cooked by Jill herself—to those who needed it the most. Jill naturally thought of The Salvation Army. “I was born and bred there,” she says, “so it’s a big part of my life. I attend Oshawa Temple and I have a lot of friends that belong to the Army.” Jill brought all the donated items to Oshawa Temple’s food bank. So much was donated that Jill was able to bring food items to The Salvation Army’s food banks in Whitby, Ont., and Bowmanville, Ont., as well. “I wanted to be fair,” she smiles. Chalking Up Success Encouraged, Jill started collecting for seniors in Salvation Army and other long-term care facilities. “We knew many families couldn’t get in to give their loved ones shampoo, soap, toothbrushes and so on,” Jill explains. “We assembled more than a hundred care packs and delivered them to some of the homes.” Not content with that, Jill started preparing personal hygiene bags— consisting of face cloths, soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste and lip balm—for those suffering from homelessness, which she sent to Leigh Rowney, director of The Salvation Army’s community and family services in Oshawa. “We assembled 80 bags and they all went that first night,” Jill smiles. Jill also prepared kids’ packs for

those who go to the food banks with their parents or live on the streets. “They need some encouragement, so we set up packs for all different ages with colouring books, crayons and sidewalk chalk.” What Can I Do Today? Jill was doing this out of the goodness of her heart. However, she never imagined that her actions would ripple out into the community. People from all over Ontario have contacted her to inquire how they can participate. They started telling Jill, “I’ve never felt so good before, being able to help people.” Others asked her, “What else can we do?” “The encouragement I am getting from them is a constant, but the encouragement that they’re all receiving from giving and being part of something greater is just spectacular,” Jill says. “This one person, in particular, told me, ‘You’ve given me a new lease on life. I’m excited to wake up each morning and think, What can I do today for somebody?’ ” Jill replied, “That’s just great! You can give a bar of soap or you could give a hundred bars of soap, and you’re still giving the same kind of blessing.” “The church doors may be closed or partially closed,” Jill concludes, “but this is as much church to me as anything. This is what church should be.”

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Faith&Friends

FAITH BUILDERS

Life-andDeath Lesson Marcel Marceau (Jesse Eisenberg) teaches his charges the power of silence

Resistance Is Not Futile Second World War movie tells the story of Marcel Marceau’s fight against the Nazis. by Ken Ramstead

10 • NOVEMBER 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

ous honours accorded to him by an admiring public, was a wartime story of heroism and resistance. On the Run Resistance, fittingly, is the title of the new movie dealing with Marcel Marceau during the Second World War. Played by Jesse Eisenberg, Marcel Mangel, as he was then, was the son of a Jewish butcher who dreamed of becoming a mime artist, inspired by a Charlie Chaplin movie he had seen as a youngster. Self-centred on his career, Marcel at first refuses to

Photos: Courtesy of IFC Films

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he world knows Marcel Marceau as a legendary mime, internationally renowned for his artistry and skill. He could move audiences to laughter and tears without uttering a single word and was known as the “master of silence.” Marcel received an Emmy award, was declared a “national treasure” by Japan, served as a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations, and was made an officer of France’s Legion of Honour. But before the acclaim and the accolades, before the performances all over the world, before the numer-


help his brother, Alain (Félix Moati), and best friend, Emma (Clémence Poésy), deal with dozens of Jewish immigrant children escaping Nazi Germany. But he soon discovers his humanity while dealing with the refugees, and he uses his pantomime skills to help them forget the horrors they had been through. With the onset of the Second World War, the fall of France and the eventual German occupation of the entire country, Marcel and his friends realize that resistance is the only way they can make a difference and save the hundreds of children in their care. Marcel and his brother take the last name of Marceau in honour of a general of the French Revolution, all the while eluding the ruthless Gestapo agent Klaus Barbie (Matthias Schweighöfer), known as the Butcher of Lyon. As part of the French Boy and Girl Scouts, Marcel, Alain and Mila (Vica Kerekes) head to the French Alps with the aim of bringing as many children as they can to the safety of neutral Switzerland. But with Barbie and a Gestapo death squad hot on their heels, their backs against a deep ravine, will they make it? In Harm’s Way The experience of the war and the persecution of his fellow Jews brought about a metamorphosis

in Marcel Marceau. Thanks to his efforts and working with the French Resistance, as well as the French Boy and Girl Scouts, Marcel was responsible for rescuing hundreds of Jewish children from death at the hands of the Nazis. Resistance illustrates how one person can make a difference. Had Marcel only continued caring for himself, he might have evaded capture and settled abroad. He chose to put himself in harm’s way and by doing so, saved the lives of hundreds if not thousands of people. The Apostle Paul said, “Carry each other’s burdens, and in this way you will fulfil the law of Christ” (Galatians 6:2). Sometimes that burden can be as literal as Marcel carrying a tired child on the trek to Switzerland. At other times, it can be as simple as checking on a friend during COVID-19. In either case, a conscious choice is made. Is that choice in you? Miming for Life Marcel didn’t just use his mime skills to make the children laugh; he mimed to save their lives. It was a good way of keeping them quiet while they were escaping. “It had nothing to do with show business. He was miming for his life,” Philippe Mora, the son of one of Marceau’s Resistance comrades, told The Age. Resistance is available on most on-demand sources.

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Faith&Friends

FEATURE

Wonder Women

FOUR YOUNG STUDENTS WERE WORTH THEIR WEIGHT IN GOLD TO THE CLIENTS OF THE SALVATION ARMY’S NORTH TORONTO COMMUNITY CHURCH.

Photos: Hossein Andarzipour

by Linda Dixon

Standing Up for the Community (from left) Phylicia Earl, Jodi Bosley, Folashade Oguntuga and Kyuhee Lee were a dynamic addition to The Salvation Army's North Toronto Community Church this past summer

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his past summer, The Salvation Army’s North Toronto Community Church received government funding through the Canada Summer Jobs 12 • NOVEMBER 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

program for four student placements. Interviewed and carefully chosen by Major Ken and Major (Dr.) Beverley Smith, the co-pastors, the students were assigned to the church’s


community and family services branch. After initial training in Salvation Army protocols and procedures, they started their summer with us. As North Toronto’s community and family services co-ordinator, I mentored and supervised them, but they all showed a welcome initiative in taking on a project that interested them personally. Together, these four contributed in ways that not only benefited North Toronto but the wider community that the church serves as well.

Phylicia Earl This sociology undergraduate entered her first year of a master’s of criminology and social justice studies at Ryerson University in Toronto this past fall.

Smart, kind and intelligent, she was instrumental in developing partnerships with three new local organizations and was able to provide North Toronto’s client community with sought-after products. As a personal project, Phylicia conducted a study in ways that North Toronto could advance programs and services to greater meet the needs of local women and their families. One mother who participated in Phylicia’s women’s project told her, “The work you’re doing, empowering women, is so important. Thank you!” Another female client expressed her view of the provision of feminine protection products that Phylicia secured from a generous donor. “Sometimes feminine protection products are more important than even food,” she told Phylicia. Jodi Bosley This third-year bachelor of social work student is passionate about social justice issues and art. Another self-starter, Jodi parlayed a routine product inquiry with a supplier into a generous donation to North Toronto of much-needed healthy snack foods for youth and children. For her personal project, Jodi conducted research on mental illness and how North Toronto might better serve clients facing those significant challenges in life. One client returned especially to say to Jodi, “I faithandfriends.ca  I  NOVEMBER 2020

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Faith&Friends

FEATURE

“The work you’re doing, empowering women, is so important. Thank you!”

needed e-contact list for the newly minted North Toronto food bank. As well, Liah contacted, interviewed and vetted applicants, singlehandedly expanding the North Toronto volunteer force to include an impressive roster of capable, energetic and reliable people—all within the constraints of COVID-19. Over the summer, this resourceful student took on the task of helping various clients in their quest for employment. After helping one newcomer to Canada with her resumé and finding a suitable have felt blessed since dropping in yesterday. I’m rejuvenated thanks to the food and shower resources you gave me.” Another client recommended a friend after his first few tentative visits to North Toronto Community Church. “I feel safe with you,” he told Jodi. “I don’t like social workers much, but I think you’re going to be a really great one!” Kyuhee “Liah” Lee This York University master’s student initiated a desperately 14 • NOVEMBER 2020  I faithandfriends.ca


volunteer opportunity to help her client gain experience and references, the woman found employment. The client returned to North Toronto to say how grateful she was for the help and support she received from Liah. Folashade “Sade” Oguntuga Energetic, articulate and innovative, art features prominently in this high school student’s future. With a compassion and understanding of the stresses experienced by youth and exacerbated by COVID-19, Sade created a brochure that provided information and resources on mental health for students. As a team outreach project, copies were handed out to passersby on a nearby street corner, accompanied by smiles and offers of Skittles.

The outreach was a resounding success. One person scanned the brochure and asked, “Who made this? It’s really cute!” Sade’s co-worker, beaming with pleasure at her teammate’s accomplishment, pointed out the creator by name. Holding up the brochure, the woman called out, “Thank you, Sade!”

(left) Linda Dixon is the community and family services co-ordinator at The Salvation Army’s North Toronto Community Church. faithandfriends.ca  I  NOVEMBER 2020

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Faith&Friends

COVER STORY

Postwar Joe Knypstra in his new Dutch Army uniform in June 1946

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“ One Day At a Time” CONCENTRATION CAMP SURVIVOR JOE KNYPSTRA’S FAITH HELPS HIM MAINTAIN A POSITIVE OUTLOOK ON LIFE. by Melanie Eskal

ONE LOOK AT JOE KNYPSTRA and you wouldn’t believe he’s 100. Even after a century, his memory is still sharp. He remembers the day he immigrated to Canada from Holland in 1954, and even recalls all the names of people he first met when he arrived. One other thing he remembers very clearly is the Second World War and the two years he spent in a concentration camp in his home country after he was arrested for his involvement in the underground Dutch Resistance. “It was nothing but torture,” Joe says. He was 23 years old and a solid 150 pounds when he entered the concentration camp, but weighed just 70 pounds when he left.

Joe recalls the sadistic and often random beatings he and the other prisoners received at the hands of the guards, people being shot if they cried or complained. “If we were lucky, we got a little bit of coffee—coffee, well water,” he says. “And a little piece of bread. It was black. They said it was made from beans. Tasted terrible, but anything was fine. If we were good, we got a little bit of soup—mostly water.” He remembers being roused in the middle of the night by guards who would whip prisoners who did not get out of bed fast enough. If they didn’t bleed from the lashings, they would be dunked in a trough full of cold water and scrubbed with hard bristles. Sand would then be rubbed faithandfriends.ca  I  NOVEMBER 2020

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COVER STORY

Joe was 23 years old and a solid 150 pounds when he entered the concentration camp, but weighed just 70 pounds when he left. into the wounds. “Most of them didn’t make it,” Joe says sadly. “You just took it one day at a time.” He spent two months in the hospital after being liberated from the concentration camp. Longevity’s Secret Joe’s first home in Canada was Soda Creek, B.C., working as a farmhand before moving to Vancouver to begin selling dry goods. His time

Happy Santa Age has not stopped Joe from encouraging donations to The Salvation Army at Christmas

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as a merchant took him across the country until he settled in Kaleden, B.C., where he ran a bakery, followed by a butcher’s business, until he retired to Penticton, B.C. Although he saw the worst of humanity in a concentration camp, Joe maintains a positive outlook on life and jokes about how he doesn’t look a day over 70. “A lot of people have said to me, ‘By golly, you are looking so good. How come?’


A Century of Progress Salvation Army Majors Lisa and Paul Trickett celebrate with Joe on the occasion of his 100th birthday

“I reply, ‘You know, I was 25 years old and was 70 pounds—skin and bone—so all the flesh around me is all new. And my hair is new, so that’s why I look young,’ ” he says with a laugh.

But the real secret to longevity, according to Joe, is everything in moderation. “Doesn’t matter what you do. If you overdo it, you won’t make it.”

A 15-Year Love Affair Following the closure of their church in 2005, Joe and his wife, Frances, decided to visit a few local houses of worship in their area.

Joe immediately became as active in the congregation as he was able and found his calling as an enthusiastic greeter at the front door of the church. He hopes to do this with once again when pandemic restrictions are lifted, and continue to hand out the service bulletins and arrange for individuals to take up the weekly offering alongside him. In addition, up until this past Christmas, Joe’s been a supportive and active bell-ringer on the kettles—dressed, when appropriate, as Santa Claus!

They first stepped through the door of the Penticton Salvation Army Community Church to attend a Valentine’s dinner at the invitation of friends, not knowing that this would lead to a love affair with The Salvation Army. After familiarizing themselves with the Army’s doctrines and evangelistic method of conducting services, they soon decided that they would like to become full-time members and, following classes, were enrolled as senior soldiers.

Reprinted from Penticton Herald, January 14, 2020

“His doctor has forecast that Joe will live to be over 110,” says John Pettifer, who with his wife, Barbara, has been a close friend. “He’s a most remarkable individual.”

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Faith&Friends

FEATURE

Rising to the Challenge

Masked and Ready Jim Moulton ready for duty

CANADA’S HEALTH-CARE WORKERS HAVE TACKLED COVID-19 HEAD-ON, AS THESE THREE FRONT-LINE WORKERS CAN ATTEST. by Kimberly McIntyre faithandfriends.ca  I  NOVEMBER 2020

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Faith&Friends

FEATURE

A

s COVID-19 has infiltrated our day-to-day lives over the last several months, many Canadians have had time to reflect on work, priorities and family life. For those in health care, it has been a whirlwind of change. Their call to protect not only themselves and their families but also those in their care has been fundamental in helping to “flatten the curve.” Almost all areas of health care have been affected, and treatment for many looks much different than it did before. Here are three front-line staff working diligently to ensure safe and proper care within the walls of their hospitals. Right Place, Right Time Jim Moulton, an orthopedic healthcare aide at Grace Hospital in Winnipeg, had his work turned upside down. The patients on his floor were quickly discharged to prepare for COVID-19 cases. “As we emptied our ward, our staff became the float pool,” he says. “You could be sent anywhere in the hospital when you came to work each day. Totally understandable, but totally stressful. You don’t know the processes or who you are coming into contact with.” Within the challenges and changes that came with COVID-19, Jim has been reflecting on what led him to health care in the first place. “I was going through a time of 22 • NOVEMBER 2020  I faithandfriends.ca

Conducting Faith Jim is the bandmaster at The Salvation Army’s Heritage Park Temple in Winnipeg

struggle about what I should be doing,” he recalls. “Then I watched as my mother-in-law, who was dying, was taken care of by my sister-in-law, who is a nurse. It impacted my life and I felt a calling to do something with hospice care in particular.” As COVID-19 progressed, Jim found himself in a full-circle situation. “Our orthopedic ward started taking very serious patients, some who were dying and in palliative care,” he says. “I was able to really be of use in that way after having 12 years of experience in that area. I was working with non-COVID-19 patients who were in the hospital but were dying alone. That was challenging but affirming. I felt that I was in the right


place at the right time.” Jim’s faith and Salvation Army church community have been a great support to him. “I’m a member at Heritage Park Temple and I’m also the bandmaster, so I’m quite involved,” he says. “People have taken the time to send messages and make calls of encouragement to let me know that they were praying and thinking of me.” “Being There” Donna Lee Samson, a cardiac services manager at St. Boniface Hospital in Winnipeg, was drawn into decision-making for her hospital from the get-go. “I got a call from my director saying he needed me in the boardroom immediately,” she remembers. “Another manager and I were representing cardiac services at the table for pandemic planning. There were lots of questions, and they called the team together for answers since things were happening rapidly. We didn’t know how patients would present, what patients would bring in and what the needs would be. Each day was consumed with planning, and regular eight-hour days turned into 12-14-hour days while we managed normal flow of the hospital as well as the new information coming in.” Donna Lee felt the significance of her position as a manager and wanted to do right by her staff.

Leaning on Faith “Faith is about something greater,” says Donna Lee Samson

“I felt that they really looked to me and other managers as if to say, ‘You’ve got my back, right? I can trust you, right?’ ” she says. “I needed to make sure they still felt safe and could still come to work. I still have a job to do, to make sure supports are in place to move forward, no matter what was happening.” Donna Lee has been leaning on her faith during this time. “Faith is about something greater,” she says. “It’s all about how you show God’s love and how you live your life. That’s important to me. With the interactions I’ve had with my staff, it’s always a chance to show kindness and compassion as decisions are made. Sometimes it’s just about being there.” faithandfriends.ca  I  NOVEMBER 2020

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Faith&Friends

FEATURE

The Advocate Janine van der Horden is an occupational therapist assistant/ physiotherapist at University Health Network-Ontario Rehab in Toronto. She’s seen a shift in mindset around how treatment for the strokerehabilitation patients she cares for is taking place. Normally, a patient would be on track to leave the hospital quickly, then complete recovery in their homes. Now, things are looking very different. “We normally would have family visiting their loved ones and being involved in the recovery process,” she explains. “We would do caregiver training to teach people what they need to know about caring for a patient in their home. So much of it was hands-on, but then we had to start finding other ways to do that. It’s more of a challenge to make sure our patients are discharged safely and to fill the void that is there because patients don’t have anyone to advocate for them or in-person support from their loved ones. “Even though right now I have questions, watching people suffer

Peace and Calm “My faith gets me through the day,” says Janine van der Horden

and losing people in my own church family to COVID-19, my faith gets me through the day,” says Janine. “What I get from God is peace and calm. He already knows the outcome, and that, to me, is really hard to imagine. We need to love and be kind to each other, and there are lots of opportunities to show God’s love. My faith keeps me humbled and peaceful.”

(left) Kimberly McIntyre enjoys writing stories of transformation, faith and the human experience. After completing a communications and media degree from Canadian Mennonite University, Kimberly is continuing her education and pursuing a bachelor of science in exercise science. When she is not writing or working in Riding Mountain National Park, she enjoys cooking, exploring Canadian national parks and dancing.

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FAMILY TIME

Photo: Antonioguillem/stock.Adobe.com

Faith&Friends

The Apology When I offended my teenage grandson, God gave me the courage to ask for forgiveness. by Jeanette Levellie

I

had one goal in mind when I visited my daughter, Kelli, for the weekend last summer: help her organize and declutter the kids’ rooms. Kelli was a single mom of three. By the time she got home from work each night, making a meal and washing a load of laundry was all she could manage. If I could help her simplify her environment, life would be easier. On Friday, while Kelli was at work,

everyone was co-operative and happy. My promise to take the kids out to dinner when we were done might have helped sweeten their attitudes. But when I wanted to finish 13-year-old Ben’s room the next day, he exploded. “We got enough done last night!” he screamed. “Why are you being so pushy? Your visits are supposed to be fun!” As calmly as I could, I tried to

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Faith&Friends

FAMILY TIME

explain that Kelli needed help and couldn’t do everything on her own, but he was having none of it. With tears streaming down his face, he stomped out the door. Gathering Her Courage Now what? I thought. I tried to tidy up his room, but my heart wasn’t in it. Besides, I worried where Ben might have gone. Did he have his key with him? If I went looking for him, could

When I spotted Ben at the playground around the corner, I rolled down the window. I tried to make my voice gentle and caring. “Do you want to come to lunch with us, honey?” Ben nodded, walked to the car and got in. But the look he gave me could have wilted an oak tree. “Please Forgive Me” My voice soft and shaky, I said. “Ben,

The look Ben gave me could have wilted an oak tree.  JEANETTE LEVELLIE he get back in the house? I prayed, justifying my actions by my desire to help Kelli get organized. But the more I talked to God, the worse I felt. Finally, I listened. You are being too hard on Ben, the Holy Spirit whispered. He needs to learn responsibility, but you can’t just whiz in and expect him to learn everything in a few days. Tears stung my eyes. I knew the Lord was right. I needed to find Ben and apologize. I gathered my courage, my purse and Ben’s two sisters. “Maybe he’ll be calmed down enough to agree to go to lunch with us,” I said as we got in the car.

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I was too harsh with you today. I realize I was expecting too much. Can you please forgive me?” Then I let myself cry. To my surprise, Ben reached over and hugged me. “I’m sorry, too, Grandma. I should not have snapped at you like I did.” Lunch was punctuated with stories of my childhood and loud laughter. It could have turned out so differently. I was grateful for God’s mercy at work. Heartfelt apologies are never easy. When we realize we’ve hurt or wronged someone, it feels uncomfortable—even downright scary—to


Jeanette Levellie with her grandson, Ben. “When I apologize, I like to think I’m passing on God’s example of mercy, “ she says

say, “I was wrong—please forgive me.” And that often involves admitting we’ve acted unkindly and then seeking forgiveness. Passing Mercy On We all know that “love brings about the forgiveness of many sins” (1 Peter 4:8 Common English Bible). Still, we aren’t so sure it’s in an offended teenager’s heart to love us

unconditionally. But they deserve our sincere apologies as much— sometimes more—than our adult friends, spouses and co-workers do. I’m sure I’ll have many more opportunities to apologize to people I’ve hurt or wronged. But when I apologize, I like to think I’m passing on God’s example of mercy. And that changes everything.

(left) Author of five books and hundreds of published articles, Jeanette Levellie and her husband make their home in Paris, Illinois. Jeanette’s hobbies include spoiling her three grandchildren, pampering her cats and inventing new ways to avoid housework. Find her splashes of hope and humour at www.jeanettelevellie.com.

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Faith&Friends

LITE STUFF

Eating Healthy With Erin BAKED ITALIAN RICE BALLS

Recipe photos: Erin Stanley

TIME 2 hrs  MAKES 4 servings  SERVE WITH chicken or fish

2 eggs 1. In medium bowl, whisk together eggs, cheese, oregano, basil, salt 75 g (3 oz.) mozzarella and pepper and place in cheese, cubed 15 ml (1 tbsp) dried oregano refrigerator. 2. Bring rice, butter and stock to a 15 ml (1 tbsp) dried basil boil, then reduce to simmer until 1 ml (¼ tsp) salt most of the water is absorbed. 1 ml (¼ tsp) black pepper 3. Remove from heat and place in 250 ml (1 cup) uncooked bowl in refrigerator for 10 minutes. white rice 4. Combine egg and rice mixtures in 15 ml (1 tbsp) butter bowl and chill covered in 500 ml (2 cups) vegetable refrigerator for one hour. or chicken stock 5. Roll into 25 mm (1 in.) balls and 375 ml (1½ cups) dried coat in bread crumbs. Stuff the bread crumbs inside with ham and cheese. 60 ml (¼ cup) vegetable oil 6. Preheat oven to 205 C (400 F). 200 g (7 oz.) ham or 2 slices Arrange on well-greased baking sheet. Bake for 10 minutes and flip 200 g (7 oz.) mozzarella balls over for an additional 10 cheese, cubed minutes or until golden brown. 250 ml (1 cup) marinara 7. Serve with your favourite marinara sauce sauce and garnish with basil if fresh basil to garnish desired. (optional)

MAPLE HOT COCOA TIME 5 mins  MAKES 3 servings  SERVE WITH marshmallows

60 ml (¼ cup) real cocoa 60 ml (4 tbsp) pure maple syrup 75 ml (1/3 cup) boiling water 500 ml (2 cups) milk of choice 2 ml (½ tsp) cinnamon

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1. Stir cocoa and maple syrup in medium saucepan and slowly pour boiling water while whisking. 2. Heat on medium low and slowly pour milk. 3. Bring to boil, whisking constantly. 4. Sprinkle cinnamon on top.


Mission to Costa Rica

ARMY HELPS P.8

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KATE ESCAPES P.26

Standing Up to Racism

THE PLAY DATE P.22

Faith&Friends I N S P I R AT I O N F O R L I V I N G

faithandfriends.ca

OCTOBER 2020

Seven Days MAJOR JIM MERCER’S TIME AT A SALVATION ARMY LONGTERM CARE FACILITY CHANGED HIS LIFE. P.16

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Sudoku Puzzle

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3 × 3 box contains the digits 1 through 9.

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© www.kevinfrank.net

HEAVEN’S LOVE THRIFT SHOP by Kevin Frank

Answers on next page.

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QUICK QUIZ 1. What movie series focused on the character of Michael Corleone? 2. Who is actress Neta-Lee Hershlag better known as? 3. What African country’s capital is Windhoek?

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Faith&Friends

LITE STUFF

Word Search Lights, Camera, Action! E M D Q D D E Y D O U L S T B U D B C Z W D B L O C K B U S T E R N E G N R J C M Q S S Y R M W H E S G T Z A A A S P E C T R A T I O D C N P A I W D E D U L R E T N I T P R I I J B A C K S T O R Y D O S E Y E L R W M R O T U B I R T S I D L V E L C U A C T O R A L H A N T A G O N I S T D O U B L E E L O J A D N T P B W R J M W S U S N G B N T L A O L Q P A I P H Q C G A R V B P I I M A G E L B O E E O T O L K C A B Y D Y X H C T S N R O T C E R I D C L V T N M Z T E W R I T E R G D A K K O K Q G R S R P D F E A T U R E C U D O R P W U O E M Z H R N S F L W L C R P H P O C Z U Q B Q Q Y A W N J U N O E G I S T U N T Y G O F C Z A G R I P R ACTOR ADAPTATION AD LIB AERIAL SHOT AMBIANCE ANGLE ANTAGONIST ASPECT RATIO BACKDROP BACKLOT BACKSTORY BEHIND THE SCENES

BILLING BIOPIC BLOCKBUSTER BLOOPER CAST COMPOSER DIRECTOR DISTRIBUTOR DOUBLE EDITOR FEATURE GENRE

GRIP IMAGE INTERLUDE LEAD PRODUCER PROTAGONIST SCORE SCREENPLAY SCRIPT SEQUEL STUNT WRITER

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Quick Quiz Answers: 1. The Godfather; 2. Natalie Portman; 3. Namibia. 8

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Faith&Friends

NIFTY THRIFTY

Winter Is Coming … … so here are three tips to thrift the coat you need. you check is the label. Wool is always a popular winter coat material and is also a common thrift store find, but make sure that it is at least 70-percent wool. A polyester blend will not help you stay warm through a cold winter and lacks the water-resistant power of a highpercentage wool or nylon material.

A winter coat is a necessary investment for people living in Canada, and choosing a pre-loved piece is a more affordable and sustainable option. Here are three tips to finding one at your local Salvation Army thrift store. Look for Quality Materials  Thrifters who are experienced know that when a garment catches your eye, the first thing

Size Up, Not Down  Layering is a key component of cold-weather apparel, so make sure your coat provides enough room to fit additional layers underneath. When leaving room to layer, an area often overlooked is sleeve space. Many coats are looser fitting around the torso but tighter on the arms, which makes wearing warm sweaters underneath more difficult. Flatter Your Body  Winter coats tend to be big and bulky, which can make it difficult to find a shape that works for your unique body type. If you are on the shorter side, a coat that falls at mid-thigh level can help elongate, while a tie-waist coat can add a slimming effect.

(left) May Strutt is an avid thrifter with more than a decade of shopping experience in thrift stores across Canada. She is also a communications and engagement specialist with The Salvation Army’s thrift stores. Find a thrift store near you at thriftstore.ca.

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